WorldWideScience

Sample records for hadronic sources hydrodynamics

  1. The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source Construction Status

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jie; Cai, Jinchi; Chen, Huaibi; Cheng, Cheng; Du, Qiang; Du, Taibin; Feng, Qixi; Feng, Zhe; Gong, Hui; Guan, Xialing; Han, Xiaoxue; Huang, Tuchen; Huang, Zhifeng; Li, Renkai; Li, Wenqian; Loong, Chun-Keung; Tang, Chuanxiang; Tian, Yang; Wang, Xuewu; Xie, Xiaofeng; Xing, Qingzi; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Xu, Dong; Yang, Yigang; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Huayi; Zhang, Xiaozhang; Zheng, Shu-xin; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhong, Bin; Billen, James; Young, Lloyd; Fu, Shinian; Tao, Juzhou; Zhao, Yaliang; Guan, Weiqiang; He, Yu; Li, Guohua; Li, Jian; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Li, Jinghai; Liang, Tianjiao; Liu, Zhanwen; Sun, Liangting; Zhao, Hongwei; Shao, Beibei; Stovall, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status, technical challenges, and future perspectives of the proton-linac based Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) at the Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

  2. Event-plane dependent di-hadron correlations with harmonic vn subtraction in a hydrodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Wagner M.; Qian, Wei-Liang; Hama, Yogiro; Kodama, Takeshi

    2018-02-01

    In this work, a hydrodynamic study of the di-hadron azimuthal correlations for the Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV is carried out. The correlations are evaluated using the ZYAM method for the centrality windows as well as the transverse momentum range in accordance with the existing data. Event-plane dependence of the correlation is obtained after the subtraction of contributions from the most dominant harmonic coefficients. In particular, the contribution from the triangular flow, v3, is removed from the proper correlations following the procedure implemented by the STAR collaboration. The resultant structure observed in the correlations was sometimes attributed to the mini-jet dynamics, but the present calculations show that a pure hydrodynamic model gives a reasonable agreement with the main feature of the published data. A brief discussion on the physical content of the present findings is presented.

  3. Hydrodynamic approach to the centrality dependence of di-hadron correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Wagner M.; Qian, Wei-Liang; Gardim, Fernando G.; Hama, Yogiro; Kodama, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of di-hadron azimuthal correlations at different centralities for Au+Au collisions at 200 A GeV were reported by the PHENIX Collaboration. The data were presented for different ranges of transverse momentum. In particular, it was observed that the away-side correlation evolves from a double- to a single-peak structure when the centrality decreases. In this work, we show that these features naturally appear due to an interplay between the centrality-dependent smooth background elliptic flow and the one produced by event-by-event fluctuating peripheral tubes. To compare with the PHENIX data, we also carry out numerical simulations by using a hydrodynamical code nexspherio, and calculate the correlations by both cumulant and the ZYAM method employed by the PHENIX Collaboration. Our results are in reasonable agreement with the data. A brief discussion on the physical content of the present model and its difference from other viewpoints is also presented.

  4. Hydrodynamical study on the conversion of hadronic matter to quark matter: I. Shock-induced conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sanada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    We study transitions of hadronic matter (HM) to three-flavor quark matter (3QM) locally, regarding the conversion processes as combustion and describing them hydrodynamically. Not only the jump condition on both sides of the conversion front but the structures inside the front are also considered by taking into account what happens during the conversion processes on the time scale of weak interactions as well as equations of state (EOSs) in the mixed phase. Under the assumption that HM is metastable with their free energies being larger than those of 3QM but smaller than those of two-flavor quark matter (2QM), we consider the transition via 2QM triggered by a rapid density rise in a shock wave. Based on the results, we discuss which combustion modes (strong/weak detonation) may be realized. HM is described by an EOS based on the relativistic mean field theory, and 2QMs and 3QMs are approximated by the MIT bag model. We demonstrate for a wide range of the bag constant and strong coupling constant in this combination of EOSs that the combustion may occur in the so-called endothermic regime, in which the Hugoniot curve for combustion runs below the one for the shock wave in the p -V plane and which has no terrestrial counterpart. Elucidating the essential features in this scenario first by a toy model, we then analyze more realistic models. We find that strong detonation always occurs. Depending on the EOS of quark matter as well as the density of HM and the Mach number of the detonation front, deconfinement from HM to 2QM is either completed or not completed in the shock wave. In the latter case, which is more likely if the EOS of quark matter ensures that deconfinement occurs above the nuclear saturation density and that the maximum mass of cold quark stars is larger than 2 M⊙, the conversion continues further via the mixing state of HM and 3QM on the time scale of weak interactions.

  5. Hydrodynamic Flow in PbPb Collisions Observed via Azimuthal Angle Correlations of Charged Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00192137

    2012-01-01

    Azimuthal angle correlations of charged hadrons were measured in $\\sqrt s_{NN}$ = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions by the CMS experiment. The distributions exhibit anisotropies that are correlated with the event-by-event orientation of the reaction plane. Several methods were employed to extract the strength of the signal: the event-plane, cumulant and Lee-Yang Zeros methods. These methods have different sensitivity to correlations that are not caused by the collective motion in the system (non-flow correlations due to jets, resonance decays, and quantum correlations). The second Fourier coefficient of the charged hadron azimuthal distributions was measured as a function of transverse momentum, pseudorapidity and centrality in a broad kinematic range: $0.3 < p_T < 12.0$ GeV/c, $|\\eta| < 2.4$, as a function of collision centrality. In addition, the third through sixth Fourier components were measured at midrapidity using selected methods.

  6. Hydrodynamic analysis of potential groundwater extraction capacity increase: case study of 'Nelt' groundwater source at Dobanovci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajić Dragoljub I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive hydrodynamic analysis of the groundwater regime undertaken to assess the potential for expanding the 'Nelt' groundwater source at Dobanovci, or developing a new groundwater source for a future baby food factory, including the quantification of the impact on the production wells of the nearby 'Pepsi' groundwater source, is presented in the paper. The existing Nelt source is comprised of three active production wells that tap a subartesian aquifer formed in sands and gravelly sands; however, the analysis considers only the two nearest wells. A long-term group pumping test was con-ducted of production wells N-1 and N2 (Nelt source and production wells B-1 and B-2 (Pepsi source, while the piezometric head in the vicinity of these wells was monitored at observation well P-1, which is located in the area considered for Nelt source expansion. Data were collected at maximum pumping capacity of all the production wells. A hydrodynamic model of groundwater flow in the extended area of the Nelt source was generated for the purposes of the comprehensive hydrodynamic analysis. Hydrodynamic prognostic calculations addressed two solution alternatives for the capacity increase over a period of ten years. Licensed Visual MODFLOW Pro software, deemed to be at the very top in this field, was used for the calculations.

  7. Source tracking using microbial community fingerprints: Method comparison with hydrodynamic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D T; Jovanovic, D; Lintern, A; Teakle, I; Barnes, M; Deletic, A; Coleman, R; Rooney, G; Prosser, T; Coutts, S; Hipsey, M R; Bruce, L C; Henry, R

    2017-02-01

    Urban estuaries around the world are experiencing contamination from diffuse and point sources, which increases risks to public health. To mitigate and manage risks posed by elevated levels of contamination in urban waterways, it is critical to identify the primary water sources of contamination within catchments. Source tracking using microbial community fingerprints is one tool that can be used to identify sources. However, results derived from this approach have not yet been evaluated using independent datasets. As such, the key objectives of this investigation were: (1) to identify the major sources of water responsible for bacterial loadings within an urban estuary using microbial source tracking (MST) using microbial communities; and (2) to evaluate this method using a 3-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The Yarra River estuary, which flows through the city of Melbourne in South-East Australia was the focus of this study. We found that the water sources contributing to the bacterial community in the Yarra River estuary varied temporally depending on the estuary's hydrodynamic conditions. The water source apportionment determined using microbial community MST correlated to those determined using a 3-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the transport and mixing of a tracer in the estuary. While there were some discrepancies between the two methods, this investigation demonstrated that MST using bacterial community fingerprints can identify the primary water sources of microorganisms in an estuarine environment. As such, with further optimization and improvements, microbial community MST has the potential to become a powerful tool that could be practically applied in the mitigation of contaminated aquatic systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei: Jets as the Source of Hadrons and Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Meli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Active galactic nuclei are extragalactic sources, and their relativistic hot-plasma jets are believed to be the main candidates of the cosmic-ray origin, above the so-called knee region of the cosmic-ray spectrum. Relativistic shocks, either single or multiple, have been observed or been theorized to be forming within relativistic jet channels in almost all active galactic nuclei sources. The acceleration of non-thermal particles (e.g. electrons, protons via the shock Fermi acceleration mechanism, is believed to be mainly responsible for the power-law energy distribution of the observed cosmic-rays, which in very high energies can consequently radiate high energy gamma-rays and neutrinos, through related radiation channels. Here, we will focus on the primary particle (hadronic shock acceleration mechanism, and we will present a comparative simulation study of the properties of single and multiple relativistic shocks, which occur in AGN jets. We will show that the role of relativistic (quasi-parallel either quasi-perpendicular shocks, is quite important since it can dramatically alter the primary CR spectral indices and acceleration eciencies. These properties being carried onto gamma-ray and neutrino radiation characteristics, makes the combination of them a quite appealing theme for relativistic plasma and shock acceleration physics, as well as observational cosmic-ray, gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy.

  9. Operational Experience with Radioactive Source Calibration of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Wedges with Phase I Upgrade Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2017-01-01

    The Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeters consists of new photodetectors and front-end electronics. The upgrade will allow the elimination of the high amplitude noise and drifting response of the Hybrid Photo-Diodes, at the same time enabling the mitigation of the radiation damage of the scintillators and the wavelength shifting fibers with a larger spectral acceptance of the Silicon Photomultipliers. The upgrade will also allow increasing the longitudinal segmentation of the readout to be beneficial for pile-up mitigation and recalibration due to depth-dependent radiation damage. As a realistic operational exercise, the responses of the Hadron Endcap Calorimeter wedges were calibrated with a 60Co radioactive source both with current and upgrade electronics. The exercise provided significant experience towards the full upgrade during the Year End Technical Stop 2017-2018. Here we describe the instrumentation details and the operational experiences related to the sourcing exercise.

  10. Operational Experience with Radioactive Source Calibration of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Wedges with Phase I Upgrade Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2017-01-01

    The Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeters consist of new photodetectors (Silicon Photomultipliers in place of Hybrid Photo-Diodes) and front-end electronics (QIE11). The upgrade will allow the elimination of the high amplitude noise and drifting response of the Hybrid Photo-Diodes, at the same time enabling the mitigation of the radiation damage of the scintillators and the wavelength shifting fibers with a larger spectral acceptance of the Silicon Photomultipliers. The upgrade will also allow to increase the longitudinal segmentation of the readout to be beneficial for pile-up mitigation and recalibration due to depth-dependent radiation damage.As a realistic operational exercise, the responses of the Hadron Endcap Calorimeter wedges are being calibrated with a $^{60}$Co radioactive source both with current and upgrade electronics. The exercise will provide a manifestation of the benefits of the upgrade. Here we describe the instrumentation details and the operational experiences related to t...

  11. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Near-Source Environment at a Jointed Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelson, C. M.; Bradley, C. R.; Steedman, D. W.; Rougier, E.

    2014-12-01

    We perform near source hydrodynamic modeling of an explosive event in granite: the first Source Physics Experiment (SPE-1). The effort includes constitutive material behavior of the rock, the optimal means for representing the granite joint response, and the best modeling approach for including both the high-deformation source region and the complex material response in the near field. Each of these factors contributes to better estimates of explosion to seismic phenomena to help the verification community. We illustrate the transition of results from increasing modeling fidelity from one-dimensional (1-D) modeling which simplifies both the source geometry and the geologic character to full, detailed three-dimensional (3-D) modeling. Both levels of modeling include an accepted explosive source model and a laboratory test-based constitutive mode for the intact granite. But the full 3-D model also explicitly models the cylindrically-shaped explosive in a grout filled borehole as well as explicit representation of rock joints as contact surfaces. These modeling attributes provide for an excellent match to recorded velocity measurements in both amplitude and character. But as explicit modeling of joints is currently impractical for a large rock volume, we modify the laboratory intact properties to implicitly include the effects of joints such as in the method of Hoek and Brown to develop a credible predictive methodology for a large region.

  12. Commissioning Status of the 3 MeV RFQ for the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, QZ; Stovall, J; He, Y; Guan, WQ; Du, L; Cheng, C; Cai, JC; Bin, DT; Bai, YJ; Wang, XW; Wang, D; Jiang, C; Du, Q; Billen, JH; Li, J; Xiong, ZF; Xing, QZ; Zheng, SX; Zhang, HY; Yang, SY; Qiang, Q; Guan, XL; Du, TB

    2012-01-01

    The 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator for the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) is in its initial stage for the commissioning at Tsinghua University. Braze of the flanges was completed in January, 2012. The RFQ cavity has been delivered to Tsinghua University after the final field tuning. In 2012 the 3-meter-long RFQ is expected to deliver 3 MeV protons to the downstream High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) with the peak current of 50 mA, pulse length of 0.5 ms and beam duty factor of 2.5%. The initial commissioning is now underway.

  13. Operation of the GTS-LHC Source for the Hadron Injector at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, L; Hitz, D; Küchler, D; Mastrostefano, C; O'Neill, M; Scrivens, R

    2007-01-01

    The GTS-LHC ion source, designed and build by CEA Grenoble, was installed and commissioned at CERN in 2005. Since than the source has delivered oxygen and lead ion beams (O4+ and Pb27+ from the source, Pb54+ from the linac) for the commissioning of the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Results of this operation and attempts to improve the source performance and reliability, and the linac performance will be presented in this paper.

  14. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, R.; et al.,

    2013-11-21

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam-gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors.

  15. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bregliozzi, G.; Burkhardt, H.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Huhtinen, M.; Lechner, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Mereghetti, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2013-11-01

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam-gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors.

  16. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, R., E-mail: roderik.bruce@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Assmann, R.W. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Boccone, V.; Bregliozzi, G.; Burkhardt, H.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Huhtinen, M.; Lechner, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Mereghetti, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S. [FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Vlachoudis, V. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2013-11-21

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam–gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam–gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors. -- Highlights: •We simulate sources of machine-induced experimental background at the CERN LHC. •We focus on the ATLAS and CMS experiments. •The LHC machine conditions are analyzed to normalize the simulation results. •Beam–gas interactions is found to be the dominating source of particles entering the detectors.

  17. Effects of jet-induced medium excitation in γ-hadron correlation in A+A collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Pang, Long-Gang; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2018-02-01

    Coupled Linear Boltzmann Transport and hydrodynamics (CoLBT-hydro) is developed for co-current and event-by-event simulations of jet transport and jet-induced medium excitation (j.i.m.e.) in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. This is made possible by a GPU parallelized (3 + 1)D hydrodynamics that has a source term from the energy-momentum deposition by propagating jet shower partons and provides real time update of the bulk medium evolution for subsequent jet transport. Hadron spectra in γ-jet events of A+A collisions at RHIC and LHC are calculated for the first time that include hadrons from both the modified jet and j.i.m.e. CoLBT-hydro describes well experimental data at RHIC on the suppression of leading hadrons due to parton energy loss. It also predicts the enhancement of soft hadrons from j.i.m.e. The onset of soft hadron enhancement occurs at a constant transverse momentum due to the thermal nature of soft hadrons from j.i.m.e. which also have a significantly broadened azimuthal distribution relative to the jet direction. Soft hadrons in the γ direction are, on the other hand, depleted due to a diffusion wake behind the jet.

  18. Hydrodynamic analysis of the interaction of two operating groundwater sources, case study: Groundwater supply of Bečej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polomčić Dušan M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing groundwater source 'Vodokanal' for the public water supply of Bečej city in Serbia tapping groundwater from three water-bearing horizons over 15 wells with summary capacity of 100 l/s. Near the public water source of Bečej exists groundwater source 'Soja Protein' for industry with current capacity of 12 l/s which tapped same horizons. In the coming period is planned to increase summary capacity of this groundwater source up to 57 l/s. Also, the increase of summary city's source capacity is planned for 50 l/s in the next few years. That is means an increase of groundwater abstraction for an additional 84 % from the same water-bearing horizons. Application of hydrodynamic modeling, based on numerical method of finite difference will show the impact of increasing the total capacity of the source 'Soja Protein' on the groundwater level in groundwater source 'Vodokanal' and effects of additional decrease in groundwater levels, in all three water-bearing horizons, on the wells of the 'Vodokanala' groundwater source due to operation of industrial source. It was done 7 variant solutions of the extensions of groundwater sources and are their effects for a period of 10 years with the aim of the sustainable management of groundwater.

  19. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068843; Boccone, V; Bregliozzi, G; Burkhardt, H; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Huhtinen, M.; Lechner, A; Levinsen, Y; Mereghetti, A; Mokhov, N.V; Tropin, I.S; Vlachoudis, V

    2013-01-01

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, a...

  20. Heat Source/Sink in a Magneto-Hydrodynamic Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in a Porous Medium: Dual Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Awais, Muhammad; Imtiaz, Amna

    2016-01-01

    This communication deals with the properties of heat source/sink in a magneto-hydrodynamic flow of a non-Newtonian fluid immersed in a porous medium. Shrinking phenomenon along with the permeability of the wall is considered. Mathematical modelling is performed to convert the considered physical process into set of coupled nonlinear mathematical equations. Suitable transformations are invoked to convert the set of partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are tackled numerically for the solution computations. It is noted that dual solutions for various physical parameters exist which are analyzed in detail.

  1. Energy dependence of source geometry and chaoticity in hadronic collisions from Bose-Einstein correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Andreev, I. V.; Plümer, M.; Schlei, B.R.; Weiner, R M

    1994-01-01

    We compare and analyse Bose-Einstein correlation data for $\\pi^+ p$ and $K^+ p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=22\\ GeV$ obtained by the NA22-Collaboration and data for $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=630\\ GeV$ obtained by the UA1-Minimum-Bias-Collaboration. Using a parametrization for a longitudinally expanding source, we observe that correlation lengths and radii extracted from fits to the data change significantly if one goes from the NA22- to the UA1-data: the transverse radius of the chaotic ...

  2. Space-time evolution of the hadronic source in peripheral to central Pb+Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bearden, I G; Boissevain, J G; Christiansen, P H L; Conin, L; Dodd, J; Erazmus, B; Esumi, S C; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Ferenc, D; Franz, A; Gaardhøje, J J; Hansen, A G; Hansen, O; Hardtke, D; van Hecke, H; Holzer, E B; Humanic, T J; Hummel, P; Jacak, B V; Kaimi, K; Kaneta, M; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M L; Leltchouk, M; Ljubicic, A; Lörstad, B; Maeda, N; Martin, L; Medvedev, A; Murray, M; Ohnishi, H; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Piuz, François; Pluta, J; Polychronakos, V; Potekhin, M V; Poulard, G; Reichhold, D M; Sakaguchi, A; Schmidt-Sørensen, J; Simon-Gillo, J; Sondheim, W E; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Willis, W J; Wolf, K; Xu, N; Zachary, D S

    2000-01-01

    Two-particle correlations of negative pions as a function of charged particle multiplicity are studied in Pb+Pb collisions at square root s=17.3 GeV per nucleon using the NA44 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We find that the source size parameters increase with the charged particle multiplicity. However the slope of the source size parameters plotted as a function of charged multiplicity is slightly larger at high multiplicity than at low multiplicity. The value of lambda is independent of charged multiplicity. For Pb+Pb collisions, R/sub L/ is larger than R/sub TS/ and R/sub TO/ for all multiplicity intervals, whereas these three radius parameters were approximately equal in S+Nucleus collisions. The ratios (R/sub L//R/sub TS/) and (R/sub L//R/sub TO/) for Pb+Pb data show almost no dependence on charged multiplicity. The duration of pion emission Delta T is constant at 3.8+or-1.1 fm/c as a function of the charged multiplicity in Pb+Pb collisions. The effective volume (V) is also calcul...

  3. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  4. A Hydrodynamical Model of a Rotating Wind Source and Its Effects on the Collapse of a Rotating Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Arreaga-Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with the fully parallel GAGDET2 code, to model a rotating source that emits wind in order to study the subsequent dynamics of the wind in three independent scenarios. In the first scenario we consider several models of the wind source, which is characterized by a rotation velocity Vrot and an escape velocity Vesc, so that the models have a radially outward wind velocity magnitude Vrad given by 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 times Vrot. In the second scenario, we study the interaction of winds emitted from a binary system in two kinds of models: one in which the source remains during the wind emission and a second one in which all the source itself becomes wind. In the third scenario we consider the interaction of a rotating source that emits wind within a collapsing and rotating core. In this scenario we consider only wind models of the second kind built over a new initial radial mesh, such that the angular velocity of the wind Ωw is 1, 100, and 1000 times the angular velocity of the core Ωc.

  5. Determining the Groundwater Balance and Radius of Influence Using Hydrodynamic Modeling: Case Study of the Groundwater Source “Šumice” in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Polomčić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A groundwater flow model was developed to simulate groundwater extraction from the public water supply source of the City of Kikinda. The hydrodynamic model includes the municipal groundwater source of Kikinda (“Šumice” and the Jezero Well, but also an extended area where there are groundwater sources that provide water supply to three factories (MSK, TM and LŽT Kikinda. Hydrodynamic modeling, based on the numerical method of finite differences, shows the groundwater balance of the sources in the extended area of Kikinda. The impact of the industrial water sources on the regime of the public water supply source is also be assessed. The radius of influence of the groundwater sources is determined by simulating the travel of conservative particles over a period of 200 days. The 200-day period reflected the travel time to the wells and represented the third and widest sanitary protection zone

  6. Geochemical evidence of water source characterization and hydrodynamic responses in a karst aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano Bicalho, C.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J. L.; Van Exter, S.; Jourde, H.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe Lez karst spring, the main perennial outlet of the Lez karst system in southern France, plays an important role in supplying drinking water to the Montpellier metropolitan region. In order to investigate the origin of groundwater, its circulation patterns, and to understand the connectivity and compartmentalization of a karst system, a multi-tracer approach was used to describe the hydrogeology of the Lez karst system. Groundwater samples were collected from Lez karst during a range of hydrologic conditions (between March 2006 and August 2009) and analyzed for major and trace elements, total organic carbon, fecal, and total coliform. During the first recharge event of autumn, highly-mineralized water was observed at Lez Spring during the studied years. Multiple parameters of water during this rise were monitored with a fine time-step in 2008. Discriminate Factorial Analyses revealed the existence of different water-types discharging at Lez Spring. During high stage periods, highly mineralized water initially discharges from the spring, followed by rapid infiltration water. This behavior suggests that hydrodynamics affect groundwater circulation by soliciting different endmembers. These characteristics were observed on a larger scale when monitoring three intermittent springs connected to Lez Spring. A detailed analysis using bivariate diagrams of major, trace elements and elemental ratios provided insight into different water origins, associated lithologies, and mineral-solution reactions related to hydrodynamic responses. From the five identified water-types, the two more contrasting ones are emphasized: the first one corresponds to the most geochemically evolved waters, issued from deep layers where evaporite chemical fingerprinting has been identified. They are characterized by high mineralization and high concentrations in Cl, Na, Mg, Li, B and Br elements, and high Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca and Cl/Br ratios. The second water-type corresponds to the most diluted

  7. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  8. Hadronic Modeling of Blazars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidinger Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing systematic search for sources of extragalactic gamma rays has now revealed many blazars in which the very high energy output can not consistently be described as synchrotron self-Compton radiation. In this paper a self consistent hybrid model is described, explaining the very high energy radiation of those blazars as proton synchrotron radiation accompanied by photo-hadronic cascades. As the model includes all relevant radiative processes it naturally includes the synchrotron self-Compton case as well, depending on the chosen parameters. This paper focuses on rather high magnetic fields to be present within the jet, hence the hadronically dominated case. To discriminate the hadronic scenario against external photon fields being upscattered within the jet to produce the dominating gamma-ray output, the temporal behavior of blazars may be exploited with the presented model. Variability reveals both, the highly non-linear nature caused by the photohadronic cascades and typical timescales as well as fingerprints in the inter-band lightcurves of the involved hadrons. The modeling of two individual sources is shown : 1 ES 1011+496, a high frequency peaked blazar at redshift z = 0.212, which is well described within the hybrid scenario using physically reasonable parameters. The short term variability of the second example, namely 3C 454.3, a Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar at z = 0.859, reveals the limitations of the gamma-rays being highly dominated by proton synchrotron radiation.

  9. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Free Surface Interactions and Implications for P and Rg Waves Recorded on the Source Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmat, C. S.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E.; Yang, X.; Patton, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    A goal of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) is to develop explosion source models expanding monitoring capabilities beyond empirical methods. The SPE project combines field experimentation with numerical modelling. The models take into account non-linear processes occurring from the first moment of the explosion as well as complex linear propagation effects of signals reaching far-field recording stations. The hydrodynamic code CASH is used for modelling high-strain rate, non-linear response occurring in the material near the source. Our development efforts focused on incorporating in-situ stress and fracture processes. CASH simulates the material response from the near-source, strong shock zone out to the small-strain and ultimately the elastic regime where a linear code can take over. We developed an interface with the Spectral Element Method code, SPECFEM3D, that is an efficient implementation on parallel computers of a high-order finite element method. SPECFEM3D allows accurate modelling of wave propagation to remote monitoring distance at low cost. We will present CASH-SPECFEM3D results for SPE1, which was a chemical detonation of about 85 kg of TNT at 55 m depth in a granitic geologic unit. Spallation was observed for SPE1. Keeping yield fixed we vary the depth of the source systematically and compute synthetic seismograms to distances where the P and Rg waves are separated, so that analysis can be performed without concern about interference effects due to overlapping energy. We study the time and frequency characteristics of P and Rg waves and analyse them in regard to the impact of free-surface interactions and rock damage resulting from those interactions. We also perform traditional CMT inversions as well as advanced CMT inversions, developed at LANL to take into account the damage. This will allow us to assess the effect of spallation on CMT solutions as well as to validate our inversion procedure. Further work will aim to validate the developed

  10. Hadronic {tau} decays and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  11. Assessment of Water Quality Improvements Using the Hydrodynamic Simulation Approach in Regulated Cascade Reservoirs: A Case Study of Drinking Water Sources of Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixiang Hua

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Water quality safety is of critical importance in environmental improvement, particularly with respect to drinking water resources worldwide. As the main drinking water sources in Shenzhen, China, the cascade reservoirs comprising the Shiyan, Tiegang, and Xili Reservoirs are highly regulated and have experienced water quality deterioration in recent years. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model was established using the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC for the cascade reservoirs. The relationships between water quality and improvement measures were quantified and the main pollution sources for individual reservoirs were identified. Results showed that the hydrodynamic and water quality model well captured the spatial and temporal variations of water level, the permanganate concentration index (CODMn, and total nitrogen (TN, with high resolution in the cascade reservoirs. The correlation coefficients between simulations and observations were close to 1.00 for water levels, and over 0.50 for CODMn and TN concentrations. The most effective methods for water quality improvement were the reduction of the runoff load for TN and transferred water load for CODMn in the Shiyan Reservoir, reduction of the transferred water load in the Tiegang Reservoir, and an increase in transfer water volume, especially in the flood season, in the Xili Reservoir. Internal pollution sources also played an important role in water pollution, and thus sedimentation should be cleaned up regularly. This study is expected to provide scientific support for drinking water source protection and promote the application of hydrodynamic model in water quality management.

  12. Hadron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.

    1985-10-01

    Heavy quark systems and glueball candidates, the particles which are relevant to testing QCD, are discussed. The review begins with the heaviest spectroscopically observed quarks, the b anti-b bound states, including the chi state masses, spins, and hadronic widths and the non-relativistic potential models. Also, P states of c anti-c are mentioned. Other heavy states are also discussed in which heavy quarks combine with lighter ones. The gluonium candidates iota(1460), theta(1700), and g/sub T/(2200) are then covered. The very lightest mesons, pi-neutral and eta, are discussed. 133 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs. (LEW)

  13. Source and distribution of sedimentary thallium in the Bohai Sea: Implications for hydrodynamic forces and anthropogenic impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ningjing; Liu, Jihua; Shi, Xuefa

    2015-04-01

    Source and distribution of sedimentary thallium in the Bohai Sea: Implications for hydrodynamic forces and anthropogenic impact Hu Ningjing, Liu Jihua, Shi Xuefa First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China Thallium (Tl), a non-essential and highly toxic trace metal, is listed as priority toxic pollutant by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) (Keith and Telliard, 1979). However, its geochemical cycling in aquatic environment has received far less attention than that of many other trace metals. This has been attributed to relatively little commercial interest in Tl and, until recently, problems inherent in its detection at environmental concentrations (Meeravali and Jiang, 2008). In this study, we investigated the sources, distribution and fate of Tl in surface sediments of the Bohai Sea (BS), China, based on the datasets of total Tl and chemical speciation of Tl of 408 surface sediment samples in the total entire BS. The enrichment factors and chemical speciation of Tl indicated that Tl in BS was dominated by natural Tl, although anthropogenic Tl contamination was observed in the Liuguhe River mouth; the mud deposits are the sinks of Tl and the regional currents and tide systems play a key role on the accumulation of Tl in BS. The distribution of Tl consistent with that of MnO and Fe2O3 as well as the level of Fe-Mn fraction is relatively high, indicating MnO and Fe2O3 influence the geochemical behaviors of Tl in the BS. Although the positive correlation between Tl and TOC is observed for the samples in the BS, however, level of Tl in oxidizable faction could be neglected, suggesting TOC might not be a major factor affecting the concentration of Tl in BS. The low proportion of Tl in the non-residual fraction dominated by the Fe-Mn oxides suggested that the labile Tl was controlled by the Fe-Mn oxides and Tl has a low bioavailability and a minor potential threat to biota in BS. Acknowledgements: this work

  14. Hydrodynamic modelling for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nz. 1. Introduction. The quark gluon plasma (QGP) is formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at Relativis- .... To obtain final hadrons, pure hydrodynamic simulations assume free hadron resonances directly emitted ... models is realized by a Monte-Carlo event generator, which transforms the hydrody- namic output into ...

  15. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the {\\sc aleph} detector at {\\sc lep} . The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to b e less than $10^{-6}$. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of $\\bd$, $\\bs$ and $\\lb$ weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes , here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be $\\Br(\\btohh) = \\resultBR$. The relative branching fraction $\\rratio$, where $\\rs$ is the ratio of $\\bs$ to $\\bd$ decays in the sample, is measured to be $\\resultR$. %Branching ratio upper limits are also obtained for a variety In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  16. Hydrodynamic Hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Al Juboori, Mohammed; Weistuch, Corey; Miller, Nicholas; Nguyen, Tyler; Meyerhoff, Viktoria; McCoy, Bryan; Perkins, Stephanie; Wallgren, Ross; Ray, Bruce D; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Anderson, Gregory G; Pressé, Steve

    2017-03-28

    The Gram-negative Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) is a model bacterial predator that hunts other bacteria and may serve as a living antibiotic. Despite over 50 years since its discovery, it is suggested that BV probably collides into its prey at random. It remains unclear to what degree, if any, BV uses chemical cues to target its prey. The targeted search problem by the predator for its prey in three dimensions is a difficult problem: it requires the predator to sensitively detect prey and forecast its mobile prey's future position on the basis of previously detected signal. Here instead we find that rather than chemically detecting prey, hydrodynamics forces BV into regions high in prey density, thereby improving its odds of a chance collision with prey and ultimately reducing BV's search space for prey. We do so by showing that BV's dynamics are strongly influenced by self-generated hydrodynamic flow fields forcing BV onto surfaces and, for large enough defects on surfaces, forcing BV in orbital motion around these defects. Key experimental controls and calculations recapitulate the hydrodynamic origin of these behaviors. While BV's prey (Escherichia coli) are too small to trap BV in hydrodynamic orbit, the prey are also susceptible to their own hydrodynamic fields, substantially confining them to surfaces and defects where mobile predator and prey density is now dramatically enhanced. Colocalization, driven by hydrodynamics, ultimately reduces BV's search space for prey from three to two dimensions (on surfaces) even down to a single dimension (around defects). We conclude that BV's search for individual prey remains random, as suggested in the literature, but confined, however-by generic hydrodynamic forces-to reduced dimensionality. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  18. Hadrons in medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    medium properties of hadrons. I discuss the relevant symmetries of QCD and how they might affect the observed hadron properties. I then discuss at length the observable consequences of in-medium changes of hadronic properties in reactions with ...

  19. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  20. Assessing enigmatic boulder deposits in NE Aegean Sea: importance of historical sources as tool to support hydrodynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vacchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their importance in the assessment of coastal hazards, several studies have focused on geomorphological and sedimentological field evidence of catastrophic wave impacts related to historical tsunami events. Among them, many authors used boulder fields as important indicators of past tsunamis, especially in the Mediterranean Sea. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanism of deposition of clusters of large boulders, consisting of beachrock slabs, which were found on the southern coasts of Lesvos Island (NE Aegean Sea. Methods to infer the origin of boulder deposits (tsunami vs. storm wave are often based on hydrodynamic models even if different environmental complexities are difficult to be incorporated into numerical models. In this study, hydrodynamic equations did not provide unequivocal indication of the mechanism responsible for boulder deposition in the study area. Further analyses, ranging from geomorphologic to seismotectonic data, indicated a tsunami as the most likely cause of displacement of the boulders but still do not allow to totally exclude the extreme storm origin. Additional historical investigations (based on tsunami catalogues, historical photos and aged inhabitants interviews indicated that the boulders are likely to have been deposited by the tsunami triggered by the 6.7 Ms Chios-Karaburum earthquake of 1949 or, alternatively, by minor effects of the destructive tsunami produced by 1956's Amorgos Island earthquake. Results of this study point out that, at Mediterranean scale, to flank numerical models with the huge amount of the available historical data become a crucial tool in terms of prevention policies related to catastrophic coastal events.

  1. Theoretical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Milne-Thomson, L M

    2011-01-01

    This classic exposition of the mathematical theory of fluid motion is applicable to both hydrodynamics and aerodynamics. Based on vector methods and notation with their natural consequence in two dimensions - the complex variable - it offers more than 600 exercises and nearly 400 diagrams. Prerequisites include a knowledge of elementary calculus. 1968 edition.

  2. Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Hydrodynamic Lubrication Experiment with 'Floating' Drops. Jaywant H Arakeri K R Sreenivas. General Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 51-58. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  4. On hadronic shower simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wellisch, J P

    1999-01-01

    The exploitation of hadronic final states played a key role in the successes of all recent HEP collider experiments, and the ability to use the hadronic final state will continue to be one of the decisive issues during the LHC era. Monte Carlo techniques to make efficient use of hadronic final states have been developed for many years, and have a technological culmination in object oriented tool-kits for hadronic shower simulation that now are becoming available. In the present paper we give a brief overview on the physics modeling underlying hadronic shower simulation, and report on advanced techniques used and developed for simulation of hadronic showers in HEP experiments. We will discuss the three basic types of modelling - data driven, parametrisation driven, and theory driven modelling - and demonstrate ways to combine them in a flexible manner for concrete applications. We will confront the different types of modelling with the stringent requirements on hadronic shower simulation posed by LHC, and inve...

  5. Hadron melting and QCD thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovac, A.

    2013-01-01

    We study in this paper mechanisms of hadron melting based on the spectral representation of hadronic quantum channels, and examine the hadron width dependence of the pressure. The findings are applied to a statistical hadron model of QCD thermodynamics, where hadron masses are distributed by the Hagedorn model and a uniform mechanism for producing hadron widths is assumed. According to this model the hadron - quark gluon plasma transition occurs at $T\\approx 200$-250 MeV, the numerically obse...

  6. Nanoflow hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We show by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations that the Navier-Stokes equation does not correctly describe water flow in a nanoscale geometry. It is argued that this failure reflects the fact that the coupling between the intrinsic rotational and translational degrees of freedom becomes...... important for nanoflows. The coupling is correctly accounted for by the extended Navier-Stokes equations that include the intrinsic angular momentum as an independent hydrodynamic degree of freedom. © 2011 American Physical Society....

  7. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components.

  8. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Abler, Daniel; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-07-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components.

  9. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  10. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  11. Statistical Hadronization and Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechi, Jacopo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider some issues about the statistical model of the hadronization in a holographic approach. We introduce a Rindler like horizon in the bulk and we understand the string breaking as a tunneling event under this horizon. We calculate the hadron spectrum and we get a thermal...

  12. An integrated Boltzmann+hydrodynamics approach to heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Hannah

    2009-04-22

    In this thesis the first fully integrated Boltzmann+hydrodynamics approach to relativistic heavy ion reactions has been developed. After a short introduction that motivates the study of heavy ion reactions as the tool to get insights about the QCD phase diagram, the most important theoretical approaches to describe the system are reviewed. The hadron-string transport approach that this work is based on is the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) approach. Predictions for the charged particle multiplicities at LHC energies are made. The next step is the development of a new framework to calculate the baryon number density in a transport approach. Time evolutions of the net baryon number and the quark density have been calculated at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. Studies of phase diagram trajectories using hydrodynamics are performed. The hybrid approach that has been developed as the main part of this thesis is based on the UrQMD transport approach with an intermediate hydrodynamical evolution for the hot and dense stage of the collision. The full (3+1) dimensional ideal relativistic one fluid dynamics evolution is solved using the SHASTA algorithm. Three different equations of state have been used, namely a hadron gas equation of state without a QGP phase transition, a chiral EoS and a bag model EoS including a strong first order phase transition. For the freeze-out transition from hydrodynamics to the cascade calculation two different set-ups are employed. The parameter dependences of the model are investigated and the time evolution of different quantities is explored. The hybrid model calculation is able to reproduce the experimentally measured integrated as well as transverse momentum dependent v{sub 2} values for charged particles. The multiplicity and mean transverse mass excitation function is calculated for pions, protons and kaons in the energy range from E{sub lab}=2-160 A GeV. The HBT correlation of the negatively charged pion source

  13. Physical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guyon, Etienne; Petit, Luc; Mitescu, Catalin D

    2015-01-01

    This new edition is an enriched version of the textbook of fluid dynamics published more than 10 years ago. It retains the same physically oriented pedagogical perspective. This book emphasizes, as in the first edition, experimental inductive approaches and relies on the study of the mechanisms at play and on dimensional analysis rather than more formal approaches found in many classical textbooks in the field. The need for a completely new version also originated from the increase, over the last few decades, of the cross-overs between the mechanical and physical approaches, as is visible in international meetings and joint projects. Hydrodynamics is more widely linked today to other fields of experimental sciences: materials, environment, life sciences and earth sciences, as well as engineering sciences.

  14. Submarine hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Renilson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This book adopts a practical approach and presents recent research together with applications in real submarine design and operation. Topics covered include hydrostatics, manoeuvring, resistance and propulsion of submarines. The author briefly reviews basic concepts in ship hydrodynamics and goes on to show how they are applied to submarines, including a look at the use of physical model experiments. The issues associated with manoeuvring in both the horizontal and vertical planes are explained, and readers will discover suggested criteria for stability, along with rudder and hydroplane effectiveness. The book includes a section on appendage design which includes information on sail design, different arrangements of bow planes and alternative stern configurations. Other themes explored in this book include hydro-acoustic performance, the components of resistance and the effect of hull shape. Readers will value the author’s applied experience as well as the empirical expressions that are presented for use a...

  15. Radiation hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1982-12-31

    This course was intended to provide the participant with an introduction to the theory of radiative transfer, and an understanding of the coupling of radiative processes to the equations describing compressible flow. At moderate temperatures (thousands of degrees), the role of the radiation is primarily one of transporting energy by radiative processes. At higher temperatures (millions of degrees), the energy and momentum densities of the radiation field may become comparable to or even dominate the corresponding fluid quantities. In this case, the radiation field significantly affects the dynamics of the fluid, and it is the description of this regime which is generally the charter of radiation hydrodynamics. The course provided a discussion of the relevant physics and a derivation of the corresponding equations, as well as an examination of several simplified models. Practical applications include astrophysics and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  16. Thermo-hydrodynamic lubrication in hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the thermo-hydrodynamic and the thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication. The algorithms are methodically detailed and each section is thoroughly illustrated.

  17. Fractal aspects of hadrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deppman Airton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The non extensive aspects of pT distributions obtained in high energy collisions are discussed in relation to possible fractal structure in hadrons, in the sense of the thermofractal structure recently introduced. The evidences of self-similarity in both theoretical and experimental works in High Energy and in Hadron Physics are discussed, to show that the idea of fractal structure of hadrons and fireballs have being under discussion for decades. The non extensive self-consistent thermodynamics and the thermofractal structure allow one to connect non extensivity to intermittence and possibly to parton distribution functions in a single theoretical framework.

  18. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to be less than 10 -6. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of B d0, B s0 and Λb weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes, here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be Br(B → h +h -) = (1.7 -0.7+1.0 ± 0.2) × 10 -5. The relative branching fraction {Br( B d(s)0 → π +π -(K -)) }/{Br( B d(s)0 → h +h -) } is measured to be 1.0 -0.3 -0.1+0.0 +0.0. In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  19. Topics in Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Alfred [Univ. of Wiscon, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2002-08-01

    Hadron production cross sections are calculated in the perturbative QCD frame work. Parton distribution functions are obtained from a strip-soliton model. The fragmentation functions are derived from the Lund model of string breaking.

  20. Modeling of Nonlinear Hydrodynamics of the Coastal Areas of the Black Sea by the Chain of the Proprietary and Open Source Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantardgi, Igor; Zheleznyak, Mark; Demchenko, Raisa; Dykyi, Pavlo; Kivva, Sergei; Kolomiets, Pavlo; Sorokin, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    The nearshore hydrodynamic fields are produced by the nonlinear interactions of the shoaling waves of different time scales and currents. To simulate the wind wave and swells propagated to the coasts, wave generated near shore currents, nonlinear-dispersive wave transformation and wave diffraction in interaction with coastal and port structure, sediment transport and coastal erosion the chains of the models should be used. The objective of this presentation is to provide an overview of the results of the application of the model chains for the assessment of the wave impacts on new construction designed at the Black Sea coasts and the impacts of these constructions on the coastal erosion/ accretion processes to demonstrate needs for further development of the nonlinear models for the coastal engineering applications. The open source models Wave Watch III and SWAN has been used to simulate wave statistics of the dedicated areas of the Black Sea in high resolution to calculated the statistical parameters of the extreme wave approaching coastal zone construction in accordance with coastal engineering standards. As the main tool for the costal hydrodynamic simulations the modeling system COASTOX-MORPHO has been used, that includes the following models. HWAVE -code based on hyperbolic version of mild slope equations., HWAVE-S - spectral version of HWAVE., BOUSS-FNL - fully nonlinear system of Boussinesq equations for simulation wave nonlinear -dispersive wave transformation in coastal areas. COASTOX-CUR - the code provided the numerical solution of the Nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (NLSWE) by finite-volume methods on the unstructured grid describing the long wave transformation in the coastal zone with the efficient drying -wetting algorithms to simulate the inundation of the coastal areas including tsunami wave runup. Coastox -Cur equations with the radiation stress term calculated via near shore wave fields simulate the wave generated nearhore currents. COASTOX

  1. Hadron Dragons strike again

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Dragon Boat team – the Hadron Dragons – achieved a fantastic result at the "Paddle for Cancer" Dragon Boat Festival at Lac de Joux on 6 September. CERN Hadron Dragons heading for the start line.Under blue skies and on a clear lake, the Hadron Dragons won 2nd place in a hard-fought final, following top times in the previous heats. In a close and dramatic race – neck-and-neck until the final 50 metres – the local Lac-de-Joux team managed to inch ahead at the last moment. The Hadron Dragons were delighted to take part in this festival. No one would turn down a day out in such a friendly and fun atmosphere, but the Dragons were also giving their support to cancer awareness and fund-raising in association with ESCA (English-Speaking Cancer Association of Geneva). Riding on their great success in recent competitions, the Hadron Dragons plan to enter the last Dragon Boat festival of 2009 in Annecy on 17-18 October. This will coincide with t...

  2. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  3. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Jozef [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  4. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  5. Measurements on hadron production in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zenis, Tibor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studies of correlated hadron production are an important source of information about the early stages of hadron formation, not yet understood from first principles. Although experimental high energy physics employs several semiclassical models of hadronization which describe the formation of jets with remarkable accuracy, correlation phenomena are more elusive. In this proceeding, we will discuss Bose-Einstein correlations measured with the ATLAS detector and provide a unique opportunity for detailed understanding of the space-time geometry of the hadronization region.

  6. Local Hadronic Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Barillari, T; Carli, T; Erdmann, J; Giovannini, P; Grahn, K J; Issever, C; Jantsch, A; Kiryunin, A; Lohwasser, K; Maslennikov, A; Menke, S; Oberlack, H; Pospelov, G; Rauter, E; Schacht, P; Spanó, F; Speckmayer, P; Stavina, P; Strízenec, P

    2008-01-01

    The scheme of the hadronic calibration is discussed. Based on the cluster reconstruction an effective noise suppression is achieved. In a first step clusters are classified as electromagnetic or hadronic clusters. The weighting scheme to correct for the different e/pion response in the ATLAS calorimeter is presented. Dead material corrections and out of cluster corrections yield finally a signal which is rather close to the energy deposited by the final state particles in the ATLAS calorimeter. The constants and algorithms are derived from single pion MC studies and tested with jets. The validation of the scheme using testbeam data is presented as well.

  7. Hadron physics from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Andreas [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2016-11-01

    with the required precision. However, quantum field theory has a very important fundamental property, which allows to make progress: When the variable ''time'' is analytically continued to imaginary time (in the sense of square root of minus one) it gets mapped onto thermodynamics and statistics and questions in quantum field theory are transformed into purely statistical problems, which can be solved numerically by Monte Carlo techniques. While there might be more to it, this can be seen as just a mathematical trick. This trick does not only make numerical simulations of quantum field theories possible, but it solves at the same time the problem alluded to above: Within QCD any quark-gluon model which is simple enough that one can use it for practical calculations, fails to describe a real hadron. More precisely a simple quark-gluon state, which can easily be described within QCD corresponds to an infinitely complicated superposition of hadronic states. However, if such a superposition is propagated in imaginary time in the right manner all components except the lowest mass physical hadron, e.g. the proton, get exponentially suppressed. Thus the exact many particle wave function of the physical proton is obtained with which one can then calculate all physical quantities one is interested in, with one constraint: Because time has lost its meaning, only time-independent quantities can be obtained. Consequently, Lattice QCD has nearly always to be combined with real time treatments, most prominently perturbative QCD, to obtain physical predictions. The schematic structure of hadron structure lattice calculations is illustrated. Because source, sink and matrix element define three points in space-time such amplitudes are called ''3-point functions''.The Greens function on the lattice is just the inverse of a large sparse matrix. This inversion is one of the computationally most expensive tasks in lattice QCD calculations. To

  8. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  9. Hadrons in compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    volving Bose–Einstein condensates of antikaons within relativistic models. Also, the structures of non-rotating neutron stars are calculated using this EoS. 2. Hadrons in cold and dense medium. At normal nuclear matter density, neutron star matter mainly consists of neutrons, protons and electrons. The particle population is ...

  10. Jets in Hadron Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Michael H

    2000-01-01

    Comment: 13 pages, 18 figures, talks given at XXXVth Rencontres de Moriond, QCD and Hadronic Interactions, Les Arcs 1800, France, March 18th-25th 2000, and DIS 2000, 8th International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering, Liverpool, UK, April 25th-30th 2000

  11. The large hadron computer

    CERN Multimedia

    Hirstius, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Plans for dealing with the torrent of data from the Large Hadron Collider's detectors have made the CERN particle-phycis lab, yet again, a pioneer in computing as well as physics. The author describes the challenges of processing and storing data in the age of petabyt science. (4 pages)

  12. Hadronic Degrees of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Marco

    I report on the research activities performed under the (italian) MURST-PRIN project "Fisica Teorica del Nuc1eo e dei sistemi a piú corpi" covering part of the topics on hadronic degrees of freedom. The most recent achievements in the field are summarized focusing on the specific role of the nuclear physics community.

  13. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  14. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  15. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  16. Hadron Multiplicities at HERMES

    CERN Document Server

    Hartig, M

    2005-01-01

    Hadron multiplicities of $\\pim$, $\\pip$, $\\km$ and $\\kp$ have been measured in the deep-inelastic scattering of 27.5 GeV positrons off a hydrogen target. The data used in this analysis have been collected during the 2000 HERA running period. The multiplicities were obtained for 0.15$$ = 2.5 GeV$^2$.

  17. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  18. Hydrodynamics challenge problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornung, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Keasler, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gokhale, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-09

    The hydrodynamics challenge problem represents a classical HPC physics problem, namely high deformation event modeling via Lagrangian shock hydrodynamics. This challenge problem solves the Sedov blast wave problem for one material in three dimensions. The problem has an analytic solution, and can be scaled to arbitrarily large problem sizes. The reference code is drawn from a production LLNL hydrodynamics code.

  19. Extracting hadron-neutron scattering amplitudes from hadron-proton and hadron-deuteron measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, V.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for extracting hadron-neutron scattering amplitudes from hadron-proton and hadron-deuteron measurements within the framework of the Glauber approximation. This method, which involves the solution of a linear integral equation, is applied to pn collisions between 15 and 275 GeV/c. Effects arising from inelastic intermediate states are estimated.

  20. Effective dynamical coupling of hydrodynamics and transport for heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliinychenko, Dmytro; Petersen, Hannah

    2017-04-01

    Present hydrodynamics-based simulations of heavy-ion collisions neglect the feedback from the frozen-out particles flying back into the hydrodynamical region. This causes an artefact called “negative Cooper-Frye contributions”, which is negligible for high collision energies, but becomes significant for lower RHIC BES energies and for event-by-event simulations. To avoid negative Cooper-Frye contributions, while still preserving hydrodynamical behavior, we propose a pure hadronic transport approach with forced thermalization in the regions of high energy density. It is demonstrated that this approach exhibits enhancement of strangeness and mean transverse momenta compared to conventional transport - an effect typical for hydrodynamical approaches.

  1. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  2. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  3. QCD and Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  4. The role of hadron resonances in hot hadronic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Hadron resonances can play a significant role in hot hadronic matter. Of particular interest for this workshop are the contributions of hyperon resonances. The question about how to quantify the effects of resonances is here addressed. In the framework of the hadron resonance gas, the chemically equilibrated case, relevant in the context of lattice QCD calculations, and the chemically frozen case relevant in heavy ion collisions are discussed.

  5. Elementary classical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chirgwin, B H; Langford, W J; Maxwell, E A; Plumpton, C

    1967-01-01

    Elementary Classical Hydrodynamics deals with the fundamental principles of elementary classical hydrodynamics, with emphasis on the mechanics of inviscid fluids. Topics covered by this book include direct use of the equations of hydrodynamics, potential flows, two-dimensional fluid motion, waves in liquids, and compressible flows. Some general theorems such as Bernoulli's equation are also considered. This book is comprised of six chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the fundamental principles of fluid hydrodynamics, with emphasis on ways of studying the motion of a fluid. Basic c

  6. Elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication

    CERN Document Server

    Dowson, D; Hopkins, D W

    1977-01-01

    Elasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication deals with the mechanism of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, that is, the lubrication regime in operation over the small areas where machine components are in nominal point or line contact. The lubrication of rigid contacts is discussed, along with the effects of high pressure on the lubricant and bounding solids. The governing equations for the solution of elasto-hydrodynamic problems are presented.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication and representation of contacts by cylinders, followed by a discussio

  7. 14th Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T

    2003-01-01

    Hadron colliders probe physics at new energy frontiers and search for new particles and forces. In addition, hadron colliders now provide also an environment for precision physics. The present volume collects the results from recently completed runs at major colliders as well as new ideas about collider physics and techniques. It will serve as the main source of reference in the field for many years to come.

  8. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry inside hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iritani, Takumi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP) (Japan); Cossu, Guido [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Hashimoto, Shoji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai) (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    We investigate the spatial distribution of the chiral condensate around static color sources for both quark-antiquark and three-quark systems. In the QCD vacuum a tube-like structure of chromo fields appears between color sources, which leads to a linearly confining potential. We show that the magnitude of the condensate is reduced inside the flux-tube, which suggests that chiral symmetry is partially restored inside the hadrons. By using a static baryon source in a periodic box as a model of the nuclear matter, we estimate the restoration of chiral symmetry with finite baryon number density.

  9. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry inside hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iritani, Takumi; Cossu, Guido; Hashimoto, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of the chiral condensate around static color sources for both quark-antiquark and three-quark systems. In the QCD vacuum a tube-like structure of chromo fields appears between color sources, which leads to a linearly confining potential. We show that the magnitude of the condensate is reduced inside the flux-tube, which suggests that chiral symmetry is partially restored inside the hadrons. By using a static baryon source in a periodic box as a model of the nuclear matter, we estimate the restoration of chiral symmetry with finite baryon number density.

  10. Transformations of integrable hydrodynamic chains and their hydrodynamic reductions

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlov, Maxim V.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrodynamic reductions of the hydrodynamic chain associated with dispersionless limit of 2+1 Harry Dym equation are found by the Miura type and reciprocal transformations applied to the Benney hydrodynamic chain.

  11. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  12. Single spin asymmetries in hadron-hadron collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacchetta, A.; Bomhof, C.J.; Mulders, P.J.G.; Pijlman, F.

    2005-01-01

    We study weighted azimuthal single spin asymmetries in hadron-hadron scattering using the diagrammatic approach at leading order and assuming factorization. The effects of the intrinsic transverse momenta of the partons are taken into account. We show that the way in which T-odd functions, such as

  13. Monte Carlo event generators for hadron-hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, I.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). High Energy Physics Div.; Protopopescu, S.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    A brief review of Monte Carlo event generators for simulating hadron-hadron collisions is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on comparisons of the approaches used to describe physics elements and identifying their relative merits and weaknesses. This review summarizes a more detailed report.

  14. Hydrodynamic radial and elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions from AGS to LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Kestin, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Using ideal relativistic hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions, we study the collision energy dependence of radial and elliptic flow, of the emitted hadron spectra, and of the transverse momentum dependence of several hadronic particle ratios, covering the range from Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies. These calculations establish an ideal fluid dynamic baseline that can be used to assess non-equilibrium features manifest in future LHC heavy-ion experiments. Contrary to earlier suggestions we find that a saturation and even decrease of the differential elliptic flow v_2(p_T) with increasing collision energy cannot be unambiguously associated with the QCD phase transition.

  15. Gamma-hadron families and scaling violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.; Wrotniak, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    For three different interaction models we have simulated gamma-hadron families, including the detector (Pamir emulsion chamber) response. Rates of gamma families, hadrons, and hadron-gamma ratios were compared with experiments.

  16. SHARE: Statistical hadronization with resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrieri, G.; Steinke, S.; Broniowski, W.; Florkowski, W.; Letessier, J.; Rafelski, J.

    2005-05-01

    interaction feed-down corrections, the observed hadron abundances are obtained. SHARE incorporates diverse physical approaches, with a flexibility of choice of the details of the statistical hadronization model, including the selection of a chemical (non-)equilibrium condition. SHARE also offers evaluation of the extensive properties of the source of particles, such as energy, entropy, baryon number, strangeness, as well as the determination of the best intensive input parameters fitting a set of experimental yields. This allows exploration of a proposed physical hypothesis about hadron production mechanisms and the determination of the properties of their source. Method of solving the problem: Distributions at freeze-out of both the stable particles and the hadronic resonances are set according to a statistical prescription, technically calculated via a series of Bessel functions, using CERN library programs. We also have the option of including finite particle widths of the resonances. While this is computationally expensive, it is necessary to fully implement the essence of the strong interaction dynamics within the statistical hadronization picture. In fact, including finite width has a considerable effect when modeling directly detectable short-lived resonances ( Λ(1520),K, etc.), and is noticeable in fits to experimentally measured yields of stable particles. After production, all hadronic resonances decay. Resonance decays are accomplished by addition of the parent abundances to the daughter, normalized by the branching ratio. Weak interaction decays receive a special treatment, where we introduce daughter particle acceptance factors for both strongly interacting decay products. An interface for fitting to experimental particle ratios of the statistical model parameters with the help of MINUIT[1] is provided. The χ function is defined in the standard way. For an investigated quantity f and experimental error Δ f, χ=((N=N-N. (note that systematic and statistical

  17. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavai, R. [Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, Bombay (India); Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  18. Dijet imbalance in hadronic collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    The imbalance of dijets produced in hadronic collisions has been used to extract the average transverse momentum of partons inside the hadrons. In this paper we discuss new contributions to the dijet imbalance that could complicate or even hamper this extraction. They are due to polarization of

  19. Heavy hadrons in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    Current studies on heavy hadrons in nuclear medium are reviewed with a summary of the basic theoretical concepts of QCD, namely chiral symmetry, heavy quark spin symmetry, and the effective Lagrangian approach. The nuclear matter is an interesting place to study the properties of heavy hadrons from many different points of view. We emphasize the importance of the following topics: (i) charm/bottom hadron-nucleon interaction, (ii) structure of charm/bottom nuclei, and (iii) QCD vacuum properties and hadron modifications in nuclear medium. We pick up three different groups of heavy hadrons, quarkonia (J / ψ, ϒ), heavy-light mesons (D/ D ¯ , B ¯ / B) and heavy baryons (Λc, Λb). The modifications of those hadrons in nuclear matter provide us with important information to investigate the essential properties of heavy hadrons. We also give the discussions about the heavy hadrons, not only in infinite nuclear matter, but also in finite-size atomic nuclei with finite baryon numbers, to serve future experiments.

  20. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  1. Hadronic Imaging Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Alexander; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Dubbers, Dirk

    This thesis focuses on a prototype of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter at the planned International Linear Collider optimized for the Particle Flow Approach. The 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths deep sandwich calorimeter was built by the CALICE collaboration and consists of 38 active plastic scintillator layers. Steel is used as absorber material and the active layers are subdivided into small tiles. In total 7608 tiles are read out individually via embedded Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The prototype is one of the first large scale applications of these novel and very promising miniature photodetectors. The work described in this thesis comprises the commissioning of the detector and the data acquisition with test beam particles over several months at CERN and Fermilab. The calibration of the calorimeter and the analysis of the recorded data is presented. A method to correct for the temperature dependent response of the SiPM has been developed and implemented. Its successful application shows that it...

  2. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  3. The Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex instrument ever built for particle physics research. It will, for the first time, provide access to the TeV-energy scale. Numerous technological innovations are necessary to achieve this goal. For example, two counterrotating proton beams are guided and focused by superconducting magnets whose novel two-in-one structure saves cost and allowed the machine to be installed in an existing tunnel. The very high (>8-T) field in the dipoles can be achieved only by cooling them below the transition temperature of liquid helium to the superfluid state. More than 80 tons of superfluid helium are needed to cool the whole machine. So far, the LHC has behaved reliably and predictably. Single-bunch currents 30% above the design value have been achieved, and the luminosity has increased by five orders of magnitude. In this review, I briefly describe the design principles of the major systems and discuss some initial results.

  4. The Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-02-28

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron-positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  5. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  6. Heavy quarks in hadronic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Peterson, C.

    1982-03-01

    It is suggested that the presence of c anti c-pairs on the 1 to 2% level in the hadron Fock state decomposition (intrinsic charm) gives a natural description of the ISR data for charm hadron production. The theoretical foundations of the intrinsic charm hypothesis together with its consequences for lepton- and hadron-induced reactions are discussed in some detail. There is no contradiction with the EMC data on F/sub 2//sup c/ provided the appropriate threshold dependence is taken into account.

  7. Fundamentals in hadronic atom theory

    CERN Document Server

    Deloff, A

    2003-01-01

    Hadronic atoms provide a unique laboratory for studying hadronic interactions essentially at threshold. This text is the first book-form exposition of hadronic atom theory with emphasis on recent developments, both theoretical and experimental. Since the underlying Hamiltonian is a non-self-adjoined operator, the theory goes beyond traditional quantum mechanics and this book covers topics that are often glossed over in standard texts on nuclear physics. The material contained here is intended for the advanced student and researcher in nuclear, atomic or elementary-particle physics. A good know

  8. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  9. Hydrodynamics and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi; van der Kolk, Naomi; Bilandzic, Ante

    The main purpose of the lecture was to lead students and young postdocs to the frontier of the hydrodynamic description of relativistic heavy-ion collisions (H.I.C.) in order for them to understand talks and posters presented in the Quark Matter 2008 (QM08) conference in Jaipur, India [1]. So the most recent studies were not addressed in this lecture as they would be presented during the QM08 conference itself. Also, we try to give a very pedagogical lecture here. For the readers who may want to study relativistic hydrodynamics and its application to H.I.C. as an advanced course, we strongly recommend them to consult the references. This lecture note is divided into three parts. In the first part we give a brief introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics in the context of H.I.C. In the second part we present the formalism and some fundamental aspects of relativistic ideal and viscous hydrodynamics.

  10. A Hadron Radiation Installation and Verification Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, F.J.; Bom, V.R.

    2013-01-01

    A hadron radiation installation adapted to subject a target to irradiation by a hadron radiation beam, said installation comprising: - a target support configured to support, preferably immobilize, a target: - a hadron radiation apparatus adapted to emit a hadron radiation beam along a beam axis to

  11. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  12. Lare Hadron Collider faces today

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN could be delayed after three of the magnets used to focus and manipulate the accelerator's proton beams failed premilinary tests at CERN earlier this week." (1 page)

  13. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  14. Physics at Hadronic Colliders course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Present and future hadron colliders play an important role in the investigation of fundamental questions of particle physics. After an introductory lecture, tests of the Standard Model and measurements of its parameters (like the mass of the top quark) at hadron colliders are presented. In addition, it will be discussed how the Higgs boson can be searched for at hadron colliders and how "New Physics", i.e. physics beyond the Standard Model, can be explored. Results are presented from the currently ongoing run at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at the US research lab Fermilab. In addition, the rich physics potential of the experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is discussed. Note: Prerequisite Knowledge: - The Standard Model (Lecture by A. Pich) - Beyond The Standard Model (Lecture by E. Kiritsis)

  15. Fixed target hadron production measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Panman, J

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge of light hadron production cross-sections in proton-nucleus interactions is an important prerequisite to the analysis of a wide variety of experiments. One of the important limiting factors for the precision of accelerator based and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments is the uncertainty in the composition and spectrum of the neutrino flux. Cosmic-ray experiments detecting extensive air-showers can greatly improve their ability to interpret the data when precise hadron production spectra are available over a large range of energies. Dedicated hadron production experiments have been taking data recently and are now publishing their results. Other experiments have just started their data-taking and plan to supply measurements which can significantly extend the kinematic range in which data will be available. Early measurements at the LHC can extend this range to much higher energies than available up to now. Recent results will be shown and compared with hadronic production models. An outl...

  16. Thermalization in a small hadron gas system and high-multiplicity p p events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Nachiketa; Ghosh, Premomoy

    2017-10-01

    We study the system-size dependence of Knudsen number, a measure of degree of thermalization, for hadron resonance gas that follows the lattice quantum chromodynamics equation of state at zero chemical potential. A comparison between Knudsen numbers for the AuAu collisions at RHIC and the hadron gas of size similar to the size of high-multiplicity p p events at LHC, reassures the applicability of hydrodynamics in interpreting the features of particle production in high-multiplicity p p events.

  17. Hadron physics with KLOE-2

    CERN Document Server

    Czerwinski, Eryk; Babusci, D; Badoni, D; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bulychjev, S A; Campana, P; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; De Zorzi, G; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Hoistad, B; Iarocci, E; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kulikov, V V; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Loddo, F; Martemianov, M A; Martini, M; Matsyuk, M A; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moricciani, D; Morello, G; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Ranieri, A; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2010-01-01

    In the upcoming month the KLOE-2 data taking campaign will start at the upgraded DAFNE phi-factory of INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati. The main goal is to collect an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb^(-1) in 3-4 years in order to refine and extend the KLOE program on both kaon physics and hadron spectroscopy. Here the expected improvements on the results of hadron spectroscopy are presented and briefly discussed.

  18. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    Since the beginning of 2007, HCAL has made significant progress in the installation and commissioning of both hardware and software. A large fraction of the physical Hadron Calorimeter modules have been installed in UX5. In fact, the only missing pieces are HE- and part of HO. The HB+/- were installed in the cryostat in March. HB scintillator layer-17 was installed above ground before the HB were lowered. The HB- scintillator layer-0 was installed immediately after completion of EB- installation. HF/HCAL Commissioning The commissioning and checkout of the HCAL readout electronics is also proceeding at a rapid pace in Bldg. 904 and USC55. All sixteen crates of HCAL VME readout electronics have been commissioned and certified for service. Fifteen are currently operating in the S2 level of USC55. The last crate is being used for firmware development in the Electronics Integration Facility in 904. All installed crates are interfaced to their VME computers and receive synchronous control from the fully-equipp...

  19. Late effects from hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  20. Late effects from hadron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Eleanor A; Chang, Polly Y

    2004-12-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  1. Hydrodynamic Vortex on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzo, Clodoaldo Grotta; de Barros Viglioni, Humberto Henrique

    2017-10-01

    The equations of motion for a system of point vortices on an oriented Riemannian surface of finite topological type are presented. The equations are obtained from a Green's function on the surface. The uniqueness of the Green's function is established under hydrodynamic conditions at the surface's boundaries and ends. The hydrodynamic force on a point vortex is computed using a new weak formulation of Euler's equation adapted to the point vortex context. An analogy between the hydrodynamic force on a massive point vortex and the electromagnetic force on a massive electric charge is presented as well as the equations of motion for massive vortices. Any noncompact Riemann surface admits a unique Riemannian metric such that a single vortex in the surface does not move ("Steady Vortex Metric"). Some examples of surfaces with steady vortex metric isometrically embedded in R^3 are presented.

  2. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-19

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low p_{T} direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.

  3. Single spin asymmetries in hadron-hadron collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Bacchetta, A.; Bomhof, C. J.; Mulders, P. J.; Pijlman, F.

    2005-01-01

    We study weighted azimuthal single spin asymmetries in hadron-hadron scattering using the diagrammatic approach at leading order and assuming factorization. The effects of the intrinsic transverse momenta of the partons are taken into account. We show that the way in which $T$-odd functions, such as the Sivers function, appear in these processes does not merely involve a sign flip when compared with semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, such as in the case of the Drell-Yan process. Expres...

  4. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  5. RAA vs. v2 of heavy and light hadrons within a linear Boltzmann transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Pang, Long-Gang; Luo, Tan; He, Yayun; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2017-08-01

    We establish a linear Boltzmann transport (LBT) model coupled to hydrodynamical background to study hard parton evolution in heavy-ion collisions. Both elastic and inelastic scatterings are included in our calculations; and heavy and light flavor partons are treated on the same footing. Within this LBT model, we provide good descriptions of heavy and light hadron suppression from RHIC to the LHC energies. Possible solutions to the RAA vs. v2 puzzle are discussed.

  6. Hydrodynamic separator sediment retention testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Hydrodynamic separators are widely used in urban areas for removal of suspended sediments and floatables from : stormwater due to limited land availability for the installation of above ground stormwater best management : practices (BMPs). Hydrodynam...

  7. On Collective Quantum Effect Influence on Hadronization Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kostenko, B F

    2001-01-01

    For description of co-operative quantum effect influence on hadronization processes, a model which assumes the transition of quark-antiquark pairs into mesons to be analogous to generation of electromagnetic field by excited atoms in gas laser is suggested. With the purpose of account for bounded states of meson field, a quantization scheme based on q-deformed commutation rules is formulated. In the adiabatic approximation after averaging over the quark-antiquark degrees of freedom an evolution equation for description of hadronization is obtained. Stimulating influence of mesons (including the bounded ones) on their sources is taken into account.

  8. The COMPASS Hadron Spectroscopy Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, A

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS for the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a large acceptance and high momentum resolution spectrometer including particle identification and calorimetry and is therefore ideal to access a broad range of different final states. Following the promising observation of a spin-exotic resonance during an earlier pilot run, COMPASS focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the years 2008 and 2009. A data set, world leading in terms of statistics and resolution, has been collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on either liquid hydrogen or nuclear targets. Spin-exotic meson and glueball candidates formed in both diffractive dissociation and central production are presently studied. Since the beam composition includes protons, the excited baryon spectrum is also accessible. Furthermore, Primakoff reactions have the potential to determine radiative widths of the resonances and to probe chiral pe...

  9. Hadronic tau decays and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hocker, Andreas

    1997-01-01

    We present new results for the r hadronic spectral functions analysis using data accumulated by the ALEPH detector at LEP during the years 1991-94. The vector and the axial-vector spectral functions are determined from their respective unfolded, i.e., physical invariant mass spectra. The r vector and axial-vector hadronic widths and certain spectral moments are exploited to measure a, and nonperturbative contributions at the r mass scale. The best, and experimentally and theoretically most robust, determination of a,(Mr) is obtained from the inclusive (V + A) fit that yields a,(Mr) = 0.349 ± 0.018 giving a,(Mz) = 0.1 212 ± 0.0022 after the evolution to the mass of the Z boson. The approach of the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) is tested experimentally by means of an evolution of the r hadronic width to masses smaller than the r mass.

  10. Local Hadron Calibration in Atlas.

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in Atlas as one of two major calibration schemes for hadronic signals like jets and missing transverse energy. Starting from noise suppressed energy clusters a modular chain of classification and corrections steps are applied to distinguish electro-magnetic from hadronic deposits and to compensate invisible energy losses, deposits in dead material and noise threshold related losses. Finally jet-level corrections take care of missing energy due to particles never reaching the calorimeter. The method and its application to single charged and neutral pion simulations as well as di-jet simulations are presented. First comparisons of MinBias simulations and real Atlas data at sqrt(s)=900 GeV are shown.

  11. History of hadron therapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Amaldi, Ugo

    2015-06-01

    In the last 60 years, hadron therapy has made great advances passing from a stage of pure research to a well-established treatment modality for solid tumours. In this paper the history of hadron therapy accelerators is reviewed, starting from the first cyclotrons used in the thirties for neutron therapy and passing to more modern and flexible machines used nowadays. The technical developments have been accompanied by clinical studies that allowed the selection of the tumours which are more sensitive to this type of radiotherapy. This paper aims at giving a review of the origin and the present status of hadron therapy accelerators, describing the technological basis and the continuous development of this application to medicine of instruments developed for fundamental science. At the end the present challenges are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bosonization and quantum hydrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bosonization and quantum hydrodynamics. GIRISH S SETLUR. Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, North Guwahati .... and Haldane [3] breaks up the Fermi surface into patches where the separation between the patches ∆kF ≫ Λ ∼ ∆q. Not only is this contrived, it involves the introduction of one ...

  13. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  14. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  15. Hadron scattering, resonances, and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has historically left a gap in our understanding of the connection between the fundamental theory of the strong interactions and the rich structure of experimentally observed phenomena. For the simplest properties of stable hadrons, this is now circumvented with the use of lattice QCD (LQCD). In this talk I discuss a path towards a rigorous determination of few-hadron observables from LQCD. I illustrate the power of the methodology by presenting recently determined scattering amplitudes in the light-meson sector and their resonance content.

  16. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decamp, D.; Deschizeaux, B.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Alemany, R.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mato, P.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Tubau, E.; Catanesi, M. G.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Gao, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Ruan, T.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Albrecht, H.; Atwood, W. B.; Bird, F.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Brown, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Dydak, F.; Forty, R. W.; Grab, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Haywood, S.; Jost, B.; Kasemann, M.; Kellner, G.; Knobloch, J.; Lacourt, A.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lüke, D.; Marchioro, A.; Martinez, M.; May, J.; Menary, S.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Nash, J.; Palazzi, P.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Rotscheidt, H.; von Rüden, W.; St. Denis, R.; Schlatter, D.; Takashima, M.; Talby, M.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wheeler, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Falvard, A.; El Fellous, R.; Gay, P.; Harvey, J.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nielsen, E. R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Bourotte, J.; Braems, F.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Gamess, A.; Guirlet, R.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Veitch, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Massimo-Brancaccio, F.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Nicoletti, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Zografou, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Halley, A. W.; Have, I. Ten; Hearns, J. L.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Taylor, G.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Rowlingson, B. S.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Barczewski, T.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Roehn, S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Albanese, J.-P.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Courvoisier, D.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Qian, Z.; Blum, W.; Cattaneo, P.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Jahn, A.; Kozanecki, W.; Lange, E.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Pan, Y.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Stierlin, U.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; de Bouard, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Ganis, G.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Journé, V.; Kim, D. W.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, J.-M.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Moneta, L.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini-Castaldi, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Saich, M. R.; Strong, J. A.; Thomas, R. M.; West, L. R.; Wildish, T.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lançon, E.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Ashan, J. G.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dinsdale, M.; Dogru, M.; Hatfield, F.; Martin, J.; Parker, D.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Brandt, S.; Burkhardt, H.; Grupen, C.; Meinhard, H.; Mirabito, L.; Neugebauer, E.; Schäfer, U.; Seywerd, H.; Apollinari, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Liello, F.; Rolandi, L.; Stiegler, U.; Bellantoni, L.; Boudreau, J. F.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Deweerd, A. J.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, J. E.; Jared, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Leclaire, B. W.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, M. A.; Wear, J. A.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Lan Wu, Sau Lan Wu; Zhou, Z. L.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1991-03-01

    The average lifetime of B hadrons has been measured by the ALEPH experiment at LEP. Events containing B hadrons are selected by the identification of leptons with high transverse momentum in hadronic Z decays, and the lifetime is extracted from a fit to the impact parameter distribution of the lepton tracks. From a sample of 1.7×10 5 hadronic Z decays a lifetime of 1.29±0.06±0.10 ps is measured.

  17. 16th International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this conference is to review the status, progress and future plans of the field of hadron spectroscopy, and relate these to understanding hadron dynamics. This series of biennial conferences began in 1985 at College Park, Maryland, USA, with the 15th conference held in Nara, Japan in November 2013. Hadron 2015 will be organized by Jefferson Lab.

  18. Hadron bubbles in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troitskii, M.A.; Khodel' , V.A.

    1983-08-25

    Nonlinear effects in the interaction of hadrons with a nucleus are analyzed. It is shown that K/sup +/ mesons form bubbles in nuclear matter which are similar to electron bubbles in liquid helium. Charged pions produced in collisions of heavy relativistic ions may collect and form droplets approx.5--7 Fm in size containing approx.10/sup 2/ particles.

  19. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  20. A PARTNERship for hadron therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    PARTNER, the Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy, has recently been awarded 5.6 million euros by the European Commission. The project, which is coordinated by CERN, has been set up to train researchers of the future in hadron therapy and in doing so aid the battle against cancer.

  1. Hadron structure from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Martha

    2017-09-01

    More than 99 per cent of the mass of the visible world resides in hadrons which are bound states of quarks and gluons, the fundamental constituents of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The proton is at the heart of the hadronic matter and is an ideal laboratory for studying the QCD dynamics. Lattice QCD (LQCD) is a powerful non-perturbative tool for the ab inition calculation of hadron observables that are well determined experimentally, or not easily accessible in experiment. Progress in the simulation of LQCD has been impressive, mainly due to improvements in the algorithms, development of new techniques and increase in computational power, that have enabled simulations to be carried out at parameters very close to their physical values. In this talk I will present recent developments in hadron structure focusing on achievements in the evaluation of nucleon quantities, such as the nucleon charges, form factors, and gluonic contributions, in view of simulations close or at the physical value of the pion mass. I will also discuss the enormous efforts towards a new direct approach to compute quark parton distributions functions on the lattice. Work partly supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, within the framework of the TMD Topical Collaboration.

  2. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  3. Theoretical predictions for exotic hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational and Theoretical Physics Group]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution the authors discuss current theoretical expectations for the properties of light meson exotica, which are meson resonances outside the q{anti q} quark model. Specifically they discuss expectations for gluonic hadrons (glueballs and hybrids) and multiquark systems (molecules). Experimental candidates for these states are summarized, and the relevance of a TCF to these studies is stressed.

  4. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  5. B physics at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  6. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  7. Charmed hadrons in nuclear medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, L.; Gamermann, D.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Molina, R.; Nieves, J.; Oset, E.; Ramos, A.

    We study the properties of charmed hadrons in dense matter within a coupled-channel approach which accounts for Pauli blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner We analyze the behaviour in this dense environment of dynamically-generated baryonic resonances as well as the

  8. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument. It is being constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest particle physics laboratories.

  9. The very large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  10. Hadronic decays of $W$ bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, III, Richard Paul [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for hadronic W decays in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton + neutrino + ≥ 4 jet events using a 109 pb -1 data sample of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  11. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  12. Superluminous Supernovae hydrodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, M.

    2017-07-01

    We use our radiation hydrodynamic code in order to simulate magnetar powered Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe). It is assumed that a central rapidly rotating magnetar deposits all its rotational energy into the ejecta where is added to the usual power. The magnetar luminosity and spin-down timescale are adopted as the free parameters of the model. For the case of ASASSN-15lh, which has been claimed as the most luminous supernova ever discovered, we have found physically plausible magnetar parameters can reproduce the overall shape of the bolometric light curve (LC) provided the progenitor mass is ≍ 8M⊙. The ejecta dynamics of this event shows signs of the magnetar energy input which deviates the expansion from the usually assumed homologous behaviour. Our numerical experiments lead us to conclude that the hydrodynamical modeling is necessary in order to derive the properties of powerful magnetars driving SLSNe.

  13. Anomalous correlation between hadron and electromagnetic particles in hadron and gamma-ray families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between hadrons and electromagnetic particles were studied in the hadron-gamma families observed in the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. It is found that there exist a number of hadrons which associate electromagnetic showers in extraordinarily close vicinity. The probability to have such a large number of hadrons associating electromagnetic showers, expected from background calculation, is found to be negligibly small and it means there exists anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in the characteristic spread of atmospheric electromagnetic cascade.

  14. Hydrodynamic blade guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Davis, Pete J.; Landram, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A saw having a self-pumped hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing for retaining the saw blade in a centered position in the saw kerf (width of cut made by the saw). The hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing utilizes pockets or grooves incorporated into the sides of the blade. The saw kerf in the workpiece provides the guide or bearing stator surface. Both sides of the blade entrain cutting fluid as the blade enters the kerf in the workpiece, and the trapped fluid provides pressure between the blade and the workpiece as an inverse function of the gap between the blade surface and the workpiece surface. If the blade wanders from the center of the kerf, then one gap will increase and one gap will decrease and the consequent pressure difference between the two sides of the blade will cause the blade to re-center itself in the kerf. Saws using the hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing have particular application in slicing slabs from boules of single crystal materials, for example, as well as for cutting other difficult to saw materials such as ceramics, glass, and brittle composite materials.

  15. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  16. Hydrodynamics of insect spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, On Shun; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    Microorganism motility plays important roles in many biological processes including reproduction. Many microorganisms propel themselves by propagating traveling waves along their flagella. Depending on the species, propagation of planar waves (e.g. Ceratium) and helical waves (e.g. Trichomonas) were observed in eukaryotic flagellar motion, and hydrodynamic models for both were proposed in the past. However, the motility of insect spermatozoa remains largely unexplored. An interesting morphological feature of such cells, first observed in Tenebrio molitor and Bacillus rossius, is the double helical deformation pattern along the flagella, which is characterized by the presence of two superimposed helical flagellar waves (one with a large amplitude and low frequency, and the other with a small amplitude and high frequency). Here we present the first hydrodynamic investigation of the locomotion of insect spermatozoa. The swimming kinematics, trajectories and hydrodynamic efficiency of the swimmer are computed based on the prescribed double helical deformation pattern. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, and explore the dependence of the swimming performance on the geometric and dynamical parameters.

  17. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-08-07

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms.

  18. Measurements on hadron production in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zenis, Tibor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studies of correlated hadron production are an important source of information about the early stages of hadron formation, not yet understood from first principles. Although experimental high energy physics employs several semiclassical models of hadronization which describe the formation of jets with remarkable accuracy, correlation phenomena are more elusive. In this presentation, we will discuss Bose-Einstein correlations measured with the ATLAS detector and provide a unique opportunity for detailed understanding of the space-time geometry of the hadronization region. If available, an analysis of the momentum difference between charged hadrons in highenergy protonproton collisions will be also presented, which is performed in order to study coherent particle production. This allows the investigation of observables sensitive to the predictions of the quantized string model.

  19. Single spin asymmetries in hadron-hadron collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, A.; Bomhof, C. J.; Mulders, P. J.; Pijlman, F.

    2005-08-01

    We study weighted azimuthal single spin asymmetries in hadron-hadron scattering using the diagrammatic approach at leading order and assuming factorization. The effects of the intrinsic transverse momenta of the partons are taken into account. We show that the way in which T-odd functions, such as the Sivers function, appear in these processes does not merely involve a sign flip when compared with semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, such as in the case of the Drell-Yan process. Expressions for the weighted scattering cross sections in terms of distribution and fragmentation functions folded with hard cross sections are obtained by introducing modified hard cross sections, referred to as gluonic-pole cross sections.

  20. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    Andris Skuja

    HE HE+ was connected to its LV system after delivery delays and then repairs of the power supplies. Commissioning of HE+ has been completed (pedestals, LED, gain changing for different HV values). Still to be done are laser measurement runs for both response and timing as well as pedestal measurements in histogram mode. In addition HV tests to evaluate a possible light leak were done. No light leak was discovered. HE- has been connected to HTRs, TTC sources, DCS and LVTMM services. No channels are missing and good agreement is found between the new pedestals values and old measurements. However, commissioning of HE- is not complete. Still missing is the measurement of HPD gain as a function of HV values. Laser runs and pedestal measurements in histogram mode are also not finished. All 6 permanent source drivers have been installed on HE (3 on each HE), connected to control lines and to high pressure air lines. All of them have passed a primary functionality test. HF The HFs are essentially complete as demo...

  1. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Mans and P. De Barbaro

    2012-01-01

      During first three months of LHC operation in 2012 (April-June 2012), HCAL performed well.  Out of a total of 6.15 fb–1 recorded by CMS, 230 pb–1 had to be declared as ‘bad’ during certification process due to HCAL-related problems. There were two major sources of ‘bad’ data coming from HCAL. Firstly, RBX data losses resulted in approximately 90 pb–1 declared as ‘bad’. The RBX data loss problems are caused by Single Event Upsets (SEU) in Clock and Control Modules (CCMs). As CCMs are not accessible with the CMS detector closed, this problem can be only fixed during LS1. The second major source of  ‘bad’ data was a failure of TTCrx chip (installed on HF detector), which resulted in a loss of almost 80 pb–1. The intervention required access to the cavern, and so the unit could only be replaced during the inter-fill period. In 2011 and early 2012, we have...

  2. Matching excluded-volume hadron-resonance gas models and perturbative QCD to lattice calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, M.; Kapusta, J.; Young, C.

    2014-08-01

    We match three hadronic equations of state at low energy densities to a perturbatively computed equation of state of quarks and gluons at high energy densities. One of them includes all known hadrons treated as point particles, which approximates attractive interactions among hadrons. The other two include, in addition, repulsive interactions in the form of excluded volumes occupied by the hadrons. A switching function is employed to make the crossover transition from one phase to another without introducing a thermodynamic phase transition. A χ2 fit to accurate lattice calculations with temperature 100coupling and the hard core radius of protons and neutrons, which turns out to be 0.62±0.04 fm. The most physically reasonable models include the excluded-volume effect. Not only do they include the effects of attractive and repulsive interactions among hadrons, but they also achieve better agreement with lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state. The equations of state constructed in this paper do not result in a phase transition, at least not for the temperatures and baryon chemical potentials investigated. It remains to be seen how well these equations of state will represent experimental data on high-energy heavy-ion collisions when implemented in hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. Charmonium and light hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    In this report I review some results on the charmonium and light hadron spectroscopy mainly from BESIII and Belle experiments. For the charmonium, the contents include the observation of $\\psi(4040)/\\psi(4160) \\to \\eta \\jpsi$, the measurements of the $\\eta_c/\\eta_c(2S)$ resonance parameters and their decays, the evidence of the $\\psi_2(1^3D_2)$ state in the $\\chi_{c1}\\gamma$ mass spectrum. For the light hadron spectroscopy, the contents include the $X(1835)$ research in $e^+e^- \\to \\jpsi + X(1835)$ and $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\eta' \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ processes, and the analysis of the $\\eta \\eta$, $\\omega \\phi$, $\\phi\\phi$ and $\\omega \\omega$ mass spectra in low mass region.

  4. Supersymmetry across the Hadronic Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Günter Dosch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semiclassical light-front bound-state equations for hadrons are presented and compared with experiment. The essential dynamical feature is the holographic approach; that is, the hadronic equations in four-dimensional Minkowski space are derived as holograms of classical equations in a 5-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. The form of the equations is constrained by the imposed superconformal algebra, which fixes the form of the light-front potential. If conformal symmetry is strongly broken by heavy quark masses, the combination of supersymmetry and the classical action in the 5-dimensional space still fixes the form of the potential. By heavy quark symmetry, the strength of the potential is related to the heavy quark mass. The contribution is based on several recent papers in collaboration with Stan Brodsky and Guy de Téramond.

  5. Hadron therapy physics and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an in-depth overview of the physics of hadron therapy, ranging from the history to the latest contributions to the subject. It covers the mechanisms of protons and carbon ions at the molecular level (DNA breaks and proteins 53BP1 and RPA), the physics and mathematics of accelerators (Cyclotron and Synchrotron), microdosimetry measurements (with new results so far achieved), and Monte Carlo simulations in hadron therapy using FLUKA (CERN) and MCHIT (FIAS) software. The text also includes information about proton therapy centers and carbon ion centers (PTCOG), as well as a comparison and discussion of both techniques in treatment planning and radiation monitoring. This brief is suitable for newcomers to medical physics as well as seasoned specialists in radiation oncology.

  6. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satz, H. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[Universitat Bielefeld (Germany); Wang, X.N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  7. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebach, M.; Gotta, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Anagnostopoulos, D.F. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ioannina (Greece); Dax, A.; Liu, Y.W.; Markushin, V.E.; Simons, L.M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Vienna (Austria); Indelicato, P. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Sorbonne Universites, Paris (France); CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Departement de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Manil, B. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Sorbonne Universites, Paris (France); Rusi el Hassani, A.J. [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Tanger (Morocco); Trassinelli, M. [Sorbonne Universites, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Paris (France); CNRS, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Paris (France)

    2014-12-01

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be ε {sub 1s} = 7.086 ± 0.007(stat) ± 0.006(sys) eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground-state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer with bent crystals. (orig.)

  8. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Green

    The organization of CMS HCAL contains four “geographic” efforts, HB, HO, HE and HF. In addition there are presently five “common” HCAL activities. These ef¬forts are concentrated on electronics, on controls (DCS), on physics objects (JetMet), on Installation and Commissioning (I&C), and on Test Beam (TB) and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) data taking. HCAL has begun planning to re-organize to be synchronized with the overall CMS management structure. HF The full production of the wedges is completed for some time. The 2004 test beam work has established the radioactive source calibration system for HF works at the 5 % level or better and a note is completed. The calibration of the complete HF is complete. HF is now in the UX cavern and will be hooked up and read out as soon as the services are available. HE The two HE calorimeters are installed and an initial calibration has been established. In the MTCC the HE was read out and muon data was observed. Event b...

  9. How to fake hydrodynamic signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romatschke, Paul [Department of Physics, 390 UCB, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Center for Theory of Quantum Matter, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Flow signatures in experimental data from relativistic ion collisions, are usually interpreted as a fingerprint of the presence of a hydrodynamic phase during the evolution of these systems. I review some theoretical ideas to ‘fake’ this hydrodynamic behavior in p+A and A+A collisions. I find that transverse flow and femtoscopic measurements can easily be forged through non-hydrodynamic evolution, while large elliptic flow requires some non-vanishing interactions in the hot phase.

  10. Foundations of radiation hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    1999-01-01

    Radiation hydrodynamics is a broad subject that cuts across many disciplines in physics and astronomy: fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, and radiative transfer, among others. The theory developed in this book by two specialists in the field can be applied to the study of such diverse astrophysical phenomena as stellar winds, supernova explosions, and the initial phases of cosmic expansion, as well as the physics of laser fusion and reentry vehicles. As such, it provides students with the basic tools for research on radiating flows.Largely self-contained,

  11. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  12. Hadron calorimetry in the L3 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Civinini, C.; D' Alessandro, R.; Gallo, E.; Marchionni, A.; Meschini, M.; Pieri, M.; Wang, Y.F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy) Florence Univ. (Italy)); Arefiev, A.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Gorodkov, Yu.; Kamyshkov, Y.U.; Klimentov, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Malinin, A.; Morgunov, V.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Savin, A.; Shevchenko, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shmakov, K.; Shoumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vorobiev, I. (Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental' noj Fiziki, Moscow (USSR)); An, Q.; Blomeke, P.; Cai, X.; Cui, X.; Gong, Z.F.; Ilyas, M.M.; Khan, R.; Kumar, V.; Kunin, A.; Lin, Y.B.; Qureshi, K.; Siedling, R.; Wadhawa, M.; Wu, R.J.; Wu, S.W.; Wu, Y.G.; Zichichi, A. (World Lab., Geneva (Switzerland). FBLJA Project); Azemoon, T.; Ball, R.C.; Capell, M.; Chen, M.L.; Goldfarb, S.; Jones, L.W.; Mills, G.B.; Roe, B.P. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA)); Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Chendvankar, S.R.; Ganguli, S.N.; Gurtu, A.; Malh

    1991-04-01

    The characteristics of the L3 hadron calorimeter as realized in the observation of hadronic jets and other events from e{sup +}e{sup -} c collisions at LEP are presented and discussed. The pattern-recognition algorithm utilizing the fine granularity of the calorimeter is described, and the observed overall resolution of 10.2% for hadron jets from Z decay is reported. The use of the calorimeter in providing information on muon energy losses is also noted. (orig.).

  13. Free Quarks and Antiquarks versus Hadronic Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Peng, Ru

    2007-01-01

    Meson-meson reactions A(q_1 \\bar{q}_1) + B(q_2 \\bar{q}_2) to q_1 + \\bar{q}_1 + q_2 + \\bar{q}_2 in high-temperature hadronic matter are found to produce an appreciable amount of quarks and antiquarks freely moving in hadronic matter and to establish a new mechanism for deconfinement of quarks and antiquarks in hadronic matter.

  14. Validation of Hadronic Models in GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koi, Tatsumi; Wright, Dennis H.; /SLAC; Folger, Gunter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; /CERN; Heikkinen, Aatos; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Truscott,; Lei, Fan; /QinetiQ; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

    2007-09-26

    Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

  15. Hadronization systematics and top mass reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corcella Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available I discuss a few issues related to the systematic error on the top mass mea- surement at hadron colliders, due to hadronization effects. Special care is taken about the impact of bottom-quark fragmentation in top decays, especially on the reconstruction relying on final states with leptons and J/Ψ in the dilepton channel. I also debate the relation between the measured mass and its theoretical definition, and report on work in progress, based on the Monte Carlo simulation of fictitious top-flavoured hadrons, which may shed light on this issue and on the hadronization systematics.

  16. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  17. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  18. Hadronic molecules with hidden charm and bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Feng-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the new structures observed since 2003 in experiments in the heavy quarkonium mass region, such as the X(3872 and Zc (3900, are rather close to certain thresholds, and thus can be good candidates of hadronic molecules, which are loose bound systems of hadrons. We will discuss the consequences of heavy quark symmetry for hadronic molecules with heavy quarks. We will also emphasize that the hadronic molecular component of a given structure can be directly probed in long-distance processes, while the short-distance processes are not sensitive to it.

  19. Hadron-hadron total cross sections and soft high-energy scattering on the lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, M.; Meggiolaro, E.

    2011-01-01

    The nonperturbative approach to soft high-energy hadron-hadron scattering, based on the analytic continuation of Euclidean Wilson-loop correlation functions, makes possible the investigation of the problem of the asymptotic energy dependence of hadron-hadron total cross sections by means of lattice calculations. In this contribution we compare the lattice numerical results to analytic results obtained with various nonperturbative techniques. We also discuss the possibility to obtain indicatio...

  20. Hadronic Expansion Dynamics in Central Pb+Pb Collisions at 158 GeV per Nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Appelshäuser, H; Bailey, S J; Barnby, L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Barton, R A; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blyth, C O; Bock, R; Bormann, C; Brady, F P; Brockmann, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Caines, H L; Cebra, D; Cooper, G E; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dunn, J; Eckardt, V; Eckhardt, F; Ferguson, M I; Ferenc, D; Fischer, H G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Fuchs, M; Gabler, F; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, J; Günther, J; Harris, J W; Hegyi, S; Henkel, T; Hill, L A; Huang, I; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Irmscher, D; Jacobs, P; Jones, P G; Kadija, K; Kolesnikov, V I; Kowalski, M; Lasiuk, B; Lévai, Peter; Malakhov, A I; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Melkumov, G L; Mock, A; Molnár, J; Nelson, J M; Oldenburg, M; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Petridis, A; Piper, A; Porter, R J; Poskanzer, A M; Poziombka, S; Prindle, D J; Pühlhofer, F; Rauch, W; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R E; Retyk, W; Ritter, H G; Röhrich, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, H; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Semenov, A Yu; Schäfer, E; Schmischke, D; Schmitz, N; Schönfelder, S; Seyboth, P; Seyerlein, J; Siklér, F; Skrzypczak, E; Squier, G T A; Stock, Reinhard; Ströbele, H; Struck, C; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Toy, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Ullrich, T S; Vassiliou, Maria; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wang, F; Weerasundara, D D; Wenig, S; Whitten, C; Wienold, T; Wood, L; Yates, T A; Xu, N; Zimányi, J; Zhu, X Z; Zybert, R

    1998-01-01

    Two-particle correlation functions of negative hadrons over wide phase space, and transverse mass spectra of negative hadrons and deuterons near mid-rapidity have been measured in central Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. A novel Coulomb correction procedure for the negative two-particle correlations is employed making use of the measured oppositely charged particle correlation. Within an expanding source scenario these results are used to extract the dynamic characteristics of the hadronic source, resolving the ambiguities between the temperature and transverse expansion velocity of the source, that are unavoidable when single and two particle spectra are analysed separately. The source shape, the total duration of the source expansion, the duration of particle emission, the freeze-out temperature and the longitudinal and transverse expansion velocities are deduced.

  1. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and moments which the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull.The first part of the text is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections (with and without cavitation......) and about wings. It then treats propellers in uniform flow, first via advanced actuator disc modelling, and then using lifting-line theory. Pragmatic guidance is given for design and evaluation of performance, including the use of computer modelling.The second part covers the development of unsteady forces...... arising from operation in non-uniform hull wakes. First, by a number of simplifications, various aspects of the problem are dealt with separately until the full problem of a non-cavitating, wide-bladed propeller in a wake is treated by a new and completely developed theory. Next, the complicated problem...

  2. Foundations of radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalas, D.; Mihalas, B. W.

    This book is the result of an attempt, over the past few years, to gather the basic tools required to do research on radiating flows in astrophysics. The microphysics of gases is discussed, taking into account the equation of state of a perfect gas, the first and second law of thermodynamics, the thermal properties of a perfect gas, the distribution function and Boltzmann's equation, the collision integral, the Maxwellian velocity distribution, Boltzmann's H-theorem, the time of relaxation, and aspects of classical statistical mechanics. Other subjects explored are related to the dynamics of ideal fluids, the dynamics of viscous and heat-conducting fluids, relativistic fluid flow, waves, shocks, winds, radiation and radiative transfer, the equations of radiation hydrodynamics, and radiating flows. Attention is given to small-amplitude disturbances, nonlinear flows, the interaction of radiation and matter, the solution of the transfer equation, acoustic waves, acoustic-gravity waves, basic concepts of special relativity, and equations of motion and energy.

  3. Hydrodynamics of Peristaltic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    A curious class of animals called salps live in marine environments and self-propel by ejecting vortex rings much like jellyfish and squid. However, unlike other jetting creatures that siphon and eject water from one side of their body, salps produce vortex rings by pumping water through siphons on opposite ends of their hollow cylindrical bodies. In the simplest cases, it seems like some species of salp can successfully move by contracting just two siphons connected by an elastic body. When thought of as a chain of timed contractions, salp propulsion is reminiscent of peristaltic pumping applied to marine locomotion. Inspired by salps, we investigate the hydrodynamics of peristaltic propulsion, focusing on the scaling relationships that determine flow rate, thrust production, and energy usage in a model system. We discuss possible actuation methods for a model peristaltic vehicle, considering both the material and geometrical requirements for such a system.

  4. Hydrodynamics of foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakashev, Stoyan I.

    2017-08-01

    This brief review article is devoted to all the aspects related to hydrodynamics of foams. For this reason, we focused at first on the methods for studying the basic structural units of the foams—the foam films (FF) and the Plateau borders (PB), thus reviewing the literature about their drainage. After this, we scrutinized in detail the Derjaguin's works on the electrostatic disjoining pressure along with its Langmuir's interpretation, the microscopic and macroscopic approaches in the theory of the van der Waals disjoining pressure, the DLVO theory, the steric disjoining pressure of de Gennes, and the more recent works on non-DLVO forces. The basic methods for studying of foam drainage are presented as well. Engineering and other applications of foam are reviewed as well. All these aspects are presented from retrospective and perspective viewpoints.

  5. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  6. Are Hadrons Shell-Structured?

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzi, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    A stability analysis of the mass spectrum indicates that hadrons, like atoms and nuclei, are shell-structured. The mesonic shells mass series, combined with the results of a mass quantization analysis, reveals striking similarities with the nuclear shells. In addition, the mesonic mass patterns suggest solid-phase partonic bound states on an fcc lattice, compatible with a model by A. O. Barut with stable leptons as constituents, bound by magnetism. Baryonic shells grow with a lower density, and only start at shell 3 with the nucleon.

  7. Hadron Interactions from lattice QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Sinya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review our strategy to study hadron interactions from lattice QCD using newly proposed potential method. We first explain our strategy in the case of nuclear potentials and its application to nuclear physics. We then discuss the origin of the repulsive core, by adding strange quarks to the system. We also explore a possibility for H-dibaryon to exist in flavor SU(3 limit of lattice QCD. We conclude the paper with an application of our strategy to investigate the maximum mass of neutron stars.

  8. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  9. A review of oceanographic and meteorological controls on the North Sea circulation and hydrodynamics with a view to the fate of North Sea methane from well site 22/4b and other seabed sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauw, J.; de Haas, H.; Rehder, G.

    2015-01-01

    The North Sea hydrodynamics are key to the redistribution of methane released at the 22/4b Site, locatedat (57?550N, 1?380E) in the UK Central North Sea, 200 km east of the Scottish mainland. This reviewsummarizes the current state of knowledge on the North Sea circulation, stratification, and

  10. Direct photon elliptic flow at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Teaney, Derek; Zahed, Ismail

    2017-07-01

    We use an event-by-event hydrodynamical description of the heavy-ion collision process with Glauber initial conditions to calculate the thermal emission of photons. The photon rates in the hadronic phase follow from a spectral function approach and a density expansion, while in the partonic phase they follow from the Arnold-Moore-Yaffe (AMY) perturbative rates. The calculated photon elliptic flows are lower than those reported recently by both the ALICE and PHENIX collaborations.

  11. Novel Perspectives for Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-03-09

    I discuss several novel and unexpected aspects of quantum chromodynamics. These include: (a) the nonperturbative origin of intrinsic strange, charm and bottom quarks in the nucleon at large x; the breakdown of pQCD factorization theorems due to the lensing effects of initial- and final-state interactions; (b) important corrections to pQCD scaling for inclusive reactions due to processes in which hadrons are created at high transverse momentum directly in the hard processes and their relation to the baryon anomaly in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions; and (c) the nonuniversality of quark distributions in nuclei. I also discuss some novel theoretical perspectives in QCD: (a) light-front holography - a relativistic color-confining first approximation to QCD based on the AdS/CFT correspondence principle; (b) the principle of maximum conformality - a method which determines the renormalization scale at finite order in perturbation theory yielding scheme independent results; (c) the replacement of quark and gluon vacuum condensates by 'in-hadron condensates' and how this helps to resolve the conflict between QCD vacuum and the cosmological constant.

  12. State of hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grannis, P.D. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  13. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio [Lab. Naz. Frascati, Frascati, Italy; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  14. Successive combination jet algorithm for hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, S D; Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davision E.

    1993-01-01

    Jet finding algorithms, as they are used in $e^+ e^-$ and hadron collisions, are reviewed and compared. It is suggested that a successive combination style algorithm, similar to that used in $e^+ e^-$ physics, might be useful also in hadron collisions, where cone style algorithms have been used previously.

  15. Particle Ratios from Strongly Interacting Hadronic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the particle ratios K+/π+, K-/π-, and Λ/π- for a strongly interacting hadronic matter using nonlinear Walecka model (NLWM in relativistic mean field (RMF approximation. It is found that interactions among hadrons modify K+/π+ and Λ/π- particle ratios, while K-/π- is found to be insensitive to these interactions.

  16. Light-Front Dynamics in Hadron Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, C.R.; Bakker, B.L.G.; Choi, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Light-front dynamics(LFD) plays an important role in the analyses of relativistic few-body systems. As evidenced from the recent studies of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in hadron physics, a natural framework for a detailed study of hadron structures is LFD due to its direct application in

  17. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  18. Exclusive hadronic processes and color transparency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hadronic processes; color transparency. PACS Nos 24.85.+p; 25.30.-c. 1. Introduction. It is known that at asymptotically large momentum transfer certain exclusive hadronic reac- tions are calculable within the framework of perturbative QCD (pQCD) due to asymptotic freedom. However the applicability of pQCD to exclusive ...

  19. Hadron05 summary: heavy quark hadrons and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.; University of Tennessee, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2005-07-01

    This HADRON05 summary covers the topics of (1) mesons containing heavy quarks, and (2) theory. The new material discussed here is taken mainly from plenary presentations. We specifically emphasize new or recent results in spectroscopy that are likely to appear in future editions of the PDG. An exception is made for the pentaquark, which was withdrawn at this meeting. We undoubtedly have something important to (re)learn about multiquarks from the pentaquark saga, and this merits a phrase in Portuguese. The three general areas we consider are: I. QQ-bar spectroscopy, II. Qq-bar spectroscopy, and III. lessons from the pentaquark. Finally, in Section IIIb. we conclude with 'Our moment of Zen'. (author)

  20. Large momentum transfer scattering and hadronic bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    1975-01-01

    The interchange theory provides a simple picture of large momentum transfer scattering which correlates many features of hadrons and their interactions. It is simple to compute and has considerable predictive power. It unites the electromagnetic structure of hadrons as expressed through their form factors and inelastic structure functions with elastic and inelastic hadron-hadron scattering. The theory joins smoothly onto Regge behavior which controls forward scattering and in fact predicts such behaviour. The unified description of large and small momentum transfer scattering provided by the interchange model should allow considerable insight into the interaction of hadrons and their possible composite nature. It already yields a remarkably simple quantitative description which seems valid all the way from large angle elastic scattering at 5 GeV/c to inclusive scattering at the CERN-ISR. (13 refs).

  1. Hadron muoproduction at the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rajotte, J F

    The COMPASS Collaboration has two main fields of interest: to improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure and to study hadrons through spectroscopy. These goals require a multipurpose universal spectrometer such as the COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy, COMPASS. In its first years of data taking (2002-2007), the nucleon spin structure was studied with a polarized muon beam scattering off a polarized target. These studies resumed in 2010 and will continue until at least 2011. The years 2008 and 2009 were dedicated to hadron spectroscopy using hadron beams. In the case of the nucleon structure studies, it is crucial to detect with high precision the incoming beam muon (160 GeV), the scattered muon and the produced hadrons. The large amount of high quality data accumulated provides access to the unpolarized and polarized parton distributions of the nucleon and the hadronization process. Subtle differences (asymmetries) between polarized cross sections have been predicted for...

  2. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter at LHC in Run I and planned upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyanov, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider, a key detector for the measurements of hadrons, jets tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. After an initial setting of the absolute energy scale in test beams with particles of well-defined momentum, the calibrated scale was transferred to the rest of the detector via the response to radioactive sources. The calibrated scale was validated in situ with muons and single hadrons and the timing performance with muons and jets as detailed in this contribution. The data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking and the evolution of the detector status are exposed. The energy and the time reconstruction performance...

  3. Study of the deconfinement phase transition in a finite volume with massive particles: Hydrodynamics of the system near the transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghenam, L.; Djoudi, A. Ait El [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure - Kouba, B.P. 92, 16050, Vieux Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    We study the finite size and finite mass effects for the thermal deconfinement phase transition in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), using a simple model of coexistence of hadronic (H) gas and quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. We consider the equations of state of the two phases with the QGP containing two massless u and d quarks and massive s quarks, and a hadronic gas of massive pions, and we probe the system near the transition. For this, we examine the behavior of the most important hydrodynamical quantities describing the system, at a vanishing chemical potential ({mu}= 0), with temperature and energy density.

  4. Engineering Hydrodynamic AUV Hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.

    2016-12-01

    AUV stands for autonomous underwater vehicle. AUVs are used in oceanography and are similar to gliders. MBARIs AUVs as well as other AUVs map the ocean floor which is very important. They also measure physical characteristics of the water, such as temperature and salinity. My science fair project for 4th grade was a STEM activity in which I built and tested 3 different AUV bodies. I wanted to find out which design was the most hydrodynamic. I tested three different lengths of AUV hulls to see which AUV would glide the farthest. The first was 6 inches. The second was 12 inches and the third was 18 inches. I used clay for the nosecone and cut a ruler into two and made it the fin. Each AUV used the same nosecone and fin. I tested all three designs in a pool. I used biomimicry to create my hypothesis. When I was researching I found that long slim animals swim fastest. So, my hypothesis is the longer AUV will glide farthest. In the end I was right. The longer AUV did glide the farthest.

  5. Lotic Water Hydrodynamic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tasseff, Byron Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Water-related natural disasters, for example, floods and droughts, are among the most frequent and costly natural hazards, both socially and economically. Many of these floods are a result of excess rainfall collecting in streams and rivers, and subsequently overtopping banks and flowing overland into urban environments. Floods can cause physical damage to critical infrastructure and present health risks through the spread of waterborne diseases. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed Lotic, a state-of-the-art surface water hydrodynamic model, to simulate propagation of flood waves originating from a variety of events. Lotic is a two-dimensional (2D) flood model that has been used primarily for simulations in which overland water flows are characterized by movement in two dimensions, such as flood waves expected from rainfall-runoff events, storm surge, and tsunamis. In 2013, LANL developers enhanced Lotic through several development efforts. These developments included enhancements to the 2D simulation engine, including numerical formulation, computational efficiency developments, and visualization. Stakeholders can use simulation results to estimate infrastructure damage and cascading consequences within other sets of infrastructure, as well as to inform the development of flood mitigation strategies.

  6. Hydrodynamics of ocean pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, S.; Toyoda, S.; Venkataramana, K.; Aiko, Y. (Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1993-09-30

    This paper describes the current forces acting on cylindrical models in a steady flow, corresponding to the cases of rigid and large diameter pipelines in real seas. The models were placed in a circulating water channel normal to the direction of flow. The strains in the models were recorded using strain gauges, from which fluid forces in the horizontal and vertical directions were obtained. The drag coefficient, lift coefficient, and Straul number were calculated, and were illustrated against the Reynolds number. Consequently, the drag force was found to increase with flow velocity. In addition, it was shown that the variation of lift force was more complex and was affected by the eddies and other forms of turbulence around the models. For the model which consists of two pipes held together, it was found that the fluid forces were greater on the upstream side. It was provided that the fluid forces were also affected by the orientation of the pipelines. Furthermore, it was clarified that the values of hydrodynamic coefficients and Straul number were similar to the results for vertical cylinders in uniform flows. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  7. Hydrodynamics of electrons in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew; Chung Fong, Kin

    2018-02-01

    Generic interacting many-body quantum systems are believed to behave as classical fluids on long time and length scales. Due to rapid progress in growing exceptionally pure crystals, we are now able to experimentally observe this collective motion of electrons in solid-state systems, including graphene. We present a review of recent progress in understanding the hydrodynamic limit of electronic motion in graphene, written for physicists from diverse communities. We begin by discussing the ‘phase diagram’ of graphene, and the inevitable presence of impurities and phonons in experimental systems. We derive hydrodynamics, both from a phenomenological perspective and using kinetic theory. We then describe how hydrodynamic electron flow is visible in electronic transport measurements. Although we focus on graphene in this review, the broader framework naturally generalizes to other materials. We assume only basic knowledge of condensed matter physics, and no prior knowledge of hydrodynamics.

  8. Anomalous hydrodynamics in two dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    s12043-015-1167-5; ePublication: 14 January 2016. Abstract. A new approach is presented to discuss two-dimensional hydrodynamics with gauge and gravitational anomalies. Exact constitutive relations for the stress tensor and charge current are.

  9. Hydrodynamic modeling and morphological analysis of lake Bolonha: a water source in Belém, Pará State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i1.13670

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiana Silva de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper’s main contribution includes hydrodynamic modeling and morphological analysis of lake Bolonha which, along with lake Água Preta, makes up the Utinga watershed in Belém, Pará State, Brazil. Bathymetry of lake Bolonha was undertaken by digitalizing the data provided by COSANPA (the local Sanitation and Water Supply Company dating back to 1983, and from a 2007 field study. Both bathymetries produced two terrain elevation models which were used for morphological analysis and hydrodynamic simulations. The morphological analysis showed that between 1983 and 2007, no significant relief changes occurred on the bottom of lake Bolonha, except for the formation of the outflow channels between the interconnecting channel and Bolonha Water Treatment Plant (WTP. The hydrodynamic model was able to simulate depths and velocities. The velocities, ranging between 1.8 and 9.0 cm s-1, showed a subtle current between the outlet of the canal connecting the lakes Bolonha and Água Preta and the water intakes of the Bolonha and São Braz WTPs. This fact demonstrated that lake Bolonha reservoir is a passage for waters from lake Água Preta.  

  10. Hadron-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T

    2000-01-01

    A new type of nuclear spectroscopy to study hadron-nucleus bound states is described. The first successful experiment was to search for deeply bound pi sup - states in heavy nuclei using the sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb(d, sup 3 He) reaction at GSI, in which a narrow peak arising from the 2p pi sup - orbital coupled with the neutron-hole states was observed at 135 MeV excitation energy. An improved experiment has just been carried out to separately identify the 1s and 2p pi sup - states. These experiments provide important information on the local potential strength, from which the effective mass of pi sup - is deduced to be 20 MeV. This method will be extended to search for eta and omega bound states as well as for K sup - bound states. The advantage of the bound-state spectroscopy versus invariant mass spectroscopy is emphasized.

  11. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naive inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau trig...

  12. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naïve inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau tri...

  13. Nuclear Physics and Hadron Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunn, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 Caen (France); CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Colin, J.; Courtois, C.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Labalme, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 Caen (France)

    2011-12-13

    Hadron therapy uses light charged particles beams (mainly proton and {sup 12}C ions) to irradiate tumors. These beams present a ballistic advantage with a maximum energy deposition at the end of the path. A large dose can be delivered inside a deep tumor while the surrounding healthy tissues are preserved. There is an obvious advantage in using these beams but the beam control has to be achieved and all the physical processes leading to the energy deposition have to be fully under control. This treatment protocol requires accurate control devices and a good knowledge of the physical processes occurring all along the path of the projectile in human tissues. In this report, we will present one example of a beam monitor for the proton therapy. We will also present the experimental program which has been initiated to obtain fundamental data on the nuclear fragmentation process.

  14. Nuclear Physics and Hadron Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunn, B.; Colin, J.; Courtois, C.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Labalme, M.

    2011-12-01

    Hadron therapy uses light charged particles beams (mainly proton and 12C ions) to irradiate tumors. These beams present a ballistic advantage with a maximum energy deposition at the end of the path. A large dose can be delivered inside a deep tumor while the surrounding healthy tissues are preserved. There is an obvious advantage in using these beams but the beam control has to be achieved and all the physical processes leading to the energy deposition have to be fully under control. This treatment protocol requires accurate control devices and a good knowledge of the physical processes occurring all along the path of the projectile in human tissues. In this report, we will present one example of a beam monitor for the proton therapy. We will also present the experimental program which has been initiated to obtain fundamental data on the nuclear fragmentation process.

  15. Local hadron calibration with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in ATLAS as one of the two major calibration schemes for the reconstruction of jets and missing transverse energy. The method starts from noise suppressed clusters and corrects them for non-compensation effects and for losses due to noise threshold and dead material. Jets are reconstructed on the calibrated clusters and are then corrected for out of cone effects. The performance of the corrections applied to the calorimeter clusters is tested with detailed GEANT4 information. Results obtained with this procedure are discussed both for single pion simulations and for di-jet simulations. The calibration schema is validated on data, by comparing the calibrated cluster energy with data and Mote Carlo simulations. Preliminary results obtained with sqrt(s)=900 GeV are presented. The agreement between data and Monte Carlo is inside 5% for the final cluster scale.

  16. The Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Engelen, Joseph J

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will enable proton-proton collisions at an energy of more than fourteen thousand times the proton mass. This allows the discovery of new elementary particles with very large masses, in particular of the Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is crucial for understanding the mechanism that Nature chose to give mass to particles. The Higgs boson has turned out to be very hard to find but the LHC should allow a decisive step into new territory, unveiling one or even more Higgs bosons. The new energy domain of the LHC also inspires speculations about discoveries relevant for understanding dark matter and about the discovery of new space dimensions, so far hidden to us. In the talk an overview of the physics at LHC and a report on the status of the project, accelerator and experiments, will be presented.

  17. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  18. Leading Hadron Production at HERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buniatyan Armen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Data from the recent measurements of very forward baryon and photon production with the H1 and ZEUS detectors at electron-proton collider HERA are presented and compared to the theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo models. Results are presented of the production of leading protons, neutrons and photons in deep inelastic scattering (ep → e' pX, ep → e'nX, ep → e'γX as well as the leading neutron production in the photoproduction of dijets (ep → ejjXn. The forward baryon and photon results from the H1 and ZEUS Experiments are compared also with the models of the hadronic interactions of high energy Cosmic Rays. The sensitivity of the HERA data to the differences between the models is demonstrated.

  19. Odd tracks at hadron colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Patrick; Papucci, Michele; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-20

    New physics that exhibits irregular tracks such as kinks, intermittent hits, or decay in flight may easily be missed at hadron colliders. We demonstrate this by studying viable models of light, O(10  GeV), colored particles that decay predominantly inside the tracker. Such particles can be produced at staggering rates, and yet, may not be identified or triggered on at the LHC, unless specifically searched for. In addition, the models we study provide an explanation for the original measurement of the anomalous charged track distribution by CDF. The presence of irregular tracks in these models reconcile that measurement with the subsequent reanalysis and the null results of ATLAS and CMS. Our study clearly illustrates the need for a comprehensive study of irregular tracks at the LHC.

  20. An introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    1992-01-01

    This book is an introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics for both astronomy and physics students. It provides a comprehensive and unified view of the general problems associated with fluids in a cosmic context, with a discussion of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. It is the only book on hydrodynamics that addresses the astrophysical context. Researchers and students will find this work to be an exceptional reference. Contents include chapters on irrotational and rotational flows, turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and instabilities.

  1. Hemodynamics of a hydrodynamic injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Kanefuji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamics during a hydrodynamic injection were evaluated using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and fluoroscopic imaging. The impacts of hydrodynamic (5 seconds and slow (60 seconds injections into the tail veins of mice were compared using 9% body weight of a phase-contrast medium. Hydrodynamically injected solution traveled to the heart and drew back to the hepatic veins (HV, which led to liver expansion and a trace amount of spillover into the portal vein (PV. The liver volumes peaked at 165.6 ± 13.3% and 165.5 ± 11.9% of the original liver volumes in the hydrodynamic and slow injections, respectively. Judging by the intensity of the CBCT images at the PV, HV, right atrium, liver parenchyma (LP, and the inferior vena cava (IVC distal to the HV conjunction, the slow injection resulted in the higher intensity at PV than at LP. In contrast, a significantly higher intensity was observed in LP after hydrodynamic injection in comparison with that of PV, suggesting that the liver took up the iodine from the blood flow. These results suggest that the enlargement speed of the liver, rather than the expanded volume, primarily determines the efficiency of hydrodynamic delivery to the liver.

  2. A Hydro-Dynamical Model for Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu BERBENTE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available hydro-dynamical model for gravity by using an analogy with the attraction of spherical sources in incompressible fluids is proposed. Information regarding a photon-like particle called graviton is taken using an author’s previous paper [6]. The substance and radiation interaction due to emission of gravitons takes place via an energy field made of the emitted gravitons and filling the entire universe. The energy distribution is considered uniform at the universe scale. A consequence of the proposed model is the increasing of the universal “constant” of gravity, as a function of the age of universe.

  3. Advancement in Mixing Hydrodynamics using Motionless Mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Hussain

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A large number of scientists have been conducting research to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of mixing of fluids. Out of these techniques, static mixing is adopted in this study to improve the mixing of fluids, which has a lead of negligible energy consumption in comparison with dynamic mixers. Air Water system have been cast-off for mixing in which reduction in pressure, energy consumed, bubble diameter and mass transfer rate was mainly taken into account to design the static mixer element. Five different types of elements (Baffle, Plate, Blade, Needle and Wheel were tested to observe and compare above mentioned hydrodynamic properties. Two point source characteristics i.e. reduction in pressure and bubble size, were carried out using Hg manometer and still photography respectively. Other nonpoint source characteristics (Energy depletion, rate of mixing were found to be directly influenced by these point source characteristics. From the experimentations baffle element catches more importance, in terms of less energy depletion, more mixing rate, when compared with the other elements tested. This element becomes also comparable with other elements renowned in literature.

  4. CALIBRATED HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezar Gülbaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land development and increase in urbanization in a watershed affect water quantityand water quality. On one hand, urbanization provokes the adjustment of geomorphicstructure of the streams, ultimately raises peak flow rate which causes flood; on theother hand, it diminishes water quality which results in an increase in Total SuspendedSolid (TSS. Consequently, sediment accumulation in downstream of urban areas isobserved which is not preferred for longer life of dams. In order to overcome thesediment accumulation problem in dams, the amount of TSS in streams and inwatersheds should be taken under control. Low Impact Development (LID is a BestManagement Practice (BMP which may be used for this purpose. It is a land planningand engineering design method which is applied in managing storm water runoff inorder to reduce flooding as well as simultaneously improve water quality. LID includestechniques to predict suspended solid loads in surface runoff generated over imperviousurban surfaces. In this study, the impact of LID-BMPs on surface runoff and TSS isinvestigated by employing a calibrated hydrodynamic model for Sazlidere Watershedwhich is located in Istanbul, Turkey. For this purpose, a calibrated hydrodynamicmodel was developed by using Environmental Protection Agency Storm WaterManagement Model (EPA SWMM. For model calibration and validation, we set up arain gauge and a flow meter into the field and obtain rainfall and flow rate data. Andthen, we select several LID types such as retention basins, vegetative swales andpermeable pavement and we obtain their influence on peak flow rate and pollutantbuildup and washoff for TSS. Consequently, we observe the possible effects ofLID on surface runoff and TSS in Sazlidere Watershed.

  5. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana [James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  6. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tran, David [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy

    2012-05-15

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons.We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  7. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Jozef J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study pi pi elastic scattering, including the rho resonance, as well as coupled-channel pi K, eta K scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  8. Hadron mass spectrum from lattice QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Abhijit; Müller, Berndt

    2010-12-17

    Finite temperature lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are sensitive to the hadronic mass spectrum for temperatures below the "critical" temperature T(c) ≈ 160 MeV. We show that a recent precision determination of the QCD trace anomaly shows evidence for the existence of a large number of hadron states beyond those known from experiment. The lattice results are well represented by an exponentially growing mass spectrum up to a temperature T=155 MeV. Using simple parametrizations of the hadron mass spectrum we show how one may estimate the total spectral weight in these yet undermined states.

  9. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  10. Hadronic production of high p$_{T}$ leptons and hadrons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment measures the production of direct real photons with large transverse momentum in pion-nucleon collisions at the SPS (H8 beam) using the NA3 spectrometer with an upgraded e-$\\gamma$ calorimeter. The experiment proceeds in steps of increasing complexity: \\item a) measurement of the direct $\\gamma$ cross-section in $\\pi^{\\pm}$C $\\rightarrow \\gamma +$ X and search for the annihilation process $q\\bar{q} \\rightarrow \\gamma$g by measuring the charge asymmetry at 200 GeV/c; \\item b) determination of the gluon structure function of the pion and the nucleon; \\item c) use of the $\\pi^{-}-\\pi^{+}$ difference on carbon, if found experimentally, to extract the gluon fragmentation from the $\\gamma$ hadron correlations. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ For comparison, the quark fragmentation functions can, in principle, be extracted from processes where the Compton scattering qg $\\rightarrow$ q$\\gamma$ dominates and compared with data from D.I.S. as a test of the method. \\\\ \\\\ The existing standard NA3 spectrometer is we...

  11. Constraining hadronic models of the Fermi bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Soebur

    2018-01-01

    The origin of sub-TeV gamma rays detected by Fermi-LAT from the Fermi bubbles at the Galactic center is unknown. In a hadronic model, acceleration of protons and/or nuclei and their subsequent interactions with gas in the bubble volume can produce observed gamma ray. Such interactions naturally produce high-energy neutrinos, and detection of those can discriminate between a hadronic and a leptonic origin of gamma rays. Additional constraints on the Fermi bubbles gamma-ray flux in the PeV range from recent HAWC observations restrict hadronic model parameters, which in turn disfavor Fermi bubbles as the origin of a large fraction of neutrino events detected by IceCube along the bubble directions. We revisit our hadronic model and discuss future constraints on parameters from observations in very high-energy gamma rays by CTA and in neutrinos.

  12. ENLIGHT: Hadron-therapy in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN BULLETIN; Nathalie Hospital; Manuela Cirilli

    2011-01-01

    ENLIGHT was established in 2002 to coordinate the European efforts in hadron therapy. The ENLIGHT network is formed by the European hadrontherapy Community, with more than 300 participants from twenty European countries.

  13. Multidimensional study of hadronization in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Univ. Giessen, Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); University of Michigan, Randall Lab. of Physics, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Akopov, N.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Grigoryan, L.; Karyan, G.; Marukyan, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Petrosyan, A.; Taroian, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z.; Avetisyan, E.; Borissov, A.; Deconinck, W.; Hartig, M.; Holler, Y.; Rostomyan, A.; Ye, Z.; Zihlmann, B. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C.; Fabbri, R.; Golembiovskaya, M.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hristova, I.; Lu, X.G.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.D.; Riedl, C.; Stewart, J. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W.; Marianski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Zupranski, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Belostotski, S.; Kisselev, A.; Manaenkov, S.I.; Naryshkin, Y.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Gatchina, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Bianchi, N.; Capitani, G.P.; De Sanctis, E.; Di Nezza, P.; Fantoni, A.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hasch, D.; Muccifora, V.; Reolon, A.R. [Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lab. Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bowles, J.; Burns, J.; Hoek, M.; Kaiser, R.; Lehmann, I.; Mahon, D.; Murray, M.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B. [Univ. of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Brodski, I.; Dueren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Perez-Benito, R.; Yu, W. [Univ. Giessen, Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); Bryzgalov, V.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Ivanilov, A.; Korotkov, V.; Salomatin, Y. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Capiluppi, M.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Lenisa, P.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M. [Univ. di Ferrara, Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy)] [and others

    2011-09-15

    Hadron multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering were measured on neon, krypton, and xenon targets relative to deuterium at an electron(positron)-beam energy of 27.6GeV at HERMES. These ratios were determined as a function of the virtual-photon energy {nu}, its virtuality Q{sup 2}, the fractional hadron energy z and the transverse hadron momentum with respect to the virtual-photon direction p{sub t}. Dependences were analysed separately for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons as well as protons and antiprotons in a two-dimensional representation. Compared to the one-dimensional dependences, some new features were observed. In particular, when z > 0.4 positive kaons do not show the strong monotonic rise of the multiplicity ratio with {nu} as exhibited by pions and negative kaons. Protons were found to behave very differently from the other hadrons. (orig.)

  14. Multidimensional study of hadronization in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2011-07-15

    Hadron multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering were measured on neon, krypton and xenon targets relative to deuterium at an electron(positron)-beam energy of 27.6 GeV at HERMES. These ratios were determined as a function of the virtual-photon energy {nu}, its virtuality Q{sup 2}, the fractional hadron energy z and the transverse hadron momentum with respect to the virtual-photon direction p{sub t}. Dependences were analysed separately for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons as well as protons and antiprotons in a two-dimensional representation. Compared to the one-dimensional dependences, some new features were observed. In particular, when z>0:4 positive kaons do not show the strong monotonic rise of the multiplicity ratio with {nu} as exhibited by pions and K{sup -}. Protons were found to behave very differently from the other hadrons. (orig.)

  15. Hadron physics at Fermilab. [Review lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferbel, T.

    1976-08-30

    Recent experimental results from studies of hadron interactions at Fermilab are surveyed. Elastic, total and charge-exchange cross section measurements, diffractive phenomena, and inclusive production, using nuclear as well as hydrogen targets, are discussed in these lectures.

  16. The CMS central hadron calorimeter: Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.

    1998-06-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a brass absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe details of the mechanical and optical structure. We also discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  17. Hadron physics programs at J-PARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruki M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The J-PARC Hadron Facility is designed as a multipurpose experimental facility for a wide range of particle and nuclear physics programs, aiming to provide the world highest intensity secondary beams. Currently three secondary beam lines; K1.8, K1.8BR and KL together with the test beam line named K1.1BR come into operation. Various experimental programs are proposed at each beam line and some of them have been performed so far. As the first experiment at the J-PARC Hadron Facility, the Θ+ pentaquark was searched for via the pion-induced hadronic reaction in the autumn of 2010. Also experimental programs to search for new hadronic states such as K−pp have started to perform a physics run. The current status and near future programs are introduced.

  18. Hadron Spectroscopy with COMPASS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Schönning, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the COMPASS hadron programme is to study the light-quark hadron spectrum, and in particular, to search for evidence of hybrids and glueballs. COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS and features a two-stage spectrometer with high momentum resolution, large acceptance, particle identification and calorimetry. A short pilot run in 2004 resulted in the observation of a spin-exotic state with $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ consistent with the debated $\\pi1(1600)$. In addition, Coulomb production at low momentum transfer data provide a test of Chiral Perturbation Theory. During 2008 and 2009, a world leading data set was collected with hadron beam which is currently being analysed. The large statistics allows for a thorough decomposition of the data into partial waves. The COMPASS hadron data span over a broad range of channels and shed light on several different aspects of QCD.

  19. Track segments in hadronic showers in a highly granular scintillator-steel hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S.T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N.K.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Klempt, W.; Kraaij, E.van der; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I; Ribon, A.; Schlatter, D.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Lima, J.G.R.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y; Morin, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Feege, N.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Sudo, Y.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Magnan, A.-M; Bartsch, V.; Wing, M.; Salvatore, F.; Gil, E.Cortina; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Negra, R.Della; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J-C; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Donckt, M.Vander; Zoccarato, Y.; Alamillo, E.Calvo; Fouz, M.-C; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Lorenzo, S.Conforti di; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; der Kolk, N.van; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; Taille, Ch de la; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouëné, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Musat, G.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Jeans, D.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the three dimensional substructure of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel hadronic calorimeter. The high granularity of the detector is used to find track segments of minimum ionising particles within hadronic showers, providing sensitivity to the spatial structure and the details of secondary particle production in hadronic cascades. The multiplicity, length and angular distribution of identified track segments are compared to GEANT4 simulations with several different shower models. Track segments also provide the possibility for in-situ calibration of highly granular calorimeters.

  20. Anisotropic hydrodynamic modeling of 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Nopoush, Mohammad; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2017-10-01

    We compare phenomenological results from 3 +1 D quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics (aHydroQP) with experimental data collected in the CERN Large Hadron Collider 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions. In particular, we present comparisons of particle spectra, average transverse momentum, elliptic flow, and Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii. The aHydroQP model relies on the introduction of a single temperature-dependent quasiparticle mass which is fit to lattice QCD data. By taking moments of the resulting Boltzmann equation, we obtain the dynamical equations used in the hydrodynamic stage which include the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. At freeze-out, we use anisotropic Cooper-Frye freeze-out performed on a fixed-energy-density hypersurface to convert to hadrons. To model the production and decays of the hadrons we use therminator2 which is customized to sample from ellipsoidal momentum-space distribution functions. Using smooth Glauber initial conditions, we find very good agreement with many heavy-ion collision observables.

  1. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  2. Modelling hadronic interactions in HEP MC generators

    CERN Document Server

    Skands, Peter

    2015-01-01

    HEP event generators aim to describe high-energy collisions in full exclusive detail. They combine perturbative matrix elements and parton showers with dynamical models of less well-understood phenomena such as hadronization, diffraction, and the so-called underlying event. We briefly summarise some of the main concepts relevant to the modelling of soft/inclusive hadron interactions in MC generators, in particular PYTHIA, with emphasis on questions recently highlighted by LHC data.

  3. LHC suppliers win Golden Hadron awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    In a ceremony on 30 July, three of the 200 suppliers for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented with Golden Hadron awards. It is the third year that the awards have been presented to suppliers, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. This year the three companies are all involved in the supplies for the LHC's main magnet system.

  4. Summary of the Hadronic Weak Interaction session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, G.; Bryman, D. A.; Numao, T.

    1993-07-01

    We summarize and discuss present and future experiments on decays of light mesons and muons that were presented in the Hadronic Weak Interaction working group session of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Facilities. Precise measurements and rare-decay searches, which sense mass scales in the 1-1000 TeV region, are discussed in the context of the standard model and beyond.

  5. Summary of the Hadronic Weak Interaction session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Bryman, D.A.; Numao, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility

    1993-07-01

    We summarize and discuss present and future experiments on decays of light mesons and muons that were presented in the Hadronic Weak Interaction working group session of the ``Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Facilities.`` Precise measurements and rare-decay searches, which sense mass scales in the 1--1000 TeV region, are discussed in the context of the standard model and beyond.

  6. Hadron thermodynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammiraju, P.

    1985-01-01

    Various phenomenological models based on statistical thermodynamical considerations were used to fit the experimental data at high P sub T to a two temperature distribution. Whether this implies that the two temperatures belong to two different reaction mechanisms, or consequences of Lorentz-contraction factor, or related in a fundamental way to the intrinsic thermodynamics of Space-Time can only be revealed by further theoretical and experimental investigations of high P sub T phenomena in extremely energetic hadron-hadron collisions.

  7. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  8. On the hadronic component of extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerandel, J.R.; Antoni, T.; Apel, W.D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bercuci, A.; Bluemerba, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Buettner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engler, J.; Fessler, F.; Gils, H.J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haeusler, R.; Hambsch, M.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Iwan, A.; Kampert, K.-H.; Klages, H.O.; Maier, G.; Mathes, H.J.; Mayer, H.J.; Milke, J.; Mueller, M.; Obenland, R.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Schieler, H.; Scholz, J.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; Weber, J.H.; Weindl, A.; Wentz, J.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J

    2003-07-01

    The hadronic component of extensive air showers is investigated with the large calorimeter of the KASCADE experiment. The transverse momentum transfer in EAS is explored by investigations of the geometrical structure in the hadronic shower core and the arrival times of hadrons. The flux of unaccompanied hadrons is studied to probe hadronic cross sections. The measured results are compatible with simulations using CORSIKA/QGSJET.

  9. Causal viscous hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Huichao

    2008-01-01

    We explore the effects of shear viscosity on the hydrodynamic evolution and final hadron spectra of Cu+Cu collisions at ultrarelativistic collision energies, using the newly developed (2+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code VISH2+1. Based on the causal Israel-Stewart formalism, this code describes the transverse evolution of longitudinally boost-invariant systems without azimuthal symmetry around the beam direction. Shear viscosity is shown to decelerate the longitudinal and accelerate the transverse hydrodynamic expansion. For fixed initial conditions, this leads to a longer quark-gluon plasma (QGP) lifetime, larger radial flow in the final state, and flatter transverse momentum spectra for the emitted hadrons compared to ideal fluid dynamic simulations. We find that the elliptic flow coefficient v_2 is particularly sensitive to shear viscosity: even the lowest value allowed by the AdS/CFT conjecture, eta/s=1/4pi, suppresses v_2 enough to have significant consequences for the phenomenology of heavy-ion c...

  10. Hydrodynamics of oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, Carl

    1960-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of Oceans and Atmospheres is a systematic account of the hydrodynamics of oceans and atmospheres. Topics covered range from the thermodynamic functions of an ideal gas and the thermodynamic coefficients for water to steady motions, the isothermal atmosphere, the thermocline, and the thermosphere. Perturbation equations, field equations, residual equations, and a general theory of rays are also presented. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic equations and their solutions, with the aim of illustrating the laws of dynamics. The nonlinear

  11. Anisotropic hydrodynamics: Motivation and methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Michael

    2014-06-15

    In this proceedings contribution I review recent progress in our understanding of the bulk dynamics of relativistic systems that possess potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies. In order to deal with these momentum-space anisotropies, a reorganization of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics can be made around an anisotropic background, and the resulting dynamical framework has been dubbed “anisotropic hydrodynamics”. I also discuss expectations for the degree of momentum-space anisotropy of the quark–gluon plasma generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC from second-order viscous hydrodynamics, strong-coupling approaches, and weak-coupling approaches.

  12. Design, Performance, and Calibration of CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Baiatian, G; Emeliantchik, Igor; Massolov, V; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Stefanovich, R; Damgov, Jordan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Vankov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Bencze, Gyorgy; Laszlo, Andras; Pal, Andras; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zálán, Peter; Fenyvesi, Andras; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Jas Bir; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Katta, S; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Sudhakar, Katta; Verma, Piyush; Hashemi, Majid; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Paktinat, S; Babich, Kanstantsin; Golutvin, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kamenev, Alexey; Konoplianikov, V; Kosarev, Ivan; Moissenz, K; Moissenz, P; Oleynik, Danila; Petrosian, A; Rogalev, Evgueni; Semenov, Roman; Sergeyev, S; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Vishnevskiy, Alexander; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Druzhkin, Dmitry; Ivanov, Alexander; Kudinov, Vladimir; Orlov, Alexandre; Smetannikov, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Gershtein, Yuri; Ilyina, N; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kisselevich, I; Kolossov, V; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Ulyanov, A; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Demianov, A; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Teplov, V; Vardanyan, Irina; Yershov, A; Abramov, Victor; Goncharov, Petr; Kalinin, Alexey; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Kryshkin, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Pikalov, Vladimir; Ryazanov, Anton; Talov, Vladimir; Turchanovich, L; Volkov, Alexey; Camporesi, Tiziano; de Visser, Theo; Vlassov, E; Aydin, Sezgin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Koylu, S; Kurt, Pelin; Onengüt, G; Ozkurt, Halil; Polatoz, A; Sogut, Kenan; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankoc, K; Esendemir, Akif; Gamsizkan, Halil; Güler, M; Ozkan, Cigdem; Sekmen, Sezen; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, Ramazan; Yazgan, Efe; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isiksal, Engin; Kaya, Mithat; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Grynev, B; Lyubynskiy, Vadym; Senchyshyn, Vitaliy; Hauptman, John M; Abdullin, Salavat; Elias, John E; Elvira, D; Freeman, Jim; Green, Dan; Los, Serguei; ODell, V; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Suzuki, Ichiro; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Arcidy, M; Hazen, Eric; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Lawlor, C; Lazic, Dragoslav; Machado, Emanuel; Rohlf, James; Varela, F; Wu, Shouxiang; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Grassi, Tullio; Jarvis, Chad; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunori, Shuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Skuja, Andris; Podrasky, V; Sanzeni, Christopher; Winn, Dave; Akgun, Ugur; Ayan, S; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Schmidt, Ianos; Akchurin, Nural; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Gusum, K; Kim, Heejong; Spezziga, Mario; Thomas, Ray; Wigmans, Richard; Baarmand, Marc M; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Kramer, Laird; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Cushman, Priscilla; Ma, Yousi; Sherwood, Brian; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Karmgard, Daniel John; Ruchti, Randy; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Tully, Christopher; Bodek, Arie; De Barbaro, Pawel; Budd, Howard; Chung, Yeon Sei; Haelen, T; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Barnes, Virgil E; Laasanen, Alvin T

    2008-01-01

    Detailed measurements have been made with the CMS hadron calorimeter endcaps (HE) in response to beams of muons, electrons, and pions. Readout of HE with custom electronics and hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) shows no change of performance compared to readout with commercial electronics and photomultipliers. When combined with lead-tungstenate crystals, an energy resolution of 8\\% is achieved with 300 GeV/c pions. A laser calibration system is used to set the timing and monitor operation of the complete electronics chain. Data taken with radioactive sources in comparison with test beam pions provides an absolute initial calibration of HE to approximately 4\\% to 5\\%.

  13. The quark-hadron phase transition and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1987-01-01

    After presenting the current view of the processes taking place during the cosmological transition from 'quark soup' to normal hadron matter, attention is given to what happens to cosmological nucleosynthesis in the presence of small-scale baryon inhomogeneities. The QCD phase transition is among the plausible sources of this inhomogeneity. It is concluded that the formation of primordial 'quark nuggets' and other cold exotica requires very low entropy regions at the outset, and that even the more modest nonlinearities perturbing nucleosynthesis probably require some ingredient in addition to a quiescent, mildly supercooled transition.

  14. Schwinger Model and String Percolation in Hadron-Hadron and Heavy Ion Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Dias De Deus, J; Ferreiro, E. G.; Pajares, C.; Ugoccioni, R.

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the Schwinger Model for percolating strings we establish a general relation between multiplicity and transverse momentum square distributions in hadron-hadron and heavy ion collisions. Some of our results agree with the Colour Glass Condensate model.

  15. Hadronic interactions in the MINOS detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordosky, Michael Alan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2004-08-01

    MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, will study neutrino flavor transformations using a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and a Far detector located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The MINOS collaboration also constructed the CalDet (calibration detector), a smaller version of the Near and Far detectors, to determine the topological and signal response to hadrons, electrons and muons. The detector was exposed to test-beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron East Hall during 2001-2003, where it collected events at momentum settings between 200 MeV/c and 10 GeV/c. In this dissertation we present results of the CalDet experiment, focusing on the topological and signal response to hadrons. We briefly describe the MINOS experiment and its iron-scintillator tracking-sampling calorimters as a motivation for the CalDet experiment. We discuss the operation of the CalDet in the beamlines as well as the trigger and particle identification systems used to isolate the hadron sample. The method used to calibrate the MINOS detector is described and validated with test-beam data. The test-beams were simulated to model the muon flux, energy loss upstream of the detector and the kaon background. We describe the procedure used to discriminate between pions and muons on the basis of the event topology. The hadron samples were used to benchmark the existing GEANT3 based hadronic shower codes and determine the detector response and resolution for pions and protons. We conclude with comments on the response to single hadrons and to neutrino induced hadronic showers.

  16. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS TRIGGERED BY A QUARK-HADRON PHASE TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Hempel, Matthias; Kaeppeli, Roger; Rauscher, Thomas; Winteler, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Froehlich, Carla [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States); Sagert, Irina, E-mail: nobuya.nishimura@unibas.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis in the explosion of massive stars that are triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition during the early post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. The present study is based on general-relativistic radiation hydrodynamics simulations with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry, which utilize a quark-hadron hybrid equation of state based on the MIT bag model for strange quark matter. The quark-hadron phase transition inside the stellar core forms a shock wave propagating toward the surface of the proto-neutron star. This shock wave results in an explosion and ejects neutron-rich matter from the outer accreted layers of the proto-neutron star. Later, during the cooling phase, the proto-neutron star develops a proton-rich neutrino-driven wind. We present a detailed analysis of the nucleosynthesis outcome in both neutron-rich and proton-rich ejecta and compare our integrated nucleosynthesis with observations of the solar system and metal-poor stars. For our standard scenario, we find that a 'weak' r-process occurs and elements up to the second peak (A {approx} 130) are successfully synthesized. Furthermore, uncertainties in the explosion dynamics could barely allow us to obtain the strong r-process which produces heavier isotopes, including the third peak (A {approx} 195) and actinide elements.

  17. Speed of Sound in Hadronic matter using Non-extensive Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Khuntia, Arvind; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath; Cleymans, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The speed of sound ($c_s$) is studied to understand the hydrodynamical evolution of the matter created in heavy-ion collisions. The quark gluon plasma (QGP) formed in heavy-ion collisions evolves from an initial QGP to the hadronic phase via a possible mixed phase. Due to the system expansion in a first order phase transition scenario, the speed of sound reduces to zero as the specific heat diverges. We study the speed of sound for systems, which deviate from a thermalized Boltzmann distribution using non-extensive Tsallis statistics. In the present work, we calculate the speed of sound as a function of temperature for different $q$-values for a hadron resonance gas. We observe a similar mass cut-off behaviour in non-extensive case for $c^{2}_s$ by including heavier particles, as is observed in the case of a hadron resonance gas following equilibrium statistics. Also, we explicitly present that the temperature where the mass cut-off starts, varies with the $q$-parameter which hints at a relation between the d...

  18. Latest results of charged hadron flow measurements in CuAu collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of azimuthal anisotropic flow vn for inclusive charged hadrons and identified particles at mid rapidity in Cu+Au collisions at √sNN = 200GeV are presented. The data were recorded by the PHENIX experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider(RHIC). Directed, elliptic and triangular flow as a function of transverse momentum pT are measured with respect to event planes. The inclusive charged hadron vi shows the negative value at high pT. The v2 and v3 are compared to those in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. We find the v 2 and v3 follow an empirical scaling with 1/(ɛnN1/3 part). We also compare the v2 and v3 to hydrodynamical predictions. The identified particles v2 and v3 show a mass ordering in low pT region and baryon and meson splitting in high pT region. However the identified hadron v1 only shows mass ordering in mid pT region.

  19. Speed of sound in hadronic matter using non-extensive Tsallis statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuntia, Arvind; Sahoo, Pragati; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Science, Simrol, M.P. (India); Cleymans, Jean [University of Cape Town, UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2016-09-15

    The speed of sound (c{sub s}) is studied to understand the hydrodynamical evolution of the matter created in heavy-ion collisions. The quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formed in heavy-ion collisions evolves from an initial QGP to the hadronic phase via a possible mixed phase. Due to the system expansion in a first-order phase transition scenario, the speed of sound reduces to zero as the specific heat diverges. We study the speed of sound for systems which deviate from a thermalized Boltzmann distribution using non-extensive Tsallis statistics. In the present work, we calculate the speed of sound as a function of temperature for different q-values for a hadron resonance gas. We observe a similar mass cut-off behaviour in the non-extensive case for c{sup 2}{sub s} by including heavier particles, as is observed in the case of a hadron resonance gas following equilibrium statistics. Also, we explicitly show that the temperature where the mass cut-off starts varies with the q-parameter which hints at a relation between the degree of non-equilibrium and the limiting temperature of the system. It is shown that for values of q above approximately 1.13 all criticality disappears in the speed of sound, i.e. the decrease in the value of the speed of sound, observed at lower values of q, disappears completely. (orig.)

  20. Workshop on Hadron-Hadron & Cosmic-Ray Interactions at multi-TeV Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Bergman, D; Bongi, M; Bunyatyan, A; Cazon, L; d'Enterria, D; de Mitri, I; Doll, P; Engel, R; Eggert, K; Garzelli, M; Gerhardt, L; Gieseke, S; Godbole, R; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Gustafson, G; Hebbeker, T; Kheyn, L; Kiryluk, J; Lipari, P; Ostapchenko, S; Pierog, T; Piskounova, O; Ranft, J; Rezaeian, A; Rostovtsev, A; Sakurai, N; Sapeta, S; Schleich, S; Schulz, H; Sjostrand, T; Sonnenschein, L; Sutton, M; Ulrich, R; Werner, K; Zapp, K; CRLHC10; CRLHC 10

    2011-01-01

    The workshop on "Hadron-Hadron and Cosmic-Ray Interactions at multi-TeV Energies" held at the ECT* centre (Trento) in Nov.-Dec. 2010 gathered together both theorists and experimentalists to discuss issues of the physics of high-energy hadronic interactions of common interest for the particle, nuclear and cosmic-ray communities. QCD results from collider experiments -- mostly from the LHC but also from the Tevatron, RHIC and HERA -- were discussed and compared to various hadronic Monte Carlo generators, aiming at an improvement of our theoretical understanding of soft, semi-hard and hard parton dynamics. The latest cosmic-ray results from various ground-based observatories were also presented with an emphasis on the phenomenological modeling of the first hadronic interactions of the extended air-showers generated in the Earth atmosphere. These mini-proceedings consist of an introduction and short summaries of the talks presented at the meeting.

  1. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. With respect to an earlier version of the article, the present update provides additional information on numerical schemes, and extends the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general relativistic hydrodynamics. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of available numerical schemes is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is presented. These include gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes, and hydrodynamical evolutions of neutron stars. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances on the formulation of the gravitational field and hydrodynamic equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them.

  2. Multiplicities of Hadrons Within Jets at STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Suzanne; Drachenberg, Jim; STAR Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Jet measurements have long been tools used to understand QCD phenomena. There is still much to be learned from the production of hadrons inside of jets. In particular, hadron yields within jets from proton-proton collisions have been proposed as a way to unearth more information on gluon fragmentation functions. In 2011, the STAR experiment at RHIC collected 23 pb-1 of data from proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 500 GeV. The jets of most interest for gluon fragmentation functions are those with transverse momentum around 6-15 GeV/c. Large acceptance charged particle tracking and electromagnetic calorimetry make STAR an excellent jet detector. Time-of-flight and specific energy loss in the tracking system allow particle identification on the various types of hadrons within the jets, e.g., distinguishing pions from kaons and protons. An integral part of analyzing the data collected is understanding how the finite resolutions of the various detector subsystems influence the measured jet and hadron kinematics. For this reason, Monte Carlo simulations can be used to track the shifting of the hadron and jet kinematics between the generator level and the detector reconstruction level. The status of this analysis will be presented. We would like to acknowledge the Ronald E. McNair program for supporting this research.

  3. Theoretical studies of hadrons and nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COTANCH, STEPHEN R

    2007-03-20

    This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei , was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

  4. Highlights from COMPASS in hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for $98\\%$ of the mass in the visible universe. The measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons, consisting of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which are made out of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be e.g. described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the COMPASS experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to ...

  5. First Results on Hadron Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS is dedicated to the study of hadron structure and dynamics. One goal of the physics programme using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particular the search for $J^{PC}$ exotic states and glueballs. After a short pilot run in 2004 (190 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ beam, lead target), we started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting unprecedented statistics using 190 GeV/c negative hadron beams on a liquid hydrogen target. A similar amount of data with 190 GeV/c positive hadron beams has been taken in 2009, as well as some data (negative beam) on nuclear targets. As a first result the observation of a significant $J^{PC}$ spin-exotic signal in the 2004 data -- consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$ -- was recently published. Our spectrometer features good coverage by electromagnetic calorimetry, crucial for the detection of final states involving $\\pi^0$, $\\eta$ or $\\eta'$, and the 2008/09 data provide an excellent opportunity for the simu...

  6. Sivers effect in two-hadron electroproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzinian, Aram; Matevosyan, Hrayr H; Thomas, Anthony W

    2014-08-08

    The Sivers effect in single hadron semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized nucleon describes the modulation of the cross section with the sine of the azimuthal angle between the produced hadron's transverse momentum and the nucleon spin (P(h) and φ(S), respectively). This effect is attributed to the so-called Sivers parton distribution function of the nucleon. We employ a simple phenomenological parton model to derive the relevant cross section for two-hadron production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering including the Sivers effect. We show that the Sivers effect can be observed in such a process as sine modulations involving the azimuthal angles φ(T) and φ(R) of both the total and the relative transverse momenta of the hadron pair. The existence of the modulation with respect to φ(R) is new. Finally, we employ a modified version of the lepto Monte Carlo event generator that includes the Sivers effect to estimate the size of single spin asymmetries corresponding to these modulations. We show that sin(φ(R)-φ(S)) modulations can be significant, especially if we impose asymmetric cuts on the momenta of the hadrons in the pairs.

  7. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Archives Archivo Histórico del Estado de Jalisco Fondo Gobernación, Asunto Pasaportes y Salvoconductos : G-8-877/9773-9775 G-8-878/9774, 9776, 9777 et 9781 G-8-879/9782-9788 G-8-880/9789-9798 G-8-881-882/9803 G-8-882/9804-9805 G-8-883/9806-9811 G-8-884/9813 G-8-885/9817-9820 G-8-886/9822-9825 G-8-887/9826-9830 G-8-888/9835 G-8-889-890/9837 G-8-889/9839 Sources imprimées Livres et chroniques O’Farrill Romulo, (2004) Reseña histórica estadística y comercial de México y sus estados, directorio g...

  8. The Hamiltonian approach in classification and integrability of hydrodynamic chains

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlov, Maxim V.

    2006-01-01

    New approach in classification of integrable hydrodynamic chains is established. This is the method of the Hamiltonian hydrodynamic reductions. Simultaneously, this approach yields explicit Hamiltonian hydrodynamic reductions of the Hamiltonian hydrodynamic chains. The concept of reducible Poisson brackets is established. Also this approach is useful for non-Hamiltonian hydrodynamic chains. The deformed Benney hydrodynamic chain is considered.

  9. The ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter performance at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Francavilla, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identi cation and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical bers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read-out system exploiting di erent signal sources: laser light, charge injection, a radioactive source and the signal produced by minimum bias events. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons, splash events and most importantly the large sample of pp collision events. Results are discussed that demonstrate how the calorimeter is operated, how is monitored and what performance has been obtai...

  10. The ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter performance at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Francavilla, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read-out system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection, a radioactive source and the signal produced by minimum bias events. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons, splash events and most importantly the large sample of pp collision events. Results are discussed that demostrate how the calorimeter is operated, how is monitored and what performance has been ob...

  11. Medium-induced color flow softens hadronization

    CERN Document Server

    Beraudo, A; Wiedemann, U A

    2012-01-01

    Medium-induced parton energy loss, resulting from gluon exchanges between the QCD matter and partonic projectiles, is expected to underly the strong suppression of jets and high-$p_T$ hadron spectra observed in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, we present the first color-differential calculation of parton energy loss. We find that color exchange between medium and projectile enhances the invariant mass of energetic color singlet clusters in the parton shower by a parametrically large factor proportional to the square root of the projectile energy. This effect is seen in more than half of the most energetic color-singlet fragments of medium-modified parton branchings. Applying a standard cluster hadronization model, we find that it leads to a characteristic additional softening of hadronic spectra. A fair description of the nuclear modification factor measured at the LHC may then be obtained for relatively low momentum transfers from the medium.

  12. Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, José, E-mail: repond@hep.anl.gov

    2013-12-21

    To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R and D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

  13. Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repond, José

    2013-12-01

    To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R&D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

  14. Extended hadron and two-hadron operators of definite momentum for spectrum calculations in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Morningstar, C; Fahy, B; Foley, J; Jhang, Y C; Juge, K J; Lenkner, D; Wong, C C H

    2013-01-01

    Multi-hadron operators are crucial for reliably extracting the masses of excited states lying above multi-hadron thresholds in lattice QCD Monte Carlo calculations. The construction of multi-hadron operators with significant coupling to the lowest-lying states of interest involves combining single hadron operators of various momenta. The design and implementation of large sets of spatially-extended single-hadron operators of definite momentum and their combinations into two-hadron operators are described. The single hadron operators are all assemblages of gauge-covariantly-displaced, smeared quark fields. Group-theoretical projections onto the irreducible representations of the symmetry group of a cubic spatial lattice are used in all isospin channels. Tests of these operators on 24^3 x 128 and 32^3 x 256 anisotropic lattices using a stochastic method of treating the low-lying modes of quark propagation which exploits Laplacian Heaviside quark-field smearing are presented. The method provides reliable estimat...

  15. Monte Carlo implementation of polarized hadronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Kotzinian, Aram; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2017-01-01

    We study the polarized quark hadronization in a Monte Carlo (MC) framework based on the recent extension of the quark-jet framework, where a self-consistent treatment of the quark polarization transfer in a sequential hadronization picture has been presented. Here, we first adopt this approach for MC simulations of the hadronization process with a finite number of produced hadrons, expressing the relevant probabilities in terms of the eight leading twist quark-to-quark transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) splitting functions (SFs) for elementary q →q'+h transition. We present explicit expressions for the unpolarized and Collins fragmentation functions (FFs) of unpolarized hadrons emitted at rank 2. Further, we demonstrate that all the current spectator-type model calculations of the leading twist quark-to-quark TMD SFs violate the positivity constraints, and we propose a quark model based ansatz for these input functions that circumvents the problem. We validate our MC framework by explicitly proving the absence of unphysical azimuthal modulations of the computed polarized FFs, and by precisely reproducing the earlier derived explicit results for rank-2 pions. Finally, we present the full results for pion unpolarized and Collins FFs, as well as the corresponding analyzing powers from high statistics MC simulations with a large number of produced hadrons for two different model input elementary SFs. The results for both sets of input functions exhibit the same general features of an opposite signed Collins function for favored and unfavored channels at large z and, at the same time, demonstrate the flexibility of the quark-jet framework by producing significantly different dependences of the results at mid to low z for the two model inputs.

  16. The Ways of Four-Quark Hadrons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Ten years after the discovery of the X(3872) we can assert that a number of exotic four-quark hadrons with hidden charm and beauty have been discovered, the most recent, Z(3900), found by BES in 2013, being among the top-striking ones. However, ten years have not been enough to dispel the controversy about their inner structure, with two body hadron molecules and compact multiquark states being the withstanding antipodal models. In this seminar I will review the status of the field, presenting both the experimental facts and the theoretical pictures attempting to interpret them.

  17. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  18. R-Hadron Search at ATLAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterkamp, Simon Johann Franz

    In this thesis I motivate and present a search for long lived massive R-hadrons using the data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011. Both ionisation- and time-of-ight-based methods are described. Since no signal was found, a lower limit on the mass of such particles is set. The analysis was also...... published by the ATLAS collboration in Phys.Lett.B. titled `Searches for heavy long-lived sleptons and R-Hadrons with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV'....

  19. Recent results on hadron physics at KLOE

    CERN Document Server

    Babusci, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkest, L Caldeira; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gajos, A; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjold, L; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kacprzak, K; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Palladino, A; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2013-01-01

    One of the basic motivations of the KLOE and KLOE-2 collaborations is the test of fundamental symmetries and the search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model via the hadronic and leptonic decays of ground-state mesons and via their production in the fusion of virtual gamma quanta exchanged between colliding electrons and positrons. This contribution includes brief description of results of recent analysis of the KLOE data aimed at (i) the search for the dark matter boson, (ii) determination of the hadronic and light-by-light contributions to the g-2 muon anomaly and (iii) tests of QCD anomalies.

  20. Hadron Spectroscopy in Double Pomeron Exchange Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, Michael [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Central exclusive production in hadron-hadron collisions at high energies, for example p + p -> p + X + p, where the "+" represents a large rapidity gap, is a valuable process for spectroscopy of mesonic states X. At collider energies the gaps can be large enough to be dominated by pomeron exchange, and then the quantum numbers of the state X are restricted. Isoscalar JPC = 0++ and 2++ mesons are selected, and our understanding of these spectra is incomplete. In particular, soft pomeron exchanges favor gluon-dominated states such as glueballs, which are expected in QCD but not yet well established. I will review some published data.

  1. Moment analysis of hadronic vacuum polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael, Eduardo de

    2014-09-07

    I suggest a new approach to the determination of the hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon a{sub μ}{sup HVP} in lattice QCD. It is based on properties of the Mellin transform of the hadronic spectral function and their relation to the HVP self-energy in the Euclidean. I show how a{sub μ}{sup HVP} is very well approximated by a few moments associated to this Mellin transform and how these moments can be evaluated in lattice QCD, providing thus a series of tests when compared with the corresponding determinations using experimental data.

  2. Hadron spectroscopy in double pomeron exchange experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrow, Michael G.

    2017-03-01

    Central exclusive production in hadron-hadron collisions at high energies, for example p + p → p + X + p, where the + represents a large rapidity gap, is a valuable process for spectroscopy of mesonic states X. At collider energies the gaps can be large enough to be dominated by pomeron exchange, and then the quantum numbers of the state X are restricted. Isoscalar JPC = 0++ and 2++ mesons are selected, and our understanding of these spectra is incomplete. In particular, soft pomeron exchanges favor gluon-dominated states such as glueballs, which are expected in QCD but not yet well established. I will review some published data.

  3. Moment analysis of hadronic vacuum polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Rafael

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I suggest a new approach to the determination of the hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon aμHVP in lattice QCD. It is based on properties of the Mellin transform of the hadronic spectral function and their relation to the HVP self-energy in the Euclidean. I show how aμHVP is very well approximated by a few moments associated to this Mellin transform and how these moments can be evaluated in lattice QCD, providing thus a series of tests when compared with the corresponding determinations using experimental data.

  4. Hadron polarizability data analysis: GoAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegen, H., E-mail: hkstegen@mta.ca; Hornidge, D. [Mount Allison University, Sackville (Canada); Collicott, C. [Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Martel, P. [Mount Allison University, Sackville (Canada); Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Ott, P. [Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-12-31

    The A2 Collaboration at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, Germany, is working towards determining the polarizabilities of hadrons from nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics through Compton scattering experiments at low energies. The asymmetry observables are directly related to the scalar and spin polarizabilities of the hadrons. Online analysis software, which will give real-time feedback on asymmetries, efficiencies, energies, and angle distributions, has been developed. The new software is a big improvement over the existing online code and will greatly develop the quality of the acquired data.

  5. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter at LHC in Run 1 and planned upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyanov, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider, a key detector for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. The data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking and the evolution of the detector status are explained in the presentation. The energy and the time reconstruction performance of the digitized signals is presented and the noise behaviour and its improvement during the detector consolidation in maintenance periods are shown. A set of calibration systems allow monitoring and equalization of the calorimeter channels responses via signal sources that act at every stage of the signal path, from scintillation light to digitized signal...

  6. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams Generating High-Energy-Density Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, IV; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. This data has been used as input to a sophisticated two--dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1~m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy de...

  7. Rapidity distributions of hadrons in the HydHSD hybrid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S., E-mail: hvorost@theor.jinr.ru; Toneev, V. D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    A multistage hybrid model intended for describing heavy-ion interactions in the energy region of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna is proposed. The model combines the initial, fast, interaction stage described by the model of hadron string dynamics (HSD) and the subsequent evolution that the expanding system formed at the first stage experiences at the second stage and which one treats on the basis of ideal hydrodynamics; after the completion of the second stage, the particles involved may still undergo rescattering (third interaction stage). The model admits three freeze-out scenarios: isochronous, isothermal, and isoenergetic. Generally, the HydHSD hybrid model developed in the present study provides fairly good agreement with available experimental data on proton rapidity spectra. It is shown that, within this hybrid model, the two-humped structure of proton rapidity distributions can be obtained either by increasing the freeze-out temperature and energy density or by more lately going over to the hydrodynamic stage. Although the proposed hybrid model reproduces rapidity spectra of protons, it is unable to describe rapidity distributions of pions, systematically underestimating their yield. It is necessary to refine the model by including viscosity effects at the hydrodynamic stage of evolution of the system and by considering in more detail the third interaction stage.

  8. Effect of viscosity on one dimensional hydrodynamic flow and direct photons from 200 AGeV S+Au collisions at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed the direct photon data obtained by the WA80 collaboration in 200 A GeV S+Au collision at CERN SPS, in a one dimensional hydrodynamical model. Two scenario was considered: (i) formation of quark-gluon plasma and (ii) formation of hot hadronic gas. For both the scenario, ideal as well as extremely viscous fluid was considered. It was found that direct photon yield from QGP is not affected much whether the fluid is treated as ideal or extremely viscous. The yield however differ substantially if hadron gas is produced. Both the scenario do not give satisfactory description of the data.

  9. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Abhisek [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gerhard, Jochen [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Germany; Torrieri, Giorgio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física " Gleb Wataghin" (IFGW), Sao Paulo, Brazil; Read jr, Kenneth F. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  10. Interplay among transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Chang, W.C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hsieh, C.Yu; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.C.; Pereira, F.; Pesaro, G.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark several left-right asymmetries are possible for the hadrons in the jet. When only one unpolarized hadron is selected, it exhibits an azimuthal modulation known as Collins effect. When a pair of oppositely charged hadrons is observed, three asymmetries can be considered, a di-hadron asymmetry and two single hadron asymmetries. In lepton deep inelastic scattering on transversely polarized nucleons all these asymmetries are coupled with the transversity distribution. From the high statistics COMPASS data on oppositely charged hadron-pair production we have investigated for the first time the dependence of these three asymmetries on the difference of the azimuthal angles of the two hadrons. The similarity of transversity induced single and di-hadron asymmetries is discussed. A phenomenological analysis of the data allows to establish quantitative relationships among them, providing strong indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven ...

  11. Hydrodynamic model in isospin channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S.

    1987-08-31

    The Steinwedel-Jensen hydrodynamic model is generalized to study isovector collective modes excited in charge-exchange reactions. Results are given for the energy splittings between the different isospin components of the giant dipole and monopole resonances recently observed in (p,n) and (..pi../sup +- /,..pi../sup 0/) reactions. The quenching of the ..delta..T/sub z/ = +1 excitation strength in Nnot =Z nuclei with respect to the N = Z case is also discussed.

  12. Student Conceptual Difficulties in Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez, Alvaro; Kahan, Sandra; Zavala, Genaro; Marti, Arturo C.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a study on the conceptual difficulties faced by college students in understanding hydrodynamics of ideal fluids. This study was based on responses obtained in hundreds of written exams complemented with several oral interviews, which were held with first-year engineering and science university students. Their responses allowed us to identify a series of misconceptions unreported in the literature so far. The study findings demonstrate that the most critical difficulties arise from...

  13. The upgraded calibration system for the scintillator-PMT Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN/LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dhiman; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy in highest energy proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each read out by two PMTs in parallel. A multi-component calibration system is employed to calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during data taking. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and ...

  14. The Upgraded Calibration System for the Scintillator-PMT Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN/LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dhiman; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy in highest energy proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each read out by two PMTs in parallel. A multi-component calibration system is employed to calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during data taking. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and ...

  15. Numerical Hydrodynamics in Special Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, José Maria; Müller, Ewald

    2003-01-01

    This review is concerned with a discussion of numerical methods for the solution of the equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD). Particular emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods in SRHD. Results of a set of demanding test bench simulations obtained with different numerical SRHD methods are compared. Three applications (astrophysical jets, gamma-ray bursts and heavy ion collisions) of relativistic flows are discussed. An evaluation of various SRHD methods is presented, and future developments in SRHD are analyzed involving extension to general relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. The review further provides FORTRAN programs to compute the exact solution of a 1D relativistic Riemann problem with zero and nonzero tangential velocities, and to simulate 1D relativistic flows in Cartesian Eulerian coordinates using the exact SRHD Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2003-7 and is accessible for authorized users.

  16. Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids are ubiquitous, from natural phenomena up to geological scales, to industrial and technological applications, where they represent the only way to control and promote mixing at low Reynolds numbers, well below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As for immiscible fluids, the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids is directly related to the physics of their interfaces. The focus of this review is therefore on the general mechanisms driving the growth of disturbances at the boundary between miscible fluids, under a variety of forcing conditions. In the absence of a regularizing mechanism, these disturbances would grow indefinitely. For immiscible fluids, interfacial tension provides such a regularizing mechanism, because of the energy cost associated to the creation of new interface by a growing disturbance. For miscible fluids, however, the very existence of interfacial stresses that mimic an effective surface tension is debated. Other mechanisms, however, may also be relevant, such as viscous dissipation. We shall review the stabilizing mechanisms that control the most common hydrodynamic instabilities, highlighting those cases for which the lack of an effective interfacial tension poses deep conceptual problems in the mathematical formulation of a linear stability analysis. Finally, we provide a short overview on the ongoing research on the effective, out of equilibrium interfacial tension between miscible fluids.

  17. Parton-hadron cascade approach at SPS and RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    A parton-hadron cascade model which is the extension of hadronic cascade model incorporating hard partonic scattering based on HIJING is presented to describe the space-time evolution of parton/hadron system produced by ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated and compared with HIJING and VNI. Baryon density, energy density and temperature for RHIC are calculated within this model. (author)

  18. R-hadrons at ATLAS -discovery prospects and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Johansen, M

    2007-01-01

    R-hadrons are massive, meta-stable particles predicted in several Super- symmetry scenarios. Studies exploring the discovery potential of R-hadrons at the ATLAS detector have mainly focused on gluino R-hadrons. These studies have shown that gluino R-hadrons should be discovered in early running of the LHC, that they are easily isolated by simple cuts and that their mass can be measured to an accuracy of a few percent.

  19. $b$-hadron production at ATLAS and CMS experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De La Cruz Burelo, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We report on a selected number of studies performed by the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations on b -hadron production. Both experiments have a rich program on b -hadron physics exploiting the large cross section of b -hadrons at the high energies of the LHC.

  20. Hadron wave functions and the issue of nucleon deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Tsapalis, A; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2003-01-01

    Using gauge invariant hadronic two- and three- density correlators we extract information on the spatial distributions of quarks in hadrons, and on hadron shape and multipole moments within quenched lattice QCD. Combined with the calculation of N to Delta transition amplitudes the issue of nucleon deformation can be addressed.

  1. An Investigation of Hadronization Mechanism at $Z^{0}$ Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yi; Si, Zongguo; Xie, Qubing; Yao, Tao

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the hadronization pictures adopted in the LUND String Fragmentation Model(LSFM), Webber Cluster Fragmentation Model(WCFM) and Quark Combination Model(QCM), respectively. Predictions of hadron multiplicity, baryon to meson ratios and baryon-antibaryon flavor correlations, especially related to heavy hadrons at $Z^0$ factory obtained by LSFM and QCM are reported.

  2. An investigation of hadronization mechanism at a Z 0 factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Si, Zongguo; Xie, Qubing; Yao, Tao

    2010-11-01

    We briefly review the hadronization pictures adopted in the LUND String Fragmentation Model (LSFM), Webber Cluster Fragmentation Model (WCFM) and Quark Combination Model (QCM), respectively. Predictions of hadron multiplicity, baryon to meson ratios and baryon-antibaryon flavor correlations, especially those related to heavy hadrons at a Z 0 factory obtained by LSFM and QCM, are reported.

  3. Production of strange particles in hadronization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, W.

    1987-08-01

    Strange particles provide an important tool for the study of the color confinement mechanisms involved in hadronization processes. We review data on inclusive strange-particle production and on correlations between strange particles in high-energy reactions, and discuss phenomenological models for parton fragmentation. 58 refs., 24 figs.

  4. Hadron Spectroscopy with COMPASS – Newest Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerling Frank

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS investigates the structure and spectrum of hadrons by scattering high energetic hadrons and polarised muons off various fixed targets. During the years 2002–2007, COMPASS focused on nucleon spin physics using 160 GeV/c polarised µ+ beams on polarised deuteron and proton targets, including measurements of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin using longitudinal target polarisation as well as studies of transverse spin effects in the nucleon on a transversely polarised target. One major goal of the physics programme using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particular the search for JPC exotic states and glue-balls. COMPASS measures not only charged but also neutral final-state particles, allowing for investigation of new objects in different reactions and decay channels. In addition COMPASS can measure low-energy QCD constants like, e.g. the electromagnetic polarisability of the pion. Apart from a few days pilot run data taken in 2004 with a 190 GeV/c π− beam on a Pb target, showing a significant spin-exotic JPC = 1−+ resonance at around 1660 MeV/c2, COMPASS collected high statistics with negative and positive 190 GeV/c hadron beams on a proton (H2 and nuclear (Ni, Pb targets in 2008 and 2009. We give a selected overview of the newest results and discuss the status of various ongoing analyses.

  5. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted. Keywords. Heavy flavour; spectroscopy; potential models; exotics. PACS Nos 12.40.Yx; 14.40.Pq; 14.40.Rt; 12.39.Pn. 1. Introduction.

  6. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-31

    Oct 31, 2014 ... ... CLEO-c, BaBar, Belle, LHC etc., the scope for theoretical extensions of the present knowledge of heavy flavour physics would be very demanding. In this context, many relevant contributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour ...

  7. Vector boson production in hadron nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.D. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Whitmore, J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Lab. for Elementary Particle Science); Toothacker, W.S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Mont Alto (USA)); Hill, J.C.; Neale, W.W. (Cambridge Univ. (UK)); Lucas, P.; Voyvodic, L. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Ammar, R.; Gress, J. (Kansas Univ., Lawrence (USA)); Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Cason, N.M.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Ruchti, R.C.; Shephard, W.D. (Notre Dame Univ., IN (USA))

    1991-01-31

    We report a search for the production of light quark vector bosons in hadron-nucleus collisions at 100 GeV bombarding energy. We find surprisingly few of these resonances produced. The lack of these particles is though to be due to the absorption by the many modestly energetic nucleons and the few anti-nucleons in the final state. (orig.).

  8. Hadronic b decays and $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067638

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is ideally suited to the study of decays involving b quarks to fully hadronic final states. In these proceedings I summarise the status of the LHCb $\\gamma$ combination and present several recent analyses involving beauty baryon and meson decays.

  9. CP violation in $b$ hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, Adlene

    2017-01-01

    The most recent results on $CP$ violation in b hadrons obtained by the LHCb Collaboration with Run I and years 2015-2016 of Run II are reviewed. The different types of violation are covered by the studies presented in this paper.

  10. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  11. QCD and the physics of hadronic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L [Theory Group, PH Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-05-11

    We review the basic principles underlying the use of quantum chromodynamics in understanding the structure of high-Q{sup 2} processes in high-energy hadronic collisions. Several applications relevant to the Tevatron and the LHC are illustrated. (reviews of topical problems)

  12. Introduction to quantum chromodynamics at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A basic introduction to the application of QCD at hadron colliders is presented. I briefly review the phenomenological and theoretical origins of QCD, and then discuss factorization and infrared safety, parton distributions, the computation of hard scattering amplitudes and applications of perturbative QCD.

  13. Hadron structure in the ladder model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soper, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    The (flavor non-singlet) Green's function to find a far-off-shell quark in a hadron is obtained in the renormalization group improved ladder model for QCD in the space-like axial gauge. Particular attention is paid to the role of the singularity in the gluon propagator. 4 figures.

  14. Hadronic Cross Section Measurement at CMD-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetshin, R. R.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Barkov, L. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Gromov, E. M.; Ignatov, F. V.; Karpov, S. V.; Kazanin, V. F.; Khazin, B. I.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kozyrev, E. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Lysenko, A. P.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Perevedentsev, E. A.; Popov, A. S.; Popov, Yu. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Rogovsky, Yu. A.; Romanov, A. L.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Solodov, E. P.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.; Zharinov, Yu. M.

    2014-12-01

    The VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider was commissioned in 2010. About 60 pb-1 were collected so far by CMD-3 detector in the whole available c.m. energy range from 0.32 GeV to 2.0 GeV. The preliminary results of data analysis for various modes of e+e- → hadrons are discussed.

  15. Scaling violation in hadron-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbetski, Y. G.; Garsevanishvili, L. P.; Kotlyarevski, D. M.; Ladaria, N. K.; Tatalashvili, N. G.; Tsomaya, P. V.; Sherer, N. I.; Shabelski, Y. M.; Stemanetyan, G. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The scaling violation within the pionization region in the energy range of 0.2 to 2.0 TeV is shown on the basis of the analysis of angular characteristics in the interactions of the cosmic radiation hadrons with the nuclei of various substances (CH2, Al, Cu, Pb).

  16. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  17. Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

  18. Hadron physics at the COMPASS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-05-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interactions, in principle describes the interaction of quark and gluon fields. However, due to the self-coupling of the gluons, quarks and gluons are confined into hadrons and cannot exist as free particles. The quantitative understanding of this confinement phenomenon, which is responsible for about 98% of the mass of the visible universe, is one of the major open questions in particle physics. The measurement of the excitation spectrum of hadrons and of their properties gives valuable input to theory and phenomenology. In the Constituent Quark Model (CQM) two types of hadrons exist: mesons, made out of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which consist of three quarks. But more advanced QCD-inspired models and Lattice QCD calculations predict the existence of hadrons with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). The Compass experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large data sets, which allow to study light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unprecedented detail. The presented overview of the first results from this data set focuses in particular on the light meson sector and presents a detailed analysis of three-pion final states. A new JPC = 1++ state, the a1(1420), is observed with a mass and width in the ranges m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2.

  19. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with ...

  20. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Eigen, G.; Watson, N.K.; Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Doren, B.van; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Alamillo, E.Calvo; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; der Kolk, N.van; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.C.; Cizel, J.B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; de Freitas, P.Mora; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Taille, Ch.de la; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-23

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range from 10 to 80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from Geant4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  1. Entropy-limited hydrodynamics: a novel approach to relativistic hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercilena, Federico; Radice, David; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We present entropy-limited hydrodynamics (ELH): a new approach for the computation of numerical fluxes arising in the discretization of hyperbolic equations in conservation form. ELH is based on the hybridisation of an unfiltered high-order scheme with the first-order Lax-Friedrichs method. The activation of the low-order part of the scheme is driven by a measure of the locally generated entropy inspired by the artificial-viscosity method proposed by Guermond et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 230(11):4248-4267, 2011, doi: 10.1016/j.jcp.2010.11.043). Here, we present ELH in the context of high-order finite-differencing methods and of the equations of general-relativistic hydrodynamics. We study the performance of ELH in a series of classical astrophysical tests in general relativity involving isolated, rotating and nonrotating neutron stars, and including a case of gravitational collapse to black hole. We present a detailed comparison of ELH with the fifth-order monotonicity preserving method MP5 (Suresh and Huynh in J. Comput. Phys. 136(1):83-99, 1997, doi: 10.1006/jcph.1997.5745), one of the most common high-order schemes currently employed in numerical-relativity simulations. We find that ELH achieves comparable and, in many of the cases studied here, better accuracy than more traditional methods at a fraction of the computational cost (up to {˜}50% speedup). Given its accuracy and its simplicity of implementation, ELH is a promising framework for the development of new special- and general-relativistic hydrodynamics codes well adapted for massively parallel supercomputers.

  2. Highlights from Compass in hadron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-06-01

    Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for 98% of the mass in the visible universe. Measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons consisting of a quark and an antiquark and baryons, which are made of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD, predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be, e.g., described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the Compass experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to study the light-quark meson and baryon spectra with unmatched precision. The overview shown here focuses on the light meson sector, presenting a detailed Partial-Wave Analysis of the processes: π- p → π-π+π- p and π- p → π-π0π0 p. A new state, the a1(1420) with JPC = 1++, is observed. Its Breit-Wigner parameters are found to be in the ranges: m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2. In the same analysis, a signal in a wave with JPC = 1- + is observed. A resonant origin of this signal would not be explicable within the CQM. In addition to this possibility of an exotic state, possible non-resonant origin of this signal is discussed.

  3. High Brightness Hadron Injectors for TeV Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Schindl, Karlheinz

    1998-01-01

    The ambitious performance goals of present and future hadron colliders call for a chain of injectors that are specially designed to provide high quality beams. However, for many reasons, not the least of which is cost, all these colliders make use of existing accelerator complexes that were not built for this new task and have therefore to be upgraded. A key issue such hadron injectors have to deal with is the preservation of transverse normalised emittance. Small transverse emittances are important because (i) the collider luminosity is proportional to N(N/e) and becomes larger for smaller emit tance; (ii) particle losses at injection into the collider are reduced, thus reducing the risk of quenching a superconducting magnet. Sources of emittance blow-up, such as mis-steering and mismatch be tween machines, space charge, instabilities and intra-beam scattering, are covered along with corrective measures. Problems common to the Tevatron, HERA-p, RHIC, LHC injector chains (the latter two in cluding heavy ion p...

  4. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  5. Measurements of $B^{0}-\\overline{B}^{0}$ Mixing, $\\Gamma(Z^{0} \\to b\\overline{b}) / \\Gamma (Z^{0} \\to$ Hadrons) and Semileptonic Branching Ratios for $b$-Flavoured Hadrons in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Akers, R J; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Astbury, Alan; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Baines, J T M; Ball, A H; Banks, J; Barlow, R J; Barnett, S; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Beaudoin, G; Beck, A; Beck, G A; Becker, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentkowski, P; Berlich, P; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Boden, B; Bosch, H M; Boutemeur, M; Breuker, Horst; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Buijs, A; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chu, S L; Clarke, P E L; Clayton, J C; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooper, M; Coupland, M; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Deng, H; Dieckmann, A; Dittmar, Michael; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Duboscq, J E; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Dumas, D J P; Elcombe, P A; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fabbro, B; Fierro, M; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fischer, H M; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Gaidot, A; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Gensler, S W; Gentit, F X; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gillies, James D; Goldberg, J; Gingrich, D M; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Grant, F C; Hagemann, J; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hargrove, C K; Harrison, P F; Hart, J; Hattersley, P M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Heflin, E; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hilse, T; Hinshaw, D A; Hobbs, J D; Hobson, P R; Hochman, D; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Hughes-Jones, R E; Humbert, R; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ihssen, H; Imrie, D C; Janissen, A C; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, M; Jones, R W L; Jovanovic, P; Jui, C; Karlen, D A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; King, J; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kral, J F; Kowalewski, R V; Von Krogh, J; Kroll, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lafoux, H; Lahmann, R; Lamarche, F; Lauber, J; Layter, J G; Leblanc, P; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lehto, M H; Lellouch, Daniel; Leroy, C; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lorah, J M; Lorazo, B; Losty, Michael J; Lou, X C; Ludwig, J; Luig, A; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; Maur, U; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McNutt, J R; Meijers, F; Menszner, D; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Middleton, R P; Mikenberg, G; Mildenberger, J L; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Moisan, C; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Nellen, B; Nguyen, H H; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oram, C J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pansart, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Paschievici, P; Patrick, G N; Paz-Jaoshvili, N; Pearce, M J; Pfister, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Pitman, D; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Pritchard, T W; Przysiezniak, H; Quast, G; Redmond, M W; Rees, D L; Richards, G E; Rison, M; Robins, S A; Robinson, D; Rollnik, A; Roney, J M; Ros, E; Rossberg, S; Rossi, A M; Rosvick, M; Routenburg, P; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sasaki, M; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Schappert, W; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schmitt, B; von der Schmitt, H; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Schwiening, J; Scott, W G; Settles, M; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Smith, T J; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stegmann, C; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tarem, S; Tecchio, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tesch, N; Thomson, M A; Torrente-Lujan, E; Towers, S; Tranströmer, G; Tresilian, N J; Tsukamoto, T; Turner, M F; Van den Plas, D; Van Kooten, R; VanDalen, G J; Vasseur, G; Wagner, A; Wagner, D L; Wahl, C; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weber, M; Weber, P; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; Whalley, M A; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Winterer, V H; Wlodek, T; Wolf, G; Wotton, S A; Wyatt, T R; Yaari, R; Yeaman, A; Yekutieli, G; Yurko, M; Zeuner, W; Zorn, G T

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of $B^{0}-\\overline{B}^{0}$ Mixing, $\\Gamma(Z^{0} \\to b\\overline{b}) / \\Gamma (Z^{0} \\to$ Hadrons) and Semileptonic Branching Ratios for $b$-Flavoured Hadrons in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

  6. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  7. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  8. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  9. Students’ conceptual difficulties in hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Suarez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a study on the conceptual difficulties faced by college students in understanding hydrodynamics of ideal fluids. This study was based on responses obtained in hundreds of written exams complemented with several oral interviews, which were held with first-year engineering and science university students. Their responses allowed us to identify a series of misconceptions unreported in the literature so far. The study findings demonstrate that the most critical difficulties arise from the students’ inability to establish a link between the kinematics and dynamics of moving fluids, and from a lack of understanding regarding how different regions of a system interact.

  10. Students' conceptual difficulties in hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Alvaro; Kahan, Sandra; Zavala, Genaro; Marti, Arturo C.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a study on the conceptual difficulties faced by college students in understanding hydrodynamics of ideal fluids. This study was based on responses obtained in hundreds of written exams complemented with several oral interviews, which were held with first-year engineering and science university students. Their responses allowed us to identify a series of misconceptions unreported in the literature so far. The study findings demonstrate that the most critical difficulties arise from the students' inability to establish a link between the kinematics and dynamics of moving fluids, and from a lack of understanding regarding how different regions of a system interact.

  11. Hydrodynamic characteristics of UASB bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Siby; Tare, Vinod

    2011-10-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of UASB bioreactors operated under different organic loading and hydraulic loading rates were studied, using three laboratory scale models treating concocted sucrose wastewater. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis using dispersion model and tanks-in-series model was directed towards the characterization of the fluid flow pattern in the reactors and correlation of the hydraulic regime with the biomass content and biogas production. Empty bed reactors followed a plug flow pattern and the flow pattern changed to a large dispersion mixing with biomass and gas production. Effect of increase in gas production on the overall hydraulics was insignificant.

  12. Hydrodynamic loading of tensegrity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroldsen, Anders S.; Johansen, Vegar; Skelton, Robert E.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces hydrodynamic loads for tensegrity structures, to examine their behavior in marine environments. Wave compliant structures are of general interest when considering large marine structures, and we are motivated by the aquaculture industry where new concepts are investigated in order to make offshore installations for seafood production. This paper adds to the existing models and software simulations of tensegrity structures exposed to environmental loading from waves and current. A number of simulations are run to show behavior of the structure as a function of pretension level and string stiffness for a given loading condition.

  13. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A representative sample of available numerical schemes is discussed and particular emphasis is paid to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of relevant astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields, including gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes and evolution of neutron stars, is also presented.

  14. Higher-twist dynamics in large transverse momentum hadron production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arleo, François; Brodsky, Stanley J; Hwang, Dae Sung; Sickles, Anne M

    2010-08-06

    A scaling law analysis of the world data on inclusive large-p(⊥) hadron production in hadronic collisions is carried out. Significant deviations from leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order are observed, particularly at high x(⊥)=2p(⊥)/sqrt[s]. In contrast, the production of prompt photons and jets exhibits near-conformal scaling behavior in agreement with leading-twist expectations. These results indicate a non-negligible contribution of higher-twist processes in large-p(⊥) hadron production, where the hadron is produced directly in the hard subprocess, rather than by quark and gluon fragmentation. Predictions for the scaling exponents at RHIC and LHC are given. Triggering on isolated large-p(⊥) hadron production will enhance the higher-twist processes. We also note that the use of isolated hadrons as a signal for new physics can be affected by the presence of direct hadron production.

  15. Double-hadron leptoproduction in the nuclear medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, N; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, H; Borissov, A; Borysenko, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Grebeniouk, O; Gregor, I M; Griffioen, K; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hesselink, W H; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lu, J; Lu, S; Ma, B-Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Mikloukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W-D; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Roelon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T-A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Streit, J; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; van Haarlem, Y; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2006-04-28

    The first measurements of double-hadron production in deep-inelastic scattering within the nuclear medium were made with the HERMES spectrometer at DESY HERA using a 27.6 GeV positron beam. By comparing data for deuterium, nitrogen, krypton, and xenon nuclei, the influence of the nuclear medium on the ratio of double-hadron to single-hadron yields was investigated. Nuclear effects on the additional hadron are clearly observed, but with little or no difference among nitrogen, krypton, or xenon, and with smaller magnitude than effects seen on previously measured single-hadron multiplicities. The data are compared with models based on partonic energy loss or prehadronic scattering and with a model based on a purely absorptive treatment of the final-state interactions. Thus, the double-hadron ratio provides an additional tool for studying modifications of hadronization in nuclear matter.

  16. Hydrodynamics and stellar winds an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Maciel, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Stellar winds are a common phenomenon in the life of stars, from the dwarfs like the Sun to the red giants and hot supergiants, constituting one of the basic aspects of modern astrophysics. Stellar winds are a hydrodynamic phenomenon in which circumstellar gases expand towards the interstellar medium. This book presents an elementary introduction to the fundamentals of hydrodynamics with an application to the study of stellar winds. The principles of hydrodynamics have many other applications, so that the book can be used as an introduction to hydrodynamics for students of physics, astrophysics and other related areas.

  17. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  18. Annual Report 2006 for Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2007-04-05

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining data using a backlit pinhole with a 100 ps backlighter and beginning to develop the ability to look into the shock tube with optical or x-ray diagnostics. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, using dual-axis radiographic data with backlit pinholes and ungated detectors to complete the data set for a Ph.D. student. We lead a team that is developing a proposal for experiments at the National Ignition Facility and are involved in experiments at NIKE and LIL. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers. We assemble the targets for the experiments at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. We also have several projects underway in our laboratory involving our x-ray source. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  19. Invariant description of solutions of hydrodynamic type systems in hodograph space: hydrodynamic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ferapontov, E. V.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrodynamic surfaces are solutions of hydrodynamic type systems viewed as non-parametrized submanifolds of the hodograph space. We propose an invariant differential-geometric characterization of hydrodynamic surfaces by expressing the curvature form of the characteristic web in terms of the reciprocal invariants.

  20. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States); Wickham, Logan [Department of Computer Science, Washington State University, Richland, 99354 (United States); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.voulgarakis@wsu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States)

    2017-04-25

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau–Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids. - Highlights: • A new fluctuating hydrodynamics method for ionic liquids. • Description of ionic liquid morphology in bulk and near electrified surfaces. • Direct comparison with experimental measurements.

  1. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  2. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This "rotating balance" was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  3. Physical phantom of craniospinal hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzerar, R; Czosnyka, M; Czosnyka, Z; Balédent, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Inside the craniospinal system, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interactions occurring through volume exchanges are still not well understood. We built a physical model of this global hydrodynamic system. The main objective was to study, in controlled conditions, CSF-blood interactions to better understand the phenomenon underlying pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. A structure representing the cranium is connected to the spinal channel. The cranium is divided into compartments mimicking anatomical regions such as ventricles or aqueduct cerebri. Resistive and compliant characteristics of blood and CSF compartments can be assessed or measured using pressure and flow sensors incorporated in the model. An arterial blood flow input is generated by a programmable pump. Flows and pressures inside the system are simultaneously recorded. Preliminary results show that the model can mimic venous and CSF flows in response to arterial pressure input. Pulse waveforms and volume flows were measured and confirmed that they partially replicated the data previously obtained with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The phantom shows that CSF oscillations directly result from arteriovenous flow, and intracranial pressure measurements show that the model obeys an exponential relationship between pressure and intracranial volume expansion. The phantom will be useful to investigate the hydrodynamic hypotheses underlying development of hydrocephalus.

  4. The hydrodynamics of lamprey locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, Megan C.

    The lamprey, an anguilliform swimmer, propels itself by undulating most of its body. This type of swimming produces flow patterns that are highly three-dimensional in nature and not very well understood. However, substantial previous work has been done to understand two-dimensional unsteady propulsion, the possible wake structures and thrust performance. Limited studies of three-dimensional propulsors with simple geometries have displayed the importance of the third dimension in designing unsteady swimmers. Some of the results of those studies, primarily the ways in which vorticity is organized in the wake region, are seen in lamprey swimming as well. In the current work, the third dimension is not the only important factor, but complex geometry and body undulations also contribute to the hydrodynamics. Through dye flow visualization, particle induced velocimetry and pressure measurements, the hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming are studied using a custom built robotic lamprey. These studies all indicate that the undulations of the body are not producing thrust. Instead, it is the tail which acts to propel the animal. This conclusion led to further investigation of the tail, specifically the role of varying tail flexibility on hydrodymnamics. It is found that by making the tail more flexible, one decreases the coherence of the vorticity in the lamprey's wake. Additional flexibility also yields less thrust.

  5. Hydrodynamic instability of meandering channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the hydrodynamic instability of meandering channels driven by the turbulent flow. The governing equations of channel dynamics with suitable boundary conditions are closed with the fluid and granular constitutive relationships. A regular expansion of the fundamental variables is employed to linearize the parent equations by superimposing the perturbations on the basic unperturbed flow. The channel dynamics reveal a resonance phenomenon which occurs when the key variables fall in the vicinity of the distinct critical values. The resonance phenomenon preserves its distinctive signature in different flow regimes which are guided by the characteristic values of the shear Reynolds number. The hydrodynamic analysis indicates that the fluid friction and the volumetric sediment flux play a decisive role to characterize the channel instability in different flow regimes. The growths of azimuthal velocity perturbation in phase with curvature, bed topography perturbation, bend amplification rate, and meander propagation speed in different flow regimes are investigated by varying the meander wavenumber, Shields number, channel aspect ratio, and relative roughness number. The analysis is capable to capture the effects of grain size on azimuthal velocity perturbation, bed topography perturbation, bend amplification rate, and meandering propagation speed over a wide range of shear Reynolds numbers. The variations of resonant wavenumbers in different flow regimes with the Shields number, channel aspect ratio, and relative roughness number are addressed. For a specific flow regime, the upstream and downstream migrations of meandering channels are typically governed by the Shields number, channel aspect ratio, and relative roughness number.

  6. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Pedro (Costa Rica); Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deur, Alexandre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dosch, Hans Gunter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; Sufian, Raza Sabbir [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron sector.

  7. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  8. Future Prospects for Hadron Physics at PANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will be the major hadron physics experiment at the end of this decade. It has an ambitious far-reaching physics program that spans the most fascinating topics that are emerging in contemporary hadron physics. The universality of the antiproton annihilation process, with either protons or nuclei as targets, allows physicists to address questions like the structure of glueballs and hybrids; to clarify the nature of the X, Y and Z states; to investigate electromagnetic channels in order to measure form factors of the nucleon; and to provide theory with input with respect to non-perturbative aspects of QCD. The possibility to use different nuclear targets opens the window for charm physics with nuclei or for color transparency studies, as well as for an intensive hypernuclear physics program. Previous experimental experience has clearly demonstrated that the key to success lies in high levels of precision complemented with sophisticated analysis methods, only possible...

  9. Muon Detection Based on a Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, T; Abreu, R; Achenbach, R; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Aielli, G; Al-Shabibi, A; Aleksandrov, I; Alexandrov, E; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Angelaszek, D; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, S; Anulli, F; Apolle, R; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Avolio, G; Baak, M; Backes, M; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J; Ballestrero, S; Banerjee, S; Bansil, H S; Barnett, B M; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, V; Batraneanu, S; Battaglia, A; Bauss, B; Beauchemin, P; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behera, P K; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Y; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R E; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Bondioli, M; Borer, C; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A G; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Brock, R; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bucci, F; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buscher, V; Buttinger, W; Calvet, S; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Capasso, L; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cattani, G; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapleau, B; Childers, J T; Chiodini, G; Christidi, I; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Coccaro, A; Cogan, J; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Conidi, C; Conventi, F; Corradi, M; Corso-Radu, A; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Crescioli, F; Crone, G; Crupi, R; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cummings, J T; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Dao, V; Darlea, G L; Davis, A O; De Asmundis, R; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; de Seixas, J M; Degenhardt, J; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Diaz, M A; Dietzsch, T A; Dionisi, C; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Drake, G; Dufour, M-A; Dumitru, I; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, K V; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Ernst, J; Etzion, E; Falciano, S; Farrington, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner , P J W; Fedorko, W; Fellmann, D; Feng, E; Ferrag, S; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fiorini, L; Fischer, G; Flowerdew, M J; Fonseca Martin, T; Francis, D; Fratina, S; French, S T; Front, D; Fukunaga, C; Gadomski, S; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gee, C N P; George, S; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gillman, A R; Giorgi, M; Giunta, M; Giusti, P; Goebel, M; Gonçalo, R; Gonzalez Silva, L; Göringer, C; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Grabowska-Bold, I; Green, B; Groll, M; Guida, A; Guler, H; Haas, S; Hadavand, H; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hauser, R; Hayakawa, T; Hayden, D; Head, S; Heim, S; Hellman, S; Henke, M; Hershenhorn, A; Hidvégi, A; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hirayama, S; Hod, N; Hoffmann, D; Hong, T M; Hryn'ova, T; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jez, P; Jimenez Otero, S; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Jones, G; Joos, M; Kadlecik, P; Kajomovitz, E; Kanaya, N; Kanega, F; Kanno, T; Kapliy, A; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Kessoku, K; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kirk, J; Klemetti, M; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Kobayashi, T; Koeneke, K; Koletsou, I; Koll, J D; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Kowalewski, R V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J; Kreisel, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kunkle, J; Kurashige, H; Kuze, M; Kwee, R; Laforge, B; Landon, M; Lane, J; Lankford, A J; Laranjeira Lima, S M; Larner, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lilley, J N; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Lowe, A; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lundberg, J; Lupu, N; Machado Miguéns, J; Mackeprang, R; Maettig, S; Magnoni, L; Maiani, C; Maltrana, D; Mangeard, P-S; Männer, R; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Marino, C; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martin, T; Martyniuk, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; Mastrandrea, P; Matsushita, T; McCarn, A; Mechnich, J; Medinnis, M; Meier, K; Melachrinos, C; Mendoza Nava, L M; Merola, L; Messina, A; Meyer, C P; Middleton, R P; Mikenberg, G; Mills, C M; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Moa, T; Moenig, K; Monk, J; Monticelli, F; Mora Herrera, C; Morettini, P; Morris, J D; Müller, F; Munwes, Y; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nelson, S; Nemethy, P; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Newman, P; Nisati, A; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Nurse, E; Ochando, C; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Oh, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Olivito, D; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Ospanov, R; Owen, M A; Özcan, V E; Ozone, K; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Paramonov, A; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Petcu, M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Phan, A; Piegaia, R; Pilkington, A; Pinder, A; Poddar, S; Polini, A; Pope, B G; Potter, C T; Primavera, M; Prokoshin, F; Ptacek, E; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Ramos Dos Santos Neves, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S H; Robinson, M; Rodriguez, D; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Romero, R; Roos, L; Ruiz Martinez, A; Ryabov, Y; Ryan, P; Saavedra, A; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saland, J; Salnikov, A; Salvatore, F; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santonico, R; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sasaki, O; Savu, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schäfer, U; Scharf, V L; Scheirich, D; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, K; Schroder, C; Schroer, N; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekhniaidze, G; Sfyrla, A; Shamim, M; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shooltz, D; Sidoti, A; Silbert, O; Silverstein, S; Sinev, N; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sjoen, R; Sjölin, J; Slagle, K; Sloper, J E; Smith, B C; Soffer, A; Soloviev, I; Spagnolo, S; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strauss, E A; Strom, D; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Taffard, A; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Taylor, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Thomson, M A; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Topfel, C; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Traynor, D; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Tripiana, M; Triplett, N; True, P; Tsiakiris, M; Tsuno, S; Tuggle, J; Ünel, G; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vallecorsa, S; Valsan, L; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Vaz Gil Lopes, L; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J C; Volpi, G; Vorwerk, V; Wagner, P; Wang, M; Warburton, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; White, M; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Winklmeier, F; Woods, K S; Wu, S-L; Wu, X; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Xella, S; Yakovlev, A; Yamazaki, Y; Yang, U; Yasu, Y; Yuan, L; Zaitsev, A; Zanello, L; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; zur Nedden, M

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. The information from TileCal's last segmentation layer can assist in muon tagging and it is being considered for a near future upgrade of the level-one trigger, mainly for rejecting triggers due to cavern background at the barrel region. A muon receiver for the TileCal muon signals is being designed in order to interface with the ATLAS level-one trigger. This paper addresses the preliminary studies concerning the muon discrimination capability for the muon receiver. Monte Carlo simulations for single muons from the interaction point were used to study the effectiveness of hadronic calorimeter information on muon detection.

  10. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally Melnitchouk; Rolf Ent; Cynthia Keppel

    2004-08-01

    The duality between partonic and hadronic descriptions of physical phenomena is one of the most remarkable features of strong interaction physics. A classic example of this is in electron-nucleon scattering, in which low-energy cross sections, when averaged over appropriate energy intervals, are found to exhibit the scaling behavior expected from perturbative QCD. We present a comprehensive review of data on structure functions in the resonance region, from which the global and local aspects of duality are quantified, including its flavor, spin and nuclear medium dependence. To interpret the experimental findings, we discuss various theoretical approaches which have been developed to understand the microscopic origins of quark-hadron duality in QCD. Examples from other reactions are used to place duality in a broader context, and future experimental and theoretical challenges are identified.

  11. Hadronic density of states from string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A; Vaman, Diana

    2003-09-12

    We present an exact calculation of the finite temperature partition function for the hadronic states corresponding to a Penrose-Güven limit of the Maldacena-Nùñez embedding of the N=1 super Yang-Mills (SYM) into string theory. It is established that the theory exhibits a Hagedorn density of states. We propose a semiclassical string approximation to the finite temperature partition function for confining gauge theories admitting a supergravity dual, by performing an expansion around classical solutions characterized by temporal windings. This semiclassical approximation reveals a hadronic energy density of states of a Hagedorn type, with the coefficient determined by the gauge theory string tension as expected for confining theories. We argue that our proposal captures primarily information about states of pure N=1 SYM theory, given that this semiclassical approximation does not entail a projection onto states of large U(1) charge.

  12. Transverse Momentum Correlations in Hadronic Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    Using data obtained with the ALEPH detector at the Z resonance, a measure based on transverse momentum is shown to exhibit a correlation between the two halves of a hadronic event which cannot be explained by energy-momentum conservation, flavour conservation, the imposition of an event axis or imperfect event reconstruction. Two possible explanations based on Monte Carlo models are examined: a) ARIADNE, with the correlation forming early in the parton shower and with the transition from partons to hadrons playing only a minor part; b) JETSET, with the correlation forming at the fragmentation stage. A correlation technique based on a jet cluster analysis is used to make a comparison of the models with the data. It is concluded that both non-perturbative and perturbative effects make important contributions to the observed correlation.

  13. Neutron stars as cosmic hadron physics laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, D.

    1985-05-01

    Extensive observations of Her-1 with the Exosat satellite have led to a new understanding of both the dynamics of neutron-star superfluids and the free precession of neutron stars. Detailed microscopic calculations on neutron matter and the properties of the pinned crustal superfluid are provided to serve as a basis for comparing theory with observation on neutron stars. Topics discussed include the Hadron matter equation of state, neutron star structure, Hadron superfluids, the vortex creep theory, Vela pulsar glitches, astrophysical constraints on neutron matter energy gaps, the 35 day periodicity of Her-1, and the neutron matter equation of state. It is concluded that since the post-glitch fits and the identification of the 35th periodicity in Her X-1 as stellar wobble require a rigid neutron matter equation of state, the astrophysical evidence for such an equation seems strong, as well as that for an intermediate Delta(rho) curve.

  14. Hadron muoproduction at the COMPASS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajotte, Jean-Francois

    2010-09-30

    The COMPASS Collaboration has two main fields of interest: to improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure and to study hadrons through spectroscopy. These goals require a multipurpose universal spectrometer such as the COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy, COMPASS. In its first years of data taking (2002-2007), the nucleon spin structure was studied with a polarized muon beam scattering off a polarized target. These studies resumed in 2010 and will continue until at least 2011. The years 2008 and 2009 were dedicated to hadron spectroscopy using hadron beams. In the case of the nucleon structure studies, it is crucial to detect with high precision the incoming beam muon (160 GeV), the scattered muon and the produced hadrons. The large amount of high quality data accumulated provides access to the unpolarized and polarized parton distributions of the nucleon and the hadronization process. Subtle differences (asymmetries) between polarized cross sections have been predicted for hadron production from polarized muon-nucleon interaction for COMPASS. It is based on these differences that the polarized parton distributions can be measured. In this context, it is important to first compare predictions with the gross features of the measured unpolarized semi-inclusive differential cross sections or the closely related differential multiplicities. In order to determine cross sections, the data has to be corrected for the acceptance of the spectrometer. In this thesis, a multidimensional acceptance correction method, based on Monte Carlo simulation, is developed and applied to the data measured in 2004. The method is first used to determine the inclusive muon-nucleon cross section which is compared with a global fit to world data. This serves as a test of the acceptance correction method and to verify if the results from previous experiments can be reproduced. Then, unpolarized differential multiplicities as a function of transverse momentum

  15. Hadronization via coalescence at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minissale V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An hadronization model that includes coalescence and fragmentation is used in this work to obtain predictions at both RHIC and LHC energy for light and strange hadrons transverse momentum spectra (π, p, k, Λ and baryon to meson ratios (p/π, Λ/k in a wide range of pT. This is accomplished without changing coalescence parameters. The ratios p/π and Λ/K shows the right behaviour except for some lack of baryon yield in a limited pT range around 6 GeV. This would indicate that the AKK fragmentation functions is too flat at pT < 8 GeV.

  16. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00304670; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. Results on the calorimeter operation and performance are presented, including the calibration, stability, absolute energy scale, uniformity and time resolution. These results show that the TileCal performance is within the design requirements and has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results.

  17. Theory of hadronic production of heavy quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.

    1981-07-01

    Conventional theoretical predictions for hadronic production of heavy quarks (Q anti Q) are reviewed and confronted with data. Perturbative hard scattering predictions agree qualitatively well with hidden Q anti Q production (e.g., psi, chi, T) whereas for open Q anti Q-production (e.g., pp ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c//sup +/X) additional mechanisms or inputs are needed to explain the forwardly produced ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ at ISR. It is suggested that the presence of c anti c-pairs on the 1 to 2% level in the hadron Fock state decomposition (intrinsic charm) gives a natural description of the ISR data. The theoretical foundations of the intrinsic charm hypotheses together with its consequences for lepton-induced reactions is discussed in some detail.

  18. Unraveling hadron structure with generalized parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Belitsky; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2004-10-01

    The recently introduced generalized parton distributions have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. They combine the features of form factors, parton densities and distribution amplitudes - the functions used for a long time in studies of hadronic structure. Generalized parton distributions are analogous to the phase-space Wigner quasi-probability function of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which encodes full information on a quantum-mechanical system. We give an extensive review of main achievements in the development of this formalism. We discuss physical interpretation and basic properties of generalized parton distributions, their modeling and QCD evolution in the leading and next-to-leading orders. We describe how these functions enter a wide class of exclusive reactions, such as electro- and photo-production of photons, lepton pairs, or mesons.

  19. Identified charged hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Milano, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Identified particle spectra represent a crucial tool to understand the behavior of the matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The transverse momentum p_T distributions of identified hadrons contain informations about the transverse expansion of the system and constrain the freezeout properties of the matter created. The ALICE experiment has good particle identification performance over a broad p_T range. In this contribution the results for identified pions, kaons and protons in heavy-ion collisions at 2.76 TeV center-of-mass energy are presented. These results are compared with other identified particle measurements obtained by previous experiments, and discussed in terms of the thermal and hydrodynamic pictures. The status of extensions of this analysis, with the study of identified particles as a function of event-by-event flow in Pb-Pb collisions, is also discussed.

  20. Top Quark Production at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaf, Lukas Kaj [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-03-01

    This thesis describes both theoretical and experimental research into top quark production. The theoretical part contains a calculation of the single-top quark production cross section at hadron colliders, at Next to Leading Order (NLO) accuracy. The experimental part describes a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions, at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  1. The Large Hadron Collider Pop Up Book

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Discover the ATLAS experiment in full 3D pop-up in this promotional video for the Large Hadron Collider pop-up book. The book contains 16 pop-ups telling the story of how the experiment works and its quest to understand what the universe is made of. It is now available in English, French and German. Paper engineer Anton Radevsky, texts Emma Sanders.

  2. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  3. Excited quark production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1987-06-01

    Composite models generally predict the existence of excited quark and lepton states. We consider the production and experimental signatures of excited quarks Q* of spin and isospin 1/2 at hadron colliders and estimate the background for those channels which are most promising for Q* identification. Multi-TeV pp-colliders will give access to such particles with masses up to several TeV.

  4. Hadronic Vacuum Polarization in True Muonium

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the hyperfine splitting of true muonium is reevaluated in two ways. The first considers a more complex pionic form factor and better estimates of the perturbative QCD contributions. The second, more accurate method directly integrates the Drell ratio $R(s)$ to obtain $C_{1,\\rm hvp}=-0.0489(3)$. This corresponds to an energy shift in the hyperfine splitting of $\\Delta E^\\mu_{hfs,\\rm hvp}=276196(51)$ MHz.

  5. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  6. Emissivity and conductivity of parton-hadron matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnyk O.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the properties of the QCD matter across the deconfinement phase transition. In the scope of the parton-hadron string dynamics (PHSD transport approach, we study the strongly interacting matter in equilibrium as well as the out-of equilibrium dynamics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We present here in particular the results on the electromagnetic radiation, i.e. photon and dilepton production, in relativistic heavy-ion collisions and the relevant correlator in equilibrium, i.e. the electric conductivity. By comparing our calculations for the heavy-ion collisions to the available data, we determine the relative importance of the various production sources and address the possible origin of the observed strong elliptic flow ν2 of direct photons.

  7. Status of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter production

    CERN Document Server

    Henriques, A

    2002-01-01

    The status of the construction of the ATLAS TILECAL hadron calorimeter is reported. The various aspects of the construction started at the end of 1998: mechanics, optics, instrumentation, certification and final integration will be presented. At present 80% of the 3 cylinders: 1 barrel and 2 extended barrels is fully instrumented and stored at CERN. Various quality control steps are done during the components production and during the modules instrumentation. An evaluation of the modules uniformity extracted during the final certification using a radioactive /sup 137/Cs source is shown. The status of the electronics production and the modules performance extracted during the calibration with particle beams are described in other talks of this conference presented by M. Varanda, F. Martin and S. Nemecek. (2 refs).

  8. Update on the sea contributions to hadron polarizabilities via reweighting

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Walter; Lujan, Mike; Lee, Frank X

    2014-01-01

    We have made significant progress on extending lattice QCD calculation of the polarizability of the neutron and other hadrons to include the effects of charged dynamical quarks. This is done by perturbatively reweighting the charges of the sea quarks to couple them to the background field. The dominant challenge in such a calculation is stochastic estimation of the weight factors, and we discuss the difficulties in this estimation. Here we use an extremely aggressive dilution scheme with N = 124,416 sources per configuration to reduce the stochastic noise to a manageable level. We find that \\alpha_E = 2.70(55) * 10^-4 fm^3 for the neutron on one ensemble. We show that low-mode substitution can be used in tandem with dilution to construct an even better estimator, and introduce the offdiagonal matrix element mapping technique for predicting estimator quality.

  9. Understanding hadronic gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiano, Caprioli, E-mail: caprioli@arcetri.astro.it [INAF – Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    We aim to test the plausibility of a theoretical framework in which the gamma-ray emission detected from supernova remnants may be of hadronic origin, i.e., due to the decay of neutral pions produced in nuclear collisions involving relativistic nuclei. In particular, we investigate the effects induced by magnetic field amplification on the expected particle spectra, outlining a phenomenological scenario consistent with both the underlying Physics and the larger and larger amount of observational data provided by the present generation of gamma experiments, which seem to indicate rather steep spectra for the accelerated particles. In addition, in order to study to study how pre-supernova winds might affect the expected emission in this class of sources, the time-dependent gamma-ray luminosity of a remnant with a massive progenitor is worked out. Solid points and limitations of the proposed scenario are finally discussed in a critical way.

  10. Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, D

    2015-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, Laser, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems as well TileCal calibration stability are presented.

  11. Calibration and Monitoring systems of the ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems are presented.

  12. Calibration and Monitoring systems of the ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated on the calorimeter there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of its formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER and charge injection and minimum bias events produces in proton-proton collisions. In this contribution is given a brief description of the different systems hardware and presented the latest results on their performance, like the determination of the conversion factors, linearity and stability.

  13. Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated on the calorimeter there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of its formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER and charge injection and minimum bias events produces in proton-proton collisions. In this contribution is given a brief description of the different systems hardware and presented the latest results on their performance, like the determination of the conversion factors, linearity and stability.

  14. Exobase properties of hydrodynamic and kinetic models of thermal escape from planetary atmospheres and notion of slow hydrodynamic escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexey N.

    2017-12-01

    Exobase parameters obtained based on one-dimensional spherically symmetric hydrodynamic Parker's and kinetic models of thermal escape are studied parametrically for monatomic and diatomic gases. For source parameters, when Parker's and kinetic models predict similar escape rates and atmospheric structures well below the exobase, the exobase parameters obtained based on the both models are different. Parker's model systematically underestimates the exobase distance and overestimates the exobase Jeans parameter. The assumption that the escape rate is equal to the Jeans escape rate at the exobase is not satisfied in both kinetic and hydrodynamic simulations. The ratio of the escape rate to the Jeans rate at the exobase predicted by the hydrodynamics model can be either a few times higher or orders of magnitude smaller than unity. The kinetic model predicts systematic enhancement of the escape rate compared to the Jeans rate at the exobase. This enhancement can be attributed to the bulk velocity only if the exobase Jeans parameter is smaller than 5. This is the domain of slow hydrodynamic escape. At larger exobase Jeans parameters, the enhancement of the escape rate is attributed to non-equilibrium distribution of molecular velocities. In the kinetic solutions obtained for the Maxwell gas, the escape rate is about 2-2.5 of the Jeans rate when the ratio of the mean free path of gas molecules to the atmospheric scale height is ˜0.2. This finding can be used to set up boundary conditions in the hydrodynamic model in order to bring it into agreement with the kinetic model.

  15. Ntuples for NLO Events at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z.; Febres Cordero, F.; Höche, S.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present an event-file format for the dissemination of next-to-leading-order (NLO) predictions for QCD processes at hadron colliders. The files contain all information required to compute generic jet-based infrared-safe observables at fixed order (without showering or hadronization), and to recompute observables with different factorization and renormalization scales. The files also make it possible to evaluate cross sections and distributions with different parton distribution functions. This in turn makes it possible to estimate uncertainties in NLO predictions of a wide variety of observables without recomputing the short-distance matrix elements. The event files allow a user to choose among a wide range of commonly-used jet algorithms and jet-size parameters. We provide event files for a $W$ or $Z$ boson accompanied by up to four jets, and for pure-jet events with up to four jets. The files are for the Large Hadron Collider with a center of mass energy of 7 or 8 TeV. A C++ library along with a Python in...

  16. Measurement with hadron beams at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrero, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    The physics program of the COMPASS experiment at CERN focuses on the investigation of the hadron structure and spectroscopy, using both leptonic and hadronic probes. The COMPASS experiment has collected so far mostly data with polarized muon beams of 160 GeV, but also a pilot data taking with negative hadron beams of 190 GeV has been successfully completed at the end of the 2004 run. The main physics objectives of this pilot run are the study of soft pion-nuclei interactions. The predictions of the Chiral Perturbation Theory for the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the pion will be verified through the study of the Primakoff scattering of 190 GeV pions on thin lead targets. A sample corresponding to an integrated beam flux of more than 10$^{11}$ pions has been collected for this purpose, and an equivalent sample with the muon beam of 190 GeV has been collected in the same experimental conditions to correct possible systematic effects. In parallel to the polarizability measurements, first data have al...

  17. First Half Of CMS Hadron Calorimeter Completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CMS HCAL electronics coordinator John Elias from Fermilab inspecting the assembled first half of the calorimeter. The first half barrel of the CMS hadron calorimeter was completed last month and assembly work on the elements of the second half commenced just last week. This is not a simple task considering the fact that the constructed half-barrel consists of eighteen 30 tonne segments each made with 0.15 mm tolerance. But through the work of everyone on the CMS hadron calorimeter team it is all moving forward. In the LHC, detection of particles produced in collisions of two proton beams requires measurement of their energy. To do this, the particle energy has to be changed into a form that can be easily measured. This is achieved by stopping the initial particles in a dense medium, where they create a shower of secondary particles. While particles that interact through electromagnetic forces (electrons and positrons) create relatively small showers, the size of showers created by hadrons, particles that i...

  18. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Pavol; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter have been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations o...

  19. Top quark physics in hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, W

    2005-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle observed to date. Its large mass makes the top quark an ideal laboratory to test predictions of perturbation theory concerning heavy quark production at hadron colliders. The top quark is also a powerful probe for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. In addition, the top quark mass is a crucial parameter for scrutinizing the Standard Model in electroweak precision tests and for predicting the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. Ten years after the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron top quark physics has entered an era where detailed measurements of top quark properties are undertaken. In this review article an introduction to the phenomenology of top quark production in hadron collisions is given, the lessons learned in Tevatron Run I are summarized, and first Run II results are discussed. A brief outlook to the possibilities of top quark research a the Large Hadron Collider, currently under construction at CERN, is...

  20. Hydrodynamics, Fungal Physiology, and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Carreón, L; Galindo, E; Rocha-Valadéz, J A; Holguín-Salas, A; Corkidi, G

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous cultures, such as fungi and actinomycetes, contribute substantially to the pharmaceutical industry and to enzyme production, with an annual market of about 6 billion dollars. In mechanically stirred reactors, most frequently used in fermentation industry, microbial growth and metabolite productivity depend on complex interactions between hydrodynamics, oxygen transfer, and mycelial morphology. The dissipation of energy through mechanically stirring devices, either flasks or tanks, impacts both microbial growth through shearing forces on the cells and the transfer of mass and energy, improving the contact between phases (i.e., air bubbles and microorganisms) but also causing damage to the cells at high energy dissipation rates. Mechanical-induced signaling in the cells triggers the molecular responses to shear stress; however, the complete mechanism is not known. Volumetric power input and, more importantly, the energy dissipation/circulation function are the main parameters determining mycelial size, a phenomenon that can be explained by the interaction of mycelial aggregates and Kolmogorov eddies. The use of microparticles in fungal cultures is also a strategy to increase process productivity and reproducibility by controlling fungal morphology. In order to rigorously study the effects of hydrodynamics on the physiology of fungal microorganisms, it is necessary to rule out the possible associated effects of dissolved oxygen, something which has been reported scarcely. At the other hand, the processes of phase dispersion (including the suspended solid that is the filamentous biomass) are crucial in order to get an integral knowledge about biological and physicochemical interactions within the bioreactor. Digital image analysis is a powerful tool for getting relevant information in order to establish the mechanisms of mass transfer as well as to evaluate the viability of the mycelia. This review focuses on (a) the main characteristics of the two most

  1. String resonances at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2014-09-01

    -brane string compactifications. Our calculations have been performed using a semianalytic parton model approach which is cross checked against an original software package. The string event generator interfaces with HERWIG and Pythia through BlackMax. The source code is publicly available in the hepforge repository.

  2. Hydrodynamics Versus Intracellular Coupling in the Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaranta, G.; Aubin, M.E.; Tam, D.S.W.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic forces on eukaryotic flagella synchronization is investigated by triggering phase locking between a controlled external flow and the flagella of C. reinhardtii. Hydrodynamic forces required for synchronization are over an order of magnitude larger than hydrodynamic

  3. Hydrodynamic model of the open-pit mine “Buvač” (Republic of Srpska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papić Petar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Projecting of the dewatering system of the open-pit mine “Buvač” (Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina is based on the use of hydrodynamic model of groundwater regime. Creating the hydrodynamic model of the open-pit mine “Buvač“ was made in phases, which began by basic interpretation of collected data, along with schematization of the groundwater flow and flow conditions, and finally, forming and calibration of model. Hydrodynamic model was created as multilayer model with eight layers. Calibration of the hydrodynamic model is the starting point for making prognosis calculation in order to create the most optimal system of open-pit mine protection from groundwater. The results of model calibration indicated that the rivers Gomjenica and Bistrica, precipitation and inflow from karstified rocks are the primary sources of recharge of the limonite ore body “Buvač”.

  4. Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.

    2003-12-09

    Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping carried out by introducing a side stream into the main stream to squeeze the fluid containing particles close to the electrodes producing the dielelectrophoretic forces. The region of most effective or the strongest forces in the manipulating fields of the electrodes producing the dielectrophoretic forces is close to the electrodes, within 100 .mu.m from the electrodes. The particle trapping arrangement uses a series of electrodes with an AC field placed between pairs of electrodes, which causes trapping of particles along the edges of the electrodes. By forcing an incoming flow stream containing cells and DNA, for example, close to the electrodes using another flow stream improves the efficiency of the DNA trapping.

  5. Hydrodynamic Limit for Interacting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.; Galves, A.; Löcherbach, E.; Presutti, E.

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the hydrodynamic limit of a stochastic process describing the time evolution of a system with N neurons with mean-field interactions produced both by chemical and by electrical synapses. This system can be informally described as follows. Each neuron spikes randomly following a point process with rate depending on its membrane potential. At its spiking time, the membrane potential of the spiking neuron is reset to the value 0 and, simultaneously, the membrane potentials of the other neurons are increased by an amount of potential . This mimics the effect of chemical synapses. Additionally, the effect of electrical synapses is represented by a deterministic drift of all the membrane potentials towards the average value of the system. We show that, as the system size N diverges, the distribution of membrane potentials becomes deterministic and is described by a limit density which obeys a non linear PDE which is a conservation law of hyperbolic type.

  6. Staggered Schemes for Fluctuating Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balboa, F; Delgado-Buscalioni, R; Donev, A; Fai, T; Griffith, B; Peskin, C S

    2011-01-01

    We develop numerical schemes for solving the isothermal compressible and incompressible equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics on a grid with staggered momenta. We develop a second-order accurate spatial discretization of the diffusive, advective and stochastic fluxes that satisfies a discrete fluctuation-dissipation balance, and construct temporal discretizations that are at least second-order accurate in time deterministically and in a weak sense. Specifically, the methods reproduce the correct equilibrium covariances of the fluctuating fields to third (compressible) and second (incompressible) order in the time step, as we verify numerically. We apply our techniques to model recent experimental measurements of giant fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids in a micro-gravity environment [A. Vailati et. al., Nature Communications 2:290, 2011]. Numerical results for the static spectrum of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations are in excellent agreement between the compressible and incompressible simula...

  7. Hydrodynamics of active permeating gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan-Jones, A C [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5521 CNRS-UM2, Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Juelicher, F, E-mail: andrew.callan-jones@univ-montp2.fr [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzerstrasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    We develop a hydrodynamic theory of active permeating gels with viscoelasticity in which a polymer network is embedded in a background fluid. This situation is motivated by active processes in the cell cytoskeleton in which motor molecules generate elastic stresses in the network, which can drive permeation flows of the cytosol. Our approach differs from earlier ones by considering the elastic strain in the polymer network as a slowly relaxing dynamical variable. We first present the general ideas for the case of a passive, isotropic gel and then extend this description to a polar, active gel. We discuss two specific cases to illustrate the role of permeation in active gels: self-propulsion of a thin slab of gel relative to a substrate driven by filament polymerization and depolymerization; and non-equilibrium deswelling of a gel driven by molecular motors.

  8. Special vortex in relativistic hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupakhin, A. P.; Yanchenko, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    An exact solution of the Euler equations governing the flow of a compressible fluid in relativistic hydrodynamics is found and studied. It is a relativistic analogue of the Ovsyannikov vortex (special vortex) investigated earlier for classical gas dynamics. Solutions are partially invariant of Defect 1 and Rank 2 with respect to the rotation group. A theorem on the representation of the factor-system in the form of a union of a non-invariant subsystem for the function determining the deviation of the velocity vector from the meridian, and invariant subsystem for determination of thermodynamic parameters, the Lorentz factor and the radial velocity component is proved. Compatibility conditions for the overdetermined non-invariant subsystem are obtained. A stationary solution of this type is studied in detail. It is proved that its invariant subsystem reduces to an implicit differential equation. For this equation, the manifold of branching of solutions is investigated, and a set of singular points is found.

  9. Anomalous hydrodynamics kicks neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Matthias, E-mail: mski@ua.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Uhlemann, Christoph F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bleicher, Marcus [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Goethe Universität Frankfurt (Germany); Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Goethe Universität Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-09-10

    Observations show that, at the beginning of their existence, neutron stars are accelerated briskly to velocities of up to a thousand kilometers per second. We argue that this remarkable effect can be explained as a manifestation of quantum anomalies on astrophysical scales. To theoretically describe the early stage in the life of neutron stars we use hydrodynamics as a systematic effective-field-theory framework. Within this framework, anomalies of the Standard Model of particle physics as underlying microscopic theory imply the presence of a particular set of transport terms, whose form is completely fixed by theoretical consistency. The resulting chiral transport effects in proto-neutron stars enhance neutrino emission along the internal magnetic field, and the recoil can explain the order of magnitude of the observed kick velocities.

  10. Numerical magneto-hydrodynamics for relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inghirami, Gabriele [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, John von Neumann Institute for Computing, Juelich (Germany); Del Zanna, Luca [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Firenze (Italy); INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Firenze (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Beraudo, Andrea [INFN - Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Moghaddam, Mohsen Haddadi [INFN - Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Hakim Sabzevari University, Department of Physics, P. O. Box 397, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Becattini, Francesco [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Firenze (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Bleicher, Marcus [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, John von Neumann Institute for Computing, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    We present an improved version of the ECHO-QGP numerical code, which self-consistently includes for the first time the effects of electromagnetic fields within the framework of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD). We discuss results of its application in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity of the plasma. After reviewing the relevant covariant 3 + 1 formalisms, we illustrate the implementation of the evolution equations in the code and show the results of several tests aimed at assessing the accuracy and robustness of the implementation. After providing some estimates of the magnetic fields arising in non-central high-energy nuclear collisions, we perform full RMHD simulations of the evolution of the quark-gluon plasma in the presence of electromagnetic fields and discuss the results. In our ideal RMHD setup we find that the magnetic field developing in non-central collisions does not significantly modify the elliptic flow of the final hadrons. However, since there are uncertainties in the description of the pre-equilibrium phase and also in the properties of the medium, a more extensive survey of the possible initial conditions as well as the inclusion of dissipative effects are indeed necessary to validate this preliminary result. (orig.)

  11. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  12. The hydrodynamics of dolphin drafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihs Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drafting in cetaceans is defined as the transfer of forces between individuals without actual physical contact between them. This behavior has long been surmised to explain how young dolphin calves keep up with their rapidly moving mothers. It has recently been observed that a significant number of calves become permanently separated from their mothers during chases by tuna vessels. A study of the hydrodynamics of drafting, initiated in the hope of understanding the mechanisms causing the separation of mothers and calves during fishing-related activities, is reported here. Results Quantitative results are shown for the forces and moments around a pair of unequally sized dolphin-like slender bodies. These include two major effects. First, the so-called Bernoulli suction, which stems from the fact that the local pressure drops in areas of high speed, results in an attractive force between mother and calf. Second is the displacement effect, in which the motion of the mother causes the water in front to move forwards and radially outwards, and water behind the body to move forwards to replace the animal's mass. Thus, the calf can gain a 'free ride' in the forward-moving areas. Utilizing these effects, the neonate can gain up to 90% of the thrust needed to move alongside the mother at speeds of up to 2.4 m/sec. A comparison with observations of eastern spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris is presented, showing savings of up to 60% in the thrust that calves require if they are to keep up with their mothers. Conclusions A theoretical analysis, backed by observations of free-swimming dolphin schools, indicates that hydrodynamic interactions with mothers play an important role in enabling dolphin calves to keep up with rapidly moving adult school members.

  13. Updates on the optics of the future hadron-hadron collider FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2093721; Boutin, David Jean Henri; Dalena, Barbara; Holzer, Bernhard; Langner, Andy Sven; Schulte, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The FCC-hh (Future Hadron-Hadron Circular Collider) is one of the three options considered for the next generation accelerator in high-energy physics as recommended by the European Strategy Group. The layout of FCC-hh has been optimized to a more compact design following recommendations from civil engineering aspects. The updates on the first order and second order optics of the ring will be shown for collisions at the required centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. Special emphasis is put on the dispersion suppressors and general beam cleaning sections as well as first considerations of injection and extraction sections.

  14. First Considerations on Beam Optics and Lattice Design for the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany Fernandez, R

    2014-01-01

    The present document explains the steps carried out in order to make the first design of the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) following the base line parameters that can be found in [1]. Two lattice layouts are presented, a ring collider with 12 arcs and 12 straight sections, four of them designed as interaction points, and a racetrack like collider with two arcs and two straight sections, each of them equipped with two interaction points. The lattice design presented in the paper is modular allowing the same modules be used for both layouts. The present document addresses as well the beta star reach at the interaction points.

  15. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-12-14

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-{beta} region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the {phi}{sub s}=0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs

  16. Quark–hadron phase transition in massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atazadeh, K., E-mail: atazadeh@azaruniv.ac.ir

    2016-11-15

    We study the quark–hadron phase transition in the framework of massive gravity. We show that the modification of the FRW cosmological equations leads to the quark–hadron phase transition in the early massive Universe. Using numerical analysis, we consider that a phase transition based on the chiral symmetry breaking after the electroweak transition, occurred at approximately 10 μs after the Big Bang to convert a plasma of free quarks and gluons into hadrons.

  17. New method of fast simulation for a hadron calorimeter response

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitskii, Yu A; Tokar, S; Zenis, T

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present the new method of a fast Monte-Carlo simulation of a hadron calorimeter response. It is based on the three-dimensional parameterization of the hadronic shower obtained from the ATLAS TILECAL test beam data and GEANT simulations. A new approach of including the longitudinal fluctuations of hadronic shower is described. The obtained results of the fast simulation are in good agreement with the TILECAL experimental data. (15 refs).

  18. A precise measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    An improved measurement of the average b hadron lifetime is performed using a sample of 1.5 million hadronic Z decays, collected during the 1991-1993 runs of ALEPH, with the silicon vertex detector fully operational. This uses the three-dimensional impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic b decays and yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.533 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.022 ps.

  19. First Images of a Three-Layer Compton Telescope Prototype for Treatment Monitoring in Hadron Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llosá, Gabriela; Trovato, Marco; Barrio, John; Etxebeste, Ane; Muñoz, Enrique; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, Magdalena; Solaz, Carles; Solevi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    A Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy is under development at IFIC. The system consists of three layers of LaBr3 crystals coupled to silicon photomultiplier arrays. (22)Na sources have been successfully imaged reconstructing the data with an ML-EM code. Calibration and temperature stabilization are necessary for the prototype operation at low coincidence rates. A spatial resolution of 7.8 mm FWHM has been obtained in the first imaging tests.

  20. Simulating Hadronic-to-Quark-Matter with Burn-UD: Recent work and astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbanks, Luis; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2017-06-01

    We present the new developments in Burn-UD, our in-house hydrodynamic combustion code used to model the phase transition of hadronic-to-quark matter. Our two new modules add neutrino transport and the time evolution of a (u, d, s) quark star (QS). Preliminary simulations show that the inclusion of neutrino transport points towards new hydrodynamic instabilities that increase the burning speed. A higher burning speed could elicit the deflagration to detonation of a neutron star (NS) into a QS. We propose that a Quark-Nova (QN: the explosive transition of a NS to a QS) could help us explain the most energetic astronomical events to this day: superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Our models consider a QN occurring in a massive binary, experiencing two common envelope stages and a QN occurring after the supernova explosion of a Wolf-Rayet (WO) star. Both models have been successful in explaining the double humped light curves of over half a dozen SLSNe. We also introduce SiRop our r-process simulation code and propose that a QN site has the hot temperatures and neutron densities required to make it an ideal site for the r-process.

  1. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15*10/sup 11/ protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3*10/sup 14/ and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma =0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mu s. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  2. An Experimental Review on Elliptic Flow of Strange and Multistrange Hadrons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusu Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strange hadrons, especially multistrange hadrons, are good probes for the early partonic stage of heavy ion collisions due to their small hadronic cross sections. In this paper, I give a brief review on the elliptic flow measurements of strange and multistrange hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC and Large Hadron Collider (LHC.

  3. Energy-range relations for hadrons in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Range-energy relations for hadrons in nuclear matter exist similarly to the range-energy relations for charged particles in materials. When hadrons of GeV kinetic energies collide with atomic nuclei massive enough, events occur in which incident hadron is stopped completely inside the target nucleus without causing particle production - without pion production in particular. The stoppings are always accompanied by intensive emission of nucleons with kinetic energy from about 20 up to about 400 MeV. It was shown experimentally that the mean number of the emitted nucleons is a measure of the mean path in nuclear matter in nucleons on which the incident hadrons are stopped.

  4. The Brief Life of a Hadron: QCD unquenched

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Michael R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Once upon a time, the picture of hadrons was of mesons made of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons of three quarks. Though hadrons heavier than the ground states inevitably decay by the strong interaction, the successes of the quark model might suggest their decays are a mere perturbation. However, Eef van Beveren, whose career we celebrate here, recognised that decays are an integral part of the life of a hadron. The channels into which they decay are often essential to their very existence. These hold the secrets of strong coupling QCD and teach us the way quarks really build hadrons.

  5. Microbunched electron cooling for high-energy hadron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, D

    2013-08-23

    Electron and stochastic cooling are proven methods for cooling low-energy hadron beams, but at present there is no way of cooling hadrons as they near the TeV scale. In the 1980s, Derbenev suggested that electron instabilities, such as free-electron lasers, could create collective space charge fields strong enough to correct the hadron energies. This Letter presents a variation on Derbenev's electron cooling scheme using the microbunching instability as the amplifier. The large bandwidth of the instability allows for faster cooling of high-density beams. A simple analytical model illustrates the cooling mechanism, and simulations show cooling rates for realistic parameters of the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Study of the hadronisation process from single hadron and hadron-pair production in SIDIS at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Makke, Nour

    2014-01-01

    Hadron production in hard scattering reactions is described by the hadronization mechanism which combines quarks into final-state hadrons. Within the theoretical framework of leading-twist collinear QCD, the cross section for hadron production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering can be factorized into a hard scattering cross section describing the hard interaction at the quark level calculable in perturbative QED, and non-perturbative universal functions: parton distribution functions which reflect the quark structure of initial-state hadrons and collinear fragmentation functions which encode details on the hadronization process. In the last decades, a major effort has been achieved on theoretical and experimental levels and allowed to constraint, with very high precision, parton distribution functions except strange quark distribution, which still carries large uncertainties. Fragmentation functions, however, remain at a very preliminary stage of study with a growing interest in a more accurate and p...

  7. Helium-3 and helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Bulanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions (heavier than protons. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (magnetic vortex acceleration and hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He^{3} ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He^{4} with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.

  8. CRKSPH: A new meshfree hydrodynamics method with applications to astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John Michael; Raskin, Cody; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    The study of astrophysical phenomena such as supernovae, accretion disks, galaxy formation, and large-scale structure formation requires computational modeling of, at a minimum, hydrodynamics and gravity. Developing numerical methods appropriate for these kinds of problems requires a number of properties: shock-capturing hydrodynamics benefits from rigorous conservation of invariants such as total energy, linear momentum, and mass; lack of obvious symmetries or a simplified spatial geometry to exploit necessitate 3D methods that ideally are Galilean invariant; the dynamic range of mass and spatial scales that need to be resolved can span many orders of magnitude, requiring methods that are highly adaptable in their space and time resolution. We have developed a new Lagrangian meshfree hydrodynamics method called Conservative Reproducing Kernel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, or CRKSPH, in order to meet these goals. CRKSPH is a conservative generalization of the meshfree reproducing kernel method, combining the high-order accuracy of reproducing kernels with the explicit conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy necessary to study shock-driven hydrodynamics in compressible fluids. CRKSPH's Lagrangian, particle-like nature makes it simple to combine with well-known N-body methods for modeling gravitation, similar to the older Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Indeed, CRKSPH can be substituted for SPH in existing SPH codes due to these similarities. In comparison to SPH, CRKSPH is able to achieve substantially higher accuracy for a given number of points due to the explicitly consistent (and higher-order) interpolation theory of reproducing kernels, while maintaining the same conservation principles (and therefore applicability) as SPH. There are currently two coded implementations of CRKSPH available: one in the open-source research code Spheral, and the other in the high-performance cosmological code HACC. Using these codes we have applied

  9. Hadronic and nuclear interactions in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Despite the evidence that QCD - or something close to it - gives a correct description of the structure of hadrons and their interactions, it seems paradoxical that the theory has thus far had very little impact in nuclear physics. One reason for this is that the application of QCD to distances larger than 1 fm involves coherent, non-perturbative dynamics which is beyond present calculational techniques. For example, in QCD the nuclear force can evidently be ascribed to quark interchange and gluon exchange processes. These, however, are as complicated to analyze from a fundamental point of view as is the analogous covalent bond in molecular physics. Since a detailed description of quark-quark interactions and the structure of hadronic wavefunctions is not yet well-understood in QCD, it is evident that a quantitative first-principle description of the nuclear force will require a great deal of theoretical effort. Another reason for the limited impact of QCD in nuclear physics has been the conventional assumption that nuclear interactions can for the most part be analyzed in terms of an effective meson-nucleon field theory or potential model in isolation from the details of short distance quark and gluon structure of hadrons. These lectures, argue that this view is untenable: in fact, there is no correspondence principle which yields traditional nuclear physics as a rigorous large-distance or non-relativistic limit of QCD dynamics. On the other hand, the distinctions between standard nuclear physics dynamics and QCD at nuclear dimensions are extremely interesting and illuminating for both particle and nuclear physics.

  10. Hadronic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-04-18

    By means of hadronic B decays, the BABAR experiment aims to constrain the CKM matrix performing CP parameter measurements. It also seeks to test QCD factorization predictions and other models for B structure and decay mechanisms. We will present some of the on-going CP related analyses in the first section, while the second section will be dedicated to report on the conducted investigations on subjects as diverse as probing the gluon component in the B meson wave function, new physics and final state interactions in annihilation processes, intrinsic charm searches and first observation of strange charmed baryon production in B decays.

  11. Higher-twist correlations in polarized hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangerman, R.D.

    1996-09-16

    In this thesis we studied the response of polarized hadrons to several high-energy probes, working in the framework of the field theoretic model. Emphasis is laid upon higher-twist effects such as quark transverse momentum. The inclusive DIS process is very well suited to study QCD. From general principles we were able to derive four positivity constraints on the structure functions without invoking the helicity formalism. The on-shell quark model is used to illustrate these constraints. Subseqeuently, we concentrated on the higher-twist structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}). (orig./HSI).

  12. Light-Gravitino Production at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Rangarajan, R; Zichichi, Antonino; Kim, Jaewan; Lopez, Jorge L.; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    1998-01-01

    We consider the production of gravitinos ($\\widetilde G$) in association with gluinos ($\\tilde g$) or squarks ($\\tilde q$) at hadron colliders, including the three main sub-processes: $q \\bar q -> \\tilde g\\widetilde G$, $qg -> \\tilde enhanced to the point of being observable for sufficiently light gravitino masses ($m_{\\widetilde G} \\tilde g\\tilde g$. Searches for such events at the Tevatron can impose lower limits on the gravitino mass. In the Appendix, we provide a complete set of Feynman rules for gravitino interactions used in our calculation.

  13. Antenna Showers with Hadronic Initial States

    CERN Document Server

    Ritzmann, M; Skands, P

    2013-01-01

    We present an antenna shower formalism including contributions from initial-state partons and corresponding backwards evolution. We give a set of phase-space maps and antenna functions for massless partons which define a complete shower formalism suitable for computing observables with hadronic initial states. We focus on the initial-state components: initial-initial and initial-final antenna configurations. The formalism includes comprehensive possibilities for uncertainty estimates. We report on some preliminary results obtained with an implementation in the Vincia antenna-shower framework.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  15. Geneva University - Kinematics at Hadron Colliders - POSTPONED!!!

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The seminar is postponed.Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 12 décembre 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Kinematics at Hadron Colliders by Prof. Drew Baden, University of Maryland Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  16. Search for Hadronic Resonances in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Many models of new physics involve colored particles predicted to decay into hadronic final states. We present the results of searches for new heavy resonances in final states with up to 8 jets. Dedicated techniques have been developed to take advantage of the boosted topology and identify W and Z bosons. We also discuss a trigger strategy to extend the dijet search well below 1 TeV. These results are based on pp collision data collected with the CMS detector in 2011 and 2012.

  17. Quark-hadron duality in structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2011-09-01

    We review recent progress in the study of quark-hadron duality in electron–nucleon structure functions. New developments include insights into the local aspects of duality obtained using truncated moments of structure functions, which allow duality-violating higher-twist contributions to be identified in individual resonance regions. Preliminary studies of pion electropro-duction have also showed the first glimpses of duality in semi-inclusive cross sections, which if confirmed would greatly expand the scope of constraining the flavor and spin dependence of parton distributions.

  18. The hadronic cross section measurement at KLOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bacci, C.; Barva, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Carboni, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; De Lucia, E.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Di Micco, B.; Doria, A.; Dreucci, M.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franzini, P.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Gorini, E.; Graziani, E.; Incagli, M.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leone, D. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lu, F.; Martemianov, M.; Martini, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nguyen, F.; Palutan, M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perfetto, F.; Petrolo, E.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Spiriti, E.; Tabidze, M.; Testa, M.; Tortora, L.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Villella, I.; Xu, G

    2005-07-15

    KLOE uses the radiative return to measure cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -}->{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) at the electron-positron collider DA{phi}NE. Divinding by a theoretical radiator function, we obtain the cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -}->{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) for the mass range 0.35hadronic contribution to the muon anomaly for the given mass range: a{sub {mu}}=388.7+/-0.8{sub stat}+/-3.5syst+/-3.5{sub th}.

  19. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-02-28

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  20. A hadronic explanation of the lepton anomaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    The rise in the positron fraction, observed by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT and most recently by AMS-02, has created a lot of interest, fuelled by speculations about an origin in dark matter annihilation in the Galactic halo. However, other channels, e.g. antiprotons or gamma-rays, now severely constrain da....... This mechanism is guaranteed if hadronic CRs are present and would also lead to observable signatures in other secondary channels like the boron-to-carbon or antiproton-to-proton ratios. If such features were borne out by upcoming AMS-02 data, this would rule out other explanations....

  1. Studies of rare B hadron decays to leptons at hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Chiochia Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Rare B hadron decays provide an excellent test bench for the Standard Model and can probe new physics models. We review the experimental progress of the searches for rare leptonic B decays ($b\\rightarrow \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ and $b\\rightarrow s \\ell^+ \\ell^-$) at LHC and Tevatron experiments.

  2. Tuning bacterial hydrodynamics with magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, C. J.; Mumper, E.; Brown, E. E.; Brangham, J. T.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Yang, F. Y.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a group of motile prokaryotes that synthesize chains of lipid-bound, magnetic nanoparticles called magnetosomes. This study exploits their innate magnetism to investigate previously unexplored facets of bacterial hydrodynamics at surfaces. Through use of weak, uniform, external magnetic fields and local, micromagnetic surface patterns, the relative strength of hydrodynamic, magnetic, and flagellar force components is tuned through magnetic control of the bacteria's orientation. The resulting swimming behaviors provide a means to experimentally determine hydrodynamic parameters and offer a high degree of control over large numbers of living microscopic entities. The implications of this controlled motion for studies of bacterial motility near surfaces and for micro- and nanotechnology are discussed.

  3. Relevance of the hadronic interaction model in the interpretation of multiple muon data as detected with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Aramo, C; Auriemma, G; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bisi, V; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Castellano, M G; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Coutu, S; De Benedictis, L; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Grassi, M; Gray, L; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Guarnaccia, P; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Hawthorne, A; Heinz, R; Iarocci, Enzo; Katsavounidis, E; Kearns, E T; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta-Neri, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Mazzotta, C; Michael, D G; Mikheyev, S P; Miller, L; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Okada, C; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Rastelli, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rubizzo, U; Sanzgiri, A; Satriano, C; Satta, L; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra-Lugaresi, P; Severi, M; Sioli, M; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of discussing the effect of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties in simulation models, the analysis of multiple muon events from the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso is reviewed. In particular, the predictions $9 from different currently available hadronic interaction models are compared. (9 refs).

  4. The Multiparametric Effects of Hydrodynamic Environments on Stem Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Sargent, Carolyn Y.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells possess the unique capacity to differentiate into many clinically relevant somatic cell types, making them a promising cell source for tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine therapies. However, in order for the therapeutic promise of stem cells to be fully realized, scalable approaches to efficiently direct differentiation must be developed. Traditionally, suspension culture systems are employed for the scale-up manufacturing of biologics via bioprocessing systems that heavily rely upon various types of bioreactors. However, in contrast to conventional bench-scale static cultures, large-scale suspension cultures impart complex hydrodynamic forces on cells and aggregates due to fluid mixing conditions. Stem cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental perturbations, thus motivating the need for a more systematic understanding of the effects of hydrodynamic environments on stem cell expansion and differentiation. This article discusses the interdependent relationships between stem cell aggregation, metabolism, and phenotype in the context of hydrodynamic culture environments. Ultimately, an improved understanding of the multifactorial response of stem cells to mixed culture conditions will enable the design of bioreactors and bioprocessing systems for scalable directed differentiation approaches. PMID:21491967

  5. Numerical simulation of hydrodynamic flows in the jet electric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    On the basis of concepts from magnetic hydrodynamics the mathematical model of hydrodynamic flows in the stream of electric arc plasma, obtained between the rod electrode and the target located perpendicular to the flat conductive, was developed. The same phenomenon occurs in the welding arc, arc plasma and other injection sources of charged particles. The model is based on the equations of magnetic hydrodynamics with special boundary conditions. The obtained system of equations was solved by the numerical method of finite elements with an automatic selection of the time step. Calculations were carried out with regard to the normal plasma inleakage on the solid conducting surface and the surface with the orifice. It was found that the solid surface facilitates three swirling zones. Interaction of these zones leads to the formation of two stable swirling zones, one of which is located at a distance of two radii from the axis and midway between the electrodes, another is located in the immediate vicinity of the continuous electrode. In this zone plasma backflow scattering fine particles is created. Swirling zones are not formed by using the plane electrode with an orifice. Thus, the fine particles can pass through it and consolidate.

  6. Modeling of the upwelling hydrodynamics in the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.G. SAVVIDIS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The special features of the hydrodynamic circulation in the Aegean Sea referring to the development of regional upwelling coastal zones are studied by means of a mathematical model. The modeling effort is focused on the tracing of coastal areas, where upwelling events are frequently observed during the summer meteorological conditions. These areas are characterized by the enrichment of surface waters with nutrients and, consequently, increased fish production. The phenomenon is studied by the use of a two-layer mathematical model comprising the surface heated zone and the rest of the water column. The numerical solution of the model is based on the finite differences method. The wind shear applied over the stratified basin, with predefined density stratification and initial water-layers thickness, and the gravity and Coriolis forces taken into account, constitute the basic external factors for the generation of the hydrodynamic circulation in the area of the Aegean Sea. The calibration and the validation of the model are performed by the comparison of the model output to the data and observations reported in valid scientific sources. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the significant contribution of numerical models to the better understanding of the hydrodynamics governing the Aegean water circulation as well as the tracing of upwelling zones.

  7. CHF Enhancement by Surface Patterning based on Hydrodynamic Instability Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    If the power density of a device exceeds the CHF point, bubbles and vapor films will be covered on the whole heater surface. Because vapor films have much lower heat transfer capabilities compared to the liquid layer, the temperature of the heater surface will increase rapidly, and the device could be damaged due to the heater burnout. Therefore, the prediction and the enhancement of the CHF are essential to maximizing the efficient heat removal region. Numerous studies have been conducted to describe the CHF phenomenon, such as hydrodynamic instability theory, macrolayer dryout theory, hot/dry spot theory, and bubble interaction theory. The hydrodynamic instability model, proposed by Zuber, is the predominant CHF model that Helmholtz instability attributed to the CHF. Zuber assumed that the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength is related to the Helmholtz wavelength. Lienhard and Dhir proposed a CHF model that Helmholtz instability wavelength is equal to the most dangerous RT wavelength. In addition, they showed the heater size effect using various heater surfaces. Lu et al. proposed a modified hydrodynamic theory that the Helmholtz instability was assumed to be the heater size and the area of the vapor column was used as a fitting factor. The modified hydrodynamic theories were based on the change of Helmholtz wavelength related to the RT instability wavelength. In the present study, the change of the RT instability wavelength, based on the heater surface modification, was conducted to show the CHF enhancement based on the heater surface patterning in a plate pool boiling. Sapphire glass was used as a base heater substrate, and the Pt film was used as a heating source. The patterning surface was based on the change of RT instability wavelength. In the present work the study of the CHF was conducted using bare Pt and patterned heating surfaces.

  8. Hadron therapy takes off in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    A joint meeting of ULICE, ENLIGHT and PARTNER recently took place in Marburg (Germany). The three initiatives are shaping both the present and the future of hadron therapy in Europe, where new cutting-edge facilities have started to fight cancer with beams of protons and carbon ions.   A pictorial representation of a raster scan on a tumour. (Photo courtesy of HIT/GSI/Siemens.) Thanks to a very active multidisciplinary community consisting of physicists, biologists, radiobiologists, engineers, IT specialists and medical doctors, hadron therapy is taking off in Europe. Indeed, after a few decades during which the innovative technique was mainly used experimentally in Japan, the US and a couple of pioneering laboratory-based facilities in Europe, today an increasing number of hospitals are being equipped with synchrotrons and dedicated treatment rooms. “Asia and Europe are at the forefront of research and use of carbon ions in the treatment of some rare and radio-resistant t...

  9. Deformable bag model of hadrons, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ui, Haruo; Saito, Koich

    1983-05-01

    As a generalization of the MIT spherical bag model, we construct the spheroidal bag model of hadron with an arbitrary eccentricity. This generalization is made by slightly modifying the MIT linear boundary condition: The linear boundary condition is examined in detail. Our model always satisfies two necessary requirements of the MIT bag model - i.e., n.j = 0, no quark colour flux leaves the bag, and q-barq = 0, the scalar density of quark should vanish on the bag surface- and it reduces to the MIT spherical bag model in the limit of zero-eccentricity. Lagrangian formalism of our model is briefly described. The eigenfrequencies of a single massless quark confined in this spheroidal bag are numerically calculated. We obtain the level-splitting of the excited quark orbits, which is just analogous to the well-known Nilsson's splitting of single particle orbits in deformed nuclei. By using the numerical results of the lowest orbit, the effect of the bag-deformation on the mass of low-lying hadrons is estimated. It is found that, although the spherical bag is stable, the quark bag is extremely soft against the quadrupole deformation. Brief discussions are added on the mechanisms which make the spherical bag more stable.

  10. Charmless Hadronic Beauty Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary of six LHCb results on the topic of charmless hadronic b-hadron decays is presented. These are comprised of: a search for the decay Bs0→Ks0K+K− and updated branching fraction measurements of B(s0→Ks0h+h′− decays (h=K,π [1]; the first observation of the decays B0→pp¯π+π−,  Bs0→pp¯K+K−,Bs0→pp¯K+π− and strong evidence for the decay B0→pp¯K+K− [2]; the first observation of the decay Bs0→pΛ¯K− [3]; a search for the decay Bs0→φη′ [4]; the first observation of the decay Ξb−→pK−K− [5] and evidence for CP-violation in Λb0→pπ−π+π− decays [6].

  11. Hadronic Lorentz violation in chiral perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamand, Rasha; Altschul, Brett; Schindler, Matthias R.

    2017-03-01

    Any possible Lorentz violation in the hadron sector must be tied to Lorentz violation at the underlying quark level. The relationships between the theories at these two levels are studied using chiral perturbation theory. Starting from a two-flavor quark theory that includes dimension-4 Lorentz-violation operators, the effective Lagrangians are derived for both pions and nucleons, with novel terms appearing in both sectors. Since the Lorentz-violation coefficients for nucleons and pions are all related to a single set of underlying quark coefficients, one can compare the sensitivity of different types of experiments. Our analysis shows that atomic physics experiments currently provide constraints on the quark parameters that are stronger by about 10 orders of magnitude than astrophysical experiments with relativistic pions. Alternatively, it is possible to place approximate bounds on pion Lorentz violation using only proton and neutron observations. Under the assumption that the Lorentz-violating operators considered here are the only ones contributing to the relevant observables and taking the currently unknown hadronic low-energy constants to be of natural size, the resulting estimated bounds on four pion parameters are at the 10-23 level, representing improvements of 10 orders of magnitude.

  12. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Mlynarikova, Michaela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter has been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations of the LHC. Prompt isolated muons of high momentum fro...

  13. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Mlynarikova, Michaela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter has been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations of the LHC. Prompt isolated muons of high momentum from elec...

  14. Reconstruction of B hadron decays at DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Salmi, Laura Tiina Maria

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes three analyses related to heavy quarks. The analysis with the largest impact is the extraction of parameters of heavy quark decays using the lepton energy spectrum and the hadronic mass spectrum in semileptonic B decays. The extraction of the parameters allows to test the framework used to theoretically describe the decay of heavy mesons, and more accurate knowledge of the parameter values results in greater accuracy in the determination of the element |Vcb| of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix. The determination described in this thesis is important, since it is so far the only one where the full lepton energy spectrum has been used. The other determinations are based on using only a part of the spectrum. The first extraction of the parameters in the kinetic mass scheme was based on the statistical moments of the lepton energy spectrum and hadronic mass spectrum measured using the data collected at delphi. In the second analysis, the angular distribution of fragmen...

  15. Hadron Production Measurements for Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Panman, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    One of the limiting factors for the precision of neutrino oscillation experiments is the uncertainty in the composition and spectrum of the neutrino flux. Recently, dedicated hadron production experiments have been taking data and are being planned to supply measurements which can significantly reduce these uncertainties. The HARP experiment has presented results on the measurements of the double‐differential production cross‐section of charged pions in proton interactions with beryllium, carbon, aluminium, copper, tin, tantalum and lead targets. These results are relevant for a detailed understanding of neutrino flux in accelerator neutrino experiments K2K (p–Al data) and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE (p–Be data), for a better prediction of atmospheric neutrino fluxes (p–C, π + – C and π − – C data) as well as for a systematic improvement of hadron production models. The E910 experiment at BNL has recently published their p–Be data. NA49 has measured pion production spectra in p–C interactions and...

  16. Analysis of Scanning Techniques for Hadron Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Holy, P

    1998-01-01

    The use of accelerators in cancer therapy has a long and successful history. Present-day developments are directed towards high-precision irradiation of tumours with hadron beams. Firstly, hadron beams localise the irradiation in a low-dose, entry corridor with a high-dose volume at the precise depth of the Bragg peak that is set by the beam energy. Secondly, the heavier the ion the lower the defocusing effect of the multiple scattering in the patient's body, but other considerations such as nuclear fragmentation and the physics of the energy transfer lead to an optimum in the mass range around carbon. The ability to deliver the irradiation to small volumes with millimetre precision opens the way to treating complex-shaped tumours that are in close proximity to vital organs. The creation of the well-focused ion beams at variable, but precise, energies over spill times of a few seconds is best done with a synchrotron using slow extraction. However, slow extraction is notoriously difficult to stabilise and it i...

  17. Hydrodynamic Instabilities Produced by Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Cruz, Julio Cesar Ruben; Hernandez-Zapata, Sergio; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gerardo

    2012-11-01

    When a liquid layer (alcohol in the present work) is in an environment where its relative humidity is less than 100 percent evaporation appears. When RH is above a certain threshold the liquid is at rest. If RH decreases below this threshold the flow becomes unstable, and hydrodynamic cells develop. The aim of this work is to understand the formation of those cells and its main features. Firstly, we investigate how the cell size depends on the layer width. We also study how temperature depends on the vertical coordinate when the cells are present. An inverse temperature gradient is found, that is, the bottom of liquid layer is colder than the free surface. This shows that the intuitive idea that the cells are due to a direct temperature gradient, following a Marangoni-like process, does not work. We propose the hypothesis that the evaporation produce a pressure gradient that is responsible of the cell development. On the other hand, using a Schlieren technique we study the topography of the free surface when cells are present. Finally the alcohol vapor layer adjacent to the liquid surface is explored using scattering experiments, giving some insight on the plausibility of the hypothesis described previously. Authors acknowledge support by DGAPA-UNAM under project IN116312 ``Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos.''

  18. Hydrodynamics of unitary Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan E.

    Unitary fermi gases have been widely studied as they provide a tabletop archetype for re- search on strongly coupled many body systems and perfect fluids. Research into unitary fermi gases can provide insight into may other strongly interacting systems including high temperature superconductor, quark-gluon plasmas, and neutron stars. Within the unitary regime, the equilib- rium transport coefficients and thermodynamic properties are universal functions of density and temperature. Thus, unitary fermi gases provide a archetype to study nonperturbative many-body physics, which is of fundamental significance and crosses several fields. This thesis reports on two topics regarding unitary fermi gases. A recent string theory conjecture gives a lower bound for the dimensionless ratio of shear viscosity of entropy, η/s ≥ 4pi /kb . Unitary fermi gases are a candidate for prefect fluids, yet η/s is well above the string theory bound. Using a stochastic formulation of hydrodynamics, we calculate a lower bound for this ratio accounting for the momentum dissipation from fluctuations. This lower bound is in good agreement with both theoretical and experimental results. The second question addressed is the simulation of elliptic flow. Elliptic flow, first observed in 2002, is a characteristic of strongly coupled systems and has been studied in both quark-gluon plasmas and unitary fermi gases. As such, simulations of these systems are of interest. We test a variety of lattice Boltzmann models and compare the simulation results to the theoretical and experimental findings.

  19. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  20. Anisotropic hydrodynamic function of dense confined colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygârd, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2017-06-01

    Dense colloidal dispersions exhibit complex wave-vector-dependent diffusion, which is controlled by both direct particle interactions and indirect nonadditive hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the solvent. In bulk the hydrodynamic interactions are probed routinely, but in confined geometries their studies have been hitherto hindered by additional complications due to confining walls. Here we solve this issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid-filled microfluidic channels to yield the confined fluid's hydrodynamic function in the short-time limit. Most importantly, we find the confined fluid to exhibit a strongly anisotropic hydrodynamic function, similar to its anisotropic structure factor. This observation is important in order to guide future theoretical research.

  1. Polariton Superfluids Reveal Quantum Hydrodynamic Solitons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Amo; S. Pigeon; D. Sanvitto; V. G. Sala; R. Hivet; I. Carusotto; F. Pisanello; G. Leménager; R. Houdré; E Giacobino; C. Ciuti; A. Bramati

    2011-01-01

    .... Using an interacting Bose gas of exciton-polaritons in a semiconductor microcavity, we report the transition from superfluidity to the hydrodynamic formation of oblique dark solitons and vortex...

  2. Hydrodynamic properties of whole arabic gum

    OpenAIRE

    Masuelli, Martin Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The most economically important of the hydrodynamic properties of a material are viscosity and density, which allow determining the intrinsic viscosity of raw materials used in the food industry. They serve as an indirect measure of molecular weight (M), hydrodynamic radius (RH), number of Simha, (ν(P)), Perrin parameter (P); hydration value (δ), Scheraga-Mandelkern parameter (β), and Flory parameters (0 and P0). Normally, these parameters are reported at a temperature of 25ºC, which limits t...

  3. Relabeling symmetries in hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padhye, N.; Morrison, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    Lagrangian symmetries and concomitant generalized Bianchi identities associated with the relabeling of fluid elements are found for hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In hydrodynamics relabeling results in Ertel`s theorem of conservation of potential vorticity, while in MHD it yields the conservation of cross helicity. The symmetries of the reduction from Lagrangian (material) to Eulerian variables are used to construct the Casimir invariants of the Hamiltonian formalism.

  4. The influence of fragmentation models in the production of hadron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The analysis of electron–positron annihilations to hadrons at high energies shows that apart from two-jet events, there are also signs of three-jet events which are interpreted according to the QCD, as a gluon radiated by a quark. In this paper, we investigate the fragmentation of quarks and gluons to hadron jets.

  5. The influence of fragmentation models in the production of hadron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The analysis of electron–positron annihilations to hadrons at high energies shows that apart from two-jet events, there are also signs of three-jet events which are interpreted according to the QCD, as a gluon radiated by a quark. In this paper, we investigate the fragmentation of quarks and gluons to hadron jets. We show ...

  6. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    QCD physics at hadron storage rings. 3.2 Hadron spectroscopy with antiproton annhilation at PANDA. The PANDA experiment, located at an internal target position of the high energy storage ring for anti-protons is one of the large installations at the future FAIR fa- cility [4]. It is being planned by a multi-national collaboration, ...

  7. A new 'hidden colour hypothesis' in hadron physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new `hidden colour hypothesis' within the framework of QCD, as an extension of and in keeping with the spirit of the `colour singlet hypothesis' is hereby proposed. As such it should play a role in a consistent description of exotic hadrons, such as diquonia, pentaquarks, dibaryons etc. How these exotic hadrons are ...

  8. Triggering on hadronic tau decays: ATLAS meets the challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-08

    Nov 8, 2012 ... Triggering on hadronic tau decays: ATLAS meets the challenge. MARK SCARCELLA. ∗. , on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration. The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006. E-mail: mark.scarcella@cern.ch. Abstract. Hadronic tau decays play a crucial role in taking Standard Model (SM) ...

  9. Interplay among transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark several left–right asymmetries are possible for the hadrons in the jet. When only one unpolarized hadron is selected, it exhibits an azimuthal modulation known as the Collins effect. When a pair of oppositely charged hadrons is observed, three asymmetries can be considered, a di-hadron asymmetry and two single hadron asymmetries. In lepton deep inelastic scattering on transversely polarized nucleons all these asymmetries are coupled with the transversity distribution. From the high statistics COMPASS data on oppositely charged hadron-pair production we have investigated for the first time the dependence of these three asymmetries on the difference of the azimuthal angles of the two hadrons. The similarity of transversity induced single and di-hadron asymmetries is discussed. A new analysis of the data allows quantitative relationships to be established among them, providing for the first time strong experimental indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven by a common physical process.

  10. Statistical fluctuations and correlations in hadronic equilibrium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, Michael

    2010-06-17

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of fluctuation and correlation observables of hadronic equilibrium systems. The statistical hadronization model of high energy physics, in its ideal, i.e. non-interacting, gas approximation is investigated in different ensemble formulations. The hypothesis of thermal and chemical equilibrium in high energy interaction is tested against qualitative and quantitative predictions. (orig.)

  11. PHOTONS AND NEUTRAL MESONS FROM HOT HADRONIC MATTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOHNER, H; ALBRECHT, R; AWES, TC; BARLAG, C; BERGER, F; BLOOMER, M; BLUME, C; BOCK, D; BOCK, R; BUCHER, D; CLAESSON, G; CLEWING, G; DEBBE, R; DRAGON, L; EKLUND, A; FOKIN, S; GARPMAN, S; GLASOW, R; GUSTAFSSON, HA; GUTBROD, HH; HANSEN, O; HOELKER, G; IDH, J; IPPOLITOV, M; JACOBS, P; KAMPERT, KH; KARADJEV, K; KOLB, BW; LEBEDEV, A; LUND, [No Value; MANKO, [No Value; MOSKOWITZ, B; OBENSHAIN, FE; OSKARSSON, A; OTTERLUND, [No Value; PEITZMANN, T; PLASIL, F; POSKANZER, AM; PURSCHKE, M; ROTERS, B; SAINI, S; SANTO, R; SCHMIDT, HR; SODERSTROM, K; SORENSEN, SP; STEFFENS, K; STEINHAUSER, P; STENLUND, E; STUKEN, D; VINOGRADOV, A; WEGNER, H; YOUNG, GR

    1994-01-01

    Results from the experimental program with light ion beams and heavy target nuclei at the CERN SPS could demonstrate the occurrence of an unprecedented state of high density in hadronic matter. The thermal nature of the hadronic system has been investigated by analyzing spectra and production ratios

  12. Single photons, dileptons and hadrons from relativistic heavy ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The production of single photons in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS as measured by the WA98 experiment is analysed. A quark gluon plasma is assumed to be formed initially, which expands, cools, hadronizes, and undergoes freeze-out. A rich hadronic equation of state is used and the transverse expansion of ...

  13. Using analytic continuation for the hadronic vacuum polarization computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; B, Renner Dru

    2014-11-01

    We present two examples of applications of the analytic continuation method for computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function in space- and time-like momentum regions. These examples are the Adler function and the leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We comment on the feasibility of the analytic continuation method and provide an outlook for possible further applications.

  14. Photons from quark gluon plasma and hot hadronic matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The productions of real photons from quark gluon plasma and hot hadronic matter formed after the nucleus–nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are discussed. The effects of the spectral shift of the hadrons at finite temperature on the production of photons are investigated. On the basis of the present ...

  15. Single photons, dileptons and hadrons from relativistic heavy ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The production of single photons in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS as measured by the WA98 experiment is analysed. A quark gluon plasma is assumed to be formed initially, which expands, cools, hadronizes, and undergoes freeze-out. A rich hadronic equation of state is used and the transverse expansion of the ...

  16. Photons from quark gluon plasma and hot hadronic matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The productions of real photons from quark gluon plasma and hot hadronic matter formed after the nucleus–nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are discussed. The effects of the spectral shift of the hadrons at finite temperature on the production of photons are investigated. On the basis of the present analysis it is ...

  17. Hadron intensity and energy spectrum at 4380 m above level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cananov, S. D.; Chadranyan, E. K.; Khizanishvili, L. A.; Ladaria, N. K.; Roinishvili, N. N.

    1985-01-01

    The flux value of hadrons with E (sup gamma) h or = 5 TeV, where E (sup gamma) h or = is the energy transferred into electromagnetic component is presented. It is shown that the energy spectrum slope beta of hadrons with E h or = 20 TeV is equal to 1.9.

  18. Direct Probes of Linearly Polarized Gluons inside Unpolarized Hadrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    We show that linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be directly probed in jet or heavy quark pair production in electron-hadron collisions. We discuss the simplest cos2 phi asymmetries and estimate their maximal value, concluding that measurements of the unknown linearly polarized

  19. Direct Probes of Linearly Polarized Gluons inside Unpolarized Hadrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.; Brodsky, S. J.; Mulders, P.J.G.; Pisano, C.

    2011-01-01

    We show that linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be directly probed in jet or heavy quark pair production in electron-hadron collisions. We discuss the simplest cos2 asymmetries and estimate their maximal value, concluding that measurements of the unknown linearly polarized

  20. The hadronic standard model for strong and electroweak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczka, R. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    We propose a new model for strong and electro-weak interactions. First, we review various QCD predictions for hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron processes. We indicate that the present formulation of strong interactions in the frame work of Quantum Chromodynamics encounters serious conceptual and numerical difficulties in a reliable description of hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron interactions. Next we propose to replace the strong sector of Standard Model based on unobserved quarks and gluons by the strong sector based on the set of the observed baryons and mesons determined by the spontaneously broken SU(6) gauge field theory model. We analyse various properties of this model such as asymptotic freedom, Reggeization of gauge bosons and fundamental fermions, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon high energy scattering, generation of {Lambda}-polarization in inclusive processes and others. Finally we extend this model by electro-weak sector. We demonstrate a remarkable lepton and hadron anomaly cancellation and we analyse a series of important lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron processes such as e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} hadrons, e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +} + W{sup -}, e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} p + anti-p, e + p {yields} e + p and p + anti-p {yields} p + anti-p processes. We obtained a series of interesting new predictions in this model especially for processes with polarized particles. We estimated the value of the strong coupling constant {alpha}(M{sub z}) and we predicted the top baryon mass M{sub {Lambda}{sub t}} {approx_equal} 240 GeV. Since in our model the proton, neutron, {Lambda}-particles, vector mesons like {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{psi} ect. and leptons are elementary most of experimentally analysed lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron processes in LEP1, LEP2, LEAR, HERA, HERMES, LHC and SSC experiments may be relatively easily analysed in our model. (author). 252 refs, 65 figs, 1 tab.

  1. PHENIX results on low-mass dileptons in Au + Au collisions with the Hadron Blind Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makek, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present e+e- continuum measurement in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV from the RHIC 2010 run with the Hadron Blind Detector upgrade of PHENIX. The measurement reaches a high purity of the electron sample of ≥ 95% at all centralities and provides an excellent qualitative and quantitative understanding of the background. The e+e- invariant yields show an enhancement in the low-mass region (mee = 0.30 - 0.76 GeV /c2) compared to the expectations from hadronic sources, but not as large as the one previously reported by PHENIX. The observed excess is well reproduced by models incorporating the broadening of the ρ meson due to scattering off baryons in the hot hadronic gas. The measured invariant yields in the intermediate-mass region (mee = 1.2 - 2.8 GeV /c2) leave room for additional sources when compared to the cocktail dominated by the semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons.

  2. Hadronic Parity Violation: A New View Through the Looking Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Page, Shelley A.

    2006-11-01

    Studies of the strangeness-changing hadronic weak interaction have produced a number of puzzles that have evaded a complete explanation within the Standard Model. Their origin may lie either in dynamics peculiar to weak interactions involving strange quarks or in more general aspects of the interplay between strong and weak interactions. In principle, studies of the strangeness-conserving hadronic weak interaction using parity-violating hadronic and nuclear observables provide a complementary window to this question. However, progress in this direction has been hampered by the lack of a suitable theoretical framework for interpreting hadronic parity violation measurements in a model-independent way. Recent work involving effective field theory ideas has led to the formulation of such a framework, simultaneously motivating the development of a number of new hadronic parity violation experiments in few-body systems. We review these recent developments and discuss the prospects and opportunities for further experimental and theoretical progress.

  3. Particle Showers in a Highly Granular Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider. The hadron calorimeter uses small scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. The system with 7608 channels has been successfully operated in beam tests at DESY, CERN and Fermilab since 2006, and represents the first large scale tests of these devices in high energy physics experiments. The unprecedented granularity of the detector provides detailed information of the properties of hadronic showers, which helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. We will discuss results on longitudinal and lateral shower profiles compared to a variety of different shower models, and present studies of the energy reconstruction of hadronic showers using software compensation techniques.

  4. Golden Hadron awards for the LHC's top suppliers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The following firms have been selected to receive a GOLDEN HADRON AWARD 2003, in recognition of their outstanding achievement: JDL TECHNOLOGIES, Belgium "in producing automatic cable inspection systems", FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY, Japan "in producing high quality superconducting cable", IHI Corporation, Japan, and LINDE KRYOTECHNIK, Switzerland "in producing novel 1.8 K refrigeration units based on advanced cold compressor technology" for the Large Hadron Collider.Photos 01, 02: Recipients of the 2003 Golden Hadron awards at the presentation ceremony on 16 May.Photo 03: LHC project leader Lyn Evans updates the award recipients on work for CERN's new accelerator.Photo 04: René Joannes of JDL Technologies (left) receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Shinichiro Meguro, managing director of Furukawa Electric Company, receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Photo 06: Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of Linde Kryotechnik (left) and Motoki Yoshinaga, associate director of IHI...

  5. Test of interaction models with the KASCADE hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milkea, J. E-mail: jens.milke@ik.fzk.de; Antonib, T.; Apel, W.D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bercuci, A.; Bluemer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Buettner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engler, J.; Fessler, F.; Gils, H.J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haeusler, R.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hoerandel, J.R.; Iwan, A.; Kampert, K.-H.; Klages, H.O.; Maier, G.; Mathes, H.J.; Mayer, H.J.; Mueller, M.; Obenland, R.; Oehlschlaegera, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Schieler, H.; Scholz, J.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; Weber, J.H.; Weindl, A.; Wentz, J.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J

    2003-07-01

    The interpretation of extensive air shower measurements often requires the comparison with EAS simulations. These calculations rely on hadronic interaction models which have to extrapolate into kinematical and energy regions not covered by present-day collider experiments. The KASCADE experiment with its large hadron calorimeter and its detectors for the electromagnetic and muonic components provides experimental data to check hadronic interaction models. For the EAS simulations the program CORSIKA with several hadronic event generators embedded is used. Different hadronic observables are investigated as well as their correlations with the electromagnetic and muonic components. Comparing the interaction models QGSJET 98, NEXUS II, and DPMJET 11.5, it is found, that QGSJET describes the data best.

  6. Measurement of beauty-hadron decay electrons in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Volkl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC studies heavy-ion collisions to investigate the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are effective probes for this purpose. Both their energy loss in the medium as well as their possible thermalization yield information about the medium properties. Experimentally, the reconstruction of hadrons with charm valence quarks is possible. For hadrons with beauty valence quarks a promising strategy is the measurement of their decay electrons. To separate these from the background electrons (mainly from charm hadron decays, photon conversions or light-meson decays) the large decay length of beauty hadrons can be utilized. It leads to a relatively large typical impact parameter of the decay electrons. By comparing the impact parameter distribution of the signal electrons with those from the background sources, the signal can be statistically separated from the background. For this purpose a maximum likelihood fit is employed using impact paramete...

  7. Design, Performance, and Calibration of CMS Hadron-Barrel Calorimeter Wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Baiatian, G; Emeliantchik, Igor; Massolov, V; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Stefanovich, R; Damgov, Jordan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Vankov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Bencze, Gyorgy; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zálán, Peter; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Jas Bir; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Katta, S; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L; Satyanarayana, B; Sudhakar, Katta; Verma, Piyush; Paktinat, S; Golutvin, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kosarev, Ivan; Mescheryakov, G; Sergeyev, S; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Gershtein, Yuri; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kisselevich, I; Kolossov, V; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Ulyanov, A; Demianov, A; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Vardanyan, Irina; Yershov, A; Abramov, Victor; Goncharov, Petr; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Kryshkin, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Pikalov, Vladimir; Ryazanov, Anton; Talov, Vladimir; Turchanovich, L; Volkov, Alexey; Camporesi, Tiziano; De Visser, Theo; Vlassov, E; Aydin, Sezgin; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Kuzucu-Polatoz, A; Onengüt, G; Ozdes-Koca, N; Cankocak, Kerem; Ozok, Ferhat; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, Ramazan; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isiksal, Engin; Kaya, Mithat; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Grinev, B; Lubinsky, V; Senchishin, V; Anderson, E Walter; Hauptman, John M; Elias, John E; Elvira, D; Freeman, Jim; Green, Dan; Lazic, Dragoslav; Los, Serguei; O'Dell, Vivian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Suzuki, Ichiro; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Antchev, Georgy; Hazen, Eric; Lawlor, C; Machado, Emanuel; Posch, C; Rohlf, James; Wu, Shouxiang; Adams, Mark Raymond; Burchesky, Kyle; Qiang, W; Abdullin, Salavat; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Grassi, Tullio; Jarvis, Chad; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunori, Shuichi; Skuja, Andris; Podrasky, V; Sanzeni, Christopher; Winn, Dave; Akgun, Ugur; Ayan, S; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Schmidt, Ianos; Akchurin, Nural; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Gumu, K; Thomas, Ray; Baarmand, Marc M; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Cushman, Priscilla; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Sherwood, Brian; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Karmgard, Daniel John; Ruchti, Randy; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Mans, Jeremy; Tully, Christopher; De Barbaro, Pawel; Bodek, Arie; Budd, Howard; Chung, Yeon Sei; Haelen, T; Imboden, Matthias; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Barnes, Virgil E; Laasanen, Alvin T; Pompos, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Extensive measurements have been made with pions, electrons and muons on four production wedges of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) hadron barrel (HB) calorimeter in the H2 beam line at CERN with particle momenta varying from 20 to 300 GeV/c. Data were taken both with and without a prototype electromagnetic lead tungstate crystal calorimeter (EB) in front of the hadron calorimeter. The time structure of the events was measured with the full chain of preproduction front-end electronics running at 34 MHz. Moving-wire radioactive source data were also collected for all scintillator layers in the HB. These measurements set the absolute calibration of the HB prior to first pp collisions to approximately 4%.

  8. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickles, Anne M., E-mail: anne@bnl.gov

    2014-06-15

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v{sub 2} at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v{sub 2} in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  9. Aperture meter for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, G J; Redaelli, S

    2011-01-01

    The control of the high intensity beams of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particular challenging and requires a good modeling of the machine and monitoring of various machine parameters. During operation it is crucial to ensure a minimal distance between the beam edge and the aperture of sensitive equipment, e.g. the superconductingmagnets, which in all cases must be in the shadowof the collimator’s that protect the machine. Possible dangerous situations must be detected as soon as possible. In order to provide the operator with information about the current machine bottlenecks an aperture meter application was developed based on the LHC online modeling toolchain. The calculation of available free aperture takes into account the best available optics and aperture model as well as the relevant beam measurements. This paper describes the design and integration of this application into the control environment and presents results of the usage in daily operation and from validation measurements.

  10. Meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Provisional Agenda for the 111th meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee to be held on Wednesday and Thursday, 26-27 September 2012. Open Session: Wednesday, 26 September at 9 a.m. in the Main Auditorium (Bldg. 500-1-001)  09.00 - 09.20    LHC Machine Status Report  09.30 - 10.00    ATLAS Status Report  10.10 - 10.40    CMS Status Report  10.50 - 11.10    COFFEE BREAK 11.10 - 11.40    LHCb Status Report 11.50 - 12.20   ALICE Status Report 12.30 - 12.50   TOTEM Status Report 13.00 - 13.20   LHCf Status Report

  11. QCD and Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  12. Central exclusive production of hadrons in CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M. G. [Fermilab; Lontkovskyi, D. [Unlisted, PL; Makarenko, I. [Unlisted, PL; Swiech, A. [Unlisted, PL; Zurek, M. [Unlisted, PL

    2012-01-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron with $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 and 1960 GeV, we have studied exclusive double pomeron exchange in the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF. With $\\sim$300,000 events we present the mass spectrum of two hadrons, $h^+h^-$, assumed to be pions, with $|\\eta(\\pi)| <$ 1.3 and two rapidity gaps $\\Delta \\eta > 4.6$. The mass spectrum shows resonance structures, including $f_0(980),f_2(1270),$ and$ f_0(1370)$. The cross section ratio 1960 GeV/900 GeV and the mean $p_T(pair)$ show mass-dependent structures, even above $M$ = 2 GeV where there are no established $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ resonances. The data extend above $M$ = 5 GeV. We place an upper limit on exclusive $\\chi_{c0} \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$.

  13. Measurement of $b$-hadron masses

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Gracianiv Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of $b$-hadron masses are performed with the exclusive decay modes $B^+\\to J/\\psi K^+$, $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^{*0}$, $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}$, $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi\\phi$ and $\\Lambda^0_b\\to J/\\psi\\Lambda$ using an integrated luminosity of 35 pb$^{-1}$ collected in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The momentum scale is calibrated with $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays and verified to be known to a relative precision of $2 \\times 10^{-4}$ using other two-body decays. The results are more precise than previous measurements, particularly in the case of the $B^0_s$ and $\\Lambda^0_b$ masses.

  14. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, F.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

    1989-12-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. This lecture discusses the distribution functions of quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, and how knowledge of these is necessary before some quark-gluon plasma searches can be analyzed. 56 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Muon Detection Based on a Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, Thiago; Abreu, R; Achenbach, R; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Aielli, G; Al-Shabibi, A; Aleksandrov, I; Alexandrov, E; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Angelaszek, D; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, S; Anulli, F; Apolle, R; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Avolio, G; Baak, M; Backes, M; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J; Ballestrero, S; Banerjee, S; Bansil, H S; Barnett, B M; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, V; Batraneanu, S; Battaglia, A; Bauss, B; Beauchemin, P; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behera, P K; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Y; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R E; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Bondioli, M; Borer, C; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A G; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Brock, R; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bucci, F; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buscher, V; Buttinger, W; Calvet, S; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Capasso, L; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cattani, G; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapleau, B; Childers, J T; Chiodini, G; Christidi, I; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Coccaro, A; Cogan, J; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Conidi, C; Conventi, F; Corradi, M; Corso-Radu, A; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Crescioli, F; Crone, G; Crupi, R; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cummings, J T; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Dao, V; Darlea, G L; Davis, A O; De Asmundis, R; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; de Seixas, J M; Degenhardt, J; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Diaz, M A; Dietzsch, T A; Dionisi, C; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Drake, G; Dufour, M-A; Dumitru, I; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, K V; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Ernst, J; Etzion, E; Falciano, S; Farrington, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner, P J W; Fedorko, W; Fellmann, D; Feng, E; Ferrag, S; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fiorini, L; Fischer, G; Flowerdew, M J; Fonseca Martin, T; Francis, D; Fratina, S; French, S T; Front, D; Fukunaga, C; Gadomski, S; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gee, C N P; George, S; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gillman, A R; Giorgi, M; Giunta, M; Giusti, P; Goebel, M; Gonçalo, R; Gonzalez Silva, L; Göringer, C; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Grabowska-Bold, I; Green, B; Groll, M; Guida, A; Guler, H; Haas, S; Hadavand, H; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hauser, R; Hayakawa, T; Hayden, D; Head, S; Heim, S; Hellman, S; Henke, M; Hershenhorn, A; Hidvégi, A; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hirayama, S; Hod, N; Hoffmann, D; Hong, T M; Hryn'ova, T; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jez, P; Jimenez Otero, S; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Jones, G; Joos, M; Kadlecik, P; Kajomovitz, E; Kanaya, N; Kanega, F; Kanno, T; Kapliy, A; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Kessoku, K; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kirk, J; Klemetti, M; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Kobayashi, T; Koeneke, K; Koletsou, I; Koll, J D; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Kowalewski, R V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J; Kreisel, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kunkle, J; Kurashige, H; Kuze, M; Kwee, R; Laforge, B; Landon, M; Lane, J; Lankford, A J; Laranjeira Lima, S M; Larner, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lilley, J N; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Lowe, A; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lundberg, J; Lupu, N; Machado Miguéns, J; Mackeprang, R; Maettig, S; Magnoni, L; Maiani, C; Maltrana, D; Mangeard, P-S; Männer, R; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Marino, C; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martin, T; Martyniuk, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; Mastrandrea, P; Matsushita, T; McCarn, A; Mechnich, J; Medinnis, M; Meier, K; Melachrinos, C; Mendoza Nava, L M; Merola, L; Messina, A; Meyer, C P; Middleton, R P; Mikenberg, G; Mills, C M; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Moa, T; Moenig, K; Monk, J; Monticelli, F; Mora Herrera, C; Morettini, P; Morris, J D; Müller, F; Munwes, Y; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nelson, S; Nemethy, P; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Newman, P; Nisati, A; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Nurse, E; Ochando, C; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Oh, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Olivito, D; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Ospanov, R; Owen, M A; Özcan, V E; Ozone, K; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Paramonov, A; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Petcu, M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Phan, A; Piegaia, R; Pilkington, A; Pinder, A; Poddar, S; Polini, A; Pope, B G; Potter, C T; Primavera, M; Prokoshin, F; Ptacek, E; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Ramos Dos Santos Neves, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S H; Robinson, M; Rodriguez, D; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Romero, R; Roos, L; Ruiz Martinez, A; Ryabov, Y; Ryan, P; Saavedra, A; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saland, J; Salnikov, A; Salvatore, F; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santonico, R; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sasaki, O; Savu, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schäfer, U; Scharf, V L; Scheirich, D; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, K; Schroder, C; Schroer, N; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekhniaidze, G; Sfyrla, A; Shamim, M; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shooltz, D; Sidoti, A; Silbert, O; Silverstein, S; Sinev, N; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sjoen, R; Sjölin, J; Slagle, K; Sloper, J E; Smith, B C; Soffer, A; Soloviev, I; Spagnolo, S; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strauss, E A; Strom, D; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Taffard, A; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Taylor, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Thomson, M A; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Topfel, C; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Traynor, D; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Tripiana, M; Triplett, N; True, P; Tsiakiris, M; Tsuno, S; Tuggle, J; Ünel, G; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vallecorsa, S; Valsan, L; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Vaz Gil Lopes, L; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J C; Volpi, G; Vorwerk, V; Wagner, P; Wang, M; Warburton, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; White, M; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Winklmeier, F; Woods, K S; Wu, S-L; Wu, X; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Xella, S; Yakovlev, A; Yamazaki, Y; Yang, U; Yasu, Y; Yuan, L; Zaitsev, A; Zanello, L; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; zur Nedden, M

    2010-01-01

    The TileCal hadronic calorimeter provides a muon signal which can be used to assist in muon tagging at the ATLAS level-one trigger. Originally, the muon signal was conceived to be combined with the RPC trigger in order to reduce unforeseen high trigger rates due to cavern background. Nevertheless, the combined trigger cannot significantly deteriorate the muon detection performance at the barrel region. This paper presents preliminary studies concerning the impact in muon identification at the ATLAS level-one trigger, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations with single muons with 40 GeV/c momentum. Further, different trigger scenarios were proposed, together with an approach for matching both TileCal and RPC geometries.

  16. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  17. CP violation in b-hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341004

    2016-01-01

    Latest LHCb measurements of $CP$ violation in b-hadrons are presented based on $pp$ collision data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $\\rm TeV$ and $8\\ \\rm TeV$ respectively. The total integrated luminosity collected is 3.0 fb$^{-1}$. Results include recent measurements of $CP$ violation in $B_d$ and $B_s$ mixing, along with those of quantifying the effects of $b\\to c\\bar{c} s$ loop pollution. Standard Model $CP$ violation tests in loop transitions are discussed with results consistent with expectations. New decays of b-baryons are presented and preliminary studies of $CP$ violation are performed.

  18. Weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Talk will cover weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders ATLAS and CMS in particular. ATLAS has measured the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process in a wide mass range around the Z resonance region using dielectron and dimuon final states with $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV data. For the dielectron channel, the measurement includes electrons detected in the forward calorimeter which extends the covered phase space. The result is then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. Uncertainties from the limited knowledge on the parton distribution functions in the proton constitute a significant part of the uncertainty and a dedicated study is performed to obtain a PDF set describing W and Z data measured previously by ATLAS. Similar studies from CMS will be reported.

  19. The theory of hadronic parity violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias R.

    2017-07-01

    Parity-violating interactions between nucleons are the manifestation of an interplay of strong and weak interactions between quarks in the nucleons. Compared to the dominant parity-conserving part, the parity-violating component of the nuclear force is typically suppressed by approximately 6 to 7 orders of magnitude or more. Due to the short range of the weak interactions, however, it provides a unique probe of the strong dynamics that confine quarks into nucleons. An ongoing experimental program is mapping out this weak component of the nuclear force in few-nucleon systems. I will discuss recent theoretical progress based on effective field theory methods to analyze and interpret hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems, with a particular focus on two- and three-nucleon systems.

  20. Report of the Snowmass hadronization group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, M.; Gottschalk, T.

    1984-01-01

    Most of the data on jets and the relationship to the parent partons has come from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation which provides a particularly simple laboratory. A number of Monte Carlo (MC) models have been developed that are quite successful in describing the overall character e/sup +/e/sup -/ events. Although such comparisons provide an essential foundation, hadronic interactions are much more complicated and the detailed modeling of these processes is at a more primitive level of development. In this report, we review in detail the state-of-the-art of this modeling, including some comparisons with data. We highlight the experiments that are needed in order to guide the future developments of the models and give a detailed discussion of the relevant theoretical issues. Finally, we consider what can be measured at the SSC itself and make some suggestions for further work in this area. 128 references, 50 figures.

  1. The European hadron therapy community touches base

    CERN Multimedia

    Audrey Ballantine, Manuela Cirilli, Evangelia Dimovasili, Manjit Dosanjh, Seamus Hegarty

    2010-01-01

    The European hadron therapy community gathered in Stockholm from 3 to 5 September for the annual ENLIGHT workshops. Three of the four EC-funded projects born under the umbrella of ENLIGHT (see box) were discussed in the prestigious Nobel Forum at the Karolinska Institutet.   Souvenir photo from the ENLIGHT workshops On its second birthday, the PARTNER Initial Training Network was especially under the spotlight, as the European Commission conducted a formal project review bringing together the institutes, companies and young researchers involved. The 21 PARTNER researchers experienced the thrill of presenting their work in this privileged setting. During the coffee breaks, they joked about this being their only chance in life to speak in the Nobel Forum – but who knows what these brilliant young minds will achieve! They certainly impressed the European Commission’s Project Officer Gianluca Coluccio and Expert Reviewer Kaisa Hellevuo, who stated that PARTNER is a showcase proj...

  2. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  3. The NA49 large acceptance hadron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, S V; Appelshäuser, H; Bächler, J; Barna, D; Barnby, L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Barton, R A; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Bieser, F; Billmeier, A; Blyth, C O; Böck, R K; Bormann, C; Bracinik, J; Brady, F P; Brockmann, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Caines, H L; Cebra, D; Cooper, G E; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Cyprian, M; Dunn, J; Eckardt, V; Eckhardt, F; Empl, T; Eschke, J; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Fischer, H G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Ftácnik, J; Fuchs, M; Gabler, F; Gál, J; Ganz, R E; Gazdzicki, M; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, J; Günther, J; Harris, J W; Hegyi, S; Henkel, T; Hill, L A; Hlinka, V; Huang, I; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Irmscher, D; Ivanov, M; Janik, R; Jacobs, P; Jones, P G; Kadija, K; Kolesnikov, V I; Kowalski, M; Lasiuk, B; Lévai, Peter; Liebicher, K; Lynen, U; Malakhov, A I; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Marks, C; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Mock, A; Molnár, J; Nelson, J M; Oldenburg, M; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Pestov, Yu N; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pimpl, W; Pinsky, L; Piper, A; Porter, R J; Poskanzer, A M; Poziombka, S; Prindle, D J; Pühlhofer, F; Rauch, W; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R E; Retyk, W; Ritter, H G; Röhrich, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, H; Rybicki, A; Sammer, T; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schäfer, E; Schmidt, R; Schmischke, D; Schmitz, N; Schönfelder, S; Semenov, A Yu; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seyerlein, J; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Squier, G T A; Stelzer, H; Stock, Reinhard; Strmen, P; Ströbele, H; Struck, C; Susa, T; Szarka, I; Szentpétery, I; Szymanski, P; Sziklai, J; Toy, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Ullrich, T S; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wang, F; Weerasundara, D D; Wenig, S; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Wienold, T; Wood, L; Yates, T A; Zimányi, J; Zhu, X Z; Zybert, R

    1999-01-01

    The NA49 detector is a wide acceptance spectrometer for the study of hadron production in p+p, p+A, and A+A collisions at the CERN SPS. The main components are 4 large volume TPCs for tracking and particle identification via $dE/dx$. TOF scintillator arrays complement particle identification. Calorimeters for transverse energy determination and triggering, a detector for centrality selection in p+A collisions, and beam definition detectors complete the set-up. A description of all detector components is given with emphasis on new technical realizations. Performance and operational experience are discussed in particular with respect to the high track density environment of central Pb+Pb collisions.

  4. Fixed-target hadron production experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Boris A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results from fixed-target hadroproduction experiments (HARP, MIPP, NA49 and NA61/SHINE as well as their implications for cosmic ray and neutrino physics are reviewed. HARP measurements have been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve predictions of the muon yields in EAS and of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes as well as to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. Recent measurements released by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment and for interpretation of EAS data. These hadroproduction experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  5. Recent ALICE results on hadronic resonance production

    CERN Document Server

    Badalà, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Hadronic resonances are a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular, they can provide information on particle-formation mechanisms and on the properties of the medium at chemical freeze-out. Furthermore they contribute to the systematic study of parton energy loss and quark recombination. Measurements of resonances in pp and in p-Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle initial-state effects from medium-induced effects. In this paper the latest ALICE results on mid-rapidity K*(892)^0 and {\\phi}(1020) production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies are presented

  6. The Large Hadron Collider, A Megascience Project

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the next particle accelerator built to serve the world's high-energy physics community at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research. Reusing the 26.7-km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the existing LEP collider, the LHC will make use of advanced technology - high-field superconducting magnets operated in superfluid helium - to push the energy frontier up by an order of magnitude, while remaining economically feasible. The LHC demonstrates on a grand scale several typical features of megascience projects, such as the need for international funding, world-wide co-operation and integration in the local environment, which we review in the following.

  7. The BINP receives its Golden Hadron award

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday, 14 September, the LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, handed over a Golden Hadron award to Alexander Skrinsky of Russia's Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The prize is awarded in recognition of exceptional performances by suppliers and this year prizes were awarded to two firms, Cockerill-Sambre (Belgium) and Wah-Chang (United States), and to the Budker Institute, which was unable to receive the award at the same time as the two other recipients (see Bulletin No 34/2002, of 19 August 2002). The Russian institute has been rewarded for the particularly high-quality production of 360 dipole magnets and 185 quadrupole magnets for the LHC proton beam transfer lines.

  8. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  9. Two-Photon Physics in Hadronic Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-11-01

    Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic electron-scattering are reviewed. The apparent discrepancy in the extraction of elastic nucleon form factors between unpolarized Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments is discussed, as well as the understanding of this puzzle in terms of two-photon exchange corrections. Calculations of such corrections both within partonic and hadronic frameworks are reviewed. In view of recent spin-dependent electron scattering data, the relation of the two-photon exchange process to the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen is critically examined. The imaginary part of the two-photon exchange amplitude as can be accessed from the beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is reviewed. Further extensions and open issues in this field are outlined.

  10. Identified charged hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √ {s_{NN} } = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Leonardo

    2015-10-01

    Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) is an unavoidable consequence of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). High-energy heavy-ion collisions offer the unique possibility to reproduce in the laboratory the conditions expected during the very first stages of the evolution of the Universe. The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) allows the study of the dense nuclear environment created in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Particle Identification (PID) is one of the key features of the ALICE experiment. Identified particle spectra represent a crucial tool to understand the behaviour of the matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The transverse momentum p T distributions of identified hadrons contain information about the transverse expansion of the system and constrain the freeze-out properties of the system. Hydrodynamic models have proved to be very successful reproducing a large number of features of heavy-ion collisions ( e.g., particle p T distributions, radial flow, elliptic flow, Hanbury Brown-Twiss correlations, ...). The measurement of the p T distributions of identified π, K and p in Pb-Pb collisions at √ {s_{NN} } = 2.76 TeV is presented and discussed in terms of hydrodynamics. The V0 detector allows the selection of events based on the eccentricity of the collision (related with the initial geometry). This makes possible the study of the correlation between the p T distribution of hadrons and elliptic flow on an event-by-event basis. Hadron abundances can be obtained from the principle of maximum entropy using statistical concepts. This allows the extrapolation of the chemical freeze-out parameters from the data. Over the last years it has been proved that the chemical freeze-out temperature T ch is connected with the phase transition temperature T C . The measurements of the freeze-out parameters at the LHC energies are described in detail and the results obtained by various groups at lower energies are extended with

  11. B-quark production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Ruibin [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Riemersma, S. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Studying B-physics at hadron accelerators requires a good understanding of the total and differential cross sections for b-quark production. This knowledge gives those involved in B{bar B} mixing, rare B decays, and those trying to determine the CKM angles {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} an idea of how many events they can expect, given the luminosity and the branching ratios. It is particularly important for those studying rare B decays as they set limits on where we can hope to see new physics. For these reasons and others, the complete {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) corrections to heavy-quark production at hadron accelerators were calculated in. Also three groups have attempted to calculate heavy-quark production using resummation techniques in the small-x kinematic region. These resummation techniques are necessary since the b-quark mass m{sub b} is small relative to the center-of-mass energies {radical}S of the TeVatron and the SSC. While these techniques offer some hope of obtaining reasonable predictions for b-production at these machines, the current results can best be considered as preliminary. Thus we must turn to fixed-order perturbative QCD for guidance, as we have no other real choice at this point. However, let us submit a caveat here: fixed-order perturbative QCD works best when all the scales are roughly comparable, i.e. {radical}s {approx} m{sub b} {approx} p{sub t}, {radical}s being the partonic center-of-mass energy. When we are not in this regime, for example at the TeVatron and the SSC, our predictions will then be less reliable. Bearing this in mind, let use continue to the results section.

  12. A study of correlations between identified charged hadrons in hadronic Z0 decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Philip

    2003-04-01

    We present a preliminary study of correlations in rapidity between pairs of identified charged pions, kaons and protons in the SLD data. Details of short-range charge correlations between all combinations of these hadron species are used to study the locality of quantum number conservation, and suggest local charge ordering along the entire hadronization chain. A strong long-range K^+-K^- correlation is observed at high-momentum and weaker long-range π^+-π^-, π^+-K^- and p-K^- and pbar p correlations are observed in light flavor events, providing new information on leading particle production in u, d and s jets. The long-range correlations observed in cbarc and bbarb events are markedly different and consistent with expectations based on known decay properties of the leading heavy hadrons. The SLC electron beam polarization is used to tag the quark hemisphere in each event, allowing the first study of rapidities signed relative to the quark (vs. antiquark) direction. Distributions of ordered, signed rapidity differences provide a new probes of the fragmentation process, including the first direct observation of baryon number ordering along the qarrow barq axis.

  13. z-Scaling and Jet Production in Hadron-Hadron Collisions at High Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, M. V.; Dedovich, T. G.

    Inclusive jet production in ¯ pp and pp collisions at high energies in the framework of the concept of z-scaling is studied. The available experimental data on the cross-section of jet production obtained by the UA1, UA2, CDF and D0 Collaborations are used for analysis. The scaling function ψ(z) is expressed via inclusive cross-section Ed3σ/dq3 and jet multiplicity density ρ(s,η). The properties of z-scaling, the energy and angular independence of ψ(z) and the power behavior, ψ(z) z-α, of jet and dijet production were found. Based on the properties of z-scaling, the dependence of the cross-section of jets produced in ¯ pp and pp collisions on transverse momentum q⊥ over the central range is predicted. The obtained results can be of interest for future experiments planned at RHIC, LHC, HERA and Tevatron to search for new phenomena in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  14. Hydrodynamic modulation of pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Controlled expansion and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) using reproducible, high-throughput methods could accelerate stem cell research for clinical therapies. Hydrodynamic culture systems for PSCs are increasingly being used for high-throughput studies and scale-up purposes; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose PSCs to complex physical and chemical environments that include spatially and temporally modulated fluid shear stresses and heterogeneous mass transport. Furthermore, the effects of fluid flow on PSCs cannot easily be attributed to any single environmental parameter since the cellular processes regulating self-renewal and differentiation are interconnected and the complex physical and chemical parameters associated with fluid flow are thus difficult to independently isolate. Regardless of the challenges posed by characterizing fluid dynamic properties, hydrodynamic culture systems offer several advantages over traditional static culture, including increased mass transfer and reduced cell handling. This article discusses the challenges and opportunities of hydrodynamic culture environments for the expansion and differentiation of PSCs in microfluidic systems and larger-volume suspension bioreactors. Ultimately, an improved understanding of the effects of hydrodynamics on the self-renewal and differentiation of PSCs could yield improved bioprocessing technologies to attain scalable PSC culture strategies that will probably be requisite for the development of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:23168068

  15. Anisotropic hydrodynamics for conformal Gubser flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Michael; Nopoush, Mohammad [Kent State University, Kent OH 44242 (United States); Ryblewski, Radoslaw [The H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    In this proceedings contribution, we review the exact solution of the anisotropic hydrodynamics equations for a system subject to Gubser flow. For this purpose, we use the leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics equations which assume that the distribution function is ellipsoidally symmetric in local-rest-frame momentum. We then prove that the SO(3){sub q} symmetry in de Sitter space constrains the anisotropy tensor to be of spheroidal form with only one independent anisotropy parameter remaining. As a consequence, the exact solution reduces to the problem of solving two coupled non-linear differential equations. We show that, in the limit that the relaxation time goes to zero, one obtains Gubser's ideal hydrodynamic solution and, in the limit that the relaxation time goes to infinity, one obtains the exact free streaming solution obtained originally by Denicol et al. For finite relaxation time, we solve the equations numerically and compare to the exact solution of the relaxation-time-approximation Boltzmann equation subject to Gubser flow. Using this as our standard, we find that anisotropic hydrodynamics describes the spatio-temporal evolution of the system better than all currently known dissipative hydrodynamics approaches.

  16. Hydrodynamic Modeling and Its Application in AUC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Mattia; Byron, Olwyn

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic parameters measured in an AUC experiment, s(20,w) and D(t)(20,w)(0), can be used to gain information on the solution structure of (bio)macromolecules and their assemblies. This entails comparing the measured parameters with those that can be computed from usually "dry" structures by "hydrodynamic modeling." In this chapter, we will first briefly put hydrodynamic modeling in perspective and present the basic physics behind it as implemented in the most commonly used methods. The important "hydration" issue is also touched upon, and the distinction between rigid bodies versus those for which flexibility must be considered in the modeling process is then made. The available hydrodynamic modeling/computation programs, HYDROPRO, BEST, SoMo, AtoB, and Zeno, the latter four all implemented within the US-SOMO suite, are described and their performance evaluated. Finally, some literature examples are presented to illustrate the potential applications of hydrodynamics in the expanding field of multiresolution modeling. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics was held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai from 31 October to 4 November 2011. This workshop series, supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (BRNS, DAE), Govt. of India, began ten years ago with the first one being held at BARC, Mumbai in October 2002. The second one was held at Puri in 2005, organized jointly by Institute of Physics, Bhubneswar and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. The 3rd and 4th ones took place, respectively, at Shantineketan in 2006, organized by Visva Bharati University, and at Aligarh in 2008, organized by Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of the present workshop was to bring together the experts and young researchers in the field of hadron physics (both experiment and theory) and to have in-depth discussions on the current research activities in this field. The format of the workshop was: a series of review lectures by various experts from India and abroad, the presentation of advanced research results by researchers in the field, and a review of major experimental programs being planned and pursued in major laboratories in the field of hadron physics, with the aim of providing a platform for the young participants for interaction with their peers. The upcoming international FAIR facility at GSI is a unique future facility for studies of hadron physics in the charm sector and hyper nuclear physics. The Indian hadron physics community is involved in this mega science project and is working with the PANDA collaboration on the development of detectors, simulation and software tools for the hadron physics programme with antiprotons at FAIR. A one-day discussion session was held at this workshop to discuss India-PANDA activities, the current collaboration status and the work plan. This volume presents the workshop proceedings consisting of lectures and seminars which were delivered during the workshop. We are thankful to

  18. The AFS hadron calorimeter at the CERN ISR

    CERN Document Server

    Botner, O; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Gordon, H; Jeffreys, P; Kesseler, G; Molzon, W R; Oren, Y; Rosselet, L; Schindler, R; Smith, S D; Van der Lans, J; Wang, C J; Willis, W J; Witzeling, W; Woody, C

    1981-01-01

    The hadron calorimeter for the AFS experiment at CERN consists of a fine sampling uranium/copper scintillator sandwich. It is designed for high modularity and will provide azimuthal coverage over 8 sterad. The authors describe the optical readout system, consisting of acrylic scintillator and wavelength shifter plates, and present the performance of test modules with respect to the energy resolution for electrons ( sigma =0.16/ square root E) and hadrons ( sigma =0.36/ square root E), the linearity of response and the ratio of electron to hadron response (e/ pi =1.11). (4 refs).

  19. Lifetime measurements in $b$-hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Dordei, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Precision lifetime measurements of $b$-flavoured hadrons are an important test of the validity of the theoretical tool used to determine $b$-hadrons observables, the Heavy Quark Expansion. Recent measurements of the $B^+$, $\\Lambda^0_b$, $\\Xi^-_b$, $\\Xi^0_b$ and $\\Omega^-_b$ hadrons lifetimes are reported. Moreover, several $B^0$ and $B^0_s$ effective lifetime measurements are discussed, as well as a measurement of the decay width difference in the $B^0$ system, $\\Delta \\Gamma_d$. All the measurements have been performed using $pp$ collision data collected with the LHCb detector.

  20. Computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function by analytic continuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xu [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Hashimoto, Shoji [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba (Japan). School of High Energy Accelerator Science; Hotzel, Grit [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Petschlies, Marcus [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus); Renner, Dru B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We propose a method to compute the hadronic vacuum polarization function on the lattice at continuous values of photon momenta bridging between the space-like and time-like regions. We provide two independent derivations of this method showing that it leads to the desired hadronic vacuum polarization function in Minkowski space-time. We show with the example of the leading- order QCD correction to the muon anomalous magnetic moment that this approach can provide a valuable alternative method for calculations of physical quantities where the hadronic vacuum polarization function enters.