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Sample records for haematobium infected men

  1. Evidences of endemic Schistosoma haematobium infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Altogether, 1,479 pupils (60.0% boys and 40.0% girls), aged between 4-20 years, were examined in the over sixteen schools in and around the community, selected by convenience. Of all the pupils examined, 1,144 (77.4%) had the characteristic eggs of S. haematobium in their urine samples. Infection rate for boys was ...

  2. Schistosoma haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-18

    Aug 18, 2016 ... Increased education on preventive and control measures especially in ... wage earning of infected children.[19] ..... Table 2: Gender, age group and the distribution of S. haematobium infection in the two ..... Identifying gaps in.

  3. Schistosoma haematobium infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in young South African females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Anna M. O.; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke; Zulu, Siphosenkosi Gift

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium eggs can induce lesions in the urinary and genital tract epithelia, as eggs pass through or get trapped in the tissue. Local inflammatory reactions induced by S. haematobium eggs might affect the ability of bacteria to establish mucosal super-infection foci. S. haematobium...... school students from a schistosomiasis endemic area in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that asymptomatic bacteriuria is not a bias for use of micro-haematuria as a proxy diagnostic measure for S. haematobium infection in this population....

  4. Downregulation of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 with praziquantel treatment in Schistosoma haematobium and HIV-1 co-infected individuals in a rural community in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rbl; Gomo, E.; Kallestrup, P

    2009-01-01

    influence. METHODS: To determine levels of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 chemokine in plasma of S. haematobium and HIV-1 co-infected and uninfected individuals in a rural black Zimbabwean community.A cohort was established of HIV-1 and schistosomiasis infection and co-infection comprising 379 participants. Outcome...... measures consisted of HIV-1 and schistosomiasis status and levels of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 in plasma at baseline and three months post treatment. An association was established between MIP-1alpha/CCL3 plasma levels with HIV-1 and S. haematobium infections. RESULTS: A total of 379 adults formed the established...... cohort comprising 76 (20%) men and 303 (80%) women. Mean age was 33.25, range 17 - 62 years. The median MIP-1alpha/CCL3 plasma concentration was significantly higher in S. haematobium infected compared with uninfected individuals (p = 0.029). In contrast, there was no difference in the median MIP-1alpha...

  5. Increased prevalence of leukocytes and elevated cytokine levels in semen from Schistosoma haematobium-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leutscher, Peter D C; Pedersen, Mette; Raharisolo, Clairette

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the seminal inflammatory response to egg infestation of the urogenital organs in 240 semen-donating men aged 15-49 years living in a Schistosoma haematobium-endemic area of Madagascar. In 29 subjects (12%) with excretion of > or =5 ova/ejaculate, leukocytospermia (>10...

  6. Urinary estrogen metabolites and self-reported infertility in women infected with Schistosoma haematobium.

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    Júlio Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, endemic in 76 countries, that afflicts more than 240 million people. The impact of schistosomiasis on infertility may be underestimated according to recent literature. Extracts of Schistosoma haematobium include estrogen-like metabolites termed catechol-estrogens that down regulate estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estrogen responsive cells. In addition, schistosome derived catechol-estrogens induce genotoxicity that result in estrogen-DNA adducts. These catechol estrogens and the catechol-estrogen-DNA adducts can be isolated from sera of people infected with S. haematobium. The aim of this study was to study infertility in females infected with S. haematobium and its association with the presence of schistosome-derived catechol-estrogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken of female residents of a region in Bengo province, Angola, endemic for schistosomiasis haematobia. Ninety-three women and girls, aged from two (parents interviewed to 94 years were interviewed on present and previous urinary, urogenital and gynecological symptoms and complaints. Urine was collected from the participants for egg-based parasitological assessment of schistosome infection, and for liquid chromatography diode array detection electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/UV-DAD/ESI-MSn to investigate estrogen metabolites in the urine. Novel estrogen-like metabolites, potentially of schistosome origin, were detected in the urine of participants who were positive for eggs of S. haematobium, but not detected in urines negative for S. haematobium eggs. The catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts were significantly associated with schistosomiasis (OR 3.35; 95% CI 2.32-4.84; P≤0.001. In addition, presence of these metabolites was positively associated with infertility (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.13-16.70; P≤0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Estrogen metabolites occur widely in diverse

  7. Co-infection with Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths in rural South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molvik, Mari; Helland, Elin; Zulu, Siphosenkosi Gift

    2017-01-01

    trichiura in schoolgirls in the rural areas of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We also explored if S. haematobium can serve as a predictor for soil-transmitted helminths in this area. From 15 selected schools, 726 primary schoolgirls aged 10–12 years provided both urine and stool samples. The samples were...... interval =1.58–2.93; pwater contact and haematuria) were significantly associated with A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura infection. We have demonstrated a highly significant correlation and overall association between urogenital...

  8. Relationship between pure Schistosoma haematobium infection in Upper Egypt and irrigation systems. Part II: Host characteristics. The general prevalence of Schistosoma haematobium, age and sex distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, H M; Allam, F A; Hassanein, F

    1975-01-01

    The epidemiology of bilharziasis was studied in four villages in Assiut Governorate. These villages were almost similar with respect to their socioeconomic conditions, modes of living, availability and date of introduction of medical services. The first village, Gezirat El-Maabda, has a basin system of irrigation. The other three villages had shifted to the perennial system of irrigation for three years in Nazza Karrar, 26 years in El-Ghorayeb and 95 years in Garf Sarhan and were similar with respect to proximity to water courses. So the only variable of importance between the four villages was the mode of irrigation. Bilharziasis was diagnosed by detection of eggs in urine or faeces. A definitive relationship between the prevalence of S. haematobium infection and the type of irrigation system was further documented. A low prevalence was found in Gezirat El-Maabda (2.95%). In the other three villages a much higher prevalence existed (31.9%, 46.2% & 38.9% in Nazza Karar, El-Ghorayeb and Garf Sarhan respectively). The higher prevalence of S. haematobium in Nazza Karar (31.9%) only three years after introduction of perennial irrigation was a disappointing finding. It can be considered as an evidence against the elaborate measures and precautions planned and incompletely implemented before or after the establishment of Aswan High Dam. Not a single case of S. mansoni was encountered during this study. As regards the age and sex distribution of S. haematobium in the three villages irrigated perennially, a steep rise started at the age group 5-9 years reaching a peak at the age group 10-14 years. In Gezirat El-Maabda the peak was reached at later age (15-19 years). The cause of this difference was explained. Males showed a higher rate of infection than females in almost all age groups of the four village studied.

  9. Anemia and growth retardation associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection in Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Chalotte W; Sacko, Moussa; Madsen, Henry

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundThe aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate a possible association of Schistosoma haematobium with child growth development and describe a plausible schistosomiasis-related anemia in children and adults in a highly schistosomiasis endemic area of Mali. MethodsUrine, feces...... associated with anemia; i.e., odds of having anemia in the highest and the next highest category was 3.25 (95% CL 1.61–6.55; p... factors. Anemia was most pronounced in the 2–5 year olds males (55.5%, n=98). P. falciparum infection was not significantly associated with anemia. Stunting (body mass index [BMI] for age z-score

  10. Evaluation of field recognizable morbidity indicators of Schistosoma haematobium infection among primary school children in Ghana

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    Ato Kwamena Tetteh

    2016-09-01

    Materials and Methods — In all, 417 pupils in three primary schools (Kasseh sub-District, Dangme East District, Ghana, provided urine samples, which were examined for S. haematobium ova. The study utilized a structured questionnaire, the Urit 10V multi-stick urine reagent strips and the filtration method. Results — Overall, prevalence by microscopy was 20.9% (requires targeted treatment once every two years, and was higher (14.0% among the 10-15 years age group (χ2=22.44, p<0.001. The lowest prevalence was among the <6 (0.5%, 2/417 and ≥19 (1.4%, 6/417 years age groups. There was no significant difference in prevalence among females (7.9%, 33/417 and males (12.9%, 54/417 (χ2=2.58, p=0.108. Self-reported haematuria was 43.2% (targeted treatment once a year. There was a significant difference between female (16.1%, 67/417 and male (27.1%, 113/417 responses to self-reported haematuria (χ2=4.170, p<0.001. A lower consolidated mean prevalence of 11.7% was estimated among pupils who had ova in their urine and also exhibited three morbidity indicators (haematuria, leucocyturia and proteinuria. Combined and averaged sensitivity and specificity estimations (sensitivity = 55.4%, specificity = 67.8%, Positive Predictive Value (PPV = 53.4%, Negative Predictive Value (NPV = 64.2% of these morbidity indicators, was insufficient in equalizing the reliability of ova quantification. With the exception of leucocyturia, which was common among all pupils, 28.75% (25/87 of the infected individuals did not have any form of haematuria or proteinuria. Out of these, one pupil had heavy ova intensity (80 eggs/10ml of urine while the remaining 24 had low ova intensity infection (1-44 eggs/10ml of urine. Questionnaire correctly identified 56.3% of pupils with S. haematobium ova in their urine, also reporting bloody urine (PPV=27.2%; NPV=84.0%. It also identified 49.4% of pupils with ova, reporting painful urination (PPV=26.1%, NPV=82.5%. Conclusion — This study emphasizes the

  11. Evaluating diagnostic indicators of urogenital Schistosoma haematobium infection in young women: A cross sectional study in rural South Africa.

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    Hashini Nilushika Galappaththi-Arachchige

    Full Text Available Urine microscopy is the standard diagnostic method for urogenital S. haematobium infection. However, this may lead to under-diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis, as the disease may present itself with genital symptoms in the absence of ova in the urine. Currently there is no single reliable and affordable diagnostic method to diagnose the full spectrum of urogenital S. haematobium infection. In this study we explore the classic indicators in the diagnosis of urogenital S. haematobium infection, with focus on young women.In a cross-sectional study of 1237 sexually active young women in rural South Africa, we assessed four diagnostic indicators of urogenital S. haematobium infection: microscopy of urine, polymerase chain reaction (PCR of cervicovaginal lavage (CVL, urogenital symptoms, and sandy patches detected clinically in combination with computerised image analysis of photocolposcopic images. We estimated the accuracy of these diagnostic indicators through the following analyses: 1 cross tabulation (assumed empirical gold standard of the tests against the combined findings of sandy patches and/or computerized image analysis and 2 a latent class model of the four indicators without assuming any gold standard.The empirical approach showed that urine microscopy had a sensitivity of 34.7% and specificity of 75.2% while the latent class analysis approach (LCA suggested a sensitivity of 81.0% and specificity of 85.6%. The empirical approach and LCA showed that Schistosoma PCR in CVL had low sensitivity (14.1% and 52.4%, respectively and high specificity (93.0% and 98.0, respectively. Using LCA, the presence of sandy patches showed a sensitivity of 81.6 and specificity of 42.4%. The empirical approach and LCA showed that urogenital symptoms had a high sensitivity (89.4% and 100.0%, respectively, whereas specificity was low (10.6% and 12.3%, respectively.All the diagnostic indicators used in the study had limited accuracy. Using urine microscopy

  12. Micro-geographical heterogeneity in Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium infection and morbidity in a co-endemic community in northern Senegal.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, L.; Mbow, M.; Boon, N.; Van den Broeck, F.; Vereecken, K.; Dieye, T.N.; Abatih, E.; Huyse, T.; Mboup, S.; Polman, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium are co-endemic in many areas in Africa. Yet, little is known about the micro-geographical distribution of these two infections or associated disease within such foci. Such knowledge could give important insights into the drivers of infection and

  13. P53 and cancer-associated sialylated glycans are surrogate markers of cancerization of the bladder associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is a significant health problem in rural areas of Africa and the Middle East where Schistosoma haematobium is prevalent, supporting an association between malignant transformation and infection by this blood fluke. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms linking these events are poorly understood. Bladder cancers in infected populations are generally diagnosed at a late stage since there is a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tools, hence enforcing the need for early carcinogenesis markers.Forty-three formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded bladder biopsies of S. haematobium-infected patients, consisting of bladder tumours, tumour adjacent mucosa and pre-malignant/malignant urothelial lesions, were screened for bladder cancer biomarkers. These included the oncoprotein p53, the tumour proliferation rate (Ki-67>17%, cell-surface cancer-associated glycan sialyl-Tn (sTn and sialyl-Lewisa/x (sLea/sLex, involved in immune escape and metastasis. Bladder tumours of non-S. haematobium etiology and normal urothelium were used as controls. S. haematobium-associated benign/pre-malignant lesions present alterations in p53 and sLex that were also found in bladder tumors. Similar results were observed in non-S. haematobium associated tumours, irrespectively of their histological nature, denoting some common molecular pathways. In addition, most benign/pre-malignant lesions also expressed sLea. However, proliferative phenotypes were more prevalent in lesions adjacent to bladder tumors while sLea was characteristic of sole benign/pre-malignant lesions, suggesting it may be a biomarker of early carcionogenesis associated with the parasite. A correlation was observed between the frequency of the biomarkers in the tumor and adjacent mucosa, with the exception of Ki-67. Most S. haematobium eggs embedded in the urothelium were also positive for sLea and sLex. Reinforcing the pathologic nature of the studied biomarkers, none was observed in the healthy urothelium

  14. Age-related patterns in human myeloid dendritic cell populations in people exposed to Schistosoma haematobium infection.

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    Norman Nausch

    Full Text Available Urogenital schistosomiasis is caused by the helminth parasite Schistosoma haematobium. In high transmission areas, children acquire schistosome infection early in life with infection levels peaking in early childhood and subsequently declining in late childhood. This age-related infection profile is thought to result from the gradual development of protective acquired immunity. Age-related differences in schistosome-specific humoral and cellular responses have been reported from several field studies. However there has not yet been a systematic study of the age-related changes in human dendritic cells, the drivers of T cell polarisation.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from a cohort of 61 Zimbabwean aged 5-45 years with a S. haematobium prevalence of 47.5%. Two subsets of dendritic cells, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs and pDCs, were analyzed by flow cytometry.In this population, schistosome infection levels peaked in the youngest age group (5-9 years, and declined in late childhood and adulthood (10+ years. The proportions of both mDCs and pDCs varied with age. However, for mDCs the age profile depended on host infection status. In the youngest age group infected people had enhanced proportions of mDCs as well as lower levels of HLA-DR on mDCs than un-infected people. In the older age groups (10-13 and 14-45 years infected people had lower proportions of mDCs compared to un-infected individuals, but no infection status-related differences were observed in their levels of HLA-DR. Moreover mDC proportions correlated with levels of schistosome-specific IgG, which can be associated with protective immunity. In contrast proportions of pDCs varied with host age, but not with infection status.Our results show that dendritic cell proportions and activation in a human population living in schistosome-endemic areas vary with host age reflecting differences in cumulative history of exposure to schistosome infection.

  15. Ultrasound monitoring of structural urinary tract disease in Schistosoma haematobium infection

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    King Charles H

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A major advance in our understanding of the natural history of Schistosoma haematobium-related morbidity has come through the introduction of the portable ultrasound machines for non-invasive examination of the kidneys and bladder. With the use of generators or battery packs to supply power in non-clinical field settings, and with the use of instant photography or miniaturized thermal printers to record permanent images, it is possible to examine scores of individuals in endemic communities every day. Broad-based ultrasound screening has allowed better definition of age-specific disease risks in urinary schistosomiasis. Results indicate that urinary tract abnormalities are common (18% overall prevalence in S. haematobium transmission areas, with a 2-4% risk of either severe bladder abnormality or advanced ureteral obstruction. In longitudinal surveys, ultrasound studies have shown that praziquantel and metrifonate therapy are rapidly effective in reversing urinary tract abnormalities among children. The benefits of treating adults are less well known, but research in progress should help to define this issue. Similarly, the prognosis of specific ultrasound findings needs to be clarified, and the ease of sonographic examination will make such long-term follow-up studies feasible. In summary, the painless, quick, and reproducible ultrasound examination has become an essential tool in the study of urinary schistosomiasis.

  16. HPV Infection in Men

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    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  17. The effect of treatment on the age-antibody relationship in children infected with Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium

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    Mutapi Francisca

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of praziquantel treatment on the age-antibody relationship was studied in 174 children aged between 6 and 17 years from a schistosome endemic area in Zimbabwe. The children were co-infected with Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium with infection prevalences of 74% and 53% respectively. Antibody levels for the isotypes IgA, IgE, IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4, directed against soluble egg antigen were measured using an indirect ELISA assay. Treatment resulted in a significant increase in levels of IgG2 and IgG3 while levels of IgA decreased significantly. In untreated children there were significant decreases in levels of IgG4. Treatment also resulted in significant alteration in the age-antibody profiles for the isotypes IgE, IgM, IgG1 and IgG2 in treated children but not in untreated children. The results are discussed in the context of factors believed to give rise to the age-antibody relationship; i.e. age-related exposure patterns, age-related development of acquired immunity, age-related hormonal changes and age-related changes in innate susceptibility to infection.

  18. Micro-geographical heterogeneity in Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium infection and morbidity in a co-endemic community in northern Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Meurs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium are co-endemic in many areas in Africa. Yet, little is known about the micro-geographical distribution of these two infections or associated disease within such foci. Such knowledge could give important insights into the drivers of infection and disease and as such better tailor schistosomiasis control and elimination efforts. METHODOLOGY: In a co-endemic farming community in northern Senegal (346 children (0-19 y and 253 adults (20-85 y; n = 599 in total, we studied the spatial distribution of S. mansoni and S. haematobium single and mixed infections (by microscopy, S. mansoni-specific hepatic fibrosis, S. haematobium-specific urinary tract morbidity (by ultrasound and water contact behavior (by questionnaire. The Kulldorff's scan statistic was used to detect spatial clusters of infection and morbidity, adjusted for the spatial distribution of gender and age. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium infection densities clustered in different sections of the community (p = 0.002 and p = 0.023, respectively, possibly related to heterogeneities in the use of different water contact sites. While the distribution of urinary tract morbidity was homogeneous, a strong geospatial cluster was found for severe hepatic fibrosis (p = 0.001. Particularly those people living adjacent to the most frequently used water contact site were more at risk for more advanced morbidity (RR = 6.3; p = 0.043. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Schistosoma infection and associated disease showed important micro-geographical heterogeneities with divergent patterns for S. mansoni and S. haematobium in this Senegalese community. Further in depth investigations are needed to confirm and explain our observations. The present study indicates that local geospatial patterns should be taken into account in both research and control of schistosomiasis. The observed extreme focality of schistosomiasis even at community level

  19. The impact of repeated treatment with praziquantel of schistosomiasis in children under six years of age living in an endemic area for Schistosoma haematobium infection

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    Mduluza T

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Praziquantel was given every eight weeks for two years to children aged under six years of age, living in a Schistosoma haematobium endemic area. Infection with S. haematobium and haematuria were examined in urine and antibody profiles (IgA, IgE, IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 against S. haematobium adult worm and egg antigens were determined from sera collected before each treatment. Chemotherapy reduced infection prevalence and mean intensity from 51.8% and 110 eggs per 10 ml urine, respectively, before starting re-treatment programme to very low levels thereafter. Praziquantel is not accumulated after periodic administration in children. Immunoglobulin levels change during the course of treatment with a shift towards 'protective' mechanisms. The significant changes noted in some individuals were the drop in 'blocking' IgG2 and IgG4 whereas the 'protecting' IgA and IgG1 levels increased. The antibody profiles in the rest of the children remained generally unchanged throughout the study and no haematuria was observed after the second treatment. The removal of worms before production of large number of eggs, prevented the children from developing morbidity.

  20. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone-Based Microscope for Screening of Schistosoma haematobium Infection in Rural Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Koydemir, Hatice C; Tseng, Derek; Ephraim, Richard K D; Duah, Evans; Tee, Joseph; Andrews, Jason R; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-06-01

    AbstractSchistosomiasis affects over 170 million people in Africa. Here we compare a novel, low-cost mobile phone microscope to a conventional light microscope for the label-free diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium infections in a rural Ghanaian school setting. We tested the performance of our handheld microscope using 60 slides that were randomly chosen from an ongoing epidemiologic study in school-aged children. The mobile phone microscope had a sensitivity of 72.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.1-84.2), specificity of 100% (95% CI: 75.9-100), positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 86.3-100), and a negative predictive value of 57.1% (95% CI: 37.4-75.0). With its modest sensitivity and high specificity, this handheld and cost-effective mobile phone-based microscope is a stepping-stone toward developing a powerful tool in clinical and public health settings where there is limited access to conventional laboratory diagnostic support.

  1. Urinary cytokines in Schistosoma haematobium-infected schoolchildren from Tana Delta District of Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njaanake, Kariuki H.; Simonsen, Paul Erik; Vennervald, Birgitte J

    2014-01-01

    urine filtration technique, for haematuria using dipstix and for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), IL-6, IFN- γ, TNF-α and IL-10 levels using ELISA, and for S. haematobium-related urinary tract pathology using ultrasonography. In addition, venous blood was examined for serum IL-6, IFN- γ, TNF-α and IL...

  2. Chitinase 3-like 1 protein levels are elevated in Schistosoma haematobium infected children.

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    Laura J Appleby

    Full Text Available Currently there are few studies characterising the nature and aetiology of human schistosome-related inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1, also known as YKL-40, a molecule associated with inflammatory processes, and schistosome infection, morbidity and systemic cytokine levels.Serological levels of CHI3L1 and a panel of cytokines (IFN-y, IL-4/5/6/9/10/13 and 17 were measured in two Zimbabwean populations resident in a high and low schistosome infection area. CHI3L1 levels were related to schistosome infection, haematuria status and cytokine levels after allowing for confounding variables. The effect of antihelminthic treatment with praziquantel on CHI3L1 levels was determined in 246 participants 6 weeks post-treatment.CHI3L1 levels increased with age in both areas but were significantly higher in the high infection areas compared to the low infection area. CHI3L1 levels were also higher in infected compared to uninfected individuals with this difference being significant in the youngest age group. Curative antihelminthic treatment resulted in a significant decrease in CHI3L1 levels. Of the cytokines, only IL-10 and IL-17 had a significant association with CHI3L1 levels, and this association was negative.Serum CHI3L1 levels differ between infected and uninfected people before and after antihelminthic treatment. The greatest difference occurs in the youngest age group, in keeping with the period when schistosome-related pathological processes are initiated. Following from previous studies in non-infectious diseases showing that CHI3L1 is a biomarker for the inflammatory process, this study suggests that the potential for CHI3L1 as a biomarker for schistosome-related pathology should be explored further.

  3. Sonographic screening for urinary tract abnormalities in patients with Schistosoma haematobium infection: pitfalls in examining pregnant women.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, J.; Wagatsuma, Y.; Aryeetey, M.; Feldmeier, H.

    1996-01-01

    In areas where Schistosoma haematobium is endemic, urinary schistosomiasis and pregnancy are frequently concomitant; however, both these conditions may produce similar urinary tract changes in ultrasound scans and hence their differential diagnosis may be difficult. In patients with urinary schistosomiasis, focal and/or diffuse urinary bladder wall changes are frequently detected ultrasonically. Dilatation of one or both ureters and progressive hydronephrosis may be observed in more severe ca...

  4. Diagnostic performance of Schistosoma real-time PCR in urine samples from Kenyan children infected with Schistosoma haematobium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinkeles Melchers, Natalie V. S.; van Dam, Govert J.; Shaproski, David

    2014-01-01

    treatment. METHODOLOGY: Previously collected urine samples (N = 390) from 114 preselected proven parasitological and/or clinical S. haematobium positive Kenyan schoolchildren were analyzed by a Schistosoma internal transcribed spacer-based real-time PCR after 14 years of storage. Pre-treatment day......, respectively. Based on the 'gold standard', PCR showed high sensitivity (>92%) as compared to >31% sensitivity for microscopy, both pre- and post-treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Detection and quantification of Schistosoma DNA in urine by real-time PCR was shown to be a powerful and specific diagnostic...

  5. Field-testing of a cost-effective mobile-phone based microscope for screening of Schistosoma haematobium infection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Bogoch, Isaac I.; Tseng, Derek; Ephraim, Richard K. D.; Duah, Evans; Tee, Joseph; Andrews, Jason R.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic and neglected tropical disease, and affects mobile-phone microscope, a custom-designed 3D printed opto-mechanical attachment (~150g) is placed in contact with the smartphone camera-lens, creating an imaging-system with a half-pitch resolution of ~0.87µm. This unit includes an external lens (also taken from a mobile-phone camera), a sample tray, a z-stage to adjust the focus, two light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) and two diffusers for uniform illumination of the sample. In our field-testing, 60 urine samples, collected from children, were used, where the prevalence of the infection was 72.9%. After concentration of the sample with centrifugation, the sediment was placed on a glass-slide and S. haematobium eggs were first identified/quantified using conventional benchtop microscopy by an expert diagnostician, and then a second expert, blinded to these results, determined the presence/absence of eggs using our mobile-phone microscope. Compared to conventional microscopy, our mobile-phone microscope had a diagnostic sensitivity of 72.1%, specificity of 100%, positive-predictive-value of 100%, and a negative-predictive-value of 57.1%. Furthermore, our mobile-phone platform demonstrated a sensitivity of 65.7% and 100% for low-intensity infections (≤50 eggs/10 mL urine) and high-intensity infections (mobile-phone microscope may play an important role in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and various other global health challenges.

  6. CT manifestation of schistosoma haematobium cystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yujun; Hu Lirong; Cheng Yougen; Mao Guoqun; Yang Guangzhao; Modya Camara; Mohamed Traore

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT manifestation of Schistosoma haematobium cystitis. Methods: Retrospective analysis 32 patients, who were tested for Schistosoma haematobium cystitis using the urine filtration method. CT scan was performed for each patient with contrast enhancement. Results: The vast majority of urinary tract schistomiasis lesions were in the urinary bladder. Calcification of the bladder wall was observed in all patients and mild enhancement in non calcified zone was found after intravenous contrast. Except for 5 patients of bladder cancer, the rest were no abnormality in size of bladder when bladder was filling or emptying. Ureteral wall annular calcification could also be identified in 25 patients. Twenty two patients were companied with ureteric hydronephrosis. Seminal vesicle calcification was seen in 4 patients among 11 male patients, while both uterine and ovarian in female and prostate in men had non calcification. Serious illness can be combined with bladder cancer. In 5 patients of patients with bladder cancer, bladder showed irregular soft tissue mass which was enhanced moderately after post-contrast scan, with vesical calcification in mass medially. Conclusion: Bladder calcification is the most prominent CT feature of Schistosoma haematobium cystitis, which is useful in diagnosis the disease. (authors)

  7. Bulinus nyassanus is an intermediate host for Schistosoma haematobium in Lake Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, H.; Bloch, P.; Phiri, H.

    2001-01-01

    At Cape Maclear on the Nankumba Peninsula, close to the southern end of Lake Malawi, Schistosoma haematobium is highly prevalent in the local people and many tourists become infected with this parasite each year. A 'Bilharzia Control Programme' was initiated in this area in August 1998......, field-collected B. nyassanus. These are remarkable observations since, although there are very few reports of diploid members of this species group being experimentally infected with S. haematobium, B. nyassanus is a diploid member (2n = 36) of the truncatus/tropicus group. Bulinus nyassanus is probably......, schistosome-infected B. nyassanus were discovered in surveys to identify transmission sites on the peninsula. Experimental infections of wild-caught B. nyassanus with S. haematobium proved successful and S. haematobium eggs were found in hamsters experimentally exposed to cercariae retrieved from schistosome-infected...

  8. Therapeutic effect of Arctium lappa in Schistosoma haematobium associated kidney disturbance: biochemical and molecular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriem, Khaled M M; Idris, Zulzamri H; Haron, Hasniza F; Omar, Nurulhuda A; Lazain, Halita S

    2016-12-01

    Schistosoma haematobium ( S. haematobium ) infection has been found to be strongly associated with bladder cancer, which necessitates for discover of a natural new therapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of Arctium lappa seed extract in S. haematobium associated kidney disturbance. Forty male albino mice were used and divided into four equal groups; group 1 control includes non-infected healthy mice, groups 2, 3 and 4 subcutaneous infected with S. haematobium cercariae. Groups 3 co-treated daily with oral dose of A. lappa seed extract (300 mg/kg, bwt) for 15 days in the same time of S. haematobium infection. Groups 4 post-treated daily for 15 days with oral dose of A. lappa seed extract (300 mg/kg, bwt) after 15 days of S. haematobium infection. The results obtained revealed that S. haematobium significantly decreased kidney weight and serum sodium, potassium and chloride, but increased urinary volume, urinary excretion of sodium, potassium and chloride, serum urea, creatinine and uric acid. Schistosoma haematobium also significantly decreased kidney superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione levels while increased kidney lipid peroxidation level. Co- and post-treatment with A. lappa seed extract restore all the above parameters to approach the normal values. These results were supported with histopathological examinations. In conclusion, A. lappa seed extract has therapeutic effect in kidney disturbance caused by S. haematobium where co-treatment of A. lappa seed extract was more effective than post-treatment of the extract.

  9. PAPILLOMA VIRAL INFECTION AMONG BOYS AND YOUNG MEN PRIMARY PREVENTION

    OpenAIRE

    M.G. Galitskaya; M.I. Ivardava

    2009-01-01

    Young sexually active men may have anogenital HPV related infection, which can cause the genital penis verruca, penis cancer, perianal and anal cancer. Besides, men's HPV infection may cause an infection and subsequent diseases of cervix of the uterus and other organs among women. The available opportunity to inoculate boys and young men against HPV infection provides for 100% guaranteed protection from severe diseases not only for boys and young men but also for girls and women, who men may ...

  10. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benefit in preventing the development of these cancers in HIV-positive men, ... sexually transmitted infection (STI) affecting ..... age, smoking, receptive anal intercourse .... in HPV-infected circumcised men may help to explain the protective.

  11. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Sady

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1 gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01. In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays.

  12. Organomegaly in Mali before and after praziquantel treatment. A possible association with Schistosoma haematobium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Chalotte Willemann; Madsen, Henry; Wilson, Shona

    2017-01-01

    Continuous exposure to schistosome-infested water results in acute and chronic morbidity in all ages. We analysed occurence of organomegaly via ultrasonography and investigated a possible additive effect of dual-dose drug administration in 401 Schistosoma haematobium infected individuals from...

  13. Association of urogenital symptoms with history of water contact in young women in areas endemic for S. haematobium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galappaththi-Arachchige, Hashini Nilushika; Hegertun, Ingrid Elise Amlie; Holmen, Sigve

    2016-01-01

    schistosomiasis. In a cross-sectional study in rural South Africa, 883 sexually active women aged 16–22 years were included. Questions were asked about urogenital symptoms and water contact history. Urine samples were tested for S. haematobium ova. A score based on self-reported water contact was calculated......Female genital schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Schistosoma haematobium. Infected females may suffer from symptoms mimicking sexually transmitted infections. We explored if self-reported history of unsafe water contact could be used as a simple predictor of genital...... and the association with symptoms was explored while adjusting for other genital infections using multivariable logistic regression analyses. S. haematobium ova were detected in the urine of 30.5% of subjects. Having ova in the urine was associated with the water contact score (p

  14. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High rates of HPV infection have been observed in men from sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high. HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital warts and anal, penile and head and neck cancers in men. Despite increasing ...

  15. Angiogenesis in Schistosoma haematobium-associated urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematei, Anderson; Fernandes, Rúben; Soares, Raquel; Alves, Helena; Richter, Joachim; Botelho, Monica C

    2017-12-01

    Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic flatworm that infects more than 100 million people, mostly in the developing world, is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis, and is associated with a high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder. During infection, eggs are deposited in the bladder causing an intense inflammatory reaction. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones and is recognized as a key event in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis and spread of malignant lesions. A growing amount of evidence points to angiogenesis playing a key role in schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Thus, identifying biomarkers of this process plays an important role in the study of cancer. Here, we review recent findings on the role of angiogenesis in bladder cancer and the growth factors that induce and assist in their development, particularly SCC of the bladder associated to urogenital schistosomiasis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus infection: an endemic infection in men who have sex with men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domenech, Carmen M; Antequera Martín-Portugués, Isabel; Clavijo-Frutos, Encarnación; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Santos-González, Jesús; Palacios-Muñoz, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    to analyse epidemiological, clinical, and analytical features of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) diagnosed with syphilis in the Infectious Diseases Unit (Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain) during 2004-2013. An observational study was conducted on 196 syphilis episodes in 167 MSM infected with HIV (2004-2013). Epidemiological, clinical, and analytical data were collected. Annual syphilis incidence among HIV-MSM is calculated as the number of syphilis episodes among MSM in one year divided by the number of MSM followed up in that year. Incidence ranged from 1.2% (2007) to 7.8% (2012). There were asymptomatic episodes in 42.8% cases, and an HIV-syphilis coincident diagnosis in 28.5%. The annual incidence of syphilis has increased within HIV infected MSM. One third of the syphilis episodes were simultaneous to HIV diagnosis and near half of them were asymptomatic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and distribution of Schistosoma haematobium infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire was administered to 3 health facilities on diagnosis and treatment of schistosomiasis, as well as the control interventions against it. Results: Four ... Mass chemotherapy, health education, and improved water supply and sanitation were some of the interventions that contributed to lower prevalence rates in ...

  18. Misclassification of men with reported HIV infection in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čakalo, Jurja-Ivana; Božičević, Ivana; Vitek, Charles; Mandel, Jeffrey S; Salyuk, Tetyana; Rutherford, George W

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed data on reported mode of transmission in case reports of HIV-infections among men in Ukraine. The number of men who were reported to have acquired HIV through heterosexual transmission increased substantially in 2006-2011. However, we estimate that up to 40 % of reported cases of heterosexual transmission among men may actually represent misclassified men who have sex with men or persons who inject drugs. These findings indicate a need to improve the quality of data on reported mode of HIV transmission. Accurate information has important public health implications in planning prevention and treatment services.

  19. Simple questionnaire and urine reagent strips compared to microscopy for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium in a community in northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Andrews, Jason R; Dadzie Ephraim, Richard K; Utzinger, Jürg

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the utility of a simple questionnaire and urine reagent strip testing for the rapid diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium in rural northern Ghana. Cross-sectional parasitological and questionnaire survey in a community in northern Ghana. Participants provided two urine specimens that were examined under a microscope using a centrifugation method. The first urine sample was additionally subjected to reagent strip testing. A short questionnaire was administered to all participants. Microscopy of urine samples obtained from 208 individuals aged 1-77 years revealed an S. haematobium prevalence of 6.8%. The presence of any blood or protein on a urine reagent strip was 100% and 42% sensitive, and 93% and 80% specific for S. haematobium diagnosis. Questionnaires were completed by 198 individuals. Self-reported haematuria showed a sensitivity of 53% and a specificity of 85%. A dichotomous two-question panel was helpful in S. haematobium diagnosis, with working and playing near the river significantly associated with S. haematobium infection (P < 0.001). The use of urine reagent strips, coupled with questions pertaining to water contact patterns, might be considered for point-of-contact diagnosis of S. haematobium where microscopy is unavailable. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Analysing risk factors of co-occurrence of schistosomiasis haematobium and hookworm using bivariate regression models: Case study of Chikwawa, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce B.W. Phiri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections constitute a major public health problem in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. In areas where prevalence of geo-helminths and schistosomes is high, co-infection with multiple parasite species is common, resulting in disproportionately elevated burden compared with single infections. Determining risk factors of co-infection intensity is important for better design of targeted interventions. In this paper, we examined risk factors of hookworm and S. haematobium co-infection intensity, in Chikwawa district, southern Malawi in 2005, using bivariate count models. Results show that hookworm and S. haematobium infections were much localised with small proportion of individuals harbouring more parasites especially among school-aged children. The risk of co-intensity with both hookworm and S. haematobium was high for all ages, although this diminished with increasing age, increased with fishing (hookworm: coefficient. = 12.29; 95% CI = 11.50–13.09; S. haematobium: 0.040; 95% CI = 0.0037, 3.832. Both infections were abundant in those with primary education (hookworm: coef. = 0.072; 95% CI = 0.056, 0.401 and S. haematobium: coef. = 0.286; 95% CI = 0.034, 0.538. However, much lower risk was observed for those who were farmers (hookworm: coef. = −0.349, 95% CI = −0.547,−0.150; S. haematobium: coef. −0.239, 95% CI = −0.406, −0.072. In conclusion, our findings suggest that efforts to control helminths infection should be co-integrated and health promotion campaigns should be aimed at school-going children and adults who are in constant contact with water.

  1. Sources of HIV infection among men having sex with men and implications for prevention ✻

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratmann, O.; van Sighem, A.; Bezemer, D.; Gavryushkina, A.; Jurriaans, S.; Wensing, A.; de Wolf, F.; Reiss, P.; Fraser, C.

    2016-01-01

    New HIV diagnoses among men having sex with men (MSM) have not decreased appreciably in most countries, even though care and prevention services have been scaled up substantially in the past twenty years. To maximize the impact of prevention strategies, it is crucial to quantify the sources of transmission at the population level. We used viral sequence and clinical patient data from one of Europe’s nation-wide cohort studies to estimate probable sources of transmission for 617 recently infected MSM. 71% of transmissions were from undiagnosed men, 6% from men who had initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART), 1% from men with no contact to care for at least 18 months, and 43% from those in their first year of infection. The lack of substantial reductions in incidence amongst Dutch MSM is not a result of ineffective ART provision or inadequate retention in care. In counterfactual modeling scenarios, 19% of these past cases could have been averted with current annual testing coverage and immediate ART to those testing positive. 66% of these cases could have been averted with available antiretrovirals (immediate ART provided to all MSM testing positive, and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis taken by half of all who test negative for HIV), but only if half of all men at risk of transmission had tested annually. With increasing sequence coverage, molecular epidemiological analyses can be a key tool to direct HIV prevention strategies to the predominant sources of infection, and help send HIV epidemics amongst MSM into a decisive decline. PMID:26738795

  2. Extragenital Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men: Missed Treatment Opportunities for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Leandro; Crosby, Richard A; Chamberlain, Nicholas

    2018-05-01

    This study of young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) assessed the prevalence of extragenital chlamydia and gonorrhea among those testing negative for urethral infections, and compared prevalence of both by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. A convenience sample of 609 YBMSM was recruited for a cross-sectional study from 2 sexual health clinics located in Jackson, MS. To detect Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), nucleic acid amplification testing was performed on urine, rectal swabs, and oral swabs. OraSure was used to detect HIV. Seventy-three percent of all chlamydia infections and 77% of gonorrhea infections were found from anal and oral swabs in the absence of urethral positivity. Compared with HIV-uninfected men, HIV-infected men were significantly more likely to have pharyngeal chlamydia (P = 0.03), multiple CT infections (P = 0.02), rectal NG (P < 0.001), multiple NG infections (P = 0.04), both CT/NG rectal infections (P = 0.001). As much as three quarters of all chlamydia and gonorrhea infections may be missed when only urine-based nucleic acid amplification testing is used to screen YBMSM for bacterial sexually transmitted infections. These missed opportunities for diagnosis may be particularly likely among HIV-infected YBMSM.

  3. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Infected Men in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hun Lee

    Full Text Available Little is known about the epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among HIV-infected men in Korea.A single-center cross-sectional study was conducted with HIV-infected men in Korea. Participants completed a detailed sexual behavior risk factor questionnaire. Anal samples were collected for cytology and HPV genotyping. Factors associated with anal HPV infection were assessed using multivariable logistic regression, stratifying by sexual behaviour.A total of 201 HIV-infected men were included in the study: 133 were from men who have sex with men (MSM and 68 from men who have sex with women (MSW. Any anal HPV infection was detected in 82.7% of HIV-infected MSM and in 51.5% of HIV- infected MSW (P < 0.001. High-risk HPV (HR-HPV prevalence was higher among MSM (47.4% than MSW (25.0%; P = 0.002. The HR-HPV types identified most frequently were HPV 16 (11%, HPV 18 (9.9%, and HPV 58 (5% in MSM, and HPV 58(11% and HPV 16 (8.9% in MSW. Prevalence of any HPV types in 9-valent vaccine types was higher among MSM than MSW (47.4% vs 22.1%. P = 0.001. Abnormal anal cytology was more commonly detected in MSM than MSW (42.9% vs.19.1%, P < 0.001. In HIV-infected MSM, higher number of lifetime male sex partners was significantly associated with any anal HPV infection, but age was a significant risk factor associated with anal HR-HPV infection.Anal HPV infection was highly prevalent in HIV-infected MSM in Korea, and also commonly found in HIV-infected MSW. In HIV-infected MSM, the significant risk factor for being infected with any HPV infection was lifetime number of male sexual partners, and with anal oncogenic HPV infection was age.

  4. Prevalence and Correlates of Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection among Peruvian Men who have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanira, Juan V.; Casper, Corey; Lama, Javier R.; Morrow, Rhoda; Montano, Silvia M; Caballero, Patricia; Suárez, Luis; Whittington, William L. H.; Wald, Anna; Sanchez, Jorge; Celum, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) in North America and Europe, and is also found to be endemic in some regions of South America. Little is known about HHV-8 prevalence and its correlates among MSM in the Andean region. Methods We assessed HHV-8 seroprevalence among 497 MSM recruited for the 2002 Peruvian HIV sentinel surveillance program using a combined HHV-8 enzyme immunoassay and immunofluorescence assay algoritm. Logistic regression was used to estimate Odds Ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) to determine the association between selected covariates and HHV-8 seropositivity. Results 483 (97%) of 497 men had stored sera and demographic data available for analysis. 131 (66.5%, 95% CI 63.1%-69.9%) of 197 HIV-infected and 80 (26.7%, 95% CI 24.4%-29.0%) of 300 HIV-uninfected MSM had serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection. Factors independently associated with HHV-8 infection were education <12 years (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.7), anal receptive sex with the last partner (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.3), self-reported STI symptoms during the last year (OR: 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0), and co-infection with HIV (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.8-6.4) and Chronic Hepatitis B (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.5-15.8). MSM with long-standing HIV infection were more likely to have serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection when compared to men with recently-acquired HIV (OR: 3.8, 95% CI 1.7-9.1). Conclusions HHV-8 infection is common among both HIV-infected and negative MSM in Lima, Peru. HHV-8 seropositivity is correlated with anal receptive sex, self-reported STI symptoms, and HIV infection among these MSM, and thus appears to be sexually transmitted. HHV-8 infection appears to be acquired after HIV infection, suggesting that future studies should evaluate the mode of HHV-8 transmission and prevention strategies among HIV-infected MSM. PMID:18989224

  5. Induction of Protective Immune Responses against Schistosomiasis Haematobium in Hamsters and Mice Using Cysteine Peptidase-Based Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A M Tallima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major lessons we learned from the radiation-attenuated cercariae (RA vaccine studies is that protective immunity against schistosomiasis is dependent on the induction of T helper (Th1/Th2-related immune responses. Since most schistosome larval and adult-worm-derived molecules used for vaccination uniformly induce a polarized Th1 response, it was essential to include a type 2 immune responses-inducing molecule, such as cysteine peptidases, in the vaccine formula. Here we demonstrate that a single subcutaneous injection of Syrian hamsters with 200 microg active papain 1 h before percutaneous exposure to 150 cercariae of Schistosoma haematobium led to highly significant (P 50% in worm burden and worm egg counts in intestine. Immunization of hamsters with 20 microg recombinant glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (rSG3PDH and 20 ug 2-cys peroxiredoxin-derived peptide in a multiple antigen peptide construct (PRX MAP together with papain (20 microg/hamster as adjuvant led to considerable (64% protection against challenge S. haematobium infection, similar to the levels reported with irradiated cercariae. Cysteine peptidases-based vaccination was also effective in protecting outbred mice against a percutaneous challenge infection with S. haematobium cercariae. In two experiments, a mixture of Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1 and Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 (FhCL1 led to highly significant (P < 0.005 reduction of 70% in challenge S. haematobium worm burden and 60% reduction in liver egg counts. Mice vaccinated with SmCB1/FhCL1/ rSG3PDH mixture and challenged with S. haematobium cercariae three weeks after the second immunization displayed highly significant (P < 0.005 reduction of 72% in challenge worm burden and no eggs in liver of 8-10 mice/group, as compared to unimmunized mice, associated with production of a mixture of type 1 and type 2-related cytokines and antibody responses.

  6. Hepatitis B Infection and Association with Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Javier R.; Agurto, Hellen S.; Guanira, Juan V.; Ganoza, Carmela; Casapia, Martin; Ojeda, Nora; Ortiz, Abner; Zamalloa, Victoria; Suarez-Ognio, Luis; Cabezas, Cesar; Sanchez, Jose L.; Sanchez, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    To assess the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru, we evaluated the prevalence and associated risk factors for HBV serologic markers among participants of a HIV sentinel surveillance conducted in 2002–2003. The standardized prevalences for total antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were 20.2% and 2.8%, respectively. Individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection had significantly higher anti-HBc (44.3% versus 19.3%) and HBsAg (9.5% versus 2.3%) prevalences than uninfected men. Increasing age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.06), versatile sexual role (AOR = 1.59), sex in exchange for money/gifts (AOR = 1.58), syphilis (AOR = 1.74), HIV-1 infection (AOR = 1.64), and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, AOR = 2.77) infection were independently associated with anti-HBc positivity, whereas only HIV-1 infection (AOR = 3.51) and generalized lymph node enlargement (AOR = 3.72) were associated with HBsAg positivity. Pre-existing HBV infection is very common among Peruvian MSM and was correlated with sexual risk factors. MSM in Peru constitute a target population for further HBV preventive and treatment interventions. PMID:20595501

  7. HIV-1 transmission during early infection in men who have sex with men: a phylodynamic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik M Volz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases is focused on characterization of incident infections and estimation of the number of prevalent infections. Advances in methods for the analysis of the population-level genetic variation of viruses can potentially provide information about donors, not just recipients, of infection. Genetic sequences from many viruses are increasingly abundant, especially HIV, which is routinely sequenced for surveillance of drug resistance mutations. We conducted a phylodynamic analysis of HIV genetic sequence data and surveillance data from a US population of men who have sex with men (MSM and estimated incidence and transmission rates by stage of infection.We analyzed 662 HIV-1 subtype B sequences collected between October 14, 2004, and February 24, 2012, from MSM in the Detroit metropolitan area, Michigan. These sequences were cross-referenced with a database of 30,200 patients diagnosed with HIV infection in the state of Michigan, which includes clinical information that is informative about the recency of infection at the time of diagnosis. These data were analyzed using recently developed population genetic methods that have enabled the estimation of transmission rates from the population-level genetic diversity of the virus. We found that genetic data are highly informative about HIV donors in ways that standard surveillance data are not. Genetic data are especially informative about the stage of infection of donors at the point of transmission. We estimate that 44.7% (95% CI, 42.2%-46.4% of transmissions occur during the first year of infection.In this study, almost half of transmissions occurred within the first year of HIV infection in MSM. Our conclusions may be sensitive to un-modeled intra-host evolutionary dynamics, un-modeled sexual risk behavior, and uncertainty in the stage of infected hosts at the time of sampling. The intensity of transmission during early infection may have

  8. Prevalence and correlates of human herpesvirus 8 infection among Peruvian men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanira, Juan V; Casper, Corey; Lama, Javier R; Morrow, Rhoda; Montano, Silvia M; Caballero, Patricia; Suárez, Luis; Whittington, William L H; Wald, Anna; Sanchez, Jorge; Celum, Connie

    2008-12-15

    Infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) in North America and Europe and is also found to be endemic in some regions of South America. Little is known about HHV-8 prevalence and its correlates among MSM in the Andean region. We assessed HHV-8 seroprevalence among 497 MSM recruited for the 2002 Peruvian HIV sentinel surveillance program using a combined HHV-8 enzyme immunoassay and immunofluorescence assay algorithm. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to determine the association between selected covariates and HHV-8 seropositivity. One hundred thirty-one (66.5%, 95% CI 63.1% to 69.9%) of 197 HIV-infected and 80 (26.7%, 95% CI 24.4% to 29.0%) of 300 HIV-uninfected MSM had serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection. Factors independently associated with HHV-8 infection were education<12 years (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7), anal receptive sex with the last partner (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), self-reported sexually transmitted infection symptoms during the last year (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.0), coinfection with HIV (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.8 to 6.4) and chronic hepatitis B (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.5 to 15.8). MSM with long-standing HIV infection were more likely to have serologic evidence of HHV-8 infection when compared with men with recently acquired HIV (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.7 to 9.1). HHV-8 infection is common among both HIV-infected and HIV-negative MSM in Lima, Peru. HHV-8 seropositivity is correlated with anal receptive sex, self-reported sexually transmitted infection symptoms, and HIV infection among these MSM and thus seems to be sexually transmitted. HHV-8 infection seems to be acquired after HIV infection, suggesting that future studies should evaluate the mode of HHV-8 transmission and prevention strategies among HIV-uninfected MSM.

  9. Zika Virus Shedding in Semen of Symptomatic Infected Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Paul S; Duggal, Nisha K; Hook, Sarah A; Delorey, Mark; Fischer, Marc; Olzenak McGuire, Dana; Becksted, Heidi; Max, Ryan J; Anishchenko, Michael; Schwartz, Amy M; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Nelson, Christina A; McDonald, Erin M; Brooks, John T; Brault, Aaron C; Hinckley, Alison F

    2018-04-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that has been linked to adverse birth outcomes. Previous reports have shown that person-to-person transmission can occur by means of sexual contact. We conducted a prospective study involving men with symptomatic ZIKV infection to determine the frequency and duration of ZIKV shedding in semen and urine and to identify risk factors for prolonged shedding in these fluids. Specimens were obtained twice per month for 6 months after illness onset and were tested by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay for ZIKV RNA and by Vero cell culture and plaque assay for infectious ZIKV. A total of 1327 semen samples from 184 men and 1038 urine samples from 183 men were obtained 14 to 304 days after illness onset. ZIKV RNA was detected in the urine of 7 men (4%) and in the semen of 60 (33%), including in semen samples from 22 of 36 men (61%) who were tested within 30 days after illness onset. ZIKV RNA shedding in semen decreased substantially during the 3 months after illness onset but continued for 281 days in 1 man (1%). Factors that were independently associated with prolonged RNA shedding included older age, less frequent ejaculation, and the presence of certain symptoms at the time of initial illness. Infectious ZIKV was isolated from 3 of 78 semen samples with detectable ZIKV RNA, all obtained within 30 days after illness onset and all with at least 7.0 log 10 ZIKV RNA copies per milliliter of semen. ZIKV RNA was commonly present in the semen of men with symptomatic ZIKV infection and persisted in some men for more than 6 months. In contrast, shedding of infectious ZIKV appeared to be much less common and was limited to the first few weeks after illness onset. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).

  10. HIV-infected men who have sex with men who identify themselves as belonging to subcultures are at increased risk for hepatitis C infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matser, Amy; Vanhommerig, Joost; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Geskus, Ronald B.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Prins, Jan M.; Prins, Maria; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) emerged as sexually transmitted infection among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). We studied whether HCV circulated in identifiable high-risk MSM subcultures and performed phylogenetic analysis. HIV-infected MSM were recruited at the sexually transmitted

  11. [Lower urinary tract infections in men. Urethritis, cystitis and prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Marie-Céline; Schoofs, Fabian; Huttner, Benedikt; Huttner, Angela

    2017-04-12

    Recommendations for the treatment of lower non-catheter-related urinary tract infection (UTI) in men are rarely evidence-based. Their management requires the localization of the site of infection, whether it be the urethra, bladder or prostate, and includes antibiotic therapy and in most cases urological assessment. They are often associated with urinary tract procedures or anatomical or functional abnormalities. Nearly 80 % of male UTIs are caused by Enterobacteriaceae. The prevalence of broad-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains (ESBL) and quinolone-resistant strains is increasing. The aim of this article is to define three types of lower, non-catheter-related UTI in men - urethritis, cystitis and prostatitis - their microbiology and management in Switzerland.

  12. Anal HPV infection in HIV-positive men who have sex with men from China.

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    Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anal HPV infection, which contributes to the development of anal warts and anal cancer, is well known to be common among men who have sex with men (MSM, especially among those HIV positives. However, HIV and anal HPV co-infection among MSM has not been addressed in China. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing and Tianjin, China. Study participants were recruited using multiple methods with the collaboration of local volunteer organizations. Blood and anal swabs were collected for HIV-1 serological test and HPV genotyping. RESULTS: A total of 602 MSM were recruited and laboratory data were available for 578 of them (96.0%. HIV and anal HPV prevalence were 8.5% and 62.1%, respectively. And 48 MSM (8.3% were found to be co-infected. The HPV genotypes identified most frequently were HPV06 (19.6%, HPV16 (13.0%, HPV52 (8.5% and HPV11 (7.6%. Different modes of HPV genotypes distribution were observed with respect to HIV status. A strong dose-response relationship was found between HIV seropositivity and multiplicity of HPV genotypes (p<0.001, which is consistent with the observation that anal HPV infection was an independent predictor for HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of HIV and anal HPV co-infection was observed in the MSM community in Beijing and Tianjin, China. Anal HPV infection was found to be independently associated with increased HIV seropositivity, which suggests the application of HPV vaccine might be a potential strategy to reduce the acquisition of HIV infection though controlling the prevalence of HPV.

  13. High HIV infection prevalence in a group of men who have sex with men

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    Raquel Maria Cardoso Torres

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is characterized by a concentrated AIDS epidemic, it has a prevalence of less than 1% in the general population. However, there are higher rates in specific populations, especially in men who have sex with men. The study's aim was to analyze the association between sociodemographic characteristics, sexual practices, sexual behaviors and the HIV infection in a group of men who have sex with men. Secondary data was collected between June 2014 and September 2015 in a research of cross-sectional design in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Volunteers answered an online computerized questionnaire and took HIV test. Chi-squared distribution and multiple logistic regression was used. There were 341 participants. Most of them were racially mixed, single, average age of 30.6 years and with a higher education level. The HIV prevalence was 13.9%. Two logistic models were fit (insertive or receptive anal intercourse. Both models showed an association with HIV among those who had a HIV positive sexual partner (Odds Ratio ≈ 2.5 and a high self-perception of acquiring HIV (Model 1: Odds Ratio ≈ 7/Model 2: Odds Ratio ≈ 10. Low condom usage in receptive anal intercourse with casual partners had a direct association with HIV seropositivity, whereas insertive anal intercourse with casual partners with or without condoms were inversely related. The study identified a high prevalence of HIV infections among a group of men who sex with men with a high self-perception risk of acquiring HIV. The findings also showed a relation with sociodemographic and sexual behavior variables.

  14. Effect of HIV and chlamydia infection on rectal inflammation and cytokine concentrations in men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligenberg, Marlies; Lutter, René; Pajkrt, Dasja; Adams, Karin; de Vries, Henry; Heijman, Titia; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infections are common in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Although C. trachomatis combined with HIV would be likely to enhance inflammation, the asymptomatic course suggests otherwise. We assessed local inflammation, mucosal damage, and cytokine

  15. State-space forecasting of Schistosoma haematobium time-series in Niono, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel C; Findley, Sally E; Doumbia, Seydou

    2008-08-13

    Much of the developing world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, exhibits high levels of morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases. The incidence of Schistosoma sp.-which are neglected tropical diseases exposing and infecting more than 500 and 200 million individuals in 77 countries, respectively-is rising because of 1) numerous irrigation and hydro-electric projects, 2) steady shifts from nomadic to sedentary existence, and 3) ineffective control programs. Notwithstanding the colossal scope of these parasitic infections, less than 0.5% of Schistosoma sp. investigations have attempted to predict their spatial and or temporal distributions. Undoubtedly, public health programs in developing countries could benefit from parsimonious forecasting and early warning systems to enhance management of these parasitic diseases. In this longitudinal retrospective (01/1996-06/2004) investigation, the Schistosoma haematobium time-series for the district of Niono, Mali, was fitted with general-purpose exponential smoothing methods to generate contemporaneous on-line forecasts. These methods, which are encapsulated within a state-space framework, accommodate seasonal and inter-annual time-series fluctuations. Mean absolute percentage error values were circa 25% for 1- to 5-month horizon forecasts. The exponential smoothing state-space framework employed herein produced reasonably accurate forecasts for this time-series, which reflects the incidence of S. haematobium-induced terminal hematuria. It obliquely captured prior non-linear interactions between disease dynamics and exogenous covariates (e.g., climate, irrigation, and public health interventions), thus obviating the need for more complex forecasting methods in the district of Niono, Mali. Therefore, this framework could assist with managing and assessing S. haematobium transmission and intervention impact, respectively, in this district and potentially elsewhere in the Sahel.

  16. Analysis of HIV Diversity in HIV-Infected Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (HPTN 061.

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    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available HIV populations often diversify in response to selective pressures, such as the immune response and antiretroviral drug use. We analyzed HIV diversity in Black men who have sex with men who were enrolled in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 study.A high resolution melting (HRM diversity assay was used to measure diversity in six regions of the HIV genome: two in gag, one in pol, and three in env. HIV diversity was analyzed for 146 men who were HIV infected at study enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection (identified using a multi-assay algorithm, and for 21 men who seroconverted during the study. HIV diversification was analyzed in a paired analysis for 62 HIV-infected men using plasma samples from the enrollment and 12-month (end of study visits.Men with acute or recent infection at enrollment and seroconverters had lower median HRM scores (lower HIV diversity than men with non-recent infection in all six regions analyzed. In univariate analyses, younger age, higher CD4 cell count, and HIV drug resistance were associated with lower median HRM scores in multiple regions; ARV drug detection was marginally associated with lower diversity in the pol region. In multivariate analysis, acute or recent infection (all six regions and HIV drug resistance (both gag regions were associated with lower median HRM scores. Diversification in the pol region over 12 months was greater for men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load at study enrollment.HIV diversity was significantly associated with duration of HIV infection, and lower gag diversity was observed in men who had HIV drug resistance. HIV pol diversification was more pronounced in men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load.

  17. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Serostatus With Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men: The HPV in Men Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Catharina Johanna; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; da Silva, Roberto José Carvalho; Villa, Luisa Lina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Nyitray, Alan G.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies in women indicate that some sexually transmitted infections promote human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and carcinogenesis. Little is known about this association in men; therefore, we assessed whether Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection and herpes simplex virus type 2

  18. Genetic diversity of Schistosoma haematobium parasite IS NOT associated with severity of disease in an endemic area in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmelseed, Nagla; Karamino, Nhashal E; Abdelwahed, Mohammed O; Hamdoun, Anas O; Elmadani, Ahmed E

    2014-08-27

    Over 650 million people globally are at risk of schistosomiasis infection, while more than 200 million people are infected of which the higher disease rates occur in children. Eighty three students between 6-20 years (mean 12.45 ± 3.2) from Quran School for boys in Radwan village, Gezira state were recruited to investigate for the relationship between the genetic diversity of Schistosoma haematobium strains and the severity of the disease. Schistosoma haematobium infection was detected by filtration of urine. Ultrasonography was done on each study subject, while PCR technique was used for genotyping via random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with A01, A02, A12, Y20 and A13 primers. A01 primer gave three different genotypes (A01-1, A01-2 and A01-3). About 54.2% (45/83) were S. haematobium egg positive by urine filtration. On assessment of the upper and lower urinary tract by ultrasound technique, 61.4% (51/83) were positiveand73.3% (60/83) samples were PCR positive. No significant difference was found when comparing the three different genotypes with severity of the disease. This study concludes that no association was found between the different genotypes of S.haemtobium and the severity of the disease. Examination of more samples from different areas to identify any possible differences between the parasites genes and disease severity was recommended.

  19. Immunolocalization of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium antigens reacting with their Egyptian snail vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dafrawy, Shadia M; Mohamed, Amira H; Hammam, Olfat A; Rabia, Ibrahim

    2007-12-01

    The reaction of the haemolymph and the tissue of infected intermediate hosts, Biomphalaria alexandrina and Bulinus truncatus to Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium antigens were investigated using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. A new technique, Agarose cell block was used in collection of haemolymph which helped in collecting plenty of well formed cells in comparison to the ordinary one using the cytospin. Collected haemolymph and prepared tissues of uninfected and infected B. alexandria and B. truncatus were fixed and then reacted with anti-S. mansoni and anti-S. haematobium IgG polyclonal antibodies. The haemolymph and tissue of infected B. alexandrina and B. truncatus gave a positive peroxidase reaction represented by a brown colour. In haemolymph, the positive peroxidase reaction was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of the amoebocytes. In the tissue, it was detected in epithelial cells lining the tubules, male cells in the lumen of the tubules and in female oogonia cells along the periphery of the tubules. The similarity in the strength and distribution of positive reaction in B. alexandrina and B. truncates was observed as compared to control. Thus, the immunoperoxidase technique proved to be an effective indicator for the schistosome-antigen in the snails.

  20. Sequential Acquisition of Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection Following Genital Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Women: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamnani, Shitaldas J; Nyitray, Alan G; Abrahamsen, Martha; Rollison, Dana E; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Huang, Yangxin; Borenstein, Amy; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of sequential acquisition of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection following a type-specific genital HPV infection for the 9-valent vaccine HPV types and investigate factors associated with sequential infection among men who have sex with women (MSW). Genital and anal specimens were available for 1348 MSW participants, and HPV genotypes were detected using the Roche Linear Array assay. Sequential risk of anal HPV infection was assessed using hazard ratios (HRs) among men with prior genital infection, compared with men with no prior genital infection, in individual HPV type and grouped HPV analyses. In individual analyses, men with prior HPV 16 genital infections had a significantly higher risk of subsequent anal HPV 16 infections (HR, 4.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-15.23). In grouped analyses, a significantly higher risk of sequential type-specific anal HPV infections was observed for any of the 9 types (adjusted HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.32-5.99), high-risk types (adjusted HR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.26, 5.55), and low-risk types (adjusted HR, 5.89; 95% CI, 1.29, 27.01). MSW with prior genital HPV infections had a higher risk of a subsequent type-specific anal infection. The higher risk was not explained by sexual intercourse with female partners. Autoinoculation is a possible mechanism for the observed association. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Dynamic sex roles among men who have sex with men and transmissions from primary HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shah Jamal; Romero-Severson, Ethan; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Emond, Gilbert; Koopman, James S

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies estimating the fraction of transmissions from persons with primary HIV have not focused on the effects of switching sex role in male homosexual populations. Such behavioral fluctuations can increase the contribution of primary HIV in the overall population. We modeled HIV transmission with 8 compartments defined by 4 behavioral groups, with different anal-insertive and anal-receptive combinations, and 2 stages of infection. We explored the effects of fluctuating behavioral categories on endemic prevalence and the fraction of transmissions from primary HIV. We varied transition rates to develop the theory on how behavioral fluctuation affects infection patterns, and we used the transition rates in a Netherlands cohort to assess overall effects in a real setting. The dynamics of change in behavior-group status over time observed in the Netherlands cohort amplifies the prevalence of infection and the fraction of transmissions from primary HIV, resulting in the highest proportions of transmissions being from people with primary HIV. Fluctuation between dual- or receptive-role periods and no-anal-sex periods mainly determines this amplification. In terms of the total transmissions, the dual-role risk group is dominant. Fluctuation between insertive and receptive roles decreases the fraction of transmissions from primary HIV, but such fluctuation is infrequently observed. The fraction of transmissions from primary HIV is considerably raised by fluctuations in insertive and receptive anal sex behaviors. This increase occurs even when primary HIV or later infection status does not influence risk behavior. Thus, it is not simply biology but also behavior patterns and social contexts that determine the fraction of transmissions from primary HIV. Moreover, each primary HIV transmission has a larger population effect than each later infection transmission because the men to whom one transmits from primary HIV carry on more chains of transmissions than the men

  2. Natural history of polyomaviruses in men: the HPV infection in men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampras, Shalaka S; Giuliano, Anna R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fisher, Kate J; Abrahamsen, Martha E; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E

    2015-05-01

    Several new polyomaviruses have been discovered in the last decade, including Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Little is known about the natural history of the more recently discovered polyomaviruses. We estimated the incidence, prevalence, and persistence of 9 polyomaviruses (MCPyV, BK polyomavirus, KI polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus, WU polyomavirus, Human polyomavirus 6 [HPyV6], HPyV7, HPyV9, and Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus) and examined factors associated with MCPyV infection in a prospective cohort of 209 men initially enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study. Participants enrolled at the US site of the HIM study were recruited into a substudy of cutaneous viral infections and followed for a median of 12.6 months. Eyebrow hair and normal skin swab specimens were obtained at each study visit, and the viral DNA load was measured using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. MCPyV infection showed the highest prevalence (65.1% of normal skin swab specimens and 30.6% of eyebrow hair specimens), incidence (81.7 cases per 1000 person-months among normal skin swab specimens, and 24.1 cases per 1000 person-months among eyebrow hair specimens), and persistence (85.8% of normal skin swab specimens and 58.9% of eyebrow hair specimens) among all polyomaviruses examined. Age of >44 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-4.33) and Hispanic race (OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.01-6.88) were associated with an increased prevalence of MCPyV infection in eyebrow hair and normal skin swab specimens, respectively. MCPyV infection is highly prevalent in adults, with age and race being predisposing factors. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. High Prevalence of Asymptomatic Sexually Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men

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    Patrick Philibert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infection. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to prospectively detect the prevalence of chlamydia trachomatis (CT, neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG, mycoplasma genitalium (MG, and high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, and syphilis in a population of asymptomatic sexually active MSM. Methods: Rectal, pharyngeal, and urine samples for CT, NG, MG, and HR-HPV were analyzed in 116 MSM patients attending the clinic for their routine follow-up during the period the study was conducted: 99 patients were issued from the clinic routine follow-up for their HIV infection, and 17 attended the clinic because they were sexual partners of an HIV infected male. Results: An STI was found in 16% of the patients (19/116, with at least one bacterial strain (CT, NG, or MG found in one site (the pharynx, rectum, or urine. Conclusions: In this study, 16% of the MSM reporting recent RAI were asymptomatic carriers of rectal CT, NG, or MG. According to the high prevalence of asymptomatic STIs found in our MSM population and in other studies, prevention efforts in the form of counseling about the risk of STI need to be done in the population of MSM.

  4. Protective factors for HIV infection among Mexican American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mark A; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2010-01-01

    Latinos in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify potential themes for inclusion in effective HIV prevention interventions for Mexican American men who have sex with men (MSM). The authors used a phenomenological design to explore the lived experiences of Mexican American MSM who had grown up in Dallas, Texas, regarding protective factors for HIV infection. A total of 20 30- to 60-year-old Mexican American MSM participated in semistructured interviews. During data analysis, the following themes concerning protective behaviors for HIV emerged: (a) accepting one's sexuality; (b) machismo; (c) being in love; (d) respect for family, self, and life; and (e) having HIV-living now. Strategies for potential inclusion in HIV prevention interventions geared toward Mexican American MSM were identified based on these themes. The recommendations encompass modification of behavioral interventions and related social policies.

  5. Associations of sexually transmitted infections with condom problems among young men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; Ryan, Daniel T; Garofalo, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are disproportionately infected with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Condom use is the most widely available means of preventing the transmission of STIs, but effectiveness depends on correct use. Condom errors such as using an oil-based lubricant have been associated with condom failures such as breakage. Little research has been done on the impact of condom problems on the likelihood of contracting an STI. Data came from Crew 450, a longitudinal study of HIV risk among YMSM (N = 450). All self-report data were collected using computer-assisted self-interview technology, and clinical testing was done for gonorrhea, chlamydia, and HIV. Nearly all participants made at least 1 error, with high rates of using oil-based lubricant and incomplete use. No differences were found in rates of condom problems during anal sex with a man versus vaginal sex with a woman. Black YMSM reported significantly higher use of oil-based lubricants than white and Hispanic YMSM, an error significantly associated with HIV status (adjusted odds ratio, 2.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-6.51). Participants who reported a condom failure were significantly more likely to have an STI (adjusted odds ratio, 3.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-8.12). Young men who have sex with men report high rates of condom problems, and condom failures were significantly associated with STIs after controlling for unprotected sex. Educational programs are needed to enhance correct condom use among YMSM. Further research is needed on the role of oil-based lubricants in explaining racial disparities in STIs and HIV.

  6. Lymphogranuloma venereum in men screened for pharyngeal and rectal infection, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, Karin; Dudareva-Vizule, Sandra; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar; Wisplinghoff, Fabian; Sailer, Andrea; Jansen, Klaus; Henrich, Birgit; Marcus, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    To determine prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum among men who have sex with men in Germany, we conducted a multicenter study during 2009-2010 and found high rates of rectal and pharyngeal infection in men positive for the causative agent, Chlamydia trachomatis. Many infections were asymptomatic. An adjusted C. trachomatis screening policy is justified in Germany.

  7. Global challenges in human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis co-infection among men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Chelsea P.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM), and the rate of co-infection has been increasing over the last decade. HIV and syphilis co-infection is particularly challenging because the infections interact synergistically thereby increasing the risk of acquisition and transmission as well as accelerating disease progression. Areas Covered This paper reviews and summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical management and prevention of HIV and syphilis co-infection among MSM. Expert Commentary Research does not support a different syphilis treatment for co-infected individuals; however, co-infection may warrant a recommendation for antiretroviral therapy. In order to reverse the epidemic of syphilis and HIV co-infection, there needs to be greater awareness, improved cultural sensitivity among health care providers, improved access to preventative services and increased screening for syphilis and HIV. PMID:27626361

  8. Syphilis in Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Warning Sign for HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gállego-Lezáun, C; Arrizabalaga Asenjo, M; González-Moreno, J; Ferullo, I; Teslev, A; Fernández-Vaca, V; Payeras Cifre, A

    2015-11-01

    To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of syphilis in men who have sex with men (MSM) in an area of Mallorca, Spain. We performed a retrospective analysis of syphilis cases in MSM seen at a hospital in Mallorca between January 2005 and June 2013. Fifty-five cases of syphilis were recorded in MSM during the study period (34.3% of all cases diagnosed), and 74.5% of these patients had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The two diseases had been diagnosed simultaneously in 70.7% of this population. Patients with HIV coinfection had a median CD4 count of 456cells/μL (range, 29-979 cells/μL). Syphilis was diagnosed clinically in 49.1% of cases and by screening in the remaining 50.9%. The most common form of syphilis was late latent or indeterminate syphilis (41.9% of cases). In the group of men with syphilis, MSM had a higher risk of HIV infection. A majority of MSM with syphilis had HIV coinfection. HIV screening is therefore essential in this population and could even result in early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Unexpectedly high proportion of drug users and men having sex with men who develop chronic hepatitis B infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdt, Robin; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Prins, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims: In low endemic countries, most hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are found in adult behavioural risk groups, such as drug users (DU) and men having sex with men (MSM). These risk groups are frequently exposed to HBV, which might induce a different rate of viral clearance compared

  10. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sztramko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to describe the clinical characteristics and management of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections among a cohort of men who have sex with men.

  11. The use of bivariate spatial modeling of questionnaire and parasitology data to predict the distribution of Schistosoma haematobium in Coastal Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J W Sturrock

    Full Text Available Questionnaires of reported blood in urine (BIU distributed through the existing school system provide a rapid and reliable method to classify schools according to the prevalence of Schistosoma haematobium, thereby helping in the targeting of schistosomiasis control. However, not all schools return questionnaires and it is unclear whether treatment is warranted in such schools. This study investigates the use of bivariate spatial modelling of available and multiple data sources to predict the prevalence of S. haematobium at every school along the Kenyan coast.Data from a questionnaire survey conducted by the Kenya Ministry of Education in Coast Province in 2009 were combined with available parasitological and environmental data in a Bayesian bivariate spatial model. This modeled the relationship between BIU data and environmental covariates, as well as the relationship between BIU and S. haematobium infection prevalence, to predict S. haematobium infection prevalence at all schools in the study region. Validation procedures were implemented to assess the predictive accuracy of endemicity classification.The prevalence of BIU was negatively correlated with distance to nearest river and there was considerable residual spatial correlation at small (~15 km spatial scales. There was a predictable relationship between the prevalence of reported BIU and S. haematobium infection. The final model exhibited excellent sensitivity (0.94 but moderate specificity (0.69 in identifying low (<10% prevalence schools, and had poor performance in differentiating between moderate and high prevalence schools (sensitivity 0.5, specificity 1.Schistosomiasis is highly focal and there is a need to target treatment on a school-by-school basis. The use of bivariate spatial modelling can supplement questionnaire data to identify schools requiring mass treatment, but is unable to distinguish between moderate and high prevalence schools.

  12. A Schistosoma haematobium-specific real-time PCR for diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis in serum samples of international travelers and migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnops, Lieselotte; Soentjens, Patrick; Clerinx, Jan; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis by microscopy and serological tests may be elusive in travelers due to low egg load and the absence of seroconversion upon arrival. There is need for a more sensitive diagnostic test. Therefore, we developed a real-time PCR targeting the Schistosoma haematobium-specific Dra1 sequence. The PCR was evaluated on urine (n = 111), stool (n = 84) and serum samples (n = 135), and one biopsy from travelers and migrants with confirmed or suspected schistosomiasis. PCR revealed a positive result in 7/7 urine samples, 11/11 stool samples and 1/1 biopsy containing S. haematobium eggs as demonstrated by microscopy and in 22/23 serum samples from patients with a parasitological confirmed S. haematobium infection. S. haematobium DNA was additionally detected by PCR in 7 urine, 3 stool and 5 serum samples of patients suspected of having schistosomiasis without egg excretion in urine and feces. None of these suspected patients demonstrated other parasitic infections except one with Blastocystis hominis and Entamoeba cyst in a fecal sample. The PCR was negative in all stool samples containing S. mansoni eggs (n = 21) and in all serum samples of patients with a microscopically confirmed S. mansoni (n = 22), Ascaris lumbricoides (n = 1), Ancylostomidae (n = 1), Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1) or Trichuris trichuria infection (n = 1). The PCR demonstrated a high specificity, reproducibility and analytical sensitivity (0.5 eggs per gram of feces). The real-time PCR targeting the Dra1 sequence for S. haematobium-specific detection in urine, feces, and particularly serum, is a promising tool to confirm the diagnosis, also during the acute phase of urogenital schistosomiasis.

  13. Adherence to hepatitis A virus vaccination in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkounti, Sofia; Paparizos, Vassilios; Leuow, Kirsten; Paparizou, Eleni; Antoniou, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) is essential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the uptake of HAV vaccine is reported to be very low. From 2007 to 2012, 912 HIV-infected men in Athens, Greece were screened for exposure to HAV. Two doses of an HAV vaccine were recommended to 569 eligible patients. Reminder cards with scheduled vaccination visits were given to each patient. Among eligible patients, 62.2% (354/569) received both doses. Patients who were fully vaccinated compared with non-adherent patients were natives, older, had undetectable HIV viral load, higher CD4 T cell counts and lower nadir CD4 T cell counts. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that the patient's country of origin (p = 0.024; OR = 2.712; 95% CI, 1.139-6.457), CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) and nadir CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) were factors directly associated with adherence. In conclusion, adherence to HAV vaccination was better than in previously published data. Because many of the factors related to vaccination completion are parameters of HIV infection, it appears that physician interest in HIV care and vaccination planning is crucial to enhancing vaccine uptake. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. [Lymphogranuloma venereum proctocolitis in men with HIV-1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras, Eva; Llibre, Josep M; Martró, Elisa; Casabona, Jordi; Martin-Iguacel, Raquel; Martín, Raquel; Sirera, Guillem

    2011-02-01

    We present a series of 15 cases with lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) with the aim of evaluating the response to a 21-day oral course of doxycycline (100mg twice daily). It is an observational study where we describe a series of cases with LGV diagnosed in the Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol's HIV Unit between March 2008 and April 2009. All our patients were HIV infected men who had sex with men with proctitis in 80% of the cases. In all of them Chlamydia trachomatis was determined by PCR on rectal swab specimens, with a negative result after 21 days of treatment with doxycycline. Serovar L2 was confirmed in all the specimens with the reverse hybridization technique. A high index of clinical suspicion is the mainstay to the early diagnosis of LGV since the clinical presentation remains unspecific. The treatment with doxycycline eradicates C. trachomatis in HIV patients with LGV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Lower Expression of TLR2 and SOCS-3 Is Associated with Schistosoma haematobium Infection and with Lower Risk for Allergic Reactivity in Children Living in a Rural Area in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgers, Franca C.; Obeng, Benedicta B.; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Duijvestein, Marjolijn; de Breij, Anna; Amoah, Abena; Larbi, Irene A.; van Ree, Ronald; Wilson, Michael D.; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Boakye, Daniel A.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Background: Helminth infections are prevalent in rural areas of developing countries and have in some studies been negatively associated with allergic disorders and atopy. In this context little is known of the molecular mechanisms of modulation involved. We have characterized the innate immune

  16. Incidence of benign prostate hypertrophy in Danish men with and without HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S

    2015-01-01

    -associated risk factors influence risk of BPH diagnoses in families of HIV-infected individuals, we estimated risk of BPH in fathers of HIV-infected men and fathers of the comparison cohort. METHODS: In a nationwide, population-based, matched cohort study, we calculated incidence rates and used Poisson regression......BACKGROUND: Information on risk of benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) in HIV-infected men is sparse. We aimed to estimate the incidence of being diagnosed with BPH among HIV-infected men compared with an age and sex-matched comparison cohort from the background population. To exclude that family...... procedure for BPH in DNHR. RESULTS: We identified 4633 HIV-infected men, 46 330 comparison cohort individuals, 1585 fathers of HIV-infected men and 20 449 fathers of the comparison cohort. Incidence rate of being diagnosed with BPH was 37.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 31.5-43.1] per 10 000 person...

  17. Impact of Schistosoma haematobium infection on urinary tract pathology, nutritional status and anaemia in school-aged children in two different endemic areas of the Niger River Basin, Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacko, Moussa; Magnussen, Pascal; Keita, Adama D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to contribute to define urinary schistosomiasis-related morbidity indicators and to understand the relationship between infection intensity and disease burden among school-aged children in different endemic areas of Mali. A cross sectional study was undertaken in ...... this study are of importance for planning intervention as for monitoring and evaluation of control in different endemic settings in Mali....

  18. An analysis of HPV infection incidence and clearance by genotype and age in men: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Donna J; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Sudenga, Staci L; Lu, Beibei; Schabath, Matthew B; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Salmeron, Jorge; Villa, Luisa L; Ponce, Eduardo Lazcano; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-12-01

    Genital HPV infection in men causes benign and cancerous lesions, the incidence of which differs by age. The goal of this work was to comprehensively evaluate incidence and clearance of individual HPV genotypes among men by age group. HIV-negative men ages 18-70 with no history of anogenital cancer were recruited for the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study . Participants completed clinical exams and questionnaires every six months for up to ~4 years. Genital specimens underwent HPV genotyping, with associations between age and HPV assessed using Cox analyses. 4085 men were followed for a median of 48.6 months (range: 0.3-94.0). Significantly lower HPV incidence rates were observed among the oldest age group (55-70 years) for grouped high-risk (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.71), HPV16 (IRR=0.54), grouped low-risk (IRR=0.74), and HPV6 (IRR=0.57) infections compared to men ages 18-24. However, incidence of the grouped 9-valent HPV vaccine types remained constant across the lifespan. Likelihood of HPV6 and HPV16 clearance remained constant until age 54, then increased significantly for men ages 55-70 (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=1.92 and 1.65, respectively). Men remain susceptible to HPV infections throughout their lifespan, highlighting the need for prevention efforts with long-lasting duration.

  19. Alcohol consumption and prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among US men in the HPV in Men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabath, Matthew B; Thompson, Zachary J; Egan, Kathleen M; Torres, B Nelson; Nguyen, Anthony; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-02-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption can impair host defence against viral infections. The objective of this cross-sectional analysis was to assess the association between alcohol intake and prevalent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among US men enrolled in the HPV in Men (HIM) study using quantitative alcohol intake measured from a Food Frequency Questionnaire. The HIM study is a prospective, multinational study of the natural history of HPV infection. For this report, we restricted our analyses to men from the US cohort (N = 1313). Samples from the corona of glans penis, penile shaft and scrotum were combined for HPV DNA testing. Self-reported alcohol intake was quantified by grams of alcohol intake per day. Multivariable prevalence ratios (mPRs) were used to assess the association between alcohol intake and HPV infections. Prevalent infections were significantly higher among men in the highest quartile of alcohol intake and multivariable models revealed that the highest quartile of alcohol intake was associated with significantly increased risks for any (mPR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27) HPV types and oncogenic (mPR = 1.35; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.68) HPV types. The fourth quartile of alcohol intake was associated with elevated risks for prevalent HPV infection across all strata of number of sexual partners and among never-smokers and current smokers, but not among former smokers. These results demonstrate that high intake of alcohol is associated with an increased risk for prevalent HPV infections among men. The biological role that alcohol plays in genital HPV infection remains understudied and limited epidemiological data exist, especially among men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. High Multiplicity Infection by HIV-1 in Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating virus-host interactions responsible for HIV-1 transmission is important for advancing HIV-1 prevention strategies. To this end, single genome amplification (SGA and sequencing of HIV-1 within the context of a model of random virus evolution has made possible for the first time an unambiguous identification of transmitted/founder viruses and a precise estimation of their numbers. Here, we applied this approach to HIV-1 env analyses in a cohort of acutely infected men who have sex with men (MSM and found that a high proportion (10 of 28; 36% had been productively infected by more than one virus. In subjects with multivariant transmission, the minimum number of transmitted viruses ranged from 2 to 10 with viral recombination leading to rapid and extensive genetic shuffling among virus lineages. A combined analysis of these results, together with recently published findings based on identical SGA methods in largely heterosexual (HSX cohorts, revealed a significantly higher frequency of multivariant transmission in MSM than in HSX [19 of 50 subjects (38% versus 34 of 175 subjects (19%; Fisher's exact p = 0.008]. To further evaluate the SGA strategy for identifying transmitted/founder viruses, we analyzed 239 overlapping 5' and 3' half genome or env-only sequences from plasma viral RNA (vRNA and blood mononuclear cell DNA in an MSM subject who had a particularly well-documented virus exposure history 3-6 days before symptom onset and 14-17 days before peak plasma viremia (47,600,000 vRNA molecules/ml. All 239 sequences coalesced to a single transmitted/founder virus genome in a time frame consistent with the clinical history, and a molecular clone of this genome encoded replication competent virus in accord with model predictions. Higher multiplicity of HIV-1 infection in MSM compared with HSX is consistent with the demonstrably higher epidemiological risk of virus acquisition in MSM and could indicate a greater challenge for HIV-1

  1. The small RNA complement of adult Schistosoma haematobium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas J Stroehlein

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis-a neglected tropical disease (NTD that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Studies of schistosome genomes have improved our understanding of the molecular biology of flatworms, but most of them have focused largely on protein-coding genes. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs have been explored in selected schistosome species and are suggested to play essential roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of genes, and in modulating flatworm-host interactions. However, genome-wide small RNA data are currently lacking for key schistosomes including Schistosoma haematobium-the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis of humans.MicroRNAs (miRNAs and other sncRNAs of male and female adults of S. haematobium and small RNA transcription levels were explored by deep sequencing, genome mapping and detailed bioinformatic analyses.In total, 89 transcribed miRNAs were identified in S. haematobium-a similar complement to those reported for the congeners S. mansoni and S. japonicum. Of these miRNAs, 34 were novel, with no homologs in other schistosomes. Most miRNAs (n = 64 exhibited sex-biased transcription, suggestive of roles in sexual differentiation, pairing of adult worms and reproductive processes. Of the sncRNAs that were not miRNAs, some related to the spliceosome (n = 21, biogenesis of other RNAs (n = 3 or ribozyme functions (n = 16, whereas most others (n = 3798 were novel ('orphans' with unknown functions.This study provides the first genome-wide sncRNA resource for S. haematobium, extending earlier studies of schistosomes. The present work should facilitate the future curation and experimental validation of sncRNA functions in schistosomes to enhance our understanding of post-transcriptional gene regulation and of the roles that sncRNAs play in schistosome reproduction, development and parasite-host cross-talk.

  2. The small RNA complement of adult Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroehlein, Andreas J; Young, Neil D; Korhonen, Pasi K; Hall, Ross S; Jex, Aaron R; Webster, Bonnie L; Rollinson, David; Brindley, Paul J; Gasser, Robin B

    2018-05-01

    Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis-a neglected tropical disease (NTD) that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Studies of schistosome genomes have improved our understanding of the molecular biology of flatworms, but most of them have focused largely on protein-coding genes. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) have been explored in selected schistosome species and are suggested to play essential roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of genes, and in modulating flatworm-host interactions. However, genome-wide small RNA data are currently lacking for key schistosomes including Schistosoma haematobium-the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis of humans. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and other sncRNAs of male and female adults of S. haematobium and small RNA transcription levels were explored by deep sequencing, genome mapping and detailed bioinformatic analyses. In total, 89 transcribed miRNAs were identified in S. haematobium-a similar complement to those reported for the congeners S. mansoni and S. japonicum. Of these miRNAs, 34 were novel, with no homologs in other schistosomes. Most miRNAs (n = 64) exhibited sex-biased transcription, suggestive of roles in sexual differentiation, pairing of adult worms and reproductive processes. Of the sncRNAs that were not miRNAs, some related to the spliceosome (n = 21), biogenesis of other RNAs (n = 3) or ribozyme functions (n = 16), whereas most others (n = 3798) were novel ('orphans') with unknown functions. This study provides the first genome-wide sncRNA resource for S. haematobium, extending earlier studies of schistosomes. The present work should facilitate the future curation and experimental validation of sncRNA functions in schistosomes to enhance our understanding of post-transcriptional gene regulation and of the roles that sncRNAs play in schistosome reproduction, development and parasite-host cross-talk.

  3. Syphilis and HIV/Syphilis Co-infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Isabel; Johnson, Ayesha; Reina-Ortiz, Miguel; Rosas, Carlos; Sharma, Vinita; Teran, Santiago; Naik, Eknath; Salihu, Hamisu M; Teran, Enrique; Izurieta, Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    There is a reemergence of syphilis in the Latin American and Caribbean region. There is also very little information about HIV/Syphilis co-infection and its determinants. The aim of this study is to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexually transmitted infections (STIs), in particular syphilis infection and HIV/Syphilis co-infection, as well as to estimate the prevalence of syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in a city with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Ecuador. In this study, questionnaires were administered to 291 adult MSM. Questions included knowledge about STIs and their sexual practices. Blood samples were taken from participants to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. In this population, the prevalence of HIV/syphilis co-infection was 4.8%, while the prevalence of syphilis as mono-infection was 6.5%. Participants who had syphilis mono-infection and HIV/syphilis co-infection were older. Men who had multiple partners and those who were forced to have sex had increased odds of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. A high prevalence of syphilis and self-reported STI was observed, which warrants targeted behavioral interventions. Co-infections are a cause for concern when treating a secondary infection in a person who is immunocompromised. These data suggest that specific knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among MSM are associated with increased odds of STIs (including HIV/syphilis co-infections) in this region of Ecuador.

  4. Seroconversion following anal and genital HPV infection in men: The HIM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Giuliano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection from naturally acquired human papillomavirus (HPV antibodies may influence HPV infection across the lifespan. This study describes seroconversion rates following genital, anal, and oral HPV 6/11/16/18 infections in men and examines differences by HPV type and anatomic site. Methods: Men with HPV 6/11/16/18 infections who were seronegative for those genotypes at the time of DNA detection were selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM Study. Sera specimens collected ≤36 months after detection were analyzed for HPV 6/11/16/18 antibodies using a virus-like particle-based ELISA. Time to seroconversion was separately assessed for each anatomic site, stratified by HPV type. Results: Seroconversion to ≥1 HPV type (6/11/16/18 in this sub-cohort (N=384 varied by anatomic site, with 6.3%, 18.9%, and 0.0% seroconverting following anal, genital, and oral HPV infection, respectively. Regardless of anatomic site, seroconversion was highest for HPV 6 (19.3%. Overall, seroconversion was highest following anal HPV 6 infection (69.2%. HPV persistence was the only factor found to influence seroconversion. Conclusions: Low seroconversion rates following HPV infection leave men susceptible to recurrent infections that can progress to HPV-related cancers. This emphasizes the need for HPV vaccination in men to ensure immune protection against new HPV infections and subsequent disease. Keywords: HPV, Men, Seroconversion, HPV antibodies, Human papillomavirus

  5. Smoking and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the HPV in Men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabath, Matthew B; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2012-01-01

    The influence of smoking on the natural history of HPV infection in men is not well understood. Smoking could influence the incidence and persistence of HPV infections by suppressing local immune function, increased cellular proliferation, upregulated proinflammatory factors, or induced host DNA damage resulting in increased susceptibility to infection. The purpose of this analysis is to assess prevalent HPV infections by smoking status in men, and to determine baseline risk of HPV infection associated with smoking. The HPV in Men (HIM) study is a multinational prospective study of the natural history of HPV infections in men. Samples from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum were combined for HPV DNA testing. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between smoking and any-, oncogenic-, and nononcogenic HPV infections. Our analyses revealed that current smoking was associated with an increased risk of any HPV infection (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.01-1.41) and oncogenic HPV infection (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.05-1.47). However, the association between smoking and any HPV infection (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.05-1.73) and oncogenic HPV infection (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.11-1.92) was only evident among men reporting fewer lifetime sexual partners. These results suggest that current smokers with the fewest number of sexual partners are associated with an increased risk for oncogenic HPV infection. The relationship between smoking and HPV infection remains understudied in men; these data shed new light on the interplay between smoking, sexual activity, and risk of HPV infection.

  6. Association of Urogenital Symptoms with History of Water Contact in Young Women in Areas Endemic for S. haematobium. A Cross-Sectional Study in Rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galappaththi-Arachchige, Hashini Nilushika; Amlie Hegertun, Ingrid Elise; Holmen, Sigve; Qvigstad, Erik; Kleppa, Elisabeth; Sebitloane, Motshedisi; Ndhlovu, Patricia Doris; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar; Taylor, Myra; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke

    2016-11-14

    Female genital schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Schistosoma haematobium . Infected females may suffer from symptoms mimicking sexually transmitted infections. We explored if self-reported history of unsafe water contact could be used as a simple predictor of genital schistosomiasis. In a cross-sectional study in rural South Africa, 883 sexually active women aged 16-22 years were included. Questions were asked about urogenital symptoms and water contact history. Urine samples were tested for S. haematobium ova. A score based on self-reported water contact was calculated and the association with symptoms was explored while adjusting for other genital infections using multivariable logistic regression analyses. S. haematobium ova were detected in the urine of 30.5% of subjects. Having ova in the urine was associated with the water contact score ( p water contact included burning sensation in the genitals ( p = 0.005), spot bleeding ( p = 0.012), abnormal discharge smell ( p = 0.018), bloody discharge ( p = 0.020), genital ulcer ( p = 0.038), red urine ( p water contact was strongly associated with urogenital symptoms. In low-resource settings, a simple history including risk of water contact behaviour can serve as an indicator of urogenital schistosomiasis.

  7. Coinfection with Schistosoma haematobium and Plasmodium falciparum and Anaemia Severity among Pregnant Women in Munyenge, Mount Cameroon Area: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith K. Anchang-Kimbi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria and urogenital schistosomiasis are coendemic in Mount Cameroon Area. This study investigated the prevalence of S. haematobium, P. falciparum, and coinfections and their effect on anaemia in pregnancy. Methods. Pregnant women reporting for antenatal care (ANC clinic visit in Munyenge were enrolled. S. haematobium and P. falciparum infections were determined by urine filtration and microscopy, respectively. Haemoglobin (Hb levels were measured using haemoglobinometer. Of 250 women, 46.8%, 39.2%, and 15.2% had S. haematobium, P. falciparum, and coinfections, respectively. Schistosomes infection was higher in younger women (≤25 years and those who bathe in and had domestic contact with stream compared with older age (>25 years women and those who had only domestic contact with stream. Lower infection rate was associated with less water contact (≤2 times/day compared with more water contact (>2 times/day. Compared with no sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP usage, malaria parasitaemia was less among women who used SP. Stream usage increased risk of coinfection while less water contact and SP usage decreased its risk. All coinfected cases were anaemic and coinfection accounted for 93.8% of severe anaemia. Conclusion. Coinfection contributes to anaemia severity. Less water contact and SP usage will reduce coinfection in pregnancy in Munyenge.

  8. Seroconversion Following Anal and Genital HPV Infection in Men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Anna R; Viscidi, Raphael; Torres, B Nelson; Ingles, Donna J; Sudenga, Staci L; Villa, Luisa L; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Abrahamsen, Martha; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmeron, Jorge; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Protection from naturally acquired human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies may influence HPV infection across the lifespan. This study describes seroconversion rates following genital, anal, and oral HPV 6/11/16/18 infections in men and examines differences by HPV type and anatomic site. Men with HPV 6/11/16/18 infections who were seronegative for those genotypes at the time of DNA detection were selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Sera specimens collected ≤36 months after detection were analyzed for HPV 6/11/16/18 antibodies using a virus-like particle-based ELISA. Time to seroconversion was separately assessed for each anatomic site, stratified by HPV type. Seroconversion to ≥1 HPV type (6/11/16/18) in this sub-cohort (N=384) varied by anatomic site, with 6.3, 18.9, and 0.0% seroconverting following anal, genital, and oral HPV infection, respectively. Regardless of anatomic site, seroconversion was highest for HPV 6 (19.3%). Overall, seroconversion was highest following anal HPV 6 infection (69.2%). HPV persistence was the only factor found to influence seroconversion. Low seroconversion rates following HPV infection leave men susceptible to recurrent infections that can progress to HPV-related cancers. This emphasizes the need for HPV vaccination in men to ensure immune protection against new HPV infections and subsequent disease.

  9. High rates of incident and prevalent anal human papillomavirus infection among young men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Sara Nelson; Feng, Qinghua; Popov, Viorica; Koutsky, Laura A; Golden, Matthew R

    2014-02-01

    There are few published estimates of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection rates among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). We estimated incidence and prevalence of type-specific anal HPV infection using clinician-collected anal swabs for HPV DNA testing obtained during a 1-year prospective study of 94 YMSM (mean age, 21 years) in Seattle. Seventy percent of YMSM had any HPV infection detected during the study, and HPV-16 and/or -18 were detected in 37%. The incidence rate for any new HPV infection was 38.5 per 1000 person-months and 15.3 per 1000 person-months for HPV-16/18; 19% had persistent HPV-16/18 infection. No participant tested positive for all 4 HPV types in the quadrivalent vaccine. The number of lifetime male receptive anal sex partners was significantly associated with HPV infection. The prevalence of HPV-16/18 was 6% among YMSM with a history of 1 receptive anal sex partner and 31% among YMSM with ≥ 2 partners. Although the high prevalence of HPV among YMSM highlights the desirability of vaccinating all boys as a strategy to avert the morbidity of HPV infection, most YMSM appear to remain naive to either HPV-16 or -18 well into their sexual lives and would benefit from HPV immunization.

  10. Prevalence of Anal HPV Infection Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Alexandra L; Karthik, Rajiv; Sivasubramanian, Murugesan; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Gnanamony, Manu; Lensing, Shelly; Lee, Jeannette Y; Kannangai, Rajesh; Abraham, Priya; Mathai, Dilip; Palefsky, Joel M

    2016-04-01

    India has a large population of HIV-positive individuals, including men who have sex with men (MSM), and the incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers is high. In developed countries, HIV-positive MSM exhibit the highest prevalence of anal HPV infection and incidence of anal cancer. Little is known about anal HPV infection in HIV-positive Indian MSM. We evaluated 300 HIV-positive MSM from 2 cities in India. Men were tested for anal HPV infection using L1-HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction with probes specific for 29 types and a mixture of 10 additional types. CD4 level and plasma HIV viral load were measured. Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire including a sexual history. The prevalence of anal HPV was 95% (95% confidence interval: 91% to 97%). The 3 most common types were HPV 35 (20%), HPV 16 (13%), and HPV 6/11 (13%). History of taking antiretroviral medications decreased risk of anal HPV 16 infection [relative risk (RR): 0.6 (0.4-1.0)]. Having an increased number of vaginal sex partners lowered risk of any anal HPV infection. Ever having receptive sex increased risk of any anal HPV [RR: 1.2 (1.1-1.4)] and anal HPV 16 [RR: 6.5 (1.8-107)]. Almost all Indian HIV-positive MSM had anal HPV infection. The prevalence of HPV 16 was lower and the prevalence of other oncogenic HPV types was higher than in similar populations in North America and Europe. Vaccine-based prevention strategies for HPV infection in India should consider potential differences in HPV type distribution among HIV-infected MSM when designing interventions.

  11. Urinary tract pathology in some Schistosoma haematobium infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-18

    Jan 18, 2007 ... 6°E. Ihieve-Ogben is located within the guinea savanna region of the state. The villagers ... Pseudopolyp is defined as an outgrowth of the wall, attached by a .... treatment with Praziquantel among school children in Southern.

  12. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  13. Risk Factors for the Spread of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Among HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex with Men in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, JL; Konda, KA; Segura, ER; Salvatierra, HJ; Leon, SR; Hall, ER; Caceres, CF; Klausner, JD; Coates, TJ

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), frequency of sexual risk behaviors, and relationship between knowledge of HIV infection status and sexual risk behavior among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) attending an STI clinic in Peru. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of 559 MSM from a municipal STI clinic in Lima, Peru. Participants completed a survey and provided blood for HIV, Syphilis, and HSV-2 antibody testing, and urine for gonorrhea and chlamydia nucleic acid testing. Results Among 124 HIV-infected MSM, 72.6% were aware of their HIV-infected status. Active syphilis (RPR≥1:8) was diagnosed in 21.0% of HIV-infected participants, HSV-2 in 79.8%, urethral gonorrhea in 1.6%, and chlamydia in 1.6%. Among 41 participants reporting insertive anal intercourse with their last sex partner, 34.2% did not use a condom. Of 86 participants reporting receptive anal intercourse, 25.6% did not use a condom. At least one episode of insertive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with an HIV-uninfected partner during the previous six months was reported by 33.6% (35/104) of participants, and receptive UAI with an HIV-uninfected partner by 44.6% (45/101). No difference in frequency of UAI, with HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected partners, was observed between men who knew their serostatus compared with those who were previously undiagnosed (all p-values >0.05). Conclusions HIV-infected MSM in Peru engaged in high-risk behaviors for spreading HIV and STIs. Knowledge of HIV-infected status was not associated with a decreased frequency of unprotected anal intercourse. Additional efforts to reduce risk behavior after the diagnosis of HIV infection are necessary. PMID:19028945

  14. Prevalence of XMRV Nucleic Acid and Antibody in HIV-1-Infected Men and in Men at Risk for HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Spindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus (XMRV was recently reported to be associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Infection was also reported in 3.7% of healthy individuals. These highly reported frequencies of infection prompted concerns about the possibility of a new, widespread retroviral epidemic. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS provides an opportunity to assess the prevalence of XMRV infection and its association with HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men. Reliable detection of XMRV infection requires the application of multiple diagnostic methods, including detection of human antibodies to XMRV and detection of XMRV nucleic acid. We, therefore, tested 332 patient plasma and PBMC samples obtained from recent visits in a subset of patients in the MACS cohort for XMRV antibodies using Abbott prototype ARCHITECT chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs and for XMRV RNA and proviral DNA using a XMRV single-copy qPCR assay (X-SCA. Although 9 of 332 (2.7% samples showed low positive reactivity against a single antigen in the CMIA, none of these samples or matched controls were positive for plasma XMRV RNA or PBMC XMRV DNA by X-SCA. Thus, we found no evidence of XMRV infection among men in the MACS regardless of HIV-1 serostatus.

  15. Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with HIV Infection Among Men Having Sex with Men in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Le, Giang Truong; Detels, Roger

    2007-01-01

    To learn more about risk behaviors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam and their prevalence of HIV, we conducted a study among MSM in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) to determine HIV-1 prevalence and behaviors associated with infection. This consisted of formative (35 MSM) and cross-sectional (600 MSM) studies at 72 sites, including 75 transvestites, 55 bisexuals, 10 sex workers, and 460 other MSM. Only 5.3% cohabited with a wife/girlfriend, but 30% reported ever having sex with a female...

  16. Frequency of subtype B and F1 dual infection in HIV-1 positive, Brazilian men who have sex with men

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    Soares de Oliveira Ana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because various HIV vaccination studies are in progress, it is important to understand how often inter- and intra-subtype co/superinfection occurs in different HIV-infected high-risk groups. This knowledge would aid in the development of future prevention programs. In this cross-sectional study, we report the frequency of subtype B and F1 co-infection in a clinical group of 41 recently HIV-1 infected men who have sex with men (MSM in São Paulo, Brazil. Methodology Proviral HIV-1 DNA was isolated from subject's peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes that were obtained at the time of enrollment. Each subject was known to be infected with a subtype B virus as determined in a previous study. A small fragment of the integrase gene (nucleotide 4255–4478 of HXB2 was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR using subclade F1 specific primers. The PCR results were further confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. Viral load (VL data were extrapolated from the medical records of each patient. Results For the 41 samples from MSM who were recently infected with subtype B virus, it was possible to detect subclade F1 proviral DNA in five patients, which represents a co-infection rate of 12.2%. In subjects with dual infection, the median VL was 5.3 × 104 copies/ML, whereas in MSM that were infected with only subtype B virus the median VL was 3.8 × 104 copies/ML (p > 0.8. Conclusions This study indicated that subtype B and F1 co-infection occurs frequently within the HIV-positive MSM population as suggested by large number of BF1 recombinant viruses reported in Brazil. This finding will help us track the epidemic and provide support for the development of immunization strategies against the HIV.

  17. Genital prevalence of HPV types and co-infection in men

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    Marcos P. Freire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HPV infection is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted disease and there is evidence of the relationship of HPV infection and the development of genital warts, penile intraepitelial neoplasia, invasive penile carcinoma and cervical cancer. However, there is sparse data regarding the prevalence of HPV types and co-infection of different HPV types among men. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of HPV subtypes infections and rates of co-infection among men. Materials and Methods: 366 men were evaluated from March to October 2010. Men were referred to our institution for HPV diagnostic evaluation based on the following criteria: 1. presence of a genital wart; 2. presence of an atypical genital lesion; 3. absence of symptoms and a partner with a HPV diagnosis; 4. absence of symptoms and a desire to undergo a full STD diagnostic evaluation. Genital samples were collected from the urethra, penile shaft, scrotum and anus with Digene® collection and preservation kit and submitted to HPV genotype microarray detection (Papillocheck®. All men were tested for the low-risk HPV types 6-11-40-42-43-44 and for the high-risk HPV types 16-18-31-33-35-39-45-51-52-53-56-58-59-66-68-70-73-82. Results: Of the 366 men, 11 were tested inconclusive and were excluded from the analysis. 256 men (72.1% of the men from the cohort referred to our institution tested positive with genotype micro-array detection and 99 tested negative. The most prevalent HPV-subtypes in the studied population were 6, 42, 51 and 16. Co-infection was found in 153 men. Of those, 70 (19.7% had a co-infection by 2 types, 37 (10.4% by 3 types; 33 men (9.2% by 4 types; 8 men (2.2% by 5 types; 1 man (0.3% by 6 types; 1 man (0.3% by 7 types; 2 men (0.6% by 8 types and 1 man (0.3% by 9 types. Conclusion: The most frequent HPV types were 6, 16, 42 and 51. Co-infection was found in 59% of our patients. This information is vital to drive future public health policies including massive

  18. Epidemiology of anal HPV infection in high-risk men attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Puerto Rico.

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    Vivian Colón-López

    Full Text Available Recent studies in Puerto Rico have reported an increasing incidence of anal cancer in Puerto Rican men. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among men attending an STI clinic in Puerto Rico.We conducted a cross-sectional study among 205 men 18 years and older. A comprehensive survey was administered that included a demographic and a behavioral assessment. Separate logistic regression models were performed to determine factors associated with any, high-risk (HR, and multiple anal HPV infection.The mean age of the study sample was 38.0±13.5 years. The most common HR types were 58, 51 and 31. Overall, HR anal HPV infection was found in 53.5% of the participants. Multiple HPV types in the anal canal were found in 47.6% of the sample. A third (29.8% of participants reported being men who had sex with men (MSM. MSM had a significantly higher prevalence of any, HR and multiple HPV infection (p-value<0.05. Separate multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that being MSM was associated with any (OR = 4.5; [95%CI: 1.9-10.7], HR (OR = 3.4; [95%CI: 1.1-10.3 and multiple anal HPV infection (OR = 3.6; [95%CI: 1.5-9.1. HIV was marginally associated with multiple anal HPV infection in multivariate analysis (OR = 3.3; 95%CI = 1.0-11.0.Anal HPV is common among sexually active men attending this STI clinic, with higher likelihood of anal HPV infection among MSM.

  19. Broad HPV distribution in the genital region of men from the HPV infection in men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichero, Laura; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S; Luiza Baggio, Maria; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R; Villa, Luisa L

    2013-09-01

    The HPV infection in men (HIM) study examines the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genotyping methods used in this study identify 37 α-HPV types; however, the viral type could not be identified in approximately 22% of male genital specimens that were HPV PCR positive. Our aim was to genotype HPV-unclassified specimens by sequencing PGMY09/11, GP5+/6+ or FAP59/64 PCR products. Using this approach we were able to detect 86 unique HPV types among 508 of 931 specimens analyzed. We report for the first time the presence of a broad range of α-, β- and γ-HPV at the male genitals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Relative risk of HIV infection among young men and women in a South African township

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    MacPhail, C

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available as other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and answered a behavioural questionnaire. The age-prevalence of HIV infection differs between men and women with considerably higher rates of increase with age among young women. The age of sexual debut did...

  1. Evidence-based screening for low bone mineral density in HIV-infected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Patsi; Du, Ping; Haas, Richard E; Pugh, Linda C

    2014-01-01

    Low bone mineral density, which leads to osteoporosis and fracture risk, is an emerging clinical problem in HIV-infected patients. Our evidence-based practice project screened a convenience sample of 225 HIV-infected men for low bone mineral density using the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool, and of those men, 173 were also screened by quantitative ultrasound of the calcaneus. One hundred twelve men had low bone mineral density by either or both screening methods. Seventy-one of these 112 men were tested by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and 73% had low bone mineral density. The positive protective value of the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool was 73% and for quantitative ultrasound was 88%. These results suggest that routine low bone mineral density screening should be included as standard practice for all HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk Factors for Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhommerig, Joost W.; Lambers, Femke A. E.; Schinkel, Janke; Geskus, Ronald B.; Arends, Joop E.; van de Laar, Thijs J. W.; Lauw, Fanny N.; Brinkman, Kees; Gras, Luuk; Rijnders, Bart J. A.; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Prins, Maria; Molenkamp, R.; Mutschelknauss, M.; Nobel, H. E.; Reesink, H. W.; van der Valk, M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Brinkman, K.; Kwa, D.; van der Meche, N.; Toonen, A.; Vos, D.; van Broekhuizen, M.; Lauw, F. N.; Mulder, J. W.; Arends, J. E.; van Kessel, A.; de Kroon, I.; Boonstra, A.; van der Ende, M. E.; Hullegie, S.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van de laar, T. J. W.; Gras, L.; Smit, C.; van der Veldt, W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Since 2000, incidence of sexually acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection has increased among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). To date, few case-control and cohort studies evaluating HCV transmission risk factors were conducted in this

  3. Additional gonorrhea and Chlamydia infections found with rapid follow-up screening in men who have sex with men with an indication for HIV postexposure prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrieze, Nynke H. N.; van Rooijen, Martijn S.; van de Loeff, Maarten Schim; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infection was found in 16.5% of the men who have sex with men with a postexposure prophylaxis indication. Chlamydia and gonorrhea screening was repeated after 14 days. Among those who were initially sexually transmitted infection negative, 4.1% had chlamydia or gonorrhea. In

  4. Internet recruitment for sexually transmitted infection screening among men who have sex with men in Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangine, Cara; Kukk, Aigi; Noormets, Helen; Jänes, Jaak; Rüütel, Kristi

    2018-03-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) face negative health outcomes such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at disproportionate rates. Nonetheless, infections may be underestimated due to limited uptake in testing. To increase testing, screening interventions have been utilized in the past; however, some have resulted in limitations such as poor recruitment. To increase recruitment for screening of MSM in Estonia, two different recruitment strategies were examined. Recruitment was separated into two promotional periods: passive and active. Passive consisted of banners on gay-related sites, while active also placed banners on websites to the general public such as Facebook linked to specific thematic pages and users self-identifying as men. More men were recruited during the active period of five weeks (n = 134) than the passive period of 46 weeks (n = 126). Active promotion was so successful in that the number of home sampling kit orders far exceeded what was projected, forcing promotion to the general public to be closed after 13 days. Recruiting MSM through a combination of general public and gay-related websites and applications has the ability to quickly recruit for testing interventions. This method can recruit a large number in a short amount of time; therefore, a budget must be planned accordingly to support testing for all that participate.

  5. [Factors associated with syphilis/HIV infection among men who have sex with men in Shenzhen,2011-2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y M; Song, Y J; Liu, H; Hong, F C

    2017-11-06

    Objective: To investigate the factors associated with syphilis/HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) maintaining a single sexual partner in Shenzhen. Methods: Respondent driven sampling and snowball sampling method were used to recruit MSM receiving voluntary counseling and testing in Shenzhen Rainbow clinic from 2011 to 2016. aged 18 years and above; reported having one or more anal sexual partners in the recent 6 months. A total of 3 109 men who have sex with men (MSM) were involved in the study. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted on a one-on-one basis. Data were collected including socio-demographic information, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing history, history of blood donation and drug abuse in the recent two years, self-identified sexual orientation, role in homosexual behavior, ever being money boys (MB) and clients of MB, female sexual partners in the recent 6 months. 5 ml blood samples were taken after questionnaires. Syphilis was screened using toluidine red unheated serum test for the antibody of treponema pallidum and then confirmed by treponema pallidum particle assay. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for screening HIV and western blot was used to confirm the HIV screening results. The difference of condom use among MSM between female sexual partners and male sexual partners were compared. Multivariate unconditional stepwise logistic regression model was used to analyze factors associated with syphilis infection and HIV positive among MSM. Results: A total of 3 109 eligible participants with mean (SD) age of 31.49 (8.64) years were enrolled in this study. Among them, 565 cases were infected with syphilis (18.17%), 330 cases were infected with HIV (10.61%), and 165 cases (5.31%) were syphilis co-infected with HIV. 791 (25.44%) reported maintaining a single sexual partners in the recent 6 months. Compared to MSM with multiple sexual partners, the prevalence of syphilis and HIV infection among MSM

  6. Characterization of HIV Recent Infection Among High-Risk Men at Public STI Clinics in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Fatch, Robin; Grant, Robert M; Mathur, Meenakshi; Kumta, Sameer; Jerajani, Hemangi; Kellogg, Timothy A; Lindan, Christina P

    2018-02-16

    We examined associations with HIV recent infection and estimated transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence among 3345 men at sexually transmitted infection clinics in Mumbai (2002-2005). HIV seroincidence was 7.92% by the BED-CEIA and was higher at a clinic located near brothels (12.39%) than at a hospital-based clinic (3.94%). HIV recent infection was associated with a lifetime history of female sex worker (FSW) partners, HSV-2, genital warts, and gonorrhea. TDR prevalence among recent infection cases was 5.7%. HIV testing services near sex venues may enhance case detection among high-risk men who represent a bridging population between FSWs and the men's other sexual partners.

  7. [Risk factors related to HIV new infections among men who have sex with men in a cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W; Li, Y; Zhou, N; Wu, G H; Chang, W H; Huan, X P; Hui, S; Tong, X; Guo, Y; Yu, M H; Lu, R R; Ouyang, L; Dong, L F; Li, H; Li, J J; Liu, X Y; Liu, Y L; Luo, C; Wei, X L; Huang, X D; Cui, Y

    2018-01-10

    Objectives: To analyze and understand the risk factors related to HIV new infections among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods: A longitudinal observational study among MSM was conducted to collect information on HIV related behaviors and sero-conversion. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to discuss the risk factors for HIV new infection. Results: A total number of 4 305 MSM were followed during 2013-2015. Among those self-reported MSM who are seeking partners on the Interner tended to have higher proportion on receptive anal intercourse and consistent condom use during anal intercourse than the subgroups seeking their partners in gay bars or bathrooms. HIV incidence among followed MSM during the study period appeared as 4.3/100 person years, with adjusted RR (a RR ) of HIV infection for receptive anal intercourse as group 2.20 (95% CI : 1.49-3.24) times than that of insertion anal intercourse group. Those who used rush-poppers (a RR =1.55, 95% CI : 1.10-2.17), unprotected anal intercourse (a RR =2.24, 95% CI : 1.62-3.08), and those with syphilis infection (a RR =2.95, 95% CI : 2.00-4.35) were also risk factors for HIV new infections. After controlling other factors, the relationship between the ways of seeking partners and HIV new infection was not statistical significant. Conclusion: Risk factors for HIV new infection among MSM appeared complex and interactive, suggesting that further studies are needed to generate tailored strategies for the prevention of HIV epidemic among MSM population.

  8. Metabolic health across the BMI spectrum in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jordan E; Li, Xiuhong; Palella, Frank J; Erlandson, Kristine M; Wiley, Dorothy; Kingsley, Lawrence; Jacobson, Lisa P; Brown, Todd T

    2018-01-02

    In the general population, metabolic health often declines as BMI increases. However, some obese individuals maintain metabolic health. HIV and antiretroviral therapy have been associated with metabolic disturbances. We hypothesized that HIV-infected (HIV) men on suppressive antiretroviral therapy experience less metabolic health than HIV-uninfected (HIV) men across all BMI categories. In a cross-sectional analysis of 1018 HIV and 1092 HIV men enrolled in the multicenter AIDS cohort study, Poisson regression with robust variance determined associations between HIV serostatus and metabolic health prevalence (defined as meeting ≤2 of 5 National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III metabolic syndrome criteria), adjusting for age, race, BMI category, smoking, and hepatitis C virus infection status. HIV men were younger (54 vs. 59 years) and had lower median BMI (25 vs. 27 kg/m). Nonobese HIV men had lower metabolic health prevalence than HIV men (BMI ≤25 kg/m: 80 vs. 94%, P BMI 25-29 kg/m: 64 vs. 71%, P = 0.05), but metabolic health prevalence among obese men did not differ by HIV serostatus (BMI 30-34 kg/m: 35 vs. 39%, P = 0.48; BMI ≥35 kg/m: 27 vs. 25%, P = 0.79). In the adjusted model, nonobese HIV men were less likely to demonstrate metabolic health than nonobese HIV men. Among HIV men, per year darunavir, zidovudine, and stavudine use were associated with lower metabolic health likelihood. Metabolically healthy obesity prevalence does not differ by HIV serostatus. However, among nonobese men, HIV infection is associated with lower metabolic health prevalence, with associations between lack of metabolic health and darunavir and thymidine analog nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure observed.

  9. Hepatitis A and hepatitis B infection prevalence and associated risk factors in men who have sex with men, Bangkok, 2006-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkins, Robert W; Chonwattana, Wannee; Holtz, Timothy H; Wasinrapee, Punneeporn; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Varangrat, Anchalee; Tongtoyai, Jaray; Mock, Philip A; Curlin, Marcel E; Sirivongrangson, Pachara; van Griensven, Frits; McNicholl, Janet M

    2013-09-01

    Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, little is known about prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among Thai men who have sex with men. The prevalence of HAV and HBV infection among men who have sex with men cohort in Bangkok was assessed. Baseline blood specimens were drawn and demographic and behavioral data were collected. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze risk factors for prevalent HAV and HBV infection. One thousand two hundred ninety-nine Thai men who have sex with men 18 years and older were enrolled. Among those with results, 349/1,291 (27.0%) had evidence of past or current hepatitis A infection. Of the 1,117 (86.5%) men with unambiguous HBV test results, 442 (39.6%) had serologic evidence of past/current infection, 103 (9.2%) were immune due to hepatitis B vaccination, 572 (51.2%) had no evidence of immunological exposure to HBV or vaccine. Of those with past/current HBV infection, 130 (29.4%) were HIV positive. Age >35 years was independently associated with both HAV and HBV infection. University education was protective against both HAV and HBV infection. Increased alcohol consumption, number of lifetime male sexual partners ≥10, and prevalent HIV infection were also independently associated with HBV infection. The prevalence of past/current HAV and HBV infection was high in Bangkok men who have sex with men. Age-cohorts with a higher prevalence of hepatitis B vaccine induced immunity may be expected in the future. Hepatitis A and B vaccination is recommended. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. This is a US Government work, and, as such, is in the public domain in The United States.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men treated at a referral hospital for sexually transmitted diseases in the Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Panizza Jalkh

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The high prevalence of C. trachomatis infection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected men highlights that screening human immunodeficiency virus-infected men for C. trachomatis, especially among men having sex with men, is paramount to control the spread of C. trachomatis infection.

  11. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eleanor M; Oomeer, Soonita; Gilson, Richard; Copas, Andrew; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men (MSM) differs from anogenital HPV infection. The impact of HPV vaccination has, to date, largely focussed on anogenital outcomes. Vaccination of MSM in the UK has been recommended and, if implemented, baseline estimates of oral HPV prevalence will be useful. We searched Medline, Embase and psycINFO databases for studies reporting prevalence, incidence, and clearance of oral HPV infection in MSM. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression on prevalence estimates and summarised within-study risk factors for oral HPV DNA detection and incidence/clearance rates. We also performed a meta-analysis of the effect of MSM on oral HPV prevalence compared to heterosexual men. 26 publications were identified. The pooled prevalence of oral HPV16 from twelve estimates was 3.0% (95%CI 0.5-5.5) in HIV-negative and 4.7% (95%CI 2.1-7.3) in HIV-positive MSM. Median age of study participants explained 38% of heterogeneity (p<0.01) in HPV prevalence estimates (pooled = 17% and 29% in HIV-negative and HIV-positive, respectively; 22 estimates). Nine studies compared MSM to heterosexual men and found no difference in oral HPV prevalence (pooled OR 1.07 (95%CI 0.65-1.74)). The clearance rate was higher than incidence within studies. Type-specific concordance between oral and anogenital sites was rare. There was substantial heterogeneity between estimates of oral HPV prevalence in MSM populations that was partly explained by HIV status and median age.

  12. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections among men with urethritis in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sweih, N A; Khan, S; Rotimi, V O

    2011-09-01

    Chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis and gonorrhoea are the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections worldwide. Data on these infections are scanty in the Islamic world, especially Kuwait. The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among men with symptomatic urethritis in Kuwait. Men with urethral discharge seen and managed at eight governmental hospitals were recruited into the study. A pair of urethral swab and first-voided urine sample were taken from the patients and sent immediately to the laboratory where they were processed using strand displacement nucleic acid amplification kits (SDA; ProbeTec, Becton Dickinson); one pair per patient was studied. A total of 426 symptomatic men were studied, out of whom 155 (36.4%) were infected by either C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae, or both. The overall prevalence rates of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were 12.4% and 23.9%, respectively. There was no significant difference in chlamydial and gonococcal prevalence between Kuwaiti men and non-Kuwaitis (P>0.05). Infection rates were much lower in married men than unmarried men. Men in the age range of 21-35 years were more vulnerable to both infections. The findings show that N. gonorrhoeae and, to a lesser extent, C. trachomatis are common in men with urethritis in Kuwait. Appropriate preventive strategies that conform to Islamic rules and values should be of highest priority of the policymakers. Copyright © 2011 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatially explicit Schistosoma infection risk in eastern Africa using Bayesian geostatistical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schur, Nadine; Hürlimann, Eveline; Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie

    2013-01-01

    are currently infected with either S. mansoni, or S. haematobium, or both species concurrently. Country-specific population-adjusted prevalence estimates range between 12.9% (Uganda) and 34.5% (Mozambique) for S. mansoni and between 11.9% (Djibouti) and 40.9% (Mozambique) for S. haematobium. Our models revealed...

  14. Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Listen En Español Men Historically, men have not been comfortable discussing issues about their health, particularly conditions like diabetes, depression or sexual dysfunction. This has resulted in shorter ...

  15. Anal infections with concomitant Chlamydia trachomatis genotypes among men who have sex with men in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Loeff Maarten

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV proctitis is caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct genotype L and is endemic among men who have sex with men (MSM in western society. Genotype L infections need to be distinguished from non-LGV (genotypes A-K Ct infections since they require prolonged antibiotic treatment. For this purpose, an in-house developed pmpH based LGV polymerase chain reaction (PCR test is used at the Amsterdam STI outpatient clinic. We investigated retrospectively the anal Ct genotype distribution, and the frequency of concomitant genotype infections in MSM infected with LGV and non-LGV Ct infections. To detect concomitant Ct genotype infections, the pmpH LGV PCR and genoTyping Reverse Hybridization Assay (Ct-DT RHA were used. Methods A total of 201 Ct positive rectal swabs from MSM were selected, which were previously diagnosed as either LGV (n = 99 or non-LGV Ct infection (n = 102 according to the algorithm of Ct detection by the commercially available Aptima Combo 2 assay followed by an in-house pmpH LGV PCR. The samples were retested with the commercially available Ct-DT RHA, which differentiates between 14 major genotypes and is able to detect concomitant Ct genotypes. Results Excellent genotyping agreement was observed between the Ct-DT RHA and the pmpH LGV PCR (Kappa = 0.900, 95%CI = 0.845-0.955, McNemar's p = 1.000. A concomitant non-LGV genotype was detected in 6/99 (6.1% LGV samples. No additional LGV infections were observed with the Ct-DT RHA among the non-LGV Ct group. In the non-LGV group genotype G/Ga (34.3% was seen most frequent, followed by genotype D/Da (22.5% and genotype J (13.7%. All LGV infections were caused by genotype L2. Conclusions Concomitant non-LGV genotypes do not lead to missed LGV proctitis diagnosis. The pmpH LGV PCR displayed excellent agreement with the commercially available Ct-DT genotyping RHA test. The genotypes G/Ga, D/Da and J were the most frequent non-LGV Ct strains in MSM.

  16. Interrupting seasonal transmission of Schistosoma haematobium and control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in northern and central Côte d'Ivoire: a SCORE study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian-Bi, Yves-Nathan T; Ouattara, Mamadou; Knopp, Stefanie; Coulibaly, Jean T; Hürlimann, Eveline; Webster, Bonnie; Allan, Fiona; Rollinson, David; Meïté, Aboulaye; Diakité, Nana R; Konan, Cyrille K; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Utzinger, Jürg

    2018-01-29

    To achieve a world free of schistosomiasis, the objective is to scale up control and elimination efforts in all endemic countries. Where interruption of transmission is considered feasible, countries are encouraged to implement a comprehensive intervention package, including preventive chemotherapy, information, education and communication (IEC), water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), and snail control. In northern and central Côte d'Ivoire, transmission of Schistosoma haematobium is seasonal and elimination might be achieved. In a cluster-randomised trial, we will assess different treatment schemes to interrupt S. haematobium transmission and control soil-transmitted helminthiasis over a 3-year period. We will compare the impact of (i) arm A: annual mass drug administration (MDA) with praziquantel and albendazole before the peak schistosomiasis transmission season; (ii) arm B: annual MDA after the peak schistosomiasis transmission season; (iii) arm C: two yearly treatments before and after peak schistosomiasis transmission; and (iv) arm D: annual MDA before peak schistosomiasis transmission, coupled with chemical snail control using niclosamide. The prevalence and intensity of S. haematobium and soil-transmitted helminth infections will be assessed using urine filtration and Kato-Katz thick smears, respectively, in six administrative regions in northern and central parts of Côte d'Ivoire. Once a year, urine and stool samples will be collected and examined from 50 children aged 5-8 years, 100 children aged 9-12 years and 50 adults aged 20-55 years in each of 60 selected villages. Changes in S. haematobium and soil-transmitted helminth prevalence and intensity will be assessed between years and stratified by intervention arm. In the 15 villages randomly assigned to intervention arm D, intermediate host snails will be collected three times per year, before niclosamide is applied to the selected freshwater bodies. The snail abundance and infection rates over time

  17. [Development of HIV infection risk assessment tool for men who have sex with men based on Delphi method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L L; Jiang, Z; Song, W L; Ding, Y Y; Xu, J; He, N

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To develop a HIV infection risk assessment tool for men who have sex with men (MSM) based on Delphi method. Methods: After an exhaustive literature review, we used Delphi method to determine the specific items and relative risk scores of the assessment tool through two rounds of specialist consultation and overall consideration of the opinions and suggestions of 17 specialists. Results: The positivity coefficient through first and second round specialist consultation was 100.0 % and 94.1 % , respectively. The mean of authority coefficients ( Cr ) was 0.86. Kendall's W coefficient of the specialist consultation was 0.55 for the first round consultation (χ(2)=84.426, P risk assessment tool for MSM has 8 items. Conclusions: The HIV infection risk assessment tool for MSM, developed under the Delphi method, can be used in the evaluation of HIV infection risk in MSM and individualized prevention and intervention. However, the reliability and validity of this risk assessment tool need to be further evaluated.

  18. A suspected case of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) suggests underdiagnosed LGV infection among Slovenian men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Boštjan; Ramšak, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is sexually transmitted infection caused by serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis, mostly seen among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. The first three reports of possible LGV in Slovenia were from April to June 2015, followed by a confirmed case of LGV in August 2015. We present the case of an HIV-positive MSM that presented with an anorectal abscess, discharge, lymphadenopathy, and unusual perianal plaque. Gonococcal proctitis was assumed and he received empirical antibiotic treatment, after which only intermittent improvement occurred. After a positive test result for chlamydial infection, but without a response to azithromycin treatment, LGV was suspected. Treatment according to the guidelines was introduced. When doxycycline therapy started, rapid improvement was observed, and it was therefore assumed that the LGV infection had been successfully treated. Two similar cases with an unusual anorectal presentation and an excellent response to antibiotic therapy for LGV were observed at the same center shortly thereafter. While pointing out possible delays and limitations in diagnostic procedures at self-pay facilities, the need for better access to high quality STI management in public and in private services is emphasized. Enhanced surveillance and testing guidelines could reveal a hidden LGV epidemic among MSM in Slovenia.

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Cowó, Ángel E.; Chen, Marcelo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chun-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208) and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9%) were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%). Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4%) subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan’s Centers for Disease Control has created a video (www.youtube.com/watch?v=BinExvvOTMM&feature=iv&src_vid=BW81-PfmY3E&annotation_id=annotation_2436493705) to correct such misconception in its AIDS prevention campaign. PMID:26039757

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Cowó, Ángel E; Chen, Marcelo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chun-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208) and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9%) were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%). Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4%) subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p watch?v=BinExvvOTMM&feature=iv&src_vid=BW81-PfmY3E&annotation_id=annotation_2436493705) to correct such misconception in its AIDS prevention campaign.

  1. Regression models for interval censored survival data: Application to HIV infection in Danish homosexual men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Bendix

    1996-01-01

    This paper shows how to fit excess and relative risk regression models to interval censored survival data, and how to implement the models in standard statistical software. The methods developed are used for the analysis of HIV infection rates in a cohort of Danish homosexual men.......This paper shows how to fit excess and relative risk regression models to interval censored survival data, and how to implement the models in standard statistical software. The methods developed are used for the analysis of HIV infection rates in a cohort of Danish homosexual men....

  2. [Status and influencing factors of rush poppers use and HIV infection among men who have sex with men in Changsha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yunxiao; Wang, Honghong; Xiao, Xueling; Chen, Jia; Li, Xianhong

    2016-02-01

    To explore the relationship between use of rush poppers and HIV infection, and associated factors among men who have sex with men in Changsha. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Changsha from April to December, 2014. Men who have sex with men who came for HIV counseling and testing services were invited to fill out a survey. A total of 608 MSM were finally recruited. The survey included socio-demographic characteristics, sexual roles, sexual behaviors in last 6 months and rush poppers use, HIV infection among MSM. After finishing the questionnaire, 5 ml blood was also drawn for HIV testing. Chi-square test or Fisher probabilities was used to compare usage of rush poppers and HIV antibody positive rate among MSM who had different characteristics and sexual behaviors. Multi-factor unconditioned logistic regression model was used to explore related factors about rush poppers use and HIV infection of MSM. Among 608 MSM, 29.8% (181) said they ever used rush poppers, and 13.3% (81 cases) were HIV positive. Among MSM who ever used rush poppers, 18.8% (34/181) were HIV positive; While among those who never used rush poppers, 10.5% (45/427) were HIV positive (χ(2)=7.65,P=0.006). Compared with MSM who had no For One Night sex in the last 6 months,OR (95% CI) value of MSM who had 6-10 times For One Night sexes in last 6 months to use rush poppers was 4.32 (1.77-10.57). Compared with MSM who self-identified as top,OR (95% CI) value of MSM who self-identified as bottom or versatile using rush poppers were 2.99 (1.53-5.86), or 3.60 (2.13-6.09). Compared with MSM who self-identified as top, OR (95% CI) value of MSM who self-identified as bottom or versatile to infect HIV were 3.19 (1.35-7.58), or 2.33 (1.12-4.85). Compared with MSM who used condoms at every anal sex,OR (95% CI) value of MSM who used condoms sometimes or never used to infect HIV were 1.93 (1.12-3.35) or 1.87 (0.64-5.50). Compared with MSM who never used rush poppers,OR (95% CI) value of MSM who ever used

  3. HIV-infected men who have sex with men who identify themselves as belonging to subcultures are at increased risk for hepatitis C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Matser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV emerged as sexually transmitted infection among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM. We studied whether HCV circulated in identifiable high-risk MSM subcultures and performed phylogenetic analysis. METHODS: HIV-infected MSM were recruited at the sexually transmitted infections (STI outpatient clinic and a university HIV clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 2008-2009. Participants completed a detailed questionnaire and were tested for HCV antibodies and RNA, with NS5B regions sequenced for analysis of clusters. RESULTS: Among 786 participants, the median age was 43 (IQR 37-48 years, and 93 (11.8% were HCV-positive. Seropositivity was associated with belonging to subcultures identified as leather (aOR 2.60; 95% CI 1.56-4.33, rubber/lycra (aOR 2.15; 95% CI 1.10-4.21, or jeans (aOR 2.23; 95% CI 1.41-3.54. The two largest HCV-RNA monophyletic clusters were compared; MSM in cluster I (genotype 1a, n = 13 reported more partners (P = 0.037 than MSM in cluster II (genotype 4d, n = 14, but demographics, subculture characteristics and other risk behaviors did not differ significantly between the two clusters. DISCUSSION: HCV infection is associated with identifiable groups of leather/rubber/lycra/jeans subcultures among HIV-infected MSM. Separate epidemiological HCV transmission networks were not revealed. Active HCV screening and treatment within specific subcultures may reduce HCV spread among all MSM.

  4. Club Drugs and HIV/STD Infection: An Exploratory Analysis among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Changsha, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Zhao, Junshi; He, Jianmei; Zhang, Guoqiang; Tang, Xuemin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current club drug use and its potential association with the transmission of HIV/STD among Changsha men who have sex with men (MSM). Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted by using self-administered questionnaires including information regarding socio-demographics, club drug use, high-risk behaviors, and HIV/STD infections. Multiple methods including venue-based, peer referral using “snowball” techniques, and internet advertisements were used to recruit study participants. Results Of the 826 participants, 177 (21.4%) reported that they had used club drugs at some time before or during sex in the past six months. MSM with young age, low education level, and seeking partners through the internet or bars were the main population who used drugs. Poppers were the most common drug used among Changsha MSM. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus-2 were higher among drug users. There were no significant differences in unprotected sexual intercourse and condom use between drug users and non-users. Compared with non-users, risk behaviors such as group sex, multiple sex partners, and sex with foreigners were more frequent among drug users. Conclusion Club drug use is common among Changsha MSM, and is related to unsafe sex activities and HIV/STD infection. It is necessary to build novel targeted HIV prevention strategies to monitor and reduce club drug use among MSM. PMID:25950912

  5. Club Drugs and HIV/STD Infection: An Exploratory Analysis among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Changsha, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    Full Text Available To evaluate current club drug use and its potential association with the transmission of HIV/STD among Changsha men who have sex with men (MSM.A cross-sectional survey was conducted by using self-administered questionnaires including information regarding socio-demographics, club drug use, high-risk behaviors, and HIV/STD infections. Multiple methods including venue-based, peer referral using "snowball" techniques, and internet advertisements were used to recruit study participants.Of the 826 participants, 177 (21.4% reported that they had used club drugs at some time before or during sex in the past six months. MSM with young age, low education level, and seeking partners through the internet or bars were the main population who used drugs. Poppers were the most common drug used among Changsha MSM. The prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus-2 were higher among drug users. There were no significant differences in unprotected sexual intercourse and condom use between drug users and non-users. Compared with non-users, risk behaviors such as group sex, multiple sex partners, and sex with foreigners were more frequent among drug users.Club drug use is common among Changsha MSM, and is related to unsafe sex activities and HIV/STD infection. It is necessary to build novel targeted HIV prevention strategies to monitor and reduce club drug use among MSM.

  6. Health insurance and use of medical services by men infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M H; Chang, S W; Buchbinder, S P; Hessol, N A; O'Malley, P; Doll, L S

    1995-01-01

    Among 178 HIV-infected men from the San Francisco City Clinic Cohort (SFCCC), we examined the association between health insurance and use of outpatient services and treatment. For men with private insurance, we also assessed the frequency of avoiding the use of health insurance. Men without private insurance reported fewer outpatient visits than men with fee-for-service or managed-care plans. Use of zidovudine for eligible men was similar for those with fee-for-service plans (74%), managed-care plans (77%), or no insurance (61%). Use of Pneumocytstis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis was similar for those with fee-for-service (93%) and managed-care plans (83%) but lower for those with no insurance (63%). Of 149 men with private insurance, 31 (21%) reported that they had avoided using their health insurance for medical expenses in the previous year. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of avoiding the use of insurance were working for a small company and living outside the San Francisco Bay Area. Having private insurance resulted in higher use of outpatient services, but the type of private insurance did not appear to affect the use of service or treatment. Fears of loss of coverage and confidentiality may negate some benefits of health insurance for HIV-infected persons.

  7. Urban Men's Knowledge and Perceptions regarding Sexually Transmitted Infections in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mir, Ali; Reichenbach, Laura; Wajid, Abdul

    2009-01-01

    In a pioneering study undertaken in Pakistan, urban men's sexual behaviors, perceptions and knowledge regarding sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS were determined by employing both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Focus group discussions were carried out initially and followed by a structured cross sectional survey…

  8. Impact of CCR5 Delta32/+ deletion on herpes zoster among HIV-1-infected homosexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Anneke; Lensen, Ruud; Veenstra, Jan; Prins, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Coutinho, Roel A.

    2006-01-01

    The association between the presence of CCR5 Delta32 heterozygosity and incidence of clinical herpes zoster was studied among 296 homosexual men from the Amsterdam cohort study (ACS) infected with human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) with an estimated date of seroconversion. Of them 63 were

  9. Is Group Sex a Higher-Risk Setting for HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Compared With Dyadic Sex Among Men Who Have Sex With Men?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, Wijnand; Davidovich, Udi; Heuker, José; Lambers, Femke; Prins, Maria; Sandfort, Theo; Stolte, Ineke G.

    2016-01-01

    Group sex has been suggested as a potential high-risk setting for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among men who have sex with men (MSM). We investigated whether group sex is associated with lower condom use during anal sex and higher proportions of STIs compared with dyadic sex

  10. The Prevalence and Correlates of HIV and Undiagnosed Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Hanoi, Vietnam : Findings from a Cross-sectional, Biobehavioral Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu, Nga Thi Thu; Holt, Martin; Phan, Huong Thi Thu; La, Lan Thi; Tran, Gioi Minh; Doan, Tung Thanh; de Wit, John

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are a key population for HIV infection in Vietnam, and the use of amphetamine type substances (ATS) is prevalent and possibly increasing in this population. The reported analysis examines the association between ATS use before or during sex and HIV

  11. Human T-lymphotropic Virus-1/2 detected in drug abused men who have sex with men infected with HIV in Surakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agung Prasetyo, Afiono; Sari, Yulia

    2018-05-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) share similar routes of transmission with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the HTLV-1/2 co-infection may affect the clinical course of HIV infection. The HIV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection risk higher if the patient performing the high-risk activities. This study evaluated the presentation of HTLV-1 and 2 in HIV-infected men who have sex with men with drug abused history in Surakarta Indonesia. Blood samples collected from HIV-infected men who have sex with men with drug abused history in Surakarta were tested using HTLV-1/2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and confirmed by RT-PCR nested addressed the part of HTLV-1 LTR and HTLV-2 LTR region, respectively. The specificity of the molecular assays was confirmed by sequencing the amplicons. The anti HTLV-1/2 positive rate was 17.4% (8/46). All positive serological samples were confirmed by nested RT-PCR. Of these, three was HTLV-1 positive and five was HTLV-2 positive. Molecular analysis of positive PCR products revealed that all HTLV-1 isolates had a close relationship with HTLV-1 isolated in Japan while all HTLV-2 isolates with that of isolated in the USA. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 were detected in drug abused men who have sex with men infected with HIV in Surakarta.

  12. Cross-species prophylactic efficacy of Sm-p80-based vaccine and intracellular localization of Sm-p80/Sm-p80 ortholog proteins during development in Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum, and Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Sennoune, Souad R; Zhang, Weidong; Rojo, Juan U; Siddiqui, Arif J; Herrera, Karlie A; Johnson, Laura; Sudduth, Justin; May, Jordan; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2017-11-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a major global health problem. Despite large-scale schistosomiasis control efforts, clear limitations such as possible emergence of drug resistance and reinfection rates highlight the need for an effective schistosomiasis vaccine. Schistosoma mansoni large subunit of calpain (Sm-p80)-based vaccine formulations have shown remarkable efficacy in protecting against S. mansoni challenge infections in mice and baboons. In this study, we evaluated the cross-species protective efficacy of Sm-p80 vaccine against S. japonicum and S. haematobium challenge infections in rodent models. We also elucidated the expression of Sm-p80 and Sm-p80 ortholog proteins in different developmental stages of S. mansoni, S. haematobium, and S. japonicum. Immunization with Sm-p80 vaccine reduced worm burden by 46.75% against S. japonicum challenge infection in mice. DNA prime/protein boost (1 + 1 dose administered on a single day) resulted in 26.95% reduction in worm burden in S. haematobium-hamster infection/challenge model. A balanced Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4, IgG1) type of responses were observed following vaccination in both S. japonicum and S. haematobium challenge trials and these are associated with the prophylactic efficacy of Sm-p80 vaccine. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Sm-p80/Sm-p80 ortholog proteins are expressed in different life cycle stages of the three major human species of schistosomes studied. The data presented in this study reinforce the potential of Sm-p80-based vaccine for both hepatic/intestinal and urogenital schistosomiasis occurring in different geographical areas of the world. Differential expression of Sm-p80/Sm-p80 protein orthologs in different life cycle makes this vaccine potentially useful in targeting different levels of infection, disease, and transmission.

  13. Low-Grade Inflammation Is Associated with Susceptibility to Infection in Healthy Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Kathrine Agergård; Dinh, Khoa Manh; Erikstrup, Lise Tornvig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine whether low-grade inflammation (LGI) is associated with a subsequently increased risk of infection. Methods We included 15,754 healthy participants from the Danish Blood Donor Study, who completed a questionnaire on health-related items. LGI......-years of observation, 571 participants were hospitalized for infection. Similarly, during 26,125 person-years of observation, 7,276 participants filled a prescription of antimicrobials. LGI was associated with increased risk of hospital-based treatment for infection only among men (hazard ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence...

  14. Recreational Drug Use and T Lymphocyte Subpopulations in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun; Jacobson, Lisa P; Tashkin, Donald; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Roth, Michael D; Margolick, Joseph B; Chmiel, Joan S; Rinaldo, Charles; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The effects of recreational drugs on CD4 and CD8 T cells in humans are not well understood. We conducted a longitudinal analysis of men who have sex with men (MSM) enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study to define associations between self-reported use of marijuana, cocaine, poppers and amphetamines, and CD4 and CD8 T cell parameters in both HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected MSM. For the HIV-infected MSM, we used clinical and laboratory data collected semiannually before 1996 to avoid potential effects of antiretroviral treatment. A regression model that allowed random intercepts and slopes as well as autoregressive covariance structure for within subject errors was used. Potential confounders adjusted for included length of follow-up, demographics, tobacco smoking, alcohol use, risky sexual behaviors, history of sexually transmitted infections, and antiviral therapy. We found no clinically meaningful associations between use of marijuana, cocaine, poppers, or amphetamines and CD4 and CD8 T cell counts, percentages, or rates of change in either HIV-uninfected or -infected men. The regression coefficients were of minimum magnitude despite some reaching statistical significance. No threshold effect was detected for frequent (at least weekly) or continuous substance use in the previous year. These results indicate that use of these substances does not adversely affect the numbers and percentages of circulating CD4 or CD8 T cells in either HIV-uninfected or -infected MSM. PMID:18180115

  15. S. haematobium as a common cause of genital morbidity in girls: a cross-sectional study of children in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Elise Amlie Hegertun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosoma (S. haematobium infection is a common cause of genital morbidity in adult women. Ova in the genital mucosal lining may cause lesions, bleeding, pain, discharge, and the damaged surfaces may pose a risk for HIV. In a heterogeneous schistosomiasis endemic area in South Africa, we sought to investigate if young girls had genital symptoms and if this was associated with urinary S. haematobium. METHODOLOGY: In a cross-sectional study of 18 randomly chosen primary schools, we included 1057 schoolgirls between the age of 10 and 12 years. We interviewed assenting girls, whose parents had consented to their participation and examined three urines from each of them for schistosome ova. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One third of the girls reported to have a history of genital symptoms. Prior schistosomal infection was reported by 22% (226/1020, this was associated with current genital symptoms (p<0.001. In regression analysis the genital symptoms were significantly associated both with urinary schistosomiasis (p<0.001 and water contact (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Even before sexually active age, a relatively large proportion of the participating girls had similar genital symptoms to those reported for adult genital schistosomiasis previously. Anti-schistosomal treatment should be considered at a young age in order to prevent chronic genital damage and secondary infections such as HIV, sexually transmitted diseases and other super-infections.

  16. Anal cytological abnormalities and epidemiological correlates among men who have sex with men at risk for HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donà Maria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of anal cancer, a Human Papillomavirus (HPV-related neoplasia, has been increasing in recent decades, mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM. Cytological changes of the anal epithelium induced by HPV can be detected through an anal pap smear. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and epidemiological correlates of anal cytological abnormalities among relatively young MSM at risk for HIV-1 infection, to help clarify whether or not this population deserves further investigation to assess the presence of anal cancer precursor lesions. Methods MSM were recruited among attendees of a large STI clinic for a HIV-1 screening program. Anal samples, collected with a Dracon swab in PreservCyt, were used both for liquid-based cytology and HPV testing by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavior were collected in face-to-face interviews. Results A total of 346 MSM were recruited (median age 32 years. Overall, 72.5% of the individuals had an anal HPV infection, with 56.1% of them being infected by oncogenic HPV genotypes. Anal cytological abnormalities were found in 29.8% of the cases (16.7% ASC-US and 13.1% L-SIL. Presence of ASC-US+ was strongly associated with infection by any HPV type (OR=4.21, 95% CI: 1.97-9.23, and particularly by HPV 16 and/or 18 (OR=5.62, 95% CI: 2.33-13.81. A higher proportion of ASC-US+ was found in older MSM, in those with a higher number of lifetime partners and in those with a history of ano-genital warts. However, none of these variables or the others analyzed showed any significant association with abnormal cytological findings. Conclusions The presence of anal cytological abnormalities in about one third of the recruited MSM and their strong association with HPV infection, in particular that caused by HPV 16 and/or 18, might provide a further complement to the data that now support the introduction of HPV vaccination among

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Wei Huang

    Full Text Available The number of men who have sex with men (MSM infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208 and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9% were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%. Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4% subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001; exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001; versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003; oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044; times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021; illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001; and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002. In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan's Centers for Disease

  18. Anal cytological abnormalities and epidemiological correlates among men who have sex with men at risk for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Benevolo, Maria; Vocaturo, Amina; Palamara, Guido; Latini, Alessandra; Giglio, Amalia; Moretto, Domenico; Rollo, Francesca; Impara, Giampaolo; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Pimpinelli, Fulvia; Di Carlo, Aldo; Giuliani, Massimo

    2012-10-16

    The incidence of anal cancer, a Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related neoplasia, has been increasing in recent decades, mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM). Cytological changes of the anal epithelium induced by HPV can be detected through an anal pap smear. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and epidemiological correlates of anal cytological abnormalities among relatively young MSM at risk for HIV-1 infection, to help clarify whether or not this population deserves further investigation to assess the presence of anal cancer precursor lesions. MSM were recruited among attendees of a large STI clinic for a HIV-1 screening program. Anal samples, collected with a Dracon swab in PreservCyt, were used both for liquid-based cytology and HPV testing by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavior were collected in face-to-face interviews. A total of 346 MSM were recruited (median age 32 years). Overall, 72.5% of the individuals had an anal HPV infection, with 56.1% of them being infected by oncogenic HPV genotypes. Anal cytological abnormalities were found in 29.8% of the cases (16.7% ASC-US and 13.1% L-SIL). Presence of ASC-US+ was strongly associated with infection by any HPV type (OR = 4.21, 95% CI: 1.97-9.23), and particularly by HPV 16 and/or 18 (OR = 5.62, 95% CI: 2.33-13.81). A higher proportion of ASC-US+ was found in older MSM, in those with a higher number of lifetime partners and in those with a history of ano-genital warts. However, none of these variables or the others analyzed showed any significant association with abnormal cytological findings. The presence of anal cytological abnormalities in about one third of the recruited MSM and their strong association with HPV infection, in particular that caused by HPV 16 and/or 18, might provide a further complement to the data that now support the introduction of HPV vaccination among MSM to protect them from the development of HPV

  19. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ≤25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Insulin resistance, hepatic lipid and adipose tissue distribution in HIV infected men

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Engelson, Ellen S.; Ionescu, Gabriel; Glesby, Marshall J.; Albu, Jeanine B.; Kotler, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Background A large proportion of HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral medication develop insulin resistance, especially in the context of fat redistribution. This study investigates the interrelationships among fat distribution, hepatic lipid content, and insulin resistance in HIV-infected men. Design and methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from twenty-three HIV-infected participants in 3 prospective clinical studies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to quantify hepatic lipid concentrations. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify whole body adipose tissue compartments, i.e., subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes as well as inter-muscular adipose tissue (IMAT) subcompartment, and omental-mesenteric adipose tissue (OMAT) and retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT) subcompartments of VAT. Homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results Hepatic lipid content correlated significantly with total VAT (r=0.62, p=0.0014) but not with SAT (r=0.053, p=0.81). In univariate analysis, hepatic lipid content was associated with the OMAT (r=0.67, p=0.0004) and RPAT (r=0.53, p=0.009) subcompartments; HOMA-IR correlated with both VAT and hepatic lipid contents (r=0.61, p=0.057 and 0.68, p=0.0012, respectively). In stepwise linear regression models, hepatic lipid had the strongest associations with OMAT and with HOMA-IR. Conclusion Hepatic lipid content is associated with VAT volume, especially the omental-mesenteric subcompartment, in HIV-infected men. Hepatic lipid content is associated with insulin resistance in HIV-infected men. Hepatic lipid content might mediate the relationship between VAT and insulin resistance among treated, HIV-infected men. PMID:18572755

  1. Insulin resistance, hepatic lipid and adipose tissue distribution in HIV-infected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Engelson, Ellen S; Ionescu, Gabriel; Glesby, Marshall J; Albu, Jeanine B; Kotler, Donald P

    2008-01-01

    A large proportion of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral medication develop insulin resistance, especially in the context of fat redistribution. This study investigates the interrelationships among fat distribution, hepatic lipid content, and insulin resistance in HIV-infected men. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 23 HIV-infected participants in three prospective clinical studies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to quantify hepatic lipid concentrations. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify whole-body adipose tissue compartments: that is, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes, as well as the intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) subcompartment and the omental-mesenteric adipose tissue (OMAT) and retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT) subcompartments of VAT. The homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Hepatic lipid content correlated significantly with total VAT (r = 0.62, P = 0.0014), but not with SAT (r = 0.053, P = 0.81). In univariate analysis, hepatic lipid content was associated with the OMAT (r = 0.67, P = 0.0004) and RPAT (r = 0.53, P = 0.009) subcompartments; HOMA-IR correlated with both VAT and hepatic lipid contents (r = 0.61, P = 0.057 and r = 0.68, P = 0.0012, respectively). In stepwise linear regression models, hepatic lipid had the strongest associations with OMAT and with HOMA-IR. Hepatic lipid content is associated with VAT volume, especially the OMAT subcompartment, in HIV-infected men. Hepatic lipid content is associated with insulin resistance in HIV-infected men. Hepatic lipid content might mediate the relationship between VAT and insulin resistance among treated, HIV-infected men.

  2. Home sampling for sexually transmitted infections and HIV in men who have sex with men: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fisher

    Full Text Available To determine uptake of home sampling kit (HSK for STI/HIV compared to clinic-based testing, whether the availability of HSK would increase STI testing rates amongst HIV infected MSM, and those attending a community-based HIV testing clinic compared to historical control. Prospective observational study in three facilities providing STI/HIV testing services in Brighton, UK was conducted. Adult MSM attending/contacting a GUM clinic requesting an STI screen (group 1, HIV infected MSM attending routine outpatient clinic (group 2, and MSM attending a community-based rapid HIV testing service (group 3 were eligible. Participants were required to have no symptomatology consistent with STI and known to be immune to hepatitis A and B (group 1. Eligible men were offered a HSK to obtain self-collected specimens as an alternative to routine testing. HSK uptake compared to conventional clinic-based STI/HIV testing in group 1, increase in STI testing rates due to availability of HSK compared to historical controls in group 2 and 3, and HSK return rates in all settings were calculated. Among the 128 eligible men in group 1, HSK acceptance was higher (62.5% (95% CI: 53.5-70.9 compared to GUM clinic-based testing (37.5% (95% CI: 29.1-46.5, (p = 0.0004. Two thirds of eligible MSM offered an HSK in all three groups accepted it, but HSK return rates varied (highest in group 1, 77.5%, lowest in group 3, 16%. HSK for HIV testing was acceptable to 81% of men in group 1. Compared to historical controls, availability of HSK increased the proportion of MSM testing for STIs in group 2 but not in group 3. HSK for STI/HIV offers an alternative to conventional clinic-based testing for MSM seeking STI screening. It significantly increases STI testing uptake in HIV infected MSM. HSK could be considered as an adjunct to clinic-based services to further improve STI/HIV testing in MSM.

  3. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans: cat odour attractiveness increased for toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Flegr

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them.Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025. Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine.The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied for their possible role as definitive hosts in

  4. The HIV/AIDS pandemic: new ways of preventing infection in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R V

    2004-01-01

    Nelson Mandela has recently said that HIV/AIDS is the greatest health crisis in human history. At the end of 2001, UNAIDS estimated that there were 40 million people living with the infection, with 5 million new cases, and 3 million deaths per year. About half the infected individuals are men, and heterosexual intercourse is the commonest route of infection. Although condoms remain the first line of defence, they are unpopular in parts of Africa, where the pandemic is worst, so an alternative is needed. Post-coital penile hygiene has received little attention. Wiping the glans penis and inner foreskin immediately after intercourse with an acidic solution like lemon or lime juice, or even vinegar, should immediately kill the virus and might prevent infection; clinical trials are urgently needed. Several studies in Africa and India have now conclusively demonstrated a 2-7-fold protective effect of male circumcision against HIV infection. Circumcision removes the inner foreskin and the frenulum, which are the prime sites of HIV entry into the penis. Since male circumcision also protects men from human papilloma virus infection, and their wives from cervical carcinoma, the procedure should be encouraged in developed and developing countries.

  5. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men: prevalence and lack of anogenital concordance

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eleanor M; Gilson, Richard; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Panwar, Kavita; Young, Carmel; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of oral detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) attending a sexual health clinic in London and concordance with anogenital HPV infection. Such data are important to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of oral HPV and the potential use of vaccines to prevent oropharyngeal cancers. Methods Paired oral rinse samples and anogenital samples were available from 151 HIV-negative MSM within a larger cross-sectional survey. All samples were tested in parallel for 21 types of HPV DNA using an in-house assay. Results The median age of participants was 30 (IQR 25–35). The prevalence of any oral HPV and of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 13.7% (n=21; 95% CI 8.7 to 20.2) and 5.9% (n=9; 95% CI 2.7 to 10.9) compared with 64.9% (n=98; 95% CI 56.7 to 72.5) and 34.4% (n=52; 95% CI 26.9 to 42.6) in any anogenital sample, respectively. The prevalence of types prevented by the bivalent (HPV16/18), quadrivalent (HPV6/11/16/18) and nonavalent (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2 to 4.7), 2.6% (95% CI 0.7 to 6.6) and 4.6% (95% CI 1.9 to 9.3), respectively. There was no concordance between HPV genotypes detected in oral and anogenital sites. Conclusions HR-HPV DNA, including HPV 16/18, was detected in oral specimens from HIV-negative MSM attending sexual health clinics, suggesting a potential role for vaccination, but is far less common than anogenital infection. How this relates to the risk and natural history of HPV-related head and neck cancers warrants further study. Lack of concordance with anogenital infection also suggests that oral HPV infection should be considered separately when estimating potential vaccine impact. PMID:25887283

  6. Amphetamine-type stimulants and HIV infection among men who have sex with men: implications on HIV research and prevention from a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nga Thi Thu Vu; Lisa Maher; Iryna Zablotska

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: HIV infections and the use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) among men who have sex with men (MSM) have been increasing internationally, but the role of ATS use as a co-factor for HIV infection remains unclear. We aimed to summarize the association between ATS use and HIV infection among MSM. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, GLOBAL HEALTH and PsycINFO for relevant English, peer-reviewed articles of quantitative studies published between 1980 and 2...

  7. Two-year prospective study of major depressive disorder in HIV-infected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J Hampton; Heaton, Robert K; Patterson, Thomas L; Wolfson, Tanya; Deutsch, Reena; Brown, Stephen J; Summers, J; Sciolla, A; Gutierrez, R; Ellis, Ronald J; Abramson, Ian; Hesselink, John R; McCutchan, J Allen; Grant, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The risks and factors contributing to major depressive episodes in HIV infection remain unclear. This 2-year prospective study compared cumulative rates and predictors of a major depressive episode in HIV-infected (HIV+) men (N=297) and uninfected (HIV-) risk-group controls (N=90). By design participants at entry were without current major depression, substance dependence or major anxiety disorder. Standardized neuromedical, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, life events, and psychiatric assessments (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R) were conducted semi-annually for those with AIDS, and annually for all others. Lifetime prevalence of major depression or other psychiatric disorder did not differ at baseline between HIV+ men and controls. On a two-year follow-up those with symptomatic HIV disease were significantly more likely to experience a major depressive episode than were asymptomatic HIV+ individuals and HIV-controls (pdepression. After baseline disease stage and medical variables associated with HIV infection were controlled, a lifetime history of major depression, or of lifetime psychiatric comorbidity (two or more psychiatric disorders), predicted subsequent major depressive episode (pdepressive episode. Research cohort of men examined before era of widespread use of advanced anti-HIV therapies. Symptomatic HIV disease, but not HIV infection itself, increases intermediate-term risk of major depression. Prior psychiatric history most strongly predicted future vulnerability.

  8. The prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum infection in men who have sex with men: results of a multicentre case finding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, H; Alexander, S; Carder, C; Dean, G; French, P; Ivens, D; Ling, C; Paul, J; Tong, W; White, J; Ison, C A

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) and non-LGV associated serovars of urethral and rectal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection in men who have sex with men (MSM). Design: Multicentre cross-sectional survey. Setting: Four genitourinary medicine clinics in the United Kingdom from 2006–7. Subjects: 4825 urethral and 6778 rectal samples from consecutive MSM attending for sexual health screening. Methods: Urethral swabs or urine and rectal swabs were tested for CT using standard nucleic acid amplification tests. Chlamydia-positive specimens were sent to the reference laboratory for serovar determination. Main outcome: Positivity for both LGV and non-LGV associated CT serovars; proportion of cases that were symptomatic. Results: The positivity (with 95% confidence intervals) in rectal samples was 6.06% (5.51% to 6.66%) for non-LGV CT and 0.90% (0.69% to 1.16%) for LGV; for urethral samples 3.21% (2.74% to 3.76%) for non-LGV CT and 0.04% (0.01% to 0.16%) for LGV. The majority of LGV was symptomatic (95% of rectal, one of two urethral cases); non-LGV chlamydia was mostly symptomatic in the urethra (68%) but not in the rectum (16%). Conclusions: Chlamydial infections are common in MSM attending for sexual health screening, and the majority are non-LGV associated serovars. We did not identify a large reservoir of asymptomatic LGV in the rectum or urethra. Testing for chlamydia from the rectum and urethra should be included for MSM requesting a sexual health screen, but serovar-typing is not indicated in the absence of symptoms. We have yet to identify the source of most cases of LGV in the UK. PMID:19221105

  9. Sexually transmitted infections among transgender people and men who have sex with men in Port Vila, Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Veronese

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite high sexually transmitted infection (STI prevalence in the Pacific, there are limited data on STIs and risk among men who have sex with men (MSM and transgender people (TG. In 2011, an Integrated Bio-Behavioural Survey recruited self-identified MSM and TG in Port Vila, Vanuatu. Descriptive findings were stratified by sexuality. Among 28 (55% MSM and 23 (45% TG, recent anal sex with male partners was more common among MSM (94% vs 71%; P < 0.1, including with casual (47% vs 35%, regular (59% vs 29% and paying partners (28% vs 12%. MSM more commonly reported lifetime (P < 0.01 and recent sex with female partners (P < 0.01. Reported condom use with any partner type was low. More MSM (35% than TG (24% were diagnosed with an STI; previous treatment-seeking behaviour when symptomatic was lower among TG (P < 0.1. Tailored strategies acknowledging differences between MSM and TG are required to reduce STI vulnerability in Vanuatu.

  10. High prevalence of extra-genital chlamydial or gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan-Blitz, Lao-Tzu; Leon, Segundo R; Bristow, Claire C; Konda, Kelika A; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Brown, Brandon J; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are among the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections in the world. Data are limited, however, on the burden of extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru. Data were gathered from self-collected anal or pharyngeal swabs from participants in Lima, Peru, and analyzed via cross-sectional methods. Prevalence ratios for the association between extra-genital infection with socio-demographic and sexual behaviors were determined. Overall, 127 (32.8%) participants had anal or pharyngeal infections. On multivariate modeling, anal infection was positively associated with practicing both receptive and insertive anal sex, when compared to insertive alone (PR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.32-4.71), and negatively associated with any antibiotic use in the prior three months (PR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.39-0.91). Pharyngeal infection was negatively associated with age greater than 30 years compared to 18-30 years (PR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.30-0.96), and positively associated with gender identity of transgender women (PR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.20-3.73). This study demonstrates considerable burden of extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

  11. Lung cancer incidence and survival among HIV-infected and uninfected women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessol, Nancy A; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Levine, Alexandra M; Morris, Alison; Margolick, Joseph B; Cohen, Mardge H; Jacobson, Lisa P; Seaberg, Eric C

    2015-06-19

    To determine the lung cancer incidence and survival time among HIV-infected and uninfected women and men. Two longitudinal studies of HIV infection in the United States. Data from 2549 women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) and 4274 men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS), all with a history of cigarette smoking, were analyzed. Lung cancer incidence rates and incidence rate ratios were calculated using Poisson regression analyses. Survival time was assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional-hazard analyses. Thirty-seven women and 23 men developed lung cancer (46 HIV-infected and 14 HIV-uninfected) during study follow-up. In multivariable analyses, the factors that were found to be independently associated with a higher lung cancer incidence rate ratios were older age, less education, 10 or more pack-years of smoking, and a prior diagnosis of AIDS pneumonia (vs. HIV-uninfected women). In an adjusted Cox model that allowed different hazard functions for each cohort, a history of injection drug use was associated with shorter survival, and a lung cancer diagnosis after 2001 was associated with longer survival. In an adjusted Cox model restricted to HIV-infected participants, nadir CD4 lymphocyte cell count less than 200 was associated with shorter survival time. Our data suggest that pulmonary damage and inflammation associated with HIV infection may be causative for the increased risk of lung cancer. Encouraging and assisting younger HIV-infected smokers to quit and to sustain cessation of smoking is imperative to reduce the lung cancer burden in this population.

  12. Clinical and Emotional Factors Related to Erectile Dysfunction in HIV-Infected Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumaz, Carmina R; Ayestaran, Aintzane; Perez-Alvarez, Nuria; Muñoz-Moreno, Jose A; Ferrer, Maria Jose; Negredo, Eugenia; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence and associated factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected men remain controversial. The authors evaluated ED, clinical, and emotional variables in a group of 501 HIV-infected men in a cross-sectional 4-month observational study. ED was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 and emotional status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire. Median age (interquartile range) was 42 (35, 48) years. Time since HIV diagnosis was 6.3 (2.6, 17.1) years, 92% were taking antiretroviral treatment and 81.8% had an HIV-RNA viral load emotional status seemed to play a fundamental role in its presence.

  13. Longitudinal Modeling of Depressive Trajectories Among HIV-Infected Men Using Cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerji, Shibani; Haghighat, Roxanna; Misra, Vikas; Lorenz, David R; Holman, Alex; Dutta, Anupriya; Gabuzda, Dana

    2017-07-01

    Cocaine use is prevalent among HIV-infected individuals. While cross-sectional studies suggest that cocaine users may be at increased risk for depression, long-term effects of cocaine on depressive symptoms remain unclear. This is a longitudinal study of 341 HIV-infected and uninfected men (135 cocaine users and 206 controls) ages 30-60 enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study during 1996-2009. The median baseline age was 41; 73% were African-American. In mixed-effects models over a median of 4.8 years of observation, cocaine use was associated with higher depressive symptoms independent of age, education level, and smoking (n = 288; p = 0.02); HIV infection modified this association (p = 0.03). Latent class mixed models were used to empirically identify distinct depressive trajectories (n = 160). In adjusted models, cocaine use was associated with threefold increased odds of membership in the class with persistent high depressive symptoms (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-6.69) and eightfold increased odds (95% CI (2.73-25.83) when tested among HIV-infected subjects only. Cocaine use is a risk factor for chronic depressive symptoms, particularly among HIV-infected men, highlighting the importance of integrating mental health and substance use treatments to address barriers to well-being and successful HIV-care.

  14. Estimated numbers of men and women infected with HIV/AIDS in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Kimberly C; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Bravo-García, Enrique; Gayet, Cecilia; Patterson, Thomas L; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Hogg, Robert S

    2006-03-01

    Tijuana, Mexico, just south of San Diego, California, is located by the busiest land border crossing in the world. Although UNAIDS considers Mexico to be a country of "low prevalence, high risk," recent surveillance data among sentinel populations in Tijuana suggests HIV prevalence is increasing. The aim of this study was to estimate the number of men and women aged 15 to 49 years infected with HIV in Tijuana. Gender and age-specific estimates of the Tijuana population were obtained from the 2000 Mexican census. Population and HIV prevalence estimates for at-risk groups were obtained from published reports, community based studies, and data from the Centro Nacional para la Prevención y Control del VIH/SIDA (CENSIDA). Age-specific fertility rates for Mexico were used to derive the number of low and high-risk pregnant women. Numbers of HIV-positive men and women were estimated for each at-risk group and then aggregated. A high growth scenario based on current HIV prevalence and a conservative, low growth estimate were determined. A total of 686,600 men and women in Tijuana were aged 15 to 49 years at the time of the 2000 census. Considering both scenarios, the number of infected persons ranged from 1,803 to 5,472 (HIV prevalence: 0.26 to 0.80%). The majority of these persons were men (>70%). The largest number of infected persons were MSM (N = 1,146 to 3,300) and IDUs (N = 147 to 650). Our data suggest that up to one in every 125 persons aged 15-49 years in Tijuana is HIV-infected. Interventions to reduce ongoing spread of HIV are urgently needed.

  15. Behavioral risk-reduction strategies to prevent HIV infection among homosexual men: a grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, J B; Teunis, N; van Griensven, G J; Sandfort, T G

    1994-12-01

    To be able to design effective health education interventions for homosexual men, it is necessary to understand determinants of safe and unsafe sex from the perspective of those involved. In this qualitative study, therefore, an open approach was taken to allow for this perspective. Interviews were conducted with 50 randomly selected HIV-antibody negative participants in the Amsterdam Cohort Study. Detailed questions were asked about sexual interactions and behaviors with steady and nonsteady partners. Whether or not homosexual men consciously protected themselves from HIV infection and which strategy they adopted was found to depend on three major factors: 1) motivation and intention, 2) significance of anal sex, and 3) risk perception within specific relationships. From a theoretical perspective results indicate that, next to the centrality of individual motivation as postulated in both the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Theory of Planned Behavior, symbolic meaning inherent in sexual acts, as well as type of relationship are important determinants of protective sexual behaviors that have to be taken into account to understand adequately why homosexual men engage in safe or unsafe sex. Some strategies employed by homosexual men carry uncertainties that continue to put them at increased risk for HIV infection. Health education interventions can be designed to address these issues.

  16. Risk behaviours and prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in a group of Dominican gay men, other men who have sex with men and transgender women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Maximo O; Hodge, David; Donastorg, Yeycy; Khosla, Shaveta; Lerebours, Leonel; Pope, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to estimate the point prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI) and to investigate the sexual practices and behaviours associated with STIs in a group of gay men, other men who have sex with men and transgender women (GMT) in the province of La Romana, Dominican Republic. Design A cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of GMT persons. Setting The study was conducted in the province of La Romana, Dominican Republic, in June–July 2013. Participants Out of 117 GMT persons screened, a total of 100 completed the study. Participants had to be at least 18 years of age, reside in La Romana and have had sex with another man in the preceding 12 months. All participants were interviewed and tested for STI. Primary outcome measure The main outcome of interest was the detection of any STI (HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), syphilis, hepatitis B or C) by serology. Results Among 100 participants, the median age was 22 years (range 18–65). One-third had consumed illicit drugs the preceding year and only 43% consistently used condoms. Prevalence was 38% for HSV-2, 5% for HIV and 13% for syphilis. There were no cases of hepatitis B or C. Factors associated with the odds of a STI were age >22 years (OR=11.1, 95% CI 3.6 to 34.5), receptive anal intercourse (OR=4.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 13.6) and having ≥2 male sexual partners during the preceding month (OR=4, 95% CI 1.3 to 12.5). Conclusions In this group of GMT persons, seroprevalence of STI was high, and a number of risk behaviours were associated with STI. These preliminary data will help inform policy and programmes to prevent HIV/STI in GMT persons in the region. PMID:25926151

  17. Homophobia is associated with sexual behavior that increases risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV infection among black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, William L; Marks, Gary; Lauby, Jennifer; Murrill, Christopher S; Millett, Gregorio A

    2013-05-01

    We investigated whether the experience of homophobic events increases the odds of engaging in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among black men who have sex with men (MSM) and whether social integration level buffered the association. Participants (N = 1,154) reported homophobic events experienced in the past 12 months. Social integration measures included social support, closeness with family members and friends, attachment to the black gay community, openness about sexuality within religious communities, and MSM social network size. Logistic regression analyses indicated that experiencing homophobia was associated with (1) UAI among men not previously diagnosed with HIV and (2) sexual HIV transmission risk behavior among men who knew they were HIV-infected. None of the social integration measures buffered these associations. Homophobia may promote acquisition and transmission of HIV infection among black MSM. Interventions are needed to reduce homophobia experienced by black MSM.

  18. Reported sexually transmitted infections in Swedish Internet-using men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M W; Daneback, K; Mansson, S-A; Berglund, T; Tikkanen, R

    2008-06-01

    Although the Internet has become a forum for making sexual contacts, and has been associated with increased sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission, we have little information of history of STIs in Internet-based samples. The Internet behaviours that are associated with STI acquisition are poorly understood. We analysed STI histories reported by 904 Swedish men and 931 Swedish women who responded to an Internet-based survey on sexual behaviour in 2002: 16.6% of men and 22.5% of women reported a lifetime history of STIs, with Chlamydia being the most common for both genders. 3% of men and 5% of women who reported an STI, indicated that they had had more than one. Sources of the STI, where known, were Internet-acquired partners in only 3% of cases. There were no differences between men and women with or without an STI history regarding the kind of online sexual activities they engaged in, how they found sexual material online, and the reasons they engage in sexual activities. These rates are similar to those reported in a national random study of sexuality in Sweden. Contrary to prior research, these results suggest no relationship between STI and specific Internet characteristics usage patterns. These data suggest that the Internet is not yet a major source of STIs in Swedish men and women. Given these STI histories, the Internet may be a useful medium to include in STI prevention efforts.

  19. High prevalence of hepatitis B virus dual infection with genotypes A and G in HIV-1 infected men in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, during 2000-2011

    OpenAIRE

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Hogema, Boris; Bakker, Margreet; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Back, Nicole KT; Berkhout, Ben; Zaaijer, Hans L; Cornelissen, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is divided into 8 definite (A-H) and 2 putative (I, J) genotypes that show a geographical distribution. HBV genotype G, however, is an aberrant genotype of unknown origin that demonstrates severe replication deficiencies and very little genetic variation. It is often found in co-infections with another HBV genotype and infection has been associated with certain risk groups such as intravenous drug users and men having sex with men (MSM). We aimed to estimate...

  20. Pronounced lipoatrophy in HIV-infected men receiving HAART for more than 6 years compared with the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, AB; Lindegaard, B; Obel, N

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence and quantify the severity of body fat redistribution and dyslipidaemia in HIV-infected men after long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) compared with the background population. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, we included 87 HIV......-infected men who had received HAART for at least 6 years and 34 HIV-negative men. Regional body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Fasting metabolic parameters were obtained. Associations between regional body fat distribution and metabolic parameters were evaluated. RESULTS: HIV......-infected patients and controls did not differ with regard to height and lean body mass. Compared with controls, HIV-infected men had reduced total fat mass (median 12.3 versus 19.2 kg, P

  1. Variabilité de la compatibilité entre Schistosoma Haematobium et ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 janv. 2015 ... Homopatric and allopatric combinations were performed. The snail-schistosome compatibility and epidemiological involvement were assessed by the success rate of infestation (SRI). In total 2638 Bulinus truncatus and 778 B. globosus were infested. Three variants of S. haematobium subservient to their ...

  2. Increase in sexually transmitted infections in a cohort of outpatient HIV-positive men who have sex with men in the Parisian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfour, E; Dimi, S; Majerholc, C; Fourn, E; Séné, T; Chaida, M B; Vasse, M; Zucman, D

    2017-11-01

    To describe the increased incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in a cohort of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), followed in a tertiary hospital of the Île-de-France region. We performed a monocentric, retrospective, and prospective study. We included symptomatic HIV-infected MSM patients who consulted for their annual consultation. One hundred and eighty patients were seen between 2008-2011 and 215 between 2012-2015. We observed an increased incidence of STIs between the two periods (14 and 29.3%, respectively). These STIs includes: syphilis, hepatitis C, urethritis, and proctitis due to Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea. A better management of symptomatic and asymptomatic STIs is needed for HIV-infected MSM patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Urethral Lymphogranuloma Venereum Infections in Men With Anorectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum and Their Partners: The Missing Link in the Current Epidemic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Speksnijder, Arjen Gerard Cornelis Lambertus; de Vries, Henry John C.

    2013-01-01

    Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is not screened routinely. We found that in 341 men having sex with men with anorectal LGV, 7 (2.1%) had concurrent urethral LGV. Among 59 partners, 4 (6.8%) had urethral LGV infections. Urethral LGV is common, probably key in transmission, and missed in

  4. Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum infections in men with anorectal lymphogranuloma venereum and their partners: the missing link in the current epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Speksnijder, Arjen Gerard Cornelis Lambertus; de Vries, Henry John C

    2013-08-01

    Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is not screened routinely. We found that in 341 men having sex with men with anorectal LGV, 7 (2.1%) had concurrent urethral LGV. Among 59 partners, 4 (6.8%) had urethral LGV infections. Urethral LGV is common, probably key in transmission, and missed in current routine LGV screening algorithms.

  5. A Cross Sectional Analysis of Gonococcal and Chlamydial Infections among Men-Who-Have-Sex-with-Men in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Rebe

    Full Text Available Men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM are at high risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI transmission. Asymptomatic STIs are common in MSM and remain undiagnosed and untreated where syndromic management is advocated. Untreated STIs could be contributing to high HIV rates. This study investigated symptomatic (SSTI and asymptomatic STIs (ASTIs in MSM in Cape Town.MSM, 18 years and above, were enrolled into this study. Participants underwent clinical and microbiological screening for STIs. Urine, oro-pharyngeal and anal swab specimens were collected for STI analysis, and blood for HIV and syphilis screening. A psychosocial and sexual questionnaire was completed. STI specimens were analysed for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT infection.200 MSM were recruited with a median age of 32 years (IQR 26-39.5. Their median number of sex partners within the last year was 5 (IQR 2-20. 155/200 (78% reported only male sex partners while 45/200 (23% reported sex with men and women. 77/200 (39% reported transactional sex. At enrolment, 88/200 (44% were HIV positive and 8/112 (7% initially HIV-negative participants seroconverted during the study. Overall, 47/200 (24% screened positive for either NG or CT. There were 32 MSM (16% infected with NG and 7 (3.5% of these men had NG infections at two anatomical sites (39 NG positive results in total. Likewise, there were 23 MSM (12% infected with CT and all these men had infections at only one site. Eight of the 47 men (17% were infected with both NG and CT. ASTI was more common than SSTI irrespective of anatomical site, 38 /200 (19% versus 9/200 (5% respectively (p<0.001. The anus was most commonly affected, followed by the oro-pharynx and then urethra. Asymptomatic infection was associated with transgender identity (OR 4.09 CI 1.60-5.62, ≥5 male sex partners in the last year (OR 2.50 CI 1.16-5.62 and transactional sex (OR 2.33 CI 1.13-4.79 but not with HIV infection.Asymptomatic STI was

  6. [Analysis of Spatial Clustering of HIV infected in men who have sex with men in Chongqing of 2004-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y X; Qin, Q Q; Wu, G H; Zhang, W; Guo, W; Cui, Y; Liu, H; Hu, Y Y; Sun, J P

    2017-05-06

    Objective: To analyze the spatial clustering characteristics of HIV/AIDS among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Chongqing from January 2004 to December 2015 and understand the HIV/AIDS related behaviors among MSM by interview. Methods: Data related to MSM who were infected with HIV and whose present address were in Chongqing, were collected from Information System on the HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control. Information included the age when the information was inputted, address, occupation, education level, and marital status. The total number of MSM who were infected with HIV and reported was 6 604 in Chongqing. Those with unknown address were ruled out. The spatial autocorrelation analysis and the local spatial autocorrelation analysis were carried out by using ArcGIS 10.3. In addition, in November 2015 and May 2016, using a convenience sampling, we conducted one-on-one interviews among 23 MSM in the Chongqing Center for Disease Control and prevention. Receiving voluntary counseling and testing in the urban area of Chongqing and willing to participate in the interview by oral informed consent; male and self-described as MSM. The content of the interview included basic information, sexual orientation, sexual role, the main place of making friends, the main place of sexual behavior, a long-term experience in other provinces and drug abuse. Results: The HIV/AIDS reported number in Chongqing from 2004 to 2015 showed an uptrend, except in 2010. The age distribution of 6 604 cases of HIV positive patients was mainly concentrated in the 15-34 years old, about 68.5% (4 522 cases). There was a positive spatial autocorrelation in MSM, except 2005 (Moran's I =- 0.046, P = 0.823), form 2004 to 2015, Global Moran's I values were 0.308, 0.254, 0.335, 0.683, 0.673, 0.558, 0.620, 0.673, 0.685, 0.654 and 0.649, respectively; all P values were internet (17 participants). Most of the participants (11 participants) were making friends in the bar. The majority of respondents would ask

  7. HIV infection and testing among Latino men who have sex with men in the United States: the role of location of birth and other social determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Oster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the United States, Latino men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV. Latino MSM are a diverse group who differ culturally based on their countries or regions of birth and their time in the United States. We assessed differences in HIV prevalence and testing among Latino MSM by location of birth, time since arrival, and other social determinants of health. METHODS: For the 2008 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, a cross-sectional survey conducted in large US cities, MSM were interviewed and tested for HIV infection. We used generalized estimating equations to test associations between various factors and 1 prevalent HIV infection and 2 being tested for HIV infection in the past 12 months. RESULTS: Among 1734 Latino MSM, HIV prevalence was 19%. In multivariable analysis, increasing age, low income, and gay identity were associated with HIV infection. Moreover, men who were U.S.-born or who arrived ≥5 years ago had significantly higher HIV prevalence than recent immigrants. Among men not reporting a previous positive HIV test, 63% had been tested for HIV infection in the past 12 months; recent testing was most strongly associated with having seen a health care provider and disclosing male-male attraction/sexual behavior to a health care provider. CONCLUSIONS: We identified several social determinants of health associated with HIV infection and testing among Latino MSM. Lower HIV prevalence among recent immigrants contrasts with higher prevalence among established immigrants and suggests a critical window of opportunity for HIV prevention, which should prioritize those with low income, who are at particular risk for HIV infection. Expanding health care utilization and encouraging communication with health care providers about sexual orientation may increase testing.

  8. [HIV infection and syphilis prevalence among men who have sex with men receiving voluntary counseling and testing appointed through a web-based registering system and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiongmiao; Cheng, Weibin; Zhong, Fei; Xu, Huifang; Liu, Qi; Lin, Peng

    2015-05-01

    To understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection status and syphilis prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) receiving voluntary counseling and testing appointed through a web-based registering system and related factors. The MSM receiving web appointed HIV counseling and testing from 2011 to 2012 in Guangzhou were recruited and a questionnaire survey was conduct among them to obtain the information about their demographic characteristics and sexual behavior. Binary and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify the factors associated with HIV infection or syphilis prevalence. A total of 4,904 MSM were enrolled in the study, the average age of the MSM was (28.77±7.24) years, and 70.3% of them had high education level; the unmarried MSM accounted for 72.7%. The HIV infection rate and syphilis prevalence were 8.7% and 4.4% respectively. The co-infection rate of HIV and Treponema pallidum was 1.2% (59/4 904). About one in three MSM did not use condom at latest homosexual behavior, 43.5% did not use condoms at each homosexual behavior in the past three months. Lower education level, occupation (worker or farmer), non-consistent condom use at each sex with men in the past three months, receiving HIV test or not and Treponema pallidum infection were associated with HIV infection. Age≥40 years, lower education level, multi male sex partners in the past three months and HIV infection were associated with Treponema pallidum infection. MSM receiving web appointed HIV counseling and testing had high prevalence of risk behaviors and high HIV infection rate, but had low previous HIV testing rate. It is necessary to strengthen the promotion of HIV test through web based appointment and conduct target behavior intervention in older MSM with lower education level.

  9. Incidence, clearance, and disease progression of genital human papillomavirus infection in heterosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Edson Duarte; Giuliano, Anna R; Palefsky, Joel; Flores, Carlos Aranda; Goldstone, Stephen; Ferris, Daron; Hillman, Richard J; Moi, Harald; Stoler, Mark H; Marshall, Brooke; Vuocolo, Scott; Guris, Dalya; Haupt, Richard M

    2014-07-15

    In this analysis, we examine the incidence and clearance of external genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among heterosexual males aged 16-24 years. A total of 1732 males aged 16-24 years old in the placebo arm of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine trial were included in this analysis. Participants were enrolled from 18 countries in Africa, the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, Latin America, and North America. Subjects underwent anogenital examinations and sampling of the penis, scrotum, and perineal/perianal regions. The incidence rate of any HPV DNA genotype 6, 11, 16, and/or 18 detection was 9.0 cases per 100 person-years. Rates of HPV DNA detection were highest in men from Africa. Median time to clearance of HPV genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 DNA was 6.1, 6.1, 7.7, and 6.2 months, respectively. Median time to clearance of persistently detected HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 DNA was 6.7, 3.2, 9.2, and 4.7 months, respectively. The study results suggest that the acquisition of HPV 6, 11, 16, and/or 18 in males is common and that many of these so-called infections are subsequently cleared, similar to findings for women. Nevertheless, given the high rate of HPV detection among young men, HPV vaccination of males may reduce infection in men and reduce the overall burden of HPV-associated disease in the community. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Risk of HIV or second syphilis infection in Danish men with newly acquired syphilis in the period 2000-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Gerstoft, Jan

    2013-01-01

    in men diagnosed with one of these sexually transmitted diseases indicate a high frequency of unsafe sex in the Danish MSM population. As one-third of the HIV-infected persons diagnosed with syphilis had high viral loads, our data support initiation of antiretroviral therapy in all HIV-infected MSM...... to reduce HIV transmission....

  11. Awareness and knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection among high-risk men of Hispanic origin attending a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI clinic

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    Colón-López Vivian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital Human papilloma virus (HPV is one of the most commonly diagnosed Sexually Transmitted Infection (STIs in men and women. Knowledge about HPV infection among men is limited. This study aims to determine correlates of adequate knowledge of HPV infection among men who attend an STI clinic in Puerto Rico. Methods A cross-sectional study of 206 men was conducted at an STI clinic in San Juan, PR. Adequate knowledge was defined as a score of at least 70% of correct responses among those men who reported having ever heard of HPV. Variables that achieved statistical significance in the bivariate analysis (p Results Although 52.5% of men reported having heard of HPV infection before the survey, only 29.3% of this sub-group had an adequate knowledge of HPV. Most men did not know that HPV is a risk factor for anal (38.7%, penile (50.0% and oral (72.6% cancer. Factors associated with adequate knowledge of HPV in age-adjusted models were being men who have sex with men (MSM (OR=2.6;95%CI=1.1-6.1, self-report of genital warts (OR=3.2;95%CI=1.3-7.9 and herpes (OR=7.4;95% CI=2.2-25.1. MSM was marginally associated with adequate knowledge (OR=2.3;95% CI=0.9-5.9 and self-report of herpes remained significantly associated (OR=5.0;95%CI=1.3-18.4 in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Awareness and knowledge of HPV was very low in this group of men. Interventions to increase knowledge and awareness in this group are necessary to promote preventive practices for HPV-related cancers in high-risk groups.

  12. Investigating factors for increased gonorrhoea re-infection in men who have sex with men attending a genitourinary clinic: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L; Lawrence, D; Soni, S; Llewellyn, C; Dean, G

    2017-08-01

    The number of confirmed cases of gonorrhoea increased by one-third in England from 2013 to 2014 and the incidence increased by 32% in men who have sex with men (MSM). In our clinic, annual incidence increased by 28.8% (2013) and re-infection (second infection within one-year of initial infection) rose from 6.7% as a proportion of total infections (2009) to 19.4% (2013). The aim of this study was to explore reasons for repeat gonorrhoea infections among MSM. We interviewed 16 MSM about knowledge and awareness of gonorrhoea, antibiotic resistance and attitudes towards safe sex. We used qualitative methods to investigate the potential causes for the rise in gonorrhoea re-infection. Mobile applications were used to meet casual sex partners and arrange impromptu group-sex parties with partner anonymity making contact tracing difficult. The use of recreational drugs was widespread. It was suggested that new technologies could also be used to increase awareness of STI trends and services for at-risk individuals. Participants were concerned about global antibiotic resistance, but felt that behaviour would not change unless there was local evidence of this. Despite knowing gonorrhoea prevalence was high, participants felt their behaviour was unlikely to change and frequently felt resigned to repeat infections. The use of geosocial networking applications to arrange sexual encounters may be contributing to a rise in STIs, as well as recreational drugs, alcohol and sex parties. Networking applications could increase awareness and advertise testing opportunities. In some cases, risk-taking behaviours are unlikely to change, and for these men, regular sexual health screens should be encouraged to detect and treat infections earlier and reduce onward spread.

  13. Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Viral and Bacterial Infections in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men in Toronto.

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    Robert S Remis

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B (HBV, hepatitis C (HCV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs have been associated with HIV transmission risk and disease progression among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM, but the frequency and distribution of STIs in this community in Canada has not been extensively studied.We recruited MSM living with and without HIV from a large primary care clinic in Toronto. Participants completed a detailed socio-behavioural questionnaire using ACASI and provided blood for syphilis, HIV, HBV and HCV, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and type 2 (HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus (CMV serology, urine for chlamydia and gonorrhea, and a self-collected anal swab for human papillomavirus (HPV molecular diagnostics. Prevalences were expressed as a proportion and compared using chi-square.442 MSM were recruited, 294 living with HIV and 148 without. Active syphilis (11.0% vs. 3.4%, ever HBV (49.4% vs. 19.1%, HCV (10.4% vs. 3.4%, HSV-2 (55.9% vs. 38.2%, CMV (98.3% vs. 80.3% and high-risk (HR anal HPV (67.6% vs. 51.7% infections were significantly more common in men living with HIV. Chlamydia and gonorrhea were infrequent in both groups. Regardless of HIV infection status, age and number of lifetime male sexual partners were associated with HBV infection and lifetime injection drug use with HCV infection.Syphilis and viral infections, including HBV, HCV, HSV-2, CMV, and HR-HPV, were common in this clinic-based population of MSM in Toronto and more frequent among MSM living with HIV. This argues for the implementation of routine screening, vaccine-based prevention, and education programs in this high-risk population.

  14. A late IL-33 response after exposure to Schistosoma haematobium antigen is associated with an up-regulation of IL-13 in human eosinophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, S.; Jones, F. M.; Fofana, H. K. M.

    2013-01-01

    IL-33, a proposed alarmin, stimulates innate immune cells and Th2 cells to produce IL-13 and is rapidly upregulated upon antigen exposure in murine helminth infection. The human IL-33 response to helminth antigen was analysed in Malians infected with Schistosoma haematobium by disrupting parasite...... integrity via chemotherapy. Plasma IL-33 was measured pretreatment, and 24 h and 9 weeks post-treatment. At 24 h post-treatment, IL-33 levels were low. Nine week post-treatment IL-33 levels were elevated and were associated with an increase in intracellular IL-13 in eosinophils. Up......-regulation of intracellular IL-13 in eosinophils was also associated with eosinophil expression of ST2L, the IL-33 receptor. IL-33 may play an important downstream role in the human response to schistosome adult worm antigen exposure....

  15. Association of Childhood Infection With IQ and Adult Nonaffective Psychosis in Swedish Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalman, Christina; Kappelmann, Nils; Stochl, Jan; Dal, Henrik; Kosidou, Kyriaki; Jones, Peter B.; Karlsson, Håkan

    2018-01-01

    Importance Associations between childhood infection, IQ, and adult nonaffective psychosis (NAP) are well established. However, examination of sensitive periods for exposure, effect of familial confounding, and whether IQ provides a link between childhood infection and adult NAP may elucidate pathogenesis of psychosis further. Objectives To test the association of childhood infection with IQ and adult NAP, to find whether shared familial confounding explains the infection-NAP and IQ-NAP associations, and to examine whether IQ mediates and/or moderates the childhood infection-NAP association. Design, Setting, and Participants Population-based longitudinal cohort study using linkage of Swedish national registers. The risk set included all Swedish men born between 1973 and 1992 and conscripted into the military until the end of 2010 (n = 771 698). We included 647 515 participants in the analysis. Measurement of Exposures Hospitalization with any infection from birth to age 13 years. Main Outcomes and Measures Hospitalization with an International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of NAP until the end of 2011. At conscription around age 18 years, IQ was assessed for all participants. Results At the end of follow-up, the mean (SD) age of participants was 30.73 (5.3) years. Exposure to infections, particularly in early childhood, was associated with lower IQ (adjusted mean difference for infection at birth to age 1 year: –1.61; 95% CI, −1.74 to −1.47) and with increased risk of adult NAP (adjusted hazard ratio for infection at birth to age 1 year: 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.33). There was a linear association between lower premorbid IQ and adult NAP, which persisted after excluding prodromal cases (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-point increase in IQ: 0.976; 95% CI, 0.974 to 0.978). The infection-NAP and IQ-NAP associations were similar in the general population and in full-sibling pairs discordant for exposure. The association between infection and NAP was both

  16. Prevalence of infection and genotypes of GBV-C/HGV among homosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Junko; Ibe, Shiro; Nagai, Hiromi; Wada, Kaoru; Morishita, Takayuki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Utsumi, Makoto; Kaneda, Tsuguhiro

    2003-01-01

    Since the discovery of GB virus-C (GBV-C) and hepatitis G virus (HGV), many studies have been performed. These viruses are now known to be parenterally, as well as sexually transmitted. A phylogenetic analysis also revealed that GBV-C has five major genotypes: type 1 predominates in West Africa, type 2 in Europe and the United States, type 3 in parts of Asia, type 4 in Southeast Asia, and type 5 in South Africa. Despite the number of reports so far, there have been few large-scale surveys of homosexual men to determine the prevalence of the GBV-C/HGV infections. We examined the levels of GBV-C/HGV viremia in 297 homosexual men who attended the Nagoya Lesbian and Gay Revolution held in Nagoya, Japan. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)/nested PCR of the GBV-C/HGV 5 ' -non-coding region (NCR), and base sequence analyses showed that the infection rate was 12.5%, and genotypes in this population were classified into type 2 (32%) and type 3 (68%). None were classified as types 1, 4, or 5 in this study. Our results indicate that the GBV-C/HGV type 2 seen mainly in Europe and the US is spreading widely in Japan, especially in the Nagoya district.

  17. Lack of detection of XMRV in seminal plasma from HIV-1 infected men in The Netherlands.

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    Marion Cornelissen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV is a recently discovered human gammaretrovirus with yet unknown prevalence and transmission route(s. Its presence in prostate stromal fibroblasts and prostatic secretions suggests that XMRV might be sexually transmitted. We chose to study a compartment closely connected to the prostate, a location where XMRV was detected in independent studies. Seminal plasma samples from HIV-1 infected men were examined as they have an increased probability of acquiring sexually transmitted pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the prevalence of XMRV in 93 seminal plasma samples of 54 HIV-1 infected men living in The Netherlands with a nested PCR amplification specifically targeting the XMRV gag gene. As a control for the presence and integrity of retrovirus particles, HIV-1 was amplified from the same samples with a PCR amplification targeting the env gene of the virus, or HIV-1 was quantified with a real-time PCR amplifying part of the pol gene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although HIV-1 was amplified from 25% of the seminal plasma samples, no XMRV was detected, suggesting that either the prevalence of XMRV is very low in The Netherlands, or that XMRV is not naturally present in the seminal plasma.

  18. Coping, goal adjustment, and psychological well-being in HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Vivian; der Veek, Shelley M.C.; Garnefski, Nadia; Schroevers, Maya; Witlox, Robert; Maes, Stan

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in 104 HIV-positive men who have sex with men, in December 2006. The mean age of the respondents was 50 years, and almost were of Dutch nationality. On average people had known about

  19. 'Feeling' risk and seeing solutions: Predicting vaccination intention against Hepatitis B infection among men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, E.; de Wit, J.B.F.; Vet, R.; Frijns, T.

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed cognitive and affective predictors of intention to obtain vaccination against the hepatitis B virus (HBV) among men who have sex with men (MSM), based on leading social cognitive models of health behavior. The key predictors of vaccination intention were perceived risk of

  20. A Holistic Approach to Addressing HIV Infection Disparities in Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkitis, Perry N.; Wolitski, Richard J.; Millett, Gregorio A.

    2013-01-01

    Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) have been disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS since the beginning of the epidemic in the United States and in many other parts of the world. The HIV epidemic is inextricably tied to other health problems that disproportionately affect gay, bisexual, and other MSM including…

  1. A case-control study of syphilis among men who have sex with men in New York City: association With HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Meyers, Andrea; Blank, Susan; Brown, James; Rubin, Steve; Braxton, Jim; Zaidi, Akbar; Schafzin, Josh; Weigl, Susan; Markowitz, Laurie E

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine factors associated with syphilis among men who report sex with other men in New York City. DESIGN, SETTING AND STUDY SUBJECTS: We conducted a case-control study among 88 men who reported sex with men in the previous year, 18 to 55 years old and diagnosed with primary or secondary syphilis during 2001; and 176 control subjects frequently matched by age and type of health provider. HIV prevalence among syphilis cases was 48% compared with 15% among control subjects (P model were HIV infection (odds ratio [OR], 7.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-15.4), income >$30,000 per year (OR, 2.7; CI, 1.4-5.2), and barebacking (OR, 2.6; CI, 1.4-4.8). The median time since HIV diagnosis for HIV-positive was 6 years for cases and 7 years for control subjects (P = 0.70). Among HIV-infected participants, syphilis cases were more likely than control subjects to report being on antiretroviral therapy (69% vs. 44%, P = 0.05) and to report having undetectable viral load (58% vs. 24%, P = 0.02). HIV infection was strongly associated with syphilis in this study. High-risk behavior reported by both cases and control subjects indicates the potential for increased HIV transmission.

  2. Relations between circumcision status, sexually transmitted infection history, and HIV serostatus among a national sample of men who have sex with men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Schick, Vanessa; Herbenick, Debby; Novak, David S; Reece, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Circumcision's potential link to HIV/sexually transmitted infections (STI) has been at the center of recent global public health debates. However, data related to circumcision and sexual health remain limited, with most research focused on heterosexual men. This study sought to assess behavioral differences among a large sample of circumcised and noncircumcised men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. Data were collected from 26,257 U.S. MSM through an online survey. Measures included circumcision status, health indicators, HIV/STI screening and diagnosis, sexual behaviors, and condom use. Bivariate and regression analyses were conducted to determine differences between HIV/STI status, sexual behaviors, and condom use among circumcised and noncircumcised men. Circumcision status did not significantly predict HIV testing (p > 0.05), or HIV serostatus (p > 0.05), and there were no significant differences based on circumcision status for most STI diagnosis [syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, human papilloma virus (HPV)]. Being noncircumcised was predictive of herpes-2 diagnosis, however, condom use mediated this relationship. These data provide one of the first large national assessments of circumcision among MSM. While being noncircumcised did not increase the likelihood of HIV and most STI infections, results indicated that circumcision was associated with higher rates of condom use, suggesting that those who promote condoms among MSM may need to better understand condom-related behaviors and attitudes among noncircumcised men to enhance the extent to which they are willing to use condoms consistently.

  3. Disclosure of newly diagnosed HIV infection and condom use at first sex after diagnosis: a study of young Black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard A; Mena, Leandro; Arnold, Trisha

    2017-08-01

    Background The first purpose of the present study was to determine whether young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) disclose their newly diagnosed HIV infection to a male or female partner, and to determine whether this disclosure is related to condom use; the second was to identify correlates of disclosing newly diagnosed HIV infection to male sex partners, including a measure of partner-related barriers to condom use. A sample of 125 HIV-infected YBMSM (age 15-29 years) provided cross-sectional data used for both study purposes. Recruitment occurred in a mid-size city in the southern US experiencing inordinately high prevalence and incidence rates of HIV among YBMSM. Significance was defined by an α level of <0.05. Eighty-eight YBMSM (70.4%) indicated disclosing their newly diagnosed HIV status to the first male partner they had sex with after being diagnosed. Of these, nine (9.1%) reported that condoms were not used during ensuing sex with that partner. However, of the men not disclosing, 27.0% reported not using condoms for ensuing sex (P=0.009). Similar findings were observed relative to sex with females (P=0.057). Regarding the second study purpose, in addition to a protective effect of advancing age, men scoring at or above the median on a measure of partner-related barriers to condom use were 2.4-fold more likely to not disclose compared with men scoring below the median (P=0.04). For YBMSM, a beneficial counselling objective relative to disclosing newly diagnosed HIV may be to help men resolve perceptions of partner-related barriers to condom use.

  4. Incidence and Risk Factors for Incident Syphilis among HIV-1-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Tokyo, 2008−2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Shibata, Satoshi; Yanagawa, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Mizushima, Daisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Kinai, Ei; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Genka, Ikumi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of incident syphilis infection among HIV-1-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) largely remains unknown. Methods The incidence and risk factors for incident syphilis (positive TPHA and RPR> = 1:8) among HIV-1-infected MSM who visited a large HIV clinic in Tokyo for the first time between 2008 and 2013 were determined, using clinical data and stored blood samples taken every three months for screening and determination of the date of incident syphilis. Poisson regression compared the incidence of syphilis at different observation periods. Results Of 885 HIV-1-infected MSM with baseline data, 34% either presented with active syphilis at baseline (21%) or became infected with syphilis during follow-up (13%). After excluding 214 patients (MSM with syphilis at baseline (n = 190) and no follow-up syphilis test (n = 24)), of 671 men, 112 (17%) developed incident syphilis with an incidence of 43.7/1,000 person-years [95% CI, 36.5–52.3]. The incidence decreased slightly during observation period although the trend was not significant (2008–2009: 48.2/1,000 person-years, 2010–2011: 51.1/1,000 person-years, 2012–2013: 42.6/1,000 person-years, 2014 to 2015: 37.9/1,000 person-years, p = 0.315). Multivariable analysis identified young age (40, HR 4.0, 95%CI 2.22–7.18, psyphilis at baseline (HR 3.0, 95%CI 2.03–4.47, psyphilis. Incidence of syphilis was particularly high among young patients (age syphilis were asymptomatic. Conclusions Although incidence of syphilis did not increase during the observation period, it was high among HIV-1-infected MSM, especially among young HIV-1-infected MSM and those with history of syphilis, in Tokyo. Regular screening for syphilis needs to be strictly applied to this population. PMID:27992604

  5. Schistosoma haematobium treatment in 1-5 year old children: safety and efficacy of the antihelminthic drug praziquantel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Mutapi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Morbidity due to schistosomiasis is currently controlled by treatment of schistosome infected people with the antihelminthic drug praziquantel (PZQ. Children aged up to 5 years are currently excluded from schistosome control programmes largely due to the lack of PZQ safety data in this age group. This study investigated the safety and efficacy of PZQ treatment in such children.Zimbabwean children aged 1-5 years (n = 104 were treated with PZQ tablets and side effects were assessed by questionnaire administered to their caregivers within 24 hours of taking PZQ. Treatment efficacy was determined 6 weeks after PZQ administration through schistosome egg counts in urine. The change in infection levels in the children 1-5 years old (n = 100 was compared to that in 6-10 year old children (n = 435.Pre-treatment S. haematobium infection intensity in 1-5 year olds was 14.6 eggs/10 ml urine and prevalence was 21%. Of the 104 children, 3.8% reported side effects within 24 hours of taking PZQ treatment. These were stomach ache, loss of appetite, lethargy and inflammation of the face and body. PZQ treatment significantly reduced schistosome infection levels in 1-5 year olds with an egg reduction rate (ERR of 99% and cure rate (CR of 92%. This was comparable to the efficacy of praziquantel in 6-10 year olds where ERR was 96% and CR was 67%. INTERPRETATION/SIGNIFICANCE: PZQ treatment is as safe and efficacious in children aged 1-5 years as it is in older children aged 6-10 years in whom PZQ is the drug of choice for control of schistosome infections.

  6. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Kreimer, Aimée R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O'Keefe, Michael T; Ingles, Donna J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1,626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ≥2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18 to 64 years [median, 36 years; interquartile range (IQR), 25-42] and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9-49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ≥12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ≥24 months, and none persisted ≥36 months [median infection duration, 7.3 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.4-NA)]. Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ≥12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ≥24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ≥36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ≥48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (Ptrend = 0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Evaluation of sexual history-based screening of anatomic sites for chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in men having sex with men in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Casper L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted infection (STI screening programmes are implemented in many countries to decrease burden of STI and to improve sexual health. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae has a prominent role in these protocols. Most of the screening programmes concerning men having sex with men (MSM are based on opportunistic urethral testing. In The Netherlands, a history-based approach is used. The aim of this study is to evaluate the protocol of screening anatomic sites for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infection based on sexual history in MSM in routine practice in The Netherlands. Methods All MSM visiting the clinic for STI in The Hague are routinely asked about their sexual practice during consulting. As per protocol, tests for urogenital, oropharyngeal and anorectal infection are obtained based on reported site(s of sexual contact. All consultations are entered into a database as part of the national STI monitoring system. Data of an 18 months period were retrieved from this database and analysed. Results A total of 1455 consultations in MSM were registered during the study period. The prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae per anatomic site was: urethral infection 4.0% respectively and 2.8%, oropharynx 1.5% and 4.2%, and anorectum 8.2% and 6.0%. The majority of chlamydia cases (72% involved a single anatomic site, which was especially manifest for anorectal infections (79%, while 42% of gonorrhoea cases were single site. Twenty-six percent of MSM with anorectal chlamydia and 17% with anorectal gonorrhoea reported symptoms of proctitis; none of the oropharyngeal infections were symptomatic. Most cases of anorectal infection (83% and oropharyngeal infection (100% would have remained undiagnosed with a symptom-based protocol. Conclusions The current strategy of sexual-history based screening of multiple anatomic sites for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in MSM is a useful and valid guideline

  8. [Co-infections of HIV, syphilis and HSV-2 among men who have sex with men at the voluntary HIV counseling and testing clinics in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tang, H F; Ning, Z; Zheng, H; He, N; Zhang, Y Y

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence rates of HIV-syphilis and HIV-herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) co-infections and related factors among men having sex with men (MSM) who had visited the voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Shanghai, China. Methods: 756 eligible MSM who attended the VCT clinics of Shanghai Municipality and Putuo district during March to August, 2015 were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey with questionnaire interview and blood testing for HIV, syphilis and HSV-2. Results: A total of 732 participants completed a valid questionnaire survey. The prevalence rates were 3.3 % (24/732) for HIV/Syphilis co-infection, 1.9 % (14/732) for HIV/HSV-2 co-infection, and 0.7 % (5/732) for HIV/Syphilis/HSV-2 co-infection, respectively. HIV prevalence appeared significantly higher among syphilis-infected participants (45.3 % , 24/53) than those without Syphilis (7.2 % , 61/679) (χ(2)=63.11, P Syphilis co-infection. Those participants who had high middle school or lower levels of education ( OR =6.87, 95 %CI : 1.86-25.42; OR =9.82, 95 %CI : 2.25-42.85) were under risk on HIV and HSV-2 co-infection. Conclusion: HIV/Syphilis and HIV/HSV-2 co-infection were seen among MSM who attended the VCT clinics in Shanghai that called for special attention, especially on migrants, those with low education or illicit drug users.

  9. Trichomonas vaginalis infection: How significant is it in men presenting with recurrent or persistent symptoms of urethritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrea; Ross, Jonathan D C

    2016-01-01

    Persistent or recurrent non-gonococcal urethritis has been reported to affect up to 10-20% of men attending sexual health clinics. An audit was undertaken to review the management of persistent or recurrent non-gonococcal urethritis in men presenting at Whittall Street Clinic, Birmingham, UK. Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis infection was with the newly-introduced nucleic acid amplification test. A total of 43 (8%) of 533 men treated for urethritis re-attended within three months with persistent or recurrent symptoms. Chlamydia trachomatis infection was identified in 13/40 (33%), T. vaginalis in 1/27 (4%) and Mycoplasma genitalium in 6/12 (50%). These findings suggest that the prevalence of T. vaginalis infection remains low in our clinic population and may not contribute significantly to persistent or recurrent non-gonococcal urethritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Barriers, Motivators, and Facilitators to Engagement in HIV Care Among HIV-Infected Ghanaian Men Who have Sex with Men (MSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Kershaw, Trace; Kushwaha, Sameer; Boakye, Francis; Wallace-Atiapah, Nii-Dromo; Nelson, LaRon E

    2018-03-01

    In Ghana, men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a high burden of HIV. Identifying factors that influence engagement in HIV care among HIV-infected Ghanaian MSM is critical to devising novel interventions and strengthening existing programs aimed at improving outcomes across the HIV care continuum. Consequently, we conducted an exploratory qualitative research study with 30 HIV-infected Ghanaian MSM between May 2015 and July 2015. Common barriers were fear of being seen in HIV-related health facility, financial difficulties, and health system challenges. Major motivators for engagement in care included social support, fear of mortality from HIV, and knowledge of effectiveness of HIV treatment. Key facilitators were enrollment in health insurance, prior relationship and familiarity with hospital personnel, and positive experience in healthcare setting. Our findings highlight the need for new and innovative care delivery mediums, affirming and competent healthcare providers, and increased access to health insurance.

  11. Sexually transmitted infections and pre-exposure prophylaxis: challenges and opportunities among men who have sex with men in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hyman M; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has shown high efficacy in preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in several large clinical trials, and more recently in "real world" reports of clinical implementation and a PrEP demonstration project. Those studies also demonstrated high bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence and raised the discussion of how PrEP may impact STI control efforts, especially in the setting of increasing Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial resistance and the increase in syphilis cases among MSM. Here, we discuss STIs as a driver of HIV transmission risk among MSM, and the potential opportunities and challenges for STI control afforded by expanded PrEP implementation among high-risk MSM.

  12. Erectile dysfunction drug receipt, risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert L; McGinnis, Kathleen A; Samet, Jeffrey H; Fiellin, David A; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Rodriquez-Barradas, Maria C; Kraemer, Kevin L; Gibert, Cynthia L; Braithwaite, R Scott; Goulet, Joseph L; Mattocks, Kristin; Crystal, Stephen; Gordon, Adam J; Oursler, Krisann K; Justice, Amy C

    2010-02-01

    Health care providers may be concerned that prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD) will contribute to risky sexual behavior. To identify characteristics of men who received EDD prescriptions, determine whether EDD receipt is associated with risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and determine whether these relationships vary for certain sub-groups. Cross-sectional study. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven sexually-active, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men recruited from eight Veterans Health Affairs outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from participant surveys, electronic medical records, and administrative pharmacy data. EDD receipt was defined as two or more prescriptions for an EDD, risky sex as having unprotected sex with a partner of serodiscordant or unknown HIV status, and STDs, according to self-report. Overall, 28% of men received EDD in the previous year. Eleven percent of men reported unprotected sex with a serodiscordant/unknown partner in the past year (HIV-infected 15%, HIV-uninfected 6%, P sexual behavior (11% vs. 10%, p = 0.9) and STDs (7% vs 7%, p = 0.7). In multivariate analyses, EDD receipt was not significantly associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in the entire sample or in subgroups of substance users or men who had sex with men. EDD receipt was common but not associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in this sample of HIV-infected and uninfected men. However, risky sexual behaviors persist in a minority of HIV-infected men, indicating ongoing need for prevention interventions.

  13. Isothermal Recombinase Polymerase amplification (RPA) of Schistosoma haematobium DNA and oligochromatographic lateral flow detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, A; Rollinson, D; Forrest, M; Webster, B L

    2015-09-04

    Accurate diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis is vital for surveillance/control programs. Amplification of schistosome DNA in urine by PCR is sensitive and specific but requires infrastructure, financial resources and skilled personnel, often not available in endemic areas. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) is an isothermal DNA amplification/detection technology that is simple, rapid, portable and needs few resources. Here a Schistosoma haematobium RPA assay was developed and adapted so that DNA amplicons could be detected using oligochromatographic Lateral Flow (LF) strips. The assay successfully amplified S. haematobium DNA at 30-45 °C in 10 mins and was sensitive to a lower limit of 100 fg of DNA. The assay was also successful with the addition of crude urine, up to 5% of the total reaction volume. Cross amplification occurred with other schistosome species but not with other common urine microorganisms. The LF-RPA assay developed here can amplify and detect low levels of S. haematobium DNA. Reactions are rapid, require low temperatures and positive reactions are interpreted using lateral flow strips, reducing the need for infrastructure and resources. This together with an ability to withstand inhibitors within urine makes RPA a promising technology for further development as a molecular diagnostic tool for urogenital schistosomiasis.

  14. Elom et al., Afr., J. Infect. Dis.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NNACHI

    Farming. 320. 88 (27.5%). Articians. 69. 18 (26%). Civil servant. 11. 2 (18.2%). TOTAL. 400. 108 (27%). Key: Pu = proteinuria; Hu = haematuria; Lu = leucocyturia. Intensity of Infection. Table 2 shows the relationship between proteinuria, haematuria and leucocyturia and ova excretion in urine of. S. haematobium infected ...

  15. An exploration of religion and spirituality among young, HIV-infected gay and bisexual men in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, William L; Okeke, Janice O; Gelaude, Deborah J; Torrone, Elizabeth A; Gasiorowicz, Mari; Oster, Alexandra M; McCree, Donna Hubbard; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Although religion and spirituality can promote healthy behaviours and mental well-being, negative religious experiences may harm sexual minority men's health. Despite increasing vulnerability to HIV infection among young gay and bisexual men, few studies examine how religion and spirituality might affect them. To this end, we interviewed young gay and bisexual men who were diagnosed with HIV infection during January 2006-June 2009. Questionnaires assessed religious service attendance, disclosure of sexuality within religious communities, and beliefs about homosexuality being sinful. A subset described religious and spiritual experiences in qualitative interviews. We calculated the prevalence of religion- and spirituality-related factors and identified themes within qualitative interviews. Among men completing questionnaires, 66% currently attended religious services, 16% believed they could disclose their sexuality at church, and 37% believed homosexuality was sinful. Participants who completed qualitative interviews commonly discussed religious attendance and negative experiences within religious settings. They often expressed their spirituality through prayer, and some used it to cope with adverse experiences. These data suggest that religion and spirituality are notable factors that shape young, HIV-infected gay and bisexual men's social contexts. Programmes and interventions that constructively engage with religious institutions and are sensitive to spiritual beliefs may promote these men's health.

  16. Perspectives Regarding Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Highly Adherent HIV-Infected Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M; Menke, Edna M

    2008-01-01

    Focus group methodology was used to describe the medication adherence experience of 24 HIV-infected gay men who reported being adherent to their medication regimens. A conceptualization of medication adherence as an evolving process consisted of challenges to adherence (learning the diagnosis, starting the medications, struggling with the medications, dealing with side effects, coping with stigma) as well as those factors supportive of adherence (believing in medications, finding motivating factors, using reminders, depending on others, owning the disease). Themes associated with challenges to adherence focused on diagnosis and the physical and emotional adjustments individuals made to incorporate antiretroviral medications into their daily lives and move toward medication adherence. The factors supportive of adherence were related to the ongoing behaviors identified with establishing and maintaining adherence behaviors. What can be taken from the study is that adherence is a complex and dynamic process rather than a static behavior.

  17. Multidisciplinary baseline assessment of homosexual men with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection. III. Neurologic and neuropsychological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Y; Marder, K; Bell, K; Chen, J; Dooneief, G; Goldstein, S; Mindry, D; Richards, M; Sano, M; Williams, J

    1991-02-01

    We explored the possibility that neurologic and neuropsychological changes constitute the earliest detectable manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Without knowledge of HIV status, we assessed neurologic signs and symptoms and administered a battery of neuropsychological tests to 208 homosexual men, of whom 84 were HIV negative, 49 were HIV positive and asymptomatic, 29 were mildly symptomatic, and 46 had significant medical symptoms but not the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. There was no difference between the HIV-negative and HIV-positive men in the frequency of neurologic signs or of defective or borderline performance on any neuropsychological test. However, HIV-positive men performed slightly but significantly worse than HIV-negative men on tests of verbal memory, executive function, and language. Similar results were obtained when comparisons were limited to HIV-positive medically asymptomatic and HIV-negative men. There was no degradation of neurologic status or neuropsychological performance across stages of HIV severity, but neurologic and neuropsychological summary scores correlated with CD4/CD8 ratios in the HIV-positive group. Ratings of neurologic signs and symptoms correlated with neuropsychological summary scores in the HIV-positive group only. Cognitive complaints were more frequent in the HIV-positive men; they correlated with actual test performance in the HIV-positive but not HIV-negative men. The constellation of subjective and objective neuropsychological and neurologic findings suggests the possibility of a definable syndrome associated with HIV infection in asymptomatic individuals.

  18. Schistosomiasis-induced squamous cell bladder carcinoma in an HIV-infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Lis Høy; Øvrehus, Anne Lindebo Holm; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2015-01-01

    haematuria for more than a year. Investigations revealed invasive S. haematobium-associated squamous cell bladder cancer. If her origin had been taken into account, the diagnosis might have been made earlier. Awareness of the disease prevalence among HIV co-infected patients from endemic areas and timely...... screening of such patients is important for the early diagnosis of schistosomiasis and related complications, such as S. haematobium-associated squamous cell bladder cancer....

  19. Comparison of the Natural History of Genital HPV Infection among Men by Country: Brazil, Mexico, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudenga, Staci L; Torres, B Nelson; Silva, Roberto; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Abrahamsen, Martha; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Salmeron, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2017-07-01

    Background: Male genital human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and incidence has been reported to vary by geographical location. Our objective was to assess the natural history of genital HPV by country among men with a median of 48 months of follow-up. Methods: Men ages 18-70 years were recruited from United States ( n = 1,326), Mexico ( n = 1,349), and Brazil ( n = 1,410). Genital specimens were collected every 6 months and HPV genotyping identified 37 HPV genotypes. Prevalence of HPV was compared between the three countries using the Fisher exact test. Incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The median time to HPV clearance among men with an incident infection was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The prevalence and incidence of the genital HPV types known to cause disease in males (HPV 16 and 6) was significantly higher among men from Brazil than men from Mexico. Prevalence and incidence of those genital HPV types in the United States varied between being comparable with those of Mexico or Brazil. Although genital HPV16 duration was significantly longer in Brazil ( P = 0.04) compared with Mexico and the United States, HPV6 duration was shortest in Brazil ( P = 0.03) compared with Mexico and the United States. Conclusions: Men in Brazil and Mexico often have similar, if not higher prevalence of HPV compared with men from the United States. Impact: Currently, there is no routine screening for genital HPV among males and while HPV is common in men, and most naturally clear the infection, a proportion of men do develop HPV-related diseases. Men may benefit from gender-neutral vaccine policies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1043-52. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Verbal and spatial working memory among drug-using HIV-infected men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eileen; Keutmann, M K; Fogel, J S; Maki, P M; Gonzalez, R; Vassileva, J; Rubin, L H; Hardy, D

    2018-04-23

    Working memory (WM) is a critical component of many neurocognitive functions. The literature has demonstrated consistently that WM impairment is more frequent and severe among substance-dependent individuals (SDIs) infected with HIV compared with uninfected SDIs; however, the SDIs who participated in these previous studies were primarily male. There are few published data on WM performance among HIV+ women with or without substance use disorders, and essentially no direct comparisons of WM performance between HIV+ men and women, regardless of substance use. We investigated potential sex and serostatus effects on WM among a sample of 360 SDIs (114 with HIV; 66% female) verified abstinent from alcohol and drugs of abuse at testing and generally comparable on substance use and comorbid characteristics. Participants were tested with the n-back task, a well-established WM measure that is sensitive to HIV-associated cognitive impairment. HIV+ men and women performed spatial and verbal versions of the n-back significantly less accurately compared with HIV- participants. Women showed slower response times compared with men on both versions, regardless of HIV serostatus. Individuals dependent on cocaine showed faster RTs compared with non-dependent users, but this effect was not apparent among opioid- or alcohol-dependent groups. Findings on n-back accuracy are consistent with our previous proposal that WM impairment represents a signature deficit among HIV+ SDIs; however, WM impairment appears less common among HIV+ women without a substance use history. The pattern of sex differences in response speed but serostatus effects on response accuracy is comparable to a recent report by our group of sex differences in learning speed but serostatus effects on delayed recall.

  1. Use of new technologies to notify possible contagion of sexually-transmitted infections among men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer-Pont, Dolors; Barbera-Gracia, María Jesús; Fernández-Dávila, Percy; García de Olalla, Patricia; Muñoz, Rafael; Jacques-Aviñó, Constanza; Saladié-Martí, María Pilar; Gosch-Elcoso, Mercè; Arellano Muñoz, Encarna; Casabona, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Among men who have sex with men (MSM), the association between searching for sexual partners' on the Internet and increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)/HIV infection, together with current low levels of partner notification (PN), justifies a study to explore the intention to use new communication technologies for PN in Spain. Two cross-sectional surveys were performed: the first was administered online to visitors to web pages where the survey was advertised; the second was administered on paper to patients attending an STI Unit and centres similar to Community-Based Voluntary Counselling and Testing centres. The study population comprised 1578 Spanish residents (median age, 34 years [range: 18 to 74]); 84% lived in urban areas, and 69% reported searching for sexual partners on the Internet. Thirty-seven per cent would be willing to use a website for PN, 26% did not know if they would use one, and 37% would not want to use one. The main reasons for not intending to notify STI/HIV were "shame or fear" (stable partner) and "not knowing how to contact them" (casual partner). The preferred method of notification was face to face (73%) for both stable and casual partners, although using new technologies (Short Messaging System, e-mail, web page, phone applications) was widely accepted for notifying casual partners. Fighting stigma and promoting alternative methods of PN among MSM and health professionals through new technologies could increase the frequency of PN. This approach will improve early detection and reduce transmission in Spain. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Low Prevalence of Urethral Lymphogranuloma Venereum Infections Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Prospective Observational Study, Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrieze, Nynke H. N.; Versteeg, Bart; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; van Rooijen, Martijn S.; van der Helm, Jannie J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to anorectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), few urogenital LGV cases are reported in men who have sex with men. Lymphogranuloma venereum was diagnosed in 0.06% (7/12,174) urine samples, and 0.9% (109/12,174) anorectal samples. Genital-anal transmission seems unlikely the only mode of

  3. Human papillomavirus virus (HPV) genotype- and age-specific analyses of external genital lesions among men in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Donna J; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Messina, Jane A; Stoler, Mark H; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Sirak, Bradley A; O'Keefe, Michael T; Papenfuss, Mary; Gage, Christine; Carvalho da Silva, Roberto; Gonzalez Sosa, Rossana; Rojas Juarez, Oscar; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes external genital lesions (EGLs) in men, including condyloma and penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN). We sought to determine the incidence of pathologically confirmed EGLs, by lesion type, among men in different age groups and to evaluate the HPV types that were associated with EGL development. HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study participants who contributed ≥2 visits from 2009-2013 were included in the biopsy cohort. Genotyping by an HPV line-probe assay was performed on all pathologically confirmed EGLs. Age-specific analyses were conducted for incident EGLs, with Kaplan-Meier estimation of cumulative incidence. This biopsy cohort included 2754 men (median follow-up duration, 12.4 months [interquartile range, 6.9-19.2 months]). EGLs (n = 377) were pathologically confirmed in 228 men, 198 of whom had incident EGLs. The cumulative incidence of any EGL was highest among men <45 years old and, for condyloma, decreased significantly over time with age. The genotype-specific incidence of EGL varied by pathological diagnoses, with high- and low-risk genotypes found in 15.6% and 73.2% of EGLs, respectively. Condyloma primarily contained HPV 6 or 11. While PeIN lesions primarily contained HPV 16, 1 PeIN III lesion was positive for HPV 6 only. Low- and high-risk HPV genotypes contribute to the EGL burden. Men remain susceptible to HPV-related EGLs throughout the life span, making it necessary to ensure the longevity of immune protection against the most common causative HPV genotypes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. [Comparison of human papilloma virus infection status between men who have sex with men recruited from gay bathhouses and HIV voluntary counseling and testing clinics respectively in Urumqi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, T; Cai, A J; Huang, B X; Abidan, Ainiwaer; Wang, H; Dai, J H

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To understand the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection status in men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited from gay bathhouses and HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, and identify the associated risk factors. Methods: A total of 200 MSM aged ≥18 years were recruited by using the " snowballing" sampling method from gay bathhouses and VCT clinics in Urumqi during March-May, 2016. The MSM recruited completed questionnaires after filling in the informed consent form. The information about their demographic characteristics and sexual behaviors were collected, and anal swabs were collected from them for HPV genotyping. Results: The overall HPV infection rate was 54.0 % . The HPV infection rate was 66.7 % (74/111) in MSM from gay bathhouses and 38.2 % (34/89) in MSM from VCT clinics and the high risk type HPV infection rate was 39.6 % (44/111) in MSM from gay bathhouses and 14.6 % (13/89) in MSM from VCT clinics, the differences were significant ( χ (2)=16.112, P prevalence of HPV in MSM from gay bathhouses was higher than that in MSM from VCT clinics, indicating that close attention should be paid to the behavior intervention in MSM.

  5. Screening for asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum co-infection in men who have sex with men newly diagnosed with HIV, hepatitis C or syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallawela, Sns; Bradshaw, D; Hodson, L; Rehill, K; Wong, F; Rockwood, N; Gedela, K; Hardie, J; Price, H; Alexander, S; McLean, K; Dean, G; Smith, A; Sullivan, A K

    2016-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with lymphogranuloma venereum have high rates of co-infection with HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C. The aim of this enhanced surveillance was to screen all men who have sex with men (MSM) newly diagnosed with HIV, syphilis or hepatitis C for co-infection with asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum as part of the recommended sexual health screen. Of the 145 patients screened, 21 patients were diagnosed with rectal Chlamydia trachomatis, one with both rectal and urethral chlamydia and six with urethral chlamydia. One rectal chlamydia-positive sample, when tested, was equivocal for lymphogranuloma venereum. Our data suggested that there was not a pool of asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum infection in MSM recently diagnosed with HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis. However, there have been recent reports of an increased incidence of asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum, raising the question whether lymphogranuloma venereum should be screened for in high risk asymptomatic MSM. The prevalence of asymptomatic rectal chlamydia infections was 19%. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Food insecurity is associated with HIV, sexually transmitted infections and drug use among men in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    PALAR, Kartika; LARAIA, Barbara; TSAI, Alexander C.; JOHNSON, Mallory; WEISER, Sheri D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the population-level association between food insecurity, HIV risk factors, and HIV serostatus among men, the group representing the majority of HIV diagnoses in the United States (US). Design Cross-sectional secondary data analysis using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2012, a nationally representative survey of the civilian non-institutionalized US population. Methods Logistic regression with design weights and complex survey commands was used to estimate nationally-representative associations between food insecurity and HIV serostatus (primary outcome), herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), self-reported STIs, and past-year illicit drug use among men, adjusting for potential confounders. Food security was measured using the 18-item Household Food Security Survey. Results We analyzed data for 9150 men representing 61 million individuals in the US. Unadjusted HIV prevalence was 1.5% among food insecure men, compared to 0.4% among food secure men (pinsecure men had over 2 times higher odds of HIV seropositivity compared to food secure men (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.10; 95% CI 1.01 - 4.37; pinsecurity was associated with higher odds of HSV-2 seropositivity (AOR=1.28; 95% CI 1.04 - 1.57; pinsecurity is associated with prevalent HIV, STIs and illicit drug use among men in the US. Further research is needed to establish whether and through what mechanisms improved food security may help prevent new HIV infections. PMID:26990632

  7. Association between free testosterone levels and anal human papillomavirus types 16/18 infections in a cohort of men who have sex with men.

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    Hilary K Hsu

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs. Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM, especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown.Free testosterone (FT was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing.Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4 years of age, White (86%, and HIV-uninfected (56%; Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%. In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24 higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37 higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses.Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence measured approximately three years

  8. The prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection in the oligospermic and azoospermic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Sherko; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Keyvani, Hossein; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Vahabpour Roudsari, Rouhollah; Khazeni, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases that affects men like women and infected cutaneous and mucosal squamous epithelium. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in the semen of oligospermic, azoospermic and normal patients. From June 2012 to June 2013, a total of 90 individuals were enrolled in this cross sectional comparative study. The participants were classified into three groups (oligospermia, azoosprmia and normal). This classification was based on a new WHO reference values for human semen characteristics published on 2010. After extraction of DNA from specimens L1 gene of HPV was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR) and the PCR products of positive specimens were genotyped using INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay. Among 50 confirmed oligospermic male, 15 were HPV DNA positive (30%). In azoospemic group we had 8 HPV DNA positive (40%) and in normal group just 3 of 20(15%) samples were positive. Statistical assessment was done with SPSS v.15. Chi-square test showed no significant relationship between 3 groups results. Based on independent samples t-test, we found statistical significant relationship for sperm count (p<0.05) and sperm motility (slow) (p<0.05) in oligospermic group positive samples compared with negative. In the present study, 13 HPV genotypes were detected among positive samples. HPV genotypes 16, 45 in the high risk group and 6,11,42 in the low risk group were more frequent than the others. The current study shows that HPV infection can affect on sperm count and motility and decrease count of sperm cell and decrease motility capability of these cells.

  9. Cytological Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions Associated with Anal High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Northern Thailand.

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    Darin Ruanpeng

    Full Text Available Anal cancer, one of human papillomavirus (HPV related malignancies, has increased in recent decades, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM and HIV-infected (HIV+ persons. We aimed to explore the prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL using Papanicolau (Pap screening among MSM in northern Thailand and its associated factors.Two hundreds MSM aged ≥18 years reporting receptive anal intercourse in the prior 6 months were recruited from July 2012 through January 2013. Medical history and behavioral data were collected by staff interview and computer-assisted self interview. Anal Pap smear, HPV genotyping, and HIV testing were performed. Two pathologists blinded to HPV and HIV status reported cytologic results by Bethesda classification.Mean age was 27.2 years (range 18-54. Overall, 86 (43.0% had ASIL: 28 (14.2% with atypical cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS, 1 (0.5% with atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H, 56 (28.4% with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL, and 1 (0.5% with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL. ASIL was associated by univariate analysis (p ≤0.05 with older age, gender identity other than bisexual (i.e., gay men and transgender women, rectal douching, anal symptoms, genital warts, HIV positivity, and high-risk-HPV infection. However, on multiple logistic regression ASIL was associated only with high-risk HPV type (p = 0.002 and HIV infection (p = 0.01.ASIL is quite common in high-risk MSM in northern Thailand and is associated with high-risk HPV types and HIV infection. Routine anal Pap screening should be considered, given the high frequency of ASIL, particularly in the HIV+. High resolution anoscopy (HRA, not done here, should be to confirm PAP smears whose sensitivity and specificity are quite variable. Timely HPV vaccination should be considered for this population.

  10. Cytological Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions Associated with Anal High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruanpeng, Darin; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Supindham, Taweewat; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Sukpan, Kornkanok; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Songsupa, Radchanok; Wongthanee, Antika

    2016-01-01

    Anal cancer, one of human papillomavirus (HPV) related malignancies, has increased in recent decades, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-infected (HIV+) persons. We aimed to explore the prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL) using Papanicolau (Pap) screening among MSM in northern Thailand and its associated factors. Two hundreds MSM aged ≥18 years reporting receptive anal intercourse in the prior 6 months were recruited from July 2012 through January 2013. Medical history and behavioral data were collected by staff interview and computer-assisted self interview. Anal Pap smear, HPV genotyping, and HIV testing were performed. Two pathologists blinded to HPV and HIV status reported cytologic results by Bethesda classification. Mean age was 27.2 years (range 18-54). Overall, 86 (43.0%) had ASIL: 28 (14.2%) with atypical cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 1 (0.5%) with atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H), 56 (28.4%) with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), and 1 (0.5%) with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). ASIL was associated by univariate analysis (p ≤0.05) with older age, gender identity other than bisexual (i.e., gay men and transgender women), rectal douching, anal symptoms, genital warts, HIV positivity, and high-risk-HPV infection. However, on multiple logistic regression ASIL was associated only with high-risk HPV type (p = 0.002) and HIV infection (p = 0.01). ASIL is quite common in high-risk MSM in northern Thailand and is associated with high-risk HPV types and HIV infection. Routine anal Pap screening should be considered, given the high frequency of ASIL, particularly in the HIV+. High resolution anoscopy (HRA), not done here, should be to confirm PAP smears whose sensitivity and specificity are quite variable. Timely HPV vaccination should be considered for this population.

  11. Challenges Presented by Re-Emerging Sexually Transmitted Infections in HIV Positive Men who have Sex with Men: An Observational Study of Lymphogranuloma Venereum in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönn, Minttu; Hughes, Gwenda; Simms, Ian; Ison, Cathy; Alexander, Sarah; White, Peter J; Ward, Helen

    2014-08-01

    United Kingdom has reported the largest documented outbreak of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), a re-emerging sexually transmitted infection (STI) which is primarily seen in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). A diagnostic service was established in response to the outbreak linked to a voluntary LGV Enhanced Surveillance system. We examined the performance of this novel surveillance system to identify utility in tracking a re-emerging infection. We described laboratory data on samples and surveillance data from case reports for LGV from 2004-2010. We performed a cross-sectional analysis comparing clinical and behavioural characteristics of HIV-positive and HIV-negative/unknown LGV cases diagnosed in MSM using multivariable logistic regression models with generalised estimating equations to control for repeat infections. LGV Surveillance data were available for 87% (1,370/1,581) of LGV cases (after de-duplication). There were 1,342 episodes in 1,281 MSM, most of whom were known to be HIV-positive (1,028/1,281, 80.2%,). HIV-positive men reported a shorter duration of symptoms (aOR 0.5; 95%CI 0.3, 0.8 for reporting more than a week compared to a week or less) in comparison to HIV-negative/unknown MSM, and were more likely to report unprotected receptive anal intercourse (aOR 2.7; 95% CI 1.3, 5.8). The surveillance identified the population at greater risk of infection based on higher levels of risk behaviour in HIV-positive LGV cases. However, there was diagnostic bias towards HIV-positive LGV cases who presented with a shorter duration of symptoms when compared to HIV-negative/unknown LGV cases.

  12. Very high incidence of syphilis in HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Buenos Aires city: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissio, E; Cisneros, V; Lopardo, G D; Cassetti, L I

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), particularly syphilis, is high and continues to rise among some populations, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM). Furthermore, a higher incidence of STIs has been reported in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative MSM. To determine the incidence of syphilis in a cohort of men with HIV in Buenos Aires city. Retrospective cohort study. We examined the records and visits made by men with HIV aged >18 years in our institution during a 1-year period. Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory (VDRL) results for all the men in our cohort during the study period were analysed. We considered a case of syphilis as incident if a person had a VDRL result of ≥16 DILS, provided that this was increased at least fourfold compared with a previous determination. All VDRL results ≤8 were investigated, and analysed together with the medical records, to determine if they were new cases. We analysed the VDRL results and the clinical records of 1150 men followed up in our centre during the study period. Mean age was 40.9 years. According to the definition used, we registered 171 new cases of syphilis-that is, an incidence of 14.9/100 patients/year (95% CI 12.9 to 17.0). No significant differences in incidence according to age group were found, but there was a trend towards a lower incidence in older men. Ten men had two new episodes during the study. The incidence of syphilis in this cohort of men with HIV (predominantly MSM) was very high. In addition to maintaining high surveillance for early diagnosis and treatment, it is necessary to implement newer and more effective measures to prevent syphilis and other STIs in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. A monocyte chemotaxis inhibiting factor in serum of HIV infected men shares epitopes with the HIV transmembrane protein gp41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, M.; Drexhage, H. A.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes that gp41, the transmembranous envelope protein of HIV, is able to inhibit monocyte chemotaxis (measured as FMLP-induced polarization). To study the presence of such immunosuppressive HIV env proteins in the circulation of HIV-infected men, fractions were prepared from serum

  14. Low Prevalence of Urethral Lymphogranuloma Venereum Infections Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Prospective Observational Study, Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrieze, Nynke H N; Versteeg, Bart; Bruisten, Sylvia M; van Rooijen, Martijn S; van der Helm, Jannie J; de Vries, Henry J C

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to anorectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), few urogenital LGV cases are reported in men who have sex with men. Lymphogranuloma venereum was diagnosed in 0.06% (7/12,174) urine samples, and 0.9% (109/12,174) anorectal samples. Genital-anal transmission seems unlikely the only mode of transmission. Other modes like oral-anal transmission should be considered.

  15. Necrotising fasciitis as atypical presentation of infection with emerging Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W (MenW) clonal complex 11, the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russcher, Anne; Fanoy, Ewout; van Olden, Ger D. J.; Graafland, Antonie D.; van der Ende, Arie; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    In March 2017, a patient with necrotising fasciitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W (MenW) clonal complex 11 was diagnosed in the Netherlands. Unusual and severe presentations of MenW infections are common in the current European epidemic. In the Netherlands, the incidence of MenW

  16. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Zang, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men

  17. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Zang, E.A.; Morrison, J.M.; Harley, E.J.; de Cordoba, S.R.; Bacino, C.; Ting, R.C.; Bodner, A.J.; Sarngadharan, M.G.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-04-25

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men.

  18. A randomized controlled trial to enhance coping and posttraumatic growth and decrease posttraumatic stress disorder in HIV-Infected men who have sex with men in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhi; Yu, Nancy Xiaonan; Zhu, Wanling; Chen, Lihua; Lin, Danhua

    2018-06-01

    Although HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) constitute a newly emerged high-risk group in China, little research outside Western countries is available on effective intervention programs to enhance their well-being. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a group intervention program designed to improve the well-being and adaptive coping strategies of 60 HIV-infected MSM in Beijing, China, randomly assigned either to the intervention group for participation in four weekly sessions or to the control group for placement on a waiting list. They all completed measurements at pre- and postintervention. Compared with the control group, the intervention group reported significantly increased problem-focused coping strategies and levels of posttraumatic growth (PTG) as well as decreased symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at the completion of the intervention. In addition, mediation analysis showed that changes in problem-focused coping strategies mediated the intervention effect on increases in PTG; however, the mediating effect of coping strategies on the association of intervention and PTSD was not significant. This study provides empirical evidence for conducting psychological intervention to promote the well-being of HIV-infected MSM. The findings also elucidate the mechanism through which intervention improved PTG.

  19. Preliminary results of a screening program for anal cancer and its precursors for HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Vigo-Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Iribarren-Díaz

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Men who have sex with men (MSM infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have the highest risk of developing anal cancer (AC. The objective of this study was to describe our screening implementation program in this population, and report the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV anal infection, and cytological and histological findings in a Spanish medium-size community (Vigo, Spain. Method: Prospective cohort analysis of 240 HIV-infected MSM. Cellular anal sample and high risk HPV (HR-HPV-tests were performed to study cytological changes and HPV genotyping. High resolution anoscopy (HRA was performed in 209 patients. Results were analyzed with respect to epidemiological, clinical and analytical factors. Results: Of 209 patients selected for HRA, the prevalence of HR-HPV anal infection, cytological and histological alterations was 85.6%, 47.5%, and 39.8%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥ ASCUS (atypia of squamous cells of undetermined significance cytology in relation to histological alterations were 61% and 85%, (OR: 8.7; IC 95%: 4.4-17.2, respectively. Observed concordance between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL cytology and HSIL anal intraepithelial neoplasia types 2 and 3 (AIN-2/3 histology was 64% (OR: 11.4; IC 95%: 3.6-36.7. One patient with HSIL cytology presented a prevalent anal squamous carcinoma. Conclusions: HRA was feasible with similar results to relevant groups. There was a high prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection, and cytological and histological alterations.

  20. A synthesis of convenience survey and other data to estimate undiagnosed HIV infection among men who have sex with men in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kate; Seaman, Shaun R; De Angelis, Daniela; Presanis, Anne M; Dodds, Julie P; Johnson, Anne M; Mercey, Danielle; Gill, O Noel; Copas, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Hard-to-reach population subgroups are typically investigated using convenience sampling, which may give biased estimates. Combining information from such surveys, a probability survey and clinic surveillance, can potentially minimize the bias. We developed a methodology to estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in England and Wales aged 16-44 years in 2003, making fuller use of the available data than earlier work. We performed a synthesis of three data sources: genitourinary medicine clinic surveillance (11 380 tests), a venue-based convenience survey including anonymous HIV testing (3702 MSM) and a general population sexual behaviour survey (134 MSM). A logistic regression model to predict undiagnosed infection was fitted to the convenience survey data and then applied to the MSMs in the population survey to estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed infection in the general MSM population. This estimate was corrected for selection biases in the convenience survey using clinic surveillance data. A sensitivity analysis addressed uncertainty in our assumptions. The estimated prevalence of undiagnosed HIV in MSM was 2.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.7-3.0%)], and between 1.6% (95% CI 1.1-2.0%) and 3.3% (95% CI 2.4-4.1%) depending on assumptions; corresponding to 5500 (3390-7180), 3610 (2180-4740) and 7570 (4790-9840) men, and undiagnosed fractions of 33, 24 and 40%, respectively. Our estimates are consistent with earlier work that did not make full use of data sources. Reconciling data from multiple sources, including probability-, clinic- and venue-based convenience samples can reduce bias in estimates. This methodology could be applied in other settings to take full advantage of multiple imperfect data sources.

  1. Prevalence and Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2)/Syphilis Co-Infection and HSV-2 Mono-Infection among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men: a Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Hai; Xu, Jun-Jie; Chu, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yan-Qiu; Yu, Huan; Ding, Hai-Bo; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Geng, Wen-Qing; Wang, Ning; Shang, Hong

    2017-05-24

    This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)/syphilis co-infection and HSV-2 mono-infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 545 HIV-positive MSM in Shenyang between February 2009 and October 2014. Participants underwent physical examinations and serological tests for HSV-2 and syphilis. A multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with HSV-2/syphilis co-infection and HSV-2 mono-infection. The prevalence of HSV-2 mono-infection, syphilis mono-infection, and HSV-2/syphilis co-infection (95% confidence interval) was 48.6% (44.4-52.8%), 34.3% (30.3-38.3%), and 22.9% (19.4-26.5%), respectively. After controlling within HSV-2/syphilis-seropositive cases, regression analysis revealed that the related factors for HSV-2/syphilis co-infection included age (25-50 vs. ≤ 24 years: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.55; > 50 vs. ≤ 24 years: aOR, 43.02), having regular female sexual partner(s) in the past 6 months (aOR, 0.43), and age at first MSM experience (≤ 18 vs. > 18 years: aOR, 2.59) (all P syphilis co-infection in HIV-positive MSM indicates a high secondary HIV transmission risk. A campaign for detection and treatment of HSV-2 and syphilis is urgently required for HIV-positive MSM in China.

  2. Poverty, sexual behaviour, gender and HIV infection among young black men and women in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattrass, Nicoli; Maughan-Brown, Brendan; Seekings, Jeremy; Whiteside, Alan

    2012-12-01

    This article contributes methodologically and substantively to the debate over the importance of poverty, sexual behaviour and circumcision in relation to HIV infection, using panel data on young black men and women in Cape Town, South Africa. Methodological challenges included problems of endogeneity and blunt indicator variables, especially for the measurement of sexual behaviour. Noting these difficulties, we found that the importance of socioeconomic and sexual-behavioural factors differed between men and women. While we found a clear association between the number of years of sexual activity and HIV status among both men and women, we found that past participation in a concurrent sexual partnership increased the odds of HIV infection for men but not women. Women, but not men, who made the transition from school to tertiary education (our key indicator of socioeconomic status) were less likely to be HIV-positive than those who made the transition from school to unemployment. Both poverty and sexual behaviour matter to individuals' HIV risk, but in gendered ways.

  3. Psychosocial, behavioral, and cultural predictors of sexual risk for HIV infection among Latino men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarama, S Lisbeth; Kennamer, J David; Poppen, Paul J; Hendricks, Michael; Bradford, Judith

    2005-12-01

    This study sought to replicate and extend an investigation by Diaz et al. (1999) on determinants of HIV risk among Latino gay and bisexual men living in San Francisco who were predominantly English-speaking. Compared to the Diaz et al. study, the current study sample consisted of predominantly Spanish-speaking MSM, who resided outside of HIV/AIDS epicenters and whose countries of origin were primarily Central & South American. The relationships of unprotected anal sex and multiple sexual partners with demographic, developmental, behavioral, cultural and psychosocial variables were examined. Data were collected in a convenience sample of 250 participants (primarily immigrants from El Salvador) residing in Virginia. Most men in the sample had more than one sexual partner in the last 3 months (62%) and more than a third had unprotected anal sex with a casual partner in the same time period. Communication about HIV, sexual attraction, machismo, and experiences of discrimination based on homosexual behavior were predictive of HIV risk behaviors. The findings support an integrative approach to investigating HIV risk among Latino MSM. Implications for prevention programs are discussed.

  4. [Compliancy of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection in men who have sex with men in Chengdu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J Y; Mou, Y C; Ma, Y L; Zhang, J Y

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To evaluate the compliancy of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Chengdu, Sichuan province, and explore the influencing factors. Methods: From 1 July 2013 to 30 September 2015, a random, open, multi-center and parallel control intervention study was conducted in 328 MSM enrolled by non-probability sampling in Chengdu. The MSM were divided into 3 groups randomly, i.e. daily group, intermittent group (before and after exposure) and control group. Clinical follow-up and questionnaire survey were carried out every 3 months. Their PrEP compliances were evaluated respectively and multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify the related factors. Results: A total of 141 MSM were surveyed, in whom 59(41.8 % ) had good PrEP compliancy. The PrEP compliancy rate was 69.0 % in daily group, higher than that in intermittent group (14.3 % ), the difference had significance ( χ (2)=45.29, P <0.001). Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that type of PrEP was the influencing factors of PrEP compliancy. Compared with daily group, the intermittent group had worse PrEP compliancy ( OR =0.07, 95 %CI : 0.03-0.16). Conclusion: The PrEP compliance of the MSM in this study was poor, the compliancy would be influenced by the type of PrEP.

  5. Male out-migration: a factor for the spread of HIV infection among married men and women in rural India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Saggurti

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thus far, the reasons for increasing HIV prevalence in northern and eastern Indian states are unknown. We investigated the role of male out-migration in the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection through a case-control study in rural India. METHODS: Currently married men and women were recruited from HIV testing and treatment centers across seven selected districts with high rates of male out-migration in eastern and northern India in 2010 using a case-control study design. Case subjects (men: 595, women: 609 were people who tested HIV seropositive and control subjects (men: 611, women: 600 were those tested HIV seronegative. For each gender, we obtained adjusted odds ratios (AORs and population attributable risks (PARs for migration, and behavioral factors. RESULTS: For men, the prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among those with a migration history (AOR, 4.4; for women, the prevalence of HIV was higher among those with migrant husbands (AOR, 2·3. For both genders, the returned male migration (men: AOR, 3·7; women: AOR, 28 was significantly associated with higher prevalence of HIV infection. The PAR associated with male migration was higher for men (54.5%-68.6% than for women (32·7%-56·9% across the study areas. DISCUSSION: Male out-migration is the most important risk factor influencing the spread of HIV infection in rural areas with high out-migration rates, thereby emphasizing the need for interventions, particularly, for returned migrants and spouses of those migrants.

  6. Prevalence of and risk factors for anal human papillomavirus infection in men who have sex with women: a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyitray, Alan G; Smith, Dan'elle; Villa, Luisa; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Giuliano, Anna R

    2010-05-15

    Although the primary cause of anal cancer is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the anal canal, little attention has been paid to the epidemiology of anal HPV infection in men who have sex with women (MSW). Exfoliated cells from the anal canal of 902 MSW in Brazil (São Paulo), Mexico (Cuernavaca), and the United States (Tampa) were tested for HPV DNA. The prevalence of HPV infection in the anal canal (12.0%) was similar among MSW in each city (P=.77), whereas 7.0% had infection with oncogenic types. Men in Tampa had a 4-fold higher prevalence of infection with HPV type 16 (HPV-16) than that among men in São Paulo or Cuernavaca (PMen who have a larger lifetime number of female sex partners, who are in a sexual relationship of men were most likely to have an anal HPV infection.

  7. Sexual risk-reduction strategies among HIV-infected men receiving ART in Kibera, Nairobi.

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    Ragnarsson, Anders; Thorson, Anna; Dover, Paul; Carter, Jane; Ilako, Festus; Indalo, Dorcas; Ekstrom, Anna Mia

    2011-03-01

    This paper explores motivational factors and barriers to sexual behaviour change among men receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART). Twenty in-depth interviews were undertaken with male patients enrolled at the African Medical and Research Foundation clinic in Africa's largest urban informal settlement, Kibera in Nairobi, Kenya. All participants experienced prolonged and severe illness prior to the initiation of ART. Fear of symptom relapse was the main trigger for sexual behaviour change. Partner reduction was reported as a first option for behaviour change since this decision could be made by the individual. Condom use was perceived as more difficult as it had to be negotiated with female partners. Cultural norms regarding expectations for reproduction and marriage were not supportive of sexual risk-reduction strategies. Thus, local sociocultural contexts of HIV-infected people must be incorporated into the contextual adaptation and design of ART programmes and services as they have an over-riding influence on sexual behaviour and programme effectiveness. Also, HIV-prevention interventions need to address both personal, micro- and macro-level factors of behaviour to encourage individuals to take on sexual risk-reduction strategies. In order to achieve the anticipated preventive effect of ART, these issues are important for the donor community and policy-makers, who are the major providers of ART programme support within weak health systems in sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Self-esteem and optimism in men and women infected with HIV.

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    Anderson, E H

    2000-01-01

    Self-esteem and optimism have been associated with appraisal and outcomes in a variety of situations. The degree to which the contribution of self-esteem and optimism to outcomes over time is accounted for by the differences in threat (primary) or resource (secondary) appraisal has not been established in persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To examine the longitudinal relationship of personality (self-esteem and optimism) on primary and secondary appraisal and outcomes of well-being, mood, CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, and selected activities. Men (n = 56) and women (n = 42) infected with HIV completed eight self-report measures twice over 18 months. Hierarchical Multiple Regressions were used to examine the relationship of personality variables on appraisals and outcomes. The mediating effects of primary and secondary appraisals were explored. Self-esteem uniquely accounted for 6% of the variance in primary appraisal and 5% in secondary appraisal. Optimism accounted for 8% of the unique variance in secondary appraisal. Primary and secondary appraisal mediated differently between personality and outcome variables. A strong predictor of well-being, mood disturbance, and activity disruption at Time 2 was participants' initial level of these variables. Socioeconomic status was a strong predictor of mood. Self-esteem and optimism are important but different resources for adapting to HIV disease. Strategies for reducing threats and increasing resources associated with HIV may improve an individual's mood and sense of well-being.

  9. Association of genital mycoplasmas including Mycoplasma genitalium in HIV infected men with nongonococcal urethritis attending STD & HIV clinics.

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    Manhas, Ashwini; Sethi, Sunil; Sharma, Meera; Wanchu, Ajay; Kanwar, A J; Kaur, Karamjit; Mehta, S D

    2009-03-01

    Acute nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) is one of the commonest sexually transmitted infections affecting men. The role of genital mycoplasmas including Mycoplasma genitalium in HIV infected men with NGU is still not known. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation pattern/detection of genital mycoplasma including M. genitalium in HIV infected men with NGU and to compare it with non HIV infected individuals. One hundred male patients with NGU (70 HIV positive, 30 HIV negative) were included in the study. Urethral swabs and urine samples obtained from patients were subjected to semi-quantitative culture for Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasama urealyticum, whereas M. genitalium was detected by PCR from urine. The primers MgPa1 and MgPa3 were selected to identify 289 bp product specific for M. genitalium. Chalmydia trachomatis antigen detection was carried out by ELISA. M. genitalium and M. hominis were detected/isolated in 6 per cent of the cases. M. genitalium was more common amongst HIV positive cases (7.1%) as compared to HIV negative cases (3.3%) but difference was not statistically significant. Co-infection of C. trachomatis and U. urealyticum was found in two HIV positive cases whereas, C. trachomatis and M. hominis were found to be coinfecting only one HIV positive individual. M. genitalium was found to be infecting the patients as the sole pathogen. Patients with NGU had almost equal risk of being infected with M. genitalium, U. urealyticum or M. hominis irrespective of their HIV status. M.genitalium constitutes one of the important causes of NGU besides other genital mycoplasmas.

  10. Low levels of neurocognitive impairment detected in screening HIV-infected men who have sex with men: The MSM Neurocog Study.

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    Barber, T J; Bansi, L; Pozniak, A; Asboe, D; Nelson, M; Moyle, G; Davies, N; Margetts, A; Ratcliffe, D; Catalan, J; Boffito, M; Gazzard, B

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of HIV neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected men who have sex with men aged 18-50 years, using a simple battery of screening tests in routine clinical appointments. Those with suspected abnormalities were referred on for further assessment. The cohort was also followed up over time to look at evolving changes. HIV-infected participants were recruited at three clinical sites in London during from routine clinical visits. They could be clinician or self-referred and did not need to be symptomatic. They completed questionnaires on anxiety, depression, and memory. They were then screened using the Brief Neurocognitive Screen (BNCS) and International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS). Two hundred and five HIV-infected subjects were recruited. Of these, 59 patients were excluded as having a mood disorder and two patients were excluded due to insufficient data, leaving 144 patients for analysis. One hundred and twenty-four (86.1%) had a normal composite z score (within 1 SD of mean) calculated for their scores on the three component tests of the BNCS. Twenty (13.9%) had an abnormal z score, of which seven (35%) were symptomatic and 13 (65%) asymptomatic. Current employment and previous educational level were significantly associated with BNCS scores. Of those referred onwards for diagnostic testing, only one participant was found to have impairment likely related to HIV infection. We were able to easily screen for mood disorders and cognitive impairment in routine clinical practice. We identified a high level of depression and anxiety in our cohort. Using simple screening tests in clinic and an onward referral process for further testing, we were not able to identify neurocognitive impairment in this cohort at levels consistent with published data.

  11. Anorectal and inguinal lymphogranuloma venereum among men who have sex with men in Amsterdam, The Netherlands: trends over time, symptomatology and concurrent infections.

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    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten Franciscus; de Vries, Henry John C

    2013-11-01

    To examine lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) trends over time among men who have sex with men (MSM) visiting the Amsterdam sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic; to investigate anal LGV symptomatology; and to examine the positivity and characteristics of anorectal and inguinal LGV. We included MSM consultations from whom a swab (from anorectum, bubo or an genital ulcer) was taken for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) screening. Anorectal swabs were taken from all MSM who reported receptive anorectal intercourse in the preceding 6 months. Ct positive samples were further tested with a pmpH PCR to identify L-genovars. Patient symptoms, clinical and anoscopic inflammatory signs, and STI co-infections were noted; Gram-stained anorectal mucosal smears were examined. Between January 2005 and June 2012, 48 570 consultations among MSM were conducted. In 3628/35 650 visits, anorectal Ct infections were diagnosed, including 411 anal LGV (1.2%). Moreover, 65/1649 genital ulcer swabs were Ct positive; 10 were inguinal LGV (0.6%) Since January 2011 a significant increase in the positivity of LGV occurred (p<0.0001). 89 (27.2%) anorectal LGV cases were asymptomatic. HIV prevalence among anorectal LGV cases was significantly higher (p=0.008) than among inguinal LGV cases. STI co-morbidity in anorectal LGV cases remained invariably high during the study period. Since January 2011, LGV positivity in MSM consultations in Amsterdam has risen significantly. The great majority comprise anal LGV; inguinal LGV is rare. Anal LGV is asymptomatic in a quarter of cases. In all MSM with anal Ct infections LGV should be excluded, irrespective of symptoms or inflammatory signs.

  12. Elevated Serum PSA is Associated With Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Increased Circulating Cytokine Levels in Men From Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jill D; Karamchandani, Jaideep M; Bonachea, Luis A; Bunker, Clareann H; Patrick, Alan L; Jenkins, Frank J

    2017-05-01

    Serum-prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels have been used for many years as a biomarker for prostate cancer. This usage is under scrutiny due to the fact that elevated PSA levels can be caused by other conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and infections of or injury to the prostate. As a result, the identification of specific pathogens capable of increasing serum levels of PSA is important. A potential candidate responsible for elevated PSA is human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We have reported previously that HHV-8 is capable of infecting and establishing a latent infection in the prostate. In this current study we test the hypothesis that HHV-8 infection is associated with elevated PSA levels. Circulating cytokine levels between men with elevated PSA and controls are also compared. HHV-8 serostatus was determined among men with elevated serum PSA (≥4 ng/ml; n = 168, no prostate cancer on biopsy) and age-matched controls (PSA PSA and 85 controls). Men with an elevated serum PSA were significantly more likely to be HHV-8 seropositive (42.9%) than the age-matched cancer-free men (22.2%; OR 2.51; 95%CI 1.48-4.29, P = 00001). Comparison of circulating cytokine levels between men with elevated serum PSA and controls indicated that elevated serum PSA is associated with a pro-inflammatory response with a mixed Th1/Th2 response while HHV-8 infection was associated with significantly higher levels of IL12p70, IL-10, and IL-13 indicating a Th2 immune response. We found a significant association between HHV-8 infection and increased levels of serum PSA. In an age of patient-centered medicine, men with an elevated serum PSA should be considered for HHV-8 serology testing to determine if HHV-8 is responsible for the elevated PSA. Prostate 77: 617-624, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Prevalence and risk factors for HIV infection among men having sex with men in Metro Manila, Philippines.

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    Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Tan, Maria Lourdes; Berba, Regina P

    2013-09-01

    HIV incidence in the Philippines is increasing at an alarming rate. We conducted this study to understand the factors catalyzing the HIV epidemic among men having sex with men (MSM) in Metro Manila. From November 2009 to January 2010, an HIV testing booth was set up adjacent to bars and restaurants in Metro Manila frequented by MSM at night. Participants aged > or =18 years were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Rapid HIV antibody screening was performed using SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics). Of 406 MSM included in the study, the mean age was 26.2 years [standard deviation (SD) 5.4]; 96% believed condoms reduced HIV risk but only 3% reported consistent use. The leading reasons for not using condoms were belief that the partner was HIV negative (34.4%), diminished pleasure (32%), and unavailability (23.4%). The HIV prevalence using the rapid test was 11.8% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.7- 15.0]. All 40 cases who had a confirmatory Western blot test were positive, of whom 24 were business process outsourcing employees (BPOEs). On multivariate analysis, work as a BPOE [adjusted OR (aOR): 3.37; p=0.001], preference for receptive anal sex (aOR: 5.26; p=0.04), and sex while under the influence of excessive alcohol (aOR: 2.71; p=0.04) were independently associated with HIV. The proportion of BPOEs who consistently use condoms when having insertive anal sex with a stranger was significantly lower compared to non-BPOEs (24.5% versus 38.2%; p=0.02). Urgent interventions are needed to address the HIV epidemic in the Philippines.

  14. Willingness of men who have sex with men (MSM in the United States to be circumcised as adults to reduce the risk of HIV infection.

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    Elin B Begley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circumcision reduces HIV acquisition among heterosexual men in Africa, but it is unclear if circumcision may reduce HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM in the United States, or whether MSM would be willing to be circumcised if recommended. METHODS: We interviewed presumed-HIV negative MSM at gay pride events in 2006. We asked uncircumcised respondents about willingness to be circumcised if it were proven to reduce risk of HIV among MSM and perceived barriers to circumcision. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify covariates associated with willingness to be circumcised. RESULTS: Of 780 MSM, 133 (17% were uncircumcised. Of these, 71 (53% were willing to be circumcised. Willingness was associated with black race (exact odds ratio [OR]: 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-9.8, non-injection drug use (OR: 6.1, 95% CI: 1.8-23.7 and perceived reduced risk of penile cancer (OR: 4.7, 95% CI: 2.0-11.9. The most commonly endorsed concerns about circumcision were post-surgical pain and wound infection. CONCLUSIONS: Over half of uncircumcised MSM, especially black MSM, expressed willingness to be circumcised. Perceived risks and benefits of circumcision should be a part of educational materials if circumcision is recommended for MSM in the United States.

  15. Communication technology use and mHealth acceptance among HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Peru: implications for HIV prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Archana; Ferro, Enrico G; Weikum, Damian; Vagenas, Panagiotis; Lama, Javier R; Sanchez, Jorge; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in Peru is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). Given that MSM have been documented as early adopters of emerging technology, we examined communication technology access and utilization, and mobile health (mHealth) acceptance among Peruvian MSM and transgender women (TGW) in order to gauge opportunities for mHealth-enabled HIV interventions. A convenience sample of 359 HIV-infected MSM and TGW recruited from three sites in Lima, Peru completed standardized assessments of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), risky sexual behavior, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence along with self-constructed measures of communication technology access and utilization, and mHealth acceptance. Most participants (86%) had daily access to any cell phone, including smartphones (30%). The most frequent communication activities were receiving and making calls, and receiving and sending text messages using cell phones. On a 5-point Likert scale, participants expressed interest in using mHealth for medication reminders (M = 3.21, SD = 1.32) and engaging in anonymous online interactions with health professionals to discuss HIV-related issues (M = 3.56, SD = 1.33). Importantly, no significant differences were found in communication technology use and mHealth acceptance among participants with AUDs, depression, and suboptimal ART adherence, all of which are associated with poor HIV treatment outcomes. Findings show support for implementing mHealth-based intervention strategies using cell phones to assess and reduce HIV-risk behaviors among HIV-infected MSM and TGW.

  16. Exploring HIV-related stigma among HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Beijing, China: a correlation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Hsieh, Evelyn; Morano, Jamie P; Sheng, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related stigma among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy and care, and increased participation in behaviors linked to higher rates of HIV transmission. In China, the incidence of HIV is growing more rapidly among MSM than among other subgroups. This study characterizes and quantifies HIV stigma among HIV-infected MSM in Beijing, China, which arguably may be driving this epidemic. A cross-sectional survey study was performed among 266 HIV-positive MSM in Beijing, China, in 2014. The Berger HIV Stigma Scale was used to measure levels of HIV-related stigma. Participants additionally answered questions regarding socio-demographic characteristics and HIV-associated risk factors; previously validated Mandarin-language scales assessed depression, coping style, and social support networks. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify variables significantly associated with HIV stigma. The mean overall HIV stigma score among the study population was 112.78 ± 18.11 (score range: 40-160). Higher HIV stigma scores were positively associated with depression (β = 7.99, 95% CI:3.69, 12.29, p stigma. The results of this study can inform the development of culturally sensitive interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma among MSM with HIV in China, with the overarching goal of reducing HIV transmission in this vulnerable population.

  17. Depressive Symptoms Mediate the Effect of HIV-Related Stigmatization on Medication Adherence Among HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men.

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    Mitzel, Luke D; Vanable, Peter A; Brown, Jennifer L; Bostwick, Rebecca A; Sweeney, Shannon M; Carey, Michael P

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that depressive symptoms would mediate the association of HIV-related stigma to medication adherence. We recruited HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM; N = 66; 66 % White, 23 % African-American) from an outpatient infectious disease clinic, and asked them to complete self-report measures. Mediational analyses showed that depressive symptoms fully mediated the association between HIV-related stigma and adherence. That is, stigma-related experiences were positively associated with depressive symptoms and negatively associated with adherence, and, in the final model, depressive symptoms remained a significant correlate of adherence while stigma did not. A test of the indirect effect of stigma on adherence through depressive symptoms was also significant (unstandardized b = -0.19; bootstrap 95 % CI -0.45 to -0.01). These results highlight the importance of treating depressive symptoms in interventions aiming to improve medication adherence among HIV-infected MSM.

  18. Validation of a new test for Schistosoma haematobium based on detection of Dra1 DNA fragments in urine: evaluation through latent class analysis.

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    Olufunmilola Ibironke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis in chronically infected adults is challenging but important, especially because long term infection of the bladder and urinary tract can have dire consequences. We evaluated three tests for viable infection: detection of parasite specific DNA Dra1 fragments, haematuria and presence of parasite eggs for sensitivity (Se and specificity (Sp.Over 400 urine specimens collected from adult volunteers in an endemic area in Western Nigeria were assessed for haematuria then filtered in the field, the filter papers dried and later examined for eggs and DNA. The results were stratified according to sex and age and subjected to Latent Class analysis.Presence of Dra1 in males (Se=100%; Sp=100% exceeded haematuria (Se=87.6%: Sp=34.7% and detection of eggs (Se=70.1%; Sp=100%. In females presence of Dra1 was Se=100%: Sp=100%, exceeding haematuria (Se=86.7%: Sp=77.0% and eggs (Se=70.1%; Sp=100%. Dra1 became undetectable 2 weeks after praziquantel treatment. We conclude detection of Dra1 fragment is a definitive test for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium infection.

  19. Anal high-risk human papillomavirus infection and high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia detected in women and heterosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus

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    Gandra S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sumanth Gandra, Aline Azar, Mireya WessolosskyDivision of Infectious Disease and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USABackground: Although anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV infection and anal cytological abnormalities are highly prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM, there are insufficient data on these abnormalities among HIV-infected heterosexual men (HSM and women. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of anal HR-HPV, cytological abnormalities, and performance of these screening tests in detecting high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN2+ among our cohort of HIV-infected MSM and non-MSM (HSM and women.Methods: A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted with HIV-infected individuals who underwent anal cancer screening with anal cytology and HR-HPV testing from January 2011 to January 31, 2013.Results: Screening of 221 HIV-infected individuals for both HR-HPV and anal cytology showed the presence of HR-HPV in 54% (abnormal anal cytology 48% of MSM, 28% (abnormal anal cytology 28% of HSM, and 27% (abnormal anal cytology 34% of women. Among 117 (53% individuals with abnormal results (HR-HPV-positive and/or cytology was atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or above, 67 underwent high resolution anoscopy. Of these 67 individuals, 22 individuals had AIN2+ (17 MSM, four women, and one HSM. HR-HPV correlated better with AIN2+ than with anal cytology on biopsy in both MSM (r=0.29 versus r=0.10; P=0.05 versus P=0.49 and non-MSM (r=0.36 versus r=-0.34; P=0.08 versus P=0.09.Conclusion: Given the presence of AIN2+ in screened HIV-infected HSM and women, routine anal cancer screening in all HIV-infected individuals should be considered. HR-HPV merits further evaluation for anal cancer screening among non-MSM.Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, anal human papillomavirus, heterosexual men, women, anal cancer

  20. Disparities and risks of sexually transmissible infections among men who have sex with men in China: a meta-analysis and data synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P F Chow

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs, including Hepatitis B and C virus, are emerging public health risks in China, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM. This study aims to assess the magnitude and risks of STIs among Chinese MSM.Chinese and English peer-reviewed articles were searched in five electronic databases from January 2000 to February 2013. Pooled prevalence estimates for each STI infection were calculated using meta-analysis. Infection risks of STIs in MSM, HIV-positive MSM and male sex workers (MSW were obtained. This review followed the PRISMA guidelines and was registered in PROSPERO.Eighty-eight articles (11 in English and 77 in Chinese investigating 35,203 MSM in 28 provinces were included in this review. The prevalence levels of STIs among MSM were 6.3% (95% CI: 3.5-11.0% for chlamydia, 1.5% (0.7-2.9% for genital wart, 1.9% (1.3-2.7% for gonorrhoea, 8.9% (7.8-10.2% for hepatitis B (HBV, 1.2% (1.0-1.6% for hepatitis C (HCV, 66.3% (57.4-74.1% for human papillomavirus (HPV, 10.6% (6.2-17.6% for herpes simplex virus (HSV-2 and 4.3% (3.2-5.8% for Ureaplasma urealyticum. HIV-positive MSM have consistently higher odds of all these infections than the broader MSM population. As a subgroup of MSM, MSW were 2.5 (1.4-4.7, 5.7 (2.7-12.3, and 2.2 (1.4-3.7 times more likely to be infected with chlamydia, gonorrhoea and HCV than the broader MSM population, respectively.Prevalence levels of STIs among MSW were significantly higher than the broader MSM population. Co-infection of HIV and STIs were prevalent among Chinese MSM. Integration of HIV and STIs healthcare and surveillance systems is essential in providing effective HIV/STIs preventive measures and treatments.PROSPERO NO: CRD42013003721.

  1. Cistitis por schistosoma haematobium, presentación de un caso

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    Ramón Zaragoza Durañona

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No es frecuente en nuestro medio la infección por Schistosoma. haematobium, pero existen todos los elementos de la triada ecológica para su transmisión. Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, de raza mestiza, con 46 años de edad y procedencia rural, que refiere dolores lumbares al orinar, disuria, tenesmo vesical y polaquiuria durante el último año. Al examen físico se encontró el abdomen discretamente doloroso a la palpación superficial y profunda en hipogastrio y fosas lumbares. Se trató como una infección urinaria sin mejoría. Los complementarios arrojaron discreta eosinofilia y reflujo vesicoureteral grado IV en la uretrocistografía retrógrada y miccional. La cistoscopia videoasistida reportó, a nivel del trígono, la mucosa vesical enrojecida con estructuras en forma de granos de arroz de aspecto puntiforme; la biopsia informó huevos de esquistosomas y cambios metaplásicos en el epitelio vesical. Se trató con praziquantel y desaparecieron los síntomas. A los seis meses los complementarios resultaron normales y el paciente está asintomático. Se concluye en la importancia de considerar la infección por Schistosoma haematobium entre los diagnósticos de la infección urinaria refractaria al tratamiento

  2. Human Papillomavirus Infection Among 2460 Men in Denmark: Prevalence in Relation to Age Using 2 Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing Methods.

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    Hebnes, Julie Buchholt; Munk, Christian; Nøhr, Bugge; Nielsen, Ann; Jørgensen, Hans Ole; Iftner, Thomas; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to understand the epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in both men and women, to prevent the increasing HPV-related disease burden in men. Data on HPV prevalence among men in the general population are limited. In this cross-sectional population-based study, we aimed to estimate genital HPV infection prevalence in Danish men using 2 different test methods. Penile swab samples from 2460 male employees and conscripts at military barracks in Denmark were tested for HPV DNA with the hybrid capture 2 (HC2) method, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, Inno-LiPA. The overall and age- and type-specific prevalence of HPV infection with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and the correlation between the 2 assays was assessed. The overall HPV prevalence was 22.2% (95% CI, 20.6-23.9) in the HC2 test and 41.8% (95% CI, 39.9-43.8) with PCR. Of the PCR-positive samples, 50.9% were negative in the HC2 test. Of 183 PCR-positive samples that could not be genotyped (HPVX), 88.0% (95% CI, 83.2-92.7) were HC2 negative. The most prevalent types were HPV-51, HPV-16, HPV-66, HPV-53, and HPV-6. The prevalence of high-risk and low-risk HPV peaked among men aged 20 to 29 years, whereas the HPVX prevalence increased with age. Human papillomavirus is highly prevalent in the general male population of Denmark, with HPV-16 and HPV-51 being the most prevalent. Polymerase chain reaction detects twice as many positive samples as HC2 but includes HPVX, possibly representing cutaneous HPV types found on normal genital skin.

  3. Idiopathic urethritis in young men in the United States: prevalence and comparison to infections with known sexually transmitted pathogens.

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    Wetmore, Catherine M; Manhart, Lisa E; Golden, Matthew R

    2009-11-01

    Urethritis is the most common male reproductive tract disease syndrome; yet 20-50% of diagnosed cases have no defined etiology, and few population-level data exist on the prevalence or etiology of the syndrome. We estimated the prevalence of urethritis among young men in the United States and compared correlates of idiopathic cases to correlates of detected infections with sexually transmitted pathogens. Questionnaire data and urine specimens from 5,447 men aged 18-27 years participating in Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed. Symptomatic urethritis was defined as self-reported dysuria or urethral discharge in the past 24hours. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Mycoplasma genitalium were identified using nucleic acid amplification tests. Idiopathic urethritis (IU) was defined as urethral symptoms in the absence of these four pathogens. Stratified weighted analyses generated population-based estimates. Urethritis was reported by 1.2% (95% CI=.8-1.6%) of men, of whom 82.4% (61.1-93.3%) had IU. Men with previous STD diagnoses (aOR=9.3 [95% CI=3.0-28.7]), or fewer (1-4) or no lifetime vaginal sex partners (aOR=7.5 [2.9-19.3] and aOR=7.2 [1.9-27.4]), were more likely to have IU compared with men without urethral symptoms or identified pathogens, whereas men of Native American or Asian/Pacific Islander descent (aOR=.04 [.01-.2]) and heavy drinkers (aOR=.08 [.03-.2]) were less likely to have IU. Unlike infection with known pathogens, IU was not associated with black race, Hispanic ethnicity, or age at sexual debut. Urethral symptoms were rarely associated with known pathogens. IU and known pathogens were associated with distinct characteristics.

  4. Is screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in men who have sex with men associated with reduction of the prevalence of these infections? A systematic review of observational studies.

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    Tsoumanis, Achilleas; Hens, Niel; Kenyon, Chris Richard

    2018-02-26

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea) could become untreatable in the near future. Indeed, while the treatment of symptomatic gonorrhea in core groups, such men who have sex with men (MSM), is crucial for gonorrhea control programs, screening for and treating asymptomatic gonorrhea/Chlamydia trachomatis(chlamydia) in MSM may contribute to antibiotic resistance in gonorrhea. In this systematic review we aim to assess if there is evidence that screening MSM for gonorrhea/chlamydia is associated with a decline in the prevalence of these infections. We conducted a systematic review in PubMed and Web of Science for relevant studies including uncontrolled observational studies and reported the results following the PRISMA guidelines. The change in estimated prevalences for chlamydia and gonorrhea across the different time points for three anatomical sites (oral, urethral and anal) were collected and examined. Twelve studies met our entry criteria. We were able to statistically assess the change in prevalence in 10 out of 12 studies. In three studies, there was a significant increase in chlamydia prevalence, while for gonorrhea two studies reported a significant increase and two others a decrease. Our review provides little evidence that screening for gonorrhea and chlamydia in MSM has an effect on the prevalence of these infections. No evidence was found that more frequent screening reduces prevalence more effectively than annual screening. Our study was not able to provide evidence that screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea lowers the prevalence of these infections in MSM. Randomized controlled trials are required to assess the risks and benefits of gonorrhea/chlamydia screening in high and low risk MSM.

  5. Soap and water prophylaxis for limiting genital ulcer disease and HIV-1 infection in men in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, N

    1993-08-01

    In general, East, Central and Southern Africa appear to be worse affected by HIV-1 infection than West Africa. So far there is little evidence to suggest that differences in either sexual behaviour or numbers of sexual partners could account for this disparity. Two risk factors in men for acquiring HIV-1, that tend to vary along this geographical divide, are lack of circumcision and genital ulcer disease (GUD) which are much less common in West Africa. Although uncircumcised men with GUD are an important high frequency HIV-1 transmitter core group, few interventions have targeted such individuals. Given the recent expansion in AIDS-related technologies, is it possible that methods effective in limiting GUD in the preantibiotic era have been overlooked? During the first and second world wars, chancroid, the commonest cause of GUD in Africa today, was controlled successfully with various prophylactics including soap and water. Many parts of Africa are undergoing social upheaval against a background of violence, and in this environment soap and water prophylaxis would now seem to merit re-evaluation as an intervention for preventing both GUD and HIV-1 in uncircumcised men. By facilitating healing of traumatic, inflammatory and infected penile lesions, pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis with soap and water could be a cheap and effective method for decreasing the risks of acquiring GUD and HIV in this vulnerable group of uncircumcised men.

  6. HIV prevalence, risks for HIV infection, and human rights among men who have sex with men (MSM in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Baral

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the generalized epidemics of HIV in southern Sub-Saharan Africa, men who have sex with men have been largely excluded from HIV surveillance and research. Epidemiologic data for MSM in southern Africa are among the sparsest globally, and HIV risk among these men has yet to be characterized in the majority of countries. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional anonymous probe of 537 men recruited with non-probability sampling among men who reported ever having had sex with another man in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana using a structured survey instrument and HIV screening with the OraQuick(c rapid test kit. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The HIV prevalence among those between the ages of 18 and 23 was 8.3% (20/241; 20.0% (42/210 among those 24-29; and 35.7% (30/84 among those older than 30 for an overall prevalence of 17.4% (95% CI 14.4-20.8. In multivariate logistic regressions, being older than 25 (aOR 4.0, 95% CI 2.0-8.0, and not always wearing condoms during sex (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-4.9 were significantly associated with being HIV-positive. Sexual concurrency was common with 16.6% having ongoing concurrent stable relationships with a man and a woman and 53.7% had both male and female sexual partners in proceeding 6 months. Unprotected anal intercourse was common and the use of petroleum-based lubricants was also common when using condoms. Human rights abuses, including blackmail and denial of housing and health care was prevalent with 42.1% (222/527 reporting at least one abuse. CONCLUSIONS: MSM are a high-risk group for HIV infection and human rights abuses in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana. Concurrency of sexual partnerships with partners of both genders may play important roles in HIV spread in these populations. Further epidemiologic and evaluative research is needed to assess the contribution of MSM to southern Africa's HIV epidemics and how best to mitigate this. These countries should initiate and adequately fund evidence-based and targeted HIV

  7. Amphetamine-type stimulants and HIV infection among men who have sex with men: implications on HIV research and prevention from a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Vu, Nga Thi; Maher, Lisa; Zablotska, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV infections and the use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) among men who have sex with men (MSM) have been increasing internationally, but the role of ATS use as a co-factor for HIV infection remains unclear. We aimed to summarize the association between ATS use and HIV infection among MSM. Methods We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, GLOBAL HEALTH and PsycINFO for relevant English, peer-reviewed articles of quantitative studies published between 1980 and 25 April 2013. Pooled estimates of the association – prevalence rate ratios (PRR, cross-sectional studies), odds ratio (OR, case-control studies) and hazard ratio (HR, longitudinal studies), with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) – were calculated using random-effects models stratified by study design and ATS group (meth/amphetamines vs. ecstasy). We assessed the existence of publication bias in funnel plots and checked for sources of heterogeneity using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Results We identified 6710 article titles, screened 1716 abstracts and reviewed 267 full text articles. A total of 35 publications were eligible for data abstraction and meta-analysis, resulting in 56 records of ATS use. Most studies (31/35) were conducted in high-income countries. Published studies used different research designs, samples and measures of ATS use. The pooled association between meth/amphetamine use and HIV infection was statistically significant in all three designs (PRR=1.86; 95% CI: 1.57–2.17; OR=2.73; 95% CI: 2.16–3.46 and HR=3.43; 95% CI: 2.98–3.95, respectively, for cross-sectional, case-control and longitudinal studies). Ecstasy use was not associated with HIV infection in cross-sectional studies (PRR=1.15; 95% CI: 0.88–1.49; OR=3.04; 95% CI: 1.29–7.18 and HR=2.48; 95% CI: 1.42–4.35, respectively, for cross-sectional, case-control and longitudinal studies). Results in cross-sectional studies were highly heterogeneous due to issues with ATS measurement and

  8. Immunity against diphtheria and tetanus in human immunodeficiency virus-infected Danish men born 1950-59

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzhals, J A; Kjeldsen, K; Heron, I

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the possible need for vaccination against diphtheria and tetanus of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), antibodies were measured in blood samples from 78 Danish HIV-infected men, born 1950-59, who could be expected to have received primary vaccination before...... they contracted the HIV infection. No patients (95% confidence interval: 0-4) had tetanus antibodies below the protective level, whereas 24 of the 78 patients (16-33) were unprotected against diphtheria. In the background population of the same age group and sex, 5% and 10% have been found unprotected against...... tetanus and diphtheria, respectively. No relationship between disease stages and antibody levels could be found. Neither was there any difference between patients with normal and reduced numbers of CD4+ lymphocytes. From 25 patients two blood samples were taken at an interval of at least one year. Anti...

  9. Targeting screening and social marketing to increase detection of acute HIV infection in men who have sex with men in Vancouver, British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark; Cook, Darrel; Steinberg, Malcolm; Kwag, Michael; Robert, Wayne; Doupe, Glenn; Krajden, Mel; Rekart, Michael

    2013-10-23

    The contribution of acute HIV infection (AHI) to transmission is widely recognized, and increasing AHI diagnosis capacity can enhance HIV prevention through subsequent behavior change or intervention. We examined the impact of targeted pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and social marketing to increase AHI diagnosis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vancouver. Observational study. We implemented pooled NAAT following negative third-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing for males above 18 years in six clinics accessed by MSM, accompanied by two social marketing campaigns developed by a community gay men's health organization. We compared test volume and diagnosis rates for pre-implementation (April 2006-March 2009) and post-implementation (April 2009-March 2012) periods. After implementation, we used linear regression to examine quarterly trends and calculated diagnostic yield. After implementation, the AHI diagnosis rate significantly increased from 1.03 to 1.84 per 1000 tests, as did quarterly HIV test volumes and acute to non-acute diagnosis ratio. Of the 217 new HIV diagnoses after implementation, 54 (24.9%) were AHIs (25 detected by pooled NAAT only) for an increased diagnostic yield of 11.5%. The average number of prior negative HIV tests (past 2 years) increased significantly for newly diagnosed MSM at the six study clinics compared to other newly diagnosed MSM in British Columbia, per quarter. Targeted implementation of pooled NAAT at clinics accessed by MSM is effective in increasing AHI diagnoses compared to third-generation EIA testing. Social marketing campaigns accompanying pooled NAAT implementation may contribute to increasing AHI diagnoses and frequency of HIV testing.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome vulnerability of men who have sex with men in a border area of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibakar Haldar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studying level of living, awareness about sexually transmitted infections (STIs including human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS and sex behavior of men who have sex with men (MSMs is prerequisite for control of increasing AIDS among them in India. Objective: To assess sociodemographics, awareness about STIs including AIDS, and find out the pattern of high risk sex behavior of MSM. Methodology: Cross-sectional survey was undertaken in May, 2012 among MSMs catered by T I program via Nongovernmental Organization "Madhya Banglar Sangram" in Murshidabad District. 62 MSMs were included from five cruising spots sampled randomly out of fourteen such. Information was collected via interview and focused group discussions (FGD using questionnaire and FGD guide. Blood samples were examined for VDRL reactivity. Results: Median age was 25 years and sexual debut at 13.67 ± 4.29 years. 87% respondents were residing in parental house, 20% was married, 40% had low education, 80.33% had additional jobs but 54% reported poor income. About 56% respondents knew "what is AIDS" and its spread via anal sex, mother to child transmission, needle sharing, sex worker, and blood transfusion reported by 52.46, 50.82, 47.54, 45.90, and 34.43%, respectively. More than 2/3rd, about 40 and 34.43% MSMs played "anal and oral receptive," "anal insertive" and "oral insertive" role. About 33% used condom regularly. Majority knew main symptoms of STIs. About 2/3rd reported discrimination by neighbors. Blood examination showed 6.45% VDRL reactivity. Conclusion: Reducing vulnerability of MSMs to HIV/AIDS requires holistic programs.

  11. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among HIV+ men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Ashly E; Perlman, David C; Neurer, Joshua; Smith, Daniel J; Des Jarlais, Don C; Hagan, Holly

    2017-02-01

    Since 2000, an increase in hepatitis C virus infection among HIV-infected (HIV+) men who have sex with men has been observed. Evidence points to blood exposure during sex as the medium of hepatitis C virus transmission. Hepatitis C virus prevalence among HIV + MSM overall and in relation to injection drug use is poorly characterized. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis examining global hepatitis C virus antibody prevalence and estimating active hepatitis C virus prevalence among HIV + MSM were conducted; 42 reports provided anti-hepatitis C virus prevalence data among HIV + MSM. Pooled prevalence produced an overall anti-hepatitis C virus prevalence among HIV + MSM of 8.1%; active HCV prevalence estimate was 5.3%-7.3%. Anti-hepatitis C virus prevalence among injection drug use and non-injection drug use HIV + MSM was 40.0% and 6.7%, respectively. Among HIV + MSM, hepatitis C virus prevalence increased significantly over time among the overall and non-injection drug use groups, and decreased significantly among injection drug use HIV + MSM. We identified a moderate prevalence of hepatitis C virus among all HIV + MSM and among non-injection drug use HIV + MSM; for both, prevalence was observed to be increasing slightly. Pooled prevalence of hepatitis C virus among HIV + MSM was higher than that observed in the 1945-1965 US birth cohort. The modest but rising hepatitis C virus prevalence among HIV + MSM suggests an opportunity to control HCV among HIV + MSM; this combined with data demonstrating a rising hepatitis C virus incidence highlights the temporal urgency to do so.

  12. High human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroprevalence in men who have sex with men in Buenos Aires, Argentina: risk factors for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando, Maria de los Angeles; Maulen, Sergio; Weissenbacher, Mercedes; Marone, Rubén; Duranti, Ricardo; Peralta, Liliana Martínez; Salomón, Horacio; Russell, Kevin; Negrete, Monica; Sosa Estani, Sergio; Montano, Silvia; Sanchez, José L; Avila, Maria Mercedes

    2003-10-01

    To determine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence in a sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Buenos Aires City and to identify risk factors associated with HIV type 1 infection. Participants were invited to receive HIV counselling and testing at "NEXO" (a gay non-governmental organization) by means of informative leaflets distributed in gay nightclubs, porno cinemas, gymnasiums, and in the streets. During the encounter, the study was explained by a trained social worker and individuals were invited to volunteer for the study. Diagnosis of HIV was performed using two screening tests and Western Blot assay was used as confirmatory. Human immunodeficiency virus was detected in 96 (13.8%; 95% CI: 11.4-16.7) of 694 MSM. Fourteen (14.6%) of the 96 HIV-positive MSM were already aware of their HIV serostatus. In univariate analysis, HIV-1 infection (odds ratio [OR] >1.5) was found to be associated with older age (30-39 years), being unemployed, a previous sexually transmitted disease (STD) history, and having an HIV-positive partner. Cocaine consumption and irregular use of condoms with occasional partners were also found to be risk factors. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, being unemployed (OR = 3.42; 95% CI: 1.17-9.99) and having an HIV-positive partner (OR = 2.67; 95% CI: 1.09-6.52) remained significant risk factors. The high HIV-1 prevalence observed suggests an urgent need for implementation of effective prevention campaigns. This represents the first cross-sectional epidemiological study of HIV among the high-risk group of MSM in Argentina.

  13. Short message service reminder intervention doubles sexually transmitted infection/HIV re-testing rates among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, C; Knight, V; Guy, R; Wand, H; Lu, H; McNulty, A

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a short message service (SMS) reminder system on HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) re-testing rates among men who have sex with men (MSM). The SMS reminder programme started in late 2008 at a large Australian sexual health clinic. SMS reminders were recommended 3-6 monthly for MSM considered high-risk based on self-reported sexual behaviour. The evaluation compared HIV negative MSM who had a HIV/STI test between 1 January and 31 August 2010 and received a SMS reminder (SMS group) with those tested in the same time period (comparison group) and pre-SMS period (pre-SMS group, 1 January 2008 and 31 August 2008) who did not receive the SMS. HIV/STI re-testing rates were measured within 9 months for each group. Baseline characteristics were compared between study groups and multivariate logistic regression used to assess the association between SMS and re-testing and control for any imbalances in the study groups. There were 714 HIV negative MSM in the SMS group, 1084 in the comparison group and 1753 in the pre-SMS group. In the SMS group, 64% were re-tested within 9 months compared to 30% in the comparison group (preminders increased HIV/STI re-testing among HIV negative MSM. SMS offers a cheap, efficient system to increase HIV/STI re-testing in a busy clinical setting.

  14. No increase in HIV or sexually transmissible infection testing following a social marketing campaign among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R; Goller, J; Leslie, D; Thorpe, R; Grierson, J; Batrouney, C; Kennedy, M; Lewis, J; Fairley, C; Ginige, S; Zablotska, I; Hellard, M

    2009-05-01

    A social marketing campaign ran in 2004 in the Victoria to increase rates of HIV/sexually transmissible infection (STI) testing among men having sex with men (MSM). To evaluate the initiative data from HIV sentinel surveillance, laboratory data on testing for HIV/STIs and STI/HIV testing uptake reported in annual surveys were analysed. The sentinel surveillance network showed no increase in the overall extent of HIV testing and no difference in the proportion of MSM reporting regular annual HIV testing during the campaign (43%) and post campaign (41%). The annual behavioural surveys showed that between 2004 and 2006 there was no significant increase in this overall proportion of MSM reporting having an HIV test in the last 12 months (p = 0.96). The behavioural surveys also showed an increasing trend in the proportion reporting specific STI tests over time: anal swab (26% to 39%, pcampaign and was not accelerated during the campaign. Based on a range of indicators there was no evidence that the campaign increased HIV/STI testing. These findings highlight the importance of evaluating public health campaigns to assess their impact to ensure that they are modified if no impact is identified.

  15. Barriers and facilitators to HIV and sexually transmitted infections testing for gay, bisexual, and other transgender men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheim, Ayden I; Travers, Robb

    2017-08-01

    Transgender men who have sex with men (trans MSM) may be at elevated risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI), and therefore require access to HIV and STI testing services. However, trans people often face stigma, discrimination, and gaps in provider competence when attempting to access health care and may therefore postpone, avoid, or be refused care. In this context, quantitative data have indicated low access to, and uptake of, HIV testing among trans MSM. The present manuscript aimed to identify trans MSM's perspectives on barriers and facilitators to HIV and STI testing. As part of a community-based research project investigating HIV risk and resilience among trans MSM, 40 trans MSM aged 18 and above and living in Ontario, Canada participated in one-on-one qualitative interviews in 2013. Participants described a number of barriers to HIV and other STI testing. These included both trans-specific and general difficulties in accessing sexual health services, lack of trans health knowledge among testing providers, limited clinical capacity to meet STI testing needs, and a perceived gap between trans-inclusive policies and their implementation in practice. Two major facilitators were identified: access to trusted and flexible testing providers, and integration of testing with ongoing monitoring for hormone therapy. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for enhancing access to HIV and STI testing for this key population.

  16. [Effects of education level of men who have sex with men on their high risk sexual behaviors and the infection of HIV and syphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanli; Wang, Dongli; Zhou, Jianbo; Chen, Shulei; Wang, Jinta; Zhen, Sen; Huan, Xiping; Yin, Yueping

    2014-04-01

    To study the effects of educational background of men who have sex with men (MSM) on their high risk sexual behaviors and the HIV/STI infection rates. During July to November of 2009 and March to October of 2010, snowball and convenience sampling methods were adopted to recruit MSM from MSM venues and via the internet in Changzhou city of Jiangsu province, and finally 659 MSM were conducted a questionnaire survey and serological testing. According to the educational background of MSM, they were divided into 3 groups, that is, junior high school group (206 cases), high school group (254 cases), and university group (199 cases). The questionnaire mainly includes information on social demography, sexual behaviors, condom use, etc. Blood samples were collected for HIV and syphilis spirochete detection, and urine samples were also collected in 291 MSM who were recruited during July to November of 2009 for neisseria gonorrhoeae and chlamydia trachomatis nucleic acid detection. χ(2) test and other statistical analysis methods were used to compare the characteristics of sexual behaviors and HIV/STI infections in 3 groups. Of the 659 valid questionnaires returned, junior high school group, high school group, and university group accounted for 31.3% (206 cases), 38.5% (254 cases) and 30.2% (199 cases). Places where MSM of different education levels most often to seek sexual partners, were significantly different. Junior high school group and high school group mostly went to bath house/sauna club (56.3%, 116 cases) and bar (34.8%, 88 cases) for partners, respectively, while the university group sought partners mainly through the internet (41.1%, 81 cases) (χ(2) = 99.35, P sex with men in the last 6 months, which was higher than that of high school group (67.7%, 172/254) (χ(2) = 9.74, P sex with women in the last 6 months, which was higher than that of university group (38.6%, 76/197) (χ(2) = 10.10, P sex in junior high school group (73.4%, 80/109) , high school group (78

  17. Masculine Gender Ideologies, Intimate Partner Violence, and Alcohol Use Increase Risk for Genital Tract Infections Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Donta, Balaiah; Dasgupta, Anindita; Fleming, Paul J; Ghule, Mohan; Madhusudana, Battala; Nair, Saritha; Silverman, Jay G; Saggurti, Niranjan; Raj, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Masculine gender ideologies are thought to underlie alcohol use, intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration, and sexual risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We extend on studies in the Indian context by examining the roles of masculine gender ideologies, alcohol use, and IPV on three outcomes of HIV risk (condom use, genital tract infection [GTI] symptoms, and GTI diagnosis). We applied logistic regression models to cross-sectional data of men and their wives in rural Maharashtra, India ( n = 1,080 couples). We found that men with less masculine gender ideologies demonstrated greater odds of condom use (i.e., lower odds no condom use, odds ratio [OR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.93, 0.98]). IPV perpetration was associated with increased odds of reporting ≥1 GTI symptom (adjusted OR [AOR] = 1.56, 95% CI = [1.07, 2.26]) and decreased GTI diagnosis (AOR = 0.28, 95% CI = [0.08, 0.97]). Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with increased odds of reporting ≥1 GTI symptom (AOR = 1.51, 95% CI = [1.01, 2.25]). Our findings have direct implications for men's and women's health in rural India, including targeted GTI diagnosis and treatment, integrated violence prevention in STI clinics, and targeted intervention on masculine gender ideologies.

  18. Human Papillomavirus infection in men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution among men ages 18 years and older recruited from three different countries utilizing a common protocol for sampling HPV detection, and to evaluate whether HPV detection differs by age and country. MATERIAL AD METHODS: The study protocol includes a pre-enrollment run-in visit, a baseline (enrollment) visit, and nine additional visits after enrollment scheduled six months apart. For this analysis, the first 1160 men who completed...

  19. Community event-based outreach screening for syphilis and other sexually transmissible infections among gay men in Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Phillip J; Knight, Vickie; Bourne, Christopher; Guy, Rebecca; Donovan, Basil; Allan, Warwick; McNulty, Anna M

    2013-08-01

    Objectives Increased testing frequency is a key strategy in syphilis control, but achieving regular testing is difficult. The objective of this study is to describe a sexually transmissible infection (STI) testing outreach program (the Testing Tent) at a gay community event. Gay men attending the testing tent in 2010-11 completed a computer-assisted self-interview and were screened for STIs. Clinical, demographic, behavioural and diagnostic data were compared with gay men attending a clinic-based service during 2009. The Testing Tent was marketed on social media sites and data were extracted on the number of times the advertisements were viewed. Staffing, laboratory, marketing and venue hire expenses were calculated to estimate the cost of delivering the service. Ninety-eight men attended the Testing Tent. They were older (median age: 42 years v. 30 years; Pfacilities are an acceptable option and are accessed by gay men requiring regular testing, and may be an important addition to traditional testing environments.

  20. Evaluation of the health-related quality of life of children in Schistosoma haematobium-endemic communities in Kenya: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn C Terer

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis remains a global public health challenge, with 93% of the ~237 million infections occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. Though rarely fatal, its recurring nature makes it a lifetime disorder with significant chronic health burdens. Much of its negative health impact is due to non-specific conditions such as anemia, undernutrition, pain, exercise intolerance, poor school performance, and decreased work capacity. This makes it difficult to estimate the disease burden specific to schistosomiasis using the standard DALY metric.In our study, we used Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL, a modular instrument available for ages 2-18 years, to assess health-related quality of life (HrQoL among children living in a Schistosoma haematobium-endemic area in coastal Kenya. The PedsQL questionnaires were administered by interview to children aged 5-18 years (and their parents in five villages spread across three districts. HrQoL (total score was significantly lower in villages with high prevalence of S. haematobium (-4.0%, p<0.001 and among the lower socioeconomic quartiles (-2.0%, p<0.05. A greater effect was seen in the psychosocial scales as compared to the physical function scale. In moderate prevalence villages, detection of any parasite eggs in the urine was associated with a significant 2.1% (p<0.05 reduction in total score. The PedsQL reliabilities were generally high (Cronbach alphas ≥0.70, floor effects were acceptable, and identification of children from low socioeconomic standing was valid.We conclude that exposure to urogenital schistosomiasis is associated with a 2-4% reduction in HrQoL. Further research is warranted to determine the reproducibility and responsiveness properties of QoL testing in relation to schistosomiasis. We anticipate that a case definition based on more sensitive parasitological diagnosis among younger children will better define the immediate and long-term HrQoL impact of Schistosoma infection.

  1. Prevalence of anogenital HPV infection, related disease and risk factors among HIV-infected men in inner-city Johannesburg, South Africa: baseline findings from a cohort study

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    Admire Chikandiwa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV infection is associated with the development of anogenital cancers, particularly in men living with HIV (MLWH. We describe the prevalence of anogenital HPV infection, abnormal anal cytology and anogenital warts (AGWs in MLWH in Johannesburg, and explore whether HPV infection and receipt of antiretroviral treatment is associated with detection of abnormal anal cytology and AGWs. Methods We enrolled a cohort of 304 sexually-active MLWH ≥18 years, who completed a questionnaire and physical examination. Genital swabs were collected from all men and intra-anal swabs from 250 (82%. Swabs were tested for HPV DNA and genotypes, and anal smears graded using the Bethesda classification. Factors associated with anogenital disease were assessed by logistic regression models. Results Two thirds were receiving antiretroviral treatment, for a median 33 months (IQR = 15–58 and 54% were HIV-virologically suppressed. Only 5% reported ever having sex with men. Among 283 genital swabs with valid results, 79% had any HPV, 52% had HR-HPV and 27% had >1 HR-HPV infection. By comparison, 39% of the 227 valid intra-anal swabs had detectable HPV, 25% had any HR-HPV and 7% >1 HR infection. While most anal smears were normal (51%, 20% had ASCUS and 29% were LSIL. No cases had HSIL or cancer. Infection with >1 HR type (adjusted OR [aOR] = 2.39; 95%CI = 1.02–5.58 and alpha-9 types (aOR = 3.98; 95%CI = 1.42–11.16 were associated with having abnormal cytology. Prevalence of AGWs was 12%. Infection with any LR type (aOR = 41.28; 95%CI = 13.57–125.62, >1 LR type (aOR = 4.14; 95%CI = 1.60–10.69, being <6 months on antiretroviral treatment (aOR = 6.90; 95%CI = 1.63–29.20 and having a CD4+ count <200 cells/μL (aOR = 5.48; 95%CI: 1.60–18.78 were associated with having AGWs. Conclusions In this population, anogenital HR-HPV infection and associated low-grade disease is

  2. HIV infection and sexual risk among men who have sex with men and women (MSMW: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Reuel Friedman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate the number of men who have sex with men and women who are HIV-positive in the United States, and to compare HIV prevalence rates between men who have sex with men and women, men who have sex with men only, and men who have sex with women exclusively. METHODS: Following PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of reports referencing HIV prevalence and men who have sex with men and women. We searched PubMed and Ovid PsycINFO for peer-reviewed, U.S.-based articles reporting on HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men and women. We conducted event rate, effect size, moderation and sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: We estimate that 1.0% of U.S. males are bisexually-behaving, and that 121,800 bisexually-behaving men are HIV-positive. Men who have sex with men and women are less than half as likely to be HIV-positive as men who have sex with men only (16.9% vs. 33.3%; OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.31, 0.54, but more than five times as likely to be HIV-positive as men who have sex with women exclusively (18.3% vs. 3.5%; OR = 5.71, 95% CI: 3.47, 9.39. They are less likely to engage in unprotected receptive anal intercourse than men who have sex with men only (15.9% vs. 35.0%; OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.46. Men who have sex with men and women in samples with high racial/ethnic minority proportions had significantly higher HIV prevalence than their counterparts in low racial/ethnic minority samples. CONCLUSIONS: This represents the first meta-analysis of HIV prevalence in the U.S. between men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only. Data collection, research, and HIV prevention and care delivery specifically tailored to men who have sex with men and women are necessary to better quantify and ameliorate this population's HIV burden.

  3. Southern African guidelines for the safe use of pre-exposure prophylaxis in men who have sex with men who are at risk for HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southern African HIV Clinicians Society Consensus Committee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of oral antiretrovirals to prevent HIV infection among HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM has been shown to be safe and efficacious. A large, randomised, placebo-controlled trial showed a 44% reduction in the incidence of HIV infection among MSM receiving a daily oral fixed-dose combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (Truvada in combination with an HIV prevention package. Improved protection was seen with higher levels of adherence. Aim. The purpose of this guideline is to: (i explain what pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is; (ii outline current indications for its use; (iii outline steps for appropriate client selection; and (iv provide guidance for monitoring and maintaining clients on PrEP. Method. PrEP is indicated for HIV-negative MSM who are assessed to be at high risk for HIV acquisition and who are willing and motivated to use PrEP as part of a package of HIV prevention services (including condoms, lubrication, sexually transmitted infection (STI management and risk reduction counselling. Recommendations. HIV testing, estimation of creatinine clearance and STI and hepatitis B screening are recommended as baseline investigations. Daily oral Truvada, along with adherence support, can then be prescribed for eligible MSM. PrEP should not be given to MSM with abnormal renal function, nor to clients who are unmotivated to use PrEP as part of an HIV prevention package; nor should it be commenced during an acute viral illness. Three-monthly follow-up visits to assess tolerance, renal function, adherence and ongoing eligibility is recommended. Six-monthly STI screens and annual creatinine levels to estimate creatinine clearance are recommended. Hepatitis B vaccination should be provided to susceptible clients. Gastro-intestinal symptoms and weight loss are common side-effects, mostly experienced for the first 4 - 8 weeks after initiating PrEP. There is a risk of the development of antiretroviral

  4. Perceived viral load, but not actual HIV-1-RNA load, is associated with sexual risk behaviour among HIV-infected homosexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, Ineke G.; de Wit, John B. F.; van Eeden, Arne; Coutinho, Roel A.; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increases in sexual risk behaviour and sexually transmitted infections among HIV-infected homosexual men after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) confirm the need for innovative prevention activities. The present study focused on time trends in sexual risk

  5. Accuracy of ultrasonography and plain-film abdominal radiography in the diagnosis of urologic abnormalities in men with urinary tract infection: critically appraised topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daunt, S.W.

    2004-01-01

    An adult male patient presented with dysuria and urinary frequency. A subsequent urine culture confirmed the presence of a urinary tract infection. How accurate is the combination of ultrasonography and plain-film abdominal radiography in the diagnosis of urologic abnormalities in men with confirmed urinary tract infection? (author)

  6. At risk, infected, and invisible: older gay men and HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, A H

    1995-01-01

    Older gay men over the age of 50 have been and continue to be an invisible part of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The reasons for this phenomenon are many, but among them are societal beliefs, myths, and stereotypes emanating from ageism and homophobia. In addition, HIV/AIDS is sometimes misdiagnosed in older adults because many of its symptoms mimic other illness that affect older people. Among the HIV risk factors of older gay men are internalized homophobia, denial of risk, alcohol and other substance use, and anonymous sexual encounters. The challenge for nurses and other providers is to reach, educate, and assist older gay men effectively in changing and maintaining safe behaviors when they are engaging in sexual and drug-using behaviors that can transmit HIV.

  7. Incidence and characteristics of sexually transmitted acute hepatitis C virus infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in Copenhagen, Denmark during four years (2006-2009): a retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Toke S; Omland, Lars Haukali; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2011-01-01

    We determined the incidence of hepatitis C virus among Danish human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and described their characteristics. We included 871 HIV-positive MSM seen from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2009 at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen; drug users...... were excluded. We found 13 incident infections, i.e. a yearly incidence of 0.4%....

  8. The Impact of a Social Marketing Campaign on HIV and Sexually Transmissible Infection Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Anna L; Pedrana, Alisa E; El-Hayek, Carol; Vella, Alyce M; Asselin, Jason; Batrouney, Colin; Fairley, Christopher K; Read, Tim R H; Hellard, Margaret; Stoové, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In response to increasing HIV and other sexually transmissible infection (HIV/STI) notifications in Australia, a social marketing campaign Drama Downunder (DDU) was launched in 2008 to promote HIV/STI testing among men who have sex with men (MSM). We analyzed prospective data from (1) an online cohort of MSM and (2) clinic-level HIV/STI testing to evaluate the impact of DDU on HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia testing. (1) Cohort participants who completed 3 surveys (2010-2014) contributed to a Poisson regression model examining predictors of recent HIV testing.(2) HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia tests among MSM attending high caseload primary care clinics (2007-2013) were included in an interrupted time series analysis. (1) Although campaign awareness was high among 242 MSM completing 726 prospective surveys, campaign recall was not associated with self-reported HIV testing. Reporting previous regular HIV testing (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.4) and more than 10 partners in the previous 6 months (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.4) was associated with recent HIV testing. (2) Analysis of 257,023 tests showed increasing monthly HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia tests pre-DDU. Post-DDU, gonorrhea test rates increased significantly among HIV-negative MSM, with modest and nonsignificant increasing rates of HIV, syphilis, and chlamydia testing. Among HIV-positive MSM, no change in gonorrhea or chlamydia testing occurred and syphilis testing declined significantly. Increasing HIV/STI testing trends among MSM occurred pre- and post-DDU, coinciding with other plausible drivers of testing. Modest changes in HIV testing post-DDU suggest that structural changes to improve testing access may need to occur alongside health promotion to increase testing frequency.

  9. Development and validation of a risk score to assist screening for acute HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Dijkstra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early treatment of acute HIV-1 infection (AHI is beneficial for patients and could reduce onward transmission. However, guidelines on whom to test for AHI with HIV-1 RNA testing are lacking. Methods A risk score for possible AHI based on literature and expert opinion – including symptoms associated with AHI and early HIV-1 – was evaluated using data from the Amsterdam Cohort Studies among men who have sex with men (MSM. Subsequently, we optimized the risk score by constructing two multivariable logistic regression models: one including only symptoms and one combining symptoms with known risk factors for HIV-1 seroconversion, using generalized estimating equations. Several risk scores were generated from these models and the optimal risk score was validated using data from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Results Using data from 1562 MSM with 175 HIV-1 seroconversion visits and 17,271 seronegative visits in the Amsterdam Cohort Studies, the optimal risk score included four symptoms (oral thrush, fever, lymphadenopathy, weight loss and three risk factors (self-reported gonorrhea, receptive condomless anal intercourse, more than five sexual partners, all in the preceding six months and yielded an AUC of 0.82. Sensitivity was 76.3% and specificity 76.3%. Validation in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study resulted in an AUC of 0.78, sensitivity of 56.2% and specificity of 88.8%. Conclusions The optimal risk score had good overall performance in the Amsterdam Cohort Studies and performed comparable (but showed lower sensitivity in the validation study. Screening for AHI with four symptoms and three risk factors would increase the efficiency of AHI testing and potentially enhance early diagnosis and immediate treatment.

  10. Sexual Risk Behaviors and HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women in China: Evidence from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To understand the current risk of HIV infection and transmission and further elucidate the underlying risk factors among men who have sex with men and women (MSMW in China. Methods. Following PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of searching through Chinese and English available literature databases between January 2000 and June 2014 to identify articles. Results. Thirty-six articles (including 19,730 MSMW and 53,536 MSMO met the selection criteria and the aggregated results found that MSMW have significantly higher HIV prevalence than MSMO (6.6% versus 5.4%, OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.01–1.58. A higher proportion of MSMW had commercial male partners in the past 6 months (18.3% versus 12.2%, OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.01–2.42. Additionally, substance use in the past 6 months was significantly more frequent among MSMW than MSMO (alcohol use: 27.1% versus 13.1%, OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 2.14–2.99; illicit drug use: 5.3% versus 2.5%, OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.48–2.95. Conclusion. A higher proportion of commercial sex and substance use among MSMW may be a potentially indicative factor for significantly higher HIV prevalence compared to MSMO. Targeted interventions should aim at increasing the frequency of HIV/STIs screening and preventing high risk commercial sex and substance use among MSMW to decrease their HIV transmission to the general population.

  11. The Association between Infections and General Cognitive Ability in Young Men - A Nationwide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Sørensen, Holger Jelling; Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising

    2015-01-01

    nationwide registers were linked to establish a cohort of all 161,696 male conscripts during the years 2006-2012 who were tested for cognitive ability, which was based on logical, verbal, numerical and spatial reasoning at a mean age of 19.4 years. Test scores were converted to a mean of 100.......00 and with a standard deviation (SD) of 15. Data were analyzed as a cohort study with severe infections requiring hospitalization as exposure using linear regression. RESULTS: Adjusted effect sizes were calculated with non-exposure to severe infections as reference, ranging from 0.12 SD to 0.63 SD on general cognitive...... of infections (Mean: -9.44; 95%CI: -13.2 to -5.69; corresponding to 0.63 SD). Hospital contacts with infections had occurred in 35% of the individuals prior to conscription. CONCLUSIONS: Independent of a wide range of possible confounders, significant associations between infections and cognitive ability were...

  12. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in 2 million men aged 21-49 years in rural China: a population-based, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jue; Zhang, Shikun; Wang, Qiaomei; Shen, Haiping; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Yiping; Yan, Donghai; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is highly endemic (7-8% prevalence) in rural China, causing high mortality and societal burden. Data from men of reproductive age is scarce and last reported in 2006. We assessed the seroepidemiology of men in rural China, aiming to provide updated baseline data for the prevalence of HBV infection. We established prevalence of HBV infection from data gathered through a nationwide population-based study of Chinese rural men aged 21-49 years. Data were obtained from a physical check-up programme for couples of reproductive age, the National Free Preconception Health Examination Project, that covered 31 provinces from 2010-12. We tested serological samples with ELISA and categorised participants' HBV status based on presence of HBsAg, anti-HBV core antibody (anti-HBc), and anti-HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs). 2 030 083 men were recruited into the database from Jan 1, 2010, to Dec 31, 2012, and 1 966 013 men provided serum samples for analysis. 124 274 men (6%) tested positive for HBsAg, 178 559 (9%) tested positive for anti-HBc, and 583 923 (30%) tested positive for anti-HBs. Isolated anti-HBs (an indicator of vaccine-mediated immunity) were present in 527 566 men (27%). And 1 234 127 men (63%) were negative for all HBV makers (susceptible population). HBsAg prevalence was higher in men aged 25-39 years (6·35-6·47%) than in other age groups (5·54-5·78%; pChina than in the central or western regions (all pChina has changed from highly endemic into intermediate endemic in the past two decades. However, the absolute number of HBV-infected men and the susceptible population is still very large. Chinese Association of Maternal and Child Health Studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The prevalence and concordance of human papillomavirus infection in different anogenital sites among men and women in Liuzhou, China: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feixue; Li, Mingqiang; Wu, Xin; Yin, Kai; Lan, Jian; Sheng, Wei; Guo, Meng; Huang, Shoujie; Wang, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Rongcheng; Su, Yingying; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao

    2018-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the pathogenesis of anogenital cancers and genital warts in both men and women, whereas there is a scarcity of large studies focused on HPV prevalence in different anogenital sites of both sexes in the same population. From May to July 2014, 2,309 men and 2,378 women aged 18-55 were enrolled from communities in Liuzhou, China. Penis/glans penis/coronary sulcus (PGC) and perianal/anal canal (PA) specimens of men, and vaginal (VA), vulvar (VU) and PA specimens of women, were collected and genotyped for HPV. The prevalence of any HPV tested in PGC and PA samples from men and VA, VU and PA samples from women was 10.8%, 3.8%, 14.2%, 13.3% and 8.4%, respectively. The concordance of VA and VU was highest (kappa = 0.74), followed by VU and PA (0.44), VA and PA (0.38) and PGC and PA (0.14). Besides sex behavior, ever having used a towel supplied by a hotel was a risk factor for both external genital and PA HPV infection. Our data indicated that women were more of a major reservoir for oncogenic HPV infection of both genital sites and PA sites than was men. In both sexes, the genital sites were more likely than PA sites to harbor HPV infection. The concordance rates of HPV infection between genital sites and PA infection were poor. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Concomitant socioeconomic, behavioral, and biological factors associated with the disproportionate HIV infection burden among Black men who have sex with men in 6 U.S. cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth H Mayer

    Full Text Available American Black men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV, but the factors associated with this concentrated epidemic are not fully understood.Black MSM were enrolled in 6 US cities to evaluate a multi-component prevention intervention, with the current analysis focusing on the correlates of being newly diagnosed with HIV compared to being HIV-uninfected or previously diagnosed with HIV.HPTN 061 enrolled 1553 Black MSM whose median age was 40; 30% self-identified exclusively as gay or homosexual, 29% exclusively as bisexual, and 3% as transgender. About 1/6(th (16.2% were previously diagnosed with HIV (PD; of 1263 participants without a prior HIV diagnosis 7.6% were newly diagnosed (ND. Compared to PD, ND Black MSM were younger (p<0.001; less likely to be living with a primary partner (p<0.001; more likely to be diagnosed with syphilis (p<0.001, rectal gonorrhea (p = 0.011 or chlamydia (p = 0.020. Compared to HIV-uninfected Black MSM, ND were more likely to report unprotected receptive anal intercourse (URAI with a male partner in the last 6 months (p<0.001; and to be diagnosed with syphilis (p<0.001, rectal gonorrhea (p = 0.004, and urethral (p = 0.025 or rectal chlamydia (p<0.001. They were less likely to report female (p = 0.002 or transgender partners (p = 0.018. Multivariate logistic regression analyses found that ND Black MSM were significantly more likely than HIV-uninfected peers to be unemployed; have STIs, and engage in URAI. Almost half the men in each group were poor, had depressive symptoms, and expressed internalized homophobia.ND HIV-infected Black MSM were more likely to be unemployed, have bacterial STIs and engage in URAI than other Black MSM. Culturally-tailored programs that address economic disenfranchisement, increase engagement in care, screen for STIs, in conjunction with safer sex prevention interventions, may help to decrease further transmission in this heavily

  15. Understanding the high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among socio-economically vulnerable men who have sex with men in Jamaica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Peter Figueroa

    Full Text Available This study estimates HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM in Jamaica and explores social determinants of HIV infection among MSM.An island-wide cross-sectional survey of MSM recruited by peer referral and outreach was conducted in 2011. A structured questionnaire was administered and HIV/STI tests done. We compared three groups: MSM who accepted cash for sex within the past 3 months (MSM SW, MSM who did not accept cash for sex (MSM non-SW, and MSM with adverse life events (ever raped, jailed, homeless, victim of violence or low literacy.HIV prevalence among 449 MSM was 31.4%, MSM SW 41.1%, MSM with adverse life events 38.5%, 17 transgender MSM (52.9%, and MSM non-SW without adverse events 21.0%. HIV prevalence increased with age and number of adverse life events (test for trend P < 0.001, as did STI prevalence (P = 0.03. HIV incidence was 6.7 cases/100 person-years (95% CI: 3.74, 12.19. HIV prevalence was highest among MSM reporting high-risk sex; MSM SW who had been raped (65.0%, had a STI (61.2% and who self identified as female (55.6%. Significant risk factors for HIV infection common to all 3 subgroups were participation in both receptive and insertive anal intercourse, high-risk sex, and history of a STI. Perception of no or little risk, always using a condom, and being bisexual were protective.HIV prevalence was high among MSM SW and MSM with adverse life events. Given the characteristics of the sample, HIV prevalence among MSM in Jamaica is probably in the range of 20%. The study illustrates the importance of social vulnerability in driving the HIV epidemic. Programs to empower young MSM, reduce social vulnerability and other structural barriers including stigma and discrimination against MSM are critical to reduce HIV transmission.

  16. A faunistic survey of digenean larvae infecting freshwater snails ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp have been reported in Tanzania as vectors of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium respectively. Thus most schistosomiasis control efforts have focussed on elimination of these molluscs in freshwater systems or deworming infected persons. In addition almost there is limited ...

  17. Parasitic infections associated with febrile conditions in Imo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract parasites, which included Trichomonas. vaginalis and Schistosoma haematobium, were found in 330(6.87%) of the study population and hemoparasites (P. falciparum and Onchocerca spp.) in 1260(26.25%). Mixed infections of gastrointestinal and hemoparasites, gastrointestinal and urinary tract parasites, ...

  18. Relevant prevalence of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum serogroups in HIV-1 infected men without urethritis symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORDOVA Caio Mauricio Mendes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available M. hominis and U. urealyticum are the better-known mycoplasma species pathogenic to the human genitourinary tract, causing mainly urethritis, bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy complications. In HIV-infected patients, the prevalence and role of these species is still not well known. The aim of this work was to determinate the prevalence of these species in this group of male patients (HIV group, in comparison to a group of men with clinical symptoms of urethritis (STD group. M. hominis was isolated from 7.5% patients (8/106 and U. urealyticum from 18.9% patients (20/106 from the HIV group, being among these 62.5% and 85% in significant concentrations, respectively. In the STD group these rates were 0.9% (1/110 for M. hominis and 13.6% (15/110 for U. urealyticum, being 100% and 93.3% in significant concentrations, respectively. We could demonstrate infection rates by these mycoplasma species in the HIV group as high as the one found in the STD one, what may indicate the occurrence of opportunistic infections in our population. This fact is discussed here because in immunosuppressed patients, specially M. hominis has been reported causing severe infections, even systemically.

  19. Sexual partner characteristics and incident rectal Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis infections among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM): a prospective cohort in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhani, Habib O; Liu, Hongjie; Nowak, Rebecca G; Crowell, Trevor A; Ndomb, Teclaire; Gaydos, Charlotte; Peel, Sheila; Ndembi, Nicaise; Baral, Stefan D; Ake, Julie; Charurat, Man E

    2017-08-01

    STIs including Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) potentiate HIV acquisition and transmission especially among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM). We investigated the influence of sexual network composition on incident rectal NG and/or CT infections among Nigerian MSM. TRUST/RV368 is a cohort of MSM recruited using respondent-driven sampling at trusted community centres in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria. MSM respondents (egos) provided STI risk factors and demographic information for up to five of their most recent sexual partners (alters) within their sexual networks. Egos were tested for HIV, NG and CT every 3 months. Log-binomial regression was used to assess associations between alter characteristics and incident NG and/or CT. Between March 2013 and October 2015, 492 MSM were longitudinally screened for STIs, of which 28.0% (n=138) were positive for incident rectal STI (61 NG only, 42 CT only and 35 NG and CT). Among egos, condom use was associated with STIs (half of the time vs never (adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 0.5; 95% CI 0.3 to 0.8), always/almost always vs never (aRR 0.7; 95% CI 0.5 to 1.0)). Incident STIs were associated with having a younger alter ≤19 versus 30 years (aRR 0.6; 95% CI 0.4 to 1.0), HIV infection (aRR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0) and engaging in sex under the influence of alcohol (aRR 1.4 95% CI 1.1 to 1.7) among regular alters and age ≤19 versus 30 years (aRR 0.3; 95% CI 0.2 to 0.6), HIV infection (aRR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.8) and engaging in sex under the influence of alcohol (aRR 1.2 95% CI 1.0 to 1.4) among casual alters. Given the centrality of sexual partner characteristics as risks for incident STIs among Nigerian MSM, there is a need to move beyond individual interventions and syndromic surveillance and get 'out there' in the STI management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Role of cytokines and testosterone in regulating lean body mass and resting energy expenditure in HIV-infected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubenoff, Ronenn; Grinspoon, Steven; Skolnik, Paul R; Tchetgen, Eric; Abad, Leslie; Spiegelman, Donna; Knox, Tamsin; Gorbach, Sherwood

    2002-07-01

    Although catastrophic weight loss is no longer common in HIV-infected men, we hypothesized that a more gradual process of cachexia [loss of lean body mass (LBM) without severe weight loss, often accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure (REE)] is still common and is driven by excessive production of the catabolic cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). We performed a longitudinal analysis of an ongoing cohort study of nutritional status in 172 men with HIV infection. LBM loss of >1 kg occurred in 35% of the cohort, and LBM loss of >5% occurred in 12.2% over 8 mo of observation, but classical wasting (loss of approximately 10% of weight) was rare (2%). Both TNF-alpha (-150 g LBM. ng(-1) x ml(-1), P production (-130 g LBM x ng(-1) x ml(-1), P 200 kcal/day was found in 17.7% of the subjects regardless of weight change. IL-1 beta (+9 kcal/day per ng/ml, P production predicted Delta REE. Serum free testosterone was inversely associated with TNF-alpha production and was not an independent predictor of either Delta LBM or Delta REE after adjustment for cytokine production. Even though weight loss was rare in this cohort of patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy, loss of LBM was common and was driven by catabolic cytokines and not by inadequate dietary intake or hypogonadism.

  1. Prevalence and Correlates of Trichomonas vaginalis Infection Among Men and Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Eshan U; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Packman, Zoe R; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2018-03-15

    The epidemiology of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection in the United States is poorly defined. Males and females aged 18-59 years who participated in the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and provided a urine specimen were tested for TV infection (n = 4057). Participants were also examined for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection, genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus. Weighted adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were estimated by multivariable Poisson regression. TV infection prevalence was 0.5% and 1.8% among males and females, respectively. TV infection prevalence was 4.2% among black males, 8.9% among black females, and 0.03% and 0.8%, respectively, among males and females of other races/ethnicities. TV infection prevalence (aPR [95% confidence interval]) was positively associated with female sex (6.1 [3.3-11.3]), black race (vs other races/ethnicities; 7.9 [3.9-16.1]), older age (vs 18-24 years; 3.0 [1.2-7.1] for 25- to 39-year-olds and 3.5 [1.3-9.4] for 40- to 59-year-olds), having less than a high school education (vs completing high school or more; 2.0 [1.0-4.1]), being below the poverty level (vs at or above the poverty level; 4.0 [2.1-7.7]), and having ≥2 sexual partners in the past year (vs 0-1 sexual partners; 3.6 [2.0-6.6]). There were no TV and CT coinfections. Genital HPV detection was not independently associated with TV infection. Among persons aged 18-39 years, there was a significant racial disparity in all sexually transmitted infections examined, and this disparity was greatest for TV infection. There is a high and disproportionate burden of urinary TV infection in the adult civilian, noninstitutionalized black population in the United States that warrants intervention.

  2. Factors associated with intention to use internet-based testing for sexually transmitted infections among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark; Hottes, Travis Salway; Kerr, Thomas; Taylor, Darlene; Fairley, Christopher K; Lester, Richard; Wong, Tom; Trussler, Terry; Marchand, Rick; Shoveller, Jean; Ogilvie, Gina

    2013-11-14

    Internet-based testing programs are being increasingly used to reduce testing barriers for individuals at higher risk of infection, yet the population impact and potential for exacerbation of existing health inequities of these programs are not well understood. We used a large online sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Canada to measure acceptability of Internet-based testing and perceived advantages and disadvantages of this testing approach. We asked participants of the 2011/2012 Sex Now Survey (a serial online survey of gay and bisexual men in Canada) whether they intended to use Internet-based testing and their perceived benefits and disadvantages of use. We examined whether intention to use was associated with explanatory variables spanning (A) sociodemographics, (B) Internet and technology usage, (C) sexually transmitted infections (STI)/ human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and risk, and (D) health care access and testing, using multivariable logistic regression (variable selection using Bayesian information criterion). Overall, intention to use was high (5678/7938, 71.53%) among participants with little variation by participant characteristics. In our final model, we retained the variables related to (B) Internet and technology usage: use of Internet to cruise for sex partners (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.46, 95% CI 1.25-1.70), use of Internet to search for sexual health information (AOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.23-1.51), and mobile phone usage (AOR 1.19, 95% 1.13-1.24). We also retained the variables for (D) health care access and testing: not "out" to primary care provider (AOR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10-1.41), delayed/avoided testing due to privacy concerns (AOR 1.77, 95% CI 1.49-2.11), and delayed/avoided testing due to access issues (AOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.40-1.95). Finally, we retained the variable being HIV positive (AOR 0.56, 95% CI 0.46-0.68) or HIV status unknown (AOR 0.89, 95% CI 0.77-1.01), age Internet-based testing were privacy (2249/8388, 26.81%), general

  3. Endodontic infection and endothelial dysfunction are associated with different mechanisms in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Elisabetta; Zedda, Angela; Deidda, Martino; Piras, Alessandra; Flore, Giovanna; Ideo, Francesca; Madeddu, Clelia; Pau, Valentina Maria; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential link between apical periodontitis (AP) and cardiovascular (CV) function, inflammation markers, endothelial flow reserve (EFR), and levels of asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), the endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), were measured in young adults with AP aged 20-40 years of both sexes. Forty men and 41 women (31 ± 5.71 years) free from periodontal disease, CV disease, and traditional CV risk factors were enrolled in the study. Twenty men and 21 women had AP; 40 healthy individuals matched for age, sex, and physical characteristics were also recruited as controls. All subjects underwent dental and complete physical examination, electrocardiography, conventional and tissue Doppler imaging echocardiography, and measurement of EFR. Interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ADMA were also assessed. Data were analyzed using the 2-tailed Student t test, the Pearson t test (or the Spearman t test for nonparametric variables), and multivariate linear regression analysis. Echocardiography excluded any morphologic and functional cardiac alteration in all the subjects studied. Patients with AP of both sexes showed a significant reduction in EFR (P < .05) and a significant increase in IL-2 (men: P < .01, women: P < .05), whereas ROS were increased significantly only in women (P < .05). ADMA levels were unchanged in women with AP, but they were significantly increased in men (P < .05). A significant direct correlation between ADMA and IL-2 (r = 0.67, P < .001) and an inverse correlation between ADMA and EFR (r = -0.42, P < .05) in men and a significant inverse correlation between ROS and EFR (r = -0.71, P < .01) in female patients were observed. The presence of chronic inflammation in young adults with AP may cause early endothelial dysfunction documented by the reduced EFR. AP in men may influence the metabolism of NOS, whereas in women it appears to implicate a more direct detrimental

  4. Retention of clinical trial participants in a study of nongonococcal urethritis (NGU), a sexually transmitted infection in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Lensing, Shelly Y; Schwebke, Jane R

    2012-07-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis (NGU), an inflammation of the urethra not caused by gonorrhea, is the most common urethritis syndrome seen in men in the United States. It is a sexually transmitted infection commonly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, a pathogen which occurs more frequently in African-American men compared to white men. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to retention of study participants in a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial that evaluated four treatment regimens for the treatment of NGU. After the one-week treatment period, follow-up visits were scheduled during days 15-19 and days 35-45. Participants were phoned prior to scheduled appointments to encourage attendance, and contacted after missed appointments to reschedule their clinic visits. Of the 305 male study participants, 298 (98%) were African-American, 164 (54%) were 25 years of age or younger, and 80 (31%) had a post-secondary school education. The overall retention rate was 75%. Factors associated with study completion were educational level attained and clinical center. Participants with higher levels of education were more likely to complete the study. Clinical centers with the highest retention rates also provided the highest monetary incentives for participation. The retention rate for this study suggests that strategies are needed for improving the proportion of study participants that complete a clinical trial among young men with a sexually transmitted disease. These strategies may include increasing contacts with study participants to remind them of scheduled study visits using text messaging or social media and the use of financial incentives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effectiveness of electrocautery ablation for the treatment of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, J; Curran, A; Landolfi, S; Navarro, J; Tallada, N; Guelar, A; Crespo, M; Ocaña, I; Ribera, E; Falcó, V

    2016-08-01

    Electrocautery is one of the main treatment options for high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN). However, data regarding its efficacy are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of electrocautery for the treatment of HGAIN. An observational study of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) who underwent screening for anal dysplasia was carried out. The on-treatment effectiveness of electrocautery was evaluated (according to biopsy findings measured 6-8 weeks after treatment) in patients with HGAIN. A complete response was defined as resolution of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), a partial response as regression to low-grade AIN and recurrence as biopsy-proven HGAIN during follow-up. From May 2009 to November 2014, 21.9% (126 of 576) of patients screened were found to have HGAIN. Electrocautery effectiveness was evaluated in 83 patients. A complete response was observed in 27 patients [32.5%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 23.4-53.2%], a partial response in 28 patients (33.7%; 95% CI 24.5-44.4%) and persistence in 28 patients (33.7%; 95% CI 24.5-44.4%). The patients with the most successful results (81.8%) required two to four sessions of electrocautery. After a mean follow-up of 12.1 months, 14 of 55 patients with a response (25.4%; 95% CI 15.8-38.3%) developed recurrent HGAIN within a mean time of 29.9 months (95% CI 22-37.7 months). No patient progressed to invasive cancer during the study or developed serious adverse events after treatment. No factors associated with poor response or recurrences were observed. Although electrocautery is the standard treatment for anal dysplasia, almost 50% of patients with HGAIN in our study did not respond or relapsed. New treatment strategies are necessary to optimize the management of anal dysplasia. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  6. Childhood Exposure to Religions With High Prevalence of Members Who Discourage Homosexuality Is Associated With Adult HIV Risk Behaviors and HIV Infection in Black Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E.; Wilton, Leo; Zhang, Nanhua; Regan, Rotrease; Thach, Chia T.; Dyer, Typhanye V.; Kushwaha, Sameer; Sanders, Rev. Edwin C.; Ndoye, Omar; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to childhood religious affiliations where the majority of members discourage homosexuality may have negative psychological impacts for Black men who have sex with men. This study tested the hypothesis that exposures to these environments during childhood were associated with adulthood human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infection (STI) behavioral risk and HIV infection, because these exposures influenced HIV/STI risk by undermining race/sexual identity congruence and increasing internalized homophobia and interpersonal anxiety. Structural equation modeling as well as logistic and Poisson regressions were performed using baseline data from HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 (N = 1,553). Childhood religion affiliations that were more discouraging of homosexuality were associated with increased likelihood of HIV infection; however, the association was no longer significant after adjusting for age, income, and education. Having a childhood religion affiliation with high prevalence of beliefs discouraging homosexuality was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners (adjusted odds ratio = 4.31; 95% confidence interval [3.76, 4.94], p < .01). The hypothesized path model was largely supported and accounted for 37% of the variance in HIV infection; however, interpersonal anxiety was not associated with HIV/STI risk behaviors. Structural interventions are needed that focus on developing affirming theologies in religious institutions with Black men who have sex with men congregants. PMID:26758708

  7. Childhood Exposure to Religions With High Prevalence of Members Who Discourage Homosexuality Is Associated With Adult HIV Risk Behaviors and HIV Infection in Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E; Wilton, Leo; Zhang, Nanhua; Regan, Rotrease; Thach, Chia T; Dyer, Typhanye V; Kushwaha, Sameer; Sanders, Rev Edwin C; Ndoye, Omar; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to childhood religious affiliations where the majority of members discourage homosexuality may have negative psychological impacts for Black men who have sex with men. This study tested the hypothesis that exposures to these environments during childhood were associated with adulthood human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infection (STI) behavioral risk and HIV infection, because these exposures influenced HIV/STI risk by undermining race/sexual identity congruence and increasing internalized homophobia and interpersonal anxiety. Structural equation modeling as well as logistic and Poisson regressions were performed using baseline data from HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 ( N = 1,553). Childhood religion affiliations that were more discouraging of homosexuality were associated with increased likelihood of HIV infection; however, the association was no longer significant after adjusting for age, income, and education. Having a childhood religion affiliation with high prevalence of beliefs discouraging homosexuality was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners (adjusted odds ratio = 4.31; 95% confidence interval [3.76, 4.94], p < .01). The hypothesized path model was largely supported and accounted for 37% of the variance in HIV infection; however, interpersonal anxiety was not associated with HIV/STI risk behaviors. Structural interventions are needed that focus on developing affirming theologies in religious institutions with Black men who have sex with men congregants.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, and Trichomonas vaginalis Infections in Men With Nongonococcal Urethritis: Predictors and Persistence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seña, Arlene C.; Lensing, Shelly; Rompalo, Anne; Taylor, Stephanie N.; Martin, David H.; Lopez, Laureen M.; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Schwebke, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) are sexually transmitted infections (STIs) associated with nongonococcal urethritis (NGU). We assessed their predictors and persistence after treatment. Methods. We analyzed data from an NGU treatment trial among symptomatic heterosexual men aged 16–45 years from STI clinics. Nucleic acid amplification tests detected CT, MG, and TV at baseline and at 1 and 4 weeks after therapy. Associations between variables and STI detection were investigated. Results. Among 293 participants, 44% had CT, 31% had MG, and 13% had TV at baseline. In multivariate analysis, CT infection was associated with young age and STI contact. Young age was also associated with MG, and having ≥1 new partner was negatively associated with TV. We detected persistent CT in 12% and MG in 44% of participants at 4 weeks after therapy, which were associated with signs and symptoms of NGU. Persistent CT was detected in 23% of participants after azithromycin treatment vs 5% after doxycycline treatment (P = .011); persistent MG was detected in 68% of participants after doxycycline vs 33% after azithromycin (P = .001). All but 1 TV infection cleared after tinidazole. Conclusions. Persistent CT and MG after treatment of NGU are common, and were associated with clinical findings and drug regimen. PMID:22615318

  9. Using community-based participatory research to develop an intervention to reduce HIV and STD infections among Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Montaño, Jaime; Remnitz, Ivan M; Arceo, Ramiro; Bloom, Fred R; Leichliter, Jami S; Bowden, W Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Although the Latino community living in the United States has been disproportionately affected by the intersecting epidemics of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV and STD prevention interventions designed to reduce infection among Latinos lags behind prevention efforts targeting other communities. HoMBReS: Hombres Manteniendo Bienestar y Relaciones Saludables is a sexual risk reduction intervention designed to reduce HIV and STD infection among recently arrived, non-English-speaking Latino men who are members of a multicounty Latino soccer league in central North Carolina, a region of the United States with both the fastest growing Latino population and disproportionate HIV and STD infection rates. HoMBReS was developed in partnership with the local Latino community using community-based participatory research (CBPR). We describe (a) the CBPR partnership history and further expansion; (b) the development of the intervention through the integration of collected formative data, theoretical considerations, and findings from the scientific literature; and (c) lessons learned while using a CBPR approach to develop HoMBReS.

  10. Hope and resilience in suicide ideation and behavior of gay and bisexual men following notification of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, K; Meyer, I H

    1999-02-01

    Upon being notified that they are positive for HIV, people often experience terror and confusion. At the beginning stages of coping with HIV diagnosis, suicide ideation and behavior may arise as the infected person begins to envision frightening images of a future life with AIDS. We examined the narratives of gay men who contemplated or attempted suicide soon after they had learned of their HIV infection. We found that suicidal ideation and attempt often provoked a process of coping with HIV disease, leading to a redefinition of the meaning of HIV, enhancing one's sense of control over life, and prompting a renewed effort at self-help and help seeking, a new commitment to life, and a reappraisal of personal goals. We recommend that clinicians and HIV counselors be cognizant of these positive symbolic functions of suicidality in coping with HIV infection. Allowing people who were recently diagnosed with HIV to discuss suicidality may allow them to move toward acceptance and commitment to life.

  11. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptom Severity and Sexually Transmitted Infection and HIV Risk in African American Incarcerated Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidell, Joy D; Lejuez, Carl W; Golin, Carol E; Hobbs, Marcia M; Wohl, David A; Adimora, Adaora A; Khan, Maria R

    2016-05-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STI)/HIV rates are disproportionately high among men involved in the criminal justice system. Mental health disorders, including personality disorders, are also elevated among inmates. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) may be an important risk factor for STI/HIV, yet remains relatively understudied, particularly among inmates. We used baseline data from Project DISRUPT, a cohort study of African American men being released from prison in North Carolina who were in heterosexual relationships at prison entry (n=189), to assess their STI/HIV risk in the 6 months before incarceration and BPD symptoms focused on emotional lability and relationship dysfunction. We created a continuous BPD symptom severity score and a dichotomous BPD indicator split at the top quartile of the score (BPD-TQ) to examine associations between BPD and STI/HIV outcomes using logistic regression. We also examined associations between individual symptoms and outcomes. After adjustment for sociodemographics and antisocial personality disorder, BPD-TQ was associated with sexual risk behaviors including multiple partnerships (adjusted odds ratio, 2.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-5.36) and sex with nonmonogamous partners (adjusted odds ratio, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-5.51). Prevalence of previous STI (47.5% vs. 29.6%) and prevalent chlamydial infection (6.9% vs. 3.1%) seemed higher in those in BPD-TQ, although the associations were not statistically significant. Associations were similar to those with the continuous score. Borderline personality disorder symptoms most associated with STI/HIV risk were abandonment worry, mood swings, and shifts in opinions. Borderline personality disorder is strongly associated with STI/HIV risk in this sample. Researchers should further evaluate the relationship between STI/HIV and BPD, in addition to mood disorders.

  12. Dual infections with HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I are more common in older women than in men in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, B; da Silva, Z; Larsen, Olav Ditlevsen

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between the three human retroviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I. DESIGN: Community-based follow-up studies of retrovirus infections in two cohorts. METHODS: A total of 2057 individuals aged 35 years and over were eligible for inclusion. Participants were...... interviewed and had a blood sample drawn. Samples were analysed for HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV infections. Uni- and multivariate analyses that included behavioural and socio-economic factors were performed using logistic regression and Poisson regression models. RESULTS: A total of 1686 individuals participated...... increased with age for all three retroviruses. Dual infections were more common in women than in men. Assuming independent distribution of the viruses, the observed prevalence of dual infections in women was significantly higher than expected, while the prevalence was not increased in men. The prevalence...

  13. [Association between HIV infection and female sex workers in middle aged and old men in a city in Hubei provine, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M; Xiao, C C; Wang, T; Liu, J F; Li, S Y; Yan, H

    2016-07-01

    To understand the HIV infection status in middle aged and old men and the association between HIV infection and female sex workers in a city in Hubei province and provide evidence for the targeted prevention and control of HIV infection. Ten communities/villages were selected through stratified cluster sampling from the suburban and rural areas of the city. A total of 634 men aged ≥50 years were surveyed by using self-designed questionnaire in December, 2014. The awareness rate of HIV/AIDS related knowledge was 13.3%(68/513). Among the men surveyed, 63.2%(371/587)thought they couldn't be infected with HIV, 9.1%(52/573)believed that extramarital sex is acceptable, and 32.4%(189/583)considered that commercial sexual behavior is just as well. Among the surveyed men reporting sexual behavior in the past 6 months, 6.6%(15/228)had sex with regular sexual partners, in which 63.6%(7/11)never used condoms, 21.8%(128/586)reported that some friends had commercial sexual behaviors. Among 601 men receiving HIV testing, 7 were HIV positive(1.2%). The HIV detection rates among the men living at 3 communities near red light district were 4.2%(5/119), 1.1%(1/95)and 0.5%(1/192)respectively; while no HIV infections were found in the men living at 2 towns far away from red light district. Seventy seven of 581 men surveyed(13.2%)reported to meet visiting female sex workers and they had higher HIV positive rate(5.2%, 4/77)than those without such experiences(0.6%, 3/504)(P=0.007). The middle aged and old men in this city had low awareness of HIV/AIDs related knowledge, and high-risk sexual behaviors existed among them. HIV positive rate was relatively high in this population, and HIV infection might be associated with sex service.

  14. The Treatment Advocacy Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Peer-Led Safer Sex Intervention for HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKirnan, David J.; Tolou-Shams, Marina; Courtenay-Quirk, Cari

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Primary care may be an effective venue for delivering behavioral interventions for sexual safety among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM); however, few studies show efficacy for such an approach. We tested the efficacy of the Treatment Advocacy Program (TAP), a 4-session, primary-care-based, individual counseling intervention…

  15. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  16. Subclinical herpesvirus shedding among HIV-1-infected men on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Hernandez, Arcadio; Chen, Yue; Bullotta, Arlene; Buchanan, William G; Klamar-Blain, Cynthia R; Borowski, Luann; Riddler, Sharon A; Rinaldo, Charles R; Macatangay, Bernard J C

    2017-09-24

    We evaluated the subclinical shedding of six different herpesviruses in antiretroviral drug-treated HIV-positive [HIV(+)] MSM, and determined how this is associated with markers of inflammation and immune activation. We obtained blood, semen, throat washing, urine, and stool from 15 antiretroviral-treated HIV-1-infected MSM with CD4 T-cell reconstitution, and 12 age-matched HIV-negative [HIV (-)] MSM from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study at four timepoints over 24 weeks to measure DNA levels of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6), and HHV8. T-cell activation and plasma levels of soluble markers of inflammation and activation were also measured at the corresponding timepoints. HIV(+) participants had a trend for higher total herpesvirus shedding rate. HIV(+) participants also had a significantly higher rate of shedding EBV and CMV compared with the HIV(-) group. Herpesvirus shedding was mostly seen in throat washings. In the HIV(+) group, herpesvirus shedding rate inversely correlated with plasma levels of interferon γ-induced protein 10 and soluble CD163. CMV DNA levels negatively correlated with levels of T-cell activation. There was a trend for a positive correlation between EBV shedding rate and plasma soluble CD14. HHV6 shedding rate negatively correlated with plasma levels of interleukin-6, soluble CD163, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10. Correlations were not observed among HIV(-) individuals. Among treated HIV-infected MSM, there are higher subclinical shedding rates of some herpesviruses that occur in different body compartments and negatively correlate with levels of inflammation and immune activation.

  17. Contextual factors associated with treatment-seeking and higher-risk sexual behaviour in Botswana among men with symptoms of sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeni, Tabitha

    2007-11-01

    This study investigates contextual factors associated with treatment-seeking behaviour and higher-risk sexual conduct of men symptomatic of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Botswana. Data were drawn from a randomly selected, nationally representative sample of 8 222 men, aged 15-64 years, who had reported having symptoms suggestive of an STI during the previous twelve months. Higher-risk behaviour continues to sustain the HIV epidemic in Botswana. At the heart of Botswana's epidemic lies men's reluctance to seek medical treatment, engaging in unprotected sex, and having sex with multiple partners while symptomatic of an STI. The odds of engaging in unprotected sex while symptomatic of an STI were significantly higher among teenage males and males in urban households. For every year's increase in the age difference between partners there was a 28% increase in the odds of the male having had unprotected sex. Being married and having had more than one sexual partner in the last year multiplied the odds of having unprotected sex while symptomatic of an STI by three times. The longer an infected man remained with symptoms before seeking help, the more likely it was to have unprotected sex while infected and the more likely to seek treatment from a traditional healer. Notably, having sought medical treatment from hospitals, clinics and health workers, as opposed to consulting traditional healers, significantly reduced the odds of having had unprotected sex while infected with an STI by 48%. The results indicate the need to encourage men to utilise public healthcare services. The public health sector in Botswana needs to provide healthcare services that are user-friendly for men. Increasing the number of treatment sites may also contribute to preventing onward transmission of STIs. Special attention needs to be paid to boys' socialisation towards gender norms, and men are to be encouraged to play a responsible role in HIV prevention.

  18. [Complex of psycho-hygienic correction measures of personality features of hiv-infected men and evaluation of their efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serheta, Ihor V; Dudarenko, Oksana B; Mostova, Olha P; Lobastova, Tetiana V; Andriichuk, Vitalii M; Vakolyuk, Larysa M; Yakubovska, Olha M

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: In addition to adequate diagnosis and treatment of HIV-infected individuals, development, scientific substantiation and implementation of psycho-hygienic measures aimed at correcting the processes of forming personality traits and improving the psycho-emotional state of HIV-infected individuals are of particular importance. The aim: The purpose of the scientific research was to determine the most significant changes of situational and personal anxiety indicators, the degree of gravity of the asthenic state and depressive manifestations that were recorded in the context of the introduction of a number of measures for psycho-hygienic correction. Materials and methods: To determine the peculiarities of the impact of the proposed measures of psycho-hygienic correction and the study of the consequences of their implementation, two groups of comparison were created: a control group and an intervention group. 30 HIV-infected men who used a complex of measures for psycho-hygienic correction of personality traits and improvement of psycho-emotional state in their daily activities were included in the intervention group; 30 HIV-infected men who did not use this complex in their daily activities were included in the control group. Diagnosis and assessment of the anxiety of HIV-infected persons were carried out on the basis of The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The absence or presence of manifestations of an asthenic personality disorder in the subjects was determined by means of a test method created by L. Malkova for assessing asthenia. In order to determine the degree of manifestation of this characteristic, the psychic state of a person, as a level of expression of a depressive state, the psychometric Zung Depression Rating Scale was used to assess depression. Results: Studies have found that there was a statistically valid decrease of the level of indicators of situational anxiety among the representatives of the intervention group which reduced from

  19. Differential effects of sex in a West African cohort of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients: men are worse off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Medina, Candida; da Silva Té, David; Correira, Faustino Gomes; Laursen, Alex Lund; Østergaard, Lars; Andersen, Andreas; Aaby, Peter; Erikstrup, Christian; Wejse, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have reported conflicting effects of sex on HIV-1 infection. We describe differences in baseline characteristics and assess the impact of sex on HIV progression among patients at a clinic with many HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. This study utilised a retrospective cohort of treatment-naïve adults at the largest HIV clinic in Guinea-Bissau from 6 June 2005 to 1 December 2013. Baseline characteristics were assessed and the patients followed until death, transfer, loss to follow-up, or 1 June 2014. We estimated the time from the first clinic visit until initiation of ART, death or loss to follow-up using Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 5694 patients were included in the study, 3702 women (65%) and 1992 men (35%). Women were more likely than men to be infected with HIV-2 (19% vs. 15%, P < 0.01) or dually infected with HIV-1/2 (11% vs. 9%, P = 0.02). For all HIV types, women were younger (median 35 vs. 40 years), less likely to have schooling (55% vs. 77%) or to be married (46% vs. 67%), and had higher baseline CD4 cell counts (median 214 vs. 178 cells/μl). Men had a higher age-adjusted mortality rate (hazard rate ratio (HRR) 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.52) and were more often lost to follow-up (HRR 1.27, 95% CI 1.17-1.39). Significant differences exist between HIV-infected men and women regardless of HIV type. Men seek treatment at a later stage and, despite better socio-economic status, have higher mortality and loss to follow-up than women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Male midwives: preferred managers of sexually transmitted infections in men in developing countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Evelyn J; García, Patricia J; Roca, Sayda La Rosa

    2008-10-01

    To describe demographic and practice characteristics of male and female midwives in private practice (MIPPs) in 10 cities of Peru, and their role in the delivery of reproductive health care, specifically management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). As part of an intervention trial in 10 cities in the provinces of Peru designed to improve STI management, detailed information was collected regarding the number of midwives in each city working in various types of practices. A door-to-door survey of all medical offices and institutions in each city was conducted. Each MIPP encountered was asked to answer a questionnaire regarding demographics, training, practice type(s), number of STI cases seen per month, and average earnings per consultation. Of the 905 midwives surveyed, 442 reported having a private practice, either exclusively or concurrently with other clinical positions; 99.3% of these MIPPs reported managing STI cases. Andean cities had the highest density of MIPPs, followed by jungle and coastal cities, respectively. Jungle cities had the largest proportion of male MIPPs (35.5%). While both male and female MIPPs reported seeing male patients, male MIPPs saw a significantly greater number than their female counterparts. In areas of Peru where physicians are scarce, MIPPs provide needed reproductive health services, including STI management. Male MIPPs in particular appear to serve as health care providers for male patients with STIs. This trend, which may exist in other developing countries with similar healthcare workforce demographics, highlights the need for new areas of training and health services research.

  1. Analysis of overdispersed count data: application to the Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-H; Han, G; Fulp, W J; Giuliano, A R

    2012-06-01

    The Poisson model can be applied to the count of events occurring within a specific time period. The main feature of the Poisson model is the assumption that the mean and variance of the count data are equal. However, this equal mean-variance relationship rarely occurs in observational data. In most cases, the observed variance is larger than the assumed variance, which is called overdispersion. Further, when the observed data involve excessive zero counts, the problem of overdispersion results in underestimating the variance of the estimated parameter, and thus produces a misleading conclusion. We illustrated the use of four models for overdispersed count data that may be attributed to excessive zeros. These are Poisson, negative binomial, zero-inflated Poisson and zero-inflated negative binomial models. The example data in this article deal with the number of incidents involving human papillomavirus infection. The four models resulted in differing statistical inferences. The Poisson model, which is widely used in epidemiology research, underestimated the standard errors and overstated the significance of some covariates.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) as a coronary atherosclerosis risk factor in HIV-infected men: multicenter AIDS cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Rulin C; Budoff, Matthew; Hodis, Howard N; Rinaldo, Charles R; Jenkins, Frank J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Taiwo, Babafemi; Post, Wendy S; Margolick, Joseph B; Detels, Roger

    2012-08-01

    We assessed associations of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in 291 HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by non-contrast coronary CT imaging. Markers for herpesviruses infection were measured in frozen specimens collected 10-12 years prior to case identification. Multivariable logistic regression models and ordinal logistic regression models were performed. HSV-2 seropositivity was associated with coronary atherosclerosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=4.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.58-10.85) after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, and HIV infection related factors. Infection with a greater number of herpesviruses was associated with elevated CAC levels (AOR=1.58, 95% CI=1.06-2.36). Our findings suggest HSV-2 may be a risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in HIV-infected men. Infection with multiple herpesviruses may contribute to the increased burden of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of CD4+/CD8+ status and urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The CD4+ and the CD8+ counts were correlated with the ova of S. haematobium in their urine samples at r = 0.0108 and r = 0.516 respectively. The bacteriuria, urinary schistosomiasis and urinary tract co - infections namely; Escherichia coli, Proteus, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staph.

  4. Efficacy of a Clinic-Based Safer Sex Program for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Uninfected and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard A; Mena, Leandro; Salazar, Laura F; Hardin, James W; Brown, Tim; Vickers Smith, Rachel

    2018-03-01

    To test the efficacy of a single-session, clinic-based intervention designed to promote condom use among young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM). Six hundred YBMSM were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, using a 12-month observation period. An intent-to-treat analysis was performed, with multiple imputation for missing data. Compared with the reference group, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men in the intervention group had 64% greater odds of reporting consistent condom use for anal receptive sex over 12 months (estimated odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-2.17, P = 0.001). Also, compared with the reference group, HIV-uninfected men in the intervention group had more than twice the odds of reporting consistent condom use for anal receptive sex over 12 months (estimated odds ratio, 2.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.74-2.63, P < 0.001). Significant intervention effects relative to incident sexually transmitted diseases were not observed. A single-session, clinic-based, intervention may help protect HIV-uninfected YBMSM against HIV acquisition and HIV-infected YBMSM from transmitting the virus to insertive partners.

  5. Male midwives: preferred managers of sexually transmitted infections in men in developing countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn J. Hsieh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe demographic and practice characteristics of male and female midwives in private practice (MIPPs in 10 cities of Peru, and their role in the delivery of reproductive health care, specifically management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs. METHODS: As part of an intervention trial in 10 cities in the provinces of Peru designed to improve STI management, detailed information was collected regarding the number of midwives in each city working in various types of practices. A door-to-door survey of all medical offices and institutions in each city was conducted. Each MIPP encountered was asked to answer a questionnaire regarding demographics, training, practice type(s, number of STI cases seen per month, and average earnings per consultation. RESULTS: Of the 905 midwives surveyed, 442 reported having a private practice, either exclusively or concurrently with other clinical positions; 99.3% of these MIPPs reported managing STI cases. Andean cities had the highest density of MIPPs, followed by jungle and coastal cities, respectively. Jungle cities had the largest proportion of male MIPPs (35.5%. While both male and female MIPPs reported seeing male patients, male MIPPs saw a significantly greater number than their female counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: In areas of Peru where physicians are scarce, MIPPs provide needed reproductive health services, including STI management. Male MIPPs in particular appear to serve as health care providers for male patients with STIs. This trend, which may exist in other developing countries with similar healthcare workforce demographics, highlights the need for new areas of training and health services research.

  6. Reproductive Counseling by Clinic Healthcare Workers in Durban, South Africa: Perspectives from HIV-Infected Men and Women Reporting Serodiscordant Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Matthews

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Understanding HIV-infected patient experiences and perceptions of reproductive counseling in the health care context is critical to inform design of effective pharmaco-behavioral interventions that minimize periconception HIV risk and support HIV-affected couples to realize their fertility goals. Methods. We conducted semistructured, in-depth interviews with 30 HIV-infected women (with pregnancy in prior year and 20 HIV-infected men, all reporting serodiscordant partners and accessing care in Durban, South Africa. We investigated patient-reported experiences with safer conception counseling from health care workers (HCWs. Interview transcripts were reviewed and coded using content analysis for conceptual categories and emergent themes. Results. The study findings indicate that HIV-infected patients recognize HCWs as a resource for periconception-related information and are receptive to speaking to a HCW prior to becoming pregnant, but seldom seek or receive conception advice in the clinic setting. HIV nondisclosure and unplanned pregnancy are important intervening factors. When advice is shared, patients reported receiving a range of information. Male participants showed particular interest in accessing safer conception information. Conclusions. HIV-infected men and women with serodiscordant partners are receptive to the idea of safer conception counseling. HCWs need to be supported to routinely initiate accurate safer conception counseling with HIV-infected patients of reproductive age.

  7. Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Diagnosis of Mycoplasma genitalium Infection in South African Men With and Without Symptoms of Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Marie Cecilia; Hoosen, Anwar Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    This study was done to diagnose Mycoplasma genitalium infection based on bacterial load in urine specimens from symptomatic and asymptomatic men. Urine specimens from 94 men with visible urethral discharge, 206 with burning on micturition and 75 without symptoms presenting to a family practitioner were tested for M. genitalium as well as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis by transcription-mediated amplification assays. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to determine the bacterial load for all specimens in which M. genitalium was the only organism detected. Among the 375 specimens collected, M. genitalium was detected in 59 (15.7%) men (both symptomatic and asymptomatic) using the transcription-mediated amplification assay, and in 45 (12.0%) of the total population, it was the only pathogen detected. One or more pathogens were detected in 129 (43%) of the symptomatic men, with N. gonorrhoeae in 50 (16.7%); C. trachomatis in 37 (12.3%) and T. vaginalis present in 24 (8.0%) patients. Among the 17 patients where mixed infections were detected, M. genitalium with N. gonorrhoeae was the most common (11/17; 64.7%). Patients with visible urethral discharge had significantly higher M. genitalium concentrations than those with burning on micturition. The median M. genitalium load in symptomatic men was significantly higher than that in asymptomatic men. This study confirms the high prevalence of M. genitalium among men with urethritis in South Africa and demonstrates that there is a strong association with M. genitalium bacterial load and clinical urethritis. As the number of organisms increased, the severity of the symptoms increased, an indication of the role that the organism plays in disease progression.

  8. Exploring gender perceptions of risk of HIV infection and related behaviour among elderly men and women of Ga-Rankuwa, Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2016-12-01

    The literature shows that there are important differences between women and men in the underlying mechanisms of transmission of HIV infection and AIDS, as well as in the social and economic consequences of HIV/AIDS. These stem from sexual behaviour and socially constructed 'gender' differences between women and men in roles and responsibilities. Despite the fact that numerous gender-related sociocultural factors influence HIV/AIDS protective behaviours, little gender specificity is included in HIV prevention among the elderly. In order to close this gap, this study explored gender-related perceptions of risk of HIV infection among elderly men and women of Ga-Rankuwa in Gauteng Province, South Africa. This qualitative study used purposive sampling to conduct three focus group interviews with 22 women and 10 men who were above 60 years of age. Findings revealed that both genders blame each other for the spreading of HIV/AIDS. Male participants displayed the tendency to have multiple partners, whereas females accepted that males are promiscuous. Mixed perceptions about disclosure of HIV status were found. Condom use was a challenge, as men did not know how to introduce it with their wives, and some female participants indicated that men are resistant to using condoms. The elderly men also believed that women will have sex in exchange for money. It is concluded that there is a need for substantial behaviour change among both elderly males and females, which should address gender power relations. More in-depth and extensive research in this area is recommended.

  9. High risks of HIV transmission for men who have sex with men--a comparison of risk factors of HIV infection among MSM associated with recruitment channels in 15 cities of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jinlei; Zhang, Dapeng; Fu, Xiaojing; Li, Chengmei; Meng, Sining; Dai, Min; Liu, Hui; Sun, Jiangping

    2015-01-01

    While the HIV epidemic varies greatly by region and population group throughout China, the HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) continues to rise at an alarmingly fast pace. We seek to analyze the risk factors associated with HIV infection among MSM recruited from different channels in large urban centers across China, in an attempt to shed light on the design of future targeted intervention strategies. A total of 33,684 MSM from 14 cities and one province were recruited from July to December 2011. Demographic (e.g. age, marital status, education) and behavioral (e.g. condom use, HIV testing history) data were collected using information collection cards. Blood samples were also collected to test for HIV and Syphilis. Participants were recruited from five different channels, and all demonstrated distinct characteristics. The overall rate of positive HIV screening was 6.27% and the rate of syphilis infection was 6.50%. Participants recruited from bathhouses had the highest HIV (11.80%) and syphilis infection rates (11.20%). Participants who were infected with syphilis had the highest HIV-positive screening rate (13.75%; 95% CI OR, 2.33-3.06). living in the southwest region of the country (11.64%; OR=2.76, 95%CI OR 2.19-3.47), Being >20 years of age (Pstrategic interventions for MSM in China.

  10. A retrospective study of recurrent chlamydia infection in men and women: is there a role for targeted screening for those at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C; Das, C; Kinghorn, G

    2009-03-01

    Chalmydia trachomatis remains the commonest sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the UK. This study identifies those at risk of recurrent infection (RI) attending a central genitourinary clinic, time to subsequent reinfection and duration of at-risk behaviour for the consideration of targeted chlamydia screening. From 1995 to 2005, a total of 14,011 patients' were diagnosed with chlamydia and 1743 (12.4%) had RI, classified as a repeat infection greater than three months after initial diagnosis. Individual risk factors for both sexes include young age TOC) and previous STI. Men of non-White ethnicity, symptoms and those self-referred were also at risk. Combined risk factors for both sexes were non-White ethnicity, symptoms, young age, previous STI and two or more partners. Attendance for TOC considerably reduced RI rates in men (odds ratio [OR] = 0.549; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.359-0.840). Mean time to first and last reinfection in men was 1.91 and 2.49 years, in women 1.76 and 1.92 years. One in eight individuals with chlamydia infection are at risk of RI, the majority of which will occur within two years of initial presentation. These individuals have identifiable risk factors facilitating targeted re-screening, enhanced follow-up and support for behavioural change.

  11. Association between childhood physical abuse, unprotected receptive anal intercourse and HIV infection among young men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada.

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    Arn J Schilder

    Full Text Available The association between childhood sexual abuse and HIV risk among men who have sex with men (MSM is well established. However, no studies have examined the potential impact of other forms of childhood maltreatment on HIV incidence in this population.We explored the impact of child physical abuse (CPA on HIV seroconversion in a cohort of gay/bisexual men aged 15 to 30 in Vancouver, Canada. Cox proportional hazard models were used, controlling for confounders.Among 287 participants, 211 (73.5% reported experiencing CPA before the age of 17, and 42 (14.6% reporting URAI in the past year. After a median of 6.6 years follow-up, 16 (5.8% participants HIV-seroconverted. In multivariate analysis, CPA was significantly associated with HIV seroconversion (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 4.89, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.65-14.48, after controlling for potential confounders.Our study uncovered a link between childhood physical violence and HIV incidence. Results highlight an urgent need for screening of young gay and bisexual men for histories of violence, and social and structural supports to prevent HIV transmission in this population.

  12. The PICASSO Cohort: baseline characteristics of a cohort of men who have sex with men and male-to-female transgender women at high risk for syphilis infection in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Noah; Park, Hayoung; Konda, Kelika A; Joseph Davey, Dvora L; Bristow, Claire C; Brown, Brandon; Leon, Segundo R; Vargas, Silver K; Calvo, Gino M; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-11

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) and male-to-female transgender women (transwomen) are disproportionately at risk of syphilis infection in Peru. From 2013 to 2014, MSM and transwomen seeking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and/or treatment were recruited into a 2-year observational cohort study to determine predictors of recently acquired syphilis infection (defined as a rapid plasma reagin [RPR] titer ≥1:16 and a reactive treponemal antibody test) in Lima, Peru. At baseline, interviewers collected sociodemographic, behavioral, and medical characteristics from participants. All cohort participants were tested for syphilis, HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infection. Using cross-sectional analyses, bivariate and multivariate models were used to determine factors associated with recently acquired syphilis infection and calculate adjusted prevalence ratios. We recruited 401 participants, 312 MSM and 89 transwomen, with median ages of 29.0 and 32.5 years old (interquartile ranges: 23.3, 37.4 and 27.2, 39.5, respectively). The prevalence of recently acquired syphilis infection at baseline was 16.8% for MSM and 6.7% for transwomen. Among MSM and transwomen, 30.1 and 33.7% were infected with HIV, 18.6 and 24.7% were infected with CT, and 14.2 and 19.1% were infected with NG, respectively. Co-infection rates among MSM with recently acquired syphilis infection included: 44.2% with HIV, 40.4% with CT (32.7% with anal CT and 7.7% with pharyngeal CT), and 19.2% with NG (11.5% with anal NG and 7.7% with pharyngeal NG). Co-infection rates among transwomen with recently acquired syphilis infection included: 66.7% with HIV, 0% with CT, and 16.7% with anal NG. In multivariate analysis among the entire cohort, recently acquired syphilis infection was independently associated with younger age (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93-0.99), receptive role

  13. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women, heterosexual men and MSM visiting HIV counselling institutions in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany - should Chlamydia testing be scaled up?

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    Anne Lallemand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients asking for a free anonymous HIV test may have contracted other sexually transmitted infections (STIs such as Chlamydia trachomatis, yet Chlamydia prevalence in that population is unknown. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and factors associated with Chlamydia infection in patients seeking HIV testing at local public health authorities (LPHA in order to evaluate whether Chlamydia testing should be routinely offered to them. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients (≥18 years attending 18 LPHA in North Rhine-Westphalia from November 2012 to September 2013. LPHA collected information on participants’ socio-demographic characteristics, sexual and HIV testing behaviours, previous STI history and clinical symptoms. Self-collected vaginal swabs and urine (men were analysed by Transcription-Mediated Amplification. We assessed overall and age-stratified Chlamydia prevalence and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI. Using univariate and multivariable binomial regression, we estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR to identify factors associated with Chlamydia infection. Results The study population comprised 1144 (40.5 % women, 1134 (40.1 % heterosexual men and 549 (19.4 % men who have sex with men (MSM; median age was 30 years. Chlamydia prevalence was 5.3 % (95 % CI: 4.1–6.8 % among women, 3.2 % (95 % CI: 2.2–4.4 in heterosexual men and 3.5 % (95 % CI: 2.1–5.4 in MSM. Prevalence was highest among 18–24 year-old women (9 %; 95 % CI: 5.8–13 and heterosexual men (5.7 %; 95 % CI: 3.0–9.8 %, respectively. Among MSM, the prevalence was highest among 30–39 year-olds (4.4 %; 95 % CI: 1.9–8.5 %. Among those who tested positive, 76.7 % of women, 75.0 % of heterosexual men and 84.2 % of MSM were asymptomatic. Among women, factors associated with Chlamydia infection were young age (18–24 years versus ≥ 40 years, aPR: 3.0, 95 % CI: 1.2–7.8, having had more than 2

  14. Stop the drama Downunder: a social marketing campaign increases HIV/sexually transmitted infection knowledge and testing in Australian gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrana, Alisa; Hellard, Margaret; Guy, Rebecca; El-Hayek, Carol; Gouillou, Maelenn; Asselin, Jason; Batrouney, Colin; Nguyen, Phuong; Stoovè, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Since 2000, notifications of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have increased significantly in Australian gay men. We evaluated the impact of a social marketing campaign in 2008-2009 aimed to increase health-seeking behavior and STI testing and enhance HIV/STI knowledge in gay men. A convenience sample of 295 gay men (18-66 years of age) was surveyed to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaign. Participants were asked about campaign awareness, HIV/STI knowledge, health-seeking behavior, and HIV/STI testing. We examined associations between recent STI testing and campaign awareness. Trends in HIV/STI monthly tests at 3 clinics with a high case load of gay men were also assessed. Logistic and Poisson regressions and χ tests were used. Both unaided (43%) and aided (86%) campaign awareness was high. In a multivariable logistic regression, awareness of the campaign (aided) was independently associated with having had any STI test within the past 6 months (prevalence ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.0-2.4. Compared with the 13 months before the campaign, clinic data showed significant increasing testing rates for HIV, syphilis, and chlamydia among HIV-negative gay men during the initial and continued campaign periods. These findings suggest that the campaign was successful in achieving its aims of increasing health-seeking behavior, STI testing, and HIV/STI knowledge among gay men in Victoria.

  15. Incidence of Co-Infections of HIV, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and Syphilis in a Large Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Zixin; Qi, Xiao; Ruan, Yuhua; Zhou, Yunhua; Li, Chunrong; Luo, Fengji; Lau, Joseph T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The HIV-epidemic among MSM in China has worsened. In this key population, prevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis infection and co-infection with HIV is high. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted (n = 962) in Beijing, China, with three overlapping cohorts (n = 857, 757 and 760) consisting of MSM that were free from pairs of infections of concern (i.e. HIV-HSV-2, HIV-syphilis, HSV-2-syphilis) at baseline to estimate incidence of HIV, HSV-2, syphilis, and those of co-infection. Results The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis in the overall cohort was 3.90 (95% CI = 2.37, 5.43), 7.87 (95% CI = 5.74, 10.00) and 6.06 (95% CI = 4.18, 7.94) cases per 100 person-years (PYs), respectively. The incidence of HIV-HSV-2, HIV-Syphilis and HSV-2-Syphilis co-infections was 0.30 (95% CI = 0.29, 0.88), 1.02 (95% CI = 0.13, 2.17) and 1.41 (95% CI: 0.04, 2.78) cases per 100 PYs, respectively, in the three sub-cohorts constructed for this study. Conclusions The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis was very high and those of their co-infections were relatively high. Such co-infections have negative impacts on the HIV/STI epidemics. Prevention practices need to take such co-infections into account. PMID:26820145

  16. Roles of Self-Stigma, Social Support, and Positive and Negative Affects as Determinants of Depressive Symptoms Among HIV Infected Men who have Sex with Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Mo, Phoenix K H; Wu, Anise M S; Lau, Joseph T F

    2017-01-01

    Poor mental health was prevalent among HIV positive men who have sex with men (HIVMSM), and a tremendous burden extents on their families and society. The present study investigated the prevalence of depression and its relationship with social support, HIV self-stigma, positive affect and negative affect among 321 HIVMSM in Chengdu, China. The study was conducted during July 2013 through October 2013. Findings showed that 55.8 % of the participants had mild to severe depression. The results of structural equation modeling showed that social support and positive affect were negatively associated with depression, while HIV self-stigma and negative affect were positively associated with depression. Social support, positive affect, and negative affect mediated the association between HIV self-stigma and depression. The hypothesized model had a satisfactory fit. Interventions improving mental health among this population are warranted.

  17. HIV Transmission Risk Behavior in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Treatment-Naïve Men and Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landovitz, Raphael J; Tran, Thuy Tien T; Cohn, Susan E; Ofotokun, Ighovwhera; Godfrey, Catherine; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Currier, Judith S; Ribaudo, Heather J

    2016-12-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can minimize HIV transmission. Prevention benefits may be compromised by barriers to virologic suppression, and by increased condomless sex among those initiating ART. We evaluated condomless sex in a cohort of HIVinfected US individuals poised to initiate ART in a clinical trial. We assessed partner and sex act type, condom use, and perception of infectiousness. Six percent of participants reported as not infectious; men who have sex with men were more likely to perceive high infectivity. Prevalence of condomless sex was 44 %; 74 % of those also reported homosexual acquisition of HIV. Predictors of increased risk of condomless sex included greater numbers of lifetime partners, recent stimulant drug use and an HIV-positive or unknown serostatus partner. In the context of serodifferent partners, lower perception of infectiousness was also associated with a higher risk of condomless sex. Results highlight opportunities for prevention education for HIV infected individuals at ART initiation.

  18. Prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections among men and women entering the National Job Training Program--United States, 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Heather; Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    National notifiable disease data indicate that there were 99 cases of gonorrhea for every 100,000 persons in the United States in 2009, the lowest recorded gonorrhea rate in US history. However, the extent to which declining case reports signify a reduction in prevalence is unknown. Gonorrhea prevalence was estimated among 16- to 24-year-old men and women entering the National Job Training Program (NJTP) between 2004 and 2009. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the probability of testing positive for gonorrhea over time. A total of 95,184 men and 91,697 women were screened for gonorrhea upon entry to the NJTP between 2004 and 2009. For women, gonorrhea prevalence increased from 2004 (2.6%) to 2006 (2.9%), then decreased steadily through 2009 (1.8%). For men, prevalence increased from 2004 (1.3%) to 2005 (1.6%), then decreased through 2009 (0.9%). Gonorrhea prevalence among black women decreased from 3.6% in 2004 to 2.5% in 2009 and was 2 to 4 times higher than prevalence among white women. Likewise, prevalence among black men decreased from 2.0% to 1.5% and was 8 to 22 times higher than prevalence among white men. After adjusting for gonorrhea risk factors, the odds of women and men testing positive for gonorrhea decreased by 50% and 40%, respectively, from 2004 to 2009. Declining trends in gonorrhea infection among NJTP entrants are similar to those observed in gonorrhea case report data, suggesting that the decrease in case reports is due to a decrease in prevalence. However, targeted interventions are needed to reduce gonorrhea infections in populations with disproportionate risk.

  19. Social, structural and behavioral determinants of overall health status in a cohort of homeless and unstably housed HIV-infected men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise D Riley

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicate multiple influences on the overall health of HIV-infected persons; however, few assess and rank longitudinal changes in social and structural barriers that are disproportionately found in impoverished populations. We empirically ranked factors that longitudinally impact the overall health status of HIV-infected homeless and unstably housed men.Between 2002 and 2008, a cohort of 288 HIV+ homeless and unstably housed men was recruited and followed over time. The population was 60% non-Caucasian and the median age was 41 years; 67% of study participants reported recent drug use and 20% reported recent homelessness. At baseline, the median CD4 cell count was 349 cells/µl and 18% of eligible persons (CD490% ranked 5th for its positive influence on mental health, and viral load ranked 4th for its negative influence on physical health.The inability to meet food, hygiene, and housing needs was the most powerful predictor of poor physical and mental health among homeless and unstably housed HIV-infected men in an urban setting. Impoverished persons will not fully benefit from progress in HIV medicine until these barriers are overcome, a situation that is likely to continue fueling the US HIV epidemic.

  20. Expanding sexually transmitted infection screening among women and men engaging in transactional sex: the feasibility of field-based self-collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A M; Rosenberger, J G; Reece, M; Van Der Pol, B

    2013-04-01

    Routine screening is a key component of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention and control; however, traditional programmes often fail to effectively reach men and women in hidden communities. To reduce prevalence, we must understand the programmatic features that would encourage utilization of services among asymptomatic individuals. Using incentivized snowball sampling, 44 women and men recently engaging in transactional sex were recruited (24 women, 20 men); median age 37 years. Respondents were offered the opportunity to collect genital, oropharyngeal and rectal samples for STI testing and completed a face-to-face interview about their experience with self-obtained sampling. Interviews were analysed using qualitative methods. Participants were unaware of potential risk for STI, but found self-sampling in non-clinical settings to be acceptable and preferable to clinic-based testing. All participants collected genital specimens; 96% and 4% collected oropharyngeal and rectal specimens, respectively. The burden of disease in this population was high: 38% tested positive for at least one STI. We detected multiple concomitant infections. Incorporating field collection of self-obtained samples into STI control programmes may increase utilization among high-risk populations unlikely to access clinic-based services. High infection rates indicate that individuals engaging in transactional sex would benefit from, and be responsive to, community-based self-sampling for STI screening.

  1. Prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection and associated factors among non-commercial men who have sex with men attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenjie; Luo, Zhenzhou; Xu, Ruiwei; Zhao, Guanglu; Tu, Dan; Yang, Lin; Wang, Feng; Cai, Yumao; Lan, Lina; Hong, Fuchang; Yang, Tubao; Feng, Tiejian

    2017-01-18

    Although HIV and syphilis co-infection has been frequently observed in men who have sex with men (MSM), only few studies have focused on it. Different subgroups of MSM might exhibit heterogeneous HIV and syphilis risk profiles, indicating that interventions for HIV and HIV-related co-infections may vary with different subgroups of MSM. However, no previous study has investigated HIV and syphilis co-infection among non-commercial MSM (ncMSM) attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection and associated factors among ncMSM attending an STD clinic in Shenzhen, China. NcMSM attending the STD clinic of Shenzhen Center for Chronic Disease Control were recruited in this cross-sectional study every Monday between March 2013 and August 2015 using a site based convenience sampling method. An anonymous questionnaire was used to collect data regarding socio-demographic characteristics, risky sexual behaviors and HIV-related knowledge. Blood samples were collected to perform HIV and syphilis tests. Totally 533 participants were enrolled in this study and the prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection among them was 13.13%. Multivariable analyses indicated that having lived in Shenzhen for less than one year (aOR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.30-6.05), having first anal sexual intercourse before the age of 18 (aOR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.29-5.89), having 3 to 5 anal sexual partners in the past six months (aOR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.19-5.40), playing exclusively receptive (aOR = 6.87, 95% CI = 3.02-15.61) or both insertive and receptive (aOR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.64-8.09) roles in anal sexual intercourse and not always using condom in anal sexual intercourse (aOR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.08-4.19) were associated risk factors for HIV and syphilis co-infection, relative to the non-infected ncMSM. Compared with the mono-infected ncMSM, associated risk factors for the co-infection

  2. The Utility of a Syndemic Framework in Understanding Chronic Disease Management Among HIV-Infected and Type 2 Diabetic Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byg, Blaire; Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Funk, Danielle; James, Bonface; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Syndemic theory posits that epidemics of multiple physical and psychosocial problems co-occur among disadvantaged groups due to adverse social conditions. Although sexual minority populations are often stigmatized and vulnerable to multiple health problems, the syndemic perspective has been underutilized in understanding chronic disease. To assess the potential utility of this perspective in understanding the management of co-occurring HIV and Type 2 diabetes, we used linear regression to examine glycemic control (A1c) among men who have sex with men (MSM) with both HIV and Type 2 diabetes (n = 88). Bivariable linear regression explored potential syndemic correlates of inadequate glycemic control. Compared to those with adequate glycemic control (A1c ≤ 7.5 %), more men with inadequate glycemic control (A1c > 7.5 %) had hypertension (70 vs. 46 %, p = 0.034), high triglycerides (93 vs. 61 %, p = 0.002), depression (67 vs. 39 %, p = 0.018), current substance abuse (15 vs. 2 %, p = 0.014), and detectable levels of HIV (i.e., viral load ≥75 copies per ml blood; 30 vs. 10 %, p = 0.019). In multivariable regression controlling for age, the factors that were independently associated with higher A1c were high triglycerides, substance use, and detectable HIV viral load, suggesting that chronic disease management among MSM is complex and challenging for patients and providers. Findings also suggest that syndemic theory can be a clarifying lens for understanding chronic disease management among sexual minority stigmatized populations. Interventions targeting single conditions may be inadequate when multiple conditions co-occur; thus, research using a syndemic framework may be helpful in identifying intervention strategies that target multiple co-occurring conditions.

  3. Respondent-driven sampling for identification of HIV- and HCV-infected people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men in India: A cross-sectional, community-based analysis.

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    Sunil S Solomon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A major barrier to achieving ambitious targets for global control of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV is low levels of awareness of infection among key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM and people who inject drugs (PWID. We explored the potential of a strategy routinely used for surveillance in these groups, respondent-driven sampling (RDS, to be used as an intervention to identify HIV- and HCV-infected PWID and MSM who are unaware of their status and those who are viremic across 26 Indian cities at various epidemic stages.Data were collected as part of the baseline assessment of an ongoing cluster-randomized trial. RDS was used to accrue participants at 27 sites (15 PWID sites and 12 MSM sites selected to reflect varying stages of the HIV epidemic among MSM and PWID in India. A total of 56 seeds recruited a sample of 26,447 persons (approximately 1,000 participants per site between October 1, 2012, and December 19, 2013. Across MSM sites (n = 11,997, the median age was 25 years and the median number of lifetime male partners was 8. Across PWID sites (n = 14,450, 92.4% were male, the median age was 30 years, and 87.5% reported injection in the prior 6 months. RDS identified 4,051 HIV-infected persons, of whom 2,325 (57.4% were unaware of their HIV infection and 2,816 (69.5% were HIV viremic. It also identified 5,777 HCV-infected persons, of whom 5,337 (92.4% were unaware that they were infected with HCV and 4,728 (81.8% were viremic. In the overall sample (both MSM and PWID, the prevalence of HIV-infected persons who were unaware of their status increased with sampling depth, from 7.9% in participants recruited in waves 1 through 5 to 12.8% among those recruited in waves 26 and above (p-value for trend < 0.001. The overall detection rate of people unaware of their HIV infection was 0.5 persons per day, and the detection rate of HIV-infected persons with viremia (regardless of their awareness status was 0.7 per day. The detection

  4. Respondent-driven sampling for identification of HIV- and HCV-infected people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men in India: A cross-sectional, community-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sunil S; McFall, Allison M; Lucas, Gregory M; Srikrishnan, Aylur K; Kumar, Muniratnam S; Anand, Santhanam; Quinn, Thomas C; Celentano, David D; Mehta, Shruti H

    2017-11-01

    A major barrier to achieving ambitious targets for global control of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is low levels of awareness of infection among key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and people who inject drugs (PWID). We explored the potential of a strategy routinely used for surveillance in these groups, respondent-driven sampling (RDS), to be used as an intervention to identify HIV- and HCV-infected PWID and MSM who are unaware of their status and those who are viremic across 26 Indian cities at various epidemic stages. Data were collected as part of the baseline assessment of an ongoing cluster-randomized trial. RDS was used to accrue participants at 27 sites (15 PWID sites and 12 MSM sites) selected to reflect varying stages of the HIV epidemic among MSM and PWID in India. A total of 56 seeds recruited a sample of 26,447 persons (approximately 1,000 participants per site) between October 1, 2012, and December 19, 2013. Across MSM sites (n = 11,997), the median age was 25 years and the median number of lifetime male partners was 8. Across PWID sites (n = 14,450), 92.4% were male, the median age was 30 years, and 87.5% reported injection in the prior 6 months. RDS identified 4,051 HIV-infected persons, of whom 2,325 (57.4%) were unaware of their HIV infection and 2,816 (69.5%) were HIV viremic. It also identified 5,777 HCV-infected persons, of whom 5,337 (92.4%) were unaware that they were infected with HCV and 4,728 (81.8%) were viremic. In the overall sample (both MSM and PWID), the prevalence of HIV-infected persons who were unaware of their status increased with sampling depth, from 7.9% in participants recruited in waves 1 through 5 to 12.8% among those recruited in waves 26 and above (p-value for trend people unaware of their HIV infection was 0.5 persons per day, and the detection rate of HIV-infected persons with viremia (regardless of their awareness status) was 0.7 per day. The detection rate of HIV viremic individuals was

  5. Co-endemicity of Plasmodium falciparum and Intestinal Helminths Infection in School Age Children in Rural Communities of Kwara State Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoja, Ayodele; Tijani, Bukola Deborah; Akanbi, Ajibola A.; Ojurongbe, Taiwo A.; Adeyeba, Oluwaseyi A.; Ojurongbe, Olusola

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection are major public health problems particularly among school age children in Nigeria. However the magnitude and possible interactions of these infections remain poorly understood. This study determined the prevalence, impact and possible interaction of Plasmodium falciparum and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in rural communities of Kwara State, Nigeria. Methods Blood, urine and stool samples were collected from 1017 primary school pupils of ages 4–15 years. Stool samples were processed using both Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques and microscopically examined for intestinal helminths infection. Urine samples were analyzed using sedimentation method for Schistosoma haematobium. Plasmodium falciparum was confirmed by microscopy using thick and thin blood films methods and packed cell volume (PCV) was determined using hematocrit reader. Univariate analysis and chi-square statistical tests were used to analyze the data. Results Overall, 61.2% of all school children had at least an infection of either P. falciparum, S. haematobium, or intestinal helminth. S. haematobium accounted for the largest proportion (44.4%) of a single infection followed by P. falciparum (20.6%). The prevalence of malaria and helminth co-infection in the study was 14.4%. Four species of intestinal helminths were recovered from the stool samples and these were hookworm (22.5%), Hymenolepis species (9.8%), Schistosoma mansoni (2.9%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.6%). The mean densities of P. falciparum in children co-infected with S. haematobium and hookworm were higher compared to those infected with P. falciparum only though not statistically significant (p = 0.062). The age distribution of both S. haematobium (p = 0.049) and hookworm (p = 0.034) infected children were statistically significant with the older age group (10–15 years) recording the highest prevalence of 47.2% and 25% respectively

  6. Prostate-specific antigen, sexual behavior, and sexually transmitted infections in US men 40–59 years old, 2001–2004: a cross – sectional study

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    Platz Elizabeth A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted infections (STIs are hypothesized to play a role in the development of prostate cancer, perhaps due to inflammation-induced oncogenesis. We assessed in a nationally representative population of middle-aged men whether sexual behavior indicators for an increased risk of genital infection were associated with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA concentration, a marker of prostatic disease and inflammation. Results The percentage of men between the ages of 40 and 59 with a PSA ≥ 4.0 ng/ml was 2.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8% – 3.8%. The percentage of men between the ages of 40 and 59 self-reporting a past diagnosis of genital warts or genital herpes, or a recent diagnosis of gonorrhea or chlamydia is estimated to be 7.3% (95% CI, 6.2% – 8.6%. Men self-reporting that they had had sex without using a condom in the past month had a lower PSA concentration and higher %fPSA than those who did not. There were no associations between any of the other sexual activity or laboratory measures and PSA or %fPSA. Conclusion In this nationally representative sample of middle-aged American men, we did not find consistent evidence for an association between sexual behavior or a history of STIs and PSA levels. Therefore, sexual factors are unlikely to lead to falsely elevated PSA tests in this population. We cannot rule out the role of these factors in causing false positive PSA tests in subgroups of the population that have a higher prevalence of high-risk sexual behavior, and more protracted or recent exposures to these agents.

  7. Social Discrimination and Resiliency are not associated with Differences in Prevalent HIV Infection in Black and White Men who have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John L.; Bakeman, Roger; Sullivan, Patrick; Millett, Gregorio; Rosenberg, Eli; Salazar, Laura; Di Clemente, Ralph J.; Cooper, Hannah; Kelley, Colleen F.; Mulligan, Mark J.; Frew, Paula; del Rio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine associations of homophobia, racism, and resiliency with differences in prevalent HIV infection in black and white MSM. Methods The Involve[ment]t study is a cohort of black and white MSM aged 18–39 years in Atlanta, GA designed to evaluate individual, dyadic, and community level factors that might explain racial disparities in HIV prevalence. Participants were recruited irrespective of HIV serostatus from community-based venues and from Internet ads and were tested for HIV. We assessed respondents’ demographics, whether they had engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) within the past 6 months, and attitudes about perceived homophobia, perceived racism, and personal resiliency. Results Compared to white MSM, black MSM were less likely to report UAI in the past 6 months (OR = 0.59, CI = 0.44–0.80), more likely to be HIV-positive (OR = 5.05, CI = 3.52–7.25) and, among—those HIV-positive—more likely to report not being aware of their HIV infection (OR = 2.58, CI = 1.18–5.65). Greater perceived racism was associated with UAI in the black sample (partial odds ratio [pOR] = 1.48, CI = 1.10–1.99). Overall, perceived homophobia, perceived racism, and resilience were not associated with prevalent HIV infection in our samples. Greater resilience was associated with less perceived homophobia in both black and white samples (Spearman r = −.27, p < .001, for both). Conclusion Future studies of social discrimination at the institutional and network level, than at the individual level, may explain differences in HIV infection in black and white MSM. PMID:24820109

  8. Nitrative DNA damage and Oct3/4 expression in urinary bladder cancer with Schistosomahaematobium infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ning; Thanan, Raynoo; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Hammam, Olfat; Wishahi, Mohamed; Leithy, Tarek El; Hiraku, Yusuke; Amro, EL-Karef; Oikawa, Shinji; Ohnishi, Shiho; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oct3/4-positive cells increase in Schistosoma haematobium (SH)-associated bladder cancer. → iNOS-dependent DNA lesion, 8-nitroguanine, was formed in Oct3/4-positive cells. → 8-Nitroguanine formed in stem-like cells plays a role in SH-induced carcinogenesis. → Mutant stem cells may participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis. -- Abstract: To investigate whether mutant stem cells participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis, we performed immunohistochemical analysis to examine nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions (8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG) and a stem cell marker Oct3/4 in bladder tissues obtained from cystitis and bladder cancer patients infected with Schistosomahaematobium (S. haematobium). We also detected the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which lead to 8-nitroguanine formation. The staining intensity of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG was significantly higher in bladder cancer and cystitis tissues than in normal tissues. iNOS expression was colocalized with NF-κB in 8-nitroguanine-positive tumor cells from bladder cancer patients. Oct3/4 expression was significantly increased in cells from S. haematobium-associated bladder cancer tissues in comparison to normal bladder and cancer tissues without infection. Oct3/4 was also expressed in epithelial cells of cystitis patients. Moreover, 8-nitroguanine was formed in Oct3/4-positive stem cells in S. haematobium-associated cystitis and cancer tissues. In conclusion, inflammation by S.haematobium infection may increase the number of mutant stem cells, in which iNOS-dependent DNA damage occurs via NF-κB activation, leading to tumor development.

  9. Prevalence and associated factors of depressive and anxiety symptoms among HIV-infected men who have sex with men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Mo, Phoenix K H; Kahler, Christopher W; Lau, Joseph T F; Du, Mengran; Dai, Yingxue; Shen, Hanyang

    2016-01-01

    HIV-positive men who have sex with men (HIVMSM) face severe stigma and high levels of stressors, and have high prevalence of mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety). Very few studies explored the role of positive psychological factors on mental health problems among HIVMSM. The present study investigated the prevalence of two mental health problems (anxiety and depression), and their associated protective (gratitude) and risk (enacted HIV-related stigma, and perceived stress) factors among HIVMSM in China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 321 HIVMSM in Chengdu, China, by using a structured questionnaire. Over half (55.8%) of the participants showed probable mild to severe depression (as assessed by the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale); 53.3% showed probable anxiety (as assessed by the General Anxiety Disorder scale). Adjusted logistic regression models revealed that gratitude (adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 0.90, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) = 0.86-0.94) was found to be protective, whilst perceived stress (ORa = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.12-1.22) and enacted stigma (ORa = 7.72, 95% CI = 2.27-26.25) were risk factors of depression. Gratitude (ORa = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.91-0.99) was also found to be protective whilst perceived stress (ORa = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.14-1.24) was a risk factor of anxiety. Gratitude did not moderate the associations found between related factors and poor mental health. It is warranted to promote mental health among HIVMSM, as depression/anxiety was highly prevalent. Such interventions should consider enhancement of gratitude, reduction of stress, and removal of enacted stigma as potential strategies, as such factors were significantly associated with depression/anxiety among HIVMSM.

  10. Utilidade da citologia anal no rastreamento dos homens heterossexuais portadores do HPV genital Anal cytology for screening heterosexual men harboring genital HPV infection

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    Raphael Marianelli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Os papilomavírus humanos (HPV de alto risco estão fortemente relacionados à etiologia do carcinoma espinocelular (CEC anogenital e suas lesões precursoras. O HPV-16 é o tipo mais freqüente, estando presente em até 87% dos CEC do canal anal HPV-positivo. Apesar de ser relativamente raro, vem sendo cada vez mais diagnosticado, nas últimas décadas, sobretudo em indivíduos do sexo masculino. A incidência é ainda mais elevada nos grupos considerados de risco, particularmente, os homens e as mulheres HIV-positivo e os homens que fazem sexo com homens (HSH. Grande parte das pesquisas direcionadas à infecção anal pelo HPV e sua relação com neoplasia intraepitelial-anal (NIA e com o carcinoma esteve focada nos grupos de risco. Pouco interesse vem sendo destinado à investigação dos homens heterossexuais. Estudos epidemiológicos da prevalência da infecção pelo HPV em homens, mostraram que os heterossexuais masculinos apresentavam infecção anal pelo HPV em até 12%. As Sociedades médicas e os especialistas recomendam o rastreamento dos portadores de imunodepressão e dos HSH com citologia do raspado do canal anal. Entretanto, até o momento, não há recomendação de rastreamento para homens que fazem sexo com mulheres.The oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV are straightly associated with anogenital cancer and dysplasia. The HPV-16 is the most common type, isolated in 87% of the HPV-positive anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Despite being a rare tumor, the incidence of SCC has increased in the last decades, especially in males. Incidence is particularly high amongst men who have sex with men (MSM and among HIV infected men and women. For decades anogenital HPV researches have largely focused risk groups. Poor interest was intended to men who have sex with women (MSW. Prevalence studies of HPV infection in MSW have demonstrated that anal infection was identified in as far as 12%. Medical societies and specialists recommend anal

  11. The Feasibility and Acceptability of Using Technology-Based Daily Diaries with HIV-Infected Young Men Who have Sex with Men: A Comparison of Internet and Voice Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenack, Emily M; Wilson, Patrick A; Kreuzman, Andrew M; Price, Georgine N

    2016-08-01

    This study delivered a daily diary to 67 HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) between 16 and 24 years old for 66 days to measure HIV-risk behaviors and other psychosocial variables via two diary modalities: internet (accessible via any web-enabled device) and voice (accessible via telephone). Participants were randomized to complete one diary modality for 33 days before switching to the second modality for 33 days. The study was implemented in three urban HIV health care centers in the United States where participants were receiving services. Through diary data and qualitative interview data, we examined the feasibility and acceptability of the dairies and identified barriers and facilitators of dairy compliance. Results show high participant retention in the daily diary (93.4 %) and high compliance for the number of dairies completed (72.4 %). Internet diaries were preferred by 92 % of participants and completed at a significantly higher rate (77.5 %) than voice diaries (67.7 %). Facilitators included opportunities for self-reflection and cathartic sharing, monetary compensation, relationships with study staff, and daily reminders. Barriers included being busy or not having privacy at the time of reminders, forgetting, and falling asleep. Participants also described barriers and facilitators unique to each modality. Overall, both modalities were feasible and acceptable for use with our sample of HIV-infected MSM.

  12. Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms Among a Population of HIV-Infected Men and Women in Routine HIV Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Angela M; Pence, Brian W; Powers, Kimberly A; Weaver, Mark A; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Gaynes, Bradley N; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Christopoulos, Katerina; Christopher Mathews, W; Crane, Heidi; Mugavero, Michael

    2018-04-06

    Depressive symptoms vary in severity and chronicity. We used group-based trajectory models to describe trajectories of depressive symptoms (measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and predictors of trajectory group membership among 1493 HIV-infected men (84%) and 292 HIV-infected women (16%). At baseline, 29% of women and 26% of men had depressive symptoms. Over a median of 30 months of follow-up, we identified four depressive symptom trajectories for women (labeled "low" [experienced by 56% of women], "mild/moderate" [24%], "improving" [14%], and "severe" [6%]) and five for men ("low" [61%], "mild/moderate" [14%], "rebounding" [5%], "improving" [13%], and "severe" [7%]). Baseline antidepressant prescription, panic symptoms, and prior mental health diagnoses were associated with more severe or dynamic depressive symptom trajectories. Nearly a quarter of participants experienced some depressive symptoms, highlighting the need for improved depression management. Addressing more severe or dynamic depressive symptom trajectories may require interventions that additionally address mental health comorbidities.

  13. Recreational Drug Use among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Risky Combination with Unprotected Sex for Acquiring HIV Infection

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    Jun-Jie Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the prevalence of recreational drug use and its relationship with HIV infection among Chinese MSM. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 625 MSM was conducted in Shenyang, China. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on recreational drug use and sexual behaviors. Blood specimens were collected to test for HIV and syphilis antibodies. Results. Nearly a quarter (23.2%, 145/625 of participants reported ever using recreational drugs, among which alkyl nitrites (poppers was the most frequently used drug (19.2%, followed by methylmorphine phosphate (5.1%, methamphetamine (4.0%, and ketamine (0.8%. The overall prevalence of HIV and syphilis was 9.6% and 10.4%, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that recreational drug use was significantly correlated with age ≤25 year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.6, 95% CI, 1.1–2.9, single marital status (aOR = 2.1, 95% CI, 1.2–3.6, and seeking male sexual partners mainly through Internet (aOR = 1.8, 95% CI, 1.8–2.8. Recreational drug use was independently associated with an increased risk of HIV infection (aOR = 3.5, 95% CI, 2.0–6.2. Conclusions. Our study suggests that recreational drug use is popular among Chinese MSM and is associated with significantly increased HIV infection risk. HIV prevention intervention programs should reduce both drug use and risky sexual behaviors in this population.

  14. Recreational Drug Use among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Risky Combination with Unprotected Sex for Acquiring HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-Jie; Qian, Han-Zhu; Chu, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Qing-Hai; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Geng, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Christiana Meng; Shang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the prevalence of recreational drug use and its relationship with HIV infection among Chinese MSM. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 625 MSM was conducted in Shenyang, China. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on recreational drug use and sexual behaviors. Blood specimens were collected to test for HIV and syphilis antibodies. Results. Nearly a quarter (23.2%, 145/625) of participants reported ever using recreational drugs, among which alkyl nitrites (poppers) was the most frequently used drug (19.2%), followed by methylmorphine phosphate (5.1%), methamphetamine (4.0%), and ketamine (0.8%). The overall prevalence of HIV and syphilis was 9.6% and 10.4%, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that recreational drug use was significantly correlated with age ≤25 year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.6, 95% CI, 1.1–2.9), single marital status (aOR = 2.1, 95% CI, 1.2–3.6), and seeking male sexual partners mainly through Internet (aOR = 1.8, 95% CI, 1.8–2.8). Recreational drug use was independently associated with an increased risk of HIV infection (aOR = 3.5, 95% CI, 2.0–6.2). Conclusions. Our study suggests that recreational drug use is popular among Chinese MSM and is associated with significantly increased HIV infection risk. HIV prevention intervention programs should reduce both drug use and risky sexual behaviors in this population. PMID:24829916

  15. Mobile Phone and Internet Use Mostly for Sex-Seeking and Associations with Sexually Transmitted Infections and Sample Characteristics among Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino Men who have Sex with Men in Three U.S. Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacob E.; Mansergh, Gordon; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Holman, Jeremy; Herbst, Jeffrey H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) have a relatively high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This study examines the association of self-reported STIs and use of mobile phones and/or computer-based Internet to meet sexual partners among black and Hispanic/Latino MSM in the U.S. Methods Black and Hispanic/Latino MSM (N=853) were recruited from three U.S. cities (Chicago, IL, Kansas City, MO, and Fort Lauderdale, FL) via online and community outreach. Men completed a computer-assisted, self-interview assessment on demographics, use of mobile phones and computer-based Internet for sex-seeking, sexual risk behavior, and self-reported bacterial STIs in the past year. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model independent associations of STIs and use of these technologies to meet sexual partners. Results 23% of the sample reported having an STI in the past year; 29% reported using a mobile phone and 28% a computer-based Internet mostly for sex-seeking; and 22% reported using both. Number of male sexual partners (past year) was associated with any STI (AOR=1.03, 95% CI =1.01–1.06). Adjusting for HIV status, number of male sexual partners (past year), and demographic variables, men who reported use of both mobile phones and computer-based Internet for sex-seeking had increased odds of reporting an STI (AOR=2.59, 95% CI=1.75–3.83), as well as with separate reports of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis (p’smobile phone application sites. PMID:28407644

  16. The Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance in Newly Diagnosed HIV-Infected Individuals in Croatia: The Role of Transmission Clusters of Men Who Have Sex with Men Carrying the T215S Surveillance Drug Resistance Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgic, Ivana; Lunar, Maja M.; Poljak, Mario; Vince, Adriana; Vrakela, Ivana Baca; Planinic, Ana; Seme, Katja; Begovac, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in newly diagnosed and treatment-naive HIV-infected patients from Croatia and evaluate a possible contribution of transmission clusters to the spread of resistant virus. The study enrolled treatment-naive HIV-infected patients that entered clinical care at the Croatian Reference Center for HIV/AIDS between 2006 and 2008. The protease gene and a part of the reverse transcriptase gene of the HIV-1 genome were sequenced by using the Trugene HIV-1 Genotyping System. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was analyzed by using the surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) list recommended by the WHO in 2009. We report findings for 118 of 180 eligible patients (65.6% coverage). SDRM were detected in 26 of 118 patients (22.0%) who were infected with subtype B and belonged mostly to the men having sex with men (MSM). The majority of patients with primary resistance carried SDRM associated with resistance to nucleoside analogues reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 23 of 118 patients, 19.5%). The most frequently found NRTI SDRM was T215S (17 of 118 patients, 14.4%). SDRM associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were detected in three (2.5%) patients and primary resistance to protease inhibitors was not detected. Non-B subtypes were detected in 13/118 patients (11%). A total of 12 transmission pairs and eight distinct transmission clusters were identified with the largest cluster harboring sequences from 19 patients; among them all but two were carrying the T215S mutation. This study showed a high prevalence of TDR in newly diagnosed MSM from Croatia and is an important contribution concerning the relationship between local transmission clusters and the spread of resistant virus. PMID:22906365

  17. Self-reported history of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and STI-related utilization of the German health care system by men who have sex with men: data from a large convenience sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Axel J; Marcus, Ulrich

    2011-05-18

    In Germany, testing and treatment of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) services are not provided by one medical discipline, but rather dispersed among many different providers. Common STIs like gonorrhoea or Chlamydia infection are not routinely reported. Although men who have sex with men (MSM) are particularly vulnerable to STIs, respective health care utilization among MSM is largely unknown. A sexual behaviour survey among MSM was conducted in 2006. Questions on self-reported sexual behaviour, STI-related health care consultation and barriers to access, coverage of vaccination against hepatitis, screening for asymptomatic STIs, self-reported history of STIs, and partner notification were analysed. Analysis was stratified by HIV-serostatus (3,511 HIV-negative/unknown versus 874 positive). General Practitioners, particularly gay doctors, were preferred for STI-related health care. Low threshold testing in sex-associated venues was acceptable for most respondents. Shame and fear of homophobic reactions were the main barriers for STI-testing. More than half of the respondents reported vaccination against hepatitis A/B. HIV-positive MSM reported screening offers for STIs three to seven times more often than HIV-negative or untested MSM. Unlike testing for syphilis or hepatitis C, screening for asymptomatic pharyngeal and rectal infections was rarely offered. STIs in the previous twelve months were reported by 7.1% of HIV-negative/untested, and 34.7% of HIV-positive respondents. Self-reported histories of STIs in MSM convenience samples differ significantly by HIV-serostatus. Higher rates of STIs among HIV-positive MSM may partly be explained by more testing. Communication between health care providers and their clients about sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual risks should be improved. A comprehensive STI screening policy for MSM is needed.

  18. Long-term Maintenance of CD4 T Cell Memory Responses to Malaria Antigens in Malian Children Coinfected with Schistosoma haematobium

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    Kirsten E. Lyke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyparasitism is common in the developing world. We have previously demonstrated that schistosomiasis-positive (SP Malian children, aged 4–8 years, are protected from malaria compared to matched schistosomiasis-negative (SN children. The effect of concomitant schistosomiasis upon acquisition of T cell memory is unknown. We examined antigen-specific T cell frequencies in 48 Malian children aged 4–14 to a pool of malaria blood stage antigens, and a pool of schistosomal antigens, at a time point during a malaria episode and at a convalescent time point ~6 months later, following cessation of malaria transmission. CD4+ T cell-derived memory responses, defined as one or more significant cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and/or IL-17A responses, was measured to schistoma antigens in 18/23 SP children at one or both time points, compared to 4/23 SN children (P < 0.0001. At the time of malaria infection, 12/24 SN children and 15/23 SP children (P = 0.29 stimulated with malaria antigens demonstrated memory recall as defined by CD4-derived cytokine production. This compares to 7/23 SN children and 16/23 SP children (P = 0.009 at the convalescent timepoint. 46.2% of cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells expressed a single cytokine after stimulation with malaria antigen during the malaria episode. This fell to 40.9% at follow-up with a compensatory rise of multifunctional cytokine secretion over time, a phenomenon consistent with memory maturation. The majority (53.2–59.5% of responses derived from CD45RA−CD62L− effector memory T cells with little variation in the phenotype depending upon the time point or the study cohort. We conclude that detectable T cell memory responses can be measured against both malaria and schistosoma antigens and that the presence of Schistosoma haematobium may be associated with long-term maintenance of T memory to malaria.

  19. Trabecular bone microstructure is impaired in the proximal femur of human immunodeficiency virus-infected men with normal bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakia, Galateia J; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Lai, Andrew; Nardo, Lorenzo; Facchetti, Luca; Pasco, Courtney; Zhang, Chiyuan A; Han, Misung; Parrott, Amanda Hutton; Tien, Phyllis; Krug, Roland

    2018-02-01

    There is evidence that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are independent risk factors for osteoporosis and fracture which is not solely explained by changes in bone mineral density. Thus, we hypothesized that the assessment of trabecular microstructure might play an important role for bone quality in this population and might explain the increased fracture risk. In this study, we have assessed bone microstructure in the proximal femur using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as in the extremities using high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in HIV-infected men and healthy controls and compared these findings to those based on areal bone mineral density (aBMD) derived from dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) which is the standard clinical parameter for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Eight HIV-infected men and 11 healthy age-matched controls were recruited and informed consent was obtained before each scan. High-resolution MRI of the proximal femur was performed using fully balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) on a 3T system. Three volumes of interest at corresponding anatomic locations across all subjects were defined based on registrations of a common template. Four MR-based trabecular microstructural parameters were analyzed at each region: fuzzy bone volume fraction (f-BVF), trabecular number (Tb.N), thickness (Tb.Th), and spacing (Tb.Sp). In addition, the distal radius and distal tibia were imaged with HR-pQCT. Four HR-pQCT-based microstructural parameters were analyzed: trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), Tb.N, Tb.Th, and Tb.Sp. Total hip and spine aBMD were determined from DXA. Microstructural bone parameters derived from MRI at the proximal femur and from HR-pQCT at the distal tibia showed significantly lower bone quality in HIV-infected patients compared to healthy controls. In contrast, DXA aBMD data showed no significant differences between HIV-infected

  20. Increased likelihood of bacterial pathogens in the coronal sulcus and urethra of uncircumcised men in a diverse group of HIV infected and uninfected patients in India

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    John A Schneider

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biological mechanism of circumcision as potentiating HIV prevention is poorly understood. Foreskin microbiota has been postulated as having a potential role; however, little is known about the relationship between bacterial pathogens and circumcision in adults. Materials and Methods: We sampled the coronal sulcus of a diverse group of circumcised and uncircumcised men (n=315 from a government chest hospital and fertility clinic in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. Genital examination was conducted on three groups of men: Group 1 - HIV infected; Group 2 - TB infected; Group 3 - control. Aerobic and anaerobic specimens were cultured according to standard clinical protocols, and results were analyzed following multivariate logistic regression models. Results: Three hundred fifteen study participants - 47.6% of Group 1, 36.5% of Group 2, and 15.9% of Group 3 - were enrolled in the study and included in all analyses. Overall 37.1% of the participants were circumcised without variation across groups (P=0.29. Smegma was observed in 18.7% of the participants with no cases observed in Group 3 (P<0.001. Gram-negative pathogens were more prevalent among study participants in Group 1 (22.7% and Group 2 (30.4% as compared with those in Group 3 (6.0% (P=0.003. In multivariate regression analysis, controlling for group, age, and presence of smegma, uncircumcised men were more likely to be colonized with gram positives [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR 1.9; P<0.05], gram negatives (AOR 2.4; P<0.05, or any pathogen (AOR 2.8; P<0.005. Conclusions: Uncircumcised men in this population in South India are more likely to harbor bacterial pathogens in the coronal sulcus than do their circumcised counterparts. Future studies should examine the relationship between foreskin microbiota and HIV transmission.

  1. Epidemiology and laboratory characteristics of Trichomonas vaginalis infection in Croatian men with and without urethritis syndrome: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviben, Mario; Missoni, Emilija Mlinarić; Meštrović, Tomislav; Vojnović, Gordana; Galinović, Gordana Mlinarić

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of trichomoniasis in men with and without symptoms of urethritis, with concomitant analysis of sociodemographic and behavioural specificities of both groups. Also, the objective is to evaluate laboratory methods used in the diagnostics of this parasitic disease. A total of 500 men with and 200 without urethritis symptoms were included in the study. Every respondent filled out a questionnaire asking for some general data, specific information about habits, sexual behaviour and symptoms. Sediment of first void urine was analysed by wet mount microscopy, cultivation in Diamond's medium and real-time PCR. In the symptomatic group, Trichomonas vaginalis infection was documented in 2.4% of respondents by wet mount microscopy, in 4.8% by cultivation and in 8.2% by real-time PCR. In the asymptomatic group, infection was proven using the same methods in 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0% of the respondents, respectively. Trichomoniasis prevalence was statistically significantly higher in the respondents manifesting urethritis symptoms when cultivation (χ2=4.20, p=0.041) and real-time PCR (χ2=9.20, p=0.002) were used. Several epidemiological risk factors were identified, and greater sensitivity of real-time PCR was found in comparison with microscopy and culture. Trichomonas infection was statistically more frequent in men with urethritis syndrome. Assuming that the samples found positive by any laboratory technique are truly positive, it can be concluded that the real-time PCR showed the greatest sensitivity of all the methods used in this study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Social, structural and behavioral determinants of overall health status in a cohort of homeless and unstably housed HIV-infected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elise D; Neilands, Torsten B; Moore, Kelly; Cohen, Jennifer; Bangsberg, David R; Havlir, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate multiple influences on the overall health of HIV-infected persons; however, few assess and rank longitudinal changes in social and structural barriers that are disproportionately found in impoverished populations. We empirically ranked factors that longitudinally impact the overall health status of HIV-infected homeless and unstably housed men. Between 2002 and 2008, a cohort of 288 HIV+ homeless and unstably housed men was recruited and followed over time. The population was 60% non-Caucasian and the median age was 41 years; 67% of study participants reported recent drug use and 20% reported recent homelessness. At baseline, the median CD4 cell count was 349 cells/µl and 18% of eligible persons (CD4effects of behavioral, social, and structural factors on overall physical and mental health status (measured by the SF-36), and targeted variable importance (tVIM) was used to empirically rank factors by their influence. After adjusting for confounding, and in order of their influence, the three factors with the strongest negative effects on physical health were unmet subsistence needs, Caucasian race, and no reported source of instrumental support. The three factors with the strongest negative effects on mental health were unmet subsistence needs, not having a close friend/confidant, and drug use. ART adherence >90% ranked 5th for its positive influence on mental health, and viral load ranked 4th for its negative influence on physical health. The inability to meet food, hygiene, and housing needs was the most powerful predictor of poor physical and mental health among homeless and unstably housed HIV-infected men in an urban setting. Impoverished persons will not fully benefit from progress in HIV medicine until these barriers are overcome, a situation that is likely to continue fueling the US HIV epidemic.

  3. Psycho-immunology and HIV infection : biopsychosocial determinants of distress, immunological parameters, and disease progression in homosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Mulder (Niels)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSubjects who have tested positive for the presence of antibodies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (further abbreviated as HIV), have to live with a lifethreatening infection. At present, no definite medical cure is available that prevents progression of HIV infection.

  4. No influence of GB virus C on disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryt-Hansen, Rosa; Katzenstein, Terese L; Gerstoft, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Presumed apathogenic viruses have been suggested to play a role in HIV infection. In some cohorts of HIVpositive patients, GB virus C (GBVC) has been associated with prolonged survival and time to AIDS. We set out to address whether GBVC infection had any influence on survival in a cohort of 112...

  5. No influence of GB virus C on disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryt-Hansen, Rosa; Katzenstein, Terese L; Gerstoft, Jan

    2006-01-01

    homosexual white HIV-1 positive Danish men. Patients were enrolled between 1984 and 1987 and followed for a mean of 6.7 years. Follow-up was censored in May 1996 when the first patient in the cohort received HAART. Plasma samples were screened at baseline using polymerase chain reaction methods for GBVC...

  6. Using syndemic theory to understand vulnerability to HIV infection among Black and Latino men in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick A; Nanin, Jose; Amesty, Silvia; Wallace, Scyatta; Cherenack, Emily M; Fullilove, Robert

    2014-10-01

    HIV is a public health crisis that disproportionately affects Black and Latino men. To understand this crisis, syndemic theory, which takes into account multiple interrelated epidemics, should be used. A syndemic is "two or more afflictions, interacting synergistically, contributing to excess burden of disease in a population." Vulnerability to HIV among Black and Latino men is increased as structural, social, and biological factors interact in the context of social marginalization. In New York City, Black and Latino men experience a syndemic of HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, trauma, incarceration, and poverty; however, current research has yet to fully identify the mechanisms of resilience that may reduce the negative impact of a syndemic or explore the potential adaptive functions of individual-level risk behaviors. To understand HIV risk as part of a syndemic and address HIV prevention in Black and Latino men, we propose the following: (1) the use of complex systems analysis, ethnography, and other mixed-methods approaches to observe changes in relations among social conditions and disease; (2) multidisciplinary and inter-institution collaboration; and (3) involvement of public health practitioners and researchers from diverse and underrepresented backgrounds.

  7. High risks of HIV transmission for men who have sex with men--a comparison of risk factors of HIV infection among MSM associated with recruitment channels in 15 cities of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlei Qi

    Full Text Available While the HIV epidemic varies greatly by region and population group throughout China, the HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM continues to rise at an alarmingly fast pace. We seek to analyze the risk factors associated with HIV infection among MSM recruited from different channels in large urban centers across China, in an attempt to shed light on the design of future targeted intervention strategies.A total of 33,684 MSM from 14 cities and one province were recruited from July to December 2011. Demographic (e.g. age, marital status, education and behavioral (e.g. condom use, HIV testing history data were collected using information collection cards. Blood samples were also collected to test for HIV and Syphilis.Participants were recruited from five different channels, and all demonstrated distinct characteristics. The overall rate of positive HIV screening was 6.27% and the rate of syphilis infection was 6.50%. Participants recruited from bathhouses had the highest HIV (11.80% and syphilis infection rates (11.20%. Participants who were infected with syphilis had the highest HIV-positive screening rate (13.75%; 95% CI OR, 2.33-3.06. living in the southwest region of the country (11.64%; OR=2.76, 95%CI OR 2.19-3.47, Being >20 years of age (P<0.001, living in the southwest region of the country (OR=2.76, 95%CI 2.19-3.47, not having sex with female over the previous 3 months (OR=1.27, 95%CI 1.09-1.48, no condom use during the last anal intercourse (OR=1.54, 95%CI 1.39-1.70 and other factors were all associated with a higher probability of having an HIV-positive test result.Depending on the way they are recruited, more targeted interventions are required to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among MSM with different characteristics and behaviors. Results from this study could provide evidence for researchers to conduct further studies and policy-makers to establish more effective and strategic interventions for MSM in China.

  8. Association of Childhood Infection With IQ and Adult Nonaffective Psychosis in Swedish Men: A Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort and Co-relative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Golam M; Dalman, Christina; Kappelmann, Nils; Stochl, Jan; Dal, Henrik; Kosidou, Kyriaki; Jones, Peter B; Karlsson, Håkan

    2018-04-01

    Associations between childhood infection, IQ, and adult nonaffective psychosis (NAP) are well established. However, examination of sensitive periods for exposure, effect of familial confounding, and whether IQ provides a link between childhood infection and adult NAP may elucidate pathogenesis of psychosis further. To test the association of childhood infection with IQ and adult NAP, to find whether shared familial confounding explains the infection-NAP and IQ-NAP associations, and to examine whether IQ mediates and/or moderates the childhood infection-NAP association. Population-based longitudinal cohort study using linkage of Swedish national registers. The risk set included all Swedish men born between 1973 and 1992 and conscripted into the military until the end of 2010 (n = 771 698). We included 647 515 participants in the analysis. Hospitalization with any infection from birth to age 13 years. Hospitalization with an International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of NAP until the end of 2011. At conscription around age 18 years, IQ was assessed for all participants. At the end of follow-up, the mean (SD) age of participants was 30.73 (5.3) years. Exposure to infections, particularly in early childhood, was associated with lower IQ (adjusted mean difference for infection at birth to age 1 year: -1.61; 95% CI, -1.74 to -1.47) and with increased risk of adult NAP (adjusted hazard ratio for infection at birth to age 1 year: 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.33). There was a linear association between lower premorbid IQ and adult NAP, which persisted after excluding prodromal cases (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-point increase in IQ: 0.976; 95% CI, 0.974 to 0.978). The infection-NAP and IQ-NAP associations were similar in the general population and in full-sibling pairs discordant for exposure. The association between infection and NAP was both moderated (multiplicative, β = .006; SE = 0.002; P = .02 and additive, β = .008; SE = 0.002; P

  9. Online interventions to address HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rod; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Salway, Travis; Gilbert, Mark; Shoveller, Jean

    2017-11-01

    Globally, young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) continue to experience disproportionately high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs). As such, there are strong public health imperatives to evaluate innovative prevention, treatment and care interventions, including online interventions. This study reviewed and assessed the status of published research (e.g. effectiveness; acceptability; differential effects across subgroups) involving online interventions that address HIV/STBBIs among young gbMSM. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar to identify relevant English-language publications from inception to November 2016. Studies that assessed an online intervention regarding the prevention, care, or treatment of HIV/STBBIs were included. Studies with gay and bisexual men; four studies did not assess sexual identity. Two studies reported including both HIV+ and HIV- participants, and all but one study included one or more measure of socio-economic status. Few studies reported on the differential intervention effects by socio-economic status, sexual identity, race or serostatus. While online interventions show promise at addressing HIV/STBBI among young gbMSM, to date, little emphasis has been placed on assessing: (i) potential differential effects of interventions across subgroups of young gbMSM; (ii) effectiveness studies of interventions in the dissemination phase; and (iii) on some "key" populations of young gbMSM (e.g. those who are: transgender, from low-income settings and/or HIV positive). Future research that unpacks the potentially distinctive experiences of particular subgroups with "real world" interventions is needed. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  10. A systematic review of behavioral interventions to prevent HIV infection and transmission among heterosexual, adult men in low-and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Loraine; Mathews, Catherine; Zembe, Yanga

    2013-02-01

    Prevention of new HIV infections needs to move to the forefront in the fight against HIV and AIDS. In the current economic crisis, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should invest limited resources to amass reliable evidence-based information about behavioral prevention efforts, and on behaviors that are driving the epidemic among people who are engaging in those behaviors. This paper aims to provide a systematic review and synthesis of behavioral interventions among a group of people in high HIV-burden countries: heterosexual men in LMICs. The review includes articles published between January 2001 and May 2010 that evaluated behavioral prevention interventions among heterosexual males aged 18+ years in LMICs. The studies were evaluated using the quality assessment tool for quantitative studies developed by the Effective Public Health Practice Project. The review identified 19 articles that met the review's inclusion criteria. Most studies were conducted in South Africa (n=6); two each in Uganda and Thailand; and one in each of Angola, Brazil, Bulgaria, India, Nigeria, the Philippines, Russia, Ukraine and Zimbabwe. Eight of 19 interventions increased condom use among their respective populations. Those interventions that sought to reduce the number of sexual partners had little effect, and those that addressed alcohol consumption and intimate partner violence had mixed effects. There was no evidence for any specific format of intervention that impacted best on any of the targeted risk behaviors. The paucity of evaluated interventions for heterosexual men in LMICs suggests that adult men in these countries remain underrepresented in HIV prevention efforts.

  11. Relationship between pure Schistosoma haematobium infection in Upper Egypt and irrigation systems. Part 1: methods of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, H M; Allam, F A; Hassanein, F; El-Garby, M T

    1975-01-01

    Four villages in Assiut Governorate were studied. They were matched for availability and time of introduction of medical services, the size of population and the socioeconomic status. One village had a basin system of irrigation. The other three villages had perennial irrigation introduced at different dates. A sketch map of each village was made showing the location of every house and the irrigation channels. Total coverage was intended in Gezirat El-Maabda (with basin irrigation) and Nazza Karar (with perennial irrigation-recently introduced). In El-Ghorayeb and Garf Sarhan (with older systems of perennial irrigation) systematic random samples were studied. The Study included a full, double check clinical examination of urine and stools samples and a social study. Data about educational level and activities that bring the individual in contact with canal water were recorded. Tables showing the age and sex distribution of the total population and the population studied in each village are presented and show validity of the samples taken from the population.

  12. Macrolide use and the risk of vascular disease in HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolley, Ian J; Li, Xiuhong; Jacobson, Lisa P

    2007-01-01

    of macrolide prophylaxis on those outcomes. METHODS: A subcohort analysis was undertaken using data collected in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study to examine the relative risk of vascular events (myocardial infarction, unstable angina and ischaemic stroke). Cox proportional hazard model using age as the time...... scale with time varying cofactors obtained at each semi-annual visit were used to assess the independent effect of macrolide use. RESULTS: Controlling for other significant effects including race and smoking, HIV-infection was not independently associated with vascular events. Increased risk......BACKGROUND: There has been increasing concern that HIV-infected individuals may be more at risk for cardiovascular events in the highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. This study examined the risk of thromboembolic events in HIV-infected and non-infected individuals and the effect...

  13. A census tract-level examination of social determinants of health among black/African American men with diagnosed HIV infection, 2005-2009--17 US areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanetta Gant

    Full Text Available HIV disproportionately affects black men in the United States: most diagnoses are for black gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (collectively referred to as MSM. A better understanding of the social conditions in which black men live and work may better explain why HIV incidence and diagnosis rates are higher than expected in this population.Using data from the National HIV Surveillance System and the US Census Bureau's American Community Survey, we examined the relationships of HIV diagnosis rates and 5 census tract-level social determinants of health variables for 21,948 black MSM and non-MSM aged ≥ 15 years residing in 17 areas in the United States. We examined federal poverty status, marital status, education level, employment status, and vacancy status and computed rate ratios (RRs and prevalence odds ratios (PORs, using logistic regression with zero-inflated negative binomial modeling.Among black MSM, HIV diagnosis rates decreased as poverty increased (RR: 0.54. At the time of HIV diagnosis, black MSM were less likely than black non-MSM to live in census tracts with a higher proportion below the poverty level (POR: 0.81 and with a higher proportion of vacant houses (POR: 0.86. In comparison, housing vacancy was positively associated with HIV diagnosis rates among black non-MSM (RR: 1.65. HIV diagnosis rates were higher for black MSM (RR: 2.75 and non-MSM (RR: 4.90 whose educational level was low. Rates were significantly lower for black MSM (RR: 0.06 and non-MSM (RR: 0.26 as the proportion unemployed and the proportion married increased.This exploratory study found differences in the patterns of HIV diagnosis rates for black MSM and non-MSM and provides insight into the transmission of HIV infection in areas that reflect substantial disadvantage in education, housing, employment, and income.

  14. Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted Helminths in Tana Delta District of Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njaanake, Kariuki H.; Vennervald, Birgitte J.; Simonsen, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    the primary school children were high and the parasites were responsible for significant morbidity. A clear synergistic interaction was observed between hookworm and T. trichiura infections. Increased coverage in administration of praziquantel and albendazole in the area is recommended to control morbidity...

  15. Using Intervention Mapping to develop a programme to prevent sexually transmittable infections, including HIV, among heterosexual migrant men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfers, Mireille EG; van den Hoek, Caty; Brug, Johannes; de Zwart, Onno

    2007-01-01

    Background There is little experience with carefully developed interventions in the HIV/STI prevention field aimed at adult heterosexual target groups in the Netherlands. The ability to apply intervention development protocols, like Intervention Mapping, in daily practice outside of academia, is a matter of concern. An urgent need also exists for interventions aimed at the prevention of STI in migrant populations in the Netherlands. This article describes the theory and evidence based development of HIV/STI prevention interventions by the Municipal Public Health Service Rotterdam Area (MPHS), the Netherlands, for heterosexual migrant men with Surinamese, Dutch-Caribbean, Cape Verdean, Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Methods First a needs assessment was carried out. Then, a literature review was done, key figures were interviewed and seven group discussions were held. Subsequently, the results were translated into specific objectives ("change objectives") and used in intervention development for two subgroups: men with an Afro-Caribbean background and unmarried men with a Turkish and Moroccan background. A matrix of change objectives was made for each subgroup and suitable theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected. Culturally-tailored interventions were designed and were pre-tested among the target groups. Results This development process resulted in two interventions for specific subgroups that were appreciated by both the target groups and the migrant prevention workers. The project took place in collaboration with a university center, which provided an opportunity to get expert advice at every step of the Intervention Mapping process. At relevant points of the development process, migrant health educators and target group members provided advice and feedback on the draft intervention materials. Conclusion This intervention development project indicates that careful well-informed intervention development using Intervention Mapping is feasible in

  16. Functional and phenotypic evidence for a selective loss of memory T cells in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noesel, C. J.; Gruters, R. A.; Terpstra, F. G.; Schellekens, P. T.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.

    1990-01-01

    In addition to a well-documented depletion of CD4+ T helper cells in later stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, evidence has been provided for a specific unresponsiveness to triggering either by specific antigen in the context of autologous major histocompatibility molecules (self

  17. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  18. Evaluation of the nitrite and leukocyte esterase activity tests for the diagnosis of acute symptomatic urinary tract infection in men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijers, J.J.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Nys, S.; Bartelds, A.; Donker, G.; Stobberingh, E.; Verbon, A.

    2007-01-01

    For 422 male patients with symptoms indicative of a urinary tract infection, nitrite and leukocyte esterase activity dipstick test results were compared with results of culture of urine samples. The positive predictive value of a positive nitrite test result was 96%. Addition of results of the

  19. Effects of Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of HIV Infection on Sexual Risk Behavior in Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Michael W; Schroeder, Sophia E; Wright, Edwina J; Hellard, Margaret E; Cornelisse, Vincent J; Doyle, Joseph S; Stoové, Mark A

    2018-03-02

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective in reducing HIV risk in men who have sex with men (MSM). However concerns remain that risk compensation in PrEP users may lead to decreased condom use and increased incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We assessed the impact of PrEP on sexual risk outcomes in MSM. We conducted a systematic review of open-label trials and observational studies published to August 2017 reporting sexual risk outcomes (STI diagnoses, condom use, number of sexual partners) in the context of daily oral PrEP use in HIV-negative MSM and transgender women. Pooled effect estimates were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis and a qualitative review and risk of bias assessment were performed. Sixteen observational studies and one open-label trial met selection criteria. Eight studies with 4388 participants reported STI prevalence and 13 studies with 5008 participants reported change in condom use. PrEP use was associated with a significant increase in rectal chlamydia (odds ratio [OR]=1.59; 95%CI 1.19-2.13; p=0.002; heterogeneity I 2=23%) and an increase in any STI diagnosis (OR=1.24; 95%CI 0.99-1.54; p=0.059; I 2=50%). The association of PrEP use with STI diagnoses was stronger in later studies. Most studies showed evidence of an increase in condomless sex among PrEP users. Findings highlight the importance of efforts to minimize STIs among PrEP users and their sexual partners. Monitoring of risk compensation among MSM in the context of PrEP scale-up is needed to assess the impact of PrEP on the sexual health of MSM and to inform preventive strategies.

  20. MVA E2 recombinant vaccine in the treatment of human papillomavirus infection in men presenting intraurethral flat condyloma: a phase I/II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran Y Carvajal, Antonio; de la Garza, Alfonso; Cruz Quiroz, Benitez Jose Cecilio; Vazquez Zea, Eduardo; Díaz Estrada, Ismael; Mendez Fuentez, Ernesto; López Contreras, Mario; Andrade-Manzano, Alejandro; Padilla, Santiago; Varela, Axel Ramírez; Rosales, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiologic agent for warts and cervical cancer. In Mexico, the death rate from cervical cancer is extremely high, and statistical data show that since 1990 the number of deaths is increasing. Condylomas and cancer of the penis are the most common lesions presented in men; bladder and prostate cancer in men are also associated with the presence of HPV. Since HPV is transmitted by sexual intercourse, treating both partners is necessary in order to eliminate the virus in the population. Approaches to this include preventative vaccines such as Gardasil, and therapeutic vaccines to treat established infections in both men and women. This will be the only way to decrease the numbers of deaths due to this malignancy. We conducted a phase I/II clinical trial to evaluate the potential use of the recombinant vaccinia viral vaccine MVA E2 (composed of modified vaccinia virus Ankara [MVA] expressing the E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus) to treat flat condyloma lesions associated with oncogenic HPV in men. Fifty male patients with flat condyloma lesions were treated with either MVA E2 therapeutic vaccine or fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil). Thirty men received the therapeutic vaccine, at a total of 10(6) virus particles per dose, administered directly into the urethra once every week over a 4-week period. Twenty control patients were treated with 5% fluorouracil 1mL twice weekly over a 4-week period directly into the urethra. Reduction of lesions or absence of papillomavirus infection was monitored by colposcopy and histologic analysis. The immune response after MVA E2 treatment was determined by measuring the antibodies against the MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the lymphocyte cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing oncogenic papillomavirus. Presence of papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method. Twenty-eight of 30 patients showed no lesion or presence of papillomavirus as diagnosed by colposcopy and brush histologic

  1. Acute phase and transport protein synthesis in simulated infection in undernourished men using uniformly labelled Spirulina Platensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeds, P.J.; Opekun, A.; Jahoor, F.; Wong, W.W.; Klein, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that injury and infection lead to body nitrogen loss, the reason has remained obscure. In this paper, we develop the argument that the processes that are activated during infection demand the provision of specific amino acids which have to be supplied from body protein. In particular, we show that the positive acute phase proteins are very rich in the aromatic amino acids and the exaggerated use of these amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine) in acute phase protein synthesis lead to an endogenous ''amino acid imbalance'' which restricts the use of other amino acids for tissue protein synthesis. Minimally invasive protocols, involving the administration of 15 N and 13 C-labelled amino acids for studying whole body nitrogen turnover, amino acid oxidation and plasma protein synthesis are described. (author). 22 refs, 3 tabs

  2. Transient aortitis documented by positron emission tomography in a case series of men and transgender women infected with syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Davey, Dvora; Kojima, Noah; Konda, Kelika A; Gupta, Pawan; Leon, Segundo R; Calvo, Gino M; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-12-01

    Syphilis infection persists globally contributing to preventable and treatable morbidity and mortality. How extensive early syphilis disseminates is unknown. To better understand the relationship between early syphilis infection and inflammation over time, our study enrolled six individuals recently infected with syphilis for sequential positron emission tomography (PET) scans. We evaluated a case series of six individuals with high syphilis titres (two secondary, two early latent and two latent, unknown duration, but with high titre) who received sequential PET scans to assess inflammation over time and its response to treatment. At time of PET scan, four of the six individuals were co-infected with HIV. One of the four was not on antiretroviral therapy and three of the four were not virally suppressed (viral load of >400 copies/mL). Baseline rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titres ranged from 1:64 to 1:256 (four of the six participants had prior non-reactive RPR results). Five of the six participants had mild to intense hypermetabolic PET scan activity consistent with cervical (n=5), axillary (n=4), inguinal (n=5) and retroperitoneal (n=1) adenopathy. Mild hypermetabolic activity in the thoracic aortic wall, suggesting aortitis, was present among the same five participants and resolved within 30 days for four of the five participants and 60 days for the other participant. However, widespread lymphadenopathy remained present in PET scans up to 3 months following treatment in two participants. We did not find any abnormal PET scan activity of the central nervous system. We found abnormal aortic wall PET scan activity suggesting aortitis to be common in a case series of patients with early syphilis. In research settings, PET scans may be a sensitive tool to monitor inflammation associated with syphilis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  3. A study of acute phase and transport protein synthesis in undernourished men using simulated infection and uniformly 15N-labelled Spirulina Platenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpad, A.V.; Soares, M.J.; Sekhar, R.V.; Reeds, P.J.; Fjeld, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that acute phase protein synthesis is accelerated and transport protein synthesis is decelerated in adult men in whom the stress of infection is superimposed upon undernutrition. As a pilot study, four chronically undernourished men and two well-nourished controls were studied on two occasions separated by four days; the second session was conducted 24 hours after the administration of typhoid vaccine. Basal urine and blood samples were collected and then subjects were given priming oral doses of 15 N-Spirulina (13.5mg/kg body weight) and oral doses (3.5mg/kg body weight) every 30 min for the next six hours. Meals were aliquoted during the dosing period. Blood samples were collected at four, five and six hours. 15 N enrichment in different fractions of plasma i.e., albumin, non-albumin and amino acids, was measured by combustion GC-IRMS. Total urinary nitrogen was measured by Kjeldahl. 5 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Dynamics of paediatric urogenital schistosome infection, morbidity and treatment: a longitudinal study among preschool children in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Mduluza, Takafira; Midzi, Nicholas; Chase-Topping, Margo; Mutsaka-Makuvaza, Masceline Jenipher; Chimponda, Theresa; Eyoh, Enwono; Mduluza, Tariro; Pfavayi, Lorraine Tsitsi; Wami, Welcome Mkululi; Amanfo, Seth Appiah; Murray, Janice; Tshuma, Clement; Woolhouse, Mark Edward John; Mutapi, Francisca

    2018-01-01

    Recent research has shown that in schistosome-endemic areas preschool-aged children (PSAC), that is, ≤5 years, are at risk of infection. However, there exists a knowledge gap on the dynamics of infection and morbidity in this age group. In this study, we determined the incidence and dynamics of the first urogenital schistosome infections, morbidity and treatment in PSAC. Children (6 months to 5 years) were recruited and followed up for 12 months. Baseline demographics, anthropometric and parasitology data were collected from 1502 children. Urinary morbidity was assessed by haematuria and growth-related morbidity was assessed using standard WHO anthropometric indices. Children negative for Schistosoma haematobium infection were followed up quarterly to determine infection and morbidity incidence. At baseline, the prevalence of S haematobium infection and microhaematuria was 8.5% and 8.6%, respectively. Based on different anthropometric indices, 2.2%-8.2% of children were malnourished, 10.1% underweight and 18.0% stunted. The fraction of morbidity attributable to schistosome infection was 92% for microhaematuria, 38% for stunting and malnutrition at 9%-34%, depending on indices used. S haematobium -positive children were at greater odds of presenting with microhaematuria (adjusted OR (AOR)=25.6; 95% CI 14.5 to 45.1) and stunting (AOR=1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7). Annual incidence of S haematobium infection and microhaematuria was 17.4% and 20.4%, respectively. Microhaematuria occurred within 3 months of first infection and resolved in a significant number of children, 12 weeks post-praziquantel treatment, from 42.3% to 10.3%; P<0.001. We demonstrated for the first time the incidence of schistosome infection in PSAC, along with microhaematuria, which appears within 3 months of first infection and resolves after praziquantel treatment. A proportion of stunting and malnutrition is attributable to S haematobium infection. The study adds scientific evidence to the calls for

  5. Point-of-care mobile digital microscopy and deep learning for the detection of soil-transmitted helminths and Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, Oscar; Linder, Nina; Ngasala, Billy; Mårtensson, Andreas; Linder, Ewert; Lundin, Mikael; Moilanen, Hannu; Suutala, Antti; Diwan, Vinod; Lundin, Johan

    2017-06-01

    Microscopy remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of neglected tropical diseases. As resource limited, rural areas often lack laboratory equipment and trained personnel, new diagnostic techniques are needed. Low-cost, point-of-care imaging devices show potential in the diagnosis of these diseases. Novel, digital image analysis algorithms can be utilized to automate sample analysis. Evaluation of the imaging performance of a miniature digital microscopy scanner for the diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminths and Schistosoma haematobium, and training of a deep learning-based image analysis algorithm for automated detection of soil-transmitted helminths in the captured images. A total of 13 iodine-stained stool samples containing Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm eggs and 4 urine samples containing Schistosoma haematobium were digitized using a reference whole slide-scanner and the mobile microscopy scanner. Parasites in the images were identified by visual examination and by analysis with a deep learning-based image analysis algorithm in the stool samples. Results were compared between the digital and visual analysis of the images showing helminth eggs. Parasite identification by visual analysis of digital slides captured with the mobile microscope was feasible for all analyzed parasites. Although the spatial resolution of the reference slide-scanner is higher, the resolution of the mobile microscope is sufficient for reliable identification and classification of all parasites studied. Digital image analysis of stool sample images captured with the mobile microscope showed high sensitivity for detection of all helminths studied (range of sensitivity = 83.3-100%) in the test set (n = 217) of manually labeled helminth eggs. In this proof-of-concept study, the imaging performance of a mobile, digital microscope was sufficient for visual detection of soil-transmitted helminths and Schistosoma haematobium. Furthermore, we show that deep

  6. Improving spatial prediction of Schistosoma haematobium prevalence in southern Ghana through new remote sensors and local water access profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinkina, Alexandra V; Walz, Yvonne; Koch, Magaly; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Utzinger, Jürg; Naumova, Elena N

    2018-06-04

    Schistosomiasis is a water-related neglected tropical disease. In many endemic low- and middle-income countries, insufficient surveillance and reporting lead to poor characterization of the demographic and geographic distribution of schistosomiasis cases. Hence, modeling is relied upon to predict areas of high transmission and to inform control strategies. We hypothesized that utilizing remotely sensed (RS) environmental data in combination with water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) variables could improve on the current predictive modeling approaches. Schistosoma haematobium prevalence data, collected from 73 rural Ghanaian schools, were used in a random forest model to investigate the predictive capacity of 15 environmental variables derived from RS data (Landsat 8, Sentinel-2, and Global Digital Elevation Model) with fine spatial resolution (10-30 m). Five methods of variable extraction were tested to determine the spatial linkage between school-based prevalence and the environmental conditions of potential transmission sites, including applying the models to known human water contact locations. Lastly, measures of local water access and groundwater quality were incorporated into RS-based models to assess the relative importance of environmental and WASH variables. Predictive models based on environmental characterization of specific locations where people contact surface water bodies offered some improvement as compared to the traditional approach based on environmental characterization of locations where prevalence is measured. A water index (MNDWI) and topographic variables (elevation and slope) were important environmental risk factors, while overall, groundwater iron concentration predominated in the combined model that included WASH variables. The study helps to understand localized drivers of schistosomiasis transmission. Specifically, unsatisfactory water quality in boreholes perpetuates reliance of surface water bodies, indirectly increasing

  7. Efficacy and safety of praziquantel in preschool-aged children in an area co-endemic for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean T Coulibaly

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa the recommended strategy to control schistosomiasis is preventive chemotherapy. Emphasis is placed on school-aged children, but in high endemicity areas, preschool-aged children are also at risk, and hence might need treatment with praziquantel. Since a pediatric formulation (e.g., syrup is not available outside of Egypt, crushed praziquantel tablets are used, but the efficacy and safety of this treatment regimen is insufficiently studied.We assessed the efficacy and safety of crushed praziquantel tablets among preschool-aged children (<6 years in the Azaguié district, south Côte d'Ivoire, where Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium coexist. Using a cross-sectional design, children provided two stool and two urine samples before and 3 weeks after treatment. Crushed praziquantel tablets, mixed with water, were administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg. Adverse events were assessed and graded 4 and 24 hours posttreatment by interviewing mothers/guardians.Overall, 160 preschool-aged children had at least one stool and one urine sample examined with duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears and a point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA cassette for S. mansoni, and urine filtration for S. haematobium diagnosis before and 3 weeks after praziquantel administration. According to the Kato-Katz and urine filtration results, we found high efficacy against S. mansoni (cure rate (CR, 88.6%; egg reduction rate (ERR, 96.7% and S. haematobium (CR, 88.9%; ERR, 98.0%. POC-CCA revealed considerably lower efficacy against S. mansoni (CR, 53.8%. Treatment was generally well tolerated, but moderately severe adverse events (i.e., body and face inflammation, were observed in four Schistosoma egg-negative children.Crushed praziquantel administered to preschool-aged children at a dose of 40 mg/kg is efficacious against S. mansoni and S. haematobium in a co-endemic setting of Côte d'Ivoire. Further research is required with highly sensitive

  8. Calibration of the dietary data obtained from the Brazilian center of the Natural History of HPV Infection in Men study: the HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Juliana Araujo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the regressions calibration for the dietary data that were measured using the quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ) in the Natural History of HPV Infection in Men: the HIM Study in Brazil. A sample of 98 individuals from the HIM study answered one QFFQ and three 24-hour recalls (24HR) at interviews. The calibration was performed using linear regression analysis in which the 24HR was the dependent variable and the QFFQ was the independent variable. Age, body mass index, physical activity, income and schooling were used as adjustment variables in the models. The geometric means between the 24HR and the calibration-corrected QFFQ were statistically equal. The dispersion graphs between the instruments demonstrate increased correlation after making the correction, although there is greater dispersion of the points with worse explanatory power of the models. Identification of the regressions calibration for the dietary data of the HIM study will make it possible to estimate the effect of the diet on HPV infection, corrected for the measurement error of the QFFQ.

  9. High pre-exposure prophylaxis uptake and early adherence among men who have sex with men and transgender women at risk for HIV Infection: the PrEP Brasil demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Brenda; Moreira, Ronaldo I; De Boni, Raquel B; Kallas, Esper G; Madruga, José Valdez; Vasconcelos, Ricardo; Goulart, Silvia; Torres, Thiago S; Marins, Luana M S; Anderson, Peter L; Luz, Paula M; Costa Leite, Iuri da; Liu, Albert Y; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2017-04-06

    The efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in preventing sexual acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is well established. Little is known about the feasibility of PrEP implementation in middle-income settings with concentrated epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). PrEP Brasil is a prospective, multicentre, open-label demonstration project assessing PrEP delivery in the context of the Brazilian Public Health System. HIV-uninfected MSM and TGW in 3 referral centres in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo were evaluated for eligibility and offered 48 weeks of daily emtricitabine/tenofovir for PrEP. Concentrations of tenofovir diphosphate in dried blood spot samples (DBS) at week 4 after enrolment (early adherence) were measured. Predictors of drug levels were assessed using ordinal logistic regression models considering the DBS drug level as a 3 level variable (<350 fmol/punch, ≥350-699 fmol/punch and ≥700 fmol/punch). 1,270 individuals were assessed for participation; n = 738 were potentially eligible and n = 450 were offered PrEP (PrEP uptake was 60.9%). Eligible but not enrolled individuals were younger, had lower HIV risk perception and had lower PrEP awareness. At week 4, 424 participants (of the 450 enrolled) had DBS TFV-DP concentrations, 94.1% in the protective range (≥350 fmol/punch, consistent with ≥2 pills per week), and 78% were in the highly protective range (≥700 fmol/punch, ≥4 pills per week). Participants with ≥12 years of schooling had 1.9 times the odds (95%CI 1.10-3.29) of a higher versus lower drug level than participants with <12 years of schooling. Condomless receptive anal intercourse in the prior 3 months was also associated with higher drug levels (adjusted OR = 1.78; 95% CI 1.08-2.94). The high uptake and early adherence indicate that PrEP for high-risk MSM and TGW can be successfully delivered in the context of the Brazilian Public Health System. Interventions to

  10. Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

  11. A Genome Wide Comparison to Identify Markers to Differentiate the Sex of Larval Stages of Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma bovis and their Respective Hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Kincaid-Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For scientists working on gonochoric organisms, determining sex can be crucial for many biological questions and experimental studies, such as crossbreeding, but it can also be a challenging task, particularly when no sexual dimorphism is visible or cannot be directly observed. In metazoan parasites of the genus Schistosoma responsible for schistosomiasis, sex is genetically determined in the zygote with a female heterogametic ZW/ZZ system. Adult flukes have a pronounced sexual dimorphism, whereas the sexes of the larval stages are morphologically indistinguishable but can be distinguished uniquely by using molecular methods. Therefore, reliable methods are needed to identify the sex of larvae individuals. Here, we present an endpoint PCR-based assay using female-specific sequences identified using a genome-wide comparative analysis between males and females. This work allowed us to identify sex-markers for Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma bovis but also the hybrid between both species that has recently emerged in Corsica (France. Five molecular sex-markers were identified and are female-specific in S. haematobium and the hybrid parasite, whereas three of them are also female-specific in S. bovis. These molecular markers will be useful to conduct studies, such as experimental crosses on these disease-causing blood flukes, which are still largely neglected but no longer restricted to tropical areas.

  12. Utility of pooled urine specimens for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in men attending public sexually transmitted infection clinics in Mumbai, India, by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindan, Christina; Mathur, Meenakshi; Kumta, Sameer; Jerajani, Hermangi; Gogate, Alka; Schachter, Julius; Moncada, Jeanne

    2005-04-01

    Pooling urogenital specimens for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae by nucleic acid amplification tests is an attractive alternative to individual testing. As pooling can reduce the costs of testing as well as labor, it has been advocated for use in resource-poor settings. However, it has neither been widely adopted nor evaluated for use in developing countries. We evaluated the practical use of pooling first-catch urine (FCU) specimens for the detection of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae from 690 men in Mumbai, India, by PCR. FCU, urethral smears, and swabs were collected from men seen at two sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics. All laboratory testing was done at the Lokmanya Tilak General Hospital. Gram stain smears and culture isolation for N. gonorrhoeae were performed. Each FCU was tested individually and in pools using the Roche Amplicor PCR for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae with an internal control for inhibition. Specimen pools consisted of aliquots from five consecutively processed FCUs combined into an amplification tube. An optical density reading of > or =0.20 indicated a pool for which subsequent testing of individual samples was required. Prevalence by PCR on single specimens was 2.2% (15/690) for C. trachomatis and 5.4% (37/690) for N. gonorrhoeae. Compared to individual FCU results, pooling for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae had an overall sensitivity of 96.1% (50/52). Specificity was 96.5% (83/86) in that three pools required single testing that failed to identify a positive specimen. Pooling missed two positive specimens, decreased the inhibition rate, and saved 50.3% of reagent costs. In this resource-limited setting, the use of pooling to detect C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae by PCR proved to be a simple, accurate, and cost-effective procedure compared to individual testing.

  13. Performance of the quantitative food frequency questionnaire used in the Brazilian center of the prospective study Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Juliana Araujo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Giuliano, Anna R; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo

    2011-07-01

    The Natural History of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Men: The HIM Study is a prospective multicenter cohort study that, among other factors, analyzes participants' diet. A parallel cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the validity and reproducibility of the quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ) used in the Brazilian center from the HIM Study. For this, a convenience subsample of 98 men aged 18 to 70 years from the HIM Study in Brazil answered three 54-item QFFQ and three 24-hour recall interviews, with 6-month intervals between them (data collection January to September 2007). A Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the difference between instruments was dependent on the magnitude of the intake for energy and most nutrients included in the validity analysis, with the exception of carbohydrates, fiber, polyunsaturated fat, vitamin C, and vitamin E. The correlation between the QFFQ and the 24-hour recall for the deattenuated and energy-adjusted data ranged from 0.05 (total fat) to 0.57 (calcium). For the energy and nutrients consumption included in the validity analysis, 33.5% of participants on average were correctly classified into quartiles, and the average value of 0.26 for weighted kappa shows a reasonable agreement. The intraclass correlation coefficients for all nutrients were greater than 0.40 in the reproducibility analysis. The QFFQ demonstrated good reproducibility and acceptable validity. The results support the use of this instrument in the HIM Study. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Infection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-16

    characteristic in severe gram-negative sepsis. Hypertriglyceridemia results from an increase in hepatic synthesis in combination with diminished activity of...induced stress, and tissue repair (1). The magnitude and type of nutritional losses caused by an infection reflect both the severity and duration of an... several functional forms of nutrient loss must be anticipated. Functional losses are defined as the within-body losses of nutrients due to infection

  15. Improving prevention and care for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among men who have sex with men in Cambodia: the sustainable action against HIV and AIDS in communities (SAHACOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyan Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs among key populations in Cambodia continues to rise. To address this issue, KHANA, the largest national HIV organization in the country developed and implemented the Sustainable Action against HIV and AIDS in Communities (SAHACOM project. This study aims to determine the impacts of the SAHACOM on sexual behaviors and the uptake of HIV/STI services among men who have sex with men (MSM in Cambodia. Methods We compared outcome indicators at midterm (n = 352 and endline (n = 394. Surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2014 in Battambang and Siem Reap provinces. A two-stage cluster sampling method was employed to select the study sample for structured interviews. Results The midterm and endline samples were similar. The average number of sexual partners in the past three months decreased significantly from 6.2 to 4.0 (p = 0.03. The proportion of MSM who reported paying for sex with men in the past three months also decreased significantly from 19.0 % to 9.7 % (OR = 2.0, 95 % CI = 1.3-3.0. No significant change was found in condom and lubricant use in all types of relationships. Regarding STIs, 28.1 % of MSM at midterm reported having at least one STI symptom in the past three months compared to 6.1 % at endline (OR = 4.6, 95 % CI = 2.9–7.4; out of them, 14.1 % of MSM at midterm sought treatment compared to 20.7 % at endline (OR = 2.6, 95 % CI = 1.1–6.9. The proportion of MSM who reported using illicit drugs in the past three months also decreased significantly from 12.2 % to 5.1 % (OR = 2.4, 95 % CI = 1.4–4.2. However, the proportion of MSM who reported having been tested for HIV in the past six months decreased significantly from 94.1 % to 77.1 % (OR = 2.9, 95 % CI = 1.8–3.6. Conclusions Findings from this study indicate that the SAHACOM was effective in improving sexual behaviors and related

  16. Role of malnutrition and parasite infections in the spatial variation in children’s anaemia risk in northern Angola

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    Ricardo J. Soares Magalhães

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is known to have an impact on child development and mortality and is a severe public health problem in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa. We investigated the consistency between ecological and individual-level approaches to anaemia mapping by building spatial anaemia models for children aged ≤15 years using different modelling approaches. We aimed to (i quantify the role of malnutrition, malaria, Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths (STHs in anaemia endemicity; and (ii develop a high resolution predictive risk map of anaemia for the municipality of Dande in northern Angola. We used parasitological survey data for children aged ≤15 years to build Bayesian geostatistical models of malaria (PfPR≤15, S. haematobium, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura and predict small-scale spatial variations in these infections. Malnutrition, PfPR≤15, and S. haematobium infections were significantly associated with anaemia risk. An estimated 12.5%, 15.6% and 9.8% of anaemia cases could be averted by treating malnutrition, malaria and S. haematobium, respectively. Spatial clusters of high risk of anaemia (>86% were identified. Using an individual-level approach to anaemia mapping at a small spatial scale, we found that anaemia in children aged ≤15 years is highly heterogeneous and that malnutrition and parasitic infections are important contributors to the spatial variation in anaemia risk. The results presented in this study can help inform the integration of the current provincial malaria control programme with ancillary micronutrient supplementation and control of neglected tropical diseases such as urogenital schistosomiasis and STH infections.

  17. Sexual risk behaviors among HIV-infected South African men and women with their partners in a primary care program: implications for couples-based prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; de Bruyn, Guy; Lurie, Mark N; Modisenyane, Tebogo; Triche, Elizabeth W; Gray, Glenda E; Welte, Alex; Martinson, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    We studied 1163 sexually-active HIV-infected South African men and women in an urban primary care program to understand patterns of sexual behaviors and whether these behaviors differed by partner HIV status. Overall, 40% reported a HIV-positive partner and 60% a HIV-negative or status unknown partner; and 17.5% reported >2 sex acts in the last 2 weeks, 16.4% unprotected sex in the last 6 months, and 3.7% >1 sex partner in the last 6 months. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was consistently associated with decreased sexual risk behaviors, as well as with reporting a HIV-negative or status unknown partner. The odds of sexual risk behaviors differed by sex; and were generally higher among participants reporting a HIV-positive partner, but continued among those with a HIV-negative or status unknown partner. These data support ART as a means of HIV prevention. Engaging in sexual risk behaviors primarily with HIV-positive partners was not widely practiced in this setting, emphasizing the need for couples-based prevention.

  18. Incidence and characteristics of sexually transmitted acute hepatitis C virus infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in Copenhagen, Denmark during four years (2006-2009): a retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Toke S; Omland, Lars Haukali; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2011-01-01

    We determined the incidence of hepatitis C virus among Danish human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and described their characteristics. We included 871 HIV-positive MSM seen from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2009 at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen; drug users...

  19. Early life traumatic stressors and the mediating role of PTSD in incident HIV infection among US men, comparisons by sexual orientation and race/ethnicity: results from the NESARC, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Sari L; Falb, Kathryn L; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2011-08-01

    Stressful life events in childhood during critical periods of development have long-term psychological and neurobiological sequelae, which may affect risk for HIV infection across the life course. Data were from a nationally representative sample of 13,274 US men (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, 2004-2005). Weighted multivariable logistic regression models examined (1) the association of childhood violent events before age 18 on 12-month incident HIV infection and (2) whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis (clinical interview) mediated the association between early life events and HIV. Overall, the 12-month HIV incidence was incident HIV infection (aOR = 5.75; 95% CI: 4.76 to 6.95). There was evidence that PTSD partially mediated the relationship between early life events and HIV (aOR = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.28). Experiencing early life violent family stressors was associated with HIV infection among men. Early life events and HIV infection were mediated by PTSD, which has implications for understanding disparities in HIV infection. Interventions are urgently needed that address the long-term sequelae of childhood violence.

  20. An Intervention Using Gamification to Increase Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in California: Rationale and Design of Stick To It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Christopher M; Acland, Daniel; Buzdugan, Raluca; Grimball, Reva; Natoli, Lauren; McGrath, Mark R; Klausner, Jeffrey D; McCoy, Sandra I

    2017-07-17

    In the United States, young men who have sex with men (YMSM) remain disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Although routine HIV/STI screening is pivotal to the timely diagnosis of HIV and STIs, initiation of appropriate treatment, and reduced onward disease transmission, repeat screening is underused. Novel interventions that incorporate elements of games, an approach known as gamification, have the potential to increase routinization of HIV/STI screening among YMSM. The study aims to test the hypothesis that an incentive-based intervention that incorporates elements of gamification can increase routine HIV/STI screening among YMSM in California. The study consists of a formative research phase to develop the intervention and an implementation phase where the intervention is piloted in a controlled research setting. In the formative research phase, we use an iterative development process to design the intervention, including gathering information about the feasibility, acceptability, and expected effectiveness of potential game elements (eg, points, leaderboards, rewards). These activities include staff interviews, focus group discussions with members of the target population, and team meetings to strategize and develop the intervention. The final intervention is called Stick To It and consists of 3 components: (1) online enrollment, (2) Web-based activities consisting primarily of quizzes and a countdown "timer" to facilitate screening reminders, and (3) in-person activities that occur at 2 sexual health clinics. Participants earn points through the Web-based activities that are then redeemed for chances to win various prizes during clinic visits. The pilot study is a quasi-experimental study with a minimum of 60 intervention group participants recruited at the clinics, at community-based events, and online. We will compare outcomes in the intervention group with a historical control

  1. Infection status and risk factors associated with urinary schistosomiasis among school-going children in the Ndumo area of uMkhanyakude district in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa two years post-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuyaya, Muhubiri; Chimbari, Moses John; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2018-04-18

    To assess the efficacy of praziquantel of infected children with Schistosoma haematobium over a 2year period in the Ndumo area of uMkhanyakude district, South Africa. This cohort study enrolled 173 school-going children in September 2017 that participated in a baseline survey conducted in 2015 in the Ndumo area. Questionnaire interviews were conducted to collect information on the risk factors related to transmission of schistosomiasis and filtration technique was performed to detect Schistosoma haematobium eggs in urine. Infection intensity was classified as light and heavy. A Chi square test was performed to assess association between variables with 95% confidence interval and p-value=0.05 was considered significant. Of the 173 participants screened two years post-treatment, 10 were infected and six were new infection cases while 4 were re-infections. The intensity of infection decreased significantly (P value=0.001) in the follow-up survey compare to the baseline survey. However, no significant difference was found among the risk factors of schistosomiasis 2 years later. The prevalence of S. haematobium decreased significantly in the cohort 2 years post praziquantel treatment during persistent drought in the area. Risk factors which were significantly associated with schistosomiasis at baseline were not two years following treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Human Schistosoma haematobium antifecundity immunity is dependent on transmission intensity and associated with immunoglobulin G1 to worm-derived antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Jones, Frances M.; van Dam, Govert J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunity that reduces worm fecundity and, in turn, reduces morbidity is proposed for Schistosoma haematobium, a parasite of major public health importance. Mathematical models of epidemiological trends suggest that antifecundity immunity is dependent on antibody responses to adult......-worm-derived antigen. METHODS: For a Malian cohort (age, 5-29 years) residing in high-transmission fishing villages or a moderate-transmission village, worm fecundity was assessed using the ratio of urinary egg excretion to levels of circulating anodic antigen, a Schistosoma-specific antigen that is steadily secreted......, host age and transmission were negatively associated with worm fecundity. A significant interaction term between host age and transmission indicates that antifecundity immunity develops earlier in high-transmission areas. SWA immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) levels explained the effect of transmission...

  3. New location for Bulinus truncatus (Audouin, 1827 (Gastropoda: Planorbidae intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium and its distribution in the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana, Elías D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a new population of Bulinus truncatus (Audouin, 1827 (Gastropoda, Planorbidae found in the province of Almería (Southeast Spain. B. truncatus is an intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, the trematode which causes urinary schistosomiasis in humans. Individuals were identified to species level by double-nested PCR, resulting in 100% homology. This population is located under the driest climate conditions of the Iberian Peninsula. Data on the distribution of this species in the Iberian Peninsula was gathered and is provided in this paper. Improved knowledge of the distribution of Bulinus truncatus is key to assess the risk of new outbreaks of schistosomiasis in the Iberian Peninsula.En este trabajo se reporta una nueva población de Bulinus truncatus (Audouin, 1827 (Gastropoda, Planorbidae en la provincia de Almería (Sureste de España. Se trata de una especie que presenta considerable interés tanto zoológico como epidemiológico por su papel como hospedador intermediario de Schistosoma haematobium, responsable de la esquistosomiasis urogenital humana. Los ejemplares fueron determinados a nivel específico mediante PCR doble anidada, con un 100% de homología. Se trata de la población localizada más al Sureste y en condiciones de mayor aridez en la península Ibérica. Se recopilaron los datos de presencia publicados para conocer su distribución en la península. El conocimiento de la distribución de Bulinus truncatus es una pieza clave para evaluar el riesgo de nuevos focos de esquistosomiasis en la península Ibérica.

  4. High burden of Schistosoma mansoni infection in school-aged children in Marolambo District, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Stephen A; Penney, James M St John; Russell, Hannah J; Howe, Anthony P; Linder, Cortland; Rakotomampianina, Andriamahitsisambatra L D; Nandimbiniaina, Anjara M; Squire, S Bertel; Stothard, J Russell; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Rahetilahy, Alain M

    2017-06-24

    A school-based survey was undertaken to assess prevalence and infection intensity of schistosomiasis in school-aged children in the Marolambo District of Madagascar. School-aged children from six purposively selected schools were tested for Schistosoma haematobium by urine filtration and Schistosoma mansoni using circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) and Kato-Katz stool analysis. The investigators did not address soil-transmitted helminths (STH) in this study. Of 399 school-aged children screened, 93.7% were infected with S. mansoni based on CCA analysis. Kato-Katz analysis of stool revealed S. mansoni infection in 73.6% (215/ 292). Heavy infections (> 400 eggs per gram) were common (32.1%; 69/ 215), with a mean of 482 eggs per gram of stool. Moderate infection intensities were detected in 31.2% (67/ 215) and light infection intensities in 36.7% (79/ 215) of infected participants. No infection with S. haematobium was detected by urine filtration. Intestinal schistosomiasis appears a considerable public health issue in this remote area of Madagascar where there is a pressing need for mass drug administration.

  5. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Jami S; Lewis, David A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers ( Treponema pallidum , Haemophilus ducreyi , or Chlamydia trachomatis L1-L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant.

  6. Distinct Neisseria gonorrhoeae Transmission Networks Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heymans, Raymond; A Matser, Amy; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; Heijman, Titia; Geskus, Ronald B.; Speksnijder, Adrianus G. C. L.; Davidovich, Udi; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Molecular typing was used to elucidate Neisseria gonorrhoeae transmission networks among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. We determined whether clusters of patients infected with specific N. gonorrhoeae genotypes were related to various epidemiological

  7. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Leichliter, Jami S.; Lewis, David A.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1–L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be...

  8. HIV incidence on the increase among homosexual men attending an Amsterdam sexually transmitted disease clinic: using a novel approach for detecting recent infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; Spaargaren, Joke; Geskus, Ronald B.; Beijnen, Jos; Coutinho, Roel A.; Fennema, Han S. A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Dramatic increases have occurred in sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and in sexual risk behaviour among homosexual men in Amsterdam and internationally. We investigated whether these trends indicate a resurgence of the HIV epidemic. Methods: HIV incidence was determined among

  9. Circulating CD14brightCD16+ 'intermediate' monocytes exhibit enhanced parasite pattern recognition in human helminth infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Turner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Circulating monocyte sub-sets have recently emerged as mediators of divergent immune functions during infectious disease but their role in helminth infection has not been investigated. In this study we evaluated whether 'classical' (CD14brightCD16-, 'intermediate' (CD14brightCD16+, and 'non-classical' (CD14dimCD16+ monocyte sub-sets from peripheral blood mononuclear cells varied in both abundance and ability to bind antigenic material amongst individuals living in a region of Northern Senegal which is co-endemic for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium. Monocyte recognition of excretory/secretory (E/S products released by skin-invasive cercariae, or eggs, of S. mansoni was assessed by flow cytometry and compared between S. mansoni mono-infected, S. mansoni and S. haematobium co-infected, and uninfected participants. Each of the three monocyte sub-sets in the different infection groups bound schistosome E/S material. However, 'intermediate' CD14brightCD16+ monocytes had a significantly enhanced ability to bind cercarial and egg E/S. Moreover, this elevation of ligand binding was particularly evident in co-infected participants. This is the first demonstration of modulated parasite pattern recognition in CD14brightCD16+ intermediate monocytes during helminth infection, which may have functional consequences for the ability of infected individuals to respond immunologically to infection.

  10. Associations between Tobacco, Alcohol, and Drug Use with Coronary Artery Plaque among HIV-Infected and Uninfected Men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean G Kelly

    Full Text Available We characterized associations between smoking, alcohol, and recreational drug use and coronary plaque by HIV serostatus within the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS.MACS participants (N = 1005, 621 HIV+ and 384 HIV- underwent non-contrast CT scanning to measure coronary artery calcium; 764 underwent coronary CT angiograms to evaluate plaque type and extent. Self-reported use of alcohol, tobacco, smoked/inhaled cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, marijuana, inhaled nitrites, and erectile dysfunction drugs was obtained at semi-annual visits beginning 10 years prior to CT scanning. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were performed, stratified by HIV serostatus.Among HIV+ men, current smoking, former smoking, and cumulative pack years of smoking were positively associated with multiple coronary plaque measures (coronary artery calcium presence and extent, total plaque presence and extent, calcified plaque presence, and stenosis >50%. Smoking was significantly associated with fewer plaque measures of comparable effect size among HIV- men; current smoking and calcified plaque extent was the only such association. Heavy alcohol use (>14 drinks/week was associated with stenosis >50% among HIV+ men. Among HIV- men, low/moderate (1-14 drinks/week and heavy alcohol use were inversely associated with coronary artery calcium and calcified plaque extent. Few significant associations between other recreational drug use and plaque measures were observed.Smoking is strongly associated with coronary plaque among HIV+ men, underscoring the value of smoking cessation for HIV+ persons. Alcohol use may protect against coronary artery calcium and calcified plaque progression in HIV- (but not HIV+ men. Few positive associations were observed between recreational drug use and coronary plaque measures.

  11. Strong association between failure of T cell homeostasis and the syncytium-inducing phenotype among HIV-1-infected men in the Amsterdam Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J. J.; Gange, S. J.; Schuitemaker, H.; Coutinho, R. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; Margolick, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between T cell homeostasis and its failure and 1.) the occurrence of AIDS and 2.) the switch from the non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) to the syncytium-inducing (SI) HIV virus phenotype. METHODS: For each of 325 homosexual men in the Amsterdam Cohort Study, the slope

  12. Will gay and bisexually active men at high risk of infection use over-the-counter rapid HIV tests to screen sexual partners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Frasca, Timothy; Dolezal, Curtis; Balan, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration may license OraQuick™, a rapid HIV test, for over-the-counter (OTC) sale. This study investigated whether HIV-uninfected, non-monogamous, gay and bisexual men who never or rarely use condoms would use the test with partners as a harm-reduction approach. Sixty participants responded to two computer-assisted self-interviews, underwent an in-depth interview, and chose whether to test themselves with OraQuick. Over 80% of the men said they would use the kit to test sexual partners or themselves if it became available OTC. Most participants understood that antibody tests have a window period in which the virus is undetectable, yet saw advantages to using the test to screen partners; 74% tested themselves in our offices. Participants offered several possible strategies to introduce the home-test idea to partners, frequently endorsed mutual testing, and highlighted that home testing could stimulate greater honesty in serostatus disclosure. Participants drew distinctions between testing regular versus occasional partners. Non-monogamous men who have sex with men, who never or rarely use condoms, may nevertheless seek to avoid HIV. Technologies that do not interfere with sexual pleasure are likely to be used when available. Studies are needed to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using OTC rapid HIV tests as one additional harm-reduction tool.

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma genitalium: age-specific prevalence and disease burden in men attending a sexually transmitted infections clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, C.; van Rooijen, M. S.; Himschoot, M.; de Vries, H. J. C.; Bruisten, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Men are not routinely tested for Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) in the Netherlands and, therefore, very few studies have looked into their prevalence and/or role in urogenital complaints in the Dutch male population. To describe the age-specific prevalence and disease

  14. Assessing appearance-related disturbances in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM): psychometrics of the body change and distress questionnaire-short form (ABCD-SF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashill, Aaron J; Wilson, Johannes M; Baker, Joshua S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2014-06-01

    Appearance-related disturbances are common among HIV-infected MSM; however, to date, there have been limited options in the valid assessment of this construct. The aim of the current study was to assess the structural, internal, and convergent validity of the assessment of body change distress questionnaire (ABCD) and its short version. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that both versions fit the data well. Four subfactors were revealed measuring the following body disturbance constructs: (1) negative affect about appearance, (2) HIV health-related outcomes and stigma, (3) eating and exercise confusion, and (4) ART non-adherence. The subfactors and total scores revealed bivariate associations with salient health outcomes, including depressive symptoms, HIV sexual transmission risk behaviors, and ART non-adherence. The ABCD and its short form, offer valid means to assess varied aspects of body image disturbance among HIV-infected MSM, and require modest participant burden.

  15. Prevalence and associated risk characteristics of HIV infection based on anal sexual role among men who have sex with men: a multi-city cross-sectional study in Western China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zeng

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: In this study, the HIV prevalence among MSM was alarmingly high. Moreover, the ‘0.5’ and ‘0’ role MSM were found to have a higher risk of infection compared to the ‘1’ role MSM, while respective risk characteristics were not completely the same across the three groups. Along with routine preventive intervention services, more focused and specific interventions are needed to target anal sex role classes separately.

  16. Effect of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection on sperm quality in young heterosexual men with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Mondaini, Nicola; D'Elia, Carolina; Meacci, Francesca; Migno, Serena; Malossini, Gianni; Mazzoli, Sandra; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) co-infection on sperm concentration, motility and morphology, in a large cohort of young heterosexual male patients with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms. Patients with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms, attending the same centre for sexually transmitted diseases from January 2005 and December 2010, were consecutively enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental examination, microbiological cultures for common bacteria, DNA extraction, mucosal and serum antibodies evaluation for Ct, specific tests for HPV and semen analysis. The semen variables analysed were: volume; pH; sperm concentration; motility; and morphology. Subjects were subdivided in two groups: group A, patients with Ct infection alone and group B, patients with Ct and HPV co-infection. The main outcome measurement was the effect of Ct and HPV co-infection on the semen variables examined. Of 3050 screened patients, 1003 were enrolled (32.9%) in the study. A total of 716 (71.3%) patients were allocated to group A, and 287 (28.7%) to group B. Significant differences between the two groups were reported in terms of percentage of motile sperm (degrees of freedom [df] = 1001; t-test = 11.85; P prostatitis-related symptoms attributable to Ct infection, co-infection with HPV has a significant role in decreasing male fertility, in particular with regard to sperm motility and morphology. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Community-based prevention leads to an increase in condom use and a reduction in sexually transmitted infections (STIs among men who have sex with men (MSM and female sex workers (FSW: the Frontiers Prevention Project (FPP evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez Juan-Pablo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India has an estimated 2.0 million to 3.1 million people living with HIV; it has the highest number of HIV-positive people in Asia and ranks third in the world. The Frontiers Prevention Project (FPP was implemented in 2002 to conduct targeted prevention intervention geared towards female sex workers (FSW and men who have sex with men (MSM in the state of Andhra Pradesh (AP. This paper reports the overall changes in behaviour and STI outcomes between 2003/4 and 2007 and also describes the changes attributed to the FPP. Methods The evaluation used two cross-sectional surveys among MSM and FSW at 24 sites in AP. Surveys were implemented using a similar methodology. Univariate analyses were conducted by comparing means: baseline vs. four-year follow-up and FPP vs. non-FPP. For both MSM and FSW, random and fixed-effects logit regression models at the site level were estimated for condom use with last partner, syphilis sero-positivity and HSV 2 sero-positivity. In addition, for FSW we estimated models for condom use with regular partner, and for MSM we estimated models for condom use with last female partner. Results Among MSM, fixed-effects analysis revealed that FPP was positively correlated with the probability of condom use with last female sexual partner and negatively correlated with the individual probability of sero-positivity to syphilis and HSV 2. Among FSW, the FPP intervention was significantly correlated with increased condom use with regular partners and with lower probability of STI sero-positivity. Discussion Important changes in behaviours related to an increase in prevention activities translated to reductions in STI sero-prevalence in AP, India. In contrast with non-FPP sites, the FPP sites experienced an intense community approach as part of the FPP intervention, and the general increase in condom use and its effect on STI sero-prevalence reflected the efficacy of these intense prevention activities focused on

  18. Increase in condom use and decline in prevalence of sexually transmitted infections among high-risk men who have sex with men and transgender persons in Maharashtra, India: Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Shreena; Deshpande, Sucheta; Gautam, Abhishek; Pardeshi, Dilip B; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Goswami, Prabuddhagopal; Adhikary, Rajatashuvra; George, Bitra; Paranjape, Ramesh S; Mainkar, Mandar M

    2014-08-03

    The present study assessed coverage, changes in condom use, and prevalence of HIV and other STIs among high-risk men who have sex with men (HR-MSM; highly visible, recruited from cruising sites/sex venues) and transgender (TG; male-to-female transgender persons, also called hijras) in the Indian state of Maharashtra. Data from Avahan's computerized management information system; two rounds of integrated behavioral and biological assessment (IBBA) surveys (Round 1 with 653 HR-MSM/TG and Round 2 with 652 HR-MSM/TG); and project-supported condom social marketing was used for the present analysis. Logistic regression models were used to assess changes in key indicators over these two rounds and to explore the association between exposure to Avahan interventions and condom use and STI prevalence in HR-MSM/TG. By December 2007, Avahan had reached about 90% of the estimated HR-MSM/TG population, and 83% of the estimated total population had visited STI clinics by March 2009. Free direct condom distribution by Avahan program NGOs and social marketing outlets in Maharashtra increased from about 2.7 million condoms in 2004 to 15.4 million in 2008. HR-MSM/TG were more likely to report higher consistent condom use (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-3.58) with regular male partners (spouse/lover/boyfriend) in Round 2 of IBBA, compared to Round 1. HR-MSM/TG exposed to Avahan interventions were more likely to report consistent condom use with regular male partners (AOR: 2.46; CI 1.34-4.52) than those who were unexposed. Prevalence of reactive syphilis serology declined significantly from 8.8% in Round 1 to 1.1% in Round 2 (p = 0.001), while the observed change HIV prevalence (12.3% to 6.3%, p = 0.16) was insignificant. The current evaluation provides evidence for successful scale up and coverage of target population by Avahan interventions in Maharashtra. The assessment findings showed improved accessibility to condoms and reduced risk

  19. Gynecological manifestations, histopathological findings, and schistosoma-specific polymerase chain reaction results among women with Schistosoma haematobium infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrianasolo, Bodo Sahondra; Jourdan, Peter Mark; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) is only partially understood. This study aims to describe the histopathological findings, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results, and gynecological manifestations of FGS in women with different intensities of Schistosoma hae...

  20. Modelling the impact of chlamydia screening on the transmission of HIV among men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Xiridou (Maria); H.J. Vriend (Henrike); A.K. Lugnér (Anna); J. Wallinga (Jacco); J.S.A. Fennema (Johan); J.M. Prins (Jan); S.E. Geerlings (Suzanne); B.J.A. Rijnders (Bart); M. Prins (Mariia); H.J.C. de Vries (Henry); M.J. Postma (Maarten); M.G. van Veen (Maaike); M. Schim van der Loeff (Maarten); M.A.B. van der Sande (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recent studies have found high prevalences of asymptomatic rectal chlamydia among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Chlamydia could increase the infectivity of HIV and the susceptibility to HIV infection. We investigate the role of chlamydia in the spread of HIV

  1. Dual infections with HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I are more common in older women than in men in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, B; da Silva, Z; Larsen, Olav Ditlevsen

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between the three human retroviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I. DESIGN: Community-based follow-up studies of retrovirus infections in two cohorts. METHODS: A total of 2057 individuals aged 35 years and over were eligible for inclusion. Participants were...... interviewed and had a blood sample drawn. Samples were analysed for HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV infections. Uni- and multivariate analyses that included behavioural and socio-economic factors were performed using logistic regression and Poisson regression models. RESULTS: A total of 1686 individuals participated...... with a blood sample in the HIV prevalence analyses and 1581 individuals participated in the HTLV-I prevalence analyses. The overall prevalence was 2.1% for HIV-1, 13.5% for HIV-2 and 7.1% for HTLV-I. Comparing the

  2. Protect Yourself against Hepatitis A and B: A Guide for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protect Yourself Against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B... a guide for gay and bisexual men Men who have sex with men are at increased What are the symptoms of hepatitis A and hepatitis B? risk of becoming infected with ...

  3. Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark ePearson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80, tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases and glucose transporters (SGTP1, as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to Schistosoma japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognised by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

  4. Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Becker, Luke; Driguez, Patrick; Young, Neil D; Gaze, Soraya; Mendes, Tiago; Li, Xiao-Hong; Doolan, Denise L; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; McManus, Donald P; Wilson, R Alan; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Nausch, Norman; Mutapi, Francisca; Felgner, Philip L; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR) to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80), tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases, and glucose transporters (SGTP1), as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to S. japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognized by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

  5. Female genital schistosomiasis--a differential diagnosis to sexually transmitted disease: genital itch and vaginal discharge as indicators of genital Schistosoma haematobium morbidity in a cross-sectional study in endemic rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke; Kurewa, Edith Nyaradzai; Ndhlovu, Patricia D; Midzi, Nicholas; Gwanzura, Lovemore; Mason, Peter R; Gomo, Exnevia; Sandvik, Leiv; Mduluza, Takafira; Friis, Henrik; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar

    2008-12-01

    To examine the association between schistosomiasis and reproductive tract symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a Schistosoma haematobium-endemic area of rural Zimbabwe. A total of 483 permanently resident adult women of Mupfure Ward aged 20-49 were interviewed and examined clinically, each providing three consecutive urine samples. Logistic regression analysis was used to control for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Women with genital sandy patches had significantly more genital itch (P = 0.009) and perceived their discharge as abnormal (P = 0.003). Eighty percent of the women who had genital itch, yellow discharge, and childhood or current waterbody contact had sandy patches. Fifty-two percent of the women with genital sandy patches did not have detectable S. haematobium ova in urine. Genital schistosomiasis was associated with stress incontinence and pollakisuria, but not with menstrual irregularities, current or previous ulcers, or tumours. Genital schistosomiasis may be a differential diagnosis to the STDs in women who have been exposed to fresh water in endemic areas. Because of the chronic nature of the disease in adults, we suggest to pay special attention to the prevention of morbidity.

  6. Schistosomiasis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus 1 in rural Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that treatment for schistosomiasis in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) attenuated HIV replication as measured by plasma HIV RNA. We investigated systemic inflammation as measured by plasma levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor II...... (sTNF-rII), interleukin-8, (IL-8), and IL-10 during schistosomiasis and HIV co-infection and after schistosomiasis treatment. The cohort was composed of 378 persons who were or were not infected with HIV-1, Schistosoma haematobium, or S. mansoni. Schistosomiasis-infected persons were randomized...... to receive praziquantel (40 mg/kg) at baseline or at the three-month follow-up. sTNF-rII and IL-8 were positively associated with schistosomiasis intensity as measured by circulating anodic antigen (CAA), regardless of HIV status. Interleukin-10 was positively associated with CAA in HIV-negative participants...

  7. High levels of viral suppression among East African HIV-infected women and men in serodiscordant partnerships initiating antiretroviral therapy with high CD4 counts and during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared; Kidoguchi, Lara; Haberer, Jessica; Celum, Connie; Donnell, Deborah; Ngure, Kenneth; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Mugo, Nelly; Asiimwe, Stephen; Odoyo, Josephine; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Bulya, Nulu; Katabira, Elly; Heffron, Renee

    2017-09-13

    People who are asymptomatic and feel healthy, including pregnant women, may be less motivated to initiate ART or achieve high adherence. We assessed whether ART initiation, and viral suppression 6, 12 and 24-months after ART initiation, were lower in HIV-infected members of serodiscordant couples who initiated during pregnancy or with higher CD4 counts. We used data from the Partners Demonstration Project, an open-label study of the delivery of integrated PrEP and ART (at any CD4 count) for HIV prevention among high-risk HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda. Differences in viral suppression (HIV RNA 500 cells/mm3) and during pregnancy were estimated using Poisson regression. Of 865 HIV-infected participants retained after becoming eligible for ART during study follow-up, 95% initiated ART. Viral suppression 24-months after ART initiation was high overall (97%), and comparable among those initiating ART at CD4 counts >500, 351-500 and ≤350 cells/mm3 (96% vs 97% vs 97%; relative risk [RR] 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1.03 for CD4 >500 vs <350 and RR 0.99; 95% CI: (0.93-1.06) for CD4 351-500 vs ≤350). Viral suppression was as likely among women initiating ART primarily to prevent perinatal transmission as ART initiation for other reasons (p=0.9 at 6 months and p=0.5 at 12 months). Nearly all HIV-infected partners initiating ART were virally suppressed by 24 months, irrespective of CD4 count or pregnancy status. These findings suggest that people initiating ART at high CD4 counts or due to pregnancy can adhere to ART as well as those starting treatment with symptomatic HIV disease or low CD4 counts.

  8. What are the factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted infection screening behaviour among heterosexual men patronising entertainment establishments who engaged in casual or paid sex? - Results from a cross-sectional survey in an Asian urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Raymond Boon Tar; Tham, Dede Kam Tyng; Cheung, Olive N Y; Tai, Bee Choo; Chan, Roy; Wong, Mee Lian

    2016-12-19

    Late presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with heterosexual transmission, particularly among heterosexual men in Asia. Although data on HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing behaviour is increasing, information is still lacking among heterosexual men who receive far lesser attention and are generally invisible in HIV/ STI prevention, particularly in the Asian urban setting. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of HIV/STI testing among heterosexual men patronising entertainment establishments (EEs) who engaged in casual or paid sex in Singapore, and the factors associated with this behaviour. This was a cross-sectional survey involving 604 participants using time location sampling between March and May 2015. For multivariable analysis, we used a mixed effects Poisson regression model with backward stepwise approach to account for clustering by venue and to obtain the adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) for the association of various factors with HIV/STI testing. Among 604 at-risk participants, only 163 (27.0%) had gone for HIV or STI testing in the past 6 months. Of this, 83.4% of them specifically underwent HIV testing. In multivariable analysis, HIV/STI testing increased with being non-Chinese (aPR 1.50; 95% CI: 1.08-2.06), having engaged in anal sex with casual or paid partner in the past 6 months (aPR 1.80; 95% CI: 1.27-2.57), number of partners in the past 6 months (aPR 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05) and HIV knowledge score (aPR 1.11; 95% CI: 1.05-1.16). Among those who reported non-consistent condom use with casual or paid partner, almost half of them (47.9%) perceived that they were at low risk for HIV/STI. Sigmatisation and discrimination was another common barrier for non-testing. Despite being at risk of HIV/STI, the low prevalence of testing coupled with a high prevalence of risky sexual behaviour among this group of heterosexual men in Singapore calls for a need for HIV/STI prevention interventions in the EE

  9. Strange Men

    OpenAIRE

    Snider, William Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Haamid lives a modest life running a restaurant in a small market town in Uganda. A member of the minority Indian population, he is estranged from his family for reasons he prefers not to discuss. At night he cooks elaborate dinners that he eats alone. When an openly gay Peace Corps volunteer comes to town looking for more than a good meal, Haamid's comfortable routine is broken, and his life is put in danger. STRANGE MEN explores the limits of good intentions and the uneven stakes for Americ...

  10. Assessment of Risk Factors, Treatment and Hospital Stay in Complicated Urinary Tract Infections in Men Caused by Pseudomonas: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk Özger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is known that Pseudomonas has been isolated more frequently in health care-related urinary tract infections (UTIs. It was aimed to determine the risk factors and empiric therapies due to antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas-related male UTIs, and assess the effect of Pseudomonas isolation on treatment and length of hospital stay. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2011 and January 2013 with 228 male health care-related complicated UTI patients hospitalized in the Urology and Infectious Diseases Inpatient Clinics at Gazi University Faculty of Medicine. Three hundred UTI attacks in 228 patients were evaluated retrospectively with regard to agents. Results: Pseudomonas was isolated in 37 of 300 complicated UTI attacks in 228 male patients. Nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization were determined as the risk factors for Pseudomonas related with health care-related UTI. It was understood that nephrolithiasis increased Pseudomonas isolated UTI risk 3.5 fold and recurrent UTI increased the risk 8.9 fold. The antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas was higher than other agents. Pseudomonas related UTIs prolonged the duration of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment. Conclusion: In the presence of nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization, drugs against Pseudomonas would be appropriate empiric treatment for health care-related complicated UTI. Ciprofloxacin use should be restricted when local antibiotic resistance, which leads empiric treatment, is taken into consideration. Increases in hospital stay and antibiotic treatment duration were thought to be associated with recurrent infection frequency and high antibiotics resistance in Pseudomonas related UTIs.

  11. Systematic screening with information and home sampling for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections in young men and women in Norway: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kløvstad, Hilde; Natås, Olav; Tverdal, Aage; Aavitsland, Preben

    2013-01-23

    As most genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections are asymptomatic, many patients do not seek health care for testing. Infections remain undiagnosed and untreated. We studied whether screening with information and home sampling resulted in more young people getting tested, diagnosed and treated for chlamydia in the three months following the intervention compared to the current strategy of testing in the health care system. We conducted a population based randomized controlled trial among all persons aged 18-25 years in one Norwegian county (41 519 persons). 10 000 persons (intervention) received an invitation by mail with chlamydia information and a mail-back urine sampling kit. 31 519 persons received no intervention and continued with usual care (control). All samples from both groups were analysed in the same laboratory. Information on treatment was obtained from the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD). We estimated risk ratios and risk differences of being tested, diagnosed and treated in the intervention group compared to the control group. In the intervention group 16.5% got tested and in the control group 3.4%, risk ratio 4.9 (95% CI 4.5-5.2). The intervention led to 2.6 (95% CI 2.0-3.4) times as many individuals being diagnosed and 2.5 (95% CI 1.9-3.4) times as many individuals receiving treatment for chlamydia compared to no intervention in the three months following the intervention. In Norway, systematic screening with information and home sampling results in more young people being tested, diagnosed and treated for chlamydia in the three months following the intervention than the current strategy of testing in the health care system. However, the study has not established that the intervention will reduce the chlamydia prevalence or the risk of complications from chlamydia.

  12. Human Papillomavirus infection in men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA Infección por Virus de Papiloma Humano en hombres de Brasil, México y EUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess Human Papillomavirus (HPV type distribution among men ages 18 years and older recruited from three different countries utilizing a common protocol for sampling HPV detection, and to evaluate whether HPV detection differs by age and country. MATERIAL AD METHODS: The study protocol includes a pre-enrollment run-in visit, a baseline (enrollment visit, and nine additional visits after enrollment scheduled six months apart. For this analysis, the first 1160 men who completed both the run-in and baseline visit were included. To maximize sampling and prevent fraying of applicators, three different applicators were utilized to sample the external genitalia of participants among different anatomic sites. These samples were later combined to form a single sample for the detection of HPV using polymerase chain reaction (PCR for amplification of a fragment of the HPV L1 gene. RESULTS: Among 1160 men from Brazil, Mexico, and the United States (U.S., overall HPV prevalence was 65.2%; with 12.0% oncogenic types only, 20.7% non-oncogenic types only, 17.8% both oncogenic and non-oncogenic, and 14.7% unclassified infections. Multiple HPV types were detected in 25.7% of study participants. HPV prevalence was higher in Brazil (72.3% than in the U.S. (61.3% and Mexico (61.9%. HPV 16 (6.5%, 51 (6.5%, and 59 (5.3% were the most commonly detected oncogenic infections, and HPV 84 (7.7%, 62 (7.3%, and 6 (6.6% were the most commonly detected non-oncogenic infections. Overall HPV prevalence was not associated with age. However, significant associations with age were observed when specific categories of oncogenic, non-oncogenic, and unclassified HPV infections were considered. CONCLUSIONS: Studies of HPV type distribution among a broad age range of men from multiple countries is needed to fill the information gap internationally with respect to our knowledge of HPV infection in men.OBJETIVO: Evaluar la distribución tipo específica de infección por

  13. Rapid diagnostic test for G6PD deficiency in Plasmodium vivax-infected men: a budget impact analysis based in Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Henry Maia; Brito, Marcelo Augusto Mota; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; de Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; de Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incremental budget impact (IBI) of a rapid diagnostic test to detect G6PDd in male patients infected with Plasmodium vivax in the Brazilian Amazon, as compared with the routine protocol recommended in Brazil which does not include G6PDd testing. The budget impact analysis was performed from the perspective of the Brazilian health system, in the Brazilian Amazon for the years 2013, 2014 and 2015. The analysis used a decision model to compare two scenarios: the first consisting of the routine recommended in Brazil which does not include prior diagnosis of dG6PD, and the second based on the use of RDT CareStart™ G6PD (CS-G6PD) in all male subjects diagnosed with vivax malaria. The expected implementation of the diagnostic test was 30% in the first year, 70% the second year and 100% in the third year. The analysis identified negative IBIs which were progressively smaller in the 3 years evaluated. The sensitivity analysis showed that the uncertainties associated with the analytical model did not significantly affect the results. A strategy based on the use of CS-G6PD would result in better use of public resources in the Brazilian Amazon. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Risk behaviors and HIV care continuum outcomes among criminal justice-involved HIV-infected transgender women and cisgender men: Data from the Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain Harmonization Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt G Beckwith

    Full Text Available Transgender persons are highly victimized, marginalized, disproportionately experience incarceration, and have alarmingly increased rates of HIV infection compared to cis-gender persons. Few studies have examined the HIV care continuum outcomes among transgender women (TW, particularly TW who are involved with the criminal justice (CJ system.To improve our understanding of HIV care continuum outcomes and risk behaviors among HIV-infected TW who are involved with the CJ system, we analyzed data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse-supported Seek, Test, Treat, Retain (STTR Data Harmonization Initiative. Baseline data were pooled and analyzed from three U.S. STTR studies to examine HIV risk and care continuum indicators among CJ-involved HIV-infected TW compared to cisgender men (CM, matched on age (within 5 years and study at a ratio of 1:5.Eighty-eight TW and 440 CM were included in the study. Among matched participants, TW were more likely to report crack and cocaine use compared to CM (40%,16% respectively, p<0.001; both TW and CM reported high rates of condomless sex (58%, 64%, respectively; TW were more likely than CM to have more than one sexual partner (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.6, 5.2; p<0.001 and have engaged in exchange sex (OR = 3.9, 95% CI: 2.3, 6.6; p<0.001. There were no significant differences between TW and CM in the percentage currently taking ART (52%, 49%, respectively, the mean percent adherence to ART (77% for both groups, and the proportion who achieved viral suppression (61%, 58%, respectively.HIV-infected CJ-involved TW and CM had similar use of ART and viral suppression but TW were more likely than matched CM to engage in exchange sex, have multiple sexual partners, and use crack/cocaine. TW and CM had similarly high rates of condomless sex and use of other drugs. TW require tailored risk reduction interventions, however both CJ-involved TW and CM require focused attention to reduce HIV risk and improve HIV continuum of

  15. Prevalence and effect of schistosome and soil-transmitted helminth infection on labour input in rice-growing communities of Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Olufemi Sam-Wobo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH are public health problems in communities which lack basic social amenities with poor hygienic conditions. Studies were carried out to determine the prevalence and effect of schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths infection on labour input on rice production in 9 rice-growing communities of Ogun State. Parasitological examinations of urine and faecal samples, and structured questionnaires were conducted on 243 consented individuals from May 2009 to March 2010. The results showed an overall prevalence of 17% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 12% for hookworms, 2% for Trichuris trichiura, 1% for Schistosoma haematobium and 1% for Schistosoma mansoni. A. lumbricoides and hookworms were more prevalent in Agbajege (25%, and varied in the other 8 communities. T. trichiura was prevalent in three communities, Agbajege (5%, Akodu (4.2%, and Moloko-Asipa (4.8 %; S. haematobium was prevalent only in Ayedere (2.6% and Lufoko (8%, while S. mansoni was prevalent only in Moloko-Asipa (9.5%. Infections among the gender were varied as 26.3 % of males and 33.8 % of females had an overall prevalence of: A. lumbricoides (16.8%, hookworms (11.8%, T. trichiura (1.6%, S. haematobium (1.1% and S. mansoni (1.1%. On frequency of infection to incapacitation per year, 45% of respondents were incapacitated 1-2 times, 27% 3-4 times and 19% were incapacitated more than 4 times. Understanding the effect of these two diseases will not only improve the health status of residents but also increase their productivity and ensure food security.

  16. Multiple parasitic and viral infections in a patient living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Deepika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection are more prone for gastrointestinal infections causing diarrhoea, particularly with parasites. Parasitic infections have been regularly reported in such patients. A female patient confirmed positive for HIV 1 on antiretroviral therapy came with complaints of chronic diarrhoea for the past 7 months. Her initial CD4 count was 89 cells/μl of blood, and antibodies to cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 virus were found to be positive in the patient's serum, but there was no HIV-associated retinopathy. Her stool examination showed decorticated fertilised eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, cysts of Blastocystis sp. and Entamoeba species in the unconcentrated sample and oocysts of Cystoisospora species, egg of Schistosoma haematobium and eggs of Trichuris trichiura in the concentrated. The patient responded well to cotrimoxazole and albendazole, and repeat samples were negative for all these parasites.

  17. Determinación del perfil hormonal en hombres infectados con el virus del síndrome de la inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SIDA Determination of the hormonal profile in AIDS-infected men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M. Cabrera Oliva

    2002-12-01

    que otras hormonas hipofisarias, gonadales y de origen adrenal no sufren cambios significativos. Es posible que la disminución en el IMC de estos pacientes sea producida, al menos en parte, por una disminución en la síntesis o secreción de testosterona lo cual sugiere que el tratamiento de estos pacientes con testosterona podría ser un factor de importancia para mejorar la calidad de vida de este grupo.A descriptive cross-sectional study of the hormonal profile in AIDS-infected men was conducted,. 34 individuals entered the study and were dividided into 2 groups: group 1 composed of 14 sound HIV-negative men aged 25.4 ± 2.3, body mass index (BMI of 24.0 ± l.8 kg/m2 and CD4+ lymphocyte count of 689 ± 208 x 106 cel/L; and group II consisted of 20 HIV-infected men aged 26.9 ± 6.3 , BMI of 22.1 ± 2.81 kg/m2 and CD4+ cell count of 104 ± 112 x 106 cel/L. They were recently diagnosed and had no antiretroviral treatment. The plasmatic concentrations of FSH, LH, prolactin, cortisol, testosterone, T3, T4 and TSH were determined. Correlations were established between the concentrations of testosterone and prolactin and the CD4+ cell count, and between the concentrations of FSH and LH and the concentrations of testosterone. The concentrations of T3, T4, TSH, cortisol and prolactin showed no statistically significant differences in the plasmatic samples of the sound subjects. Higher concentrations of FSH and LH (p £ 0.05 were found in the group of HIV-infected men, whereas the concentrations of testosterone were significantly reduced (p £ 0.05. In the group of HIV-infected patients, the correlation between the concentrations of testosterone and CD4+ cell count was y = 0.104 in a negative slope function. In the group of sound subjects, the value was p = 0.145, but with a positive slope function. The correlations between the concentrations of prolactin and those of testosterone and the CD4+ cell count were very similar. It was demonstrated that hypogonadism in HIV-infected

  18. Condomless Sex: Gay Men, Barebacking, and Harm Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Social science research as well as a rise in sexually transmitted diseases and new HIV infections among men who have sex with men point to increasing numbers of gay men engaging in unprotected anal intercourse without condoms, a practice called "barebacking." There is some evidence that barebacking is linked to the rise of crystal methamphetamine…

  19. Reduced antituberculosis drug concentrations in HIV-infected patients who are men or have low weight: implications for international dosing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlleron, Helen; Rustomjee, Roxana; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Mthiyane, Thuli; Denti, Paolo; Connolly, Catherine; Rida, Wasima; Pym, Alexander; Smith, Peter J; Onyebujoh, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Reduced antituberculosis drug concentrations may contribute to unfavorable treatment outcomes among HIV-infected patients with more advanced immune suppression, and few studies have evaluated pharmacokinetics of the first-line antituberculosis drugs in such patients given fixed-dose combination tablets according to international guidelines using weight bands. In this study, pharmacokinetics were evaluated in 60 patients on 4 occasions during the first month of antituberculosis therapy. Multilevel linear mixed-effects regression analysis was used to examine the effects of age, sex, weight, drug dose/kilogram, CD4(+) lymphocyte count, treatment schedule (5 versus 7 days/week), and concurrent antiretrovirals (efavirenz plus lamivudine plus zidovudine) on the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h (AUC(0-12)) of the respective antituberculosis drugs and to compare AUC(0-12)s at day 8, day 15, and day 29 with the day 1 AUC(0-12). Median (range) age, weight, and CD4(+) lymphocyte count were 32 (18 to 47) years, 55.2 (34.4 to 98.7) kg, and 252 (12 to 500)/μl. For every 10-kg increase in body weight, the predicted day 29 AUC(0-12) increased by 14.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5, 20.8), 14.1% (95% CI, -0.7, 31.1), 6.1% (95% CI, 2.7, 9.6) and 6.0% (95% CI, 0.8, 11.3) for rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, respectively. Males had day 29 AUC(0-12)s 19.3% (95% CI, 3.6, 35.1) and 14.0% (95% CI, 5.6, 22.4) lower than females for rifampin and pyrazinamide, respectively. Level of immune suppression and concomitant antiretrovirals had little effect on the concentrations of the antituberculosis agents. As they had reduced drug concentrations, it is important to review treatment responses in patients in the lower weight bands and males to inform future treatment guidelines, and revision of doses in these patients should be considered.

  20. PRESUMPTIVE DIAGNOSIS OF SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY .... study. Sample Collection and Processing. Two specimen containers were given to each subject and the ... false positive results and 24.3% true negative results.

  1. Anogenital warts in Danish men who have sex with men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Stinna; Kofoed, K

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anogenital warts (AGWs) and concurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men who have sex with men (MSM), and their knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV). Attitudes towards the HPV vaccine among MSM are explored. A web-based cross-sectional survey on AGWs......, sociodemographic factors and sexual behaviour conducted in August 2009 in Denmark. Overall 25.2% of the 1184 respondents reported a prior or current episode of AGWs. The prevalence of AGW was significantly higher in homosexuals compared with bisexuals, in men with high levels of education and in those with a high...... number of sexual partners within the last year. MSM with a history of another STI reported a significantly higher prevalence of warts. More than 70% did not know what causes AGWs. If a free HPV vaccine were to be offered, 94.4% would like to receive it. These data suggest a high prevalence of AGWs...

  2. Lymphogranuloma venereum in men who have sex with men: evidence of local transmission in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Indira; Bromhead, Collette; Balm, Michelle; Upton, Arlo; Reid, Murray; Franklin, Rick; Morgan, Jane; Bower, James; Henderson, Gillian; Roberts, Sally A

    2015-03-13

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. Five laboratory confirmed cases of LGV were detected in MSM (men who have sex with men) in the upper North Island; four in Auckland between September and December 2013 and a fifth case was detected in Waikato in June 2014. The absence of a recent travel history for four cases supports the likelihood of local transmission of this uncommon infection.

  3. Nutrition for Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Aging Nutrition for Young Men Print Email Nutrition for Young Men Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, ... 2017 XiXinXing/iStock/Thinkstock For many young men, nutrition isn't always a focus. There are many ...

  4. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadukura Vivian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated combined school based antihelminthic and prompt malaria treatment. Methods A cohort of primary schoolchildren (5-17 years received combined Praziquantel, albendazole treatment at baseline, and again during 6, 12 and 33 months follow up surveys and sustained prompt malaria treatment. Sustained prompt malaria treatment was carried out throughout the study period. Children's infection status with helminths, Plasmodium and helminths-Plasmodium co-infections was determined by parasitological examinations at baseline and at each treatment point. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, STH, malaria, helminths-Plasmodium co-infections and helminths infection intensities before and after treatment were analysed. Results Longitudinal data showed that two rounds of combined Praziquantel and albendazole treatment for schistosomiasis and STHs at 6 monthly intervals and sustained prompt malaria treatment significantly reduced the overall prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, hookworms and P. falciparum infection in primary schoolchildren by 73.5%, 70.8%, 67.3% and 58.8% respectively (p P. f + schistosomes, and P. f + STHs + schistosomes co-infections were reduced by 68.0%, 84.2%, and 90.7%, respectively. The absence of anti-helminthic treatment between the 12 mth and 33 mth follow-up surveys resulted in the sharp increase in STHs + schistosomes co-infection from 3.3% at 12 months follow up survey to 10.7%, slightly more than the baseline level (10.3% while other

  5. Risk behaviours, HIV/STI testing and HIV/STI prevalence between men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alissa; Best, John; Luo, Juhua; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Dodge, Brian; Meyerson, Beth; Aalsma, Matthew; Wei, Chongyi; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Differences in risk behaviours between men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women have important implications for HIV and STI transmission. We examined differences in risk behaviours, HIV/STI testing, self-reported HIV/STI diagnoses, and linkage to HIV care between men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women across China. Methods Participants were recruited through three men who have sex with men-focused websites in China. An online survey containing items on socio-demographics, risk behaviours, testing history, self-reported HIV/STI diagnosis, and linkage to and retention in HIV care was completed from September to October 2014. Chi square tests and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results Men who have sex with both men and women were less likely to use a condom during last anal sex (p ≤ 0.01) and more likely to engage in group sex (p ≤ 0.01) and transactional sex (p ≤ 0.01) compared to men who have sex with men. Self-reported HIV/STI testing and positivity rates between men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women were similar. Among HIV-infected men who have sex with men, there was no difference in rates of linkage to or retention in antiretroviral therapy when comparing men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women. Conclusions Chinese men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women may benefit from different HIV and STI intervention and prevention strategies. Achieving a successful decrease in HIV/STI epidemics among Chinese men who have sex with men and men who have sex with both men and women will depend on the ability of targeted and culturally congruent HIV/STI control programmes to facilitate a reduction in risk behaviours. PMID:26185041

  6. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for example, lack of a functioning spleen, need vac- influenzae type b) cination with Hib. Talk to ... of developing severe complications because of your HIV infection. Meningococcal ACWY (Men- ACWY, MCV4) Yes! MenACWY vaccine ...

  7. The prevalence of anal human papillomavirus among young HIV negative men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Huachun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men who have sex with men (MSM especially those who are HIV positive are at risk for HPV-associated anal cancer. We systematically reviewed studies with data on the prevalence of vaccine preventable anal HPV among men who have sex with men aged 25 or younger and identified 6 studies. None of these studies were specifically designed to determine the prevalence of HPV in this population. Available data, albeit limited, suggest many young MSM may not already be HPV infected. Further studies using representative sampling focused on teenage MSM are required to confirm this.

  8. Rapid increase in lymphogranuloma venereum in men who have sex with men, United Kingdom, 2003 to September 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Tristan; Simms, Ian; Alexander, Sarah; Eastick, Kirstine; Hughes, Gwenda; Field, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    United Kingdom (UK) national data show a sharp increase in diagnoses of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) since 2012. Most cases are in men who have sex with men (MSM) living in London, with high rates of co-infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. In light of these data, and the recent finding that one quarter of LGV infections may be asymptomatic, clinicians should be vigilant in testing for LGV, including in asymptomatic HIV-positive MSM.

  9. The Effect of a Multi-Level Intervention on the Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) among HIV-Infected Men Who Inject Drugs and Were Diagnosed Late in Thai Nguyen, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelaya, Carla E.; Le Minh, Nguyen; Lau, Bryan; Latkin, Carl A.; Viet Ha, Tran; Minh Quan, Vu; Mo, Thi Tran; Sripaipan, Teerada; Davis, Wendy W.; Celentano, David D.; Frangakis, Constantine; Go, Vivian F.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Vietnam, an estimated 256,000 people are living with HIV, and 58% of HIV-infections reported are among people who inject drugs (PWID). While antiretroviral therapy (ART) is widely available in Vietnam, marginalized hard-to-reach male PWID, demonstrate significantly reduced and delayed access to ART. Methods We investigated the effect of a randomized four-arm multi-level intervention trial on ART initiation among male PWID. Our analysis was conducted among a subset of trial participants (n = 136), who were newly diagnosed as HIV-infected, treatment naïve, and eligible for ART (baseline late diagnosis). The trial arms included: 1, standard of care (HIV testing and counseling); 2, structural-level intervention (door-to-door communications and community video screenings); 3, individual-level intervention (counseling plus group support); and 4, individual-level plus structural-level intervention. In a time-to-event analysis, we used a non-parametric approach for competing risks to estimate cumulative incidence function (CIF) for ART initiation (event of interest) by arm and the difference in CIF for each trial arm as compared to Arm 1. Follow-up was conducted at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Data collection occurred from 2009 to 2013. Findings By 24-months, 61.0% initiated ART, and 30.9% had died prior to ART initiation. In the first 6 months, participants in arm 4 (individual plus community intervention) had a 28% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6–50%) increased probability of initiating ART. Despite increasing coverage of ART in all arms throughout follow-up, participants in arm 4 retained a 31% (95% CI: 5–56%) increased probability of initiating ART. The individual and community components of the intervention were only effective when delivered together. Conclusions Marginalized, hard-to-reach men, who do not routinely engage in HIV services, and therefore come into care late, may benefit significantly from both individual counseling and group support, in

  10. Lymphogranuloma venereum detected from the pharynx in four London men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosekun, O; Edmonds, S; Stockwell, S; French, P; White, J A

    2013-06-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is an established cause of proctitis in men who have sex with men (MSM). Currently in the UK, testing for pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is not routine, and LGV typing is usually only performed in patients with anorectal symptoms. We report four cases where LGV-associated CT DNA was detected from the pharynx in MSM, demonstrating that nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) can be used for detecting and typing pharyngeal CT infection. These cases also highlight other possible routes of infection for LGV, and add to the broad spectrum of clinical presentations associated with this infection.

  11. Cosmetic Concerns Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Marc Zachary; Goldberg, David J

    2018-01-01

    Men are interested in reducing signs of aging, while maintaining a masculine appearance. A chief concern among men is maintenance of scalp hair. Men are also concerned with reducing under eye bags and dark circles. The concern of feminization is of significant importance. Neuromodulators remain the most common cosmetic procedure performed in men. Men often prefer a reduction in facial rhytids, as opposed to elimination of the lines. Softening facial lines in men is meant to maintain an appearance of wisdom, without appearing fragile. Men also wish to maintain a taut jawline and a slim waist and reduce breast tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Young men using pornography

    OpenAIRE

    Flood, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Most everyday users of pornography are heterosexual men. Looking at, and masturbating to, pornography is the routine practice of large numbers of men. And most of the commercial pornographic industry caters to heterosexual men. These men – and their consumption of pornography – are the subject of a growing body of research. This chapter offers an overview of what we can learn about heterosexual boys' and young men's use of pornography, focusing particularly on quantitative studies of the exte...

  13. Effects of hygiene and defecation behavior on helminths and intestinal protozoa infections in Taabo, Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Thomas; Hürlimann, Eveline; Silué, Kigbafori D; Yapi, Richard B; Houngbedji, Clarisse; Kouadio, Bernadette A; Acka-Douabélé, Cinthia A; Kouassi, Dongo; Ouattara, Mamadou; Zouzou, Fabien; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Utzinger, Jürg; Raso, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    More than 1 billion people are currently infected with soil-transmitted helminths and schistosomes. The global strategy to control helminthiases is the regular administration of anthelmintic drugs to at-risk populations. However, rapid re-infection occurs in areas where hygiene, access to clean water, and sanitation are inadequate. In July 2011, inhabitants from two villages and seven hamlets of the Taabo health demographic surveillance system in south-central Côte d'Ivoire provided stool and urine samples. Kato-Katz and ether-concentration methods were used for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni, soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm), and intestinal protozoa. Urine samples were subjected to a filtration method for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium. A questionnaire was administered to households to obtain information on knowledge, attitude, practice, and beliefs in relation to hygiene, sanitation, and defecation behavior. Logistic regression models were employed to assess for associations between questionnaire data and parasitic infections. A total of 1,894 participants had complete data records. Parasitological examinations revealed prevalences of hookworm, S. haematobium, T. trichiura, S. mansoni, and A. lumbricoides of 33.5%, 7.0%, 1.6%, 1.3% and 0.8%, respectively. Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar were detected in 15.0% and 14.4% of the participants, respectively. Only one out of five households reported the presence of a latrine, and hence, open defecation was common. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age, sex, socioeconomic status, hygiene, and defecation behavior are determinants for helminths and intestinal protozoa infections. We found that inadequate sanitation and hygiene behavior are associated with soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa infections in the Taabo area of south-central Côte d'Ivoire. Our data will serve as a benchmark to monitor the

  14. Accuracy of Mobile Phone and Handheld Light Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Protozoa Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean T Coulibaly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Handheld light microscopy using compact optics and mobile phones may improve the quality of health care in resource-constrained settings by enabling access to prompt and accurate diagnosis.Laboratory technicians were trained to operate two handheld diagnostic devices (Newton Nm1 microscope and a clip-on version of the mobile phone-based CellScope. The accuracy of these devices was compared to conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni, and intestinal protozoa infection in a community-based survey in rural Côte d'Ivoire. One slide of 10 ml filtered urine and a single Kato-Katz thick smear from 226 individuals were subjected to the Newton Nm1 microscope and CellScope for detection of Schistosoma eggs and compared to conventional microscopy. Additionally, 121 sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF-fixed stool samples were examined by the Newton Nm1 microscope and compared to conventional microscopy for the diagnosis of intestinal protozoa.The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, Giardia intestinalis, and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, as determined by conventional microscopy, was 39.8%, 5.3%, 20.7%, and 4.9%, respectively. The Newton Nm1 microscope had diagnostic sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection of 91.7% (95% confidence interval (CI 59.8-99.6% and 81.1% (95% CI 71.2-88.3%, respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100% and 97.1% (95% CI 92.2-99.1%, respectively. The CellScope demonstrated sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium of 50.0% (95% CI 25.4-74.6% and 35.6% (95% CI 25.9-46.4%, respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100% and 100% (95% CI 86.7-100%, respectively. For G. intestinalis and E. histolytica/E. dispar, the Newton Nm1 microscope had sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI 63.1-94.7% and 83.3% (95% CI 36.5-99.1%, respectively, and 100% specificity.Handheld diagnostic devices can be employed in community-based surveys in resource

  15. Accuracy of Mobile Phone and Handheld Light Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Protozoa Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Jean T; Ouattara, Mamadou; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Fletcher, Daniel A; Keiser, Jennifer; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Andrews, Jason R; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2016-06-01

    Handheld light microscopy using compact optics and mobile phones may improve the quality of health care in resource-constrained settings by enabling access to prompt and accurate diagnosis. Laboratory technicians were trained to operate two handheld diagnostic devices (Newton Nm1 microscope and a clip-on version of the mobile phone-based CellScope). The accuracy of these devices was compared to conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni, and intestinal protozoa infection in a community-based survey in rural Côte d'Ivoire. One slide of 10 ml filtered urine and a single Kato-Katz thick smear from 226 individuals were subjected to the Newton Nm1 microscope and CellScope for detection of Schistosoma eggs and compared to conventional microscopy. Additionally, 121 sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF)-fixed stool samples were examined by the Newton Nm1 microscope and compared to conventional microscopy for the diagnosis of intestinal protozoa. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, Giardia intestinalis, and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, as determined by conventional microscopy, was 39.8%, 5.3%, 20.7%, and 4.9%, respectively. The Newton Nm1 microscope had diagnostic sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection of 91.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 59.8-99.6%) and 81.1% (95% CI 71.2-88.3%), respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100%) and 97.1% (95% CI 92.2-99.1%), respectively. The CellScope demonstrated sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium of 50.0% (95% CI 25.4-74.6%) and 35.6% (95% CI 25.9-46.4%), respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100%) and 100% (95% CI 86.7-100%), respectively. For G. intestinalis and E. histolytica/E. dispar, the Newton Nm1 microscope had sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI 63.1-94.7%) and 83.3% (95% CI 36.5-99.1%), respectively, and 100% specificity. Handheld diagnostic devices can be employed in community-based surveys in resource

  16. [Explanation of risky sexual behaviors in men who have sex with men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques Aviñó, Constanza; García de Olalla, Patricia; Díez, Elia; Martín, Silvia; Caylà, Joan A

    2015-01-01

    To explore views about risky sexual behaviors and perceptions of HIV, and to propose interventions for preventing HIV infections in a group of men who have sex with men. We performed a qualitative study in a sample of 13 men who have sex with men, who were participating in an HIV-seronegative cohort, and who we contacted via saunas for the gay community in Barcelona (Spain). We performed in-depth semi-structured interviews, followed by content analysis. Risky sexual behaviors were associated with masculinity related to strong sexual needs, certain sexual exchange venues (such as saunas, private parties and clubs), drug use, and a desire to experiment with risk and one's own sexuality. HIV infection was perceived as a normalized disease, although becoming infected was still associated with shame and guilt. Proposed interventions included raising awareness of what it is like to live with HIV, generating greater social alarm, incorporating new technologies in prevention, and intensifying activity at gay venues. The concept of masculinity plays a fundamental role in sexual practices among men who have sex with men. We suggest renewed innovation in preventive programs and incorporating the perception of risk and HIV infection from a gender perspective. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. An outbreak of schistosomiasis in travellers returning from endemic areas: the importance of rigorous tracing in peer groups exposed to risk of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blach, Ola; Rai, Bhavan; Oates, Ken; Franklin, Grant; Bramwell, Steve

    2012-03-01

    Each year, schools across Scotland send their students on exchange programmes to Malawi. Between 2005 and 2009, 22.8% of Scotland's new cases of schistosomiasis were from freshwater exposure in Malawi, with 41.5% diagnosed in 15-24 year olds. In January 2011, a 17-year-old male presented to our urology department with visible haematuria following freshwater exposure during a school trip to Malawi. He was subsequently diagnosed with urinary schistosomiasis. The potential involvement of other individuals from the trip prompted further public health enquiry. The school, public health department and education authorities were notified promptly and all individuals potentially exposed to Schistosoma haematobium were invited for screening. All 21 participants of the exchange programme underwent serological screening. Thirteen tested positive for Schistosoma infection. Only two individuals displayed symptoms of schistosomiasis; the other 11 were asymptomatic. Infection rates, even following a limited exposure to S. haematobium, are high. The majority of seropositive cases may never have symptoms. Therefore, a history of foreign travel to endemic schistosomiasis areas should be sought from any young person presenting with visible heamaturia and appropriate tests instigated. Schools should adopt policies forbidding activities involving freshwater exposure in Malawi. Effective public health measures must be set in place to trace and treat any other possible cases of exposure.

  18. Hombres jóvenes que tienen sexo con hombres: ¿un colectivo en alto riesgo para la infección por el VIH? Young men who have sex with men: a group at high risk for HIV infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy Fernández-Dávila

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Comparar las variables asociadas al riesgo de infección por el VIH entre los hombres 25 años de edad que tienen sexo con hombres, y determinar las variables asociadas a la penetración anal sin condón de los hombres jóvenes con parejas sexuales ocasionales. Método: Durante 1 mes, 485 participantes 25 años completaron una encuesta impresa aplicada en lugares de ambiente o a través de Internet en Madrid, Barcelona, Bilbao y San Sebastián. La encuesta investigó conductas sexuales de los últimos 3 meses según las parejas sexuales conocidas en lugares de ambiente y por Internet. Resultados: No se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los hombres 25 años con respecto a la penetración anal sin condón con parejas sexuales conocidas en lugares de ambiente (23% frente a 30%, p>0,05 o en Internet (29% frente a 30%, p>0,05, al uso del condón en la última penetración anal y a haber tenido una infección de transmisión sexual en el último año (19% frente a 23%, p>0,05. Sin embargo, los encuestados >25 años tuvieron un número promedio mayor de parejas sexuales conocidas en lugares de ambiente (9,2 frente a 7, p25 años. Sin embargo, algunas variables podrían hablar de su vulnerabilidad.Objectives: To compare variables associated with the risk of HIV among men 25 years old, and to determine the variables associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI in YMSM with casual sexual partners. Method: For 1 month, 485 participants 25 years old completed a pen-and-paper survey carried out in gay venues (GV or via the Internet in Madrid, Barcelona, Bilbao and San Sebastián (Spain. The survey investigated sexual behaviors in the past 3 months according to whether the men met sexual partners in GV (SPGV or on the Internet (SPI. Results: No significant differences were found between YMSM and those >25 years old with respect to UAI with SPGV (23% vs. 30%, p>0.05 and SPI (29% vs. 30%, p>0.05, condom use in the last anal

  19. Deteccion de la infección por virus papiloma humano en hombres: Penescopía como método de cribado Detection of infection by human papilloma virus in men: Peniscopy as screening method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R del Pazo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo es el resultado de la preocupación relativa y la escasa atención que se le presta al hombre, como portador y posible trasmisor del Virus Papiloma Humano. La población estudiada quedó conformada por 45 hombres, de 18 a 60 años de edad, que concurrieron al consultorio de Dermatología del Hospital Dr. J M Cullen de la ciudad de Santa Fe. Se confeccionó una ficha clínica protocolizada y se les realizó una penescopía. La penescopía resultó positiva en el 53,3% de la muestra tomada. Se encontró asociación estadísticamente significativa con la falta de uso del preservativo regularmente (p=0,01 y con la promiscuidad (p=0,008. No se vislumbró asociación estadísticamente significativa entre el resultado de la penescopía con otras patologías y antecedentes personales relacionados. Las lesiones encontradas fueron: máculas (p=0,037, pápulas (p=0,000 y vegetaciones (p=0,245. Los resultados señalan que es recomendable realizar penescopía como instrumento diagnóstico, especialmente por ser económica y simple de efectuar. Además se concluyó que el uso de preservativo de manera regular así como evitar la promiscuidad, son esenciales para la prevención de infecciones con VPH.Introduction: in most of the cases, the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is transmitted through sexual contact. The competent immune system limits its spread, making it latent or subclinical, and its clinical symptoms rarely result in high mortality. It's difficult to estimate precisely its incidence in males due to the lack of epidemiological studies. In this work, the peniscopy was selected as the screening method of the subclinical disease due to its high sensitivity and low cost. General objective: to detect male carriers of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV, possible transmitters of the virus. Material and methods: the population studied consisted of 45 men, between 18 and 60 years old, who assisted to the Dermatology Department of the Hospital

  20. Men and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crisis? For More Information Reprints Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... affects a large number of men. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable and has trouble ...

  1. When Men Meet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Henning

    men, mænd, masculinity, maskulinitet, gender, køn, homosexuality, homoseksualitet, modernity, modernitet, postmodernity, postmodernitet......men, mænd, masculinity, maskulinitet, gender, køn, homosexuality, homoseksualitet, modernity, modernitet, postmodernity, postmodernitet...

  2. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  3. Social and psychological context for HIV risk in non-gay-identified African American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operario, Don; Smith, Carla Dillard; Kegeles, Susan

    2008-08-01

    This study used qualitative methods to explore the social and psychological context of sexual behavior and HIV risk among African American non-gay-identified men who have sex with men. Analysis of men's narratives on their sexual behaviors revealed four social and psychological factors contributing to risk for HIV infection: (a) a tendency to compartmentalize and personally disengage from same-sex behavior, (b) traditional gender roles that reinforce men's adherence to masculine images and ambivalent attitudes toward women, (c) cultural norms that favor secrecy and privacy about any personal matters, and (d) spontaneous and unplanned sexual episodes with other men. Findings indicate that innovative HIV prevention and risk reduction strategies are necessary to reach this group and question the legitimacy of conventional sexual orientation categories for these men. Interventions must address social contextual determinants of risk, reinforce men's public identifications as straight/heterosexual, and maintain men's need for privacy about same-sex behaviors.

  4. Rundt om Mad Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen gør rede for Mad Mens tilblivelse, dens populærkulturelle efterdønninger, multimediale forgreninger og værkæstetiske karakteristika. "Story Matters Here" lyder AMCs motto, men Mad Men tilbyder et bredspektret engagement, der går langt ud over at følge med i en vedkommende fortælling...

  5. Sex tourism among Chinese men who have sex with men: a cross-sectional observational study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, J; Tang, W; Liu, C; Wong, NS; Tang, S; Wei, C; Tucker, JD

    2018-01-01

    Sex tourism among men who have sex with men (MSM) may exacerbate transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sex tourism is defined as purchasing sex with gifts or money outside of one's hometown. Our objective was to characterize the frequency, socio-demographic characteristics, and sexual risk behaviors among Chinese MSM sex tourists. An online, cross-sectional survey for high-risk MSM throughout China was conducted in November 2015 covering sociodemographic charac...

  6. Correlates of Forced Sex Among Populations of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Wimonsate, Wipas; Varangrat, Anchalee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Jommaroeng, Rapeepun; Mock, Philip A.; Tappero, Jordan W.; van Griensven, Frits

    2009-01-01

    Although forced sex is a correlate of HIV infection, its prevalence and associated risks are not well described among men who have sex with men (MSM) in developing-country settings. Between March and October 2005, we assessed the prevalence of forced sex and correlates among populations of MSM (this includes general MSM, male sex workers, and male-to-female transgender persons) in Thailand using a community-based sample. Participants were enrolled from venues around Bangkok, Chiangmai, and Ph...

  7. Rapidly boosted Plasma IL-5 induced by treatment of human Schistosomiasis haematobium is dependent on antigen dose, IgE and eosinophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Jones, Frances M.; Fofana, Hassan K. M.

    2013-01-01

    IgE specific to worm antigen (SWA) and pre-treatment eosinophil number, are associated with human immunity to re-infection with schistosomes after chemotherapeutic treatment. Treatment significantly elevates circulating IL-5 24-hr post-treatment of Schistosoma mansoni. Here we investigate...

  8. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN ADULTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Infection of the urinary tract (UTI) is frequently encountered in clinical practice — in the USA these ... Asymptomatic UTI is identified when organisms can be isolated in appropriate numbers .... Pregnancy ... men, so pre-treatment urine culture is.

  9. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by one of several ... each virus is spread in different ways. Are gay and bisexual men at risk for viral hepatitis? ...

  10. Perceived barriers to access available health services among men ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be highly affected with the HIV infection worldwide. Studies have shown that the organization of healthcare systems and how the MSM perceive it play a major role in granting or denying them access to healthcare services. Little is known in Tanzania regarding ...

  11. Risky sexual behavior among married alcoholic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Julie H; Fals-Stewart, William; Fincham, Frank D

    2008-04-01

    The current study explored whether the wives of men entering alcoholism treatment are at risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) exposure as a result of their husbands' sexual risk behaviors. The extramarital relationships of married alcoholic men entering outpatient treatment (n = 125) were compared with those of a demographically matched community sample of nonalcoholic married men (n = 125). The proportion of alcoholic men who reported 1 or more extramarital affairs in the previous year (14%) was significantly higher than that of the community sample (4%). Additionally, only 2 alcoholic husbands and 1 nonalcoholic husband reported that his wife was aware of the extramarital relationship. For both groups, none of the men who engaged in extramarital relationships reported consistent use of condoms when having sexual intercourse with their wives or with their extramarital partners. These results suggest that wives of alcoholic men are unknowingly placed at risk for indirect exposure to STIs as a result of their husbands' sexual risk behaviors. Thus, infidelity in treatment-seeking alcohol-abusing men represents a significant public health issue. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Series of Case Reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, Thijs J. W.; Paxton, William A.; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Cornelissen, Marion; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) has recently emerged as sexual transmitted infection among (human immunodeficiency virus) HIV-positive but not HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM). We present 4 case reports showing that HIV-infection is not an absolute prerequisite for sexual HCV transmission in

  13. HIV incidence and HIV testing behavior in men who have sex with men: using three incidence sources, The Netherlands, 1984-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; Fennema, Han S. A.; van der Snoek, Eric M.; Krol, Anneke; Geskus, Ronald B.; Pospiech, Marja; Jurriaans, Suzanne; van der Meijden, Willem I.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Prins, Maria

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In The Netherlands, the western part, including Rotterdam and Amsterdam harbors the majority of the known HIV-infected population, of whom men who have sex with men (MSM) comprise the largest transmission category. Given a general rise in sexually transmitted infections (STI) and risky

  14. Let's talk about sex : A qualitative study exploring the experiences of HIV nurses when discussing sexual risk behaviours with HIV-positive men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munnik, Sonja; den Daas, C; Ammerlaan, H S M; Kok, G; Raethke, M S; Vervoort, S C J M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite prevention efforts, the incidence of sexually transmitted infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men remains high, which is indicative of unchanged sexual risk behaviour. Discussing sexual risk behaviour has been shown to help prevent sexually transmitted infections

  15. Portrait of an Epidemic: Extremely High Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevalence and Incidence Among Young Black Men Having Sex With Men and Residing in a Southern City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Leandro; Crosby, Richard A

    2017-07-01

    A 12-month prospective cohort study of 609 young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) assessed human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion. One-hundred-seventy men (27.9%) were either human immunodeficiency virus-infected before enrollment or tested positive within 30 days afterward. Thirty (4.9%) were classified as incident infections occurring in a 12-month period. Subtracting the 170 from the denominator, incidence was 6.8%.

  16. Men in Feminised Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Kenn

    masculine than other men? Or do they rather represent a new, more tolerant and less stereotypical male gender role? If less restricted by stereotypes, are men then eager to challenge traditional dichotomised perceptions of man/masculinity and woman/femininity? By means of analyses of interviews with more......»Male nurses – Is that really what It’s called?« »Aren’t all male hairdressers gay?« »All preschool educators do is to wipe children’s bums, isn’t it?« »Cleaning is a job for women, not for menMen working in women’s professions often give rise to a lot of prejudices. But why? Are these men less...... than 160 Bulgarian, Danish, Italian and Polish men working in traditional women’s occupations, this publication tries to answer some of these questions....

  17. Syphilis epidemiology in Norway, 1992-2008: resurgence among men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsen Øivind

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the number of syphilis cases has stabilised in many countries of Western Europe, however several countries have reported increases among men who have sex with men (MSM. The aim of this article was to describe the epidemiology of early syphilis in Norway in 1992-2008. Methods Cases of early syphilis and congenital syphilis reported to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS 1992-2008 were described by route of transmission, gender, age, birthplace, stage of disease, HIV co-infection, source partner and place of infection. Results The incidence of reported syphilis ranged from 0.05 (1992 to 1.50 (2002 per 100 000 person-years. Of 562 cases reported to MSIS during the study period, 62% were men infected by another man. The proportion of