WorldWideScience

Sample records for haemorrhagic fever incidence

  1. Impact of Climate on the incidence of Dengue Haemorrhagic fever in Semarang City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairunisa, Ummi; Endah Wahyuningsih, Nur; Suhartono; Hapsari

    2018-05-01

    Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is one of major health problems in Indonesia. DHF is a caused by the dengue virus and potentially deadly infection spread by some mosquitos. The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the main species that spreads this disease. The incidence rate of dengue haemorrhagic fever was still increased in 2011 to 2015 in Indonesia. Dengue viruses and their mosquito vectors are sensitive to their environment. Temperature, rainfall and humidity have well-define roles in the transmission cycle. Therefore changes in these conditions may contribute to increasing incidence. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between climate factors and the incidence rate of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Semarang City. The type of research was analytic with cross sectional study. The sample used is the climate data from Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) and the number of dengue cases from Health Office in Semarang City from 2011 to 2016. Data were analyzed using Pearson trials with α=0,05. Base on this study here air temperature and relative humidity were moderate correlation with negative direction on air temperature (p = 0,000 and r = -0, 429), weakly correlation with positive direction on rainfall (p = 0,014 and r = 0,288) and humidity (p=0,001 and r = 0,382) with dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence in Semarang City. The conclusions of this study there were correlation between climate (air temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity) and DHF in Semarang City in 2011-2016.

  2. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  3. An information value based analysis of physical and climatic factors affecting dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Nitin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vector-borne diseases are the most dreaded worldwide health problems. Although many campaigns against it have been conducted, Dengue Fever (DF and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF are still the major health problems of Thailand. The reported number of dengue incidences in 1998 for the Thailand was 129,954, of which Sukhothai province alone reported alarming number of 682. It was the second largest epidemic outbreak of dengue after 1987. Government arranges the remedial facilities as and when dengue is reported. But, the best way to control is to prevent it from happening. This will be possible only when knowledge about the relationship of DF/DHF with climatic and physio-environmental agents is discovered. This paper explores empirical relationship of climatic factors rainfall, temperature and humidity with the DF/DHF incidences using multivariate regression analysis. Also, a GIS based methodology is proposed in this paper to explore the influence of physio-environmental factors on dengue incidences. Remotely sensed data provided important data about physical environment and have been used for many vector borne diseases. Information Values (IV method was utilised to derive influence of various factors in the quantitative terms. Researchers have not applied this type of analysis for dengue earlier. Sukhothai province was selected for the case study as it had high number of dengue cases in 1998 and also due to its diverse physical setting with variety of land use/land cover types. Results Preliminary results demonstrated that physical factors derived from remotely sensed data could indicate variation in physical risk factors affecting DF/DHF. A composite analysis of these three factors with dengue incidences was carried out using multivariate regression analysis. Three empirical models ER-1, ER-2 and ER-3 were evaluated. It was found that these three factors have significant relation with DF/DHF incidences and can be related to

  4. Nutritional management in Ebola haemorrhagic fever

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    Kamon Chaiyasit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola haemorrhagic fever is a viral infection causing a major health problem worldwide. In this short article, the authors briefly review and discuss on the nutritional management (energy, protein, fat and micronutrient in management of Ebola infection.

  5. THROMBOCYTOPENIA IN DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER

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    I Wayan Putu Sutirta-Yasa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue has gradually increased during the past decade. Today, dengue is considered one of the most important arthropod-borne viral diseasases in humans in term of morbidity and mortality. Dengue infection   a potential life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF / dengue shock syndrome(DSS, characterized by thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permiability. Thrombocytopenia causes bleeding, but in   DHF patients with thrombocytopenia do not always develop bleeding manifestation. The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia are not cleared. Multiple factors  may be involved in the machanisms leading to thrombocytopenia in DHF/DSS patients.

  6. Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers: A threat to Zambia?

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    Katendi Changula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers (FVHF are caused by agents belonging to Filoviridae family, Ebola and Marburg viruses. They are amongst the most lethal pathogens known to infect humans. Incidence of FVHF outbreaks are increasing, with affected number of patients on the rise. Whilst there has been no report yet of FVHF in Zambia, its proximity to Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo, which have recorded major outbreaks, as well as the open borders, increased trade and annual migration of bats between these countries, puts Zambia at present and increased risk. Previous studies have indicated bats as potential reservoir hosts for filoviruses. An increasing population with an increasing demand for resources has forced incursion into previously uninhabited land, potentially bringing them into contact with unknown pathogens, reservoir hosts and/or amplifying hosts. The recent discovery of a novel arenavirus, Lujo, highlights the potential that every region, including Zambia, has for being the epicentre or primary focus for emerging and re-emerging infections. It is therefore imperative that surveillance for potential emerging infections, such as viral haemorrhagic fevers be instituted. In order to accomplish this surveillance, rapid detection, identification and monitoring of agents in patients and potential reservoirs is needed. International co-operation is the strategy of choice for the surveillance and fight against emerging infections. Due to the extensive area in which filoviral infections can occur, a regional approach to surveillance activities is required, with regional referral centres. There is a need to adopt shared policies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases. There is also need for optimisation of currently available tests and development of new diagnostic tests, in order to have robust, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that can be used even where there are inadequate laboratories and diagnostic services.

  7. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

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    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  8. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  9. Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever presenting as Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Araimi, Hanaa; Al-Jabri, Amal; Mehmoud, Arshad; Al-Abri, Seif

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a 38 year-old Sri Lankan female who was referred to the surgeon on call with a picture of acute abdomen. She presented with a three-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and diarrhoea; however, the physical examination was not consistent with acute abdomen. Her platelet count was 22 ×109/L. A diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was made and dengue serology was positive. Dengue epidemics have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms an...

  10. Therapeutic management of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Martín-Quirós, Alejandro; Trigo, Elena; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arsuaga, Marta; Díaz-Menéndez, Marta; Arribas, José Ramón

    2017-06-29

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever has been reported in more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, with an increasing incidence in recent years, especially in Europe. Because no specific treatments have demonstrated efficacy, supportive treatment is essential, as well as the provision of a centre with the appropriate means to guarantee the safety of its healthcare professionals. Laboratory monitoring of thrombocytopenia, severe coagulopathy or liver failure is of critical importance. Patients with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever should be admitted to High Level Isolation Units where appropriate biocontainment procedures can prevent nosocomial transmission through infected fluids or accidents with contaminated material. In case of high-risk exposures, early administration of ribavirin should be considered. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. Viral haemorrhagic fever and vascular alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrowicz, P; Wolf, K; Falzarano, D; Feldmann, H; Seebach, J; Schnittler, H

    2008-02-01

    Pathogenesis of viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) is closely associated with alterations of the vascular system. Among the virus families causing VHF, filoviruses (Marburg and Ebola) are the most fatal, and will be focused on here. After entering the body, Ebola primarily targets monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. Infected dendritic cells are largely impaired in their activation potency, likely contributing to the immune suppression that occurs during filovirus infection. Monocytes/macrophages, however, immediately activate after viral contact and release reasonable amounts of cytokines that target the vascular system, particularly the endothelial cells. Some underlying molecular mechanisms such as alteration of the vascular endothelial cadherin/catenin complex, tyrosine phosphorylation, expression of cell adhesion molecules, tissue factor and the effect of soluble viral proteins released from infected cells to the blood stream will be discussed.

  12. Risk of transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and the insecticide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and the insecticide susceptibility status of Ae. aegypti in some sites in Accra, Ghana. Design: Larval surveys were carried to inspect containers within households and estimate larval indices and adult Aedes mosquitoes were collected using human landing collection technique.

  13. Marburg haemorrhagic fever: A rare but fatal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The causative virus is the Marburgvirus of the Filoviridae family. The disease is clinically indistinguishable from Ebola haemorrhagic fever though the latter's causative agent is unrelated. Transmission of the Marburgvirus is via close contact with blood or other body fluids (faeces, vomitus, urine and respiratory secretions) ...

  14. Severe Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever presented with massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage that recovered without antiviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharabaghi, Mehrnaz Asadi; Chinikar, Sadegh; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tickborne viral zoonosis with up to 50% mortality in humans caused by CCHF virus belonging to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. The geographical distribution of CCHF cases corresponds closely with the distribution of principle tick vectors...... that is species of Hyaloma. The disease presents with non-specific febrile symptoms, but progress to a serious haemorrhagic syndrome that, soon after, a full blown multi organ failure may develop with prominent features of liver damage and bleeding diathesis. The authors present a case of a 39-year-old man...

  15. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a...

  16. Retroperitoneal Haematoma in a Patient with Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasminder; Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Jagota, Ruchi; Bala, Saroj

    2016-11-01

    Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) has diverse manifestations ranging from asymptomatic petechial skin haemorrhages to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary haemorrhages. However, the association of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematomas with DHF is not well documented in literature. We report a rare case of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma complicating DHF.

  17. Management of symptomatic thrombocytopenia associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameel, T.; Saleem, I.U.; Mehmood, K.; Tanvir, I.; Saadia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Immune - mediated destruction of platelets is thought to be the mechanism of thrombocytopenia seen after the viraemic phase of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Immuno - suppressants such as steroids, immune globulin and Anti D immune globulin are effective in the treatment of this type of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of oral Prednisolone in the rate of resolution of thrombocytopenia and monitoring of complications in patients recovering from Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Method: A controlled study was carried out on diagnosed cases Dengue haemorrhagic patients presenting with sever thrombocytopenia and symptoms like confluent ecchymosis, epistaxis and purpuric rashes. In study was conducted in Ittefaq hospital (trust) Lahore, during the period of October to December 2008. Treatment group received steroids in two forms i.e. first line therapy prednisolone (1 mg / kg) orally or as second line therapy of initial I/V high dose (prednisolone) in pulse doses i.e. 40 mg / bd for four days and later oral prednisolone as in first line therapy with omeprazole 20 mg / bd in addition to standard treatment. Control group received standard supportive care only. Results: A total of 341 suspected patients were admitted in hospital. Serological diagnosis was confirmed in 166 patients. CBC revealed platelet count . 100 x 109 / l in 106 patients. A group of symptomatic febrile patients have platelet count < 20 x 109 / l was selected for therapeutic intervention. first line therapy (oral prednisolone was stated in 43 patients. In Fourteen patients second line therapy (high dose dexamethasone pulse) therapy was instituted. Seven of them attained complete response whereas two patients achieved partial response. Four patients were shifted to Anti D therapy. Three deaths occurred during our study. Rest of all the patients improved and were discharged in due course of time. Conclusion: This small scale preliminary study shows promising

  18. Progress towards the treatment of Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

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    Ströher, Ute; Feldmann, Heinz

    2006-12-01

    Being highly pathogenic for human and nonhuman primates and the subject of former weapon programmes makes Ebola virus one of the most feared pathogens worldwide today. Due to a lack of licensed pre- and postexposure intervention, the current response depends on rapid diagnostics, proper isolation procedures and supportive care of case patients. Consequently, the development of more specific countermeasures is of high priority for the preparedness of many nations. Over the past years, enhanced research efforts directed to better understand virus replication and pathogenesis have identified potential new targets for intervention strategies. The authors discuss the most promising therapeutic approaches for Ebola haemorrhagic fever as judged by their efficacy in animal models. The current development in this field encourages discussions on how to move some of the experimental approaches towards clinical application.

  19. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever in Kosova : a fatal case report

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    Raka Lul

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF is an often fatal viral infection described in about 30 countries around the world. The authors report a fatal case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF observed in a patient from Kosova. The diagnosis of CCHF was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR. Late diagnosis decreased the efficacy of treatment and patient died due to severe complications of infection.

  20. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

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    Salman Afan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  1. Marburg haemorrhagic fever: recent advances | AdegborO | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the exception of a vaccine for yellow fever and ribavirin, which is used for treatment of some arenaviral infections, no specific chemotherapy for viral hemorrhagic fever exists. Only supportive treatment is possible The filoviruses, Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), have been associated with hemorrhagic ...

  2. Dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever in Filipino children: clinical experience during the 1983-1984 epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songco, R S; Hayes, C G; Leus, C D; Manaloto, C O

    1987-09-01

    A total of 377 Filipino children out of a total of 5,427 admissions from October 31, 1983 to March 31, 1984 were found to have dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever The present clinical presentation of these infections was basically similar to that in previous epidemics but hepatomegaly and pleural effusion were less frequent and cardiac involvement, more frequent. The discrepancies between the clinical syndromes and HI antibody responses were evident; thus, the values used for the interpretation of the antibody titers must be reassessed.

  3. Ebola haemorrhagic fever virus: pathogenesis, immune responses, potential prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Nazimek, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Ebola zoonotic RNA filovirus represents human most virulent and lethal pathogens, which induces acute hemorrhagic fever and death within few days in a range of 60-90% of symptomatic individuals. Last outbreak in 2014 in West Africa caused panic that Ebola epidemic can be spread to other continents. Number of deaths in late December reached almost 8,000 individuals out of more than 20,000 symptomatic patients. It seems that only a coordinated international response could counteract the further spread of Ebola. Major innate immunity mechanisms against Ebola are associated with the production of interferons, that are inhibited by viral proteins. Activation of host NK cells was recognized as a leading immune function responsible for recovery of infected people. Uncontrolled cell infection by Ebola leads to an impairment of immunity with cytokine storm, coagulopathy, systemic bleeding, multi-organ failure and death. Tested prevention strategies to induce antiviral immunity include: i. recombinant virus formulations (vaccines); ii. cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (serotherapy); iii. alternative RNA-interference-based antiviral methods. Maintaining the highest standards of aseptic and antiseptic precautions is equally important. Present brief review summarizes a current knowledge concerning pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic disease and the virus interaction with the immune system and discusses recent advances in prevention of Ebola infection by vaccination and serotherapy.

  4. Case definition for Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fevers: a complex challenge for epidemiologists and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittalis, Silvia; Fusco, Francesco Maria; Lanini, Simone; Nisii, Carla; Puro, Vincenzo; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2009-10-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) represent a challenge for public health because of their epidemic potential, and their possible use as bioterrorism agents poses particular concern. In 1999 the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a case definition for VHFs, subsequently adopted by other international institutions with the aim of early detection of initial cases/outbreaks in western countries. We applied this case definition to reports of Ebola and Marburg virus infections to estimate its sensitivity to detect cases of the disease. We analyzed clinical descriptions of 795 reported cases of Ebola haemorrhagic fever: only 58.5% of patients met the proposed case definition. A similar figure was obtained reviewing 169 cases of Marburg diseases, of which only 64.5% were in accordance with the case definition. In conclusion, the WHO case definition for hemorrhagic fevers is too specific and has poor sensitivity both for case finding during Ebola or Marburg outbreaks, and for early detection of suspected cases in western countries. It can lead to a hazardous number of false negatives and its use should be discouraged for early detection of cases.

  5. Neisseria meningitidis: a neglected cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, David E; Silva, Luciete A

    2007-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis has not been seen as a significant cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the Amazon inlands; most reported cases are from the city of Manaus, the capital of the State of Amazonas. This picture is sustained by the lack of reliable microbiology laboratories, the perception of the health care workers, and the difficult to reach medical assistance; thus the number of confirmed cases is even lower with no reference of the strains phenotype. We report here the investigation of a case of suspected meningococcemia and his close contacts in a rural community in the Coari Lake, up the Amazon River.

  6. Neisseria meningitidis: a neglected cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the amazon rainforest

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    David E. Barroso

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis has not been seen as a significant cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the Amazon inlands; most reported cases are from the city of Manaus, the capital of the State of Amazonas. This picture is sustained by the lack of reliable microbiology laboratories, the perception of the health care workers, and the difficult to reach medical assistance; thus the number of confirmed cases is even lower with no reference of the strains phenotype. We report here the investigation of a case of suspected meningococcemia and his close contacts in a rural community in the Coari Lake, up the Amazon River.

  7. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus infection in birds: field investigations in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, H G; Cornet, J P; Camicas, J L

    1994-01-01

    In Senegal, wild ground-feeding birds are frequently infested with immature ticks. In two areas where numerous Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus isolations were obtained from Hyalomma marginatum rufipes adult ticks collected on ungulates, 175 birds were captured and sera collected. CCHF antibodies were detected by ELISA in 6/22 red-beaked hornbills (Tockus erythrorhynchus), 2/11 glossy starlings (Lamprotornis sp.) and 1/3 guinea fowls. The virus was isolated from H. m. rufipes nymphs collected on a hornbill. The role of wild ground-feeding birds in CCHF virus ecology in West Africa is discussed.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis in a recent controlled outbreak of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in the south of Iran, December 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinikar, S; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Mojtaba Ghiasi, S

    2010-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral zoonotic disease with a high mortality rate in humans. The CCHF virus is transmitted to humans through the bite of Ixodid ticks or contact with blood or tissues of CCHF patients or infected livestock. In December 2008, a re-emerging outbreak...... of CCHF occurred in the southern part of Iran. Five people were hospitalised with sudden fever and haemorrhaging, and CCHF was confirmed by RT-PCR and serological assays. One of the cases had a fulminant course and died. Livestock was identified as the source of infection; all animals in the incriminated...

  9. First dengue haemorrhagic fever epidemic in the Americas, 1981: insights into the causative agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Roche, Rosmari; Hinojosa, Yoandri; Guzman, Maria G

    2014-12-01

    Historical records describe a disease in North America that clinically resembled dengue haemorrhagic fever during the latter part of the slave-trading period. However, the dengue epidemic that occurred in Cuba in 1981 was the first laboratory-confirmed and clinically diagnosed outbreak of dengue haemorrhagic fever in the Americas. At that time, the presumed source of the dengue type 2 strain isolated during this epidemic was considered controversial, partly because of the limited sequence data and partly because the origin of the virus appeared to be southern Asia. Here, we present a molecular characterisation at the whole-genome level of the original strains isolated at different time points during the epidemic. Phylogenetic trees constructed using Bayesian methods indicated that 1981 Cuban strains group within the Asian 2 genotype. In addition, the study revealed that viral evolution occurred during the epidemic - a fact that could be related to the increasing severity from month to month. Moreover, the Cuban strains exhibited particular amino acid substitutions that differentiate them from the New Guinea C prototype strain as well as from dengue type 2 strains isolated globally.

  10. A recombinase polymerase amplification assay for rapid detection of Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic fever Virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Bonney

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic fever Virus (CCHFV is a rapidly emerging vector-borne pathogen and the cause of a virulent haemorrhagic fever affecting large parts of Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia.An isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA assay was successfully developed for molecular detection of CCHFV. The assay showed rapid (under 10 minutes detection of viral extracts/synthetic virus RNA of all 7 S-segment clades of CCHFV, with high target specificity. The assay was shown to tolerate the presence of inhibitors in crude preparations of mock field samples, indicating that this assay may be suitable for use in the field with minimal sample preparation. The CCHFV RPA was successfully used to screen and detect CCHFV positives from a panel of clinical samples from Tajikistan.The assay is a rapid, isothermal, simple-to-perform molecular diagnostic, which can be performed on a light, portable real-time detection device. It is ideally placed therefore for use as a field-diagnostic or in-low resource laboratories, for monitoring of CCHF outbreaks at the point-of-need, such as in remote rural regions in affected countries.

  11. Non-fatal case of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever imported into the United Kingdom (ex Bulgaria), June 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, S; Atkinson, B; Dowall, Sd; Pitman, Jk; Staplehurst, S; Busuttil, J; Simpson, Aj; Aarons, Ej; Petridou, C; Nijjar, M; Glover, S; Brooks, Tj; Hewson, R

    2014-07-31

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) was diagnosed in a United Kingdom traveller who returned from Bulgaria in June 2014. The patient developed a moderately severe disease including fever, headaches and petechial rash. CCHF was diagnosed following identification of CCHF virus (CCHFV) RNA in a serum sample taken five days after symptom onset. Sequence analysis of the CCHFV genome showed that the virus clusters within the Europe 1 clade, which includes viruses from eastern Europe.

  12. The Incidence and Management of Typhoid Fever in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typhoid or enteric fever is caused by Salmonella typhi. It is largely a disease of developing nations due to their poor standard of hygiene and ... Symptoms such as diarrhoea, constipation, abdominal pain and encephalopathy may occur. Complications like intestinal perforation and gastrointestinal haemorrhage may occur ...

  13. Early risk assessment for viral haemorrhagic fever: experience at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Charles J; Eziefula, Alice C; Agranoff, Dan; Scott, Geoffrey M; Watson, Julie; Chiodini, Peter L; Lockwood, Diana N J; Grant, Alison D

    2007-01-01

    To implement a policy of systematic screening for viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) among travellers returning from African countries with fever, commencing at initial clinical contact. A protocol based on UK Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens guidance was developed collaboratively by medical, nursing and laboratory staff. Audit was carried out to quantify resource demands and effects on time to diagnose malaria, the main differential diagnosis. A protocol is now implemented for all patients presenting to HTD with fever, with clear guidelines for interaction with clinical and laboratory staff at each stage. The protocol required moderate amounts of clinical and laboratory staff time and resulted in some additional hospital admissions. The time to a diagnosis of malaria increased from a median of 90 (range 50-125) min in patients without VHF risk to a median of 140 (range 101-225) min (p=0.0025) in those assessed as at risk. Although all acute medical services need to have robust procedures for early detection of patients with serious transmissible conditions, few implement such a policy. Our protocol requires increased human and other resources but has no important impact on the rapidity of diagnosis of malaria, and is now embedded in local practice.

  14. Subarachnoid haemorrhage in Sweden 1987-2002 : regional incidence and case fatality rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.; Buskens, E.; Granath, F.; Adami, J.; Ekbom, A.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Blomqvist, P.

    Background: Incidence estimates of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Sweden vary, which may be caused by regional variations. Reliable estimates of age-specific case fatality rates are lacking. We analysed regional incidence rates and case fatality rates of SAH in Sweden. Methods: The Swedish

  15. Seroepidemiological study of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Greece, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidira, P; Maltezou, H C; Haidich, A-B; Papa, A

    2012-02-01

    To estimate endemic areas for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in Greece, a country-wide seroepidemiological study was conducted, and 1611 human sera were prospectively collected along with data regarding possible risk factors for acquisition of infection, and tested for CCHF virus IgG antibodies by ELISA. The overall seroprevalence was 4.2%, with significant differences among prefectures, ranging from 0 to 27.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed that slaughtering and agricultural activities were significant risk factors for CCHFV seropositivity. The significantly high seroprevalence in specific prefectures, together with the extremely low number of CCHF cases, suggest that this phenomenon might be strain-related. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  16. Surveillance and laboratory detection system of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinikar, S; Goya, M M; Shirzadi, M R

    2008-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral zoonotic disease with a high mortality rate in humans. The CCHF virus (CCHFV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of Ixodid ticks or by contact with blood or tissues of infected livestock. In addition to zoonotic transmission, CCHFV can be ....... After two decades and observations of CCHF in some provinces of Iran, a CCHF surveillance and detection system was established in 1999, leading to a dramatically decreased mortality rate from 20% (year 2000) to 2% (year 2007)....... symptoms, the diagnosis of CCHF is based on the use of serological tests for the detection of immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies and on the use of molecular tools such as RT-PCR. From 1970 to 1978, serological and epidemiological studies were performed in humans and in livestock of Iran...

  17. Transmission of Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome in China and the Role of Climate Factors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Hansen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is a rodent-borne disease that poses a serious public health threat in China. HFRS is caused by hantaviruses, mainly Seoul virus in urban areas and Hantaan virus in agricultural areas. Although preventive measures including vaccination programs and rodent control measures have resulted in a decline in cases in recent years, there has been an increase in incidence in some areas and new endemic areas have emerged. This review summarises the recent literature relating to the effects of climatic factors on the incidence of HFRS in China and discusses future research directions. Temperature, precipitation and humidity affect crop yields, rodent breeding patterns and disease transmission, and these can be influenced by a changing climate. Detailed surveillance of infections caused by Hantaan and Seoul viruses and further research on the viral agents will aid in interpretation of spatiotemporal patterns and a better understanding of the environmental and ecological drivers of HFRS amid China's rapidly urbanising landscape and changing climate.

  18. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in Kazakhstan (1948-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmakhanov, Talgat; Sansyzbaev, Yerlan; Atshabar, Bakhyt; Deryabin, Pavel; Kazakov, Stanislav; Zholshorinov, Aitmagambet; Matzhanova, Almagul; Sadvakassova, Alya; Saylaubekuly, Ratbek; Kyraubaev, Kakimzhan; Hay, John; Atkinson, Barry; Hewson, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a pathogenic and often fatal arboviral disease with a distribution spanning large areas of Africa, Europe and Asia. The causative agent is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus classified within the Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. Cases of CCHF have been officially recorded in Kazakhstan since the disease was first officially reported in modern medicine. Serological surveillance of human and animal populations provide evidence that the virus was perpetually circulating in a local enzoonotic cycle involving mammals, ticks and humans in the southern regions of the country. Most cases of human disease were associated with agricultural professions such as farming, shepherding and fruit-picking; the typical route of infection was via tick-bite although several cases of contact transmission associated with caring for sick patients have been documented. In total, 704 confirmed human cases of CCHF have been registered in Kazakhstan from 1948-2013 with an overall case fatality rate of 14.8% for cases with a documented outcome. The southern regions of Kazakhstan should be considered endemic for CCHF with cases reported from these territories on an annual basis. Modern diagnostic technologies allow for rapid clinical diagnosis and for surveillance studies to monitor for potential expansion in known risk areas. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aedes larval indices and the occurrence of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in urban community of Thanlyin Township

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thae’ Zar Chi Bo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted in urban community of Thanlyin Township, Yangon Region during 2014 to determine Aedes larval indices and the occurrence of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF within past one year. A total of 327 households and 1491 members were included in the study. Aedes larval indices detected in this study were 25.7% for house index, 15.5% for container index and 48.0% for Breteau index. The occurrence of DHF among households and family members were 2.1% (95% CI: 0.9%, 4.4% and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.3%, 1.1%, respectively. The occurrence was highest among 5 to 14 years age-group. No case was reported among persons with equal or more than 60 years of age. Mortality and case fatality rates were 0% during study period. Larval positivity among households was significantly related to sufficiency of family income and number of water container they have. Surveillance and control procedures for both DHF and vector should be intensified in urban area. Awareness and participation of the community in prevention and control of DHF should also be raised. Socioeconomic status as well as proper water supply and storage should be improved in urban area.

  20. Ergometrine given during caesarean section and incidence of delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, R; Paterson-Brown, S

    2007-11-01

    Delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony after caesarean section was occurring in women in our recovery area despite many of them already having an oxytocin infusion running to prevent such a problem. We therefore decided to compare the incidence of such problems for a 2-month period before and after altering our uterotonic policy: in addition to the routine bolus dose of 5 units of oxytocin after delivery of the baby, we added 500 microg of intramuscular ergometrine during abdominal closure. We noticed a reduced number of massive postpartum haemorrhages due to an atonic uterus in the recovery room but an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting. No prophylactic anti-emetic was given during this pilot study. This small study suggests that 50 women would need to be given ergometrine at caesarean section to prevent one delayed massive haemorrhage from uterine atony and four extra women would suffer with vomiting. We feel this is reasonable and now use a prophylactic anti-emetic as well as delaying the ergometrine until closure of the rectus sheath which reduces the incidence of nausea and vomiting.

  1. Recognising haemorrhagic rash in children with fever: a survey of parents' knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurel, M; Dubos, F; Motte, B; Pruvost, I; Leclerc, F; Martinot, A

    2011-07-01

    Early recognition and treatment of meningococcal disease improves its outcome. Haemorrhagic rash is one of the most specific signs that parents can learn to recognise. To determine the percentage of parents able to recognise a haemorrhagic rash and perform the tumbler test. 123 parents of children consulting for mild injuries were interviewed about the significance and recognition of haemorrhagic rash in febrile children. Although 88% of parents undressed their children when they were febrile, it was never to look specifically for a skin rash. Only 7% (95% CI 3% to 12%) were able to recognise a petechial rash and knew the tumbler test. Information campaigns about the significance of haemorrhagic rash and about the tumbler test are needed.

  2. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  3. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  4. Emerging vector-borne diseases in dromedaries in Tunisia: West Nile, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease and Rift Valley fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassine, Thameur B; Amdouni, Jihane; Monaco, Federica; Savini, Giovanni; Sghaier, Soufien; Selimen, Imed B; Chandoul, Walid; Hamida, Khaled B; Hammami, Salah

    2017-03-31

    A total of 118 sera were collected during 2016 from two groups of dromedaries from Kebili and Medenine governorates in the south of Tunisia. The aim of this study was to provide the first serological investigation of four emerging vector-borne diseases in two groups of dromedaries in Tunisia. Sera were tested by ELISA and serum neutralisation test to identify West Nile virus (WNV), bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). In the first group, the seroprevalence for BTV was 4.6%, while in the second group, it was 25.8% for WNV and 9.7% for BTV. Only serotype 1 was detected for BTV in the two groups. No evidence for circulation of RVF and EHD viruses was revealed. Results indicated that dromedaries can be infected with BTV and WNV, suggesting that this species might play a significant role in the epizootiology of these viral diseases in Tunisia and neighbouring countries.

  5. Current status of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region: issues, challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abri, Seif S; Abaidani, Idris Al; Fazlalipour, Mehdi; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Pshenichnaya, Natalia; Memish, Ziad A; Hewson, Roger; Petersen, Eskild; Mala, Peter; Nhu Nguyen, Tran Minh; Rahman Malik, Mamunur; Formenty, Pierre; Jeffries, Rosanna

    2017-05-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread, tick-borne viral disease affecting humans. The disease is endemic in many regions, such as Africa, Asia, Eastern and Southern Europe, and Central Asia. Recently, the incidence of CCHF has increased rapidly in the countries of the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region (WHO EMR), with sporadic human cases and outbreaks of CCHF being reported from a number of countries in the region. Despite the rapidly growing incidence of the disease, there are currently no accurate data on the burden of the disease in the region due to the different surveillance systems used for CCHF in these countries. In an effort to increase our understanding of the epidemiology and risk factors for the transmission of the CCHF virus (CCHFV; a Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae) in the WHO EMR, and to identify the current knowledge gaps that are hindering effective control interventions, a sub-regional meeting was organized in Muscat, Oman, from December 7 to 9, 2015. This article summarizes the current knowledge of the disease in the region, identifies the knowledge gaps that present challenges for the prevention and control of CCHFV, and details a strategic framework for research and development activities that would be necessary to curb the ongoing and new threats posed by CCHFV. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Current status of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region: issues, challenges, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seif S. Al-Abri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF is the most widespread, tick-borne viral disease affecting humans. The disease is endemic in many regions, such as Africa, Asia, Eastern and Southern Europe, and Central Asia. Recently, the incidence of CCHF has increased rapidly in the countries of the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region (WHO EMR, with sporadic human cases and outbreaks of CCHF being reported from a number of countries in the region. Despite the rapidly growing incidence of the disease, there are currently no accurate data on the burden of the disease in the region due to the different surveillance systems used for CCHF in these countries. In an effort to increase our understanding of the epidemiology and risk factors for the transmission of the CCHF virus (CCHFV; a Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae in the WHO EMR, and to identify the current knowledge gaps that are hindering effective control interventions, a sub-regional meeting was organized in Muscat, Oman, from December 7 to 9, 2015. This article summarizes the current knowledge of the disease in the region, identifies the knowledge gaps that present challenges for the prevention and control of CCHFV, and details a strategic framework for research and development activities that would be necessary to curb the ongoing and new threats posed by CCHFV.

  7. Human Q fever incidence is associated to spatiotemporal environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P.G. Van Leuken

    2016-12-01

    We conclude that environmental conditions are correlated to human Q fever incidence rate. Similar research with data from other outbreaks would be needed to more firmly establish our findings. This could lead to better estimations of the public health risk of a C. burnetii outbreak, and to more detailed and accurate hazard maps that could be used for spatial planning of livestock operations.

  8. Guidance for contact tracing of cases of Lassa fever, Ebola or Marburg haemorrhagic fever on an airplane: results of a European expert consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsdorf, Andreas; Morgan, Dilys; Leitmeyer, Katrin

    2012-11-21

    Travel from countries where viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are endemic has increased significantly over the past decades. In several reported VHF events on airplanes, passenger trace back was initiated but the scale of the trace back differed considerably. The absence of guidance documents to help the decision on necessity and scale of the trace back contributed to this variation.This article outlines the recommendations of an expert panel on Lassa fever, Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever to the wider scientific community in order to advise the relevant stakeholders in the decision and scale of a possible passenger trace back. The evidence was collected through review of published literature and through the views of an expert panel. The guidance was agreed by consensus. Only a few events of VHF cases during air travel are reported in literature, with no documented infection in followed up contacts, so that no evidence of transmission of VHF during air travel exists to date. Based on this and the expert opinion, it was recommended that passenger trace back was undertaken only if: the index case had symptoms during the flight; the flight was within 21 days after detection of the event; and for Lassa fever if exposure of body fluid has been reported. The trace back should only be done after confirmation of the index case. Passengers and crew with direct contact, seat neighbours (+/- 1 seat), crew and cleaning personal of the section of the index case should be included in the trace back. No evidence has been found for the transmission of VHF in airplanes. This information should be taken into account, when a trace back decision has to be taken, because such a measure produces an enormous work load. The procedure suggested by the expert group can guide decisions made in future events, where a patient with suspected VHF infection travelled on a plane. However, the actual decision on start and scale of a trace back always lies in the hands of the responsible people

  9. Guidance for contact tracing of cases of Lassa fever, Ebola or Marburg haemorrhagic fever on an airplane: results of a European expert consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilsdorf Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Travel from countries where viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF are endemic has increased significantly over the past decades. In several reported VHF events on airplanes, passenger trace back was initiated but the scale of the trace back differed considerably. The absence of guidance documents to help the decision on necessity and scale of the trace back contributed to this variation. This article outlines the recommendations of an expert panel on Lassa fever, Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever to the wider scientific community in order to advise the relevant stakeholders in the decision and scale of a possible passenger trace back. Method The evidence was collected through review of published literature and through the views of an expert panel. The guidance was agreed by consensus. Results Only a few events of VHF cases during air travel are reported in literature, with no documented infection in followed up contacts, so that no evidence of transmission of VHF during air travel exists to date. Based on this and the expert opinion, it was recommended that passenger trace back was undertaken only if: the index case had symptoms during the flight; the flight was within 21 days after detection of the event; and for Lassa fever if exposure of body fluid has been reported. The trace back should only be done after confirmation of the index case. Passengers and crew with direct contact, seat neighbours (+/− 1 seat, crew and cleaning personal of the section of the index case should be included in the trace back. Conclusion No evidence has been found for the transmission of VHF in airplanes. This information should be taken into account, when a trace back decision has to be taken, because such a measure produces an enormous work load. The procedure suggested by the expert group can guide decisions made in future events, where a patient with suspected VHF infection travelled on a plane. However, the actual decision on start and scale

  10. Trends in incidence and in short term survival following a subarachnoid haemorrhage in Scotland, 1986 - 2005: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Walters Matthew; Briggs Andrew; Redpath Adam; Chalmers Jim WT; Gillies Michelle; Jhund Pardeep S; Lewsey James D; Macpherson Karen J; Langhorne Peter; Capewell Simon; McMurray John JV; MacIntyre Kate

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To examine age and sex specific incidence and 30 day case fatality for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Scotland over a 20 year period. Methods A retrospective cohort study using routine hospital discharge data linked to death records. Results Between 1986 and 2005, 12,056 individuals experienced an incident SAH. Of these 10,113 (84%) survived to reach hospital. Overall age-standardised incidence rates were greater in women than men and remained relatively stable over the...

  11. Incidence, trends and severity of primary postpartum haemorrhage in Australia: A population-based study using Victorian Perinatal Data Collection data for 764 244 births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Margaret; McDonald, Susan J; Pollock, Wendy; Cullinane, Fiona; Davey, Mary-Ann

    2018-05-22

    Increasing incidence and severity of postpartum haemorrhage, together with postpartum haemorrhage-associated morbidities, have been reported in many high-resource countries. In-depth analysis of such factors in Victorian births since 2002 was lacking. Our aim was to determine the incidence and trends for primary postpartum haemorrhage (World Health Organization and International Classification of Diseases 10th revision, Australian Modification definitions) for all confinements in Victoria, Australia, for the years 2003-2013 and the incidence and trends for severe postpartum haemorrhage (≥1500 mL) for 2009-2013. In this population-based cross-sectional study de-identified data from the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection were analysed for confinements (excluding terminations) from 2003 to 2013 (n = 764 244). Perinatal information for all births ≥20 weeks (or of at least 400 g birthweight if gestation was unknown) were prospectively collected. One in five women (21.8%) who gave birth between 2009 and 2013 experienced a primary postpartum haemorrhage and one in 71 women (1.4%) experienced a severe primary postpartum haemorrhage. The increasing trends in incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage, severe primary postpartum haemorrhage, blood transfusion, admission to an intensive care or high dependency unit and peripartum hysterectomy were significant (P primary postpartum haemorrhage. The highest incidence was experienced by women who had an unplanned caesarean section birth. Women who had a forceps birth had the highest incidence of severe primary postpartum haemorrhage. The incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage, severe primary postpartum haemorrhage and associated maternal morbidities have increased significantly over time in Victoria. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  12. Two cases of Hantavirus infection in Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever endemic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sünbül

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF and Leptospirosis are endemic in our region. Hantavirus infections may beconfused with similar clinical picture zoonotic infections. Two patients with fever, malaise, cough, phlegm, nausea, vomiting,thrombocytopenia, renal failure, elevated transaminases, and a history of mouse contact were hospitalized in ourclinic with a presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis, pneumonia, CCHF and Hantavirus infections. Empirical antibiotictreatment was initiated and CCHF and leptospirosis was ruled out with laboratory tests. Hantavirus immunoglobulin(Ig-G and Ig-M antibodies were detected positive by immunofluorescent antibody (IFA method in both cases but,Dobrova virus was detected in only one patient with immunoblotting methods. Both patients were discharged aftertreatment. Hantavirus infections may be misdiagnosed as zoonotic infections since they have similar clinical picture. Itshould be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of contact with mouse. J Microbiol Infect Dis2012; 2(3: 117-120Key words: Hantavirus, hemorrhagic fever, renal syndrome, pulmonary syndrome

  13. An outbreak of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome linked with mountain recreational activities in Zagreb, Croatia, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Z; Kolarić, B; Kosanović Ličina, M L; Tomljenović, M; Đaković Rode, O; Danis, K; Kaić, B; Tešić, V

    2018-05-16

    In 2017 Zagreb faced the largest outbreak of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) to date. We investigated to describe the extent of the outbreak and identify risk factors for infection. We compared laboratory-confirmed cases of Hantavirus infection in Zagreb residents with the onset of illness after 1 January 2017, with individually matched controls from the same household or neighbourhood. We calculated adjusted matched odds ratios (amOR) using conditional logistic regression. During 2017, 104 cases were reported: 11-81 years old (median 37) and 71% (73) male. Compared with 104 controls, cases were more likely to report visiting Mount Medvednica (amOR 60, 95% CI 6-597), visiting a forest (amOR 46, 95% CI 4.7-450) and observing rodents (amOR 20, 95% CI 2.6-159). Seventy per cent of cases (73/104) had visited Mount Medvednica prior to infection. Among participants who had visited Mount Medvednica, cases were more likely to have drunk water from a spring (amOR 22, 95% CI 1.9-265), observed rodents (amOR 17, 95% CI 2-144), picked flowers (amOR 15, 95% CI 1.2-182) or cycled (amOR 14, 95% CI 1.6-135). Our study indicated that recreational activity around Mount Medvednica was associated with HFRS. We recommend enhanced surveillance of the recreational areas during an outbreak.

  14. Emerging vector-borne diseases in dromedaries in Tunisia: West Nile, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease and Rift Valley fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thameur B. Hassine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 118 sera were collected during 2016 from two groups of dromedaries from Kebili and Medenine governorates in the south of Tunisia. The aim of this study was to provide the first serological investigation of four emerging vector-borne diseases in two groups of dromedaries in Tunisia. Sera were tested by ELISA and serum neutralisation test to identify West Nile virus (WNV, bluetongue virus (BTV, epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV. In the first group, the seroprevalence for BTV was 4.6%, while in the second group, it was 25.8% for WNV and 9.7% for BTV. Only serotype 1 was detected for BTV in the two groups. No evidence for circulation of RVF and EHD viruses was revealed. Results indicated that dromedaries can be infected with BTV and WNV, suggesting that this species might play a significant role in the epizootiology of these viral diseases in Tunisia and neighbouring countries.

  15. A serological survey of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in animals in the Sharkia Governorate of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Murad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A surveillance survey was conducted over a period of 12 months between September 2004 and August 2005 by the Tropical Medicine Department of Zagazig University in collaboration with Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3 (NAMRU-3, Egypt, to evaluate the role of ruminants as a reservoir host for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV. A total of 1 022 serum samples from 313 cattle, 264 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 270 sheep and 175 goats were included in the survey. All samples were collected from the Sharkia Governorate of Egypt and were examined for anti-CCHFV IgG. Of the total of 1 022 samples examined, 32 (3.13% were positive to IgG ELISA. Out of 270 sheep examined, 17 (6.30% were confirmed to have anti-CCHFV IgG with the highest titre recorded at 1:800. However, CCHFV-specific IgG-positive cases among the cattle, buffalo and goats were 3.83%, 0.38% and 1.14%, respectively. Positive cases in age group B (=2 years old were significantly higher (p<0.001 than those in age group A (<2 years old (5.7% versus 1.6%. Belbis City was found to have the highest number of positive cases compared to all other localities (p<0.001.

  16. OSBPL10, RXRA and lipid metabolism confer African-ancestry protection against dengue haemorrhagic fever in admixed Cubans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sierra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic groups can display differential genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases. The arthropod-born viral dengue disease is one such disease, with empirical and limited genetic evidence showing that African ancestry may be protective against the haemorrhagic phenotype. Global ancestry analysis based on high-throughput genotyping in admixed populations can be used to test this hypothesis, while admixture mapping can map candidate protective genes. A Cuban dengue fever cohort was genotyped using a 2.5 million SNP chip. Global ancestry was ascertained through ADMIXTURE and used in a fine-matched corrected association study, while local ancestry was inferred by the RFMix algorithm. The expression of candidate genes was evaluated by RT-PCR in a Cuban dengue patient cohort and gene set enrichment analysis was performed in a Thai dengue transcriptome. OSBPL10 and RXRA candidate genes were identified, with most significant SNPs placed in inferred weak enhancers, promoters and lncRNAs. OSBPL10 had significantly lower expression in Africans than Europeans, while for RXRA several SNPs may differentially regulate its transcription between Africans and Europeans. Their expression was confirmed to change through dengue disease progression in Cuban patients and to vary with disease severity in a Thai transcriptome dataset. These genes interact in the LXR/RXR activation pathway that integrates lipid metabolism and immune functions, being a key player in dengue virus entrance into cells, its replication therein and in cytokine production. Knockdown of OSBPL10 expression in THP-1 cells by two shRNAs followed by DENV2 infection tests led to a significant reduction in DENV replication, being a direct functional proof that the lower OSBPL10 expression profile in Africans protects this ancestry against dengue disease.

  17. Relating coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) incidence to soil moisture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E J; Bell, J E; Benedict, K; Shriber, J; McCotter, O; Cosh, M H

    2017-04-17

    Coccidioidomycosis (also called Valley fever) is caused by a soilborne fungus, Coccidioides spp. , in arid regions of the southwestern United States. Though some who develop infections from this fungus remain asymptomatic, others develop respiratory disease as a consequence. Less commonly, severe illness and death can occur when the infection spreads to other regions of the body. Previous analyses have attempted to connect the incidence of coccidioidomycosis to broadly available climatic measurements, such as precipitation or temperature. However, with the limited availability of long-term, in situ soil moisture data sets, it has not been feasible to perform a direct analysis of the relationships between soil moisture levels and coccidioidomycosis incidence on a larger temporal and spatial scale. Utilizing in situ soil moisture gauges throughout the southwest from the U.S. Climate Reference Network and a model with which to extend those estimates, this work connects periods of higher and lower soil moisture in Arizona and California between 2002 and 2014 to the reported incidence of coccidioidomycosis. The results indicate that in both states, coccidioidomycosis incidence is related to soil moisture levels from previous summers and falls. Stated differently, a higher number of coccidioidomycosis cases are likely to be reported if previous bands of months have been atypically wet or dry, depending on the location.

  18. Prophylactic ethamsylate for periventricular haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, R W; Morgan, M E

    1984-01-01

    Drug prophylaxis with ethamsylate for periventricular haemorrhage in very low birthweight infants significantly reduced the incidence of periventricular haemorrhage in survivors. A reduction in abnormalities at follow up and in insertion of ventriculoperitoneal shunts was also noted.

  19. [Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Kronborg, G.; Thybo, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review presents the latest findings on ebola. Ebola presents one of the highest case-fatality rates of all infectious diseases, and in 2007 outbreaks were observed first in the Democratic Republic of Congo and later in Uganda with a new subtype. Accumulating evidence suggests that fruit bats...... are a likely reservoir for the ebola virus. The frequency of filovirus outbreaks in Central Africa is increasing and the potential for introduction and patient care in Denmark is evaluated Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/24...

  20. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plan 2015: West Africa Ebola outbreak Health worker Ebola infections in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone Infection prevention and control guidance for care of Ebola patients Publications, technical guidance on Ebola Related topics ...

  1. Omsk haemorrhagic fever

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Daniel; Yakimenko, V. V.; Karan, L. S.; Tkachev, S. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 376, č. 9758 (2010), s. 2104-2113 ISSN 0140-6736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/08/1509 Grant - others:MO0 - Ministerstvo obrany (MO)(CZ) OVUVZU2008002 Program:OV Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : human-mediated disturbance * muskrats * Ondatra zibethicus * OHFV Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 33.633, year: 2010

  2. Ebola--haemorrhagic fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Kronborg, G.; Thybo, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review presents the latest findings on ebola. Ebola presents one of the highest case-fatality rates of all infectious diseases, and in 2007 outbreaks were observed first in the Democratic Republic of Congo and later in Uganda with a new subtype. Accumulating evidence suggests that fruit bats...

  3. [Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Kronborg, G.; Thybo, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review presents the latest findings on ebola. Ebola presents one of the highest case-fatality rates of all infectious diseases, and in 2007 outbreaks were observed first in the Democratic Republic of Congo and later in Uganda with a new subtype. Accumulating evidence suggests that fruit bats...

  4. Risk of transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and the insecticide susceptibilitystatus of aedes aegypti (linnaeus) in some sites in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Osei, Joseph H; Sasaki, Akihiro; Adimazoya, Michelle; Appawu, Maxwell; Boakye, Daniel; Ohta, Nobuo; Dadzie, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Dengue is one of the emerging diseases that can mostly only be controlled by vector control since there is no vaccine for the disease. Although, Dengue has not been reported in Ghana, movement of people from neighbouring countries where the disease has been reported can facilitate transmission of the disease. This study was carried on the University of Ghana campus to determine the risk of transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and the insecticide susceptibility status of Ae. aegypti in some sites in Accra, Ghana. Larval surveys were carried to inspect containers within households and estimate larval indices and adult Aedes mosquitoes were collected using human landing collection technique. WHO tube assays was used to assess the insecticide susceptibility status of Aedes mosquitoes. Ae. aegypti were the most prevalent species, 75.5% and followed by Ae. vittatus , 23.9 %. Ae. albopictus and Ae. granti were in smaller numbers. Household index (HI), Breteau index (BI), and container index were calculated as 8.2%, 11.2% and 10.3% respectively with man-vector contact rate of 0.67 bites/man-hour estimated for the area. The mortalities recorded for Ae. aegypti from WHO tube assays was 88%, 94%, 80% and 99% for DDT (4%), deltamethrin (0.05%), lambdacyhalothrin (0.05%) and permethrin (0.75%) respectively. The survey results indicated that the density of Aedes mosquitoes was considered to be sufficient to promote an outbreak of viral haemorrhagic fevers on Legon Campus. Aedes mosquitoes were found to be resistant to DDT, deltamethrin and lamdacyhalothrin, but susceptible to permethrin. This study was supported in part by Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-Grid).

  5. Incidence of postpartum haemorrhage in women receiving therapeutic doses of low-molecular-weight heparin: results of a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshani, Sara; Cohn, Danny M.; Stehouwer, Alexander C.; Wolf, Hans; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Büller, Harry R.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is the drug of choice to prevent venous thrombosis in pregnancy, but the optimal dose for prevention while avoiding bleeding is unclear. This study investigated whether therapeutic doses of LMWH increase the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) in

  6. Incidence of postpartum haemorrhage in women receiving therapeutic doses of low-molecular-weight heparin : results of a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshani, Sara; Cohn, Danny M; Stehouwer, Alexander C; Wolf, Hans; van der Post, Joris A M; Büller, Harry R; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is the drug of choice to prevent venous thrombosis in pregnancy, but the optimal dose for prevention while avoiding bleeding is unclear. This study investigated whether therapeutic doses of LMWH increase the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) in

  7. Trends in incidence and in short term survival following a subarachnoid haemorrhage in Scotland, 1986 - 2005: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine age and sex specific incidence and 30 day case fatality for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH in Scotland over a 20 year period. Methods A retrospective cohort study using routine hospital discharge data linked to death records. Results Between 1986 and 2005, 12,056 individuals experienced an incident SAH. Of these 10,113 (84% survived to reach hospital. Overall age-standardised incidence rates were greater in women than men and remained relatively stable over the study period. In 2005, incidence in women was 12.8 (95% CI 11.5 to 14.2 and in men 7.9 (95% CI 6.9 to 9.1. 30 day case fatality in individuals hospitalised with SAH declined substantially, falling from 30.0% in men and 33.9% in women in 1986-1990 to 24.5% in men and 29.1% in women in 2001-2005. For both men and women, the largest reductions were observed in those aged between 40 to 59 years. After adjustment for age, socio-economic status and co-morbidity, the odds of death at 30 days in 2005 compared to odds of death in 1986 was 0.64 (0.54 to 0.76, p Conclusions Incidence rates for SAH remained stable between 1986 and 2005 suggesting that a better understanding of SAH risk factors and their reduction is needed. 30 day case fatality rates have declined substantially, particularly in middle-age. However, they remain high and it is important to ensure that this is not due to under-diagnosis or under-treatment.

  8. Sustained High Levels of Both Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin in Plasma during the Convalescent Phase of Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Are Associated with Disease Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is characterised by an uncontrolled immune response that causes vascular leakage. Adiponectin (APN is an adipocytokine involved in prorevascularisation and immunomodulation. To investigate the possible effects of APN in the pathogenesis of HFRS, total and high molecular weight (HMW APN levels in the plasma of patients with HFRS were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Compared with those in healthy controls, the plasma total and HMW APN levels in patients were elevated to different degrees from the fever onset and remained high at the convalescent phase. Consistent with these results, western blot analysis additionally showed that low molecular weight (LMW, middle molecular weight (MMW, and HMW APN levels were all elevated and contributed to the elevation of the total APN level. Importantly, sustained high levels of total and HMW APN at the convalescent phase were significantly higher in patients with critical disease than those in patients with mild or moderate disease. Moreover, total and HMW APN levels negatively correlated with white blood cell count and positively correlated with platelet count and serum albumin level. These results may provide insights into understanding the roles of total and HMW APN in the pathogenesis of HFRS.

  9. Smooth incidence maps give valuable insight into Q fever outbreaks in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim van der Hoek

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available From 2007 through 2009, The Netherlands faced large outbreaks of human Q fever. Control measures focused primarily on dairy goat farms because these were implicated as the main source of infection for the surrounding population. However, in other countries, outbreaks have mainly been associated with non-dairy sheep and The Netherlands has many more sheep than goats. Therefore, a public discussion arose about the possible role of non-dairy (meat sheep in the outbreaks. To inform decision makers about the relative importance of different infection sources, we developed accurate and high-resolution incidence maps for detection of Q fever hot spots. In the high incidence area in the south of the country, full postal codes of notified Q fever patients with onset of illness in 2009, were georeferenced. Q fever cases (n = 1,740 were treated as a spatial point process. A 500 x 500 m grid was imposed over the area of interest. The number of cases and the population number were counted in each cell. The number of cases was modelled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process where the underlying incidence was estimated by 2-dimensional P-spline smoothing. Modelling of numbers of Q fever cases based on residential addresses and population size produced smooth incidence maps that clearly showed Q fever hotspots around infected dairy goat farms. No such increased incidence was noted around infected meat sheep farms. We conclude that smooth incidence maps of human notifications give valuable information about the Q fever epidemic and are a promising method to provide decision support for the control of other infectious diseases with an environmental source.

  10. First report on the seroprevalence of the Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, a tick-borne virus, in Malaysia's Orang Asli population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, R; Mohd Rahim, N F; Hassan, H; Yaghoobi, R; Chang, L-Y; AbuBakar, S; Zandi, K

    2015-01-01

    The Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), which is transmitted by the ticks of Hyalomma spp. in general and H. marginatumin particular, can cause severe disease in humans, with mortality rates of 3-30%. Other than from the bites of infected ticks, CCHFV can also be transmitted through contact with patients with the acute phase of infection or contact with blood or tissues from viraemic livestock.  Outbreaks of human cases of haemorrhagic manifestations have been documented since 1945 and described in parts of Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and the Middle East and most recently India in 2011. In addition, serological evidence of the disease has been reported in some countries where no human cases were reported. As regional neighbours China and India have been affected by this virus, this study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of CCHFV among Orang Asli population of Malaysia as the most at risk people who residing in the deep forests. A total of 682 serum samples were collected from the Orang Asli population residing in eight states in peninsular Malaysia and analysed for the presence of anti-CCHFV immunoglobulin G (IgG) using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The study subjects comprised 277 (40.6%) men and 405 (59.4%) women. However, anti-CCHFV IgG was detected in only one female serum sample (0.1%). The presence of anti-CCHFV IgG could not be correlated to age or sex from these findings. The results of this screening survey showed that the seroprevalence of the anti-CCHFV IgG among Malaysia's Orang Asli population is too low for detection or totally negative compared with that in neighbouring countries, such as India and China.

  11. An experience in the clinical use of specific immunoglobulin from horse blood serum for prophylaxis of Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, I V; Chemikova, Natalya K; Markov, V I; Krasnianskiy, V P; Borisevich, S V; Rozhdestvenskiy, E V

    The aim of this work was to estimate the efficacy and safety of single intramuscular introduction of specific heterologous immunoglobulin as prophylactic drug against Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Materials and methods. The specific heterologous immunoglobulin was introduced as a special prophylactic drug to 28 patients in epidemic situations, after skin hurt with infectious materials or contact with infectious blood. Clinico-laboratory observation was performed in 24 subjects after single intramuscular introduction of heterologous immunoglobulin Ebola. The samples of blood serum were investigated for immunoglobulin Ebola and antibodies to horse gamma-globulin on the 30th and 60th days after prophylaxis. Results. None of the subjects of the study contracted Ebola fever. There were no anaphylactic reactions after special prophylaxis with specific heterologous immunoglobulin. Among the subjects with normal allergic state 31% responded with local reactions; 13%, with a general reaction (mild case of the serum disease). Almost no reaction was observed in patients with unfavorable allergic state subjected to desensitizing therapy; in the absence of desensitizing therapy, 50% of patients with unfavorable allergic state exhibited local reactions; 17%, mild cases of the serum disease; 33%, moderate cases of the serum disease. In summary, if the tactics of immunoglobulin application was right, the quantity of local allergic reactions was 28%; of wide spread reactions, 6%. Weak serum disease was observed in 11% of the subjects. The prognostic period of resistance to Ebola fever was less than 30 days. Conclusion. The prophylactic use of specific immunoglobulin from horse blood serum against hemorrhagic Ebola fever is effective and relatively safe in patients subjected to desensitizing therapy.

  12. Cost-utility analysis of an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Poovorawan, Yong; Mak, Joon Wah; Aung, Kyan; Kamolratankul, Pirom

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the cost-utility analysis of using an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in children for controlling life-threatening bleeding in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We constructed a decision-tree model, comparing a standard care and the use of an additional adjuvant rFVIIa for controlling life-threatening bleeding in children with DHF/DSS. Cost and utility benefit were estimated from the societal perspective. The outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall, treatment with adjuvant rFVIIa gained QALYs, but the total cost was higher. The incremental cost-utility ratio for the introduction of adjuvant rFVIIa was $4241.27 per additional QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the utility value assigned for calculation of QALY was the most sensitive parameter. We concluded that despite high cost, there is a role for rFVIIa in the treatment of life-threatening bleeding in patients with DHF/DSS.

  13. Hyalomma ticks on northward migrating birds in southern Spain: Implications for the risk of entry of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus to Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Marion E; Phipps, Paul; Medlock, Jolyon M; Atkinson, Peter M; Atkinson, Barry; Hewson, Roger; Gale, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a zoonotic virus transmitted by Hyalomma ticks, the immature stages of which may be carried by migratory birds. In this study, a total of 12 Hyalomma ticks were recovered from five of 228 migratory birds trapped in Spring, 2012 in southern Spain along the East Atlantic flyway. All collected ticks tested negative for CCHFV. While most birds had zero Hyalomma ticks, two individuals had four and five ticks each and the statistical distribution of Hyalomma tick counts per bird is over-dispersed compared to the Poisson distribution, demonstrating the need for intensive sampling studies to avoid underestimating the total number of ticks. Rates of tick exchange on migratory birds during their northwards migration will affect the probability that a Hyalomma tick entering Great Britain is positive for CCHFV. Drawing on published data, evidence is presented that the latitude of a European country affects the probability of entry of Hyalomma ticks on wild birds. Further data on Hyalomma infestation rates and tick exchange rates are required along the East Atlantic flyway to further our understanding of the origin of Hyalomma ticks (i.e., Africa or southern Europe) and hence the probability of entry of CCHFV into GB. © 2016 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  14. Early CT signs in patients with acute middle cerebral artery occlusion: incidence of contrast staining and haemorrhagic transformations after intra-arterial reperfusion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, S.; Iseda, T.; Yoneyama, T.; Wakisaka, S.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how often early computed tomography (CT) signs are associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and result in haemorrhagic transformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serial CT findings were prospectively evaluated in 61 patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion who underwent initial CT examination within 3 h of stroke onset and who were treated with intra-arterial reperfusion therapy within 6 h of stroke onset. Obscuration of the margin of the lentiform nucleus and loss of the insular ribbon were evaluated as early CT signs in the deep MCA territories. Cortical effacement was also evaluated. BBB disruption was defined as contrast medium staining in post-therapeutic CT just after reperfusion therapy. The relationship between pre-therapeutic early CT signs and post-therapeutic contrast staining or haemorrhagic transformations was investigated. RESULTS: The frequency of early CT signs in the deep MCA territories was significantly higher than that of cortical effacement (68.9 versus 27.9%). There were significant correlations between pre-therapeutic early CT signs and post-therapeutic contrast staining in both the deep and superficial MCA territories. Compared with early CT signs in the deep MCA territories, cortical effacement had a significantly higher incidence of post-therapeutic contrast staining (54.8 versus 82.4%). Although not statistically significant, cortical effacement tended to develop into haemorrhagic transformations. There was no correlation between early CT signs in the deep MCA territories and haemorrhagic transformations. CONCLUSION: Cortical effacement may be an advanced CT sign with BBB disruption and potential risk for haemorrhagic transformations. The presence of early CT signs in the deep MCA territories may not be a contraindication of reperfusion therapy

  15. Impact of meteorological changes on the incidence of scarlet fever in Hefei City, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yu; Huang, Xiao-lei; Wang, Yu-jie; Zhang, Jun-qing; Zhang, Qi; Dang, Yue-wen; Wang, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Studies on scarlet fever with meteorological factors included were few. We aimed to illustrate meteorological factors' effects on monthly incidence of scarlet fever. Cases of scarlet fever were collected from the report of legal infectious disease in Hefei City from 1985 to 2006; the meteorological data were obtained from the weather bureau of Hefei City. Monthly incidence and corresponding meteorological data in these 22 years were used to develop the model. The model of auto regressive integrated moving average with covariates was used in statistical analyses. There was a highest peak from March to June and a small peak from November to January. The incidence of scarlet fever ranges from 0 to 0.71502 (per 105 population). SARIMAX (1,0,0)(1,0,0)12 model was fitted with monthly incidence and meteorological data optimally. It was shown that relative humidity ( β = -0.002, p = 0.020), mean temperature ( β = 0.006, p = 0.004), and 1 month lag minimum temperature ( β = -0.007, p ARIMA model could be useful not only for prediction but also for the analysis of multiple correlations.

  16. Incidence and risk factors of milk fever among cross-bred dairy cows ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted on 206 cross-bred dairy cows in different dairy herds in Khartoum State, Sudan, during the period from March 2003 to June 2004 to determine the prevalence and incidence rate of milk fever (MF) based on clinical and laboratory diagnosis, and to recognize the risk factors associated with the ...

  17. Prospective cohort study of fever incidence and risk in elderly persons living at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokobayashi, Kenichi; Matsushima, Masato; Watanabe, Takamasa; Fujinuma, Yasuki; Tazuma, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of fever among elderly persons under home medical management, diagnosis at fever onset and outcomes from a practical standpoint. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 5 clinics in residential areas of Tokyo that process an average of 50–200 outpatients/day. Participants Patients (n=419) aged ≥65 years who received home medical management from the five clinics between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010. Main outcome measures Fever (≥37.5°C or ≥1.5°C above usual body temperature), diagnosis at onset and outcomes (cure at home, hospitalisation and death). Results The incidence of fever was 2.5/1000 patient-days (95% CI 2.2 to 2.8). Fever occurred at least once (229 fever events) among one-third of the participants during the study period. Fever was more likely to arise in the wheelchair users or bedridden than in ambulatory individuals (HR 1.9 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.8; p<0.01); in patients with moderate-to-severe rather than those with none-to-mild cognitive impairment (HR, 1.7 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.6, p=0.01); and in those whose care-need levels were ≥3 rather than ≤2 (HR, 4.5 (95% CI 2.9 to 7.0; p<0.01). The causes of fever were pneumonia/bronchitis (n=103), skin and soft tissue infection (n=26), urinary tract infection (n=22) and the common cold (n=13). Fever was cured in 67% and 23% of patients at home and in hospital, respectively, and 5% of patients each died at home and in hospital. Antimicrobial agents treated 153 (67%) events in the home medical care setting. Conclusions Fever was more likely to occur in those requiring higher care levels and the main cause of fever was pneumonia/bronchitis. Healthcare providers should consider the conditions of elderly residents with lower objective functional status. PMID:25009132

  18. Spatio-temporal modelling of dengue fever incidence in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che-Him, Norziha; Ghazali Kamardan, M.; Saifullah Rusiman, Mohd; Sufahani, Suliadi; Mohamad, Mahathir; @ Kamariah Kamaruddin, Nafisah

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies reported significant relationship between dengue incidence rate (DIR) and both climatic and non-climatic factors. Therefore, this study proposes a generalised additive model (GAM) framework for dengue risk in Malaysia by using both climatic and non-climatic factors. The data used is monthly DIR for 12 states of Malaysia from 2001 to 2009. In this study, we considered an annual trend, seasonal effects, population, population density and lagged DIR, rainfall, temperature, number of rainy days and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The population density is found to be positively related to monthly DIR. There are generally weak relationships between monthly DIR and climate variables. A negative binomial GAM shows that there are statistically significant relationships between DIR with climatic and non-climatic factors. These include mean rainfall and temperature, the number of rainy days, sea surface temperature and the interaction between mean temperature (lag 1 month) and sea surface temperature (lag 6 months). These also apply to DIR (lag 3 months) and population density.

  19. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also cause fevers. Some examples are: Arthritis or connective tissue illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus Ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease Vasculitis or periarteritis nodosa The first symptom of a cancer may be a fever. This is particularly true ...

  20. Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Bartfai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of body temperature remains one of the most common ways to assess health. An increase in temperature above what is considered to be a normal value is inevitably regarded as a sure sign of disease and referred to with one simple word: fever. In this review, we summarize how research on fever allowed the identification of the exogenous and endogenous molecules and pathways mediating the fever response. We also show how temperature elevation is common to different pathologies and how the molecular components of the fever-generation pathway represent drug targets for antipyretics, such as acetylsalicylic acid, the first “blockbuster drug”. We also show how fever research provided new insights into temperature and energy homeostasis, and into treatment of infection and inflammation.

  1. Association between Intrapartum Magnesium Administration and the Incidence of Maternal Fever: A Retrospective Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Elizabeth M S; Segal, Scott; Pancaro, Carlo; Wong, Cynthia A; Grobman, William A; Russell, Gregory B; Toledo, Paloma

    2017-12-01

    Intrapartum maternal fever is associated with several adverse neonatal outcomes. Intrapartum fever can be infectious or inflammatory in etiology. Increases in interleukin 6 and other inflammatory markers are associated with maternal fever. Magnesium has been shown to attenuate interleukin 6-mediated fever in animal models. We hypothesized that parturients exposed to intrapartum magnesium would have a lower incidence of fever than nonexposed parturients. In this study, electronic medical record data from all deliveries at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (Chicago, Illinois) between 2007 and 2014 were evaluated. The primary outcome was intrapartum fever (temperature at or higher than 38.0°C). Factors associated with the development of maternal fever were evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression model. Propensity score matching was used to reduce potential bias from nonrandom selection of magnesium administration. Of the 58,541 women who met inclusion criteria, 5,924 (10.1%) developed intrapartum fever. Febrile parturients were more likely to be nulliparous, have used neuraxial analgesia, and have been delivered via cesarean section. The incidence of fever was lower in women exposed to magnesium (6.0%) than those who were not (10.2%). In multivariable logistic regression, women exposed to magnesium were less likely to develop a fever (adjusted odds ratio = 0.42 [95% CI, 0.31 to 0.58]). After propensity matching (N = 959 per group), the odds ratio of developing fever was lower in women who received magnesium therapy (odds ratio = 0.68 [95% CI, 0.48 to 0.98]). Magnesium may play a protective role against the development of intrapartum fever. Future work should further explore the association between magnesium dosing and the incidence of maternal fever.

  2. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endemic areas, where they have been at the origin of human cases. For example, a former outbreak occurred at an ostrich abattoir in South Africa. There is no apparent disease in these animals. ...

  3. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the ... heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the ...

  4. Rocky mountain spotted fever in the United States, 2000-2007: interpreting contemporary increases in incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, John J; Swerdlow, David L; Krebs, John W; Holman, Robert C; Mandel, Eric; Harvey, Alexis; Haberling, Dana; Massung, Robert F; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2010-07-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a potentially fatal tick-borne infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is considered a notifiable condition in the United States. During 2000 to 2007, the annual reported incidence of RMSF increased from 1.7 to 7 cases per million persons from 2000 to 2007, the highest rate ever recorded. American Indians had a significantly higher incidence than other race groups. Children 5-9 years of age appeared at highest risk for fatal outcome. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays became more widely available beginning in 2004 and were used to diagnose 38% of cases during 2005-2007. The proportion of cases classified as confirmed RMSF decreased from 15% in 2000 to 4% in 2007. Concomitantly, case fatality decreased from 2.2% to 0.3%. The decreasing proportion of confirmed cases and cases with fatal outcome suggests that changes in diagnostic and surveillance practices may be influencing the observed increase in reported incidence rates.

  5. Intracranial haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the brain the haemorrhage is referred to as an .... The bleed is in the left basal ganglia most often originating in the putamen. Fig. 3. This 26-year-old patient presented with sudden-onset headache, right-sided ..... Early surgery versus initial.

  6. Forecasting typhoid fever incidence in the Cordillera administrative region in the Philippines using seasonal ARIMA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawiding, Olive R.; Natividad, Gina May R.; Bato, Crisostomo V.; Addawe, Rizavel C.

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of typhoid fever in developing countries such as the Philippines calls for a need for accurate forecasting of the disease. This will be of great assistance in strategic disease prevention. This paper presents a development of useful models that predict the behavior of typhoid fever incidence based on the monthly incidence in the provinces of the Cordillera Administrative Region from 2010 to 2015 using univariate time series analysis. The data used was obtained from the Cordillera Office of the Department of Health (DOH-CAR). Seasonal autoregressive moving average (SARIMA) models were used to incorporate the seasonality of the data. A comparison of the results of the obtained models revealed that the SARIMA (1,1,7)(0,0,1)12 with a fixed coefficient at the seventh lag produces the smallest root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). The model suggested that for the year 2016, the number of cases would increase from the months of July to September and have a drop in December. This was then validated using the data collected from January 2016 to December 2016.

  7. Increasing incidence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever among the American Indian population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Robert C; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Haberling, Dana L; Cheek, James E

    2009-04-01

    To examine trends of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) incidence among American Indians compared with other race groups, a retrospective analysis of national RMSF surveillance data reported to the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance and the Tickborne Rickettsial Disease Case Report Forms system were used. The RMSF incidence for American Indians, which was comparable to those for other race groups during 1990-2000, increased at a disproportionate rate during 2001-2005. The average annual incidence of RMSF reported among American Indians for 2001-2005 was 16.8 per 1,000,000 persons compared with 4.2, 2.6, and 0.5 for white, black, and Asian/Pacific Islander persons, respectively. Most cases in American Indians were reported from Oklahoma (113.1 cases per 1,000,000), North Carolina (60.0), and Arizona (17.2). The incidence of RMSF increased dramatically among American Indians disproportionately to trends for other race groups. Education about tick-borne disease and prevention measures should be addressed for high-risk American Indian populations.

  8. Trends in incidence and in short term survival following a subarachnoid haemorrhage in Scotland, 1986-2005: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Karen J; Lewsey, James D; Jhund, Pardeep S; Gillies, Michelle; Chalmers, Jim W T; Redpath, Adam; Briggs, Andrew; Walters, Matthew; Langhorne, Peter; Capewell, Simon; McMurray, John J V; MacIntyre, Kate

    2011-03-29

    To examine age and sex specific incidence and 30 day case fatality for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Scotland over a 20 year period. A retrospective cohort study using routine hospital discharge data linked to death records. Between 1986 and 2005, 12,056 individuals experienced an incident SAH. Of these 10,113 (84%) survived to reach hospital. Overall age-standardised incidence rates were greater in women than men and remained relatively stable over the study period. In 2005, incidence in women was 12.8 (95% CI 11.5 to 14.2) and in men 7.9 (95% CI 6.9 to 9.1). 30 day case fatality in individuals hospitalised with SAH declined substantially, falling from 30.0% in men and 33.9% in women in 1986-1990 to 24.5% in men and 29.1% in women in 2001-2005. For both men and women, the largest reductions were observed in those aged between 40 to 59 years. After adjustment for age, socio-economic status and co-morbidity, the odds of death at 30 days in 2005 compared to odds of death in 1986 was 0.64 (0.54 to 0.76), p p = 0.4 in those 70 years and above. Incidence rates for SAH remained stable between 1986 and 2005 suggesting that a better understanding of SAH risk factors and their reduction is needed. 30 day case fatality rates have declined substantially, particularly in middle-age. However, they remain high and it is important to ensure that this is not due to under-diagnosis or under-treatment.

  9. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever in an East Indian epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Harpreet K; Bhai, Saloni; John, Mary; Xavier, Jai

    2006-12-01

    The incidence and geographic distribution of dengue has increased dramatically in recent years. Previously, ocular findings in dengue fever were considered rare. We report a spectrum of ocular manifestations of this potentially fatal disease and its association with laboratory parameters. 134 patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of dengue fever during an epidemic were included. Systemic and ophthalmic examinations were completed on all patients. The mean age was 31.3 years and 63.4% were males. All patients presented with fever. Six (4.5%) patients had retrobulbar pain and none of the patients presented with any visual complaints. Ocular findings were present in 54 (40.3%) patients. Subconjunctival haemorrhage was the commonest eye finding seen in 50 patients, of whom 84% had characteristic petechial type of haemorrhages. Fundus findings present in 10 (7.5%) patients included dilatation and tortuosity of vessels, superficial retinal haemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, and hard exudates; the macula, however, was spared in all patients. Only 6 of the patients with posterior segment involvement returned for follow-up examination and it was found that retinal changes had resolved without any specific treatment within 2 to 8 weeks time. Of all laboratory parameters evaluated, marked thrombocytopenia (platelet count petechial type, are a common manifestation of dengue infection. Dengue fever patients with marked thrombocytopenia are predisposed to spontaneous ocular haemorrhages.

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in the United States, 2000–2007: Interpreting Contemporary Increases in Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, John J.; Swerdlow, David L.; Krebs, John W.; Holman, Robert C.; Mandel, Eric; Harvey, Alexis; Haberling, Dana; Massung, Robert F.; McQuiston, Jennifer H.

    2010-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a potentially fatal tick-borne infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is considered a notifiable condition in the United States. During 2000 to 2007, the annual reported incidence of RMSF increased from 1.7 to 7 cases per million persons from 2000 to 2007, the highest rate ever recorded. American Indians had a significantly higher incidence than other race groups. Children 5–9 years of age appeared at highest risk for fatal outcome. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays became more widely available beginning in 2004 and were used to diagnose 38% of cases during 2005–2007. The proportion of cases classified as confirmed RMSF decreased from 15% in 2000 to 4% in 2007. Concomitantly, case fatality decreased from 2.2% to 0.3%. The decreasing proportion of confirmed cases and cases with fatal outcome suggests that changes in diagnostic and surveillance practices may be influencing the observed increase in reported incidence rates. PMID:20595498

  11. Sugar, dental caries and the incidence of acute rheumatic fever: a cohort study of Māori and Pacific children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Simon; Marshall, Roger J; Bach, Katie; Koopu, Pauline; Reynolds, Gary; Sundborn, Gerhard; Ei, Win Le Shwe Sin

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether dental caries, as an indicator of cumulative exposure to sugar, is associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease, in Māori and Pacific children aged 5 and 6 years at their first dental visit. A cohort study was undertaken which linked school dental service records of caries with national hospital discharge and mortality records. Cox models were used to investigate the strength of the association between dental caries and rheumatic fever incidence. A total of 20 333 children who were free of rheumatic heart disease at enrolment were available for analysis. During a mean follow-up time of 5 years, 96 children developed acute rheumatic fever or chronic rheumatic heart disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, children with five or more primary teeth affected by caries were 57% (95% CI: 20% to 106%) more likely to develop disease during follow-up, compared to children whose primary teeth were caries free. The population attributable to the risk for caries in this cohort was 22%. Dental caries is positively associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Māori and Pacific children. Sugar intake, an important risk factor for dental caries, is also likely to influence the aetiology of rheumatic fever. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Comparative study of four time series methods in forecasting typhoid fever incidence in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Accurate incidence forecasting of infectious disease is critical for early prevention and for better government strategic planning. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of different forecasting methods based on the monthly incidence of typhoid fever. The seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA model and three different models inspired by neural networks, namely, back propagation neural networks (BPNN, radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN, and Elman recurrent neural networks (ERNN were compared. The differences as well as the advantages and disadvantages, among the SARIMA model and the neural networks were summarized and discussed. The data obtained for 2005 to 2009 and for 2010 from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention were used as modeling and forecasting samples, respectively. The performances were evaluated based on three metrics: mean absolute error (MAE, mean absolute percentage error (MAPE, and mean square error (MSE. The results showed that RBFNN obtained the smallest MAE, MAPE and MSE in both the modeling and forecasting processes. The performances of the four models ranked in descending order were: RBFNN, ERNN, BPNN and the SARIMA model.

  13. Comparative study of four time series methods in forecasting typhoid fever incidence in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Min; Zhang, Tao; Young, Alistair A; Li, Xiaosong

    2013-01-01

    Accurate incidence forecasting of infectious disease is critical for early prevention and for better government strategic planning. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of different forecasting methods based on the monthly incidence of typhoid fever. The seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and three different models inspired by neural networks, namely, back propagation neural networks (BPNN), radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN), and Elman recurrent neural networks (ERNN) were compared. The differences as well as the advantages and disadvantages, among the SARIMA model and the neural networks were summarized and discussed. The data obtained for 2005 to 2009 and for 2010 from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention were used as modeling and forecasting samples, respectively. The performances were evaluated based on three metrics: mean absolute error (MAE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), and mean square error (MSE). The results showed that RBFNN obtained the smallest MAE, MAPE and MSE in both the modeling and forecasting processes. The performances of the four models ranked in descending order were: RBFNN, ERNN, BPNN and the SARIMA model.

  14. [Culicidae insect fauna from rural zone in Amazonas State with incidence of sylvatic yellow fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fé, Nelson Ferreira; Barbosa Md, Maria das Graças Vale; Fé, Flávio Augusto Andrade; Guerra, Marcus Vinitius de Farias; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte

    2003-01-01

    After the occurrence of 14 sylvatic yellow fever cases in 10 cities in the State of Amazonas during 1996, an investigation into the presence of sylvatic yellow fever vectors was carried out. The material of larvae and adult insects was collected around residences and canopy trees within forests, using a light trap (CDC) and human bait. A total of 424 insects was collected. Thirty seven species were identified, some of which were sylvatic yellow fever vectors: Haemagogus janthinomys, Ha. leucocelaenus, Aedes fulvus.

  15. A review of dengue fever incidence in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia during the years 1998-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Narwani; Jaafar, Jesni; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Mat, Hamzah Ag; Muhamad, Abd Haris; Mamat, Mohd Noor

    2005-09-01

    Dengue is the most common and widespread arthropod borne arboviral infection in the world today. It is estimated that there are at least 100 million cases of dengue fever (DF) annually and 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) which require hospitalization. In Malaysia, it has become a major public health problem. Malaysia recorded 19,544 dengue cases in 1997, the highest recorded since the disease was made notifiable in the country. Of 19,544 cases, 806 were DHF with 50 deaths. The objectives of this analysis were to describe the incidence of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia for the years 1998-2003 and to explore the characteristics of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia for years 1998-2003. A total of 4,716 dengue cases were notified involving 4,476 (94.9%) DF and 240 (5.1%) DHF cases, which increased though the years. The highest incidence was in January (701 or 14.9%), while the lowest was in May (188 or 4.0%). Forty percent of cases (n=1,890) were in the 15-29 year old group. The Majority were Malays (4,062 or 86.1%) and 2,602 or 55.2% were male. A total of 4,477 cases (95%) were local cases and 4,289 or 91% came from the urban area. For priority areas, 3,772 (80%) were from priority 1. More than half the cases had positive serology results. All symptoms occurred in more than 96% of cases and fever was the commonest (99.7%). The mean values for age, temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were 27.8 +/- 15.4 years, 37.9 +/- 0.90 degrees C, 115 +/- 15.2 mmHg and 73 +/- 11.1 mmHg, respectively. The mean value for the time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, onset of symptoms and notification and time of diagnosis to notification were 5.1 +/- 2.3, 5.9 +/- 2.5 and 0.8 +/- 1.1 days, respectively. There were associations between the types of dengue and classification, area and priority area. Among the symptoms, the association was only seen

  16. Incidence of dengue virus infections in febrile episodes in Ile-Ife ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While dengue infection is accompanied by little or no subclinical signs in many, about 1-2% may produce clinically severe Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome. Early recognition, appropriate treatment and elimination of mosquito vectors will help control it. The study is aimed at determining the incidence ...

  17. Incidence of bacteremia in infants and children with fever and petechiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, K D; Stack, A M; Fleisher, G R

    1997-09-01

    We determined the incidence of serious invasive bacteremia caused by Neisseria meningitidis and other organisms in febrile infants and children with a petechial rash. Further, we studied the diagnostic value of laboratory and clinical finding in these patients. We conducted this prospective cohort study in the emergency department of an urban pediatric teaching hospital, during an 18-month period, and enrolled consecutive patients with temperature of 38 degrees C or higher and petechiae. Our measures included (1) laboratory tests (leukocyte count, coagulation profile, blood culture, and cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture); (2) a questionnaire requesting clinical data including general appearance, number and location of petechiae, and presence or absence of purpura; and (3) a follow-up telephone survey documenting health status. A total of 411 patients were enrolled, with 57.7% between 3 and 36 months of age. Eight patients (1.9%) had bacteremia or clinical sepsis. Six had serious invasive bacteremia: N. meningitidis (two patients), group A streptococcus (one), or sepsis with negative culture results (three). Two had occult bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and no evidence of sepsis. No patient had a positive cerebrospinal fluid culture result. None of the 357 well-appearing patients (95% confidence interval: 0.0%, 1.0%) had serious invasive bacteremia. Fifty-three patients appeared ill, including all six with serious invasive bacteremia. Ill appearance of the child had a sensitivity of 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 1.00), and a leukocyte count of 15,000 or greater, or of less than 5000, had a sensitivity of 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.00) for detecting serious invasive bacteremia. All children with meningococcemia had purpura. Invasive bacteremia occurred less frequently in our study than in previous series and was identified by clinical criteria. Our data support the treatment of selected well-appearing children with fever and

  18. Studies on the incidence of intracranial haemorrhages and their relation to the delivery by using the cranial computer-tomography (CT) in full-term newborns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockerhoff, P.; Brand, M.; Ludwig, B.

    1981-01-01

    The cranial computer-tomography is a new non-invasive method for the diagnosis of perinatal intracranial haemorrhage. Among 80 neonates, who were examined by CT after delivery at term between the 3. and 5. day of life, there were 43 newborns without any neurological symptom. These were examined voluntarily with the permission of their parents. A significant correlation between the CT-finding of an intracranial haemorrhage and the neurological observations was found, whereas there was no relation to the mode of delivery. Parity, birth weight, Apgar-score, cord blood-pH did not correspond to the CT-findings. An extremely short duration of the second stage of labor in spontaneous delivery seems to increase the risk of perinatal intracranial haemorrhage. (orig.) [de

  19. Dengue incidence in urban and rural Cambodia: results from population-based active fever surveillance, 2006-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirenda Vong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue vaccines are now in late-stage development, and evaluation and robust estimates of dengue disease burden are needed to facilitate further development and introduction. In Cambodia, the national dengue case-definition only allows reporting of children less than 16 years of age, and little is known about dengue burden in rural areas and among older persons. To estimate the true burden of dengue in the largest province of Cambodia, Kampong Cham, we conducted community-based active dengue fever surveillance among the 0-to-19-year age group in rural villages and urban areas during 2006-2008. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Active surveillance for febrile illness was conducted in 32 villages and 10 urban areas by mothers trained to use digital thermometers combined with weekly home visits to identify persons with fever. An investigation team visited families with febrile persons to obtain informed consent for participation in the follow-up study, which included collection of personal data and blood specimens. Dengue-related febrile illness was defined using molecular and serological testing of paired acute and convalescent blood samples. Over the three years of surveillance, 6,121 fever episodes were identified with 736 laboratory-confirmed dengue virus (DENV infections for incidences of 13.4-57.8/1,000 person-seasons. Average incidence was highest among children less than 7 years of age (41.1/1,000 person-seasons and lowest among the 16-to-19-year age group (11.3/1,000 person-seasons. The distribution of dengue was highly focal, with incidence rates in villages and urban areas ranging from 1.5-211.5/1,000 person-seasons (median 36.5. During a DENV-3 outbreak in 2007, rural areas were affected more than urban areas (incidence 71 vs. 17/1,000 person-seasons, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The large-scale active surveillance study for dengue fever in Cambodia found a higher disease incidence than reported to the national surveillance system, particularly

  20. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time...... and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH....

  1. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A. Matua

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies.

  2. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matua, Gerald A; Van der Wal, Dirk M; Locsin, Rozzano C

    2015-05-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world's most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies.

  3. Estimating the size of Aedes aegypti populations from dengue incidence data: Implications for the risk of yellow fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Massad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a model to estimate the density of aedes mosquitoes in a community affected by dengue. The method consists in fitting a continuous function to the incidence of dengue infections, from which the density of infected mosquitoes is derived straightforwardly. Further derivations allow the calculation of the latent and susceptible mosquitoes' densities, the sum of the three equals the total mosquitoes' density. The method is illustrated with the case of the risk of urban yellow fever resurgence in dengue infested areas but the same procedures apply for other aedes-transmitted infections like Zika and chikungunya viruses.

  4. Comparison of Strategies and Incidence Thresholds for Vi Conjugate Vaccines Against Typhoid Fever: A Cost-effectiveness Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Nathan C; Gupta, Ribhav; Stanaway, Jeffrey D; Garrett, Denise O; Bogoch, Isaac I; Luby, Stephen P; Andrews, Jason R

    2018-02-12

    Typhoid fever remains a major public health problem globally. While new Vi conjugate vaccines hold promise for averting disease, the optimal programmatic delivery remains unclear. We aimed to identify the strategies and associated epidemiologic conditions under which Vi conjugate vaccines would be cost-effective. We developed a dynamic, age-structured transmission and cost-effectiveness model that simulated multiple vaccination strategies with a typhoid Vi conjugate vaccine from a societal perspective. We simulated 10-year vaccination programs with (1) routine immunization of infants (aged typhoid fever and defined strategies as highly cost-effective by using the definition of a low-income country (defined as a country with a gross domestic product of $1045 per capita). We defined incidence as the true number of clinically symptomatic people in the population per year. Vi conjugate typhoid vaccines were highly cost-effective when administered by routine immunization activities through the EPI in settings with an annual incidence of >50 cases/100000 (95% uncertainty interval, 40-75 cases) and when administered through the EPI plus a catch-up campaign in settings with an annual incidence of >130 cases/100000 (95% uncertainty interval, 50-395 cases). The incidence threshold was sensitive to the typhoid-related case-fatality rate, carrier contribution to transmission, vaccine characteristics, and country-specific economic threshold for cost-effectiveness. Typhoid Vi conjugate vaccines would be highly cost-effective in low-income countries in settings of moderate typhoid incidence (50 cases/100000 annually). These results were sensitive to case-fatality rates, underscoring the need to consider factors contributing to typhoid mortality (eg, healthcare access and antimicrobial resistance) in the global vaccination strategy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, D; Vaeth, M; Tsiropoulos, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of occurrence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. DESIGN: Population based cohort study using data from the Danish National Discharge Registry and the Central Person Registry......, standardised for age, sex, and calendar period. This process was repeated for patients discharged from neurosurgery units, as diagnoses from these wards had high validity (93%). RESULTS: 18 patients had a total of 19 first degree relatives with subarachnoid haemorrhage during the study period, corresponding...... to a standardised incidence ratio of 2.9 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 4.6). Patients discharged from neurosurgery wards had a higher standardised incidence ratio (4.5, 2.7 to 7.3). CONCLUSIONS: First degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage have a threefold to fivefold increased risk...

  6. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  7. Effects of weather factors on dengue fever incidence and implications for interventions in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses and their mosquito vectors are sensitive to their environment. Temperature, rainfall and humidity have well-defined roles in the transmission cycle. Therefore changes in these conditions may contribute to increasing incidence. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between weather factors and dengue incidence in three provinces in Cambodia, in order to strengthen the evidence basis of dengue control strategies in this high-burden country. Methods We developed negative binomial models using monthly average maximum, minimum, mean temperatures and monthly cumulative rainfall over the period from January 1998 to December 2012. We adopted piecewise linear functions to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR between dengue incidence and weather factors for simplicity in interpreting the coefficients. We estimated the values of parameters below cut-points defined in terms of the results of sensitivity tests over a 0-3 month lagged period. Results Mean temperature was significantly associated with dengue incidence in all three provinces, but incidence did not correlate well with maximum temperature in Banteay Meanchey, nor with minimum temperature in Kampong Thom at a lag of three months in the negative binomial model. The monthly cumulative rainfall influence on the dengue incidence was significant in all three provinces, but not consistently over a 0-3 month lagged period. Rainfall significantly affected the dengue incidence at a lag of 0 to 3 months in Siem Reap, but it did not have an impact at a lag of 2 to 3 months in Banteay Meanchey, nor at a lag of 2 months in Kampong Thom. Conclusions The association between dengue incidence and weather factors also apparently varies by locality, suggesting that a prospective dengue early warning system would likely be best implemented at a local or regional scale, rather than nation-wide in Cambodia. Such spatial down-scaling would also enable dengue control

  8. Municipality Level Simulations of Dengue Fever Incidence in Puerto Rico Using Ground Based and Remotely Sensed Climate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Morin, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is caused by a virus transmitted between humans and Aedes genus mosquitoes through blood feeding. In recent decades incidence of the disease has drastically increased in the tropical Americas, culminating with the Pan American outbreak in 2010 which resulted in 1.7 million reported cases. In Puerto Rico dengue is endemic, however, there is significant inter-annual, intraannual, and spatial variability in case loads. Variability in climate and the environment, herd immunity and virus genetics, and demographic characteristics may all contribute to differing patterns of transmission both spatially and temporally. Knowledge of climate influences on dengue incidence could facilitate development of early warning systems allowing public health workers to implement appropriate transmission intervention strategies. In this study, we simulate dengue incidence in several municipalities in Puerto Rico using population and meteorological data derived from ground based stations and remote sensing instruments. This data was used to drive a process based model of vector population development and virus transmission. Model parameter values for container composition, vector characteristics, and incubation period were chosen by employing a Monte Carlo approach. Multiple simulations were performed for each municipality and the results were compared with reported dengue cases. The best performing simulations were retained and their parameter values and meteorological input were compared between years and municipalities. Parameter values varied by municipality and year illustrating the complexity and sensitivity of the disease system. Local characteristics including the natural and built environment impact transmission dynamics and produce varying responses to meteorological conditions.

  9. review article marburg haemorrhagic fever: recent advances

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    2010-07-02

    Jul 2, 2010 ... the blood, body fluids and tissues of infected persons. ... barrier nursing; mask, gown, glove, and needle precautions ... of infectious blood and body fluids. ... attention to fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory volume, and.

  10. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    mainly in children (Halstead 2002, 2007; Chaturvedi and. Shrivastava 2004). Dengue ... of molecular epidemiology, immunopathology and vaccine development. Selected work done in ..... Only the Indian initiative in this field is presented here.

  11. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    ). They are transmitted mainly by the Aedes aegypti mosquito and also by Aedes albopictus. Biologically, DV are highly adapted to the mosquito and are maintained by vertical transmission. DV produces from a subclinical infection to a mild ...

  12. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  13. Dengue Fever/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever : Case Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmannitya, Suchitra

    1995-01-01

    Dengue infections caused by the four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes (dengue virus 1, dengue virus 2, dengue virus 3, dengue virus 4) of the family Flavivindae, are the most important arbovirus disease in man, both in terms of morbidity and mortality. The infection is transmitted from man to man by Aedes mosquitoes. Since 1956, dengue virus infection has resulted in more than 3 million hospital admissions and more than 50,000 deaths in Southeast Asia, Western Pacific countries, ...

  14. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-23

    fever , chills, nausea, headache and muscle ache in July 1985. One day after admission he developed petechial haemorrhage over his body and limbs and in...ftOA179 565 NENORNAGIC FEVER WI TH RENAL SYNDOMNE (KOREAN HEMORRHAIC FEVER )(U) KOREN UNIV SEOUL COLL OF MEDICINE N N LEE 23 JUL " DAD7-94-G-4616...34,, , " S , S S .S =. 5 5 . S S S * B M Lfl IC) uIeuCc FVM WITH RENAL SYNDR~OME (KOREAN EMORRHAGIC FEVER ) ANNUAL AND FINAL REPORT S HO WANG LIZB N.D. 5

  15. Comparison of Two Hybrid Models for Forecasting the Incidence of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    Full Text Available Cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS are widely distributed in eastern Asia, especially in China, Russia, and Korea. It is proved to be a difficult task to eliminate HFRS completely because of the diverse animal reservoirs and effects of global warming. Reliable forecasting is useful for the prevention and control of HFRS.Two hybrid models, one composed of nonlinear autoregressive neural network (NARNN and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA the other composed of generalized regression neural network (GRNN and ARIMA were constructed to predict the incidence of HFRS in the future one year. Performances of the two hybrid models were compared with ARIMA model.The ARIMA, ARIMA-NARNN ARIMA-GRNN model fitted and predicted the seasonal fluctuation well. Among the three models, the mean square error (MSE, mean absolute error (MAE and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of ARIMA-NARNN hybrid model was the lowest both in modeling stage and forecasting stage. As for the ARIMA-GRNN hybrid model, the MSE, MAE and MAPE of modeling performance and the MSE and MAE of forecasting performance were less than the ARIMA model, but the MAPE of forecasting performance did not improve.Developing and applying the ARIMA-NARNN hybrid model is an effective method to make us better understand the epidemic characteristics of HFRS and could be helpful to the prevention and control of HFRS.

  16. Population-based incidence of typhoid fever in an urban informal settlement and a rural area in Kenya: implications for typhoid vaccine use in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F Breiman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High rates of typhoid fever in children in urban settings in Asia have led to focus on childhood immunization in Asian cities, but not in Africa, where data, mostly from rural areas, have shown low disease incidence. We set out to compare incidence of typhoid fever in a densely populated urban slum and a rural community in Kenya, hypothesizing higher rates in the urban area, given crowding and suboptimal access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene. METHODS: During 2007-9, we conducted population-based surveillance in Kibera, an urban informal settlement in Nairobi, and in Lwak, a rural area in western Kenya. Participants had free access to study clinics; field workers visited their homes biweekly to collect information about acute illnesses. In clinic, blood cultures were processed from patients with fever or pneumonia. Crude and adjusted incidence rates were calculated. RESULTS: In the urban site, the overall crude incidence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi bacteremia was 247 cases per 100,000 person-years of observation (pyo with highest rates in children 5-9 years old (596 per 100,000 pyo and 2-4 years old (521 per 100,000 pyo. Crude overall incidence in Lwak was 29 cases per 100,000 pyo with low rates in children 2-4 and 5-9 years old (28 and 18 cases per 100,000 pyo, respectively. Adjusted incidence rates were highest in 2-4 year old urban children (2,243 per 100,000 pyo which were >15-fold higher than rates in the rural site for the same age group. Nearly 75% of S. Typhi isolates were multi-drug resistant. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic urban slum and rural comparison showed dramatically higher typhoid incidence among urban children <10 years old with rates similar to those from Asian urban slums. The findings have potential policy implications for use of typhoid vaccines in increasingly urban Africa.

  17. Airborne Transmission of Coxiella burnetii : Spatial dispersion modelling and the effects of meteorological and environmental conditions on Q fever incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuken, J.P.G.

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands experienced the largest human and veterinary Q fever epidemic ever described. From 2007 through 2010, over 4,000 human cases were notified and approximately a twelve-fold higher number was probably infected by Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. Dairy goat farms, and

  18. Haemorrhagic pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, C.M.; Philippine General Hospital, Manila; Guo, W.Y.; Sami, M.; Hindmarsch, T.; Ericson, K.; Hulting, A.L.; Wersaell, J.

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 69 patients with pituitary tumours, 12 were found to have evidence of intratumoral haemorrhage on MRI, characterized by high signal intensity on short TR/TE sequences. This was verified in all but 1 patient. The majority of the bleedings occurred in macroadenomas. Five (42%) were prolactinomas and 4 (33%) were non-functioning adenomas. There were 2 GH- and 1 ACTH-secreting tumours. All 5 patients with prolactinomas were on bromocriptine medication. Two of the patients had a clinical picture of pituitary apoplexy. The haemorrhage was not large enough to prompt surgery in any of the patients. However, surgical verification of the diagnosis was obtained in 5 cases, while 6 patients were examined with follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  19. Milk fever and subclinical hypocalcaemia--an evaluation of parameters on incidence risk, diagnosis, risk factors and biological effects as input for a decision support system for disease control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, H; Østergaard, S; Thilsing-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    The present review analyses the documentation on incidence, diagnosis, risk factors and effects of milk fever and subclinical hypocalcaemia. It is hereby evaluated whether the existing documentation seems sufficient for further modelling in a decision support system for selection of a control...... concerning incidence, diagnosis, risk factors and effects seems sufficient for a systematic inclusion in a decision support system. A model on milk fever should take into consideration the variation in biological data and individual herd characteristics. The inclusion of subclinical hypocalcaemia would...... of risk factors is outlined. The clinical symptoms of milk fever are highly specific and the disease level may thus be determined from recording of treatments. Diagnosis of subclinical hypocalcaemia needs to include laboratory examinations or it may be determined by multiplying the incidence of milk fever...

  20. Yellow fever: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    Yellow fever, the original viral haemorrhagic fever, was one of the most feared lethal diseases before the development of an effective vaccine. Today the disease still affects as many as 200,000 persons annually in tropical regions of Africa and South America, and poses a significant hazard to unvaccinated travellers to these areas. Yellow fever is transmitted in a cycle involving monkeys and mosquitoes, but human beings can also serve as the viraemic host for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean and Asia. Here I review the clinical features of the disease, its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The disease mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. Since there is no specific treatment, and management of patients with the disease is extremely problematic, the emphasis is on preventative vaccination. As a zoonosis, yellow fever cannot be eradicated, but reduction of the human disease burden is achievable through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, with a low cost for the benefits obtained. The biological characteristics, safety, and efficacy of live attenuated, yellow fever 17D vaccine are reviewed. New applications of yellow fever 17D virus as a vector for foreign genes hold considerable promise as a means of developing new vaccines against other viruses, and possibly against cancers.

  1. Haemorrhage from Pancreatic Pseudocysts Presenting as Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Garcea

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhage is a rare but frequently fatal complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. The high mortality associated with pancreatic haemorrhage makes prompt and aggressive management essential. Occasionally, haemorrhage may present atypically, leading to delay in its diagnosis and management. This report details a case of pancreatic haemorrhage presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed and discusses the subsequent management. When managing patients with pancreatic pseudocysts who present with the stigmata of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility that the bleeding originates from the pancreas must always be borne in mind.

  2. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy with bullae and koebnerisation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Sazlly Lim, S; Shamsudin, N

    2014-01-01

    A 5-month-old Malay boy presented with purpuric papules and plaques on the face and extremities accompanied by fever, coryzal symptoms and bilateral lower limb oedema. There were also bullous linear purpuric lesions on the right upper limb. Blood and culture tests were normal. Histopathological tests showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The patient achieved complete recovery after 2 weeks with no recurrence.

  3. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy with bullae and koebnerisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norashikin Shamsudin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old Malay boy presented with purpuric papules and plaques on the face and extremities accompanied by fever, coryzal symptoms and bilateral lower limb oedema. There were also bullous linear purpuric lesions on the right upper limb. Blood and culture tests were normal. Histopathological tests showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The patient achieved complete recovery after 2 weeks with no recurrence.

  4. [Neonatal subgaleal haemorrhage; a potential life-threatening extracranial haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuijkschot, J.; Antonius, T.A.J.; Meijers, P.W.; Vrancken, S.L.A.G.

    2008-01-01

    A female neonate delivered at term developed hypovolemic shock due to a subgaleal haemorrhage, i.e. extracranial bleeding between the galea aponeurotica and the cranial periosteum. The subgaleal haemorrhage was most likely the result of a traumatic vacuum extraction. The patient was treated with

  5. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chelmow, David

    2008-01-01

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract and coagulation disorders.Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of ...

  6. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chelmow, David

    2011-01-01

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders.Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of hig...

  7. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. 16. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • July 2005. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis. M Modi. FCRad (SA), MMed. Department of Radiation Sciences ... wall where granulomatous inflamma- tion (Fig. 2, arrow) was present in the adventitia. A specific site of origin for the subarachnoid haemorrhage was.

  8. Yellow Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Vaccine Information Testing for Vaccine Adverse Events Yellow fever Vaccine Continuing Education Course Yellow Fever Home Prevention Vaccine Vaccine Recommendations Reactions to Yellow Fever Vacine Yellow Fever Vaccine, Pregnancy, & ... Transmission Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment Maps Africa ...

  9. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmow, David

    2011-04-04

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood following childbirth is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders. Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of high parity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug interventions and of drug interventions to prevent primary postpartum haemorrhage? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 40 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: active management of the third stage of labour, carboprost injection, controlled cord traction, ergot compounds (ergometrine/methylergotamine), immediate breastfeeding, misoprostol (oral, rectal, sublingual, or vaginal), oxytocin, oxytocin plus ergometrine combinations, prostaglandin E2 compounds, and uterine massage.

  10. Traumatic primary brain stem haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrioli, G.C.; Zuccarello, M.; Trincia, G.; Fiore, D.L.; De Caro, R.

    1983-01-01

    We report 36 cases of post-traumatic 'primary brain stem haemorrhage' visualized by the CT scan and confirmed at autopsy. Clinical experience shows that many technical factors influence the inability to visualize brain stem haemorrhages. Experimental injection of fresh blood into the pons and midbrain of cadavers shows that lesions as small as 0.25 ml in volume may be visualized. The volume and the anatomical configuration of traumatic lesions of the brain stem extended over a rostro-caudal direction, and their proximity to bony structures at the base of the skull are obstacles to the visualization of brain stem haemorrhages. (Author)

  11. Relationship between lunar cycle and haemorrhagic complication rate in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposio, Edoardo; Caruana, Giorgia; Santi, Pierluigi; Cafiero, Ferdinando

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible relationship between lunar cycles and haemorrhagic complication rate in surgery. The possible relationship between moon phases and surgical outcome was tested by evaluating the haemorrhagic complication rate for 18,760 patients who underwent surgery between January 2001 and December 2008 at the National Institute for Cancer Research in Genoa. A total of 103 lunar phases were considered using Chi-square (χ 2 ) test analysis, and patients were allocated a surgery date. One hundred and sixty-seven haemorrhagic complications were observed. Three hundred and nine new moon phase days were analysed and 12 incidences of complications detected, with a 3.9% complication rate per day. In the waxing moon phase, 1184.5 d were analysed with 68 incidences of complications at a daily rate of 5.7%. In the full moon phase there was a 4.9% complication rate per day (15 incidences in 309 d), whereas in the waning moon phase, the 6% percentage rate per day resulted from 72 incidences in 1184.5 d. No statistically significant correlations were found between moon cycles and postoperative haemorrhagic complications (p = .50).

  12. The incidence of fever in US Critical Care Air Transport Team combat trauma patients evacuated from the theater between March 2009 and March 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnick, Joanne M; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Stanton, Marietta; Lairet, Julio R; King, James; Torres, Pedro; Aden, James; Ramirez, Rosemarie

    2013-11-01

    Most critically ill injured patients are transported out of the theater by Critical Care Air Transport Teams (CCATTs). Fever after trauma is correlated with surgical complications and infection. The purposes of this study are to identify the incidence of elevated temperature in patients managed in the CCATT environment and to describe the complications reported and the treatments used in these patients. We performed a retrospective review of available records of trauma patients from the combat theater between March 1, 2009, and March 31, 2010, who were transported by the US Air Force CCATT and had an incidence of hyperthermia. We then divided the cohort into 2 groups, patients transported with an elevation in temperature greater than 100.4°F and patients with no documented elevation in temperature. We used a standardized, secure electronic data collection form to abstract the outcomes. Descriptive data collected included injury type, temperature, use of a mechanical ventilator, cooling treatment modalities, antipyretics, intravenous fluid administration, and use of blood products. We also evaluated the incidence of complications during the transport in patients who had a recorded elevation in temperature greater than 100.4°F. A total of 248 trauma patients met the inclusion criteria, and 101 trauma patients (40%) had fever. The mean age was 28 years, and 98% of patients were men. The mechanism of injury was an explosion in 156 patients (63%), blunt injury in 11 (4%), and penetrating injury in 45 (18%), whereas other trauma-related injuries accounted for 36 patients (15%). Of the patients, 209 (84%) had battle-related injuries and 39 (16%) had non-battle-related injuries. Traumatic brain injury was found in 24 patients (24%) with an incidence of elevated temperature. The mean temperature was 101.6°F (range, 100.5°F-103.9°F). After evaluation of therapies and treatments, 80 trauma patients (51%) were intubated on a mechanical ventilator (P cooling interventions

  13. Relationship of climate, geography, and geology to the incidence of Rift Valley fever in Kenya during the 2006-2007 outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Allen; Kinkade, Carl; Nguku, Patrick M; Anyangu, Amwayi; Mutonga, David; Omolo, Jared; Njenga, M Kariuki; Feikin, Daniel R; Schnabel, David; Ombok, Maurice; Breiman, Robert F

    2012-02-01

    We estimated Rift Valley fever (RVF) incidence as a function of geological, geographical, and climatological factors during the 2006-2007 RVF epidemic in Kenya. Location information was obtained for 214 of 340 (63%) confirmed and probable RVF cases that occurred during an outbreak from November 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007. Locations with subtypes of solonetz, calcisols, solonchaks, and planosols soil types were highly associated with RVF occurrence during the outbreak period. Increased rainfall and higher greenness measures before the outbreak were associated with increased risk. RVF was more likely to occur on plains, in densely bushed areas, at lower elevations, and in the Somalia acacia ecological zone. Cases occurred in three spatial temporal clusters that differed by the date of associated rainfall, soil type, and land usage.

  14. Intracerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Boesen, J

    1987-01-01

    Among 662 consecutive carotid endarterectomies eight cases of postoperative ipsilateral intracerebral haemorrhage were identified, occurring into brain areas which, preoperatively were without infarction. As blood pressures across the stenosis were routinely measured during surgery, the internal...

  15. Successful allogeneic stem cells transplantation in severe aplastic anaemia complicated by dengue fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, K.; Satti, T.M.; Ahmed, P.; Raza, A.; Akhtar, F.M.; Tariq, W.U.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Aplastic anaemia is characterized by severe compromise of haematopoiesis and hypocellular bone marrow. Haemorrhagic episodes in patients with aplastic anemia occur usually secondary to thrombocytopenia and require frequent support with platelet concentrates and other blood products. Infection with dengue virus (particularly dengue sero type-2 of South Asian genotype) is associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever. Dengue infection further worsens the disease process in patients with aplastic anaemia due to uncontrolled haemorrhagic diathesis and major organ failure, which may prove fatal in these already immunocompromised patients, if not treated in time. Recent epidemics of dengue haemorrhagic fever has not only affected the southern region of our country but also spread to other areas of the country. With this background, we report a case of aplastic anaemia complicated by dengue haemorrhagic fever who achieved successful engraftment after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from sibling brother and is having normal healthy post transplant life. (author)

  16. Dengue Haemorrhagic Encephalitis: Rare Case Report with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiyal, Aditya Singh; Malik, Chetanya; Hyanki, Gitika

    2017-07-01

    Dengue is an endemic arboviral infection prevalent especially in tropical countries including Southern and Southeast Asia. Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement in dengue infection is uncommon. Haemorrhagic encephalitis is a rare presentation in dengue. This is a case of a 58-year-old male who presented with fever, petechial rash and altered sensorium. Dengue serology IgM was reactive and MRI brain was suggestive of haemorrhagic encephalitis. Patient was managed in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) but eventually succumbed to his illness. We report this fatal outcome of a common viral infection with unusual neurological presentation to propose an association between dengue and neurotropism and the need to look at dengue infection beyond its classical features.

  17. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation.

  18. Modelling spatial concordance between Rocky Mountain spotted fever disease incidence and habitat probability of its vector Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Samuel F; Sarkar, Sahotra; Aviña, Aldo; Schuermann, Jim A; Williamson, Phillip

    2012-11-01

    The spatial distribution of Dermacentor variabilis, the most commonly identified vector of the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii which causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in humans, and the spatial distribution of RMSF, have not been previously studied in the south central United States of America, particularly in Texas. From an epidemiological perspective, one would tend to hypothesise that there would be a high degree of spatial concordance between the habitat suitability for the tick and the incidence of the disease. Both maximum-entropy modelling of the tick's habitat suitability and spatially adaptive filters modelling of the human incidence of RMSF disease provide reliable portrayals of the spatial distributions of these phenomenons. Even though rates of human cases of RMSF in Texas and rates of Dermacentor ticks infected with Rickettsia bacteria are both relatively low in Texas, the best data currently available allows a preliminary indication that the assumption of high levels of spatial concordance would not be correct in Texas (Kappa coefficient of agreement = 0.17). It will take substantially more data to provide conclusive findings, and to understand the results reported here, but this study provides an approach to begin understanding the discrepancy.

  19. Modelling spatial concordance between Rocky Mountain spotted fever disease incidence and habitat probability of its vector Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel F. Atkinson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of Dermacentor variabilis, the most commonly identified vector of the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii which causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF in humans, and the spatial distribution of RMSF, have not been previously studied in the south central United States of America, particularly in Texas. From an epidemiological perspective, one would tend to hypothesise that there would be a high degree of spatial concordance between the habitat suitability for the tick and the incidence of the disease. Both maximum-entropy modelling of the tick’s habitat suitability and spatially adaptive filters modelling of the human incidence of RMSF disease provide reliable portrayals of the spatial distributions of these phenomenons. Even though rates of human cases of RMSF in Texas and rates of Dermacentor ticks infected with Rickettsia bacteria are both relatively low in Texas, the best data currently available allows a preliminary indication that the assumption of high levels of spatial concordance would not be correct in Texas (Kappa coefficient of agreement = 0.17. It will take substantially more data to provide conclusive findings, and to understand the results reported here, but this study provides an approach to begin understanding the discrepancy.

  20. Valved or valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunting in the treatment of post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Trine Hjorslev; Holst, Anders Vedel; Lilja, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant infection and obstruction are major complications for ventriculoperitoneal shunts in patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. In an effort to (1) reduce the incidence of these complications, (2) reduce the rate of shunt failure and (3) shorten the duration of neurosurgical...... hospitalisation, we have implemented valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunts at our department for adult patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus and haemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid at the time of shunt insertion. METHODS: All adult patients (>18 years old) treated for post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus.......3 %, p = 0.02), but a higher rate of overdrainage (10.3 % vs 2.6 %, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The use of a valveless shunting for patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus results in shorter duration of neurosurgical hospitalisation and lower rate of shunt infection, although these advantages should...

  1. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Russian population (2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problems of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD are discussed. Carditis, polyarthritis, erythema annulare, subcutaneous nodules, and chorea minor are the main clinical manifestations of ARF caused by β-hemolytic streptococcus A. Cardiac failures emerge in 60–65% of patients after the first ARF episode. Repeated ARF attacks promote CRHD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in different age groups in the regions of Russian Federation in 2011–2012. Materials and Methods. Analysis of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation reports on population morbidity in 2011–2012 (Form N12.Results. The highest ARF prevalence was observed in 15–17-year-old teenagers, while the lowest, in adults over 18-year-old. The lowest CRHD figures were registered in juniors, while the highest ones, in adults. No ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children were registered in 31 entities of the Russian Federation; single cases, in 17 entities; no ARF cases in 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in 37 entities, and 1–2 ARF cases were registered in 23 entities. Only in 10 entities, no ARF cases were registered in adults, and single cases were registered in 22 entities. Extremely unfavorable situations were found in the Chechen Republic (140 ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children and in the Dagestan Republic (140 cases. High morbidity among 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in tje Kaliningrad region (83 cases and the Chechen Republic (100. ARF cases in adults were most frequent in St. Petersburg (124 cases, the Chechen Republic (154, and the Moscow region (161.The article lists the ARF and CRHD preventive measures.

  2. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Russian population (2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD are discussed. Carditis, polyarthritis, erythema annulare, subcutaneous nodules, and chorea minor are the main clinical manifestations of ARF caused by β-hemolytic streptococcus A. Cardiac failures emerge in 60–65% of patients after the first ARF episode. Repeated ARF attacks promote CRHD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in different age groups in the regions of Russian Federation in 2011–2012. Materials and Methods. Analysis of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation reports on population morbidity in 2011–2012 (Form N12.Results. The highest ARF prevalence was observed in 15–17-year-old teenagers, while the lowest, in adults over 18-year-old. The lowest CRHD figures were registered in juniors, while the highest ones, in adults. No ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children were registered in 31 entities of the Russian Federation; single cases, in 17 entities; no ARF cases in 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in 37 entities, and 1–2 ARF cases were registered in 23 entities. Only in 10 entities, no ARF cases were registered in adults, and single cases were registered in 22 entities. Extremely unfavorable situations were found in the Chechen Republic (140 ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children and in the Dagestan Republic (140 cases. High morbidity among 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in tje Kaliningrad region (83 cases and the Chechen Republic (100. ARF cases in adults were most frequent in St. Petersburg (124 cases, the Chechen Republic (154, and the Moscow region (161.The article lists the ARF and CRHD preventive measures.

  3. Acute Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy in a Patient of Dengue Fever: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Mehtani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue haemorrhagic fever is known for its haemorrhagic and neurologic complications. Neurologic complications are caused by three mechanism namely neurotropism, systemic complications causing encephalopathy and postinfectious immune-mediated mechanisms. However acute compressive neuropathy due to haemorrhage is not frequent and we could find no literature describing this Case Report: We report a case of acute compressive ulnar neuropathy due to peri neural hematoma, following an attempt at intravenous cannulation in the cubital fossa in a patient of dengue haemorrhagic fever with thrombocytopenia. Immediate fasciotomy and removal of haematoma was performed to relieve the symptoms. Conclusion: Compression neuropathies can be seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever and removal of compressing hematoma relieves symptoms. Keywords: Dengue haemmorrhagic fever; coagulopathy; peri neural haematoma.

  4. Male-female differences in the number of reported incident dengue fever cases in six Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Anker

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Demographic factors, such as age and sex, are associated with the likelihood of exposure to Aedes aegypti, the vector for dengue. However, dengue date disaggregated by both sex and ageare not routinely reported or analyzed by national surveillance systems. This study analysed the reported number of incident dengue cases by age and sex for six countries in Asia. Methods. Data for the Lao People's Democratic Republic, the Philippines, Singapore and Sri Lanka were obtained from DengueNet; the number of male and female dengue cases was available for four age groups ( 15 years over a cumulative period of six to 10 years. Data for Cambodia (2010 and Malaysia (1997–2008 were obtained from their respective ministries of health. Results. An excess of males was found among reported dengue cases > 15 years of age. This pattern was observed consistently over several years across six culturally and economically diverse countries. Discussion. These data indicated the importance of reporting data stratified by both sex and age since collapsing the data over all ages would have masked some of the observed differences. In order to target preventive measures appropriately, assessment of gender by age is important for dengue because biological or gender-related factors can change over the human lifespan and gender-related factors may differ across countries.

  5. THE PREVALENCE OF INTRAVENTRICULAR HAEMORRHAGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    haemorrhage in preterm infants with birth weight 1.5kg and less was 34.2% in ... case fatality rate was 85.7% for those with grade 4 in the first three days of life. ... with case fatality rates of more than 45% (2007 and 2008 NICU ward statistics).

  6. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa | Richards | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As has been demonstrated during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, the consequences of VHFs are not limited to specific countries – they may become epidemic, and may have considerable economic impact and disrupt local public health and social service structures. Intensive public health intervention is ...

  7. Review of Lassa fever, an emerging old world haemorrhagic viral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Laboratory/diagnostic and care centres), poor socioeconomic environment, lack of ... of the natural host and reservoir mouse (Mastomys natalensis) of Lassa virus . ... The stakeholders need to prioritize intervention and support program and ...

  8. Dengue fever

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms and research has been limited to studies ... severity and problems with vaccination (4). History of ... Americas in 1970s reduced the spread of dengue fever. After this .... Reiter P. Yellow fever and dengue: a threat to Europe? 9.

  9. Yellow fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to thrive. Blood tests can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment There is no specific treatment for yellow fever. ... SJ, Endy TP, Rothman AL, Barrett AD. Flaviviruses (dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile encephalitis, St. ...

  10. Typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typhoid fever is an infection that causes diarrhea and a rash . It is most commonly caused due to ... in their stools for years, spreading the disease. Typhoid fever is common in developing countries. Most cases in ...

  11. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Illyas, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107 (2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107 (37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107 (63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-105 degreeC (mean 101 degree C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1 (0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count 40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection, the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by molecular studies or dengue specific IgM. (author)

  12. Fulminant intravascular lymphomatosis mimicking acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, D; Sicurelli, F; Cerase, A; Tripodi, S; Cintorino, M; Lazzi, S; Federico, A

    2012-09-15

    Intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, usually of B cell lineage, characterized by massive angiotropic growth. The clinical presentation of IVL may include changes in mental status, non-localizing neurological deficits, seizures, fever of unknown origin and skin changes. Because of its rarity and the absence of specific diagnostic procedures except for cerebral biopsy, diagnosis is often postmortem. Brain MRI usually shows non-specific abnormalities. The purpose of this case report is to increase the knowledge of clinical and neuroimaging features of IVL by describing the findings observed in a 71-year-old patient. A 71-year-old male was admitted for right hemiparesis, acute cognitive impairment and febricula. A bone marrow biopsy resulted normal. He then developed a rapid progressive impairment of his mental status and left hemisoma motor seizures. Brain CT and MRI were interpreted as consistent with acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (AHLE), including multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and a small focal area of gadolinium enhancement in the left temporal lobe white matter. The patient died within a few days and the autopsy led to the diagnosis of IVL. IVL may present with a variety of clinical signs and symptoms, including stroke and hemiparesis. IVL may mimic AHLE at brain MRI. However, the evidence of multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and of a small area of gadolinium enhancement could have led to the correct diagnosis. IVL should be added to the differential diagnosis of AHLE at brain MRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hepatitis C in haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M.; Baloch, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the maternal health and fetal outcome in hepatitis C with obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit-I, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Hospital, Hyderabad, Sindh, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: All the women admitted during the study period with different obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were included. On virology screening, hepatitis C screening was done on all. The women with non-haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies were excluded. Studied variables included demographic characteristics, the nature of obstetrical emergency, haemorrhagic conditions and maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The data was analyzed on SPSS version 20. Results: More frequent obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were observed with hepatitis C positive in comparison with hepatitis C negative cases including post-partum haemorrhage in 292 (80.88%) and ante-partum haemorrhage in 69 (19.11%) cases. Associated morbidities seen were disseminated intravascular coagulation in 43 (11.91%) and shock in 29 (8.03%) cases with hepatitis C positive. Fetal still birth rate was 37 (10.24%) in hepatitis C positive cases. Conclusion: Frequency of maternal morbidity and mortality and perinatal mortality was high in obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies with hepatitis C positive cases. (author)

  14. Bilateral spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage complicating acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianta, M.; Varma, D. K.

    2007-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is an event that mandates prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent primary adrenocortical insufficiency and potential death. Presentation can be non-specific and incidentally diagnosed with imaging alone, primarily CT. We present a case of acute pancreatitis with spontaneous bilateral adrenal haemorrhage and briefly discuss imaging and treatment implications

  15. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  16. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  17. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage: cost consequences analysis of misoprostol in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Danielle L; Zhao, Fei-Li; Robertson, Jane

    2015-11-23

    While inferior to oxytocin injection in both efficacy and safety, orally administered misoprostol has been included in the World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medicines for use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) in low-resource settings. This study evaluates the costs and health outcomes of use of oral misoprostol to prevent PPH in settings where injectable uterotonics are not available. A cost-consequences analysis was conducted from the international health system perspective, using data from a recent Cochrane systematic review and WHO's Mother-Baby Package Costing Spreadsheet in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 births in a mixed hospital (40% births)/community setting (60% births). Costs were estimated based on 2012 US dollars. Using oxytocin in the hospital setting and misoprostol in the community setting in a cohort of 1000 births, instead of oxytocin (hospital setting) and no treatment (community setting), 22 cases of PPH could be prevented. Six fewer women would require additional uterotonics and four fewer women a blood transfusion. An additional 130 women would experience shivering and an extra 42 women fever. Oxytocin/misoprostol was found to be cost saving (US$320) compared to oxytocin/no treatment. If misoprostol is used in both the hospital and community setting compared with no treatment (i.e. oxytocin not available in the hospital setting), 37 cases of PPH could be prevented; ten fewer women would require additional uterotonics; and six fewer women a blood transfusion. An additional 217 women would experience shivering and 70 fever. The cost savings would be US$533. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the results are sensitive to the incidence of PPH-related outcomes, drug costs and the proportion of hospital births. Our findings confirm that, even though misoprostol is not the optimum choice in the prevention of PPH, misoprostol could be an effective and cost-saving choice where oxytocin is not or cannot be used due to a

  18. Post eclamptic aneurysmal rupture subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosed in the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid and/or intracerebral haemorrhage in women during pregnancy is rare. The risk depends on the stage of pregnancy, but seems to be highest during the late third trimester, during delivery and in the puerperium. Headache can be a symptom of both preeclampsia, subarachnoid haemorrhage and other pathologies or conditions. It is essential for pregnant women with a suspected ruptured aneurysm to be investigated and treated without delay, irrespective of fear of harm to the foetus, to avoid complications from aneurysm rupture. This case study presents a 39-year-old woman who was 35 weeks and 3 days pregnant with known preeclampsia. She endured a headache for the three days leading up to the delivery with associated diplopia on the third day, but these symptoms were thought to be related to her preeclampsia. Over the three hours following childbirth, her headache became more severe and she suffered from vomiting, loss of vision, torticollis and seizures. Computed tomography (CT) of her head revealed a subarachnoid haemorrhage while CT angiography of the Circle of Willis failed to reveal an aneurysm and 4-vessel angiography only demonstrated an area slightly suspicious for the presence of an aneurysm. 3D rotational angiography clearly demonstrated a 1-2 mm aneurysm superior to the left terminal internal carotid artery. In this case, 3D rotational angiography proved to be a valuable additional technique. This patient underwent surgery for her ruptured aneurysm and has made an excellent recovery

  19. Clinical practice guidelines in intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Yáñez, M; Castellanos, M; Freijo, M M; López Fernández, J C; Martí-Fàbregas, J; Nombela, F; Simal, P; Castillo, J; Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; Gállego, J; García Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Ribó, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2013-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage accounts for 10%-15% of all strokes; however it has a poor prognosis with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Neurological deterioration is often observed during the first hours after onset and determines poor prognosis. Intracerebral haemorrhage, therefore, is a neurological emergency which must be diagnosed and treated properly as soon as possible. In this guide we review the diagnostic procedures and factors that influence the prognosis of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and we establish recommendations for the therapeutic strategy, systematic diagnosis, acute treatment and secondary prevention for this condition. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of peripartum hysterectomy and end organ dysfunction in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, D

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the incidence and aetiology of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH) in our population, to examine the success rates of medical and surgical interventions and to identify risk factors for peripartum hysterectomy and end organ dysfunction (EOD).

  1. Mortality from trauma haemorrhage and opportunities for improvement in transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanworth, S J; Davenport, R; Curry, N; Seeney, F; Eaglestone, S; Edwards, A; Martin, K; Allard, S; Woodford, M; Lecky, F E; Brohi, K

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, patterns of blood use and outcomes of major haemorrhage in trauma. This was a prospective observational study from 22 hospitals in the UK, including both major trauma centres and smaller trauma units. Eligible patients received at least 4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) in the first 24 h of admission with activation of the massive haemorrhage protocol. Case notes, transfusion charts, blood bank records and copies of prescription/theatre charts were accessed and reviewed centrally. Study outcomes were: use of blood components, critical care during hospital stay, and mortality at 24 h, 30 days and 1 year. Data were used to estimate the national trauma haemorrhage incidence. A total of 442 patients were identified during a median enrolment interval of 20 (range 7-24) months. Based on this, the national incidence of trauma haemorrhage was estimated to be 83 per million. The median age of patients in the study cohort was 38 years and 73·8 per cent were men. The incidence of major haemorrhage increased markedly in patients aged over 65 years. Thirty-six deaths within 24 h of admission occurred within the first 3 h. At 24 h, 79 patients (17·9 per cent) had died, but mortality continued to rise even after discharge. Patients who received a cumulative ratio of fresh frozen plasma to PRBCs of at least 1 : 2 had lower rates of death than those who received a lower ratio. There were delays in administration of blood. Platelets and cryoprecipitate were either not given, or transfused well after initial resuscitation. There is a high burden of trauma haemorrhage that affects all age groups. Research is required to understand the reasons for death after the first 24 h and barriers to timely transfusion support. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Treatment of dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo,Chaturaka; Rajapakse,Anoja Chamarie

    2012-01-01

    Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decad...

  3. Immediate post-partum haemorrhage: Epidemiological aspects and maternal prognosis at South N’djamena District Hospital (Chad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabkika Bray Madoue

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-partum haemorrhage defined as blood loss after delivery over 500mls, affects all countries and is the commonest cause of maternal mortality. It is a frequent obstetric emergency in developing countries. Objective: To identify the causes of post-partum haemorrhage and identify adequate management of immediate post-partum haemorrhage and thus reduce maternal mortality. Patients and methods: This was a prospective and descriptive study of one year from 1st January 2014 to 31stDecember 2014 conducted at South N’Djamena district hospital. Before including a patient in our survey her consent was obtained after explaining to her the need for the survey. All consenting patients with post-partum haemorrhage were included. Data were analyzed using SPSS17.0. Results: We recorded 100 cases of post-partum haemorrhage among 6815 deliveries giving an incidence of 1.47%. The average age of the women was 25.0 years. The majority of deliveries (90% were vaginal. The main cause of immediate post-partum haemorrhage was a third stage of labour bleeding (66% followed by genital lesions (32%. The management was medical (uterotonic drug, fluid replacement and blood transfusion, obstetric (manual removal of placenta or clot, and surgical (suture of lesions, vascular ligature and hysterectomy. There were two maternal deaths (2%. Conclusion: Post-partum haemorrhage is often fatal in our region. Preventive measures and efficient management can help to improve maternal prognosis.

  4. Aetiology and treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is comprised of three studies focusing on severe postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). PPH is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Risk factors include retained placenta, prolonged duration of the third stage of labour, previous caesarean section, and operative vaginal...... delivery. Occurrence and development of PPH are, however, unpredictable and can sometimes give rise to massive haemorrhage or even hysterectomy and maternal death. Severe haemorrhage can lead to coagulopathy causing further haemorrhage and requiring substitution with blood transfusions. The aim...... had a cardiac arrest, and a total of 128 women (52%) required a hysterectomy. Hysterectomy was associated with increased blood loss, increased number of blood transfusions, a higher fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell ratio (p=0.010), and an increased number of red blood cells before first platelet...

  5. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  6. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  7. Hypopituitarism is uncommon after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Brennum, Jannick; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has recently been reported as a common cause of chronic hypopituitarism, and introduction of routine neuroendocrine screening has been advocated. We aimed at estimating the risk of hypopituitarism after SAH using strict criteria including confirmatory...

  8. Rat bite fever without fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, P; Dubuis, O; So, A; Dudler, J

    2003-09-01

    Rat bite fever is a rarely reported acute febrile bacterial illness caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus following a rat bite. It is classically characterised by abrupt onset of fever with rigors, myalgias, headache, and the appearance of a generalised maculopapular petechial skin rash. Polyarthritis complicates the course of the disease in up to 50% of infected patients, and numerous hurdles can make the diagnosis particularly difficult in the absence of fever or rash, as in the present case. A high degree of awareness is necessary to make the correct diagnosis in such cases. Diagnosis has important prognostic implications as the disease is potentially lethal, but easily treatable.

  9. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, R.; James, B.

    1998-01-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be p...

  10. Conservative management of primary postpartum haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.; Makhdoom, T.

    2004-01-01

    Severe postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a serious obstetrical emergency. Two cases of severe PPH due to uterine atony are described which were managed by uterine packing with sterile ribbon gauze by vaginal route under general anesthesia. Along with supportive measures, it resulted in marked improvement in controlling haemorrhage and infectious morbidity. This is an effective treatment for severe PPH and should be practiced at tertiary care level in woman who wishes to preserve fertility. (author)

  11. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia during treatment of Fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Timothy Lee; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Reynolds, Jamie

    2014-10-14

    We present a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) in a 61-year-old man admitted to hospital for the treatment of Fournier's gangrene. He presented to hospital with scrotal swelling and fever, and developed spreading erythaema and a gangrenous scrotum. His scrotum was surgically debrided and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered. Unfractionated heparin was given postoperatively for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. The patient deteriorated clinically 8-11 days postoperatively with delirium, chest pain and severe hypertension followed by hypotension and thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal CT scan revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Antibodies to the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex were present. HIT-associated BAH was diagnosed and heparin was discontinued. Intravenous bivalirudin and hydrocortisone were started, with rapid improvement in clinical status. BAH is a rare complication of HIT and should be considered in the postoperative patient with unexplained clinical deterioration. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Recanalisation of spontaneously occluded vertebral artery dissection after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takenori; Onozuka, Satoshi; Horiguchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2012-10-01

    Spontaneous occlusion is a rare manifestation of ruptured vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Its natural history and treatment strategy have yet to be established due to its rarity. Here, we report five lesions involving spontaneous occlusion of VAD after subarachnoid haemorrhage, among which three lesions showed recanalisation. Based on our experience and previous reports, spontaneous occlusion of ruptured VAD can be classified into two groups-one group with occlusion in the acute stage with a high incidence of recanalisation and another group with occlusion in the chronic stage with a relatively low incidence of recanalisation. The underlying mechanism is likely different in each group, and treatment strategies should also be tailored depending on the pathophysiology.

  13. Yellow Fever in Africa: Estimating the Burden of Disease and Impact of Mass Vaccination from Outbreak and Serological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Tini; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Yactayo, Sergio; Ronveaux, Olivier; Lewis, Rosamund F.; Staples, J. Erin; Perea, William; Ferguson, Neil M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and non-human primates in tropical areas of Africa and South America. While eradication is not feasible due to the wildlife reservoir, large scale vaccination activities in Africa during the 1940s to 1960s reduced yellow fever incidence for several decades. However, after a period of low vaccination coverage, yellow fever has resurged in the continent. Since 2006 there has been substantial funding for large preventive mass vaccination campaigns in the most affected countries in Africa to curb the rising burden of disease and control future outbreaks. Contemporary estimates of the yellow fever disease burden are lacking, and the present study aimed to update the previous estimates on the basis of more recent yellow fever occurrence data and improved estimation methods. Methods and Findings Generalised linear regression models were fitted to a dataset of the locations of yellow fever outbreaks within the last 25 years to estimate the probability of outbreak reports across the endemic zone. Environmental variables and indicators for the surveillance quality in the affected countries were used as covariates. By comparing probabilities of outbreak reports estimated in the regression with the force of infection estimated for a limited set of locations for which serological surveys were available, the detection probability per case and the force of infection were estimated across the endemic zone. The yellow fever burden in Africa was estimated for the year 2013 as 130,000 (95% CI 51,000–380,000) cases with fever and jaundice or haemorrhage including 78,000 (95% CI 19,000–180,000) deaths, taking into account the current level of vaccination coverage. The impact of the recent mass vaccination campaigns was assessed by evaluating the difference between the estimates obtained for the current vaccination coverage and for a hypothetical scenario excluding these vaccination campaigns. Vaccination campaigns

  14. Yellow Fever in Africa: estimating the burden of disease and impact of mass vaccination from outbreak and serological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Tini; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Yactayo, Sergio; Ronveaux, Olivier; Lewis, Rosamund F; Staples, J Erin; Perea, William; Ferguson, Neil M

    2014-05-01

    Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and non-human primates in tropical areas of Africa and South America. While eradication is not feasible due to the wildlife reservoir, large scale vaccination activities in Africa during the 1940s to 1960s reduced yellow fever incidence for several decades. However, after a period of low vaccination coverage, yellow fever has resurged in the continent. Since 2006 there has been substantial funding for large preventive mass vaccination campaigns in the most affected countries in Africa to curb the rising burden of disease and control future outbreaks. Contemporary estimates of the yellow fever disease burden are lacking, and the present study aimed to update the previous estimates on the basis of more recent yellow fever occurrence data and improved estimation methods. Generalised linear regression models were fitted to a dataset of the locations of yellow fever outbreaks within the last 25 years to estimate the probability of outbreak reports across the endemic zone. Environmental variables and indicators for the surveillance quality in the affected countries were used as covariates. By comparing probabilities of outbreak reports estimated in the regression with the force of infection estimated for a limited set of locations for which serological surveys were available, the detection probability per case and the force of infection were estimated across the endemic zone. The yellow fever burden in Africa was estimated for the year 2013 as 130,000 (95% CI 51,000-380,000) cases with fever and jaundice or haemorrhage including 78,000 (95% CI 19,000-180,000) deaths, taking into account the current level of vaccination coverage. The impact of the recent mass vaccination campaigns was assessed by evaluating the difference between the estimates obtained for the current vaccination coverage and for a hypothetical scenario excluding these vaccination campaigns. Vaccination campaigns were estimated to have reduced the

  15. Dengue fever (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  16. Typhoid fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Mikoleit, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas...... with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main...... cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow...

  17. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Ali, Nadir; Ashraf, Shahzad; Ilyas, Mohammad; Tariq, Waheed-Uz-Zaman; Chotani, Rashid A

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. An observational study. The Combined Military Hospital, Malir Cantt., Karachi, from August 2005 to December 2006. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107(2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107(37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107(63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-1050C (mean 1010C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1(0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection; the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by

  18. [Surveillance data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in 2015, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F F; Zhao, S L; Chen, Q; Chang, Z R; Zhang, J; Zheng, Y M; Luo, L; Ran, L; Liao, Q H

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Through analyzing the surveillance data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in 2015 to understand the related epidemiological features and most possible clustering areas of high incidence. Methods: Individual data was collected from the passive surveillance program and analyzed by descriptive statistic method. Characteristics on seasonal, regional and distribution of the diseases were described. Spatial-temporal clustering characteristics were estimated, under the retrospective space-time method. Results: A total of 8 850 typhoid fever cases were reported from the surveillance system, with incidence rate as 0.65/100 000. The number of paratyphoid fever cases was 2 794, with incidence rate as 0.21/100 000. Both cases of typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever occurred all year round, with high epidemic season from May to October. Most cases involved farmers (39.68 % ), children (15.89 % ) and students (12.01 % ). Children under 5 years showed the highest incidence rate. Retrospective space-time analysis for provinces with high incidence rates would include Yunnan, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hunan and Guangdong, indicating the first and second class clusters were mainly distributed near the bordering adjacent districts and counties among the provinces. Conclusion: In 2015, the prevalence rates of typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever were low, however with regional high prevalence areas. Cross regional transmission existed among provinces with high incidence rates which might be responsible for the clusters to appear in these areas.

  19. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valley fever. These fungi are commonly found in soil in specific regions. The fungi's spores can be stirred into the air by ... species have a complex life cycle. In the soil, they grow as a mold with long filaments that break off into airborne ...

  20. Scarlet Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Katherine Fleming-Dutra, pediatrician, discusses scarlet fever, its cause, how to treat it, and how to prevent its spread.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  1. Multicentre trial of ethamsylate for prevention of periventricular haemorrhage in very low birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J W; Drayton, M R; Hayward, C; Murphy, J F; Osborne, J P; Rennie, J M; Schulte, J F; Speidel, B D; Cooke, R W

    1986-12-06

    The effectiveness of ethamsylate in the prevention of periventricular haemorrhage (PVH) in very low birthweight infants was evaluated by means of a multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. In 330 infants without evidence of PVH on initial cranial ultrasound examination there was little difference between ethamsylate and placebo groups with respect to subependymal haemorrhage, but intraventricular and parenchymal haemorrhages developed in 30/162 infants (18.5%) in the treated group, compared with 50/168 (29.8%) in the control group (p less than 0.02). The incidence of intraventricular and parenchymal haemorrhage in survivors was 20/137 (14.6%) in the ethamsylate group and 37/146 (25.3%) in the controls (p less than 0.05). In 30 infants with evidence of PVH on the initial scan, ethamsylate treatment seemed to limit parenchymal extension. Analysis of the total cohort of 360 infants showed that the proportion of infants in whom an increase of two or more grades of severity of PVH was recorded during the trial was lower in the treated than in the placebo group (p less than 0.01). No adverse effects were attributed to ethamsylate therapy. The reported incidence of patent ductus arterious was lower in the treated than in the placebo group (p less than 0.02). Mortality was similar in the two groups.

  2. Emergency percutaneous transcatheter embolisation of acute arterial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, A N

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review indications, source of haemorrhage, method of embolisation and clinical outcome in patients referred to Interventional Radiology for the emergency management of acute arterial haemorrhage.

  3. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with the oxytocin analogue carbetocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Werner

    2009-11-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide: 67-80% of cases are caused by uterine atony. Preventive measures include prophylactic drug use to aid uterine contraction after delivery, thus avoiding severe blood loss and reducing maternal morbidity and mortality. Carbetocin is a synthetic analogue of oxytocin with a half-life approximately 4-10 times longer than that reported for oxytocin. It combines the safety and tolerability profile of oxytocin with the sustained uterotonic activity of injectable ergot alkaloids. Furthermore, carbetocin can be administered as a single dose injection either intravenously or intramuscularly rather than as an infusion over several hours as is the case with oxytocin. Carbetocin is currently indicated for prevention of uterine atony after delivery by caesarean section in spinal or epidural anaesthesia. Data from three randomised controlled trials in caesarean delivery and a meta-analysis indicate that carbetocin significantly reduces the need for additional uterotonic agents or uterine massage to prevent excessive bleeding compared with placebo or oxytocin. The risk of headache, tremor, hypotension, flushing, nausea, abdominal pain, pruritus and feeling of warmth was similar in women who received carbetocin or oxytocin. The findings from two more recent double-blind randomised trials and one retrospective study suggest that carbetocin may also represent a good alternative to conventional uterotonic agents for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal deliveries. A reduced need for additional uterotonics was observed with carbetocin vs. oxytocin in high-risk women and carbetocin was at least as effective as syntometrine in low-risk women. In these studies of vaginal deliveries, carbetocin was associated with a low incidence of adverse effects and demonstrated a better tolerability profile than syntometrine. Carbetocin had a long duration of action compared with intravenous oxytocin alone and a

  4. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, R; James, B

    1998-10-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be provided, along with the work-up of the differential diagnosis.

  5. Intrapituitary fluid levels following haemorrhage: MRI appearances in 13 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenthall, R.K.; Dean, J.R.; Jeffree, M.A.; Bartlett, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstration of fluid levels on MRI is well recognised in cerebral haematomas, tumours and cysts. The occurrence of fluid levels within haemorrhagic pituitary tumours has not previously been described in detail. Evidence of haemorrhage was identified in 27 of 125 pituitary tumours. Fluid levels occurred in 13 of these haemorrhagic tumours. No association with histological type was identified. Recognised risk factors for haemorrhage were identified in half of the cases. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. Tri-phasic fever in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Pradeepa H; Rao, Sathish B; B, Ganaraj; Bhat, Gopalakrishna; M, Chakrapani

    2018-04-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness with a duration of 2-12 days. Our observational study observed the 24-h continuous tympanic temperature pattern of 15 patients with dengue fever and compared this with 26 others with fever due to a non-dengue aetiology. A tri-phasic fever pattern was seen among two-thirds of dengue fever patients, but in only one with an inflammatory disease. One-third of dengue fever patients exhibited a single peak temperature. Continuous temperature monitoring and temperature pattern analysis in clinical settings can aid in the early differentiation of dengue fever from non-dengue aetiology.

  7. Dengue fever with hepatitis E and hepatitis A infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Siddiqui, Shaheer; Riaz, Mehmood

    2009-03-01

    Infection with dengue viruses produces a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from a nonspecific viral syndrome to severe and fatal haemorrhagic disease. Important risk factors include the strain and serotype of the infecting virus, as well as the age, immune status, and genetic predisposition of the patient. The teaching point in this case study was Dengue fever which occurred concomitantly with Hepatitis A and Hepatitis E virus infection.

  8. Jungle fever

    OpenAIRE

    Waeckerlé, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    This project developed from the premise that the global economy and media have transformed the world and its inhabitants into tourist attractions – so it sets out to reclaim not tourism, but everyday life. Jungle Fever explores the poetics and politics of the everyday, using the body and mind as tools: it offers a 42-page user guide in three languages, with a map and three accompanying posters, proposing destinations, activities and excursions for 8-hour and 24-hour journeys. The instructions...

  9. Antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, A; García Rodríguez, L A; Poulsen, F R

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the relationship between use of antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We identified patients discharged from Danish neurosurgery units with a first-ever SAH diagnosis in 2000 to 2012 (n=5,834). For each case, we selected 40 age-, sex...

  10. Total Body Opacification 'Technique Neonatal Adrenal Haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-12-11

    Dec 11, 1971 ... A case is reported illustrating the possible usefulness of total body opacification in the diagnosis of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage. To derive maximum benefit from this principle, the routine use of an early film coupled with high dosage is urged whenever an intravenous pyelogram is performed for ...

  11. Cyclophosphamide induced Haemorrhagic Cystitis; a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclophosphamide is an akylating agent widely used in the management of both malignant and non neoplastic disorders. We undertook this review to assess the advancement in knowledge regarding the aetiopathogenesis and current management approaches of haemorrhagic cystitis resulting from the use of ...

  12. Sanitation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    A sanitation programme for stamping-out viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was implemented in Denmark in 1965. The programme has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of infected rainbow trout farms, from approximate to 400 to 26. The programme is carried out on a voluntary basis...

  13. The Prevalence of Intraventricular Haemorrhage and Associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Prevalence of Intraventricular Haemorrhage and Associated Risk Factors in Preterm Neonates in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University Teaching ... any-IVH generated at the time of analysis was used in determining the prevalence of IVH and also as the dependent variable in multivariate logistic regression.

  14. Forecasting incidence of dengue in Rajasthan, using time series analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sunil; Lal, Vivek; Gupta, Shiv D; Gupta, Om P

    2012-01-01

    To develop a prediction model for dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) using time series data over the past decade in Rajasthan and to forecast monthly DF/DHF incidence for 2011. Seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model was used for statistical modeling. During January 2001 to December 2010, the reported DF/DHF cases showed a cyclical pattern with seasonal variation. SARIMA (0,0,1) (0,1,1) 12 model had the lowest normalized Bayesian information criteria (BIC) of 9.426 and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 263.361 and appeared to be the best model. The proportion of variance explained by the model was 54.3%. Adequacy of the model was established through Ljung-Box test (Q statistic 4.910 and P-value 0.996), which showed no significant correlation between residuals at different lag times. The forecast for the year 2011 showed a seasonal peak in the month of October with an estimated 546 cases. Application of SARIMA model may be useful for forecast of cases and impending outbreaks of DF/DHF and other infectious diseases, which exhibit seasonal pattern.

  15. A model of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutayeb A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a disease which is now endemic in more than 100 countries of Africa, America, Asia and the Western Pacific. It is transmitted to the man by mosquitoes (Aedes and exists in two forms: Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. The disease can be contracted by one of the four different viruses. Moreover, immunity is acquired only to the serotype contracted and a contact with a second serotype becomes more dangerous. Methods The present paper deals with a succession of two epidemics caused by two different viruses. The dynamics of the disease is studied by a compartmental model involving ordinary differential equations for the human and the mosquito populations. Results Stability of the equilibrium points is given and a simulation is carried out with different values of the parameters. The epidemic dynamics is discussed and illustration is given by figures for different values of the parameters. Conclusion The proposed model allows for better understanding of the disease dynamics. Environment and vaccination strategies are discussed especially in the case of the succession of two epidemics with two different viruses.

  16. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiram Chakrabarti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  17. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Abhiram; Nandy, Manab; Pal, Dipankar; Mallik, Sudesna

    2014-05-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  18. An increase in rates of obstetric haemorrhage in a setting of high HIV seroprevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Shabalala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstetric haemorrhage (OH is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide, although, indirectly, HIV is also a leading cause of maternal mortality in some settings with a high HIV seroprevalence. Objective. To determine the possible association between increasing rates of OH and HIV or its treatment. Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review of women with OH at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa, over a 3-year period (2009 - 2011, during which the drug regimen for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission was evolving from single-dose nevirapine to antenatal zidovudine combined with intrapartum nevirapine (also referred to as dual therapy, and finally to a combination or highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART or HAART. Cases of OH (including abruptio placentae, placenta praevia, unspecified antepartum haemorrhage (APH, and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH were identified from maternity delivery records, and the relevant data extracted. Results. We analysed the records of 448 women diagnosed with OH. Even though the incidence of OH was low, the study found an increasing number of cases during the 3-year period. PPH – not APH – was associated with HIV seropositivity (odds ratio 1.84, 95% confi­dence interval 1.14 - 2.95. cART was not associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage. Conclusion. HIV was associated with a high risk of PPH, and its possible association with HIV treatment needs further research.

  19. Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Nóbrega Litvoc

    Full Text Available Summary The yellow fever (YF virus is a Flavivirus, transmitted by Haemagogus, Sabethes or Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in forest areas in Africa and Latin America leading to epizootics in monkeys that constitute the reservoir of the disease. There are two forms of YF: sylvatic, transmitted accidentally when approaching the forests, and urban, which can be perpetuated by Aedes aegypti. In Brazil, the last case of urban YF occurred in 1942. Since then, there has been an expansion of transmission areas from the North and Midwest regions to the South and Southeast. In 2017, the country faced an important outbreak of the disease mainly in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro. In 2018, its reach extended from Minas Gerais toward São Paulo. Yellow fever has an incubation period of 3 to 6 days and sudden onset of symptoms with high fever, myalgia, headache, nausea/vomiting and increased transaminases. The disease ranges from asymptomatic to severe forms. The most serious forms occur in around 15% of those infected, with high lethality rates. These forms lead to renal, hepatic and neurological impairment, and bleeding episodes. Treatment of mild and moderate forms is symptomatic, while severe and malignant forms depend on intensive care. Prevention is achieved by administering the vaccine, which is an effective (immunogenicity at 90-98% and safe (0.4 severe events per 100,000 doses measure. In 2018, the first transplants in the world due to YF were performed. There is also an attempt to evaluate the use of active drugs against the virus in order to reduce disease severity.

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spotted fever on the foot Rocky Mountain spotted fever, petechial rash Antibodies Deer and dog tick References McElligott SC, Kihiczak GG, Schwartz RA. Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other rickettsial infections. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann ...

  1. Limiting global-mean temperature increase to 1.5–2 °C could reduce the incidence and spatial spread of dengue fever in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian; Osborn, Timothy J.; Steiner São Bernardo, Christine; Peres, Carlos A.; Lake, Iain R.

    2018-01-01

    The Paris Climate Agreement aims to hold global-mean temperature well below 2 °C and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels. While it is recognized that there are benefits for human health in limiting global warming to 1.5 °C, the magnitude with which those societal benefits will be accrued remains unquantified. Crucial to public health preparedness and response is the understanding and quantification of such impacts at different levels of warming. Using dengue in Latin America as a study case, a climate-driven dengue generalized additive mixed model was developed to predict global warming impacts using five different global circulation models, all scaled to represent multiple global-mean temperature assumptions. We show that policies to limit global warming to 2 °C could reduce dengue cases by about 2.8 (0.8–7.4) million cases per year by the end of the century compared with a no-policy scenario that warms by 3.7 °C. Limiting warming further to 1.5 °C produces an additional drop in cases of about 0.5 (0.2–1.1) million per year. Furthermore, we found that by limiting global warming we can limit the expansion of the disease toward areas where incidence is currently low. We anticipate our study to be a starting point for more comprehensive studies incorporating socioeconomic scenarios and how they may further impact dengue incidence. Our results demonstrate that although future climate change may amplify dengue transmission in the region, impacts may be avoided by constraining the level of warming. PMID:29844166

  2. A rare cause of fatal intracranial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: We report the case of a 53-year-old farmer with a 5-day history of severe headache, photophobia and neck stiffness. Full blood count (platelets 173), coagulation screen were normal throughout. Liver function tests remained normal apart from an elevated gamma-GT (156). CT Brain was normal. CSF analysis showed a WCC of 454\\/mm(3) (60% lymphocytes), elevated CSF protein (1.42 g\\/l) and a normal CSF glucose. He was commenced on IV antibiotics and IV acyclivor and improved. On day 3 of admission, he complained of a sudden severe headache, became unresponsive (GCS 3\\/15). INVESTIGATIONS: CT Brain showed a massive left intraventricular haemorrhage. He died 4 days later. Subsequent serum serology for leptospirosis was positive. A repeat sample taken 4 days post-admission, showed a rising IgM indicating active leptospirosis. Detailed pathological examination confirmed intracerebral haemorrhage with normal cerebral vasculature. CONCLUSION: Leptospirosis is a rare cause of intracerebral haemorrhage even in the absence of coagulopathy.

  3. Retinal haemorrhage in infants with pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Naz; Pereira, Susana; Dai, Shuan; Neutze, Jocelyn; Grant, Cameron Charles; Kelly, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that paroxysmal coughing in infantile pertussis (whooping cough) could produce retinal haemorrhages identical to those seen in abusive head trauma. We aimed to test this hypothesis. This is a prospective study of infants hospitalised with pertussis in Auckland, New Zealand, from 2009 to 2014. The clinical severity of pertussis was categorised. All infants recruited had retinal examination through dilated pupils by the paediatric ophthalmology service using an indirect ophthalmoscope. Forty-eight infants with pertussis, aged 3 weeks to 7 months, were examined after a mean of 18 days of coughing. Thirty-nine had severe pertussis and nine had mild pertussis. All had paroxysmal cough, and all were still coughing at the time of examination. No retinal haemorrhages were seen. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that pertussis may cause the pattern of retinal haemorrhages seen in abusive head trauma in infants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Merlot, Benjamin; Madar, Hugo; Sztark, François; Brun, Stéphanie; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is one of the leading causes of maternal death and severe maternal morbidity worldwide and strategies to prevent and treat PPH vary among international authorities. Areas covered: This review seeks to provide a global overview of PPH (incidence, causes, risk factors), prevention (active management of the third stage of labor and prohemostatic agents), treatment (first, second and third-line measures to control PPH), by also underlining recommendations elaborated by international authorities and using algorithms. Expert commentary: When available, oxytocin is considered the drug of first choice for both prevention and treatment of PPH, while peripartum hysterectomy remains the ultimate life-saving procedure if pharmacological and resuscitation measures fail. Nevertheless, the level of evidence for preventing and treating PPH is globally low. The emergency nature of PPH makes randomized controlled trials (RCT) logistically difficult. Population-based observational studies should be encouraged as they can usefully strengthen the evidence base, particularly for components of PPH treatment that are difficult or impossible to assess through RCT.

  5. Lifetime risks for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: multivariable risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlak, Monique H M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Greebe, Paut; Greving, Jacoba P; Algra, Ale

    2013-06-01

    The overall incidence of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) in western populations is around 9 per 100 000 person-years, which confers to a lifetime risk of around half per cent. Risk factors for aSAH are usually expressed as relative risks and suggest that absolute risks vary considerably according to risk factor profiles, but such estimates are lacking. We aimed to estimate incidence and lifetime risks of aSAH according to risk factor profiles. We used data from 250 patients admitted with aSAH and 574 sex-matched and age-matched controls, who were randomly retrieved from general practitioners files. We determined independent prognostic factors with multivariable logistic regression analyses and assessed discriminatory performance using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Based on the prognostic model we predicted incidences and lifetime risks of aSAH for different risk factor profiles. The four strongest independent predictors for aSAH, namely current smoking (OR 6.0; 95% CI 4.1 to 8.6), a positive family history for aSAH (4.0; 95% CI 2.3 to 7.0), hypertension (2.4; 95% CI 1.5 to 3.8) and hypercholesterolaemia (0.2; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.4), were used in the final prediction model. This model had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.76). Depending on sex, age and the four predictors, the incidence of aSAH ranged from 0.4/100 000 to 298/100 000 person-years and lifetime risk between 0.02% and 7.2%. The incidence and lifetime risk of aSAH in the general population varies widely according to risk factor profiles. Whether persons with high risks benefit from screening should be assessed in cost-effectiveness studies.

  6. Efficacy of b-lynch brace suture in postpartum haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarique, S.; Wazir, S.; Moeen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Massive uncontrolled haemorrhage after childbirth is the leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. Postpartum haemorrhage is traditionally defined as blood loss of more than 500 ml after vaginal delivery and more than 1000 ml after caesarean section, but intraoperative estimation of blood loss is inaccurate. Uterine atony alone accounts for 75 - 90% of PPH. To estimate the effectiveness and safety of B-Lynch brace Suture in the management of primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). (author)

  7. Haemorrhage in pregnancy: information given to women in Chiradzulu (Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kapyepye

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Advising women on , haemorrhage in pregnancy could, be viewed, as an integral aspect of maternal health care in M alawi. The WHO (1999 confirmed, that haemorrhage in pregnancy was not only a direct reason for maternal mortality but also a major cause of maternal death. The question on the nature of information that midwives and traditional birth attendants (referred to as TBA’s in the Chiradzulu district in Malawi gave with regard to haemorrhage in pregnancy, therefore arose. Research available focused on the women’s knowledge about the complications of pregnancy but not on the nature of information women received from midwives and TBA’s. This study explored and described the nature of information that was given to rural women in the Chiradzulu district by the midwives and TBA’s regarding haemorrhage in pregnancy. The findings revealed that although both the midwives and TBA’s included important information about haemorrhage in pregnancy, there were deficiencies in some critical areas. Examples of these deficiencies were the definition of haemorrhage in pregnancy; the predisposing factors for antepartum and postpartum haemorrhage and deficiencies in the nature of information on the management and referral of haemorrhaging patients. The findings provided insights into the nature of the information that was provided to the women regarding haemorrhage in pregnancy in the Chiradzulu district in Malawi. Thereafter guidelines were developed for the provision of this information. Finally a follow-up study was recommended after implementation of these guidelines in the district to evaluate the change in the nature of the information communicated to patients regarding haemorrhage by midwives and TBA’s. In this study, haemorrhage during pregnancy referred to the perinatal phase, including antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum haemorrhage.

  8. Adult adrenal haemorrhage: an unrecognised complication of renal vein thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L. E-mail: lokekl@ha.org.hk

    2001-07-01

    There are many predisposing factors for neonatal adrenal haemorrhage but the causative factors are different in adults. Several cases of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage have been reported in association with renal vein thrombosis. This complication has not been documented in the adults. The presence of an adrenal mass in the setting of renal vein thrombosis should raise the possibility of adrenal haemorrhage even though this is extremely uncommon in adults.

  9. CLINICAL PROFILE OF DENGUE FEVER IN KANYAKUMARI GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE- A STUDY FROM KANYAKUMARI, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue infection is viral infection with different clinical presentation. This study was conducted in Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital, Asaripallam, Tamil Nadu, to study the various clinical profile and polyserositis involvement in dengue. MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical profile and polyserositis involvement in dengue infection were determined by the retrospective study of all dengue infection in Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital, Asaripallam, Nagercoil, Tamilnadu. It was a retrospective study. All probable cases that had high-grade fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, features of hock or haemorrhage and so forth and were admitted with provisional diagnosis of dengue fever were taken into account. All patients with positive dengue tests, either NS1 antigen, IgM, IgG antibody rapid serological test kit or ELISA were taken into the study group. As the duration of history of fever might be fallacious, the patients were subjected to all three serological tests. Patients who were positive for malaria, meningitis and enteric fever were excluded from the study. The whole number of patients included in our study was 40 (=40. RESULTS In this study, it was found that the bleeding manifestation had no correlation with thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly and raised SGOT. All 40 patients had fever and they were treated with antipyretics (paracetamol in appropriate doses. Patients who presented with warning signs and stable vital signs were initially encouraged to take oral fluids; if they were not tolerated, intravenous fluids were started according to the WHO guidelines. CONCLUSION Dengue is an important arboviral infection in tropical countries. 1 Global incidence of dengue fever has increased dramatically in the recent decades. There are very few studies based on the revised new dengue classification. In our study, the total number of cases analysed was 40, out of which 28 (70% were categorised as cases of non

  10. Pituitary apoplexy with optic tract oedema and haemorrhage in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenthall, R.; Jaspan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Bilateral optic tract oedema, left optic tract haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred in a 70-year-old man with pituitary apoplexy associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Left optic tract haemorrhage was confirmed on MRI. (orig.)

  11. Haemorrhagic SLE In A Young Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE is a systemic autoimmune disease that tends to occur in early adult life. The peak age of onset of the first symptom or sign in females is about 38 years and later in men, at about 44 years. Females outnumber men in this illness in a ratio of about 8 : 1. Cutaneous lesions in male have not been properly investigated and some studies in male with SLE have shown that the illness may present with atypical skin lesions. A case of SLE in a 20 year male who developed sudden onset of haemorrhagic vesiculobullous butterfly rash is described.

  12. Late onset retinoblastoma presenting with vitreous haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Mette; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Heegard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    in the retina. A vascularized gelatinous mass was revealed after vitrectomy. Later the patient developed white cysts in the anterior chamber and histological findings were indicative of a retinoblastoma. The patient was enucleated and the diagnosis of retinoblastoma was confirmed. Intraocular surgery in young...... people with unknown retinoblastoma enhances the risk of metastasis development, orbital recurrence and death. Unexplained vitreous haemorrhage can obscure the view of a tumour but ultrasonic findings of a retinal mass calls for further imaging e.g. through MRI. The case illustrates the importance...

  13. Bipallidal haemorrhage after ethylene glycol intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caparros-Lefebvre, D.; Policard, J.; Rigal, M. [CHU Pointe a Pitre, Service de Neurologie, Lille (France); Sengler, C. [CHU Pointe a Pitre, Laboratoire de Pharmaco-Toxicologie, Guadeloupe (France); Benabdallah, E. [CHU Pointe a Pitre, Service de Radiologie, Guadeloupe (France); Colombani, S. [Centre d' Imagerie medicale, Martinique (France)

    2005-02-01

    Acute or subacute bipallidal lesion, an uncommon radiological feature produced by metabolic disorders or poisoning, has never been attributed to ethylene glycol (EG) intoxication. This 50-year-old Afro-Caribbean alcoholic man had unexplained loss of consciousness. Blood tests showed osmolar gap. Drug screening was positive for EG at 6.06 mmol/l. Brain CT revealed bilateral pallidal haemorrhage. Pallidal haematoma, which could be related to deposition of oxalate crystals issued from EG metabolism, should lead to toxicological screening. (orig.)

  14. Bipallidal haemorrhage after ethylene glycol intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caparros-Lefebvre, D.; Policard, J.; Rigal, M.; Sengler, C.; Benabdallah, E.; Colombani, S.

    2005-01-01

    Acute or subacute bipallidal lesion, an uncommon radiological feature produced by metabolic disorders or poisoning, has never been attributed to ethylene glycol (EG) intoxication. This 50-year-old Afro-Caribbean alcoholic man had unexplained loss of consciousness. Blood tests showed osmolar gap. Drug screening was positive for EG at 6.06 mmol/l. Brain CT revealed bilateral pallidal haemorrhage. Pallidal haematoma, which could be related to deposition of oxalate crystals issued from EG metabolism, should lead to toxicological screening. (orig.)

  15. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH........ No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death...

  16. Primary postpartum haemorrhage at the university of Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading global cause of severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Approximately 14 million women suffer postpartum haemorrhage annually and at least 128,000 of these women bleed to death. Most of these deaths, which occur within four hours of delivery and are as a ...

  17. Bovine petechial fever (Ondiri disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1993-02-01

    Bovine petechial fever is a Rickettsial disease of cattle, which has been diagnosed, only in Kenya, East Africa. Other countries in the region share some of the biotopes in which the disease occurs, and may well have the infection. The disease is characterised by widespread petechial and ecchymotic haemorrhages on the mucosal surfaces, and throughout the serosal and subserosal surfaces of the body organs and cavities. It may be fatal in up to 50% of untreated cases. The causal organism may be demonstrated most readily in the cytoplasm of polymorphonuclear granulocytes of the peripheral blood, as well as other leucocytes, and has been classified as Cytoecetes ondirii, a member of the tribe Ehrlichiae. Circumstantial and other evidence suggests that the disease is transmitted by an arthropod vector, which has yet to be identified. The blood of a naturally infected wild ruminant, the bushbuck, Tragelaphus scriptus has been shown to remain infective for at least 2 years, and other species such as the African buffalo, Syncercus caffer for at least 5 weeks. These and possibly other species, may serve as the amplifying and reservoir hosts.

  18. Molecular diagnosis of Haemorrhagic Septicaemia - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Rajeev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida is associated with hemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle and buffaloes, pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep and goats, fowl cholera in poultry, atrophic rhinitis in pigs and snuffles in rabbits. Haemorrhagic septicaemia is caused by Pasteurella multocida type B:2, B:2,5 and B:5 in Asian countries and type E:2 in African countries. Pasteurella multocida have five types of capsular serotype i.e. type A, B, D, E and F. Diagnosis of the disease is mainly based on the clinical sign and symptom, post mortem findings. Confirmatory diagnosis is done by isolation and identification of causative agent. A variety of laboratory diagnostic techniques have been developed over the years for pasteurellosis and used routinely in the laboratory. Among these techniques molecular techniques of diagnosis is most important. This technique not only gives diagnosis but it also provides information regarding capsular type of Pasteurella multocida. Techniques which are used for molecular diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia are PCR based diagnosis, Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA, Ribotyping, Colony hybridization assay, Filled alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE, Detection of Pasteurella multocida by Real Time PCR. Among these techniques real time PCR is most sensitive and specific. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 189-192

  19. Late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Emine; Sarper, Nazan; Türker, Gülcan; Corapçioğlu, Funda; Etuş, Volkan

    2006-09-01

    Late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN) can occur owing to a lack of vitamin K prophylaxis, as a manifestation of an underlying disorder or idiopatically from the 8th day to 12 weeks after birth. Eight infants admitted to Kocaeli University Hospital with nine episodes of late HDN between January 2002 and April 2005 were evaluated retrospectively from hospital records. The median age at presentation was 46 (26-111) days. All the infants were born at full-term to healthy mothers and were exclusively breast-fed. All had an uneventful perinatal history, except one who had meconium aspiration. Four patients had received no vitamin K prophylaxis and another three had uncertain histories. At presentation, six had intracranial bleeding and the remainder had bleeding either from the venepuncture site or the gastro-intestinal tract. The presenting signs and symptoms were irritability, vomiting, bulging or full fontanelle, convulsions and diminished or absent neonatal reflexes. Galactosaemia was detected in a 2-month-old infant with prolonged jaundice. There was no surgery-related mortality or complications but one survived for only 2 days on ventilatory support following surgery. Only one of the six survivors had severe neurological sequelae. Late HDN frequently presents with intracranial haemorrhage, leading to high morbidity and mortality. HDN can be the manifestation of an underlying metabolic disorder. Vitamin K prophylaxis of the newborn should be routine in developing countries.

  20. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of central nervous system haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Hennessy, O.

    1993-01-01

    The variable magnetic resonance imaging appearances of central nervous system haemorrhage, both intra- and extra-axial, are described. These will vary with the type of image contrast (T1 or T2 weighting), the nature of the imaging sequence (spin-echo or gradient-echo) and the time from onset of haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful technique for imaging haemorrhage in the central nervous system as it yields temporal information about haematoma development, and it is the only non-invasive means of imaging intraspinal haemorrhage. However, in the imaging of haematomas within 24 h of onset and in subarachnoid haemorrhage computed tomography is the investigation of choice. 13 refs., 6 figs

  2. Dengue fever in patients admitted in tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, M. A.; Saqib, M. A. N.; Qureshi, H.; Alam, S. E.; Arif, A.; Khan, Z. U.; Saeed, Q.; Iqbal, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the gaps in the diagnosis and management of dengue fever cases. Methods: The retrospective descriptive analytical study was done with a case record analysis of patients with dengue fever admitted from January to December 2010 at five tertiary care hospitals in different Pakistani cities. Using a questionnaire, information was gathered on demography, haematological profile, management, use of blood and platelet transfusions and the outcome. For comparison, data of serologically-confirmed dengue patients from a private laboratory in Islamabad was collected to see the age, gender and month-wise distribution of cases tested over the same period. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Out of the 841 confirmed dengue cases, 514 (79%) were males and 139 (21%) females. The overall mean age was 31.3+-14.0 years. Dengue fever was seen in 653 (78%) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in 188 (22%) patients. Most cases were between 20 and 49 years of age. A gradual increase in dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever was seen from August, with a peak in October/November. Tourniquet test was done only in 20 (2.3%) cases, out of which 11 (55%) were positive and 9 (45%) were negative. Serial haematocrit was not done in any case. Total deaths were 5 (0.6%). Conclusions: Most cases were seen in October/November with the majority being in the 20-39 age group. Tourniquet test and serial haematocrit were infrequently used. No standard national guidelines were employed. (author)

  3. Follow-up of Thalidomide treatment in patients with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosman, A; Westermann, C J J; Snijder, R; Disch, F; Mummery, C L; Mager, J J

    2015-12-01

    Patients with a hereditary vascular disorder called Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome (Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia, HHT) haemorrhage easily due to weak-walled vessels. Haemorrhage in lungs or brain can be fatal but patients suffer most from chronic and prolonged nosebleeds (epistaxis), the frequency and intensity of which increases with age. Several years ago, it was discovered serendipitously that the drug Thalidomide had beneficial effects on the disease symptoms in several of a small group of HHT patients: epistaxis and the incidence of anaemia were reduced and patients required fewer blood transfusions. In addition, they reported a better quality of life. However, Thalidomide has significant negative side effects, including neuropathy and fatigue. We followed up all HHT patients in the Netherlands who had been taking Thalidomide at the time the original study was completed to find out (i) how many had continued taking Thalidomide and for how long (ii) the nature and severity of any side-effects and (iii) whether side-effects had influenced their decision to continue taking Thalidomide. Only a minority of patients had continued taking the drug despite its beneficial effects on their symptoms and that the side effects were the primary reason to stop. Despite symptom reduction, alternative treatments are still necessary for epistaxis in HHT patients and a large-scale clinical trial is not justified although incidental use in the most severely affected patients can be considered.

  4. Allergies and Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Allergies and Hay Fever Allergies and Hay Fever Patient ... life more enjoyable. Why does the body develop allergies? Allergy symptoms appear when the immune system reacts ...

  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Credit: CDC A male cayenne tick, Amblyomma cajennense, ... and New Mexico. Why Is the Study of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever a Priority for NIAID? Tickborne diseases are becoming ...

  6. Q fever in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anders; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jorgen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection.......We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection....

  7. Quality of care in the management of major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, S N

    2012-02-01

    Substandard care is reported to occur in a large number of cases of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). A prospective audit was carried out by a multidisciplinary team at our hospital over a one year period to assess the quality of care (QOC) delivered to women experiencing MOH. MOH was defined according to criteria outlined in the Scottish Audit of Maternal Morbidity (SAMM). 31 cases were identified yielding an incidence of 3.5\\/1000 deliveries. The predominant causes were uterine atony 11 (35.4%), retained products of conception 6 (19.3%) and placenta praevia\\/accreta 6 (19.3%). Excellent initial resuscitation and monitoring was noted with a high level of senior staff input. Indicators of QOC compared favourably with the SAMM. Areas for improvement were identified. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of detailed prospective data collection in MOH in a busy Dublin obstetric unit with a view to developing a national audit. Standardization of definitions allows for international comparisons.

  8. Factors affecting the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis depending on the haemorrhage definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzińska-Dźwigał, M; Sobolewski, Piotr; Szczuchniak, W

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (sICH) remains the most feared complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with ischaemic stroke. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of different factors on the occurrence of sICH, depending on definition used. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of several factors on the occurrence of sICH (according to definitions used in ECASS2, SITS-MOST and NINDS studies) in 200 patients treated with systemic thrombolysis from 2006 to 2011. Multivariate analysis of impact of individual variables on the occurrence of haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and parenchymal haemorrhage type 2 (PH2) were performed. Haemorrhagic transformation occurred in 35 cases (17.5%). SICH was found in 10 cases according to ECASS2, in 7 cases according to SITS and in 13 cases according to NINDS. Older age was related to higher risk of sICH, regardless which definition was used (ECASS2: p = 0.014, SITS-MOST: p = 0.048, NINDS: p = 0.008), and female sex was related to higher risk of sICH according to NINDS and ECASS2 definition (p = 0.002 and p = 0.04, respectively). Blood glucose level and high NIHSS score (> 14 pts) were found as risk factor of sICH in ECASS2 definition (p = 0.044 and p = 0.03, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression higher NIHSS scores were associated with HT independent of age, gender and glucose level (p = 0.012). Multivariate analysis showed no impact of age, gender, severity of stroke and glucose level on presence of PH2. Definition of sICH can determine variables that are related to a high risk of this complication. In our study most factors correlated with sICH using the ECASS2 definition.

  9. [Haemorrhagic proctocolitis as primary manifestation of lymphogranuloma venereum in an HIV-positive male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, Andreas Brandt; Fraes Diernæs, Jon Erik; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Koppelhus, Uffe

    2018-05-14

    This is a case report of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) manifesting as haemorrhagic proctocolitis in a homosexual HIV-positive male. The primary symptom was a rectal abscess, which was initially surgically treated and subsequently insufficiently treated with single-dose tablet azithromycin. The patient's symptoms were successfully treated after a 21-day doxycycline regime. LGV is a se xually transmitted infection with a rising incidence among persons with risk behaviour. This case report underlines the importance, that all positive rectal screenings for Chlamydia trachomatis should be routinely serotyped.

  10. Adverse Effects of Carbetocin versus Oxytocin in the Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage after Caesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    D. Mannaerts; L. Van der Veeken; H. Coppejans; Y. Jacquemyn

    2018-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the incidence of nausea, vomiting, and arterial hypotension between carbetocin and oxytocin to prevent haemorrhage after caesarean section (CS). Methods. A randomized controlled trial in term pregnant women undergoing planned CS. Groups were randomized to carbetocin or oxytocin. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate, presence of nausea/vomitus, and need for vasopressors were evaluated throughout surgery. Preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels were comp...

  11. Chronic hypopituitarism is uncommon in survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Behan, L A; O'Brien, M M; Tormey, W; Javadpour, M; Sherlock, M; Thompson, C J

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hypopituitarism after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is unclear from the conflicting reports in the literature. As routine neuroendocrine screening for hypopituitarism for all patients would be costly and logistically difficult, there is a need for precise data on the frequency of hypopituitarism and on factors which might predict the later development of pituitary dysfunction. We aimed to: (i) Establish the incidence of long-term hypopituitarism in patients with aneurysmal SAH. (ii) Determine whether data from patients' acute admission with SAH could predict the occurrence of long-term hypopituitarism. One hundred patients were studied prospectively from the time of presentation with acute SAH. Plasma cortisol, plasma sodium and a variety of clinical and haemodynamic parameters were sequentially measured for the first 12 days of their acute admission. Forty-one patients then underwent dynamic pituitary testing at median 15 months following SAH (range 7-30 months), with insulin tolerance test (ITT) or, if contraindicated, a glucagon stimulation test (GST) plus short synacthen test (SST). If symptoms of cranial diabetes insipidus (CDI) were present, a water deprivation test was also performed. Forty-one patients attended for follow-up dynamic pituitary testing. Although 14 of 100 had acute glucocorticoid deficiency immediately following SAH, only two of 41 had long-term adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficiency and four of 41 had growth hormone (GH) deficiency. None were hypothyroid or gonadotrophin deficient. None had chronic CDI or hyponatraemia. There was no association between acute glucocorticoid deficiency, acute CDI or acute hyponatraemia and long-term pituitary dysfunction. Both anterior and posterior hypopituitarism are very uncommon following SAH and are not predicted by acute clinical, haemodynamic or endocrinological parameters. Routine neuroendocrine screening is not justified in SAH patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  12. Cases of typhoid fever in Copenhagen region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrett, Freja Cecille; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2013-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic illness which in high-income countries mainly affects travellers. The incidence is particularly high on the Indian subcontinent. Travellers who visit friends and relatives (VFR) have been shown to have a different risk profile than others. We wished to identify main...

  13. Neglect and not forgetting produces shameful diseases such as yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yellow fever (YF is a disease caused by a flavivirus that bears its name, is a disease with haemorrhagic manifestations and high lethality that compromises the central nervous system. YF has two cycles; one in the jungle and another urban, epizootics precede outbreaks before migrating to urban areas. The vectors are the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Haemogogus janthinomys and Sabethes sp, which have a wide geographical distribution in Colombia and South America.

  14. Burden of typhoid fever in Sulaimania, Iraqi Kurdistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Jonathan; Saeed, Rebeen; Mykhan, Hawar; Kanan, Shwan; Farhad, Dlawer; Ali, Kocher Omer; Abdulwahab, Runak Hama Kareem; Palardy, John; Neill, Marguerite A

    2014-10-01

    Typhoid fever imposes a high disease burden worldwide, but resource limitations mean that the burden of typhoid fever in many countries is poorly understood. The authors conducted a prospective surveillance study at the adult and pediatric teaching hospitals in Sulaimania, Iraqi Kurdistan. All patients presenting with an undifferentiated febrile illness consistent with typhoid were eligible for enrollment. Enrolled patients had blood cultures and Brucella serologies performed. Incidence was calculated with reference to census data. Both typhoid fever and brucellosis were common, and the incidence of typhoid fever was 21 cases/100 000 patient-years. Classic disease symptoms were uncommonly observed. Cost-effective surveillance projects to calculate disease burden of typhoid fever are practical and replicable. Typhoid has successfully adapted to the healthcare environment in Sulaimania. Additional work in the region should focus on antibiotic resistance and other enteric pathogens such as Brucella spp. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatio-Temporal modelling of Dengue Fever in Zulia state, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera, Maritza

    2014-01-01

    Over half of the world's population are at risk of infection from dengue fever (Guha-Sapir2005). This viral disease is transmitted by the female Aedes aegypti mosquito and is the major source of human death in the world when compared with any other vector borne disease (Gubler1998a). The first important epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in America was reported in Cuba in 1981 and subsequently in Venezuela during 1989 and 1990 (Oletta2006, Brightmer1998). There has been a trend of in...

  16. Typhoid Fever in South Africa in an Endemic HIV Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, Karen H; Sooka, Arvinda; Smith, Anthony M; Musekiwa, Alfred; Tau, Nomsa P; Klugman, Keith P; Angulo, Frederick J

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains an important disease in Africa, associated with outbreaks and the emerging multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (Salmonella Typhi) haplotype, H58. This study describes the incidence of, and factors associated with mortality due to, typhoid fever in South Africa, where HIV prevalence is high. Nationwide active laboratory-based surveillance for culture-confirmed typhoid fever was undertaken from 2003-2013. At selected institutions, additional clinical data from patients were collected including age, sex, HIV status, disease severity and outcome. HIV prevalence among typhoid fever patients was compared to national HIV seroprevalence estimates. The national reference laboratory tested Salmonella Typhi isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility and haplotype. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analyses were conducted determining factors associated with typhoid fever mortality. We identified 855 typhoid fever cases: annual incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.39 per 100,000 population. Additional clinical data were available for 369 (46.8%) cases presenting to the selected sites. Among typhoid fever patients with known HIV status, 19.3% (29/150) were HIV-infected. In adult females, HIV prevalence in typhoid fever patients was 43.2% (19/44) versus 15.7% national HIV seroprevalence (P Typhoid fever incidence in South Africa was largely unchanged from 2003-2013. Typhoid fever mortality was associated disease severity. HIV infection may be a contributing factor. Interventions mandate improved health care access, including to HIV management programmes as well as patient education. Further studies are necessary to clarify relationships between HIV infection and typhoid fever in adults.

  17. Streptococcus sanguinis meningitis following endoscopic ligation for oesophageal variceal haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Chin-Fu; Lee, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    We report a case of acute purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus sanguinis after endoscopic ligation for oesophageal variceal haemorrhage in a cirrhotic patient without preceding symptoms of meningitis. Initial treatment with flomoxef failed. The patient was cured after 20 days of intravenous penicillin G. This uncommon infection due to S. sanguinis adds to the long list of infectious complications among patients with oesophageal variceal haemorrhage.

  18. An Unusual Case of Bilateral Vitreous Haemorrhage following Snake Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A-45-year-old man presented to us with diminution of vision in both eye following snake bite. On examination vision in the right eye (RE was 6/36 and vision in left eye (LE was hand movement positive and fundus examination revealed a subhyloid haemorrhage, left eye showed vitreous haemorrhage. Patient was advised bed rest, vitamin C tablets and oral steroids.

  19. [Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia diagnosed in connection with a traffic accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Demény, Ann Kathrin; Almind, Merete; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2014-02-17

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by vascular dysplasia and haemorrhage. It is manifested by mucocutaneous telangiec-tases and arteriovenous malformations in organs such as lungs, liver and brain. We present a case of HHT. A 16-year-old patient with a history of recurrent epistaxis was admitted to the local hospital with chest pain and desaturation. A CT scan revealed pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

  20. Renal impairment in stroke patients: A comparison between the haemorrhagic and ischemic variants [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratyush Shrestha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal impairment is regularly seen in hospitalized stroke patients, affecting the outcome of patients, as well as causing difficulties in their management. A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the trend of renal function in hospitalized ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke patients. The incidence of renal impairment in these subgroups, the contributing factors and the need for renal replacement in renal impaired patients was evaluated. Methods: Alternate day renal function testing was performed in hospitalized stroke patients. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR was calculated and the trend of renal function in the two stroke subgroups (haemorrhagic and ischemic was assessed, with renal impairment defined as e-GFR < 60mL/ minute per 1.73m2. Results: Among 52 patients, 25 had haemorrhagic stroke (mean age 59.81 ± 14.67 and 27 had ischemic stroke (mean age 56.12 ± 13.08. The mean e-GFR (mL/minute per 1.732m2 at admission in the haemorrhagic stroke subgroup was 64.79 ± 25.85 compared to 86.04 ± 26.09 in the ischemic stroke subgroup (p=0.005. Sixteen out of 25 (64% patients in the haemorrhagic stroke subgroup and 9 out of 27 (33.3% patients in the ischemic subgroup developed renal impairment (p=0.27. The location of the bleed (p=0.8, volume of hematoma (p=0.966 and surgical intervention (p=0.4 did not predispose the patients to renal impairment. One out of 16 patients with haemorrhagic stroke (who eventually died, and 2 out of 9 patients with ischemic stroke required renal replacement. Conclusion: Renal impairment is commonly seen in stroke patients, more so in patients who suffered haemorrhagic strokes.  The impairment, however, is transient and rarely requires renal replacement therapy.

  1. Postpartum haemorrhage: a preventable cause of maternal mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, B.; Hassan, L.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the preventable predictors of severe postpartum haemorrhage and the adverse outcome associated with it. All the admitted patients who developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (>1500 ml) were included in the study. Clinical and sociodemographic data was obtained along with results of investigations to categorize the complications encountered. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were determined. During the study period, 75 out of 4683 obstetrical admissions, developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (1.6 %). About 65% of the patients were admitted with some other complications including obstructed labour, antepartum haemorrhage and eclampsia. The risk factors were grand multiparity (OR=3.4), pre-eclampsia (OR=2.75), antepartum haemorrhage (OR=13.35), active labour of more than 10 hours (OR=46.92), twin delivery (OR=3.25), instrumental delivery (OR=8.62) and caesarean section (OR=9.74). Maternal mortality in these cases was 2.66% and residual morbidity being 40%. Birth attendant other than doctor and delivery outside the study unit were significantly associated with the adverse outcome in these patients. Maternal outcome associated with postpartum haemorrhage is a function of care given during labour and postnatal period with early diagnosis and management of the complication and its risk factors, being the key of good maternal outcome. (author)

  2. Evidence-based management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, I; Sunkaraneni, V S

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no guidelines in the UK for the specific management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The authors aimed to review the literature and provide an algorithm for the management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The Medline and Embase databases were interrogated on 15 November 2013 using the search items 'hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia' (title), 'epistaxis' (title) and 'treatment' (title and abstract), and limiting the search to articles published in English. A total of 46 publications were identified, comprising 1 systematic review, 2 randomised, controlled trials, 27 case series, 9 case reports, 4 questionnaire studies and 3 in vitro studies. There is a lack of high-level evidence for the use of many of the available treatments for the specific management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Current management should be based on a multidisciplinary team approach involving both a hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia physician and an ENT surgeon, especially when systemic therapy is being considered. The suggested treatment algorithm considers that the severity of epistaxis merits intervention at different levels of the treatment ladder. The patient should be assessed using a reproducible validated assessment tool, for example an epistaxis severity score, to guide treatment. More research is required, particularly in the investigation of topical agents targeting the development and fragility of telangiectasiae in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  3. Emergency admissions for major haemorrhage associated with direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouget, Jacques; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    To describe the population admitted in an emergency department of a teaching hospital for severe bleeding associated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC). During a three-year period (2012-2014) patients older than 16 years were prospectively identified by haemorrhagic symptoms from computerised requests. At least one of the following criteria defined major haemorrhage: haemorrhagic shock, unstable haemodynamic, need for transfusion or haemostatic procedure, or a life threatening location. Fifty four patients, 23 receiving dabigatran, 30 rivaroxaban and one apixaban were included, 2 in 2012, 35 in 2013 and 17 in 2014. Median age was 84 years (range 63-99) with a sex ratio of 1.16. Haemorrhagic complications were gastrointestinal (n=27), intracranial (n=12) or miscellaneous (n=15). Indication of DOAC was stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in 49 cases and deep vein thrombosis in 5 cases. Hospitalization was required for 45 patients (83%) with a mean length of stay of 8.5 days. Sixteen patients needed intensive care. Reversal therapy was prescribed in 11 patients. At 1 month, overall mortality was 24%, reaching 41.7% for intracranial haemorrhage. Among surviving patients, DOAC was stopped in 10 cases, continued in 17 patients and switched for other antithrombotic in 17 patients. Our study contributes to the post marketing surveillance of major haemorrhagic complications associated with DOAC. It takes part to the knowledge about the course of this severe event in emergencies. Careful awareness in risk benefit assessment, especially in elderly, is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or higher that is unresponsive to fever-reducing medicine?YesNoDoes your child have a low-grade fever (up to 101°) ... fever, give your child a nonaspirin fever-reducing medicine. Call your child’s doctor after 24 hours if the fever continues ...

  5. Treatment of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decades at an alarming rate. In the endemic areas, waves of infection occur in epidemics, with thousands of individuals affected, creating a huge burden on the limited resources of a country's health care system. While the illness passes off as a simple febrile episode in many, a few have a severe illness marked by hypovolemic shock and bleeding. Iatrogenic fluid overload in the management may further complicate the picture. In this severe form dengue can be fatal. Tackling the burden of dengue is impeded by several issues, including a lack of understanding about the exact pathophysiology of the infection, inability to successfully control the vector population, lack of specific therapy against the virus, and the technical difficulties in developing a vaccine. This review provides an overview on the epidemiology, natural history, management strategies, and future directions for research on dengue, including the potential for development of a vaccine.Keywords: dengue, treatment, fluid resuscitation

  6. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  7. Psychosis in dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Suprakash Chaudhury; Biswajit Jagtap; Deepak Kumar Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    An 18-year-old male student developed abnormal behavior while undergoing treatment for dengue fever. He was ill-kempt, irritable and had auditory and visual hallucinations and vague persecutory delusions in clear sensorium with impaired insight. The psychotic episode had a temporal correlation with dengue fever. Psychiatric comorbidities of dengue fever including mania, anxiety, depression, and catatonia are mentioned in literature but the literature on the psychosis following dengue is spars...

  8. Oropouche Fever: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hercules Sakkas; Petros Bozidis; Ashley Franks; Chrissanthy Papadopoulou

    2018-01-01

    Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV), an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and s...

  9. Current diagnostic approaches to subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-King-Im, Jean Marie; Koo, Brendan; Trivedi, Rikin A.; Higgins, Nicholas J.; Tay, Keng Y.; Cross, Justin J.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the field of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Prompt diagnosis with high-resolution CT and intensive critical care support remain key aspects of good patient management. Early identification and definitive treatment of underlying ruptured aneurysms is generally advocated to reduce the risk of re-bleeding, a complication with high mortality and morbidity. Although intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still considered the gold standard for sourcing aneurysms, CT angiography, especially with the evolution of multi-slice technology, is slowly gaining acceptance as a rapid, accessible and minimally invasive method which appears likely to replace DSA as first-line modality in the future. Furthermore, the advent of Guglielmi detachable coils and the ISAT trial have revolutionised the treatment of ruptured aneurysms, with a significant trend towards endovascular coiling away from operative clipping. Improvements in clinical experience, coiling technology and assistive devices now allow interventionalists to potentially treat the majority of aneurysms, including wide-necked or complex lesions. The uncertain long-term results of coiling, however, still fuel strong debate and controversy. This review summarises current diagnostic approaches to SAH from a radiological perspective, with an emphasis on aneurysmal SAH and an evidence-based approach to the role of imaging and interventional radiology in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Current diagnostic approaches to subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U-King-Im, Jean Marie; Koo, Brendan; Trivedi, Rikin A.; Higgins, Nicholas J.; Tay, Keng Y.; Cross, Justin J.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Gillard, Jonathan H. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the field of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Prompt diagnosis with high-resolution CT and intensive critical care support remain key aspects of good patient management. Early identification and definitive treatment of underlying ruptured aneurysms is generally advocated to reduce the risk of re-bleeding, a complication with high mortality and morbidity. Although intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still considered the gold standard for sourcing aneurysms, CT angiography, especially with the evolution of multi-slice technology, is slowly gaining acceptance as a rapid, accessible and minimally invasive method which appears likely to replace DSA as first-line modality in the future. Furthermore, the advent of Guglielmi detachable coils and the ISAT trial have revolutionised the treatment of ruptured aneurysms, with a significant trend towards endovascular coiling away from operative clipping. Improvements in clinical experience, coiling technology and assistive devices now allow interventionalists to potentially treat the majority of aneurysms, including wide-necked or complex lesions. The uncertain long-term results of coiling, however, still fuel strong debate and controversy. This review summarises current diagnostic approaches to SAH from a radiological perspective, with an emphasis on aneurysmal SAH and an evidence-based approach to the role of imaging and interventional radiology in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  11. [Q fever. Description of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Irún, Á; González Santamaría, A R; Munguía Rozadilla, F; Herrero González, J L

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis of global distribution with an incidence of 3 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year. A variety of animals can be the coxiella reservoir which always must be taken into account when faced with a fever process in a compatible context. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve the prognosis, and prevent the development of chronic infection or other potential complications associated with the coxelliosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in Kazakhstan (1948-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talgat Nurmakhanov

    2015-09-01

    The southern regions of Kazakhstan should be considered endemic for CCHF with cases reported from these territories on an annual basis. Modern diagnostic technologies allow for rapid clinical diagnosis and for surveillance studies to monitor for potential expansion in known risk areas.

  13. Hemorrhagic Fevers - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English PDF Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - 繁體中文 (Chinese, Traditional ( ...

  14. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  15. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  16. Fever with Rashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Letha

    2018-07-01

    Fever with rashes is one of the commonest clinical problems a general practitioner or pediatrician has to face in day-to-day clinical practice. It can be a mild viral illness or a life-threatening illness like meningococcemia or Dengue hemorrhagic fever or it can be one with a lifelong consequence like Kawasaki disease. It is very important to arrive at a clinical diagnosis as early as possible with the minimum investigational facilities. The common causes associated with fever and rashes are infections, viral followed by other infections. There can be so many non-infectious causes also for fever and rashes like auto immune diseases, drug allergies etc. The type of rashes, their appearance in relation to the fever and pattern of spread to different parts of body and the disappearance, all will help in making a diagnosis. Often the diagnosis is clinical. In certain situations laboratory work up becomes essential.

  17. Massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Kamphausen, Thomas; Bajanowski, Thomas; Trübner, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    A 76-year-old male suffering from nephrolithiasis developed a shock syndrome 5 days after extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). CT scan of the abdomen showed massive haemorrhage around the right kidney. Although nephrectomy was performed immediately, the haemorrhage could not be controlled. Numerous units of erythrocytes were transfused, but the patient died. The autopsy revealed massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage around the right kidney. The kidney showed a subcapsular haematoma and a rupture of the capsule. The right renal artery was dissected. The inferior vena cava was lacerated. Accordingly, a hemorrhagic shock as the cause of death was determined, which might mainly have resulted from the laceration of the inferior vena cava due to ESWL. ESWL seems to be a relatively non-invasive modality, but one of its severe complications is perirenal hematoma. The injuries of the blood vessels might have been caused by excessive shock waves. Subsequently, anticoagulation therapy had been resumed 3 days after EWSL, which might have triggered the haemorrhage. Physicians should note that a haemorrhage after an ESWL can occur and they should pay attention to the postoperative management in aged individuals especially when they are under anticoagulation therapy.

  18. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Microbiological surveillance: viral hemorrhagic fever in Central African Republic: current serological data in man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakounné, E; Selekon, B; Morvan, J

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was conducted between 1994 and 1997 in forested areas of the Central African Republic (CAR) to determine the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies against several haemorrhagic fever viruses present in the region. Sera were obtained from 1762 individuals in two groups (Pygmy and Bantu locuted populations) living in 4 forested areas in the south of the country. Sera were tested for IgG antibodies against Ebola, Marburg, Rift Valley fever (RVF), Yellow fever (YF) and Hantaviruses by enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and against Lassa virus by immunofluorescent assay. The prevalence of IgG antibodies was 5.9% for Ebola, 2% for Marburg, 6.9% pour RVF, 6.5% for YF, 2% for Hantaan. No antibodies were detected against Lassa, Seoul, Puumala and Thottapalayam viruses. No IgM antibodies were detected against RVF and YF viruses. The distribution of antibodies appears to be related to tropical rain forest areas. This study indicates that several haemorrhagic fever viruses are endemic in forested areas of the CAR and could emerge due to environmental modification.

  20. Vesical Artery Embolization in Haemorrhagic Cystitis in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Gámez, Andrés, E-mail: agargamez@gmail.com; Bermúdez Bencerrey, Patricia, E-mail: PBERMUDE@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic (Spain); Brio-Sanagustin, Sonia, E-mail: sbrio@santpau.cat [Hospital de la Santa Creu y Sant Pau (Spain); Guerrero Vara, Rubén, E-mail: rguerrerov@santpau.cat [Hospital Clinic (Spain); Sisinni, Luisa, E-mail: lsisinni@santpau.cat [Hospital de la Santa Creu y Sant Pau (Spain); Stuart, Sam, E-mail: sam.stuart@gosh.nhs.uk; Roebuck, Derek, E-mail: Derek.Roebuck@gosh.nhs.uk [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom); Gómez Muñoz, Fernando, E-mail: FEGOMEZ@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Haemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon and, in its severe form, potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cancer therapy in children. The severe form involves macroscopic haematuria with blood clots, urinary obstruction and/or renal impairment. There are many therapeutic options to treat acute haemorrhage, but only recombinant factor VII has a high level of clinical evidence in children. Supraselective vesical artery embolization (SVAE) is an increasingly used therapeutic procedure for controlling haemorrhage in adults, but is less commonly used in children. This might be due to several factors, such as the invasive nature of the procedure, lack of appropriate medical experience and possible long-term side effects. We present three cases of children successfully treated by means of effective SVAE.

  1. Neurosurgical management of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of L-asparaginase induced intracranial thrombosis and subsequent haemorrhage in a newly diagnosed 30-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully managed by surgical intervention. At presentation, he had a Glasgow Coma Score of 7\\/15, was aphasic and had dense right hemiplegia. Neuroimaging revealed an acute anterior left middle cerebral artery infarct with parenchymal haemorrhagic conversion, mass effect and subfalcine herniation. He subsequently underwent left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of large frontal haematoma and decompressive craniectomy for cerebral oedema. Six months postoperatively he underwent titanium cranioplasty. He had made good clinical recovery and is currently mobilising independently with mild occasional episodes of expressive dysphasia, difficulty with fine motor movement on the right side, and has remained seizure free. This is the first documented case of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke managed by neurosurgical intervention. The authors emphasise the possible role of surgery in managing chemotherapy induced intracranial complications.

  2. The value of MRI in angiogram-negative intracranial haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, S.A. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Molyneux, A.J. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Anslow, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Byrne, J.V. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    In one year, cerebral angiograms were performed for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) on 334 patients. No cause for haemorrhage could be identified in 41 (12 %), 30 of whom had predominantly subarachnoid (SAH) and 11 predominantly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). These patients were prospectively examined by cranial MRI 1-6 weeks after the ictus. The MRI studies were positive in 7 patients (17 %). In the 30 patients examined after SAH, 2 studies were positive, showing an aneurysm in one case and a brain stem lesion of uncertain aetiology in the other. In those examined after PH, cavernous angiomas were shown in 2, a tumour in 1 and a vascular malformation in another; useful diagnostic information was thus obtained in 36 % of this group. (orig.)

  3. Trends in monitoring patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Frederiksen, H-J; Eskesen, V

    2005-01-01

    After aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), the clinical outcome depends upon the primary haemorrhage and a number of secondary insults in the acute post-haemorrhagic period. Some secondary insults are potentially preventable but prevention requires prompt recognition of cerebral or systemic...... implemented monitoring system provides answers but it also raises valuable new questions challenging our current understanding of the brain injury after SAH....... complications. Currently, several neuro-monitoring techniques are available; this review describes the most frequently used techniques and discusses indications for their use, and their value in diagnosis and prognosis. None of the techniques, when considered in isolation, has proved sufficient after SAH...... with the conventional monitoring systems, for example intracranial pressure measurements, transcranial Doppler ultrasound and modern neuro-imaging, direct assessment of biochemical markers by intracerebral microdialysis is promising in the advancement of neurointensive care of patients with SAH. A successfully...

  4. Spontaneous haemorrhage and rupture of third ventricular colloid cyst.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    Acute bleeding within a colloid cyst of the third ventricle represents a rare event causing sudden increase in the cyst volume that may lead to acute hydrocephalus and rapid neurological deterioration. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of haemorrhagic third ventricular colloid cyst and its management. A 77-year-old ex-smoker presented with unsteady gait, incontinence and gradually worsening confusion over a 3-week period. Brain CT scan findings were highly suggestive of a third ventricular colloid cyst with intraventricular rupture. He underwent cyst excision and histopathology, which confirmed the radiological diagnosis with evidence of haemorrhage within the cyst. A ventriculo peritoneal shunt was performed for delayed hydrocephalus. Surgical management of these patients must include emergency ventriculostomy followed by prompt surgical removal of the haemorrhagic cyst.

  5. What are the current therapeutic options for haemorrhagic strokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Kamal, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    The Factor Seven for Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke Trial (FAST) and Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage trial (INTERACT). Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating form of stroke carrying a mortality of up to 40% at one month. In our part of the world the levels of uncontrolled hypertension pose a greater risk of ICH for our population where ICH is about 30% of all strokes compared to 14% in developed countries. There is evidence to suggest that haematoma expansion occurs in as many as 70% of patients. This expansion translates into increased disability and death. Most of this expansion is within the initial three hours. Also early elevation of blood pressure (BP) is very common after ICH and many studies have highlighted an association between elevated BP post ICH and poor outcomes. The reason for this is postulated to be an increase in both the size of the haematoma and perilesional oedema. (author)

  6. Oropouche Fever: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Sakkas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV, an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and sylvatic transmission cycles, with the primary vector in the urban cycle being the anthropophilic biting midge Culicoides paraensis. Currently, there is no evidence of direct human-to-human OROV transmission. OROV fever is usually either undiagnosed due to its mild, self-limited manifestations or misdiagnosed because its clinical characteristics are similar to dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever, including malaria as well. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment, and in the absence of a vaccine for effective prophylaxis of human populations in endemic areas, the disease prevention relies solely on vector control strategies and personal protection measures. OROV fever is considered to have the potential to spread across the American continent and under favorable climatic conditions may expand its geographic distribution to other continents. In view of OROV’s emergence, increased interest for formerly neglected tropical diseases and within the One Health concept, the existing knowledge and gaps of knowledge on OROV fever are reviewed.

  7. Oropouche Fever: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Hercules; Bozidis, Petros; Franks, Ashley; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2018-04-04

    Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV), an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and sylvatic transmission cycles, with the primary vector in the urban cycle being the anthropophilic biting midge Culicoides paraensis . Currently, there is no evidence of direct human-to-human OROV transmission. OROV fever is usually either undiagnosed due to its mild, self-limited manifestations or misdiagnosed because its clinical characteristics are similar to dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever, including malaria as well. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment, and in the absence of a vaccine for effective prophylaxis of human populations in endemic areas, the disease prevention relies solely on vector control strategies and personal protection measures. OROV fever is considered to have the potential to spread across the American continent and under favorable climatic conditions may expand its geographic distribution to other continents. In view of OROV's emergence, increased interest for formerly neglected tropical diseases and within the One Health concept, the existing knowledge and gaps of knowledge on OROV fever are reviewed.

  8. International prospective observational study of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: Does weekend admission affect outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Iain A.; Dalton, Harry R.; Stanley, Adrian J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Out of hours admissions have higher mortality for many conditions but upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage studies have produced variable outcomes. Methods Prospective study of 12 months consecutive admissions of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage from four international high volume...

  9. Typhoid Fever Presenting With Acute Renal Failure And Hepatitis Simultaneously - A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajput R.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is an important health problem worldwide but its incidence is more in developing countries. Hepatic involvement is common, but both hepatic and renal involvement is rare in typhoid fever. We report a case of typhoid fever presenting with hepatitis and acute renal failure. A 17 year old male presenting with fever and pain abdomen was found to have raised blood urea, creatinine, liver enzymes and bilirubin. Widal and typhidot (IgM,IgG test were positive. His symptoms subsided and deranged parameters resolved with treatment of typhoid fever.

  10. Lithotrites and postoperative fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, David I; Lipkin, Michael E; Wang, Agnes J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risks of fever from different lithotrites after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PNL database is a prospective, multi-institutional, international PNL registry. Of 5,803 total...... with fever [Odds Ratio (OR) 1.17, p = 0.413], while diabetes (OR 1.32, p = 0.048), positive urine culture (OR 2.08, p PNL...... fever was not significantly different among the various lithotrites used in the CROES PNL study....

  11. Perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Heung Chul; Lee, In Sun; Hwang, Woo Chul; Namkung, Sook

    2003-01-01

    Duplication cysts of the gastrointestinal tract are rare congenital abnormalities. Ectopic gastric mucosa, which can be found in duplications, may cause peptic ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. We report a 1-year-old boy with a perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation caused by peptic ulceration of the duplication cyst. It presented a snowman-like appearance consisting of a small, thick-walled, true enteric cyst and a large, thin-walled haemorrhagic pseudocyst on US and CT. It is an unusual manifestation of a duplication cyst, which has not been reported in the English language literature. (orig.)

  12. Dengue fever in pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phupong Vorapong

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue, a mosquito-borne flavivirus infection, is endemic in Southeast Asia. Currently, the incidence has been increasing among adults. Case presentation A 26-year-old Thai woman, G1P0 31 weeks pregnancy, presented with epigastric pain for 1 day. She also had a high-grade fever for 4 days. The physical examination, complete blood counts as well as serology confirmed dengue fever. The patient was under conservative treatment despite severe thrombocytopenia. She was well at the 3rd day of discharge and 1-week follow-up. The pregnancy continued until term without any complication and she delivered vaginally a healthy female baby. Conclusions More cases of dengue infection in pregnancy can be found due to the increasing incidence during adulthood. It should be suspected when a pregnant woman presents with symptoms and signs like in a non-pregnant. Conservative treatment should be conducted unless there are any complications.

  13. Epidural Analgesia and Fever at Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Shifman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of labor fever under epidural analgesia (EA and to evaluate its impact on the courses of puerperium and early neonatality. Subjects and methods. The paper presents the data of a prospective study of the course of labor, puerperium, and early neonatality in 397 women in whom labors occurred at the Republican Peritoneal Center in 2006. A study group included 324 parturients in whom labor pain was relieved by EA. A comparison group comprised 55 parturients in whom no analgesics were used at labor. Results. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups in the incidence of labor fever and complicated puerperium and in that of neonatal pyoseptic diseases. Key words: labor hyperthermia, epidural analgesia, labor pain relief.

  14. Vaccines for preventing typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Rachael; Paul, Mical; Richardson, Marty; Neuberger, Ami

    2018-05-31

    )A three-dose schedule of Ty21a vaccine probably prevents around half of typhoid cases during the first three years after vaccination (cumulative efficacy 2.5 to 3 years: 50%, 95% CI 35% to 61%, 4 trials, 235,239 participants, moderate-certainty evidence). These data include patients aged 3 to 44 years.Compared with placebo, this vaccine probably does not cause more vomiting, diarrhoea, nausea or abdominal pain (2 trials, 2066 participants; moderate-certainty evidence), headache, or rash (1 trial, 1190 participants; moderate-certainty evidence); however, fever (2 trials, 2066 participants; moderate-certainty evidence) is probably more common following vaccination.Vi polysaccharide vaccine (injection, one dose)A single dose of Vi polysaccharide vaccine prevents around two-thirds of typhoid cases in the first year after vaccination (year 1: 69%, 95% CI 63% to 74%; 3 trials, 99,979 participants; high-certainty evidence). In year 2, trial results were more variable, with the vaccine probably preventing between 45% and 69% of typhoid cases (year 2: 59%, 95% CI 45% to 69%; 4 trials, 194,969 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). These data included participants aged 2 to 55 years of age.The three-year cumulative efficacy of the vaccine may be around 55% (95% CI 30% to 70%; 11,384 participants, 1 trial; low-certainty evidence). These data came from a single trial conducted in South Africa in the 1980s in participants aged 5 to 15 years.Compared with placebo, this vaccine probably did not increase the incidence of fever (3 trials, 132,261 participants; moderate-certainty evidence) or erythema (3 trials, 132,261 participants; low-certainty evidence); however, swelling (3 trials, 1767 participants; moderate-certainty evidence) and pain at the injection site (1 trial, 667 participants; moderate-certainty evidence) were more common in the vaccine group.Vi-rEPA vaccine (two doses)Administration of two doses of the Vi-rEPA vaccine probably prevents between 50% and 96% of typhoid

  15. STUDY OF ULTRASOUND FINDING IN DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Bajaj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue fever (DF is a viral haemorrhagic fever causing severe morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The aim of the study is to describe the role of ultrasonography (USG in the assessment of patients with Dengue fever, and its complications and to prove ultrasound is useful in the diagnosis during an epidemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective study was conducted in 2016 comprising of 178 patients who were serologically positive for dengue, radiological investigations were conducted in all cases. RESULTS Out of 178 patients Males (N=117 are more effected subjects in the study. female: Male ratio is 1:2. Hepatomegaly 74.1% which is most common findings in study, 113 (63.4% had GB wall thickening 98 had ascites (55%, 32 had pleural effusion (17.9%. most commonly seen in the age group of 20-39 years. Hepatomegaly was the most common finding noted in 67 patients (37.6%, followed by GB wall thickening in 65 patients (36.1%. Hepatomegaly was more common in 0-19 is 56 patients with 31.4% years age group Ascites in >40 years age group (16.8%. Hepatomegaly was seen in most of the patients whose platelet count was <40,000. (94.7%. GB wall thickening (88.5% common findings seen in patients whose platelet count was <40,000. In patients with platelet count of 40,000-80,000, Ascites is most common finding (87.5%, followed by Splenomegaly (60.7%. In patients whose platelet count was 80,000-150,000, Ascites (50% was more common than Splenomegaly (45.8%. In three patients with platelet count more than 150,000, no sonological abnormality was detected. CONCLUSIONS Ultrasound findings of hepatic changes, GB wall oedema, splenomegaly, ascites and pleural effusion in patients presenting with signs and symptoms of Dengue fever during an epidemic are diagnostic. Contributing in the differential diagnosis with other causes of febrile disease.

  16. Early fever after trauma: Does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Holly E; Rowell, Susan; Morris, Cynthia; Lin, Amber L; Schreiber, Martin A

    2018-01-01

    Fever is strongly associated with poor outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that early fever is a direct result of brain injury and thus would be more common in TBI than in patients without brain injury and associated with inflammation. We prospectively enrolled patients with major trauma with and without TBI from a busy Level I trauma center intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were assigned to one of four groups based on their presenting Head Abbreviated Injury Severity Scale scores: multiple injuries: head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score greater than 2, one other region greater than 2; isolated head: head AIS score greater than 2, all other regions less than 3; isolated body: one region greater than 2, excluding head/face; minor injury: no region with AIS greater than 2. Early fever was defined as at least one recorded temperature greater than 38.3°C in the first 48 hours after admission. Outcome measures included neurologic deterioration, length of stay in the ICU, hospital mortality, discharge Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended, and plasma levels of seven key cytokines at admission and 24 hours (exploratory). Two hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled, including subjects with multiple injuries (n = 59), isolated head (n = 97), isolated body (n = 100), and minor trauma (n = 12). The incidence of fever was similar in all groups irrespective of injury (11-24%). In all groups, there was a significant association between the presence of early fever and death in the hospital (6-18% vs. 0-3%), as well as longer median ICU stays (3-7 days vs. 2-3 days). Fever was significantly associated with elevated IL-6 at admission (50.7 pg/dL vs. 16.9 pg/dL, p = 0.0067) and at 24 hours (83.1 pg/dL vs. 17.1 pg/dL, p = 0.0025) in the isolated head injury group. Contrary to our hypothesis, early fever was not more common in patients with brain injury, though fever was associated with longer ICU stays and death in all groups. Additionally, fever was

  17. STUDIES ON TUBERCULIN FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles H.; Atkins, Elisha

    1959-01-01

    Evidence has been presented that the fever elicited by intravenous administration of old tuberculin (O.T.) in BCG-infected rabbits is a specific property of this hypersensitivity system and is probably not due to contamination of tuberculin with bacterial endotoxins. Daily injections of O.T. in sensitized animals resulted in a rapid tolerance to its pyrogenic effect. Tuberculin tolerance can be differentiated from that occurring with endotoxins and was invariably associated with the development of a negative skin test. The mechanism of this tolerance would thus appear to be desensitization. A circulating pyrogen found during tuberculin fever was indistinguishable in its biologic effects from endogenous pyrogens obtained in several other types of experimental fever. This material produced fevers in normal recipients and therefore may be clearly differentiated from O.T. itself which was pyrogenic only to sensitized animals. Since the titer of serum pyrogen was directly proportional to the degree of fever induced by injection of O.T. in the donor animals, a causal relation is suggested. On the basis of these findings, it is postulated that tuberculin fever is due to a circulating endogenous pyrogen released by a specific action of O.T. on sensitized cells of the host. PMID:13641561

  18. Intra-arterial nimodipine for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) has shown a promising effect on cerebral vasospasm (CV) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. At our institution, Rigshospitalet, IAN treatment has been used since 2009, but the short- and long-term clinical efficacy of IAN has not yet been assessed. The purpo...

  19. Review of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage in Sagamu, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of these deliveries, 76 had primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), giving a prevalence of 3.1%. Uterine atony and genital tract trauma were the main causes of the primary PPH. Associated factors were prolonged second and third stages of labour, induction and augmentation of labour with oxytocin and instrumental ...

  20. New trends in the management of postpartum haemorrhage | Dyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New trends in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. ... Africa is poor access to basic obstetric care, blood products and basic commodities, such as electricity, for the refrigeration of blood and drugs such as oxytocin.1 Nevertheless, there are many areas where management, and hence outcomes, could be improved.

  1. Expression of VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) YL strain in Northeast of China, under control of the ats1A promoter from Rubisco small subunit genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into the transfer deoxyribonucleic acid (T-DNA) region of plant transfer vector pCAMBIA1300 and transferred to ...

  2. Haemorrhagic Vaginal Discharge Following Ovariectomy in a Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic Vaginal Discharge Following Ovariectomy in a Three Year Old Domestic Short-haired Cat. RA Ajadi, OO Adebayo, TA Ajadi. Abstract. Nigerian Veterinary Journal, VOL:33 (1) 403-406. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  3. Prenatal MR imaging features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, Francesca; Malova, Mariya; Ramenghi, Luca A.; Cesaretti, Claudia; Parazzini, Cecilia; Doneda, Chiara; Righini, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions have not been sufficiently characterised. We aimed to better define their MR imaging characteristics, documenting the location, extension, evolution stage and anatomic sequelae, and to better understand cerebellar haemorrhage pathophysiology. We screened our foetal MR imaging database (3200 cases) for reports of haemorrhagic lesions affecting only the cerebellum (without any supratentorial bleeding or other clastic lesions), defined as one of the following: T2-weighted hypointense or mixed hypo-/hyperintense signal; rim of T2-weighted hypointense signal covering the surface of volume-reduced parenchyma; T1-weighted hyperintense signal; increased DWI signal. Seventeen cases corresponded to the selection criteria. All lesions occurred before the 26th week of gestation, with prevalent origin from the peripheral-caudal portion of the hemispheres and equal frequency of unilateral/bilateral involvement. The caudal vermis appeared affected in 2/3 of cases, not in all cases confirmed postnatally. Lesions evolved towards malformed cerebellar foliation. The aetiology and pathophysiology were unknown, although in a subset of cases intra- and extracranial venous engorgement seemed to play a key role. Onset from the peripheral and caudal portion of the hemispheres seems characteristic of prenatal cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions. Elective involvement of the peripheral germinal matrix is hypothesised. (orig.)

  4. Periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage in low-birth-weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage (PV-IVH) aInong very-low-birthweight infants at Baragwanath Hospital has not been well docwnented. In this prospective study, a total of 282 live-born infants with birth weights of 1 000 - 1 749 g were studied over a 41/2-month period. Every infant had at least ...

  5. Tranexamic acid for control of haemorrhage in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avvisati, G.; ten Cate, J. W.; Büller, H. R.; Mandelli, F.

    1989-01-01

    In a double-blind study, 12 consecutive patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia were randomised either to tranexamic acid (TA group) or to placebo (control group) for 6 days to see whether inhibition of fibrinolysis would reduce haemorrhage and transfusion requirements. The total study period

  6. Considerable delay in diagnosis and acute management of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Eskesen, Vagn; Hauerberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Rebleeding from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) usually occurs within the first six hours after the initial bleeding. Rebleeding can be prevented effectively with tranexamic acid (TXA). Although a broad consensus has evolved that SAH should be treated as an emergency, it is likely that delays do...

  7. CT and MRI of haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Katayama, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Itoh, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Tsuchida, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Ohmoto, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    Six patients with haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas were studied by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T with spin-echo pulse sequences. The nature of the tumour and the presence of a haematoma were confirmed by surgery and microscopic examination in all cases. Four neuromas arose from the acoustic nerves and two from the trigeminal. Four of the six patients suffered from sudden onset or rapid worsening of symptoms including headache, vertigo and/or hemifacial motor and sensory disturbances. CT in the acute stage revealed a hyperdense area or a fluid-fluid level (FFL). The hyperdense area disappeared on CT repeated in the chronic stage. On MRI in subacute and chronic stages the haemorrhage showed hyperintensity on both T1 and T2 weighting in five cases examined between 16 and 46 days after the onset, and isointensity on T1 weighting and an FFL on T2 weighting in one case examined 12 days after the onset of symptoms. A well-defined low intensity rim indicating prior haemorrhage was observed on T2-weighted images in three cases. MRI was more effectie than CT in detecting haemorrhage into the tumours and in staging it. (orig.)

  8. Uterine artery embolization: an effective treatment for intractable obstetric haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, T.-M.; Tseng, H.-S. E-mail: hstseng@vghtpe.gov.tw; Lee, R.-C.; Wang, J.-H.; Chang, C.-Y

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To present the findings of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the management of obstetric haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From October 1999 to February 2003, 10 women with postpartum haemorrhage (n=7) and post-abortion haemorrhage with placenta accreta (n=3), were referred to our department for pelvic angiography and possible arterial embolization. RESULTS: Angiography revealed engorged and tortuous uterine arteries in all patients; and contrast medium extravasation in three patients. Eight patients (three with and five without detectable active bleeding) then underwent bilateral UAE. Medium-sized (250-355 {mu}m) polyvinyl alcohol particles were injected via a coaxial catheter into the uterine arteries, followed by gelatin sponge pieces via a 4 F Cobra catheter. Microcoil devascularization was also performed in the two patients with visible, active bleeding. The vaginal bleeding resolved in all patients, without any ischaemic complications. At follow-up, all patients who underwent UAE had normal menstruation; three of them subsequently gave birth to full-term healthy babies. CONCLUSION: Selective UAE by the coaxial method is safe and effective to control obstetric haemorrhage, with the potential to preserve fertility.

  9. Prospective study of sentinel headache in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, F.H.H.; Wijdicks, E.F.M.; Graaf, Y. van der; Weerdesteyn-van Vliet, F.A.C.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Gijn, J. van

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective surveys of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage suggest that minor episodes with sudden headache (warning leaks) may precede rupture of an aneurysm, and that early recognition and surgery might lead to improved outcome. We studied 148 patients with sudden and severe headache

  10. Post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage following traditional uvulectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    routinely performed in children due to the traditional belief that an elongated uvula is responsible for all throat problems, including suffocation during sleep in the neonatal period. Occasionally, it is done during ethnic identification ritual practices.2 The commonest complications following this procedure include haemorrhage,.

  11. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J.; Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.

    1999-01-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F; Gerardin, E; Thiebot, J [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J P; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  13. Life threatening vaginal haemorrhage from coital laceration in a post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: A 55-year-old woman who presented as an emergency with haemorrhagic shock following vaginal bleeding from consensual coitus is presented. She was resuscitated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. The vaginal laceration of about 5 cm on the right side of the posterior fornix was sutured ...

  14. Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute abdominal pain in a 12-year-old girl. Rolf P. Dahmen a,c. , Gerhard Stuhldreier b. , Hartmut Bindewald c and Malte Weinrich a,c. Pancreatic disorders are a relatively uncommon event in children, particularly the development of pancreatic pseudocysts. The most ...

  15. Hypopituitarism after subarachnoid haemorrhage, do we know enough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Khajeh (Ladbon); K. Blijdorp (Karin); S.J.C.M.M. Neggers (Bas); G.M. Ribbers (Gerard); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fatigue, slowness, apathy and decrease in level of activity are common long-term complaints after a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). They resemble the symptoms frequently found in patients with endocrine dysfunction. Pituitary dysfunction may be the result of SAH or its

  16. Comparison of serum lipid profile in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Sharif, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    To compare serum lipid profile between patients of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes. Study Design: Cross sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from August 2004 to February 2005. Methodology: Patients with diagnosis of stroke comprising 100 consecutive patients each of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes were included in the study while patients on lipid lowering therapy were excluded from study. To determine the subtype of stroke, clinical examination followed by CT scan of brain was done. A serum sample after 8 hours of overnight fasting was taken on the next day of admission for both groups of patients. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was determined, using enzymatic colorimetric method. Statistical analysis was done by comparison of lipid profile in two subgroups, using proportion test for any significant difference. Results: The mean age at presentation of patients with stroke was 64.2+-12 years with a male to female ratio of 3.6:1. In 100 ischaemic stroke patients, raised serum total cholesterol was seen in 42, triglyceride in 04, LDL-cholesterol in 05 and VLDL-cholesterol in 07 patients. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below the normal reference in 31 cases. On the other hand, serum total cholesterol and triglycerides was raised in 05 patients each, LDL-cholesterol in 09 and VLDL-cholesterol in 03 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below normal in 04 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. On comparison, there were significantly greater number of patients with raised serum cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol in ischaemic stroke than haemorrhagic stroke (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found on comparing serum values of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke for triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke patients had high serum total cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol levels as compared to

  17. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I prevent yellow fever? Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow fever. Yellow fever vaccine ... such as those containing DEET. 3 Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine is a live, weakened virus. It is ...

  18. Placenta Praevia: Incidence, Risk Factors, Maternal and Fetal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal complications included post-partum anaemia, postpartum haemorrhage & operative site infection. There were two maternal deaths (1.48%) and the perinatal mortality rate was 18.7%. Conclusion: The incidence of Placenta praevia was relatively high and associated with high maternal and perinatal complications.

  19. Design of the CHina Epidemiology Research in Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (CHERISH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy; Zhang, Jing Fen; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Ji Guang; Liu, Guo Rong; Li, Yue Chun; Wang, Min; Cheng, Guo Juan; Anderson, Craig S

    2010-12-01

    Limited epidemiological data exist on subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in China. Effective prevention requires knowledge of the rates and risk factors for SAH the most lethal type of stroke that most often affects younger adults. We report the methods and the initial experience of a new study to address this deficiency. To determine the incidence, risk factors, management and outcomes of SAH. The CHina Epidemiology Research In Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (CHERISH) is a prospective, population-based, case-control study in a defined region (study population 1.7 million) of the city of Baotou in Inner Mongolia, China. Cases of spontaneous SAH are identified using standard definitions through prospective surveillance of all major acute care hospitals with neurology/neurosurgery facilities, small hospitals/clinics, and the single city crematorium over a 2-year period. Verbal autopsy procedures are used to ascertain the probable causes of deaths outside of hospital. For each case, two nonrelative controls without SAH are matched by age (5-year strata), gender, and district of residence. Data are collected on socio-demography, lifestyle factors, and medical history, and blood is taken for the extraction and storage of DNA. Details of the clinical features, presentation, and management of SAH are obtained from cases, and survivors provide details on health care utilisation, physical function, health-related quality of life, and complications, at 6-months. The primary outcomes are overall, age- and gender-specific incidence, relative (odds ratios) and population-attributable risks for defined exposures, and 28-day and 6-month case fatality ratios and other outcomes. Preliminary experience confirms the completeness of the surveillance methods, with no clear missed out-of-hospital cases of SAH with sudden death, and of high participation and reliable data collection procedures. CHERISH is well placed to provide reliable estimates of the burden of SAH in China. © 2010 The Authors

  20. Yellow fever: epidemiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2007-03-15

    Yellow fever continues to occur in regions of Africa and South America, despite the availability of effective vaccines. Recently, some cases of severe neurologic disease and multiorgan system disease have been described in individuals who received yellow fever vaccine. These events have focused attention on the need to define criteria for judicious use of yellow fever vaccine and to describe the spectrum of adverse events that may be associated with yellow fever vaccine. Describing host factors that would increase risk of these events and identifying potential treatment modalities for yellow fever and yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events are subjects of intense investigation.

  1. Antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Haleema; Beaumont, Danielle; Pavord, Sue; Gayet-Ageron, Angele; Ker, Katharine; Mousa, Hatem A

    2018-02-20

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) - heaving bleeding within the first 24 hours after giving birth - is one of the main causes of death of women after childbirth. Antifibrinolytics, primarily tranexamic acid (TXA), have been shown to reduce bleeding in surgery and safely reduces mortality in trauma patients with bleeding without increasing the risk of adverse events.An earlier Cochrane review on treatments for primary PPH covered all the various available treatments - that review has now been split by types of treatment. This new review concentrates only on the use of antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary PPH. To determine the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary PPH. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (28 May 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-randomised trials of antifibrinolytic drugs (aprotinin, TXA, epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) and aminomethylbenzoic acid, administered by whatever route) for primary PPH in women.Participants in the trials were women after birth following a pregnancy of at least 24 weeks' gestation with a diagnosis of PPH, regardless of mode of birth (vaginal or caesarean section) or other aspects of third stage management.We have not included quasi-randomised trials, or cross-over studies. Studies reported as abstracts have not been included if there was insufficient information to allow assessment of risk of bias.In this review we only identified studies looking at TXA. Two review authors independently extracted data from each study using an agreed form. We entered data into Review Manager software and checked for accuracy.For key review outcomes, we rated the quality of the evidence as 'high', 'moderate', 'low' or 'very low' according to the GRADE approach. Three trials (20,412 women) met our inclusion criteria. Two trials

  2. Uterine massage for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Abdel-Aleem, Hany; Abdel-Aleem, Mahmoud A

    2013-07-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) (bleeding from the genital tract after childbirth) is a major cause of maternal mortality and disability, particularly in under-resourced areas. In these settings, uterotonics are often not accessible. There is a need for simple, inexpensive techniques which can be applied in low-resourced settings to prevent and treat PPH. Uterine massage is recommended as part of the routine active management of the third stage of labour. However, it is not known whether it is effective. If shown to be effective, uterine massage would represent a simple intervention with the potential to have a major effect on PPH and maternal mortality in under-resourced settings. To determine the effectiveness of uterine massage after birth and before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, to reduce postpartum blood loss and associated morbidity and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2013). All published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials comparing uterine massage alone or in addition to uterotonics before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, with non-massage. Two researchers independently considered trials for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data using the agreed form. Data were checked for accuracy. The effect of uterine massage commenced before or after placental delivery were first assessed separately, and then the combined for an overall result. This review included two randomised controlled trials. The first trial included 200 women who were randomised to receive uterine massage or no massage following delivery of the placenta, after active management of the third stage of labour including use of oxytocin. The numbers of women with blood loss more than 500 mL was small, with no statistically significant difference (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 1.67). There were no cases of retained placenta in either group. The mean

  3. Febres hemorrágicas por vírus no Brasil Viral hemorrhagic fevers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Chamando a atenção para as febres hemorrágicas por vírus, que em sua maioria tem escassa informação divulgada e provavelmente são subnotificadas, mostra-se neste artigo casos clínicos das 4 doenças deste tipo que ocorrem no Brasil: febre amarela, dengue hemorrágico/síndrome de choque do dengue, febre hemorrágica por arenavírus e síndrome pulmonar e cardiovascular por hantavírus. Também, relevantes aspectos clínicos, laboratoriais e epidemiológicos destas viroses são aqui abordados. São doenças que têm alta letalidade e induzem extravasamento capilar e coagulopatia, que podem ser evidenciados pela elevação do hematócrito e plaquetopenia. A suspeita clínica e o tratamento precoce são fundamentais à sobrevida dos pacientes.To call atention to viral hemorrhagic fevers, diseases that are mostly underdivulged and, probably, undereported, we present here case reports of the 4 diseases of this kind that occur in Brazil: yellow fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, arenavirus haemorrhagic fever and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. Relevant clinical, epidemiological and laboratorial diagnostic aspects of these viral haemorrhagic fevers are also shown here. These diseases have a high case fatality rate, induce capillary leaking and blood coagulation disturbances that are evidenced by hemoconcentrantion and thrombocytopenia. An early clinical diagnosis and treatment is fundamental for patient survival.

  4. Risk factors for the incidence of dengue virus infection in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Maria G; Morato, Vanessa; Barreto, Florisneide R; Mendes, Carlos M C; Barreto, Maurício L; Costa, Maria da Conceição N

    2012-11-01

    To estimate the seroincidence of dengue in children living in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil and to evaluate the factors associated.   A prospective serological survey was carried out in a sample of children 0-3 years of age. A multilevel logistic model was used to identify the determinants of seroincidence. The seroprevalence of dengue was 26.6% in the 625 children evaluated. A second survey detected an incidence of 33.2%. Multilevel logistic regression showed a statistically significant association between the seroincidence of dengue and age and the premises index. In Salvador, the dengue virus is in active circulation during early childhood; consequently, children have heterotypic antibodies and run a high risk of developing dengue haemorrhagic fever, because the sequence and intensity of the three dengue virus serotypes currently circulating in this city are very similar to those that were circulating in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2008. Therefore, the authors strongly recommend that the health authorities in cities with a similar epidemiological scenario be aware of this risk and implement improvements in health care, particularly targeting the paediatric age groups. In addition, information should be provided to the population and actions should be implemented to combat this vector. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days should raise suspicion of typhoid or paratyphoid fever. Typhoid fever is a nationally notifiable disease. TREATMENT Specific ... typhoid-fever Table 3-21. Vaccines to prevent typhoid fever VACCINA- TION AGE (y) DOSE, MODE OF ADMINISTRA- ...

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kucuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive inherited disease with a course of autoinflammation, which is characterized by the episodes of fever and serositis. It affects the populations from Mediterranean basin. Genetic mutation of the disease is on MEFV gene located on short arm of Chromosome 16. The disease is diagnosed based on clinical evaluation. Amyloidosis is the most important complication. The only agent that decreases the development of amyloidosis and the frequency and severity of the episodes is colchicine, which has been used for about 40 years. In this review, we aimed to discuss especially the most recent advances about Familial Mediterranean Fever which is commonly seen in our population.

  7. Rift Valley Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Amy

    2017-06-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe veterinary disease of livestock that also causes moderate to severe illness in people. The life cycle of RVF is complex and involves mosquitoes, livestock, people, and the environment. RVF virus is transmitted from either mosquitoes or farm animals to humans, but is generally not transmitted from person to person. People can develop different diseases after infection, including febrile illness, ocular disease, hemorrhagic fever, or encephalitis. There is a significant risk for emergence of RVF into new locations, which would affect human health and livestock industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Urinary tract infections and post-operative fever in percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Jorge; Smith, Arthur; Geavlete, Petrisor; Shah, Hemendra; Kural, Ali Riza; de Sio, Marco; Amón Sesmero, José H.; Hoznek, András; de la Rosette, Jean

    2013-01-01

    To review the incidence of UTIs, post-operative fever, and risk factors for post-operative fever in PCNL patients. Between 2007 and 2009, consecutive PCNL patients were enrolled from 96 centers participating in the PCNL Global Study. Only data from patients with pre-operative urine samples and who

  9. Control measures against Q fever in Dutch dairy goat herds: epidemiological and economical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontje, D.M.; Backer, J.A.; Roest, H.I.J.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Bergevoet, R.H.M.; Roermund, van H.J.W.

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the disease dynamics in goat herds and to study the effect of control measures, a Q fever transmission model was developed by CVI. With such a model we can study questions like ‘What strategy can lower the incidence of Q fever in goats or even lead to disease extinction?’ and ‘Is

  10. Urinary tract infections and post-operative fever in percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Jorge; Smith, Arthur; Geavlete, Petrisor

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the incidence of UTIs, post-operative fever, and risk factors for post-operative fever in PCNL patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 2007 and 2009, consecutive PCNL patients were enrolled from 96 centers participating in the PCNL Global Study. Only data from patients with pre...

  11. Characterizing amide proton transfer imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions using 3T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ha-Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Yansong [Philips Healthcare, MR Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals in acute and subacute haemorrhage brain lesions of various underlying aetiologies. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic haemorrhage brain lesions including tumorous (n = 16) and non-tumorous lesions (n = 7) were evaluated. APT imaging was performed and analyzed with magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}). Regions of interest were defined as the enhancing portion (when present), acute or subacute haemorrhage, and normal-appearing white matter based on anatomical MRI. MTR{sub asym} values were compared among groups and components using a linear mixed model. MTR{sub asym} values were 3.68 % in acute haemorrhage, 1.6 % in subacute haemorrhage, 2.65 % in the enhancing portion, and 0.38 % in normal white matter. According to the linear mixed model, the distribution of MTR{sub asym} values among components was not significantly different between tumour and non-tumour groups. MTR{sub asym} in acute haemorrhage was significantly higher than those in the other regions regardless of underlying pathology. Acute haemorrhages showed high MTR{sub asym} regardless of the underlying pathology, whereas subacute haemorrhages showed lower MTR{sub asym} than acute haemorrhages. These results can aid in the interpretation of APT imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions. (orig.)

  12. FETOMATERNAL HAEMORRHAGE – DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Domazet-Fink

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are several different causes for fetomaternal haemorrhage. Sinusoidal pattern, which is relatively characteristic for fetal anaemia, may in its final stages completely disappear. Differential diagnosis of silent trace of cardiotocogram with late decelerations is quite difficult to solve.Case report. A case of unusual injury of a pregnant woman is described. The injury led to fetomaternal haemorrhage. Typical sinusoidal pattern cardiotocogram was not seen and the differential diagnosis was hard to determine. Because of prompt intervention and efficient postnatal therapy the child and mother are both well. The dilemmas in regards to differential diagnosis are being discussed.Conclusions. It is important to be very careful in history taking even if the situation is urgent. If there is no explanation for pathological cardiotocogram, decision must be made according to pregnant woman’s wishes. Kleihauer-Betke test, which is easy to perform and gives much information, is described.

  13. Clinical presentation of late haemorrhagic disease of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, R.; Memon, Y.; Majeed, F.

    2008-01-01

    To observe the clinical presentation of late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn (LHDNB), and clinical improvement after the administration of vitamin K/sub 1/. This is a prospective descriptive study. All the children older than seven days who presented with bleeding were admitted in pediatrics ward of Isra University Hyderabad from April 2006 to April 2007 were included. Data collection was done by means of detailed proforma. Analysis was done on SPSS version 11. Thirty five cases were included. Commonest site of bleeding was subcutaneous followed by oral and injection site. Mean age of late haemorrhagic disease of newborn was 109 days and minimum age of presentation was 28 days. Common clinical presentations were irritability, convulsions, poor reflexes and poor feeding. Mostly recovery was within 24 hours after vit K. Late HDN results in severe hemorrhage especially hemorrhage in the central nervous system. Administration of Vitamin K (1mg, 1M) at birth can present these severe complications. (author)

  14. The role of fibrinogen and haemostatic assessment in postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne Juul

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a state of hypercoagulobility that might be an evolutionary way of protecting parturients from exsanguination following child birth. Observational studies suggest an association between a low level of fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) at the start of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH....... Paper III was based on two national Danish registries evaluating the predictability of postpartum blood transfusion. Prediction was found difficult. However, retained placental parts seemed to be the strongest predictor. Since this diagnosis is made very late and often in association with the onset...... describes the protocol for a RCT of early fibrinogen supplementation in women with severe postpartum haemorrhage. Several practical, ethical and trial management challenges need to be addressed when conducting independent clinical research involving parturients with severe bleeding, placebo...

  15. Ligation of internal iliac arteries for control of pelvic haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanwar Y

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective review of the internal iliac ligations (IAL done over a period of 3 years. Both gynaecological and obstetric cases were considered. A total of 46 ligations were performed. The additional treatment required was hysterectomy to control haemorrhage. Intra-and post-operative complications were noted. A comparative review of the effectiveness of IAL in different situations is done and alternative modalities of treatment are considered.

  16. Haemorrhagic enteritis seroconversion in turkey breeders: field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Ceruti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seroconversion to viral haemorrhagic enteritis (HE was studied in seven flocks of turkey breeders (17.974 birds in total, after 20 weeks of the onset of egg production. They showed no clinical signs, and mortality rate was normal. However, the infection caused a drop in egg production lasting about five weeks (-2.32 eggs laid during this period, but had no effect on hatching parameters.

  17. Endovascular control of haemorrhagic urological emergencies: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorpe Peter

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transarterial embolisation (TAE is an effective method in control of haemorrhage irrespective of the nature of urological emergency. As the technique and technology have evolved, it is now possible to perform highly selective embolisation. The aim of this study was to critically appraise feasibility and efficacy of therapeutic TAE in control of haemorrhagic urological emergencies using selective and non-selective embolisation. Specifically, we aimed to assess the impact of timing of embolisation on the requirement of blood transfusion and long-term morphological and functional follow-up of embolised organs. Methods This is a single institutional observational study carried out between March 1992 and March 2006. Records of all patients who underwent selective and non-selective angioembolisation to control bleeding in urological emergencies were reviewed. Data on success rate, periprocedural complications, timing of embolisation, requirement of blood transfusion and the long-term morphological and functional outcomes of embolised organs was recorded. Results Fourteen patients underwent endovascular control of bleeding as a result of trauma, iatrogenic injury and spontaneous perinephric haemorrhage during a period of 14 years. All these patients would have required emergency open surgery without the option of embolisation procedure. The mean time between the first presentation and embolisation was 22 hours (range 30 minutes to 60 hours. Mean pre-embolisation transfusion requirement was 6.8 units (range 0–22 units. None of the patients with successful embolisation required post-procedural blood transfusion. Permanent haemostasis was achieved in all but one patient, who required emergency nephrectomy. There were no serious procedure related post-embolisation complications. Conclusion Endovascular control using transarterial angioembolisation is an effective method for managing haematuria or haemorrhage in urological emergencies

  18. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Elise N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume. Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  19. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth / For Parents / Seasonal Allergies (Hay ... español Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno) About Seasonal Allergies "Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of ...

  20. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  1. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  2. [Carbetocin versus Oxytocin during caesarean section for preventing postpartum haemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, F; Agasse, J; Marpeau, L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of Carbetocin versus Oxyotcin during caesarean section for preventing postpartum haemorrhage. Prospective observational study (before/after design). Five hundred and forty patients who received an injection of Oxytocin were compared to 262 patients with single injection of 100 micrograms of Carbetocin. The primary outcome was to compare the differential hematocrit level between pre- and postoperative blood samples. The secondary outcome was to compare differential hemoglobin level and the use of complementary therapies for postpartum haemorrhage. We did not find any difference between the Oxytocin and Carbetocin groups on differential hematocrit level. There was no difference between the groups regarding the use of additionnal therapies (Sulproston injections, blood transfusions and surgery methods). The rate of postpartum haemorrhage was similar in the two groups (18.7% vs 21.6%; P=0.33). We found a lower percentage of patients with differential of hemoglobin level between 2 g/dL and 4 g/dL in the Carbetocin group (6.5% vs 15.6%, Poxytocin. Carbetocin seems to reduce the need for postoperative intravenous iron injection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of Mean Platelet Volume with Severity, Serology & Treatment Outcome in Dengue Fever: Prognostic Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kritika; Yadav, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Dengue fever (DF) with its severe manifestations such as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) has emerged as a major public health problem of international concern. Thrombocytopenia and bleeding are common complications of dengue fever, hence besides platelet counts, there is a need to assess the role of mean platelet volume. Studying association of mean platelet volume (MPV) with severity, serology & treatment outcome to assess its prognostic utility, which can be of great help in limiting morbidity & mortality associated with dengue fever. The present study was conducted in Central Pathology Lab of SMS Medical College & Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan from the period of March 2013 till October 2013. Blood samples were collected from 200 patients with NS 1 Antigen positivity experiencing febrile illness, clinically consistent with dengue infection. Evaluation of platelet counts, MPV, IgM and IgG antibodies was done in all these cases. Categorical data were presented as numbers (percent) and were compared among groups using Chi-square test. Groups compared for demographic data were presented as mean and standard deviation and were compared using student t-test, ANOVA and Post-Hoc Test, Tukey Test using SPSS, version 20 for Windows. A total of 200 Dengue fever cases were studied. Out of which, 68% cases were of DF, 23% DHF & 9% DSS i.e. classical dengue fever was most common presentation. Maximum (44%) cases were in age group of 15-24 years. Fever was the presenting complaint in all cases (100%). 98% cases of dengue had thrombocytopenia. MPV showed no significant correlation with severity, serology & treatment outcome, thus excluding its role in dengue cases. Mean platelet volume is not important as prognostic parameter in dengue fever.

  4. [Coexistence of acute appendicitis and dengue fever: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna-Ramos, Juan Fidel; Silva-Gracia, Carlos; Maya-Vacio, Gerardo Joel; Romero-Utrilla, Alejandra; Ríos-Burgueño, Efrén Rafael; Velarde-Félix, Jesús Salvador

    2017-12-01

    Dengue is the most important human viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It can be asymptomatic or it can present in any of its 3clinical forms: Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, some atypical manifestations have been reported in surgical emergencies caused by acute appendicitis in patients with dengue fever. We report the case of an 18-year-old Mexican male who presented to the emergency department of the General Hospital of Culiacan, Sinaloa, with symptoms of dengue fever, accompanied by crampy abdominal pain with positive Rovsing and Dunphy signs. Dengue infection was confirmed by a positive NS1 antigen test performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An abdominal ultrasound revealed an appendicular process; as the abdominal pain in the right side kept increasing, an open appendectomy was performed. Abundant inflammatory liquid was observed during the surgery, and the pathology laboratory reported an oedematous appendix with fibrinopurulent plaques, which agreed with acute ulcerative appendicitis. The patient was discharged fully recovered without complications during the follow-up period. Acute abdominal pain can be caused in some cases by dengue infection. This can be confusing, which can lead to unnecessary surgical interventions, creating additional morbidities and costs for the patient. This unusual and coincident acute appendicitis with dengue highlights the importance of performing careful clinical studies for appropriate decision making, especially in dengue endemic regions during an outbreak of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Arthropod-borne viral infections associated with a fever outbreak in the northern province of Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D M; el-Tigani, A; Botros, B A; Salib, A W; Olson, J G; McCarthy, M; Ksiazek, T G

    1994-08-01

    An outbreak of acute febrile illness occurred during August and September 1989 in the Northern Province of Sudan coinciding with a high population density of phlebotomine sandflies. An investigation was conducted to determine whether arboviruses were associated with human illness during this outbreak. Sera were obtained from 185 febrile individuals and tested for IgG and IgM antibody to selected arboviruses by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The prevalence of IgG antibody was 59% for West Nile (WN), 53% for Sandfly Fever Sicilian (SFS), 32% for Sandfly Fever Naples (SFN), 39% for Yellow Fever (YF), 24% for dengue-2 (DEN-2), 23% for Rift Valley Fever (RVF), 12% for Chikungunya (CHIK) and 5% for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) viruses. Antibody prevalences tended to increase with age for WN and YF viruses. Antibody rates were about the same for males and females for most of the viruses tested. The prevalence of IgM antibody to SFN was 24% and reciprocal IgM titre exceeded 12,800 for some individuals suggesting that this virus was the cause of recent infection. The prevalence of IgM antibody for the other viruses did not exceed 5%. The study indicated that several arboviruses were endemic and some of them may have caused human disease in the Northern Province of Sudan.

  6. Prevention of cardiovascular events in Asian patients with ischaemic stroke at high risk of cerebral haemorrhage (PICASSO): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Eun-Jae; Kwon, Sun U; Park, Jong-Ho; Kim, Yong-Jae; Hong, Keun-Sik; Wong, Lawrence K S; Yu, Sungwook; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Rha, Joung-Ho; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Seo, Woo-Keun; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Ju-Hun; Kwon, Jee-Hyun; Sohn, Sung-Il; Jung, Jin-Man; Navarro, Jose C; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2018-06-01

    The optimal treatment for patients with ischaemic stroke with a high risk of cerebral haemorrhage is unclear. We assessed the efficacy and safety of cilostazol versus aspirin, with and without probucol, in these patients. In this randomised, controlled, 2 × 2 factorial trial, we enrolled patients with ischaemic stroke with a history of or imaging findings of intracerebral haemorrhage or two or more microbleeds from 67 centres in three Asian countries. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to receive oral cilostazol (100 mg twice a day), aspirin (100 mg once a day), cilostazol plus probucol (250 mg twice a day), or aspirin plus probucol with centralised blocks stratified by centre. Cilostazol versus aspirin was investigated double-blinded; probucol treatment was open-label, but the outcome assessor was masked to assignment. The co-primary outcomes were incidence of the composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death (efficacy) and incidence of haemorrhagic stroke (safety), which were assessed in intention-to-treat and modified intention-to-treat populations. Efficacy was analysed with a non-inferiority test and a superiority test if non-inferiority was satisfied. Safety was assessed with a superiority test only. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01013532. Between Aug 1, 2009, and Aug 31, 2015, we randomly assigned 1534 patients to one of the four study groups, of whom 1512 were assessed for the co-primary endpoints. During a median follow-up of 1·9 years (IQR 1·0-3·0), the incidence of composite vascular events was 4·27 per 100 person-years in patients who received cilostazol and 5·33 per 100 person-years in patients who received aspirin (HR 0·80, 95% CI 0·57-1·11; non-inferiority p=0·0077; superiority p=0·18). Incidence of cerebral haemorrhage was 0·61 per 100 person-years in patients who received cilostazol and 1·20 per 100 person-years in those who received aspirin (HR 0·51, 97·5% CI 0·20-1·27; superiority

  7. Bilateral adrenal cystic neuroblastoma with superior vena cava syndrome and massive intracystic haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinarli, Faruk Guclu; Danaci, Murat; Diren, Baris; Tander, Burak; Rizalar, Riza; Dagdemir, Ayhan; Acar, Sabri

    2004-01-01

    Bilateral cystic adrenal tumours are a rare presentation of neuroblastoma. Intratumoural haemorrhage is a frequent finding in neuroblastoma, but is rarely symptomatic. We present an 11-month-old girl with predominantly cystic bilateral neuroblastomas and distant lymph-node metastasis. Massive intracystic haemorrhage and superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome were ominous prognostic factors, leading to death. Large tumours with intracystic haemorrhage might require a conservative approach. (orig.)

  8. Notification of rheumatic fever in South Africa - evidence for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information on the incidence of rheumatic fever (RF) and the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is required for the prevention of valvular heart disease in developing countries. In South Africa, RF was made a notifiable condition in 1989. It has recently been suggested that the reporting of RF cases ...

  9. Super selective transcatheter angiographic embolization: an effective and prophylactic treatment for massive obstetric haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yiming; Zhai Renyou; Qian Xiaojun; Wei Baojie; Gao Kun; Zhang Shilong; Liu Jinmei; Zhang Qiuhong; Jiang Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effect and safety of transcatheter angiographic embolization (TAE)for managing massive obstetric haemorrhage. Methods: 17 cases of obstetric massive haemorrhage or with haemorrhage tendency were treated with TAE. Among them 14 cases had haemorrhage already, including 10 cases after abortion, caesarean section or normal labor and other 4 of hydatidiform mole. 3 cases with obstetric haemorrhage tendency included 2 cases of placenta praevia and 1 case of cervical pregnancy. Selective catheterization into bilateral uterine arteries or internal iliac arteries for DSA, showed the cause and location of the haemorrhage and then embolized with gelfoam sponge chips (1-3 mm) or Polyvinyl Alcohol(PVA); and part of the cases with MTX through uterine arterial perfusion. Results: The successful rate of catheterization was 100%. The achievement in 14 cases showed no active haemorrhage immediately after the procedure and no vaginal bleeding after 1-5 days. In 3 prophylactic cases before abortion or uterine curettage, obstetric massive haemorrhage occurred in 1 case, but not so in other 2 cases. Conclusions: TAE is an effective treatment for obstetric massive haemorrhage, with the advantages of minimal trauma, fast and definite treating effect and less complications. Prophylactical application for high risk patients can reduce the bleeding and mortality. (authors)

  10. Fever and rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D

    1996-03-01

    The combination of fever and rash comprises an extensive differential diagnosis. Many of the causes of this presentation are life-threatening. In this article, rashes are categorized as petechial, maculopapular, vesicular, erythematous, and urticarial. Each type of rash is then divided into infectious etiologies, both treatable and nontreatable, and noninfectious etiologies. It is usually possible to arrive at a workable differential diagnosis when clinical, historical, and epidemiologic factors are considered.

  11. Fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Matsui, Akira; Tanaka, Fumiko; Okuno, Yoshishige; Mitsumori, Michihide; Torizuka, Tatsurou; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Shimbo, Shin-ichirou

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a commonly performed imaging modality in deteting pyrogenic lesions in cases of long-standing inexplainable fever. To re-evaluate the significance of gallium imaging in such cases, a retrospective review was made of 56 scans performed in febrile patients in whom sufficient clinical and laboratory findings were obtained. Gallium scans were true positive in 30 patients, false positive in 3, true negative in 19, and false negative in 4. In the group of true positive, local inflammatory lesions were detected in 23 patients with a final diagnosis of lung tuberculosis, urinary tract infection, and inflammatory joint disease. Abnormal gallium accumulation, as shown in the other 7 patients, provided clues to the diagnosis of generalized disorders, such as hematological malignancies (n=3), systemic autoimmune diseases (n=3), and severe infectious mononucleosis (n=one). In the group of false positive, gallium imaging revealed intestinal excretion of gallium in 2 patients and physiological pulmonary hilar accumulation in one. In the true negative group of 19 patients, fever of unknown origin was resolved spontaneously in 12 patients, and with antibiotics and corticosteroids in 2 and 5 patients, respectively. Four patients having false negative scans were finally diagnosed as having urinary tract infection (n=2), bacterial meningitis (n=one), and polyarteritis (n=one). Gallium imaging would remain the technique of choice in searching for origin of unknown fever. It may also be useful for early diagnosis of systemic disease, as well as focal inflammation. (N.K.)

  12. Reported 5 cases of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Fars province in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rezaei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF is a viral hemorrhagic disease and a zoonosis disease that has been developed in people who deal with animals such as cattle and butchers. The diagnosis of CCHF is performed by detection of human antibodies (IgG and IgM against CCHF virus. Five Patients with CCHF occurred in Fath Abad’s village (in Fars province in the summer of 2011. All patients were men and aged 25-46 years old. Three patients were farmer and two other ones were butchers. The samples were sent to the National Reference Laboratory for Arboviruses and Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers (Pasteur Institute of Iran in Tehran. The result of laboratory test for all patients was positive. None of the patients had died. Since the CCHF is rare, present study was aimed to assess the causes of the disease’s epidemic and clinical and laboratory symptoms stones.

  13. Surveillance of Rift Valley Fever in Iran between 2001 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh CHINIKAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an acute zoonotic viral disease that mostly affects ruminants with an occasional spillover as human infection. Following the outbreak of RVF in Saudi Arabia in 2000, surveillance of both animal and human population in Iran increased until 2011. During this period 1206 ovine, 405 caprine, 325 bovine and 28 camel samples were tested for RVFV in nine provinces in Iran. None of these samples tested IgG positive. Moreover, amongst 37 clinically suspected human cases of patients with RVF symptoms, none of these samples tested positive for RVFV. Despite the fact that no positive cases in human or animal populations were identified in Iran, surveillance and monitoring of viral haemorrhagic fevers including RVFV will continue.

  14. Surveillance of Rift Valley Fever in Iran between 2001 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh CHINIKAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an acute zoonotic viral disease that mostly affects ruminants with an occasional spillover as human infection. Following the outbreak of RVF in Saudi Arabia in 2000, surveillance of both animal and human population in Iran increased until 2011. During this period 1206 ovine, 405 caprine, 325 bovine and 28 camel samples were tested for RVFV in nine provinces in Iran. None of these samples tested IgG positive. Moreover, amongst 37 clinically suspected human cases of patients with RVF symptoms, none of these samples tested positive for RVFV. Despite the fact that no positive cases in human or animal populations were identified in Iran, surveillance and monitoring of viral haemorrhagic fevers including RVFV will continue.

  15. EpiReview: Typhoid fever, NSW, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Praveena; Tobin, Sean; Seale, Holly; Musto, Jennie

    2013-11-01

    To examine trends in the incidence of typhoid fever in NSW to inform the development of prevention strategies. Typhoid fever case notification data for the period 2005-2011 were extracted from the NSW Notifiable Conditions Information Management System. Population incidence rates were calculated and analysed by demographic variables. There were 250 case notifications of typhoid fever in NSW from 2005 to 2011, of which 240 are likely to have been acquired overseas. Case notifications remained relatively stable over the review period with the highest rates in Western Sydney Local Health District (10.9 per 100,000 population). Two-thirds (66.4%) of all case notifications are likely to have been acquired in South Asia, and about half of overseas-acquired case notifications were most likely to have been associated with travel to visit friends and relatives. Hospitalisation was required for 79.6% of cases where hospitalisation status was known. Prior typhoid vaccination was reported in 7% of cases in 2010 and 2011 where vaccination status was known. While typhoid fever rates remain low in NSW, case notifications of this preventable infection continue to be reported, particularly in travellers visiting friends and relatives in South Asia. Further research to better understand barriers to the use of preventive measures may be useful in targeting typhoid fever prevention messages in high-risk groups, particularly South Asian communities in NSW.

  16. New Therapeutic Possibilities of the Post-Irradiation Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, J.; Dienstbier, Z. [Institute of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of General Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Czech Republic); Skala, E. [Central Military Hospital, Prague-Stresovice, Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Czech Republic)

    1969-10-15

    Haemorrhagic diathesis is one of the dominant symptoms of acute post-irradiation lesion. Haemorrhagic syndrome is caused by the disturbance of haemocoagulation during simultaneous lesion of the vascular system. In our study we have tried to affect the post-irradiation haemocoagulation disturbance. Epsilon- amino-caproic acid (EACA) administered between the 8{sup th} and the 18{sup th} day (0.4 g/kg per day) to whole- body irradiated dogs (600 R) partially regulated the post-irradiation disturbance of haemocoagulation. The favourable effect of EACA was verified by in vitro experiments in which the blood of irradiated dogs was used. A repeated administration of EACA in the dose of 0.4 g/kg per day to whole-body irradiated rats (600 R) did not substantially affect the post-irradiation changes in the number of white blood elements; however, its administration to healthy animals caused lymphocytosis. In whole-body irradiated dogs (600 R) we have found lower levels of EACA in the blood up to the 8 day following irradiation as compared with healthy dogs after oral application of EACA. The whole-body irradiation of mice did not increase the acute toxicity of EACA. The daily administration of 0.4 g EACA/kg to whole-body irradiated mice (600 and 700 R) did not change the mortality induced by irradiation. The authors consider EACA to be a suitable compound for a complex therapy of radiation sickness. The administration of para-amino-methyl-benzoic acid (PAMBA), in spite of a certain improvement of postirradiation haemocoagulation disturbance, is less efficient. Our recent experiments with ellagic acid which significantly affects the post-traumatic haemorrhage in whole-body irradiated rats seem to be very promising. (author)

  17. Capacity building permitting comprehensive monitoring of a severe case of Lassa hemorrhagic fever in Sierra Leone with a positive outcome: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonnie Mbalu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lassa fever is a neglected tropical disease with a significant impact on the health care system of endemic West African nations. To date, case reports of Lassa fever have focused on laboratory characterisation of serological, biochemical and molecular aspects of the disease imported by infected individuals from Western Africa to the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan and Israel. Our report presents the first comprehensive real time diagnosis and characterization of a severe, hemorrhagic Lassa fever case in a Sierra Leonean individual admitted to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Fever Ward. Fever, malaise, unresponsiveness to anti-malarial and antibiotic drugs, followed by worsening symptoms and onset of haemorrhaging prompted medical officials to suspect Lassa fever. A recombinant Lassa virus protein based diagnostic was employed in diagnosing Lassa fever upon admission. This patient experienced a severe case of Lassa hemorrhagic fever with dysregulation of overall homeostasis, significant liver and renal system involvement, the interplay of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the course of hospitalization and an eventual successful outcome. These studies provide new insights into the pathophysiology and management of this viral illness and outline the improved infrastructure, research and real-time diagnostic capabilities within LASV endemic areas.

  18. Emergence of viral hemorrhagic fevers: Is recent outbreak of crimean congo hemorrhagic fever in India an indication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lahariya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The emerging and re-emerging diseases are posing a great health risk for the last few years. One such category of diseases is viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs, which have emerged in the new territories, worldwide. Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF cases, for the first time in India, were reported from Gujarat, in January 2011. The emergence of diseases not reported earlier, pose great economic and social challenge, burden health system, and create panic reaction. Nonetheless, with recent experience in control of epidemic diseases, and advances in basic scientific knowledge; the public health community is better prepared for these unexpected events. This review provides information to physicians on CCHF for managing outbreak, and identifies public health measures to prevent emergence and re-emergence of VHFs (including CCHF in future. The authors suggest that though, there are a few challenging and unanswered questions, the public health preparedness still remains the key to control emerging and re-emerging diseases. The countries where virus activities have been reported need to be prepared accordingly.

  19. Typhoid fever cases in the U.S. military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Tia; Selig, Daniel J; Riddle, Mark S; Porter, Chad K

    2015-10-14

    Salmonella enterica, serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), a causative agent of enteric fever (typhoid fever), predominately affects populations in developing regions with poor access to clean food and water. In addition, travelers to these regions are at risk of exposure. We report the epidemiological characteristics of S. Typhi cases among active duty United States military personnel from 1998 to 2011 using data obtained from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Cases were identified based on International Classification for Disease Ninth Edition - Clinical Modification codes. We identified a total of 205 cases S. Typhi for an incidence of 1.09 per 100,000 person-years. Cases were on average 31.7 years old, predominately married (n = 129, 62.9 %), Caucasian (n = 142, 69.3 %), male (n = 176, 85.9 %), and had a high school education (n = 101, 49.3 %). Of the identified cases, 122 had received a Typhoid vaccination within 4 years of diagnosis. This study provides an overview of enteric fever in the United States military. The incidence was similar to the general U.S. population except for increased incidence from 1998 to 2000, perhaps attributable to operational deployments in that period. Given that vaccination is an effective primary prevention measure against typhoid fever, active monitoring of pre-deployment vaccine history is warranted.

  20. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N. [Dept. of Pathology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Ricolfi, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Henri Mondo Hospital, Creteil (France); Poirier, J. [Dept. of Histology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  1. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2018-03-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  2. Three-dimensional reconstruction and volumetry of intracranial haemorrhage and its mass effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strik, H.M.; Baehr, M.; Borchert, H.; Fels, C.; Knauth, M.; Rienhoff, O.; Verhey, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage still causes considerable disability and mortality. The studies on conservative and operative management are inconclusive, probably due to inexact volumetry of the haemorrhage. We investigated whether three-dimensional (3-D), voxel-based volumetry of the haemorrhage and its mass effect is feasible with routine computed tomography (CT) scans. The volumes of the haemorrhage, ventricles, midline shift, the intracranial volume and ventricular compression in CT scans of 12 patients with basal ganglia haemorrhage were determined with the 3-D slicer software. Indices of haemorrhage and intracranial or ventricular volume were calculated and correlated with the clinical data. The intended measures could be determined with an acceptable intra-individual variability. The 3-D volumetric data tended to correlate better with the clinical course than the conventionally assessed distance of midline shift and volume of haemorrhage. 3-D volumetry of intracranial haemorrhage and its mass effect is feasible with routine CT examination. Prospective studies should assess its value for clinical studies on intracranial space-occupying diseases. (orig.)

  3. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N.; Ricolfi, F.; Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y.; Poirier, J.

    1999-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  4. Carbetocin versus oxytocin after caesarean section: similar efficacy but reduced pain perception in women with high risk of postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, Maria; Torricelli, Michela; Leoni, Licia; Berti, Paolo; Ciani, Valentina; Puzzutiello, Rosa; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Petraglia, Felice

    2012-06-01

    To compare the effectiveness of carbetocin with oxytocin with respect to maintain adequate uterine tone and to reduce the incidence and severity of postpartum haemorrhage. Moreover safety, adverse effects and the need of additional medications were evaluated. Prospective controlled clinical trial. We compared the effect of a single dose of carbetocin (n = 55) with oxytocin infusion (n = 55) in a women population undergoing to elective caesarean section with regional subarachnoid anaesthesia with at least one risk factor for postpartum haemorrhage. The mean ± SD of postoperative pain in the day of surgery in carbetocin group was significantly lower than in oxytocin group and remained significant till the third day after caesarean section. In the day of surgery and the first day after surgery, women of carbetocin group who needed analgesic drugs were significantly lower than women of oxytocin group. The differences of diuresis and of diuretic drugs need were not statistically significant between the two groups. A single carbetocin injection is efficacious and safe on the maintenance of uterine tone and on the limitation of blood losses, in peri- and in postoperative period. In addition, carbetocin was able to reduce pain perception during postoperative days improving quality life of women.

  5. Application of Gis in Temporal and Spatial Analyses of Dengue Fever Outbreak : Case of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Achu, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Since Dengue fever (DF) and its related forms, Dengue Hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) have become important health concerns worldwide, it is also imperative to develop methods which will help in the analysis of the incidences. Dengue fever cases are growing in number as it also invades widely, affecting larger number of countries and crossing climatic boundaries. Considering that the disease as of now has neither an effective vaccine nor a cure, monitoring in order to ...

  6. A serosurvey of bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease in a convenience sample of sheep and cattle herds in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stuart J G; Bolwell, Charlotte; Rogers, Chris W; Musuka, Godfrey; Kelly, Patrick; Guthrie, Alan; Mellor, Philip S; Hamblin, Chris

    2017-11-14

    A convenience sample of sheep and cattle herds around the cities of Harare, Kwekwe and Bulawayo, located in the Highveld region of Zimbabwe, was used to estimate the seroprevalence and sero-incidence of bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) antibodies. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to identify serum antibodies against BTV and EHDV across three rainy seasons. The median sero-prevalence of BTV and EHDV antibodies in cattle was 62% (interquartile range [IQR]: 30-89) and 56% (IQR: 5-77), respectively. In sheep, the median sero-prevalence of BTV and EHDV was 41% (IQR: 19-63) and 0% (IQR: 0-21), respectively. Median sero-incidences of BTV and EHDV antibodies in cattle of 43% (IQR: 22-67) and 27% (IQR: 9-57) respectively were recorded. The median sero-incidence of BTV in sheep was 14% (IQR: 6-23). Based on these preliminary findings, animal health workers in Zimbabwe should continue to monitor the exposure rates of cattle and sheep to BTV and consider the possibility of strains emerging with increased pathogenicity. There are no previous published reports of antibodies against EHDV in Zimbabwe so the possibility of epizootic haemorrhagic disease existing in domestic livestock should now be considered by Zimbabwean animal health officials. Seroconversions to BTV and EHDV occurred predominantly at the end of each rainy season (March and April), which generally corresponds to high numbers of the Culicoides vectors. BTV isolations were made from three individual cows in two of the sentinel herds and all three were identified as serotype 3. This is the first time BTV serotype 3 has been recorded in Zimbabwe, although its presence in neighbouring South Africa is well documented.

  7. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  8. Treatment of hay fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S F

    1989-01-01

    The range of treatments for hay fever available to the general practitioner has changed considerably in recent years. New antihistamines have addressed the problem of sedation and moved towards one daily dose; nasally applied corticosteroids avoid the need for systemic steroid therapy and its potential adverse effect; and regulatory decisions have set a trend away from immunotherapy in general practice. However, knowledge about the mechanism of action of immunotherapy is increasing and new developments with improved safety profiles include allergen polymers, allergoids, oral immunotherapy and nasal immunotherapy. Choice of treatment depends, as always, on the individual circumstances of the patient and his or her disease. PMID:2556545

  9. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders this the m......The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...... this the most comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of marine VHSV conducted to date. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences confirmed the existence of the 4 major genotypes previously identified based on N- and subsequent G-gene based analyses. The range of Genotype I included subgroups...... of isolates associated with rainbow trout aquaculture (Genotype la) and those from the Baltic marine environment (Genotype Ib) to emphasise the relatively close genetic relationship between these isolates. The existence of an additional genotype circulating within the Baltic Sea (Genotype II) was also...

  11. Role of canine circovirus in dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A; Hartmann, K; Leutenegger, C M; Proksch, A L; Mueller, R S; Unterer, S

    2017-06-03

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) has been detected in some dogs with severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea, but its pathogenic role is unclear. This study evaluated a suspected association between the presence of CanineCV and acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) in dogs. The prevalence of CanineCV in dogs with AHDS was compared with that in healthy dogs and those infected with canine parvovirus (CPV). Additionally, time to recovery and mortality rate were compared between CanineCV-positive and CanineCV-negative dogs. Faecal samples of dogs with AHDS (n=55), healthy dogs (n=66) and dogs infected with CPV (n=54) were examined by two real-time TaqMan PCR assays targeting the replicase and capsid genes of CanineCV. CanineCV was detected in faecal samples of two dogs with AHDS, three healthy controls and seven dogs infected with CPV. Among the three groups, there was no significant difference in prevalence of CanineCV. CPV-infected animals that were coinfected with CanineCV had a significantly higher mortality rate compared with those negative for CanineCV. CanineCV does not appear to be the primary causative agent of AHDS in dogs, but might play a role as a negative co-factor in disease outcome in dogs with CPV infection. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Need yellow fever vaccine? Plan ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Need yellow fever vaccine? Plan ahead. Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... none were from the United States). What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is caused by a virus that ...

  13. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  14. A crimean - congo hemorrhagic fever outbreak in northern balochistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, M.; Ali, N.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, predictors of fatal outcome (PFO), and management effects of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) patients during an outbreak in Northern Balochistan. Patients presenting with a fever of less than 2 weeks duration and bleeding manifestations were included. Clinical history was recorded and patients were placed on oral ribavirin, and hematological support. Diagnosis was established by PCR for CCHF or detection of CCHF specific IgM and IgG. Eighty-four patients were received, 34 (40.5%) were suspected of suffering from classical CCHF. All 34 (100%) patients presented with a history of fever and bleeding (epistaxis, gum bleeding, melena or haematuria). Mean platelet count was 30 x 109/L and mean ALT (alanine transferase) was 288 U/L. Among fatal cases, the mean platelet count was 18.4 x 10 9/L and ALT was 781 units/L. PCR for CCHF viral RNA performed on 10 patients was positive in 3 (30%) patients. CCHF specific IgM and IgG was positive in 17.6% (6/34). Four patients were brought in moribund condition and expired before treatment could be started, 4 patients expired during treatment and 76.5% (26/34) were cured. The overall mortality was 23.5% (8/34). Main predictors of fatal outcome were ALT z 150 units/L, activated partial thromboplastin time(aPT) z 60 seconds, prothrombin time (PT) z 34 seconds, aspartate transferase (AST) z 200 units/L, platelets o 20 x 109/L, and fibrinogen o 110 mg/dL. In this series of CCHF occurring in Northern parts of Balochistan, gastrointestinal tract bleeding was the worst prognostic factor associated with fatal outcome. Providing education to healthcare workers and at risk populations, hematological support, antiviral drugs, and barrier nursing may help reduce mortality. (author)

  15. Churg-Strauss Syndrome as an Unusual Aetiology of Stroke with Haemorrhagic Transformation in a Patient with No Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Sairanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We present here a case of haemorrhagic brain infarction in a middle-aged and physically active male, who had never smoked. This case report aims to remind the internist and neurologist to bear in mind unusual aetiologies of brain infarcts in patients without classical cardiovascular risk factors. Case Description: A 49-year-old male with pulmonary asthma and a prior history of nasal polyps had a wake-up stroke with left-sided symptoms and speech disturbance. A head MRI and MR angiography revealed a recent haemorrhagic infarct in the right putamen and corona radiata. The left hemiparesis progressed to sensory-motor hemiplegia on the 4th day. In the head CT, it was shown that the haemorrhagic infarct had progressed to a large haematoma. A pansinusitis was also diagnosed. The aetiological investigations revealed a minor atrial septal defect (ASD with shunting and a heterozygotic clotting factor V R506Q mutation. A remarkable blood eosinophilia of 9.80 E9/l (42% together with fever, sinusitis, wide-spread bilateral nodular pulmonary infiltrates that did not respond to wide-spectrum antimicrobial treatment, positive anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies, a high myeloperoxidase antibody level and slightly positive anti-proteinase 3 antibodies suggested the diagnosis of Churg-Strauss syndrome. These inflammatory symptoms and findings promptly responded to treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Conclusions: Even after the concomitant findings of the low risk factors, i.e. small ASD and heterozygotic clotting factor mutation, continued search for the final aetiology of stroke revealed Churg-Strauss syndrome, which was the key to the treatment.

  16. Churg-Strauss Syndrome as an Unusual Aetiology of Stroke with Haemorrhagic Transformation in a Patient with No Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairanen, Tiina; Kanerva, Mari; Valanne, Leena; Lyytinen, Jukka; Pekkonen, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Background We present here a case of haemorrhagic brain infarction in a middle-aged and physically active male, who had never smoked. This case report aims to remind the internist and neurologist to bear in mind unusual aetiologies of brain infarcts in patients without classical cardiovascular risk factors. Case Description A 49-year-old male with pulmonary asthma and a prior history of nasal polyps had a wake-up stroke with left-sided symptoms and speech disturbance. A head MRI and MR angiography revealed a recent haemorrhagic infarct in the right putamen and corona radiata. The left hemiparesis progressed to sensory-motor hemiplegia on the 4th day. In the head CT, it was shown that the haemorrhagic infarct had progressed to a large haematoma. A pansinusitis was also diagnosed. The aetiological investigations revealed a minor atrial septal defect (ASD) with shunting and a heterozygotic clotting factor V R506Q mutation. A remarkable blood eosinophilia of 9.80 E9/l (42%) together with fever, sinusitis, wide-spread bilateral nodular pulmonary infiltrates that did not respond to wide-spectrum antimicrobial treatment, positive anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies, a high myeloperoxidase antibody level and slightly positive anti-proteinase 3 antibodies suggested the diagnosis of Churg-Strauss syndrome. These inflammatory symptoms and findings promptly responded to treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Conclusions Even after the concomitant findings of the low risk factors, i.e. small ASD and heterozygotic clotting factor mutation, continued search for the final aetiology of stroke revealed Churg-Strauss syndrome, which was the key to the treatment. PMID:21468361

  17. Arrival of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 to northern Europe: Emergence and outbreaks in wild and domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimanis, A S; Ahola, H; Zohari, S; Larsson Pettersson, U; Bröjer, C; Capucci, L; Gavier-Widén, D

    2018-02-01

    Incursion of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) into Sweden was documented in 1990 and it is now considered endemic in wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) populations. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2), a new, related lagovirus was first detected in France in 2010, and has spread rapidly throughout Europe and beyond. However, knowledge of RHDV2 in northern Europe is sporadic and incomplete, and in Sweden, routinely available diagnostic methods to detect rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) do not distinguish between types of virus causing disease. Using RHDV2-specific RT-qPCR, sequencing of the VP60 gene and immunological virus typing of archived and prospective case material from the National Veterinary Institute's (SVA) wildlife disease surveillance programme and diagnostic pathology service, we describe the emergence of RHDV2 in Sweden in both wild and domestic rabbits. The earliest documented outbreak occurred on 22 May 2013, and from May 2013 to May 2016, 10 separate incidents of RHDV2 were documented from six different municipalities in the southern half of Sweden. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP60 gene shows clear clustering of Swedish isolates into three separate clusters within two different clades according to geographic location and time, suggesting viral evolution, multiple introduction events or both. Almost all cases of RHD examined by SVA from May 2013 to May 2016 were caused by RHDV2, suggesting that RHDV2 may be replacing RHDV as the predominant cause of RHD in Sweden. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Fever in trauma patients: evaluation of risk factors, including traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengualid, Victoria; Talari, Goutham; Rubin, David; Albaeni, Aiham; Ciubotaru, Ronald L; Berger, Judith

    2015-03-01

    The role of fever in trauma patients remains unclear. Fever occurs as a response to release of cytokines and prostaglandins by white blood cells. Many factors, including trauma, can trigger release of these factors. To determine whether (1) fever in the first 48 hours is related to a favorable outcome in trauma patients and (2) fever is more common in patients with head trauma. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit for at least 2 days. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis. Of 162 patients studied, 40% had fever during the first 48 hours. Febrile patients had higher mortality rates than did afebrile patients. When adjusted for severity of injuries, fever did not correlate with mortality. Neither the incidence of fever in the first 48 hours after admission to the intensive care unit nor the number of days febrile in the unit differed between patients with and patients without head trauma (traumatic brain injury). About 70% of febrile patients did not have a source found for their fever. Febrile patients without an identified source of infection had lower peak white blood cell counts, lower maximum body temperature, and higher minimum platelet counts than did febrile patients who had an infectious source identified. The most common infection was pneumonia. No relationship was found between the presence of fever during the first 48 hours and mortality. Patients with traumatic brain injury did not have a higher incidence of fever than did patients without traumatic brain injury. About 30% of febrile patients had an identifiable source of infection. Further studies are needed to understand the origin and role of fever in trauma patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  19. Comparisons of predictors for typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deen Jacqueline L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Exposure of the individual to contaminated food or water correlates closely with the risk for enteric fever. Since public health interventions such as water improvement or vaccination campaigns are implemented for groups of individuals we were interested whether risk factors not only for the individual but for households, neighbourhoods and larger areas can be recognised? Methods: We conducted a large enteric fever surveillance study and analyzed factors which correlate with enteric fever on an individual level and factors associated with high and low risk areas with enteric fever incidence. Individual level data were linked to a population based geographic information systems. Individual and household level variables were fitted in Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE with the logit link function to take into account the likelihood that household factors correlated within household members. Results: Over a 12-month period 80 typhoid fever cases and 47 paratyphoid fever cases were detected among 56,946 residents in two bustees (slums of Kolkata, India. The incidence of paratyphoid fever was lower (0.8/1000/year, and the mean age of paratyphoid patients was older (17.1 years than for typhoid fever (incidence 1.4/1000/year, mean age 14.7 years. Residents in areas with a high risk for typhoid fever had lower literacy rates and economic status, bigger household size, and resided closer to waterbodies and study treatment centers than residents in low risk areas. Conclusion: There was a close correlation between the characteristics detected based on individual cases and characteristics associated with high incidence areas. Because the comparison of risk factors of populations living in high versus low risk areas is statistically very powerful this methodology holds promise to detect risk factors associated with diseases using geographic information systems.

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  1. Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q Fever in the United States Hospitalization Rates Geography Seasonal trends People at Risk Q fever was first recognized as a human disease in Australia in 1935 and in the United States in the early 1940s. The “Q” stands for “query” and was applied at a time when the cause was unknown. ...

  2. Yellow fever virus: genetic and phenotypic diversity and implications for detection, prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, David W C; McAuley, Alexander J; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototypical hemorrhagic fever virus, yet our understanding of its phenotypic diversity and any molecular basis for observed differences in disease severity and epidemiology is lacking, when compared to other arthropod-borne and haemorrhagic fever viruses. This is, in part, due to the availability of safe and effective vaccines resulting in basic YFV research taking a back seat to those viruses for which no effective vaccine occurs. However, regular outbreaks occur in endemic areas, and the spread of the virus to new, previously unaffected, areas is possible. Analysis of isolates from endemic areas reveals a strong geographic association for major genotypes, and recent epidemics have demonstrated the emergence of novel sequence variants. This review aims to outline the current understanding of YFV genetic and phenotypic diversity and its sources, as well as the available animal models for characterizing these differences in vivo. The consequences of genetic diversity for detection and diagnosis of yellow fever and development of new vaccines and therapeutics are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Febre amarela Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A febre amarela é doenca infecciosa não-contagiosa causada por um arbovírus mantido em ciclos silvestres em que macacos atuam como hospedeiros amplificadores e mosquitos dos gêneros Aedes na África, e Haemagogus e Sabethes na América, são os transmissores. Cerca de 90% dos casos da doença apresentam-se com formas clínicas benignas que evoluem para a cura, enquanto 10% desenvolvem quadros dramáticos com mortalidade em torno de 50%. O problema mostra-se mais grave em África onde ainda há casos urbanos. Nas Américas, no período de 1970-2001, descreveram-se 4.543 casos. Os países que mais diagnosticaram a doença foram o Peru (51,5%, a Bolívia (20,1% e o Brasil (18,7%. Os métodos diagnósticos utilizados incluem a sorologia (IgM, isolamento viral, imunohistoquímica e RT-PCR. A zoonose não pode ser erradicada, mas, a doença humana é prevenível mediante a vacinação com a amostra 17D do vírus amarílico. A OMS recomenda nova vacinação a cada 10 anos. Neste artigo são revistos os principais conceitos da doença e os casos de mortes associados à vacina.Yellow fever is an infectious and non-contagious disease caused by an arbovirus, the yellow fever virus. The agent is maintained in jungle cycles among primates as vertebrate hosts and mosquitoes, especially Aedes in Africa, and Haemagogus and Sabethes in America. Approximately 90% of the infections are mild or asymptomatic, while 10% course to a severe clinical picture with 50% case-fatality rate. Yellow fever is largely distributed in Africa where urban epidemics are still reported. In South America, between 1970-2001, 4,543 cases were reported, mostly from Peru (51.5%, Bolivia (20.1% and Brazil (18.7%. The disease is diagnosed by serology (detection of IgM, virus isolation, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Yellow fever is a zoonosis and cannot be eradicated, but it is preventable in man by using the 17D vaccine. A single dose is enough to protect an individual for at least

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen as sole treatment for severe radiation - induced haemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellis, Athanasios, E-mail: aedellis@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaieion Academic Hospital, Athens (Greece); Papatsoris, Athanasios; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Skolarikos, Andreas [Department of Urology, University of Athens, Sismanoglio General Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kalentzos, Vasileios [Department of Diving and Hyperbaric Oxygen, Naval and Veterans Hospital, Athens (Greece)

    2017-05-15

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary and sole treatment for severe radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and methods: Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as primary treatment in 38 patients with severe radiation cystitis. Our primary endpoint was the incidence of complete and partial response to treatment, while the secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival. Results: All patients completed therapy without complications with a mean follow-up of 29.33 months. Median number of sessions needed was 33. Complete and partial response rate was 86.8% and 13.2%, respectively. All 33 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset. One patient needed cystectomy, while 33 patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Our study suggests the early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen for radiation-induced severe cystitis as an effective and safe treatment option. (author)

  5. Duration of Second Stage of Labour at Term and Pushing Time: Risk Factors for Postpartum Haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looft, Emelie; Simic, Marija; Ahlberg, Mia; Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Stephansson, Olof

    2017-03-01

    Prolonged labour is associated with increased risk of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), but the role of active pushing time and the relation with management during labour remains poorly understood. A population-based cohort study from electronic medical record data in the Stockholm-Gotland Region, Sweden. We included 57 267 primiparous women with singleton, term gestation, livebirths delivered vaginally in cephalic presentation in 2008-14. We performed multivariable Poisson regression to estimate the association between length of second stage, pushing time, and PPH (estimated blood loss >500 mL during delivery), adjusting for maternal, delivery, and fetal characteristics as potential confounders. The incidence of PPH was 28.9%. The risk of PPH increased with each passing hour of second stage: compared with a second stage pushing time exceeding 30 min. Compared to pushing time between 15 and 29 min, the RR for PPH were for pushing time during labour are both associated with increased risk of PPH. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The worldwide epidemiology of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckeler, Michael D; Hoke, Tracey R

    2011-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are significant public health concerns around the world. Despite decreasing incidence, there is still a significant disease burden, especially in developing nations. This review provides background on the history of ARF, its pathology and treatment, and the current reported worldwide incidence of ARF and prevalence of RHD. PMID:21386976

  7. The prevalence of maternal F cells in a pregnant population and potential overestimation of foeto-maternal haemorrhage as a consequence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corcoran, Deirdre

    2014-06-12

    Acid elution (AE) is used to estimate foeto-maternal haemorrhage (FMH). However AE cannot differentiate between cells containing foetal or adult haemoglobin F (F cells), potentially leading to false positive results or an overestimate of the amount of FMH. The prevalence of F cells in pregnant populations remains poorly characterised. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the incidence of HbF-containing red cells in our pregnant population using anti-HbF-fluorescein isothiocyanate flow cytometry (anti-HbF FC) and to assess whether its presence leads to a significant overestimate of FMH.

  8. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  9. Pre-emptive treatment with fibrinogen concentrate for postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, A J; Edwards, H M; Afshari, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In early postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), a low concentration of fibrinogen is associated with excessive subsequent bleeding and blood transfusion. We hypothesized that pre-emptive treatment with fibrinogen concentrate reduces the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients...... and the fibrinogen concentration at inclusion. The primary outcome was RBC transfusion up to 6 weeks postpartum. Secondary outcomes were total blood loss, total amount of blood transfused, occurrence of rebleeding, haemoglobin ... concentrate, thereby significantly increasing fibrinogen concentration compared with placebo by 0.40 g litre(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.65; P=0.002). Postpartum blood transfusion occurred in 25 (20%) of the fibrinogen group and 26 (22%) of the placebo group (relative risk, 0.95; 95% confidence...

  10. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, N. J.; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, B. B.

    2013-01-01

    resources have been used to control and eradicate the disease. The control program included strict biosecurity and preventative measures, trade regulations, zoning and intensive inspections and laboratory testing. During the first decades of control and eradication programs the number of infected farms......Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms were considered to be infected. Today, 50 years later, the country obtained status as EU approved VHS free zone. In the years in between very significant...... was significantly reduced while the curve flattened the last 20 years. It was only after a large and costly coordinated action in 2009-2013 including all affected areas that the country managed to free itself totally from VHS. Molecular tracing of the origin of VHSV isolates revealed that despite strict trade...

  11. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L.; Zentner, J.

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.)

  12. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H; Solymosi, L [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Zentner, J [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs.

  13. Identifying the risk: a prospective cohort study examining postpartum haemorrhage in a regional Australian health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Lauren; Kynn, Mary; Reed, Rachel; Davenport, Lisa; Young, Jeanine; Schafer, Keppel

    2018-06-07

    In industrialised countries the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is increasing, for which exact etiology is not well understood. Studies have relied upon retrospective data with estimated blood loss as the primary outcome, known to be underestimated by clinicians. This study aimed to explore variables associated with PPH in a cohort of women birthing vaginally in coastal Queensland, Australia, using the gravimetric method to measure blood loss. Women were prospectively recruited to participate using an opt-out consent process. Maternal demographics; pregnancy history; model of care; mode of birth; third stage management practices; antenatal, intrapartum and immediate postpartum complications; gravimetric and estimated blood loss; and haematological laboratory data, were collected via a pre-designed data collection instrument. Descriptive statistics were used for demographic, intrapartum and birthing practices. A General Linear Model was used for multivariate analysis to examine relationship between gravimetric blood loss and demographic, birthing practices and intrapartum variables. The primary outcome was a postpartum haemorrhage (blood loss > 500 ml). 522 singleton births were included in the analysis. Maternal mean age was 29 years; 58% were multiparous. Most participants received active (291, 55.7%) or modified active management of third stage (191, 36.6%). Of 451 births with valid gravimetric blood loss recorded, 35% (n = 159) recorded a loss of 500 ml or more and 111 (70%) of these were recorded as PPH. Gravimetric blood loss was strongly correlated with estimated blood loss (r = 0.88; p gravimetric blood loss, about 78% of the measured value. High neonatal weight, perineal injury, complications during labour, separation of mother and baby, and observation of a gush of blood were associated with PPH. Nulliparity, labour induction and augmentation, syntocinon use were not associated with PPH. In contrast to previous study findings

  14. Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of meptazinol and naloxone following haemorrhagic shock in rats and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, E.; Paciorek, P. M.; Todd, M. H.; Waterfall, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of the opioid mixed agonist-antagonist, meptazinol, and the opioid antagonist, naloxone, have been evaluated in conscious rats, anaesthetized rats and anaesthetized cats following the induction of haemorrhagic shock. The mean arterial pressure of conscious rats decreased by 17-29 mmHg following a haemorrhage of 20% of blood volume. Meptazinol (17 mg kg-1, i.m.) administered after haemorrhage evoked a rapid and sustained increase in mean arterial pressure to pre-haemorrhage levels. Naloxone (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) also increased mean arterial pressure to a level significantly higher than post-haemorrhage values. Neither haemorrhage nor subsequent drug treatments evoked significant changes in the heart rates of conscious rats. In anaesthetized rats, 20% haemorrhage evoked decreases in mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cardiac output. Blood flow to the heart, skin, skeletal muscle, kidneys, spleen and liver (arterial) was decreased. Meptazinol and naloxone increased blood pressure and total peripheral resistance, but did not significantly alter heart rate or cardiac output. Hepatic arterial flow decreased further in both drug and vehicle treated groups. In addition meptazinol slightly reduced skeletal muscle flow. In anaesthetized cats 40% haemorrhage decreased mean arterial pressure by 46 +/- 3 mmHg. An intravenous infusion of either meptazinol or naloxone (cumulative 2 mg kg-1, i.v.) partially restored blood pressure. In experimental animal models of haemorrhagic shock, meptazinol has a similar cardiovascular profile to naloxone. The established analgesic activity of meptazinol may confer an advantage in some shock states. PMID:4052729

  15. The Significance of Variceal Haemorrhage in Ghana: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, T N A; Tachi, K; Agyei, A A; Nkrumah, K N

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the burden of bleeding oesophageal varices at the main tertiary referral centre in Accra. Retrospective design to describe the endoscopic spectrum and review mortality data following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Endoscopic data was reviewed in the Endoscopy Unit between 2007 and 2010. Mortality data was collated from the Department of Medicine between 2010 and 2013. The study questionnaire compiled clinical and demographic characteristics, endoscopic diagnoses, length of hospital admission and treatment regimens. Aetiology and time-trend analysis of mortality rates following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding; variceal bleeding treatment modalities. On review of the endoscopic diagnoses, gastro-oesophageal varices were identified in 21.9% of cases followed by gastritis 21.7%, duodenal ulcer, 17.0%, and gastric ulcer, 13.2%. Gastro-oesophageal varices were the predominant cause of death from acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage from 46% in 2010 to 76% in 2013. Outcomes following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding were dismal with some 38% of fatalities occurring within the first 24 hours. Injection sclerotherapy was the dominant endoscopic modality for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding in comparison with band ligation, mainly as a result of cost and availability. At the tertiary centre in Accra, variceal bleeding is an increasingly common cause of acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage in comparison with previous reviews in Ghana. Its significantly high in-hospital mortality reflects inadequate facilities to deal with this medical emergency. A strategic approach to care with endoscopic services equipped with all the necessary therapeutic interventions will be vital in improving the outcomes of variceal bleeding in Ghana.

  16. ROLE OF HYSTEROSCOPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SECONDARY POSTPARTUM HAEMORRHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Patalay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Secondary postpartum haemorrhage [PPH] or puerperal haemorrhage, though rare can sometimes cause severe morbidity needing prolonged hospitalisation. Majority of the cases can be managed medically, a few of them requiring surgical interventions. With retained placental tissue being a common cause, emptying the uterus in the puerperium can be difficult and dangerous too as the wall is soft and perforation chances are high. Hysteroscopic evaluation of the puerperal uterus gives us a better picture of the retained bits of placental tissue, and helps in complete evacuation of the tissue without causing much trauma to the fragile uterine wall. It is also more specific than ultrasonogram [USG] to rule out the presence of retained tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS 17 patients who had secondary PPH and did not respond to the initial medical management were included in the study. Hysteroscopy was done in these cases. Definitive pathology was found in 12 cases; 7 cases had polypoidal tissue [retained bits of placenta], 3 cases had placental tissue adherent to the caesarean scar [placenta accreta] and 2 cases had submucous fibroids. RESULTS In cases which had retained placental bits, the tissue could be visualised, its exact location noted and the entire tissue could be removed without inciting much trauma to the uterine wall. In cases with placenta accreta, gentle extraction of the adherent tissue could be done without traumatising the scar. In one case which had multiple fibroids with irregular uterine cavity, hysteroscopy helped in localising the retained tissue. CONCLUSION Hysteroscopy is a useful modality in managing cases of secondary PPH, who have persistent bleeding in the postpartum period.

  17. ETIOLOGY OF OROYA FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1926-01-01

    The experiments reported here were carried on in the main with passage strains of Bartonella bacilliformis, and the results indicate that the virulence of the organism has been considerably enhanced by passage through susceptible animals. While the animals of the earlier experimental series showed no anemia, some of the present group manifested a definite reduction in the number of red cells and in hemoglobin, and in one instance (M. rhesus 25) anemia was of the extreme type so often associated with Oroya fever in man. The anemic condition appeared to be secondary in character, however, nucleated red cells being few in number. In this animal also Bartonella bacilliformis was readily demonstrated in the erythrocytes by means of stained smears, though the number of cells invaded by the parasites was by no means so great as in the human infection. In most instances of experimental Bartonella infection so far induced the demonstration of the parasites by ordinary routine examination of stained film preparations is possible only when the titer of the blood exceeds 1:1,000. Prolonged search of many slides has not been attempted, however. The number of microorganisms in the blood, as shown by culture tests of ascending dilutions, was in most instances highest (1:100,000 to 1:10,000,000) during the early period of the infection coincident usually with the period of highest fever, falling to a titer of 1:10 during the last half of the disease. In one of the fatally infected monkeys, however, the titer increased from 1:10 on the 4th day to 1:1,000,000 on the 24th day. The titer of the blood was equally great in Monkeys 5 and 6, although the former was inoculated locally, the other intravenously and intraperitoneally. The largest proportion of infected red cells was found in Monkey 25, while the blood titer, as shown by culture test, was highest in Monkey 7. The febrile reaction varied in the animals of this series from a severe continuous fever of 104–105°F., lasting 2 to

  18. Case report: probable transmission of vaccine strain of yellow fever virus to an infant via breast milk

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Susan; Twele-Montecinos, Loreto; MacDonald, Judy; Webster, Patricia; Law, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The 17D yellow fever vaccine is a live-virus vaccine that has been in use since the 1940s. The incidence of encephalitis after yellow fever vaccination among young infants is much higher than among children older than nine months of age. Until recently, avoidance of vaccination by breastfeeding women who have received yellow fever vaccine had been based on theoretical grounds only. We report the probable transmission of vaccine strain of yellow fever virus from a mother to her infant through ...

  19. Epidemiological features and financial loss due to clinically diagnosed Haemorrhagic Septicemia in bovines in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, G; Krishnamoorthy, P; Nethrayini, K R; Shalini, R; Rahman, H

    2017-09-01

    The epidemiological features and financial losses due to Haemorrhagic Septicemia (HS) in bovines were studied in Karnataka state using the primary data collected from 133 clinically diagnosed HS affected farms. The various losses due to HS and the Benefit- Cost of the vaccination programme in cattle and water buffaloes were studied using mathematical models. The number of HS outbreaks were higher during the year 2002 and peaked during 2005 and thereafter declined due to targeted vaccination against HS. The morbidity and mortality risks were lower in large farms than medium and small farms, and lower in indigenous cattle compared to high yielding crossbred cattle and water buffaloes. The disease occurrence was more in in-milk animals causing serious economic loss to the farmers. Most outbreaks were observed during monsoon season, though the disease was prevalent throughout the year. The mean milk loss per animal was $2, $11 and $50 in indigenous cattle, water buffaloes and crossbred cattle, respectively. In the case of draught animals, the average effective draught power was unavailable for 1.2days/outbreak resulting in a loss of $5 per affected oxen. The treatment and extra labor expenses incurred per animal were $24 and $7, respectively. The average loss per animal due to mortality loss was $275, $284 and $415 in case of indigenous cattle, water buffaloes and crossbred cattle, respectively. The projected loss for the state of Karnataka were $23.89, $17.92 and $11.95 million under high, medium and low HS incidence scenarios, respectively. The Benefit Cost Analysis (BCA) of the vaccination against HS has been estimated at 5.97:1, 4.48:1 and 2.98:1 under high, medium and low incidence scenarios, respectively. The results highlight the important epidemiological features and financial losses to the affected households and the state of Karnataka. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogeny of Yellow Fever Virus, Uganda, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Holly R; Kayiwa, John; Mossel, Eric C; Lutwama, Julius; Staples, J Erin; Lambert, Amy J

    2018-08-17

    In April 2016, a yellow fever outbreak was detected in Uganda. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA in a clinical sample improved the sensitivity of next-generation sequencing. Molecular analyses determined the Uganda yellow fever outbreak was distinct from the concurrent yellow fever outbreak in Angola, improving our understanding of yellow fever epidemiology.

  1. Human Q fever incidence is associated to spatiotemporal environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leuken, J. P G; Swart, A. N.; Brandsma, J.; Terink, W.; Van de Kassteele, J.; Droogers, P.; Sauter, F.; Havelaar, A. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; Van der Hoek, W.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne pathogenic transmission from sources to humans is characterised by atmospheric dispersion and influence of environmental conditions on deposition and reaerosolisation. We applied a One Health approach using human, veterinary and environmental data regarding the 2009 epidemic in The

  2. Discriminating fever behavior in house flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Anderson

    Full Text Available Fever has generally been shown to benefit infected hosts. However, fever temperatures also carry costs. While endotherms are able to limit fever costs physiologically, the means by which behavioral thermoregulators constrain these costs are less understood. Here we investigated the behavioral fever response of house flies (Musca domestica L. challenged with different doses of the fungal entomopathogen, Beauveria bassiana. Infected flies invoked a behavioral fever selecting the hottest temperature early in the day and then moving to cooler temperatures as the day progressed. In addition, flies infected with a higher dose of fungus exhibited more intense fever responses. These variable patterns of fever are consistent with the observation that higher fever temperatures had greater impact on fungal growth. The results demonstrate the capacity of insects to modulate the degree and duration of the fever response depending on the severity of the pathogen challenge and in so doing, balance the costs and benefits of fever.

  3. A survey of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in livestock and ticks in Ardabil Province, Iran during 2004-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telmadarraiy, Z; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Moradi, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    for the presence of CCHF virus genome using gel-based and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). The results showed CCHF infection in almost 28% of ticks collectively. Also, of 56 livestock sera, around 39% were IgG-positive. The presence of anti-CCHF virus IgG antibodies and the CCHF...... in the adjacent districts. A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the epidemiological aspects of the disease in this province. In the study area, 130 ticks were collected from randomly selected villages and classified into 9 species of hard tick and 2 species of soft tick. All ticks were analyzed...

  4. Trends and risk factors for human Q fever in Australia, 1991-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan-Gardner, T S; Massey, P D; Hutchinson, P; Knope, K; Fearnley, E

    2017-03-01

    Australian abattoir workers, farmers, veterinarians and people handling animal birthing products or slaughtering animals continue to be at high risk of Q fever despite an effective vaccine being available. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System data were analysed for the period 1991-2014, along with enhanced risk factor data from notified cases in the states of New South Wales and Queensland, to examine changes in the epidemiology of Q fever in Australia. The national Q fever notification rate reduced by 20% [incident rate ratio (IRR) 0·82] following the end of the National Q fever Management Program in 2006, and has increased since 2009 (IRR 1·01-1·34). Highest rates were in males aged 40-59 years (5·9/100 000) and 87% of Q fever cases occurred in New South Wales and Queensland. The age of Q fever cases and proportion of females increased over the study period. Based on the enhanced risk factor data, the most frequently listed occupation for Q fever cases involved contact with livestock, followed by 'no known risk' occupations. More complete and comparable enhanced risk factor data, at the State/Territory and national levels, would aid in further understanding of the epidemiology of Q fever.

  5. Decompressive craniectomy in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage for hematoma or oedema versus secondary infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedemans, Taco; Verbaan, Dagmar; Coert, Bert A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van den Berg, René; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Munckhof, Pepijn

    2017-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been proposed as lifesaving treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). However, data is sparse and controversy exists whether the underlying cause of elevated ICP influences neurological outcome. The

  6. Development and validation of outcome prediction models for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : The SAHIT multinational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Saposnik, Gustavo; Lingsma, Hester F.; Macdonald, Erin; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Mamdani, Muhammed; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Molyneux, Andrew; Manoel, Airton Leonardo De Oliveira; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David M.; Wong, George K C; Etminan, Nima; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Torner, James C.; Schaller, Karl L.; Suarez, Jose I.; Stienen, Martin N.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Spears, Julian; Cusimano, Michael D.; Todd, Michael; Le Roux, Peter; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Pickard, John; Van Den Bergh, Walter M.; Murray, Gordon D; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Yamagata, Sen; Mayer, Stephan A.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2018-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a set of practical prediction tools that reliably estimate the outcome of subarachnoid haemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms (SAH). Design Cohort study with logistic regression analysis to combine predictors and treatment modality. Setting Subarachnoid

  7. Infrastructure and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, A.; Schäfer, N.; Albrecht, V.; Schenk, M.; Fröhlich, M.; Stürmer, E. K.; Maegele, M.; Johansson, Pär; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Tuovinen, Hannele; Stensballe, Jakob; Goslings, Johann Carel; Juffermans, Nicole; Balvers, Kirsten; Gaarder, Christine; Brohi, Karim; Eaglestone, Simon; Rourke, Claire; Campbell, Helen; Curry, Nicola; Stanworth, Simon; Maegele, Marc; Stürmer, Ewa K.; Schäfer, Nadine; Driessen, Arne; Orr, Adrian; Schubert, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and management of post-traumatic haemorrhage and coagulopathy have been associated with improved outcomes, but local infrastructures, logistics and clinical strategies may differ. To assess local differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical management of trauma-associated

  8. Magnesium for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (MASH-2): a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; Vandertop, W. Peter; van Kooten, Fop; Kuijsten, Hans A. J. M.; Boiten, Jelis; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Lavados, Pablo M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnesium sulphate is a neuroprotective agent that might improve outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage by reducing the occurrence or improving the outcome of delayed cerebral ischaemia. We did a trial to test whether magnesium therapy improves outcome after aneurysmal

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of guys Hospital stroke score (allen score) in acute supratentorial thrombotic/haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulfiqar, A.; Toori, K. U.; Khan, S. S.; Hamza, M. I. M.; Zaman, S. U.

    2006-01-01

    A consecutive series of 103 patients, 58% male with mean age of 62 year (range 40-75 years), admitted with supratentorial stroke in our teaching hospital were studied. All patients had Computer Tomography scan brain done after clinical evaluation and application of Allen stroke score. Computer Tomography Scan confirmed thrombotic stroke in 55 (53%) patients and haemorrhagic stroke in 48 (47%) patients. Out of the 55 patients with definitive thrombotic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested infarction in 67%, haemorrhage in 6% and remained inconclusive in 27% of cases. In 48 patients with definitive haemorrhagic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested haemorrhage in 60%, infarction in 11% and remained inconclusive in 29% of cases. The overall accuracy of Allen stroke score was 66%. (author)

  10. Bakri balloon as a uterus preserving treatment of uncontrollable haemorrhage one month post-partum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnici, Mia; Markauskas, Algirdas; Munk, Torben

    2014-01-01

    In this case Bakri balloon was used to stop haemorrhage one month post-partum. The case introduces the use of this device outside usual indications. A 27-year-old woman was admitted several times with vaginal bleeding after caesarean section. She was treated pharmacologically and with curettage. ....... One month post-partum hysteroscopic removal of placental tissue was done. During this uncontrollable haemorrhage occurred and hysterectomy was considered. An attempt to save the uterus with Bakri balloon was made succesfully....

  11. Perimetric demonstration of spontaneous visual field recovery following occipital lobe haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Siying; George, Badie Z; Wilson-Holt, Nicholas J

    2013-08-29

    A 45-year-old patient on lifelong warfarin therapy after a metal aortic valve replacement developed a homonymous visual field defect following an occipital lobe haemorrhage. The patient received only conservative management and yet described continued improvement in her visual field defect for up to 20 months following the initial cerebral insult. We present the first conclusive illustrative documentation of visual recovery in a patient with an occipital lobe haemorrhage with sequential automated perimetric assessments over an extended period of time.

  12. Risk factors for severe post partum haemorrhage in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandabwa, J; Doyle, P; Todd, J; Ononge, S; Kiondo, P

    2008-02-01

    To determine the risk factors for severe postpartum haemorrhage. A case control study. Mulago hospital labour wards, Kampala, Uganda. One hundred and six mothers with severe postpartum haemorrhage were recruited between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 and were compared with 500 women who had normal delivery. The predictors for postpartum haemorrhage were co-existing hypertension (O.R 9.3, 95% CI: 1.7-51.7), chronic anaemia (OR 17.3, 95% CI: 9.5-31.7), low socio economic background (OR 5.3, 95% CI: 3.0, 9.2), past history of postpartum haemorrhage (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.1-11.8), previous delivery by Caesarean section (OR 7.5, 95% CI: 3.5-14.3), long birth interval of more than sixty months (OR 5.2, 95% CI: 2.1-13.0), prolonged third stage (OR 49.1, 95% CI: 8.8-342.8) and non use of oxytocics (OR 4.3%, 95% CI: 1.2-15.3). Severe postpartum haemorrhage is common in our environment and is associated with a high maternal morbidity and mortality. The determinants of postpartum haemorrhage are useful in identifying mothers at risk and together with the services of a skilled birth attendant at delivery will prevent postpartum haemorrhage and reduce the maternal morbidity and mortality associated with this condition. In our study, the following risk factors were identified: pre-existing hypertension, chronic anaemia, low socio-economic background, history of postpartum haemorrhage, previous delivery by Caesarean section, longbirth interval of more than sixty months, prolonged third stage and non use of oxytocics were found to be significant.

  13. [Fever and petechial exanthema in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soult Rubio, J A; Navarro González, J; Olano Claret, P

    1992-11-01

    In an attempt to determine clinical and analytical predictive parameters of a possible grave disease, we have carried out a retrospective study of 172 children admitted to our hospital with fever and petechiae as initial symptoms. The ages ranged between 1 month and 10 years. Even though we have not found a clinical symptom or analysis sufficiently sensitive as to predict all grave diseases, the general clinical state of the child associated with either a high or low white cell count and an abnormal coagulation study should be alert signals for a serious infectious disease. On the contrary, if the clinical and analytical parameters are within normal limits the risk of a grave disease is low. We emphasize the high incidence of meningococcal disease (26%).

  14. Wheelchair incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen AW van; Roszek B; Hilbers-Modderman ESM; Kallewaard M; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2002-01-01

    This RIVM study was performed to gain insight into wheelchair-related incidents with powered and manual wheelchairs reported to the USA FDA, the British MDA and the Dutch Center for Quality and Usability Research of Technical Aids (KBOH). The data in the databases do not indicate that incidents with

  15. Patch: platelet transfusion in cerebral haemorrhage: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage have a poor prognosis, especially if they are using antiplatelet therapy. Currently, no effective acute treatment option for intracerebral haemorrhage exists. Limiting the early growth of intracerebral haemorrhage volume which continues the first hours after admission seems a promising strategy. Because intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet therapy have been shown to be particularly at risk of early haematoma growth, platelet transfusion may have a beneficial effect. Methods/Design The primary objective is to investigate whether platelet transfusion improves outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet treatment. The PATCH study is a prospective, randomised, multi-centre study with open treatment and blind endpoint evaluation. Patients will be randomised to receive platelet transfusion within six hours or standard care. The primary endpoint is functional health after three months. The main secondary endpoints are safety of platelet transfusion and the occurrence of haematoma growth. To detect an absolute poor outcome reduction of 20%, a total of 190 patients will be included. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of platelet transfusion for an acute haemorrhagic disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1303

  16. MDCT diagnostic work-up of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phanis, S.; Nikolopoulos, P.; Veliou, K.; Tsampoulas, C.; Efremidis, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Our presentation is intended to analyze our experience over the last two years, in the expeditious work up of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, as well as patients whose clinical symptoms combined with radiological findings are highly suspicious of an aneurysm, acute arterial occlusion, cerebral vascular malformation, venous occlusion, dissection of the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery. 276 CT Angiographies of the brain have been performed and recorded over the last two years in our Department, on a 16 Detector Philips MX8000IDT Computed Tomograph. The patients are referred to our Department from the Emergency Department of our Hospital, as well as from Hospitals all over Northwestern Greece. The CT Angiographies are performed with examination protocols, which we will analyze thoroughly in our presentation. The primary data are then studied in workstations away from the main console of the Computed Tomograph. The study of the primary data consists in multiplanar reconstructions with the Maximum Intensity Algorithm, as well as Volume Rendering and three Dimensional Reconstruction. The stages we follow for these procedures will be presented as well as the procedures for the removal of bone structures, with the intention of the best possible angiographic results. Of the 276 patients 40 were diagnosed with an aneurysm,19 with a venous angioma, 2 with a vascular malformation, 3 with venous occlusion and 2 with dissection, a total of 66/276 with aneurysms and vascular malformations. These patients were subsequently referred to the Neurosurgery Clinic or to the Department of Interventional Radiology for further treatment. The remaining 210 patients, underwent in the following days of their hospitalization a Digital Subtraction Angiography, and in 16 (7.6%) of them a small aneurysm, 3-5 mm was diagnosed. The aneurysm was detected in a second reading of the CT Angiography in 8 patients (3.8%). The CT Angiography in patients with subarachnoid

  17. Epidemic yellow fever in Borno State of Nigeria: characterisation of hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenna, O; Chikwem, J O; Mohammed, I; Durojaiye, S O

    2010-01-01

    In 1990, an outbreak of a febrile illness with high mortality was reported in border villages, later spreading to other areas of Borno State of Nigeria. To present a report of the investigation of that outbreak, with emphasis on the characterisation of hospitalised patients. Selected centres reporting cases of acute febrile illness during the months of August to December, 1990 were visited, to establish surveillance. Case investigation forms were used to obtain clinical and demographic data; and blood samples were obtained from patients for analyses. Only hospitalised patients with adequate clinical information from three centres were included in the analysis. The outbreak, which involved five of the six health zones in the state, and spread into adjoining Gongola state and the Cameroun Republic, was caused by the yellow fever virus. Fever, central nervous system (CNS) involvement, jaundice and haemorrhage were the most common clinical manifestations of 102 hospitalised patients. Eighty -three (81%) of hospitalised patients died and most within two days of admission. CNS manifestations were more common in dying patients than in survivors. The reasons for this rare outbreak of yellow fever in the dry Savannah belt of Borno State remain unclear. Improved surveillance and more effective prevention strategies are needed to avert the recurrence of such outbreaks.

  18. Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine encoding Toscana virus NSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indran, Sabarish V; Lihoradova, Olga A; Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Kalveram, Birte; Head, Jennifer A; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Smith, Jennifer K; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-07-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in pregnant ruminants, and haemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans. The MP-12 strain is a highly efficacious and safe live-attenuated vaccine candidate for both humans and ruminants. However, MP-12 lacks a marker to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. In this study, we originally aimed to characterize the efficacy of a recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain encoding Toscana virus (TOSV) NSs gene in place of MP-12 NSs (rMP12-TOSNSs). TOSV NSs promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and inhibits interferon-β gene up-regulation without suppressing host general transcription. Unexpectedly, rMP12-TOSNSs increased death in vaccinated outbred mice and inbred BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. Immunohistochemistry showed diffusely positive viral antigens in the thalamus, hypothalamus and brainstem, including the medulla. No viral antigens were detected in spleen or liver, which is similar to the antigen distribution of moribund mice infected with MP-12. These results suggest that rMP12-TOSNSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice. Our findings demonstrate that rMP12-TOSNSs causes neuroinvasion without any hepatic disease and will be useful for studying the neuroinvasion mechanism of RVFV and TOSV.

  19. A Study of Clinical Spectrum of Dengue Fever in A Tertiary Care Centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Gargi Pathak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue viruses, of the family Flaviviridae, are the most common cause of arboviral, disease in the world. We report a clinico-epidemiological study of the dengue fever from paediatric department of civil hospital Ahmedabad. This study was designed to document the presenting features, laboratory results and outcome of dengue infection in children. Methodology: A prospective study was carried from October 2014-october 2015 and total of 126 patients were studied from age group between 1 month to 12 years. A detailed history, careful clinical examination and laboratory investigations were done in all the patients. Results and Conclusions: We documented Leucopenia as an early marker than thrombocytopenia and were seen in more numbers (47% in our study which was not found in the previous studies. Most common symptom was fever with body ache (73%. Majority of patients had platelet count between 50000-1 lakh. 55% had tested positive for dengue IgM and 44.4% had tested positive for dengue NS1. Wide variety of complications like hepatitis (20.6%, myocarditis (14.2%, dengue shock (11.1%, encephalitis (4.7%, Dengue haemorrhagic fever (4.7%, ARDS (2.3% were seen, which might indicate a change in serotype and epidemiology of the Dengue. Interestingly Bradycardia was seen in increased frequency subsequent to myocarditis with simultaneously raised CPK-MB levels. There were increased cases of coinfections like malaria, enteric, hepatitis, UTI, not seen previously .Out of 126 patients 6 patients expired.

  20. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results.

  1. Endovascular management of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, Edwige [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Ronot, Maxime; Vilgrain, Valerie [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Gaujoux, Sebastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Barbier, Louise [APHP, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Surgery, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Sauvanet, Alain [University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); APHP, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Surgery, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France)

    2016-10-15

    To assess the patient outcome after endovascular treatment of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) as first-line treatment. Between January 2005 and November 2013, all consecutive patients referred for endovascular treatment of PPH were included. Active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, collections and the involved artery were recorded on pretreatment CT. Endovascular procedures were classified as technical success (source of bleeding identified on angiogram and treated), technical failure (source of bleeding identified but incompletely treated) and abstention (no abnormality identified, no treatment performed). Factors associated with rebleeding were analysed. Sixty-nine patients (53 men) were included (mean 59 years old (32-75)). Pretreatment CT showed 27 (39 %) active bleeding. In 22 (32 %) cases, no involved artery was identified. Technical success, failure and abstention were observed in 48 (70 %), 9 (13 %) and 12 patients (17 %), respectively. Thirty patients (43 %) experienced rebleeding. Rebleeding rates were 29 %, 58 % and 100 % in case of success, abstention and failure (p < 0.001). Treatment failure/abstention was the only factor associated with rebleeding. Overall, 74 % of the patients were successfully treated by endovascular procedure(s) alone. After a first endovascular procedure for PPH, the rebleeding rate is high and depends upon the success of the procedure. Most patients are successfully treated by endovascular approach(es) alone. (orig.)

  2. Endovascular management of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottier, Edwige; Ronot, Maxime; Vilgrain, Valerie; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Barbier, Louise; Sauvanet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    To assess the patient outcome after endovascular treatment of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) as first-line treatment. Between January 2005 and November 2013, all consecutive patients referred for endovascular treatment of PPH were included. Active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, collections and the involved artery were recorded on pretreatment CT. Endovascular procedures were classified as technical success (source of bleeding identified on angiogram and treated), technical failure (source of bleeding identified but incompletely treated) and abstention (no abnormality identified, no treatment performed). Factors associated with rebleeding were analysed. Sixty-nine patients (53 men) were included (mean 59 years old (32-75)). Pretreatment CT showed 27 (39 %) active bleeding. In 22 (32 %) cases, no involved artery was identified. Technical success, failure and abstention were observed in 48 (70 %), 9 (13 %) and 12 patients (17 %), respectively. Thirty patients (43 %) experienced rebleeding. Rebleeding rates were 29 %, 58 % and 100 % in case of success, abstention and failure (p < 0.001). Treatment failure/abstention was the only factor associated with rebleeding. Overall, 74 % of the patients were successfully treated by endovascular procedure(s) alone. After a first endovascular procedure for PPH, the rebleeding rate is high and depends upon the success of the procedure. Most patients are successfully treated by endovascular approach(es) alone. (orig.)

  3. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Patients with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Matveev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the present study is to typify BAEPs configurations of patients with different location of lesions caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH and the ensuing complications, in view of assessing the auditory-brainstem system disturbance.Methods. The typization was performed by comparing BAEPs with standard patterns from two sets of types of BAEPs by ipsilateral and binaural stimulation and by cross-stimulation.Results. 94 BAEPs were used for collection of normal referential values: for the absolute latencies and the absolute amplitudes of waves I, II, III, IV and V; for inter-peak latencies I-III, II-III, III-V, I-V and II-V; for amplitude ratios I/V and III/V. 146 BAEPs of patients with mild SAH and 55 from patients with severe SAH, were typified. In 5 types of BAEPs out of a total of 11, the percentage of the potentials in patients with mild SAH and severe SAH differed significantly (p<0.01.Conclusions. The use of sets of types of BAEPs by ipsilateral, binaural and cross-stimulation correctly classifies the potentials in patients with mild and severe SAH.

  4. Bevacizumab: an option for refractory epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Arno; Steiner, Normann; Gunsilius, Eberhard

    2015-08-01

    Recurrent epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) patients significantly decreases their quality of life. Treatment in therapy refractory patients is limited although various options have been tested so far. Herein, one patient is described that was treated for HHT for over 20 years with only intermediate benefits. As epistaxis duration and frequency increased continuously, bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was administered every 2 weeks. During the time of treatment (six doses) and up to 3 month afterwards clinical symptoms, blood pressure, cardiac output, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), bleeding duration and frequency were assessed as criteria for treatment benefit. Duration and frequency of epistaxis decreased immediately after the first application resulting in reduced need of blood transfusions. After completion of six cycles, a further decrease in frequency and duration of bleeding was noted. Cardiac output and PAH decreased or remained stable, respectively, during time and after treatment. No increase in blood pressure could be found but a significant increase in heart rate was experienced after completion of all six applications. Unfortunately, the patient died due to a cerebral abscess. Bevacizumab led to an improvement of HHT related epistaxis, refractory to other treatments.

  5. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES OBSERVED IN HAEMORRHAGIC AND ISCHAEMIC CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiac abnormalities are relatively common after acute neurologic injury. Disturbances can vary in severity from transient ECG abnormalities to profound myocardial injury and dysfunction. CNS is involved in the generation of cardiac arrhythmias and dysfunction even in an otherwise normal myocardium. AIM To find out proportion of ECG changes observed in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Electrocardiographs of 100 patients with acute stroke were studied to find out the types of ECG abnormalities among different types of stroke. RESULTS In our study, the most common ECG abnormalities associated with stroke were prolonged QTc interval, ST-T segment abnormalities, prominent U wave and arrhythmias. Trop-I was positive in 12.8% patients with ECG changes. Statistical significance was found in association with Trop-I positivity and ST depression. CONCLUSION Usually patients with heart disease present with arrhythmias and Ischaemic like ECG changes. But these changes are also seen most often in the patients with presenting with stroke who didn’t have any past history of heart disease. This shows that arrhythmias and ischaemic ECG abnormalities are primarily evolved due to central nervous system disorders.

  6. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage: Is a negative CT angiogram enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, A.D.; Clifton, A.G.; Rich, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the negative predictive value of 16 channel multisection computed tomography angiography (CTA) for detecting aneurysms in spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The prospectively collected cerebral angiogram database of Department of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley Regional Neuroscience Centre was used to identify 200 consecutive patients who had undergone DSA for SAH. Of these, 176 had undergone CTA prior to DSA. Clinical details and radiology reports were correlated and images of positive investigations reviewed. Results: DSA showed one or more cerebral aneurysms in 105 (60%) patients. These were correctly reported on CTA in 100. CTA was reported negative for aneurysms in 74 patients. Of these five were false negative and had aneurysms detected on DSA. In the CTA/DSA negative group, 11 (16%) patients had classical perimesencephalic clinical syndrome and blood distribution. There were two false positives at CTA. For ruptured cerebral aneurysms, CTA had 95.2% sensitivity, 97.2% specificity, 98.1% positive predictive value, and 93.2% negative predictive value. Conclusion: The sensitivity and negative predictive value of CTA for ruptured aneurysms remains imperfect. Continued use of DSA is recommended in most patients with a negative CTA after acute SAH. Confirmation of a negative CTA result with DSA may not be routinely required in patients with perimesencephalic syndrome

  7. Annual incidence and standardized incidence ratio of cerebrovascular accidents in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, C C; Ho, L Y; To, C H

    2009-01-01

    To study the annual incidence and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The annual incidence of CVA from 1999 to 2007 in a longitudinal cohort of SLE patients was calculated each year and compared with that of the regional population within the same study period. Age-specific SIRs and outcome of CVA in SLE patients were also studied. In 2007, there were 490 SLE patients in our cohort. The mean annual incidence of CVA between 1999 and 2007 was 6.45/1000 patients and no obvious trend over time was observed. Of the 20 CVAs in patients with SLE, 18 (90%) were ischaemic stroke whereas two (10%) were haemorrhagic stroke. The mean SIR of all types of CVA in SLE patients was 2.02 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-3.81; p = 0.002]. The SIR of ischaemic stroke decreased with age and the stroke incidence was no longer significantly higher than that of the population in patients aged >or= 60 years. Haemorrhagic stroke occurred mainly in younger SLE patients. The duration of hospitalization and the mortality rate for CVA was non-significantly higher in SLE than in non-SLE patients. The incidence of CVA in SLE remained constant over the 8 years between 1999 and 2007. Younger SLE patients are at substantially increased risk of CVA compared to age-matched population. The duration of hospitalization and the mortality rate for CVA are similar in SLE and non-SLE patients.

  8. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.; Kunz, A.B.; Kieslinger, K.; Ladurner, G.; Killer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of ≤1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of ≤1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  9. Organising pneumonia presenting as acute life threatening pulmonary haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhaiah, Damodhara Honnavally; Chakravorty, Indranil; Swamy, Rajiv; Prakash, Doraiswamy

    2011-11-08

    Organising pneumonia, previously called bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia is a clinicopathological entity of unknown aetiology, which has been reported with increasing frequency. Various modes of presentation have been described such as cough, fever, weight loss and alveolar opacities on chest radiograph. Haemoptysis as primary presenting symptom has only rarely been reported. The authors report a case in which massive life-threatening haemoptysis was the major presenting symptom. No aetiology was identified for the haemoptysis and the diagnosis was confirmed on postmortem histology. This case highlights the importance of considering organising pneumonia in the differential diagnosis of acute severe haemoptysis.

  10. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  11. Seroepidemiology and risk factors of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever among butchers and slaughterhouse workers in southeastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mostafavi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF is a viral zoonotic disease. Butchers and slaughterhouse workers are considered to be high risk occupational groups for the disease. Sistan and Baluchistan province is an area in southeastern Iran which is endemic for CCHF, and the most confirmed cases of the disease are reported from this province. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of CCHF and risk factors for seropositivity among them in Sistan and Baluchistan province in 2011. Methods: Questionnaire data and blood sample collection were carried out for each participant and the sera samples were sent to the national reference laboratory for ELISA IgG testing. Results: In this study, the seroprevalence of CCHF among 190 butchers and slaughterhouse workers from 11 counties was 16.49%. 79% of participants were aware that they were at risk of zoonosis and 39.7% did not use any personal protective equipment during their work. Of 31 CCHF IgG positive individuals in this study, eleven individuals had a previous record of CCHF infection in 57 months prior to the study. Conclusions: High seroprevalence of CCHF among butchers and slaughterhouse workers and minimal use of personal protective equipment’s during daily work indicates the need for training courses, for these groups to increase their knowledge, attitude and practice with respect to zoonosis. Keywords: Seroepidemiology, Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever, Butchers, Slaughterhouse Workers, Iran

  12. Knowledge regarding Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever among private dental practitioners in Tricity, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Mehta, Nishant; Gupta, Preety; Arora, Vikram; Setia, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viral fever, a highly contagious haemorrhagic disease has today become a major public health concern in the developing countries worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge among dental practitioners regarding Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever (Ebola HF) in Tricity, (Chandigarh, Panchkula and Mohali). A total of 500 private dental practitioners were randomly approached to participate in this cross-sectional survey. A self-structured, closed ended questionnaire was administered to each participant to record demographic and professional characteristics followed by their knowledge regarding Ebola HF. Knowledge section included questions related to communicability; symptomatology and diagnostics; at-risk individuals; prevention and treatment; and, virus characteristics of Ebola HF. The results were expressed in percentages. Multivariable linear regression analysis was carried out to assess the association of participants's demographic and professional characteristics with the knowledge scores. Statistically significant difference was seen when mean knowledge scores were compared based on the locality and qualification of the participants (P < 0.05). Dental practitioners from urban areas with higher qualification had better knowledge yet there were notable deficiencies regarding the virus characteristics, diagnostics, elimination and treatment.

  13. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol or oxytocin: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellad, M B; Tara, D; Ganachari, M S; Mallapur, M D; Goudar, S S; Kodkany, B S; Sloan, N L; Derman, R

    2012-07-01

    Sublingual misoprostol produces a rapid peak concentration, and is more effective than oral administration. We compared the postpartum measured blood loss with 400 μg powdered sublingual misoprostol and after standard care using 10 iu intramuscular (IM) oxytocin. Double-blind randomised controlled trial. A teaching hospital: J N Medical College, Belgaum, India. A cohort of 652 consenting eligible pregnant women admitted to the labour room. Subjects were assigned to receive the study medications and placebos within 1 minute of clamping and cutting the cord by computer-generated randomisation. Chi-square and bootstrapped Student's t-tests were used to test categorical and continuous outcomes, respectively. Measured mean postpartum blood loss and haemorrhage (PPH, loss ≥ 500 ml), >10% pre- to post-partum decline in haemoglobin, and reported side effects. The mean blood loss with sublingual misoprostol was 192 ± 124 ml (n=321) and 366 ± 136 ml with oxytocin IM (n=331, P ≤ 0.001). The incidence of PPH was 3.1% with misoprostol and 9.1% with oxytocin (P=0.002). No woman lost ≥ 1000 ml of blood. We observed that 9.7% and 45.6% of women experienced a haemoglobin decline of >10% after receiving misoprostol and oxytocin, respectively (P ≤ 0.001). Side effects were significantly greater in the misoprostol group than in the oxytocin group. Unlike other studies, this trial found sublingual misoprostol more effective than intramuscular oxytocin in reducing PPH, with only transient side effects being greater in the misoprostol group. The sublingual mode and/or powdered formulation may increase the effectiveness of misoprostol, and render it superior to injectable oxytocin for the prevention of PPH. Further research is needed to confirm these results. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  14. Vaccination for typhoid fever in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Rachel B; Date, Kashmira A; Mintz, Eric D

    2013-04-01

    Emerging data on the epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic aspects of typhoid fever in sub-Saharan Africa call for new strategies and new resources to bring the regional epidemic under control. Areas with endemic disease at rates approaching those in south Asia have been identified; large, prolonged and severe outbreaks are occurring more frequently; and resistance to antimicrobial agents, including fluoroquinolones is increasing. Surveillance for typhoid fever is hampered by the lack of laboratory resources for rapid diagnosis, culture confirmation and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Nonetheless, in 2010, typhoid fever was estimated to cause 725 incident cases and 7 deaths per 100,000 person years in sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts for prevention and outbreak control are challenged by limited access to safe drinking water and sanitation and by a lack of resources to initiate typhoid immunization. A comprehensive approach to typhoid fever prevention including laboratory and epidemiologic capacity building, investments in water, sanitation and hygiene and reconsideration of the role of currently available vaccines could significantly reduce the disease burden. Targeted vaccination using currently available typhoid vaccines should be considered as a short- to intermediate-term risk reduction strategy for high-risk groups across sub-Saharan Africa.

  15. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Lista, Gianluca [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, ICP, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio; Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio; Lista, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  17. Population Explosions of Tiger Moth Lead to Lepidopterism Mimicking Infectious Fever Outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallara Janardhanan Wills

    Full Text Available Lepidopterism is a disease caused by the urticating scales and toxic fluids of adult moths, butterflies or its caterpillars. The resulting cutaneous eruptions and systemic problems progress to clinical complications sometimes leading to death. High incidence of fever epidemics were associated with massive outbreaks of tiger moth Asota caricae adult populations during monsoon in Kerala, India. A significant number of monsoon related fever characteristic to lepidopterism was erroneously treated as infectious fevers due to lookalike symptoms. To diagnose tiger moth lepidopterism, we conducted immunoblots for tiger moth specific IgE in fever patients' sera. We selected a cohort of patients (n = 155 with hallmark symptoms of infectious fevers but were tested negative to infectious fevers. In these cases, the total IgE was elevated and was detected positive (78.6% for tiger moth specific IgE allergens. Chemical characterization of caterpillar and adult moth fluids was performed by HPLC and GC-MS analysis and structural identification of moth scales was performed by SEM analysis. The body fluids and chitinous scales were found to be highly toxic and inflammatory in nature. To replicate the disease in experimental model, wistar rats were exposed to live tiger moths in a dose dependant manner and observed similar clinico-pathological complications reported during the fever epidemics. Further, to link larval abundance and fever epidemics we conducted cointegration test for the period 2009 to 2012 and physical presence of the tiger moths were found to be cointegrated with fever epidemics. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate that inhalation of aerosols containing tiger moth fluids, scales and hairs cause systemic reactions that can be fatal to human. All these evidences points to the possible involvement of tiger moth disease as a major cause to the massive and fatal fever epidemics observed in Kerala.

  18. Frequency of causes of primary postpartum haemorrhage in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, S.I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of causes of primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in women managed in a tertiary care Hospital. material and Methods: The study was conducted in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Unit - 1, Lady Willingdon Hospital King Edward Medical University, Lahore from July 2013 to December 2013. All the women having postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery in the labour room or referred with primary postpartum haemorrhage were included in the study and were evaluated to see the frequency of postpartum haemorrhage as well as the causes of PPH in women being treated in a tertiary care unit. Results: During the study period 1344 women delivered in unit I and 250 patients developed postpartum haemorrhage giving frequency of primary postpartum haemorrhage 18.60%. Majority of the women 29.6% (n = 74) were between 26 - 30 years of age, mean and SD was 28.43 ± 4.76 years. The gestation of 55.2% (n = 138) patients was between 37 - 40 weeks. The frequency of postpartum haemorrhage in booked women during antenatal period was recorded as 25.2% (n = 63) while 74.8% (n = 187) were not booked in any health facility. Among patients who developed PPH, uterine atony was the most common cause 57.6% (n = 144), followed by genital tract teats which was 29.2% (n = 73). The rest of the causes of PPH were retained placenta in 10% (n = 25), uterine rupture in 3.6% (n = 9) and uterine inversion in 1.6% (n = 4). Conclusions: Postpartum haemorrhage is still a leading but preventable cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in our country due to under utilization of health facilities, the major cause is uterine atony followed by perineal tears. (author)

  19. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  20. Autoinflammatory Diseases with Periodic Fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Erdal; Bilginer, Yelda; Ozen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    One purpose of this review was to raise awareness for the new autoinflammatory syndromes. These diseases are increasingly recognized and are in the differential diagnosis of many disease states. We also aimed to review the latest recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of these patients. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome/mevalonate kinase deficiency (HIDS/MVKD) are the more common autoinflammatory diseases that are characterized by periodic fevers and attacks of inflammation. Recently much collaborative work has been done to understand the characteristics of these patients and to develop recommendations to guide the physicians in the care of these patients. These recent recommendations will be summarized for all four diseases. FMF is the most common periodic fever disease. We need to further understand the pathogenesis and the role of single mutations in the disease. Recently, the management and treatment of the disease have been nicely reviewed. CAPS is another interesting disease associated with severe complications. Anti-interleukin-1 (anti-IL-1) treatment provides cure for these patients. TRAPS is characterized by the longest delay in diagnosis; thus, both pediatricians and internists should be aware of the characteristic features and the follow-up of these patients. HIDS/MVKD is another autoinflammatory diseases characterized with fever attacks. The spectrum of disease manifestation is rather large in this disease, and we need further research on biomarkers for the optimal management of these patients.

  1. Haemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteases and human ADAMs cleave LRP5/6, which disrupts cell-cell adhesions in vitro and induces haemorrhage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Tadahiko; Sakon, Taketo; Nakazawa, Shiori; Nishioka, Asuka; Watanabe, Kohei; Matsumoto, Kaori; Akasaka, Mari; Shioi, Narumi; Sawada, Hitoshi; Araki, Satohiko

    2017-06-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are members of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family of proteins, as they possess similar domains. SVMPs are known to elicit snake venom-induced haemorrhage; however, the target proteins and cleavage sites are not known. In this work, we identified a target protein of vascular apoptosis-inducing protein 1 (VAP1), an SVMP, relevant to its ability to induce haemorrhage. VAP1 disrupted cell-cell adhesions by relocating VE-cadherin and γ-catenin from the cell-cell junction to the cytosol, without inducing proteolysis of VE-cadherin. The Wnt receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) are known to promote catenin relocation, and are rendered constitutively active in Wnt signalling by truncation. Thus, we examined whether VAP1 cleaves LRP5/6 to induce catenin relocation. Indeed, we found that VAP1 cleaved the extracellular region of LRP6 and LRP5. This cleavage removes four inhibitory β-propeller structures, resulting in activation of LRP5/6. Recombinant human ADAM8 and ADAM12 also cleaved LRP6 at the same site. An antibody against a peptide including the LRP6-cleavage site inhibited VAP1-induced VE-cadherin relocation and disruption of cell-cell adhesions in cultured cells, and blocked haemorrhage in mice in vivo. Intriguingly, animals resistant to the effects of haemorrhagic snake venom express variants of LRP5/6 that lack the VAP1-cleavage site, or low-density lipoprotein receptor domain class A domains involved in formation of the constitutively active form. The results validate LRP5/6 as physiological targets of ADAMs. Furthermore, they indicate that SVMP-induced cleavage of LRP5/6 causes disruption of cell-cell adhesion and haemorrhage, potentially opening new avenues for the treatment of snake bites. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Dengue fever: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-07-01

    Dengue fever is a common tropical infection. This acute febrile illness can be a deadly infection in cases of severe manifestation, causing dengue hemorrhagic shock. In this brief article, I will summarize and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. For diagnosis of dengue, most tropical doctors make use of presumptive diagnosis; however, the definite diagnosis should be based on immunodiagnosis or viral study. Focusing on treatment, symptomatic and supportive treatment is the main therapeutic approach. The role of antiviral drugs in the treatment of dengue fever has been limited, but is currently widely studied.

  3. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  4. Adverse Effects of Carbetocin versus Oxytocin in the Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage after Caesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mannaerts

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the incidence of nausea, vomiting, and arterial hypotension between carbetocin and oxytocin to prevent haemorrhage after caesarean section (CS. Methods. A randomized controlled trial in term pregnant women undergoing planned CS. Groups were randomized to carbetocin or oxytocin. Blood pressure (BP, heart rate, presence of nausea/vomitus, and need for vasopressors were evaluated throughout surgery. Preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels were compared. Results. Fifty-eight women were randomized (carbetocin n=32; oxytocin n=26. Both medications had hypotensive effect, difference in BP for carbetocin versus oxytocin: systolic (14.4 ± 2.4 mmHg versus 8.5 ± 1.8 mmHg; diastolic (7.8 ± 1.6 mmHg versus 8.9 ± 3.0 mmHg without significant difference between the drugs (p=0.1 and p=0.7. Both groups had similar needs for vasopressors. The presence of nausea was not rare, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.4. Average blood loss was slightly lower in the carbetocin group but not statistically significant (p=0.8. Conclusion. In planned CS, a possible clinical significant lower incidence of nausea after carbetocin was noted but this was not statistically significant. There were no differences regarding BP, heart rate, the need for vasopressor, and blood loss. The study was registered in the International Journal of Clinical Trials (ISRCTN 95504420, 2/2017.

  5. The Typhoid Fever Surveillance in Africa Program (TSAP): Clinical, Diagnostic, and Epidemiological Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kalckreuth, Vera; Konings, Frank; Aaby, Peter; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Ali, Mohammad; Aseffa, Abraham; Baker, Stephen; Breiman, Robert F; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Clemens, John D; Crump, John A; Cruz Espinoza, Ligia Maria; Deerin, Jessica Fung; Gasmelseed, Nagla; Sow, Amy Gassama; Im, Justin; Keddy, Karen H; Cosmas, Leonard; May, Jürgen; Meyer, Christian G; Mintz, Eric D; Montgomery, Joel M; Olack, Beatrice; Pak, Gi Deok; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphaël; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Soura, Abdramane Bassiahi; Warren, Michelle R; Wierzba, Thomas F; Marks, Florian

    2016-03-15

    New immunization programs are dependent on data from surveillance networks and disease burden estimates to prioritize target areas and risk groups. Data regarding invasive Salmonella disease in sub-Saharan Africa are currently limited, thus hindering the implementation of preventive measures. The Typhoid Fever Surveillance in Africa Program (TSAP) was established by the International Vaccine Institute to obtain comparable incidence data on typhoid fever and invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease in sub-Saharan Africa through standardized surveillance in multiple countries. Standardized procedures were developed and deployed across sites for study site selection, patient enrolment, laboratory procedures, quality control and quality assurance, assessment of healthcare utilization and incidence calculations. Passive surveillance for bloodstream infections among febrile patients was initiated at thirteen sentinel sites in ten countries (Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Madagascar, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, and Tanzania). Each TSAP site conducted case detection using these standardized methods to isolate and identify aerobic bacteria from the bloodstream of febrile patients. Healthcare utilization surveys were conducted to adjust population denominators in incidence calculations for differing healthcare utilization patterns and improve comparability of incidence rates across sites. By providing standardized data on the incidence of typhoid fever and iNTS disease in sub-Saharan Africa, TSAP will provide vital input for targeted typhoid fever prevention programs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Biosafety standards for working with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Manfred; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Bino, Silvia; Bouloy, Michelle; Burt, Felicity; Chinikar, Sadegh; Christova, Iva; Dedushaj, Isuf; El-Sanousi, Ahmed; Elaldi, Nazif; Hewson, Roger; Hufert, Frank T; Humolli, Isme; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus; Koçak Tufan, Zeliha; Korukluoglu, Gülay; Lyssen, Pieter; Mirazimi, Ali; Neyts, Johan; Niedrig, Matthias; Ozkul, Aykut; Papa, Anna; Paweska, Janusz; Sall, Amadou A; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Swanepoel, Robert; Uyar, Yavuz; Weber, Friedemann; Zeller, Herve

    2016-11-01

    In countries from which Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is absent, the causative virus, CCHF virus (CCHFV), is classified as a hazard group 4 agent and handled in containment level (CL)-4. In contrast, most endemic countries out of necessity have had to perform diagnostic tests under biosafety level (BSL)-2 or -3 conditions. In particular, Turkey and several of the Balkan countries have safely processed more than 100 000 samples over many years in BSL-2 laboratories. It is therefore advocated that biosafety requirements for CCHF diagnostic procedures should be revised, to allow the tests required to be performed under enhanced BSL-2 conditions with appropriate biosafety laboratory equipment and personal protective equipment used according to standardized protocols in the countries affected. Downgrading of CCHFV research work from CL-4, BSL-4 to CL-3, BSL-3 should also be considered.

  7. Effectiveness of rectal misoprostol in cessation of Post Partum Haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreen, S.; Baqai, S.; Iftikhar, S.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of rectal misoprostol in management of Post Partum Haemorrhage in third stage of labour. Study Design: Interventional study. Place and Duration of Study: Gynaecology and obstetrics department at PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi, from Sep 2012 to Mar 2013. Material and Methods: All singleton and multiple pregnancies of gestation 37-42 weeks, who presented in labour room to deliver and had prolonged second stage of labour (n=112) were enrolled in the study. Patients, who were having coagulopathy, abruption, placenta previa, and allergy to prostaglandins were excluded from the study. Third stage was managed actively according to hospital standard routine. Hemoglobin was measured at the time of admission and repeated after delivery in patients having PPH. Blood was estimated by weighing all gauzes and packs. If blood loss more than 500ml one hour after delivery and all traumatic causes and retained placenta were excluded, 600 mu g (3 tablets) of misoprostol were given per rectally, which were inserted up to a digit depth. After one hour total amount of blood loss was calculated. The data were then entered in a proforma and analyzed. Results: Majority (44.6%) of the women were 26-33 years of age, 8.9% had PPH with fall in hemoglobin by 1.5-2 gms/dl. Ninety percent of the patients responded to rectal misoprostol. Conclusion: Active management of third stage of labour has a definite role in the preventive of PPH. Rectal administration of misoprostol should be considered for control of PPH in low resource settings like ours as it was found effective in the study. (author)

  8. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review

    OpenAIRE

    Heilman, James M; Wolff, Jacob De; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treat...

  10. Incidents analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  11. Incidents analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, P

    1997-12-31

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs.

  12. Embolization for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Tirukonda, P.; Nicholson, A. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Everett, S.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McPherson, S.J., E-mail: simon.mcpherson@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To assess the published evidence on the endovascular treatment of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Materials and methods: An Ovid Medline search of published literature was performed (1966-2009). Non-English literature, experimental studies, variceal haemorrhage and case series with fewer than five patients were excluded. The search yielded 1888 abstracts. Thirty-five articles were selected for final analysis. Results: The total number of pooled patients was 927. The technical and clinical success of embolization ranged from 52-100% and 44-100%, respectively. The pooled mean technical/clinical success rate in primary upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage (PUGITH) only, trans-papillary haemorrhage (TPH) only, and mixed studies were 84%/67%, 93%/89%, and 93%/64%, respectively. Clinical outcome was adversely affected by multi-organ failure, shock, corticosteroids, transfusion, and coagulopathy. The anatomical source of haemorrhage and procedural variables did not affect the outcome. A successful embolization improved survival by 13.3 times. Retrospective comparison with surgery demonstrated equivalent mortality and clinical success, despite embolization being applied to a more elderly population with a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. Conclusions: Embolization is effective in this very difficult cohort of patients with outcomes similar to surgery.

  13. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, K Y; Park, H Y; Kim, J D; Rhee, H S [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  14. Diarrhea associated with typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, S. K.; Speelman, P.; Butler, T.; Nath, S.; Rahman, H.; Stoll, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    To study the pathogenesis of diarrhea occurring with typhoid fever, we selected 42 patients with diarrhea and blood cultures positive for Salmonella typhi or Salmonella paratyphi A, but without diarrheal copathogens, for measurement of stool output and examination of fecal composition. The mean

  15. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K. Y.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  16. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sanchez-Alavez

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL, through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1β-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system.

  17. Katayama fever ID scuba divers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... A. C. EVANS, D. J. MARTIN, B. D. GINSBURG. Summary. Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal Lowveld at the same time ...

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  19. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dispersion of dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam. (Special Issue: Public health in Vietnam: here's the data, where's the action?)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Thi Thanh, Toan; Hu, WenBiao; Pham Quang, Thai; Luu Ngoc, Hoat; Wright, P; Martens, P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue fever (DF) in Vietnam remains a serious emerging arboviral disease, which generates significant concerns among international health authorities. Incidence rates of DF have increased significantly during the last few years in many provinces and cities, especially Hanoi. The

  20. Liquor circulation disturbance after subarachnoid haemorrhages - comparative pneumoencephalography and liquor scintigraphic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, J.; Georgi, P.; Krastel, A.; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg

    1976-01-01

    Haemorrhages into the subarachnoid space often lead to instant blocking of the liquor circulation pathways with an acute increase of the intracranial pressure and acute venticular enlargement. These liquor circulation disturbances may be diagnosed by liquor scintiscanning as well as by pneumoencephalography. 165 patients were examined by both methods. The following results were obtained: liquor circulation disturbances after subarachnoid bleeding are frequent, they should be expected in 33% of all cases after spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhages and in 68% of the cases after traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhages. The most severe form of liquor circulation distrubance may also be diagnosed by liquor scintiscanning as well as by pneumoencephalography. Liquor scintiscanning is the more exact method in cases with transitory ventricular reflux, while lumbar pneumoencephalography, in this series, is the method of choice when it comes to documenting the extent of the hydrocephalus. (GSE) [de

  1. Sudden headache, third nerve palsy and visual deficit: thinking outside the subarachnoid haemorrhage box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Lambert, John

    2013-11-01

    A 75-year-old lady presented with sudden severe headache and vomiting. Examination was normal, and CT and lumbar puncture not convincing for subarachnoid haemorrhage. Shortly thereafter, she developed painless diplopia. Examination confirmed right third cranial nerve palsy plus homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia. Urgent cerebral MRI with angiography was requested to assess for a possible posterior communicating artery aneurysm, but revealed an unsuspected pituitary mass. Pituitary adenoma with pituitary apoplexy was diagnosed. Pituitary apopolexy is a syndrome comprising sudden headache, meningism, visual and/or oculomotor deficits, with an intrasellar mass. It is commonly due to haemorrhage or infarction within a pituitary adenoma. Treatment includes prompt steroid administration, and potentially surgical decompression. While subarachnoid haemorrhage is an important, well-recognised cause of sudden severe headache, other aetiologies, including pituitary apoplexy, should be considered and sought.

  2. Haemorrhage in intracerebral arteriovenous malformations: detection with MRI and comparison with clinical history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Wimberger, D (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria) Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Stiglbauer, R. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Kramer, J. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Richling, B. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Bavinzski, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Czech, T. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Imhof, H. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with 59 angiographically proven cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were examined by high-field MRI to detect blood breakdown products. Results were correlated with the history of intracranial bleeding. Evidence of previous episodes of haemorrhage was seen in 10 of 12 patients (83.3%) with verified bleeding, 4 of 9 patients (44.4%) with symptoms which could suggest bleeding and in 6 of 30 patients (20%) with negative histories. Because of the known rebleeding rate and the increased risk of associated complications, identification of the subgroup who had had haemorrhage and should therefore be considered for surgery may be beneficial. MRI can make a contribution to management by demonstrating prior haemorrhage in patients with an inadequate clinical history. (orig.)

  3. Viscerotropic and neurotropic disease following vaccination with the 17D yellow fever vaccine, ARILVAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Scott

    2004-06-02

    Yellow fever vaccine associated viscerotropic (YFV-AVD) and neurotropic (YFV-AND) diseases have been recently identified in various countries. Previously post-vaccination multiple organ system failure was recognised as a rare serious adverse event of yellow fever vaccination and 21 cases of post-vaccinal (YFV) encephalitis had been recorded. Incidence data is not available. On investigation of vaccine surveillance reports from Europe following distribution of more than 3 million doses of ARILVAX trade mark, four cases each of YFV-AVD and YFV-AND were found (each 1.3 cases per million doses distributed) for the period 1991 to 2003. The incidence for each is higher after 1996 (2.5 cases per million doses distributed). The incidence of these adverse events appears to be very low with ARILVAX trade mark. Similar incidence data is required from other countries for comparison.

  4. Preventing postpartum haemorrhage: active management of the third stage of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Parreira, Maria V B; Gomes, Nádia C Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    To review scientific publications on health to identify the main practices used for the active management of the third stage of vaginal labour and to assess their effectiveness in preventing postpartum haemorrhage. According to the World Health Organization (WHO Recommendations for the Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage, 2007. WHO Document Production Services, Geneva), postpartum haemorrhage is considered to be the cause of a quarter of maternal morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. In an attempt to reduce the risk of haemorrhage, a group of interventions have been introduced into clinical practice that constitute active management conduct during the third stage of labour and are recommended by the international organisations. An integrative literature review of studies on the subject in question, indexed in databases of health between the years 2006-2012, was conducted. The analysis included 13 articles, six of which were original articles and seven of which were literature reviews. Based on our data analysis, we found that most studies supported the effectiveness of active management in reducing the risk of haemorrhage, in the immediate postpartum period. Despite the fact that active management practices for the third stage of labour differ in their specific elements, in the majority of the selected studies, the interventions followed those recommended by the international organisations. The results of this review of management practices supported active management of the third stage of labour to prevent postpartum haemorrhage, with five main forms of intervention: administration of oxytocin, delayed clamping of umbilical cord, draining of placental blood, controlled cord traction and uterine massage. There is a need to determine gaps in the clinical practices of midwives in regard to the active management of third stage of labour, to update knowledge and practices with the latest scientific evidence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Intensive care management of patients with severe intracerebral haemorrhage after endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, E.; Yonekawa, Y.; Imhof, H.G.; Tanaka, M.; Valavanis, Anton

    2002-01-01

    We studied the impact of emergency neurosurgery and intensive care on the outcome for patients with severe intracerebral haemorrhage after endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We reviewed the case notes of 18 patients with severe haemorrhage after embolisation of a brain AVM between 1986 and 2001. During this period the treatment changed: before 1993, these patients were not surgically treated, and they died, while after 1994, all patients underwent emergency surgery. We established a standardised protocol for emergency treatment and intensive care in May 1998, and emergency surgery was performed as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms of haemorrhage. Postoperative intensive care was according to a standardised regime. During these 15 years, 24 out of 605 patients undergoing 1066 interventions had a haemorrhage during or after the procedure, of which 18 were severe (3% of patients, 1.7% of interventions). All patients had a severe clinical deficit (mean Glasgow coma scale 4.2); eight had uni- or bilateral mydriasis. From 1989 to April 1998 four (31%) of 13 patients died, one (7.5%) remained in a vegetative state and eight (61.5%) made a good recovery. All five patients treated between 1998 and 2001 had a favourable outcome. The mean time from onset of the symptoms of haemorrhage to reaching the operation room was 129 min between 1989 and 1998 and 24 min between 1998 and 2001. Standardised emergency treatment and intensive care with early resuscitation, minimal radiological exploration before rapid surgery improved the outcome. A short time between the onset of the symptoms of haemorrhage and evacuation of the haematoma may be the most important factor for a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  6. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for prevention of postoperative vitreous cavity haemorrhage after vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan M; Steel, David H W

    2015-08-07

    Postoperative vitreous cavity haemorrhage (POVCH) is a significant complication following vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). It delays visual recovery and can make further treatment difficult if the view of the fundus is significantly obscured. A number of interventions to reduce the incidence of POVCH have been proposed, including the perioperative use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF). Anti-VEGFs reduce vascular proliferation and the vascularity of neovascular tissue, which is often the source of bleeding following vitrectomy. This updated review aimed to summarise the effects of anti-VEGF use to reduce the occurrence of POVCH after vitrectomy surgery for PDR. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to May 2015), PubMed (January 1966 to May 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to May 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 May 2015. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that looked at the use of anti-VEGFs and the incidence of POVCH in people undergoing vitrectomy for PDR. Both review authors independently assessed and extracted the data. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane.The primary outcomes of the review were the incidence of early and late POVCH following perioperative anti-VEGF administration. Secondary outcomes included best-corrected visual acuity at six months following

  7. Inter-Species Transmission of Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus Between Turbot (Scophthalmus Maximus) and Rainbow Trout (Onchorhynchus Mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönherz, A. A.; Lorenzen, Niels; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia is a serious viral disease of teleost fish with high economic impact on the aquaculture industry. The disease is caused by the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae. Compared to other rhabdoviruses infecting...

  8. Epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events associated with the smoking cessation medicine varenicline : a case series from two national pharmacovigilance centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison-Woolrych, Mira; Harmark, Linda; Tan, Ming; Maggo, Simran; van Grootheest, Kees

    Purpose To present a case series of haemorrhagic events associated with varenicline identified from the New Zealand (NZ) and Netherlands national pharmacovigilance centres and propose a possible mechanism for these adverse events. Methods Reports of epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events (in all

  9. Identification of pathogens for differential diagnosis of fever with jaundice in the Central African Republic: a retrospective assessment, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadia, Christelle Luce Bobossi; Manirakiza, Alexandre; Tekpa, Gaspard; Konamna, Xavier; Vickos, Ulrich; Nakoune, Emmanuel

    2017-11-29

    Febrile jaundice results clinically in generalized yellow coloration of the teguments and mucous membranes due to excess plasma bilirubin, accompanied by fever. Two types are found: conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin jaundice. Jaundice is a sign in several diseases due to viruses (viral hepatitis and arbovirus), parasites (malaria) and bacteria (leptospirosis). In the Central African Republic (CAR), only yellow fever is included on the list of diseases for surveillance. The aim of this study was to identify the other pathogens that can cause febrile jaundice, for better management of patients. Between 2008 and 2010, 198 sera negative for yellow fever IgM were randomly selected from 2177 samples collected during yellow fever surveillance. Laboratory analyses targeted four groups of pathogens: hepatitis B, C, delta and E viruses; dengue, chikungunya, Zika, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, West Nile and Rift Valley arboviruses; malaria parasites; and bacteria (leptospirosis). Overall, 30.9% sera were positive for hepatitis B, 20.2% for hepatitis E, 12.3% for hepatitis C and 8.2% for malaria. The majority of positive sera (40.4%) were from people aged 16-30 years. Co-infection with at least two of these pathogens was also found. These findings suggest that a systematic investigation should be undertaken of infectious agents that cause febrile jaundice in the CAR.

  10. Novel bivalent vectored vaccine for control of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spibey, N; McCabe, V J; Greenwood, N M; Jack, S C; Sutton, D; van der Waart, L

    2012-03-24

    A novel, recombinant myxoma virus-rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) vaccine has been developed for the prevention of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD). A number of laboratory studies are described illustrating the safety and efficacy of the vaccine following subcutaneous administration in laboratory rabbits from four weeks of age onwards. In these studies, both vaccinated and unvaccinated control rabbits were challenged using pathogenic strains of RHD and myxoma viruses, and 100 per cent of the vaccinated rabbits were protected against both myxomatosis and RHD.

  11. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mangham, D.C. [Department of Pathology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  12. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M.; Mangham, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  13. Post-transfusion hypertension, convulsion and intracranial haemorrhage in beta-thalassemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, S.A.; Zaidi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The haematologic disorder b-thalassemia major is common in Pakistan. We describe a patient with undiagnosed thalassemia presenting with hypertension and convulsions and found to have cerebral haemorrhage on neuro-imaging. He had been transfused 2 weeks before this illness. Our experience is similar to a few case reports described in literature that were found to have cerebral haemorrhages post-mortem after a similar clinical presentation. All patients had a blood transfusion within 2 weeks prior to the presentation so association with transfusion has been proposed. We have reviewed the several mechanisms presented and discussed the findings. (author)

  14. Single-dose intravenous iron infusion or oral iron for treatment of fatigue after postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, C; Thomsen, L L; Norgaard, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a single-dose intravenous infusion of iron isomaltoside compared with current treatment practice with oral iron measured by physical fatigue in women after postpartum haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single-centre, open-label, ran......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a single-dose intravenous infusion of iron isomaltoside compared with current treatment practice with oral iron measured by physical fatigue in women after postpartum haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single-centre, open...

  15. Typhoid fever complicated by intestinal perforation: a persisting fatal disease requiring surgical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, T.; Knight, J.; Nath, S. K.; Speelman, P.; Roy, S. K.; Azad, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In Bangladesh, clinical records of 323 patients with typhoid fever were reviewed to study the incidence, fatality, and optimal therapy of the complication of intestinal perforation. Fifteen patients (4.6%) developed intestinal perforation. Case-fatality rates were six of nine patients treated

  16. Hospital preparations for viral hemorrhagic fever patients and experience gained from admission of an Ebola patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. J Mark; Minderhoud, A.L.C (Ben); Wind, Jelte D D; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Ellerbroek, Pauline M.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital’s preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during

  17. Changes in self-efficacy, collective efficacy and patient outcome following interprofessional simulation training on postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egenberg, Signe; Øian, Pål; Eggebø, Torbjørn Moe; Arsenovic, Mirjana Grujic; Bru, Lars Edvin

    2017-10-01

    To examine whether interprofessional simulation training on management of postpartum haemorrhage enhances self-efficacy and collective efficacy and reduces the blood transfusion rate after birth. Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, although it is preventable in most cases. Interprofessional simulation training might help improve the competence of health professionals dealing with postpartum haemorrhage, and more information is needed to determine its potential. Multimethod, quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention design. Interprofessional simulation training on postpartum haemorrhage was implemented for midwives, obstetricians and auxiliary nurses in a university hospital. Training included realistic scenarios and debriefing, and a measurement scale for perceived postpartum haemorrhage-specific self-efficacy, and collective efficacy was developed and implemented. Red blood cell transfusion was used as the dependent variable for improved patient outcome pre-post intervention. Self-efficacy and collective efficacy levels were significantly increased after training. The overall red blood cell transfusion rate did not change, but there was a significant reduction in the use of ≥5 units of blood products related to severe bleeding after birth. The study contributes to new knowledge on how simulation training through mastery and vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion and psychophysiological state might enhance postpartum haemorrhage-specific self-efficacy and collective efficacy levels and thereby predict team performance. The significant reduction in severe postpartum haemorrhage after training, indicated by reduction in ≥5 units of blood transfusions, corresponds well with the improvement in collective efficacy, and might reflect the emphasis on collective efforts to counteract severe cases of postpartum haemorrhage. Interprofessional simulation training in teams may contribute to enhanced prevention and

  18. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  19. Effectiveness of a fluid chart in outpatient management of suspected dengue fever: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Nazrila Hairin; Mohamad, Mohazmi; Lum, Lucy Chai See; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2017-01-01

    Dengue infection is the fastest spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. One of the complications of dengue is dehydration which, if not carefully monitored and treated, may lead to shock, particularly in those with dengue haemorrhagic fever. WHO has recommended oral fluid intake of five glasses or more for adults who are suspected to have dengue fever. However, there have been no published studies looking at self-care intervention measures to improve oral fluid intake among patients suspected of dengue fever. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of using a fluid chart to improve oral fluid intake in patients with suspected dengue fever in a primary care setting. This feasibility study used a randomized controlled study design. The data was collected over two months at a primary care clinic in a teaching hospital. The inclusion criteria were: age > 12 years, patients who were suspected to have dengue fever based on the assessment by the primary healthcare clinician, fever for > three days, and thrombocytopenia (platelets dengue home care card. The intervention group received the fluid chart and a cup (200ml). Baseline clinical and laboratory data, 24-hour fluid recall (control group), and fluid chart were collected. The main outcomes were: hospitalization rates, intravenous fluid requirement and total oral fluid intake. Among the 138 participants who were included in the final analysis, there were fewer hospital admissions in the intervention group (n = 7, 10.0%) than the control group (n = 12, 17.6%) (p = 0.192). Similarly, fewer patients (n = 9, 12.9%) in the intervention group required intravenous fluid compared to the control group (n = 15, 22.1%), (p = 0.154). There was an increase in the amount of daily oral fluid intake in the intervention group (about 3,000 ml) compared to the control group (about 2,500 ml, p = 0.521). However, these differences did not reach statistical significance. This is a feasible and acceptable study to perform in

  20. A large outbreak of typhoid fever associated with a high rate of intestinal perforation in Kasese District, Uganda, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Karen P; Sodha, Samir V; Lukwago, Luswa; O-Tipo, Shikanga; Mikoleit, Matthew; Simington, Sherricka D; Mukobi, Peter; Balinandi, Stephen; Majalija, Samuel; Ayers, Joseph; Kagirita, Atek; Wefula, Edward; Asiimwe, Frank; Kweyamba, Vianney; Talkington, Deborah; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Adem, Patricia; Batten, Brigid C; Zaki, Sherif R; Mintz, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Salmonella Typhi) causes an estimated 22 million typhoid fever cases and 216 000 deaths annually worldwide. In Africa, the lack of laboratory diagnostic capacity limits the ability to recognize endemic typhoid fever and to detect outbreaks. We report a large laboratory-confirmed outbreak of typhoid fever in Uganda with a high proportion of intestinal perforations (IPs). A suspected case of typhoid fever was defined as fever and abdominal pain in a person with either vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, headache, weakness, arthralgia, poor response to antimalarial medications, or IP. From March 4, 2009 to April 17, 2009, specimens for blood and stool cultures and serology were collected from suspected cases. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed on Salmonella Typhi isolates. Surgical specimens from patients with IP were examined. A community survey was conducted to characterize the extent of the outbreak. From December 27, 2007 to July 30, 2009, 577 cases, 289 hospitalizations, 249 IPs, and 47 deaths from typhoid fever occurred; Salmonella Typhi was isolated from 27 (33%) of 81 patients. Isolates demonstrated multiple PFGE patterns and uniform susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Surgical specimens from 30 patients were consistent with typhoid fever. Estimated typhoid fever incidence in the community survey was 8092 cases per 100 000 persons. This typhoid fever outbreak was detected because of an elevated number of IPs. Underreporting of milder illnesses and delayed and inadequate antimicrobial treatment contributed to the high perforation rate. Enhancing laboratory capacity for detection is critical to improving typhoid fever control.

  1. Can internet search queries be used for dengue fever surveillance in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yanhong; Luo, Ganfeng; Zhang, Yanting; Deng, Changyu; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Qingying

    2017-10-01

    China experienced an unprecedented outbreak of dengue fever in 2014, and the number of cases reached the highest level over the past 25 years. Traditional sentinel surveillance systems of dengue fever in China have an obvious drawback that the average delay from receipt to dissemination of dengue case data is roughly 1-2 weeks. In order to exploit internet search queries to timely monitor dengue fever, we analyzed data of dengue incidence and Baidu search query from 31 provinces in mainland China during the period of January 2011 to December 2014. We found that there was a strong correlation between changes in people's online health-seeking behavior and dengue fever incidence. Our study represents the first attempt demonstrating a strong temporal and spatial correlation between internet search trends and dengue epidemics nationwide in China. The findings will help the government to strengthen the capacity of traditional surveillance systems for dengue fever. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Delayed Diagnosis of Acute Rheumatic Fever in a Patient with Multiple Emergency Department Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Kaminecki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available While the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF in the United States has declined over the past years, the disease remains one of the causes of severe cardiovascular morbidity in children. The index of suspicion for ARF in health care providers may be low due to decreasing incidence of the disease and clinical presentation that can mimic other conditions. We present the case of a 5-year-old boy with a history of intermittent fevers, fatigue, migratory joint pain, and weight loss following group A Streptococcus pharyngitis. The patient presented to the emergency department twice with the complaints described above. On his 3rd presentation, the workup for his symptoms revealed the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever with severe mitral and aortic valve regurgitation. The patient was treated with penicillin G benzathine and was started on glucocorticoids for severe carditis. The patient was discharged with recommendations to continue secondary prophylaxis with penicillin G benzathine every 4 weeks for the next 10 years. This case illustrates importance of primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever with adequate antibiotic treatment of group A Streptococcus pharyngitis. Parents should also receive information and education that a child with a previous attack of ARF has higher risk for a recurrent attack of rheumatic fever. This can lead to development of severe rheumatic heart disease. Prevention of recurrent ARF requires continuous antimicrobial prophylaxis. Follow-up with a cardiologist every 1-2 years is essential to assess the heart for valve damage.

  3. Typhoid fever as a triggering factor in acute and intractable bronchial asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhana; Surachmanto, Eko E; Datau, E A

    2013-10-01

    Typhoid fever is an enteric infection caused by Salmonella typhi. In Indonesia, typhoid fever is endemic with high incidence of the disease. In daily practice we frequently have patients with bronchial asthma, and it is becoming worse when these patients get typhoid fever. After oral ingestion, Salmonella typhi invades the the intestine mucosa after conducted by microbial binding to epithelial cells, destroying the microfold cells (M cell) then passed through the lamina propria and detected by dendritic cells (DC) which express a variety of pathogen recognition receptors on the surfaces, including Toll-Like Receptor (TLR). expressed on macrophages and on intestinal epithelial cells inducing degradation of IB, and translocation of NF-B (Nuclear Factor-Kappa Beta). This process initiates the induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression profile adhesion molecules, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and other proteins that induce and perpetuate the inflammation in host cells then will induce acute ant intractable attack of bronchial asthma. The role of typhoid fever in bronchial asthma, especially in persons with acute attack of bronchial asthma, is not well understood. In this article, we will discuss the role of typhoid fever in the bronchial asthma patients which may cause bronchial asthma significantly become more severe even triggering the acute and intractable attack of bronchial asthma. This fact makes an important point, to treat completely the typhoid fever in patients with bronchial asthma.

  4. Postpartum haemorrhage in midwifery care in the Netherlands: validation of quality indicators for midwifery guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Chan, K.L.L.; Middeldorp, J.M.; van Roosmalen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is still one of the major causes of severe maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, no guideline for PPH occurring in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands is available. A set of 25 quality indicators for prevention and management of PPH in

  5. Antigenic structure of the capsid protein of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Cortes, Elena; Vela, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) causes an important disease in rabbits. The virus capsid is composed of a single 60 kDa protein. The capsid protein gene was cloned in Escherichia coli using the pET3 system, and the antigenic structure of RHDV VP60 was dissected using 11 monoclonal...

  6. Nd:YAG laser hyaloidotomy for valsalva pre-macular haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kirwan, R P

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To report a case of successful drainage of a large pre-macular haemorrhage using laser photo-disruption of the posterior hyaloid membrane. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case report. RESULTS: A 47-year-old man presented acutely to our emergency department complaining of a 24-h history of sudden onset, painless and persistent loss of vision in his left eye. Immediately before noticing this loss of vision, he had been vomiting violently from excessive alcohol intake. The left visual acuity was counting fingers. Dilated fundoscopy of the left eye revealed a large pre-macular haemorrhage which was 14 disc diametres in size. Clotting investigations were normal. A diagnosis of valsalva retinopathy was made and the patient elected to receive a prompt neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior hyaloidotomy as an outpatient. At 1 week follow-up, the haemorrhage had drained completely into the vitreous space revealing a healthy macula and the visual acuity had improved to 6\\/12 unaided. At 6-month follow-up the left visual acuity stabilised at 6\\/9 unaided. CONCLUSION: Nd:YAG laser posterior hyaloidotomy is a useful outpatient procedure for successful clearance of large pre-macular haemorrhages that offers patients rapid recovery of visual acuity and the avoidance of more invasive intraocular surgery.

  7. Addison's disease due to bilateral post-traumatic adrenal haemorrhage: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, G.; Tits, J.; Vanstraelen, D.; Marchal, G.; Rigauts, H.; Baert, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    In a patient with Addison's disease, who gave a history of a severe car accident, CT showed bilateral enlargement of the adrenal glands. MRI, by demonstrating paramagnetic T1 shortening due to methaemoglobin and haemosiderin on T2-weighted images, confirmed the haemorrhagic nature of the lesions. (orig.)

  8. Use of thermography to monitor sole haemorrhages and temperature distribution over the claws of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K; Wilhelm, J; Fürll, M

    2015-02-07

    Subclinical laminitis, an early pathological event in the development of many claw diseases, is an important factor in the welfare and economics of high-producing dairy cows. However, the aetiology and pathogenesis of this complex claw disease are not well understood. The present study investigated to what extent thermographic examination of claws is able to give information about corium inflammation, and whether the technique may be used as a diagnostic tool for early detection of subclinical laminitis. Moreover, the temperature distribution over the individual main claws was investigated to obtain further knowledge about pressure distribution on the claws. For this purpose the claws of 123 cows were evaluated in the first week after calving as well as after the second month of lactation for presence of sole haemorrhages (a sign of subclinical laminitis). Furthermore, the ground contact area was analysed by thermography. Sole haemorrhages were significantly increased by the second month of lactation. Thermography showed clear differences between the claws of the front limbs and hindlimbs, as well as between lateral and medial claws. Although the distribution of sole haemorrhages was consistent with the pattern of the temperature distribution over the main claws, no clear correlation was found between the claw temperature after calving and the visible laminitis-like changes (sole haemorrhages) eight weeks later. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Transcatheter embolization in a haemophiliac with post-traumatic renal haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klamut, M; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, M; Kowalewski, J; Nowakowski, A [Akademia Medyczna, Lublin (Poland)

    1979-01-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization was performed in a case of severe haemophilia A to control haemorrhage secondary to renal trauma. The treatment proved to be life-saving. Eighteen months follow-up revealed no evidence of hypertension, renal failure or infection.

  10. Microvascular oxygen pressure in the pig intestine during haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaasappel, M.; van Iterson, M.; Ince, C.

    1999-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between microvascular and venous oxygen pressures during haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in the pig intestine. To this end microvascular PO2 (microPO2) was measured by quenching of Pd-porphyrin phosphorescence by oxygen and validated for

  11. Dose evaluation for long-term magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Norden, A. G. W.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent that might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We are presently running a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial with magnesium sulphate (64 mmol/day intravenously). We studied

  12. Is bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa a factor in post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, J. C.; Georgalas, C.; Kyi, M.; Ghufoor, K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify if there is a link between bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa and post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective non-interventional study of 105 patients who underwent tonsillectomy during a seven-month period. The study took place in a

  13. Uterine artery embolization for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Wang, Z.; Chen, J.; Shi, H.; Zhang, X.; Pan, J.; Liu, W.; Yang, N.; Jin, Z.; Lang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of uterine artery embolization for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta. Materials and methods: Between January 2005 and August 2011, 45 women with placenta accreta, which was discovered during delivery, were managed conservatively in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. They did not experience severe bleeding during delivery. Ten patients (mean age 31 ± 6.4 years) developed secondary postpartum haemorrhage and underwent uterine artery embolization. The complications, control of haemorrhage, and outcome of the placenta left inside the uterus were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients underwent transcatheter embolization of bilateral uterine arteries. The median time between delivery and uterine artery embolization was 11 days (range 3–76 days). The technical success rate of embolization was 100%. Bleeding was controlled in all patients during follow-up (11 ± 6.9 months; range 3–24 months), and no further bleeding occurred. One patient developed lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis after uterine artery embolization, and no other major complications occurred. The placentae that were left inside the uteri gradually decreased in size during follow-up, except in one case. Nine patients resumed normal menstruation. One patient subsequently became pregnant and had an uneventful intrauterine pregnancy carried to term. Conclusion: Uterine artery embolization is safe and effective for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta.

  14. Persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation: value of pelvic embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargeaudou, Yann; Soyer, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dahan, Henri; Dref, Olivier le [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP et Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Morel, Olivier; Barranger, Emmanuel [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Paris (France); Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the role and efficacy of pelvic embolisation in the treatment of persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation and to identify the complications of this procedure in this specific population. The clinical files and angiographic examinations of 12 consecutive women (mean age 32 years) who were treated with pelvic embolisation because of persistent, severe postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation were reviewed. Angiography revealed that persistent bleeding was due to incomplete arterial ligation (n = 4) or the presence of newly developed anastomotic routes (n = 8). In 11 women, pelvic embolisation stopped the bleeding. Hysterectomy was needed in one woman with retained placenta. Two complications due to pelvic embolisation, including leg ischaemia and transient sciatic nerve ischaemia, were identified, both after internal iliac artery ligation. In women with persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation, pelvic embolisation is an effective treatment in most cases. However, embolisation of the anastomotic routes that contribute to persistent bleeding may result in ischaemic complications. These potential complications reaffirm that arterial ligation should not be the favoured option for postpartum haemorrhage and that special care must be given during pelvic embolisation after failed arterial ligation. (orig.)

  15. Severe postpartum haemorrhage from ruptured pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe; Fargeaudou, Yann; Boudiaf, Mourad; Le Dref, Olivier; Rymer, Roland [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP Universite Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris cedex 10 (France); Morel, Olivier [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP Universite Paris 7, Department of Obstetrics, Paris cedex 10 (France)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm and to analyse the clinical symptoms that may suggest a pseudoaneurysm as a cause of postpartum haemorrhage. A retrospective search of our database disclosed seven women with severe postpartum haemorrhage in whom angiography revealed the presence of a uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm and who were treated using transcatheter arterial embolization. Clinical files were reviewed for possible clinical findings that could suggest pseudoaneurysm as a cause of bleeding. Angiography revealed extravasation of contrast material in five out of seven patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization allowed to control the bleeding in all patients and subsequently achieve vaginal suture in four patients with vaginal laceration. No complications related to transcatheter arterial embolization were noted. Only two patients had uterine atony, and inefficiency of sulprostone was observed in all patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and secure technique for the treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm. Ineffectiveness of suprostone and absence of uterine atony should raise the possibility of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. (orig.)

  16. Increased postpartum haemorrhage, the possible relation with serotonergic and other psychopharmacological drugs: a matched cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, Hanna M.; Ravelli, Anita C. J.; Bruning, Andrea H. L.; de Groot, Christianne J. M.; Scheele, Fedde; van Pampus, Maria G.; Honig, Adriaan

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is a major obstetric risk worldwide. Therefore risk factors need to be investigated to control for this serious complication. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis revealed that the use of both serotonergic and non-serotonergic antidepressants in pregnancy are

  17. Severe postpartum haemorrhage from ruptured pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyer, Philippe; Fargeaudou, Yann; Boudiaf, Mourad; Le Dref, Olivier; Rymer, Roland; Morel, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm and to analyse the clinical symptoms that may suggest a pseudoaneurysm as a cause of postpartum haemorrhage. A retrospective search of our database disclosed seven women with severe postpartum haemorrhage in whom angiography revealed the presence of a uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm and who were treated using transcatheter arterial embolization. Clinical files were reviewed for possible clinical findings that could suggest pseudoaneurysm as a cause of bleeding. Angiography revealed extravasation of contrast material in five out of seven patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization allowed to control the bleeding in all patients and subsequently achieve vaginal suture in four patients with vaginal laceration. No complications related to transcatheter arterial embolization were noted. Only two patients had uterine atony, and inefficiency of sulprostone was observed in all patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and secure technique for the treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm. Ineffectiveness of suprostone and absence of uterine atony should raise the possibility of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. (orig.)

  18. Spatio-temporal risk factors for viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ann Britt Bang; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Korsholm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is an economically very important fish disease in the northern hemisphere. When the VHS virus was first isolated in Denmark 50 yr ago, more than 80% of the 800 Danish fish farms were considered to be infected, but vigilant surveillance and eradication programmes...

  19. Improvement after treatment of hydrocephalus in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : implications for grading and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, M; Mooij, JJA

    Two patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and hydrocephalus are presented. On admission they scored E1M4V1 and E1M3Vtube on the Glasgow Coma Scale. The first patient recovered to E3M5Vtube after treatment of hydrocpehalus by extraventricular drainage. The second recovered to E2M5Vtube

  20. Bilateral Wyburn-Mason Syndrome presenting as acute subarachnoid haemorrhage - a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortnum, Søren Ole Stigaard; Sørensen, Preben; Andresen, J

    2008-01-01

    . Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder comprising of vascular malformations of the retina, ipsilateral cerebral AVMs and occasionally lesions in the oronasopharyngeal area. Subarachnoid haemorrhage associated with Wyburn-Mason syndrome has been described in only 5...

  1. Treatment of Laryngeal Telangiectatic Lesions in a Patient Diagnosed with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse; Printz, Trine; Slot Mehlum, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We here present a case concerning a 69 year old female patient with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT). She was suffering from hoarseness due to a telangiectatic lesion on the right vocal cord. The lesion was treated with laser and the voice improved markedly, which is document...

  2. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Collarino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis.

  3. The efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate compared with cryoprecipitate in major obstetric haemorrhage - an observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmed, S

    2012-10-01

    Fibrinogen replacement is critical in major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). Purified, pasteurised fibrinogen concentrate appears to have benefit over cryoprecipitate in ease of administration and safety but is unlicensed in pregnancy. In July 2009, the Irish Blood Transfusion Service replaced cryoprecipitate with fibrinogen.

  4. The role of haemorrhage and exudate detection in automated grading of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alan D; Goatman, Keith A; Philip, Sam; Williams, Graeme J; Prescott, Gordon J; Scotland, Graham S; McNamee, Paul; Leese, Graham P; Wykes, William N; Sharp, Peter F; Olson, John A

    2010-06-01

    Automated grading has the potential to improve the efficiency of diabetic retinopathy screening services. While disease/no disease grading can be performed using only microaneurysm detection and image-quality assessment, automated recognition of other types of lesions may be advantageous. This study investigated whether inclusion of automated recognition of exudates and haemorrhages improves the detection of observable/referable diabetic retinopathy. Images from 1253 patients with observable/referable retinopathy and 6333 patients with non-referable retinopathy were obtained from three grading centres. All images were reference-graded, and automated disease/no disease assessments were made based on microaneurysm detection and combined microaneurysm, exudate and haemorrhage detection. Introduction of algorithms for exudates and haemorrhages resulted in a statistically significant increase in the sensitivity for detection of observable/referable retinopathy from 94.9% (95% CI 93.5 to 96.0) to 96.6% (95.4 to 97.4) without affecting manual grading workload. Automated detection of exudates and haemorrhages improved the detection of observable/referable retinopathy.

  5. Erythropoietin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage originates from the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Sonne, Bjarne; Frederiksen, Hans Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Recent years' research has revealed a specific, neuroprotective erythropoietin (EPO) system in the central nervous system (CNS) that is upregulated by hypoxia. The presence and dynamics of EPO in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has not been investigated...

  6. Magnesium therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a dose-finding study for long term treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, W. M.; Albrecht, K. W.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, J. W.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent which might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Although the dosage for short-term magnesium therapy is well established, there is lack of knowledge on the dosage for extended use of

  7. Aneurysm occlusion in elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : a cost-utility analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.; Buskens, E.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    Background Aneurysm occlusion after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) aims to improve outcome by reducing the rebleeding risk. With increasing age, overall prognosis decreases, and the complications of aneurysm occlusion increase. The balance of risks for aneurysm occlusion in elderly SAH patients in

  8. The effects of continuous prostacyclin infusion on regional blood flow and cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine

    2012-01-01

    One of the main causes of mortality and morbidity following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the development of cerebral vasospasm, a frequent complication arising in the weeks after the initial bleeding. Despite extensive research, to date no effective treatment of vasospasm exists. Prostacycli...

  9. Necrosis and haemorrhage of the putamen in methanol poisoning shown on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteifan, K.; Gutbub, A.M.; Laplatte, G.; Oesterle, H.; Tajahmady, T.

    1998-01-01

    Methanol, a highly toxic substance, is used as an industrial solvent and in automobile antifreeze. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis and serious neurologic sequelae. We describe a 50-year-old woman with accidental methanol intoxication who was in a vegetative state. MRI showed haemorrhagic necrosis of the putamina and oedema in the deep white matter. (orig.)

  10. Spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage and outcome--results from Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S H; Yeo, T T; Seow, W T; Tan, K K; Ong, P L

    1999-07-01

    To ascertain the number of cases of spontaneous (aneurysmal) subarachnoid haemorrhage presenting to Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, over a one year period, the demographics of the patients involved, their treatment and their eventual outcome. A retrospective study from June 1995 to June 1996. There were 62 patients admitted over this period with an average of 5 patients per month. Their ages ranged from 9 to 85 years with a mean of 54 years. All 62 patients underwent 4-vessel cerebral angiograms. Forty-three patients (69%) underwent clipping of their aneurysms. Twelve patients (19%) had negative angiograms. Four patients (6%) underwent coiling of their aneurysms via interventional neuroradiology techniques. Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage of Grades 1 to 3 on the WFNS (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons) grading had a favourable outcome (Glasgow Outcome Score of 4 and 5) in 85% of the cases. The overall mortality rate for the operated group (all grades) was 11%. However for the group with good WFNS grading, namely the Grade 1 to 2 groups, there were no deaths. Twenty-four percent of patients developed clinically symptomatic vasospasm. Eighteen percent of patients required ventriculo-peritoneal shunting for hydrocephalus secondary to the subarachnoid haemorrhage. The overall management mortality (operated and non-operated cases) was 14% for proven aneurysmal and angiographically-negative spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage. These results are comparable to that of other reputable centers reported in the literature.

  11. Narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Ewald Rosch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the paediatric age-group probably linked to the use of the Pandremix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can ‘trigger’ narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population.Here we describe the case of a 13 year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow-fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Polysomnography showed rapid sleep onset with rapid eye movement (REM latency of 47 minutes, significant sleep fragmentation and a mean sleep latency of 1.6 minutes with sleep onset REM in 4 out of 4 nap periods. Together with the clinical history, these findings are diagnostic of narcolepsy type 1. The envelope protein E of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D has significant amino acid sequence overlap with both hypocretin and the hypocretin receptor 2 receptors in protein regions that are predicted to act as epitopes for antibody production. These findings raise the question whether the yellow fever vaccine strain may, through a potential molecular mimicry mechanism, be another infectious trigger for this neuro-immunological disorder.

  12. Evaluation of fever in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jennifer L; John, Sony P

    2013-02-15

    Febrile illness in children younger than 36 months is common and has potentially serious consequences. With the widespread use of immunizations against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b, the epidemiology of bacterial infections causing fever has changed. Although an extensive diagnostic evaluation is still recommended for neonates, lumbar puncture and chest radiography are no longer recommended for older children with fever but no other indications. With an increase in the incidence of urinary tract infections in children, urine testing is important in those with unexplained fever. Signs of a serious bacterial infection include cyanosis, poor peripheral circulation, petechial rash, and inconsolability. Parental and physician concern have also been validated as indications of serious illness. Rapid testing for influenza and other viruses may help reduce the need for more invasive studies. Hospitalization and antibiotics are encouraged for infants and young children who are thought to have a serious bacterial infection. Suggested empiric antibiotics include ampicillin and gentamicin for neonates; ceftriaxone and cefotaxime for young infants; and cefixime, amoxicillin, or azithromycin for older infants.

  13. Fish oil diet associated with acute reperfusion related haemorrhage, and with reduced stroke-related sickness behaviours and motor impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Celeste Pascoe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is associated with motor impairment and increased incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety/clinical depression. In non-stroke populations, successful management of such disorders and symptoms has been reported following diet supplementation with long chain omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids (PUFA. However, the potential protective effects of PUFA supplementation on affective behaviours after experimentally induced stroke and sham surgery have not been examined previously. This study investigated the behavioural effects of PUFA supplementation over a six-week period following either middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery in the hooded-Wistar rat. The PUFA diet supplied during the acclimation period prior to surgery was found to be associated with an increased risk of acute haemorrhage following the reperfusion component of the surgery. In surviving animals, PUFA supplementation did not influence infarct size as determined six weeks after surgery, but did decrease omega-6-fatty-acid levels, moderate sickness behaviours, acute motor impairment and longer-term locomotor hyperactivity and depression/anxiety-like behaviour.

  14. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, an emerging tick-borne zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; He, Biao; Huang, Si-Yang; Wei, Feng; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-08-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging haemorrhagic fever that was first described in rural areas of China. The causative agent, SFTS virus (SFTSV), is a novel phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae family. Since the first report in 2010, SFTS has been found in 11 provinces of China, with about 2500 reported cases, and an average case-fatality rate of 7·3%. The disease was also reported in Japan and Korea in 2012; Heartland virus, another phlebovirus genetically closely related to SFTSV, was isolated from two patients in the USA. The disease has become a substantial risk to public health, not only in China, but also in other parts of the world. The virus could undergo rapid evolution by gene mutation, reassortment, and homologous recombination in tick vectors and vertebrate reservoir hosts. No specific treatment of SFTS is available, and avoiding tick bites is an important measure to prevent the infection and transmission of SFTSV. This Review provides information on the molecular characteristics and ecology of this emerging tick-borne virus and describes the epidemiology, clinical signs, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of human infection with SFTSV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of a Lassa fever outbreak, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlkes, Lutz; George, Maja; Samosny, Gerhard; Burckhardt, Florian; Vogt, Manfred; Bent, Stefan; Jahn, Klaus; Zanger, Philipp

    2017-09-01

    Due to rapid diagnosis and isolation of imported cases, community outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are considered unlikely in industrialised countries. In March 2016, the first documented locally acquired case of Lassa fever (LF) outside Africa occurred, demonstrating the disease's potential as a cross-border health threat. We describe the management surrounding this case of LF in Rhineland-Palatinate - the German federal state where secondary transmission occurred. Twelve days after having been exposed to the corpse of a LF case imported from Togo, a symptomatic undertaker tested positive for Lassa virus RNA. Potential contacts were traced, categorised based on exposure risk, and monitored. Overall, we identified 21 contact persons with legal residency in Rhineland-Palatinate: seven related to the index case, 13 to the secondary case, and one related to both. The secondary case received treatment and recovered. Five contacts were quarantined and one was temporarily banned from work. No further transmission occurred. Based on the experience gained during the outbreak and a review of national and international guidelines, we conclude that exposure risk attributable to corpses may currently be underestimated, and we present suggestions that may help to improve the anti-epidemic response to imported VHF cases in industrialised countries.

  16. Clinical and laboratory profile of dengue fever patients admitted in combined military hospital rawalpindi in year 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M. M. U.; Zakaria, M.; Mustafvi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of clinical presentations, haematological and biochemical abnormalities, and outcome of dengue fever patients admitted in Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi in year 2015. Study Design: A descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, CMH Rawalpindi, from January 2015 to December 2015. Material and Methods: Patients meeting the inclusion criteria were admitted at CMH Rawalpindi and blood serology was done to confirm the diagnosis of dengue fever. Cases with positive dengue serology were included in the study. Clinical symptoms, signs, investigations and outcome of these patients were recorded on a proforma. Blood samples were taken for analysis. Chest X-Ray and ultrasound abdomen were done on required basis. Results: Out of forty confirmed cases of dengue fever, there were 25 (62.5 percent) males and 15 (37.5 percent) females. Mean age was 40 years. There were 39 cases (97.5 percent) of dengue fever and one case (2.5 percent) of dengue shock syndrome.There was no case of dengue haemorrhagic syndrome. Maximum cases were seen in the month of October 2015.The clinical features noted were: headache and myalgias 62.5 percent, chills and rigors 57.5 percent, retro-orbital pain 42.5 percent, vomiting 35.0 percent, pruritus 27 percent, skin rash 20 percent, abdominal pain 20 percent, diarrhoea 10 percent, bleeding 2.5 percent, ascites and pleural effusion 2.5 percent, and hepatomegaly 15 percent. The laboratory findings were: leucopenia 85 percent and thrombocytopenia 92.5 percent. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT), urea, and creatinine were raised in 30 percent, 2.5 percent and 7.5 percent cases respectively. Mortality was 2.5 percent. Conclusion: This study showed that patients admitted to CMH hospital had a milder presentation of dengue fever in the year 2015. (author)

  17. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-06-21

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever.

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  19. What would PCR assessment change in the management of fevers in a malaria endemic area? A school-based study in Benin in children with and without fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faucher Jean-François

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent school-based study in Benin showed that applying a policy of anti-malarial prescriptions restricted to parasitologically-confirmed cases on the management of fever is safe and feasible. Additional PCR data were analysed in order to touch patho-physiological issues, such as the usefulness of PCR in the management of malaria in an endemic area or the triggering of a malaria attack in children with submicroscopic malaria. Methods PCR data were prospectively collected in the setting of an exposed (with fever/non exposed (without fever study design. All children had a negative malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT at baseline, were followed up to day 14 and did not receive drugs with anti-malarial activity. The index group was defined by children with fever at baseline and the control group by children without fever at baseline. Children with submicroscopic malaria in these two groups were defined by a positive PCR at baseline. Results PCR was positive in 66 (27% children of the index group and in 104 (44% children of the control group respectively. The only significant factor positively related to PCR positivity at baseline was the clinical status (control group. When definition of malaria attacks included PCR results, no difference of malaria incidence was observed between the index and control groups, neither in the whole cohort, nor in children with submicroscopic malaria. The rate of undiagnosed malaria at baseline was estimated to 3.7% at baseline in the index group. Conclusions Treating all children with fever and a positive PCR would have led to a significant increase of anti-malarial consumption, with few benefits in terms of clinical events. Non malarial fevers do not or do not frequently trigger malaria attacks in children with submicroscopic malaria.

  20. [Evaluation on the effects of prevention and control programs regarding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in Guizhou province, from 2007 to 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guanghai; Zou, Zhiting; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yanping; Nie, Wei; Liu, Huihui; Tang, Guangpeng

    2014-05-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of prevention and control regarding programs on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever, in Guizhou province, from 2007 to 2012, to provide evidence for the improvement of related programs. Data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid including information on epidemics, individual, cases, measures for prevention and control programs taken and relative government documents were collected and analyzed in Guizhou province, from 2007 to 2012. Information related to the average annual incidence, nature of outbreaks, time span before confirmed diagnosis was made, unit which carried the case report, proportion of laboratory confirmed diagnosed cases and case-management were compared between 2007-2009 and 2010-2012 descriptively while chi-square test with Excel and EpiInfo software were used for data analysis. In the period of 2007-2009, a total of 5 978 typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever cases were reported in Guizhou province with the average yearly incidence as 5.29/100 000. In the period of 2010-2012, 2 765 cases were reported with the average yearly incidence as 2.57/100 000. When compared to the former, data from the latter period showed that the average yearly incidence had declined 51.31% in all the prefectures. There were still some outbreaks appeared but the total number of cases involved reduced 87.50%. The time span before the confirmation of diagnosis became shorter but the difference was not statistically significant (χ² = 0.08, P = 0.99). Number of cases reported by hospitals at county or above had 11.51% of increase while those cases reported at the township hospitals or below decreased for 61.47% . The proportion of laboratory diagnosed cases increased 23.63%. Rates of timeliness on cards being filled in, input and audited showed increase of 8.44%, 6.76% and 2.40% respectively. Successful measures for prevention and control on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever had been remarkably taken in Guizhou province, but the potential