WorldWideScience

Sample records for hadronic radiation environment

  1. Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

  2. Radioactivation of silicon tracker modules in high-luminosity hadron collider radiation environments

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, I; Buttar, C; Cindro, V; Mandic, I

    2003-01-01

    One of the consequences of operating detector systems in harsh radiation environments will be radioactivation of the components. This will certainly be true in experiments such as ATLAS and CMS, which are currently being built to exploit the physics potential at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. If the levels of radioactivity and corresponding dose rates are significant, then there will be implications for any access or maintenance operations. This paper presents predictions for the radioactivation of ATLAS's Semi- Conductor Tracker (SCT) barrel system, based on both calculations and measurements. It is shown that both neutron capture and high-energy hadron reactions must be taken into account. The predictions also show that the SCT barrel-module should not pose any serious radiological problems after operation in high radiation environments.

  3. First Calibrations of Alanine and Radio-Photo-Luminescence Dosemeters to a Hadronic Radiation Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Fürstner, Markus; Floret, Idelette; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Mayer, Sabine; Menzel, Hans Gregor; Vincke, Helmut H

    2005-01-01

    Alanine and Radio-Photo-Luminescence (RPL) dosimeters are used to monitor radiation doses occurring inside the tunnels of all CERN accelerators including the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are placed close to radiation sensitive machine components like cables or insulation of magnet coils to predict their remaining lifetime. The dosimeters are exposed to mixed high-energy radiation fields. However, up to now both dosimeter types are calibrated to 60Co-photons only. In order to study the response of RPL and alanine dosimeters to mixed particle fields like those occurring at CERN's accelerators, an irradiation campaign at the CERN-EC High-Energy Reference field Facility (CERF-field) was performed. Moreover, the dosimeters were first time calibrated to a proton radiation field of a constant momentum of 24 GeV/c. In addition to the experiment FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations were carried out, which provide information concerning the energy deposition and the radiation field at the dosimeter locations.

  4. Thermal hadron production by QCD Hawking radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satz, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    The QCD counterpart of Hawking radiation from black holes leads to thermal hadron production in high energy collisions, from e + e - annihilation to heavy ion interactions. This hadronic radiation is emitted at a universal temperature T≅(σ/2π) 1/2 , where the string tension σ measures the colour field at the event horizon of confinement. Moreover, the emitted radiation is thermal 'at birth'; since the event horizon prevents all information transfer, no memory has to be destroyed kinetically. (author)

  5. Search for charmless decays of B hadrons in hadronic and radiative (b --> s gamma) decay modes using the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liko, Dietrich

    1995-01-01

    Charmless decays of B hadrons have been of considerable interest during the last years. Decays in hadronic modes proceed either trough tree level b � u transitions or loop diagrams involving so-called "hadronic" penguins. Tree level dominated decays confirm the non zero value of JVubl in the CKM mixing matrix while those induced by penguin processes provide tests of the loop structure of the Standard Model. Decays in the radiative modes b -+ s-y are forbidden at tree level and proceed only trough loop diagrams. Possible contributions to the decay rate due to new physics provide a test of the Standard Model. During the last years various measurements of decay rates have been performed at colliders at the bb-threshold. Experiments at the LEP collider have already collected sufficient data to study these decays in a different experimental environment. Results of searches at the DELPHI experiment are presented.

  6. J/psi and Υ radiative and hadronic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1987-07-01

    The search for gluonium at the J/psi and Υ is discussed, as well as the search for exotics at the Υ. Reactions discussed include radiative and hadronic decays of the J/psi and the search for radiative decays of the Υ. Future perspectives are also briefly considered. 45 refs., 27 figs

  7. Radiative transitions from the psi (3095) to ordinary hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharre, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    Preliminary results from the Mark II and Crystal Ball experiments on radiative transitions from the psi to ordinary hadrons are presented. In additon to the previously observed transitions to the eta, eta'(958), and f(1270), both groups observe a transition to a state which is tentatively identified as the E(1420).

  8. Generalized radiative corrections for hadronic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calan, C. de; Navelet, H.; Picard, J.

    1990-02-01

    Besides the radiative corrections theory at the order α 2 for reactions involving an arbitrary number of particles, this report gives the complete formula for the correction factor δ in dσ = dσ Born (1 + δ). The only approximation made here - unavoidable in this formulation - is to assume that the Born amplitude can be factorized. This calculation is valid for spin zero bosons. In the 1/2 fermion case, an extra contribution appears which has been analytically computed using a minor approximation. Special care has been devoted to the 1/v divergence of the amplitude near thresholds [fr

  9. Effects of gluon radiation in hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, Goesta.

    1989-10-01

    In this talk I discuss effects of gluon emission in soft collisions, the so-called 'soft radiation' in the Fritjof model. It is seen e.g. that the pT in the fragmentation regions, the seagull effect, increases with energy in fair agreement with experiments. I also discuss the content of strange and heavier quarks in high-pT gluon jets. Within the dipole scheme for QCD cascades on finds a larger production of heavier quarks than in previous approaches. Qualitative agreement with data is obtained for the K/π ratio and D meson production

  10. Space radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    Coupled with the increasing concern over trapped radiation effects on microelectronics, the availability of new data, long term changes in the Earth's magnetic field, and observed variations in the trapped radiation fluxes have generated the need for better, more comprehensive tools for modeling and predicting the Earth's trapped radiation environment and its effects on space systems. The objective of this report is to describe the current status of those efforts and review methods for attacking the issues associated with modeling the trapped radiation environment in a systematic, practical fashion. The ultimate goal will be to point the way to increasingly better methods of testing, designing, and flying reliable microelectronic systems in the Earth's radiation environment. The review will include a description of the principal models of the trapped radiation environment currently available--the AE8 and AP8 models. Recent results rom radiation experiments on spacecraft such as CRRES, SAMPEX, and CLEMENTINE will then be described. (author)

  11. Ionizing radiation in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandl, J.; Petr, I.

    1988-01-01

    The basic terms are explained such as the atom, radioactivity, nuclear reaction, interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, etc. The basic dosimetric variables and units and properties of radionuclides and ionizing radiation are given. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are discussed with regard to the environment and the propagation and migration of radionuclides is described in the environment to man. The impact is explained of ionizing radiation on the cell and the somatic and genetic effects of radiation on man are outlined. Attention is devoted to protection against ionizing radiation and to radiation limits, also to the detection, dosimetry and monitoring of ionizing radiation in the environment. (M.D.). 92 figs., 40 tabs. 74 refs

  12. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  13. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity

  14. Natural radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.; Mishra, U.C.; Pillai, K.C.; Sadasivan, S.

    1982-01-01

    The volume presented contains papers presented at the Second Special Symposium on Natural Radiation Environment held at Bombay, India, during January 1981. The papers deal with such topics as : 1)high natural radiation background areas; 2)environmental natural radioactivity; 3)measurement techniques; 4)technologically enhanced radioactivity; 5)indoor radiation environment; 6)radon and daughters in ambient air, and 7)applications in Geosciences. Each of the 87 papers presented has been abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Information Center's Energy Data Base

  15. Radiation environment at Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, M.A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear facilities located at Kalpakkam in Tamil Nadu State of India include at present nuclear power reactors, a fast breeder reactor, a nuclear research centre and a waste management facility. Active wastes generated at the site are collected, treated and safely disposed. High-level wastes are stored underground in RCC trenches and tile hole and low-level wastes in the from of liquid effluents are discharged into the sea. Off-gases are dispersed through stacks in the atmosphere. Environmental survey laboratory established at the site in 1974 carries out radiation surveillance of the environment, evaluates radiological impacts on environment and public, and assesses radiation exposure of the population. It is observed that even after five years of operation of the nuclear power station, radioactivity and radiation levels in the environment have virtually remained at the pre-operational levels. (M.G.B.). 14 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Radiation environment in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goka, Tateo; Koga, Kiyokazu; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Komiyama, Tatsuo; Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Japanese Experiment Module (Kibo) had been build into the International Space Station (ISS), which is a multipurpose manned facility and laboratory and is operated in orbit at about 400 km in altitude. Two Japanese astronauts stayed in the ISS for long time (4.5 and 5.5 months) for the first time. Space radiation exposure is one of the biggest safety issues for astronauts to stay for such a long duration in space. This special paper is presenting commentary on space radiation environment in ISS, neutrons measurements and light particles (protons and electrons) measurements, the instruments, radiation exposure management for Japanese astronauts and some comments in view of health physics. (author)

  17. Radiation protection at the LHC, CERN's large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.M.; Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    After a brief description of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will produce 7 TeV on 7 TeV proton collisions, some of the radiological questions it raises will be discussed. The machine will be built in the 27 km circumference ring-tunnel of an existing collider at CERN. It aims to achieve collision rates of 10 9 per second in two of its high-energy particle detectors. This requires two high-intensity beams of more than 10 14 protons each. Shielding, access control and activation in addition to the high power in the proton-proton collisions must be taken into account. The detectors and local electronics of the particle physics experiments, which will surround these collisions, will have to be radiation resistant. Some of the environmental issues raised by the project will be discussed. (author)

  18. LHCb: Radiative decays of B hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Soomro, F

    2009-01-01

    Flavour physics is an excellent probe of physics beyond the Standard Model. It offers the possibility to measure effects from heavy virtual particles with masses above the experimental reach in terms of direct production. LHCb is well positioned to exploit the large statistics of B hadrons available at LHC, to make competitive measurements in various radiative decays like B_d->K^{*} , B_s\\phi\\gamma, \\Lambda_b->\\Lambda ^{0\\gamma} and B^+->\\phiK^{+\\gamma}.. For example, the direct CP asymmetry in K^{*\\gamma} decay can be measured to the level of 1.8%[1], better than the current experimental accuracy, with only 100 pb-1of integrated luminosity.

  19. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 57 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978 at Houston, Texas. This symposium provided a common forum for scientists in several disciplines that deal with natural radiation because there is an increasing interest in the environment as it pertains to human health and the competition for scarce energy and material resources

  20. Radiation Environment of Phobos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Clark, John H.; Sturner, Steven J.; Stubbs, Timothy; Wang, Yongli; Glenar, David A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Joyce, Colin J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Farrell, William M.

    2017-10-01

    The innermost Martian moon Phobos is a potential way station for the human exploration of Mars and the solar system beyond the orbit of Mars. It has a similar radiation environment to that at 1 AU for hot plasma and more energetic particles from solar, heliospheric and galactic sources. In the past two decades there have been many spacecraft measurements at 1 AU, and occasionally in the Mars orbital region around the Sun, that can be used to define a reference model for the time-averaged and time-variable radiation environments at Mars and Phobos. Yearly to hourly variance comes from the eleven-year solar activity cycle and its impact on solar energetic, heliospheric, and solar-modulated galactic cosmic ray particles. We report progress on compilation of the reference model from U.S. and international spacecraft data sources of the NASA Space Physics Data Facility and the Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO), and from tissue-equivalent dosage rate measurements by the CRaTER instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Observer spacecraft now in lunar orbit. Similar dosage rate data are also available from the Mars surface via the NASA Planetary Data System archive from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. The sub-Mars surface hemisphere of Phobos is slightly blocked from energetic particle irradiation by the body of Mars but there is a greater global variance of interplanetary radiation exposure as we have calculated from the known topography of this irregularly shaped moon. Phobos receives a relatively small flux of secondary radiation from galactic cosmic ray interactions with the Mars surface and atmosphere, and at plasma energies from pickup ions escaping out of the Mars atmosphere. The greater secondary radiation source is from cosmic ray interactions with the moon surface, which we have simulated with the GEANT radiation transport code for various cases of the surface regolith

  1. Resistive Plate Chamber Digitization in a Hadronic Shower Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Z.

    2016-06-28

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadron Calorimeter (SDHCAL) technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadron calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. In this paper we present our prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are ...

  2. Radiation in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, R.

    1991-01-01

    Aside from the atomic bomb attacks in 1945, the experience of radioactive contamination of human environment was the exposure of a tuna fishing boat to the radioactive fallout of a hydrogen bomb test explosion at Bikini atoll in March, 1954. Thereafter, radioactivity was frequently detected in fishes in central Pacific Ocean. Radioactivity was also detected in rain, which resulted in the contamination of agricultural products. Due to the great concern of general public for the radioactivity in food materials, the government initiated the national program of radioactivity surveillance. Since then, the fallout radioactivity due to nuclear test explosions was the main object surveillance in 1950s and 1960s, but the program was gradually expanded to include natural radiation, the artificial radioactivity due to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and other special programs. The history of the radioactive contamination of environment, natural radiation, medical exposure, the radioactive fallout due to nuclear tests, nuclear power generation and the Chernobyl accident are reported. (K.I.)

  3. The radiation environment of proton accelerators and storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    These lecture notes survey the physical processes that give rise to the stray-radiation environment of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, with emphasis on their importance for radiation protection. The origins of the prompt radiation field (which disappears when the accelerator is switched off) are described in some detail: proton-nucleus interactions, extranuclear cascades, muon generation and transport. The effects of induced radioactivity in the accelerator structure and surroundings, notably in iron, concrete, air, and water, are discussed and methods for monitoring hadrons in the radiation environment outside the accelerator are listed. Seventy-six references to the literature are included. (Author)

  4. Radiation environment of proton accelerators and storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, G R

    1976-03-08

    These lecture notes survey the physical processes that give rise to the stray-radiation environment of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, with emphasis on their importance for radiation protection. The origins of the prompt radiation field (which disappears when the accelerator is switched off) are described in some detail: proton-nucleus interactions, extranuclear cascades, muon generation and transport. The effects of induced radioactivity in the accelerator structure and surroundings, notably in iron, concrete, air, and water, are discussed, and methods for monitoring hadrons in the radiation environment outside the accelerator are listed. Seventy-six references to the literature are included.

  5. Radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    'Radiation in the environment' includes the natural background, the release and transport of radionuclides within the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and marine environments, understanding the pathways through which radionuclides gain access to humans, and the development of methods for measuring, assessing, and controlling the resulting exposures. Contributions of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to these subjects include early studies of the behaviour of radionuclides in the Columbia River and in the atmosphere and soil in the vicinity of the Hanford site, the development of methods for assessing the accompanying doses to members of the public, and the preparation of guides for the conduct of environmental surveillance activities as well as the clean-up of decommissioned facilities. An integral part of these activities has been the maintenance of close working relationships with the public, prime examples being the landmark Tri-Party Agreement and the designation of a portion of the Hanford site as the Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. Through these efforts scientists at PNL have provided leadership in environmental activities at both the national and the international level. (author)

  6. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  7. Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341385; Corti, Gloria

    The unprecedented radiation levels of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during high-energy proton-proton collisions will have an impact on the operation of its experiments’ detectors and electronics. LHCb, one of the 4 major LHC experiments, has started operation in 2009 and from 2011 onward it has been collecting data at and above its design luminosity. Detectors and associated detector electronics are prone to damage if the radiation levels exceed the expected values. It is essential to monitor the radiation environment of the experimental area and compare it with predictions obtained from simulation studies in order to assess the situation and take corrective action in case of need. Understanding the existing radiation environment will also provide important input to the planning of maintenance and for operation at upgrade luminosity. A set of radiation detectors has been installed in the LHCb experimental area to measure different aspects of its radiation environment. Passive dosimeters including Thermo-L...

  8. Natural radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The speaker discusses natural radiation in the environment. He outlines the external sources of exposure (cosmic and terrestrial), as well as the internal sources (ingestion and inhalation). He states that a clear understanding of these sources and their impacts is necessary in order to properly evaluate both the environment and human radiation exposure

  9. Radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    In this brochure a general survey is presented of the SAWORA (Dutch abbrevation for 'Radiation aspects of dwelling-hygiene and related radio-ecological problems') research-program and its results. In this program emphasis lay upon indoor radiation burden. Therewith a distinction has to be made between external and internal radiation burden of men. In this context the external burden is accounted for by gamma radiation while the internal burden depends predominantly upon the concentration of radon in the air and radioactive materials in the body. After a short explanation of the concept of radiation in ch. 2, attention is devoted to gamma radiation and radon concentration in the open air in ch. 3, furthermore the radionuclide concentrations of the Dutch soil are discussed. In ch. 4 the radio-ecological aspects of fly-ash powder and gypsum are treated and, in ch. 5, those of building materials. Ch. 6 deals with indoor gamma-radiation. In ch. 7 a survey is given of radon concentrations in Dutch dwellings and the observed differences in concentrations. The synthesis of the various factors which influence the indoor radiation burden, the way in which radon and radondaughters enter the lungs and their contribution to the origin of lung carcinomas are discussed in ch. 8, together with the computer model with which the radiation aspects of certain building-technical developments can be calculated. Ch. 9 finally summarizes the most important results of the SAWORA program. 34 refs.; figs

  10. Radiative corrections to the hadronic cross-section measurement at DA{phi}NE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoze, V.A. [Durham Univ. of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Konchatnij, M.I.; Merenkov, NP.; Shekhovzova, O.N. [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Karkhov (Ukraine); Pancheri, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Trentadue, L. [Parma Univ., Parma (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2000-07-01

    The hadronic invariant mass distribution for the process of electron--positron annihilation into a pair of charged pions accompanied by a photon radiated from the initial state has been studied for the region of DA{phi}NE energies. The Born cross-section and the electromagnetic radiative corrections to it are calculated for realistic conditions of the KLOE detector. The dependence on the physical parameters which define the event selection is obtained.

  11. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 μm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic im...

  12. Radiation, people and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.

    2004-02-01

    Radiation is a fact of life. We live in a world in which radiation is naturally present everywhere. Light and heat from nuclear reactions in the Sun are essential to our existence. Radioactive materials occur naturally throughout the environment, and our bodies contain radioactive materials such as carbon-14, potassium-40 and polonium-210 quite naturally. All life on Earth has evolved in the presence of this radiation. Since the discovery of X rays and radioactivity more than 100 years ago, we have found ways of producing radiation and radioactive materials artificially. The first use of X rays was in medical diagnosis, within six months of their discovery in 1895. So a benefit from the use of radiation was established very early on, but equally some of the potential dangers of radiation became apparent in the doctors and surgeons who unwittingly overexposed themselves to X rays in the early 1900s. Since then, many different applications of radiation and radioactive materials have been developed. We can classify radiation according to the effects it produces on matter, into ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation includes cosmic rays, X rays and the radiation from radioactive materials. Non-ionizing radiation includes ultraviolet light, radiant heat, radio waves and microwaves. This book deals with ionizing radiation, a term, which for simplicity, is often shortened to just radiation. It has been prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom) as a broad overview of the subject of ionizing radiation, its effects and uses, as well as the measures in place to use it safely. As the United Nations agency for nuclear science and its peaceful applications, the IAEA offers a broad spectrum of expertise and programmes to foster the safe use of radiation internationally

  13. The space radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    There are three primary sources of space radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped belt radiation, and solar particle events (SPE). All are composed of ions, the nuclei of atoms. Their energies range from a few MeV u -1 to over a GeV u -1 . These ions can fragment when they interact with spacecraft materials and produce energetic neutrons and ions of lower atomic mass. Absorbed dose rates inside a typical spacecraft (like the Space Shuttle) in a low inclination (28.5 degrees) orbit range between 0.05 and 2 mGy d -1 depending on the altitude and flight inclination (angle of orbit with the equator). The quality factor of radiation in orbit depends on the relative contributions of trapped belt radiation and GCR, and the dose rate varies both with orbital altitude and inclination. The corresponding equivalent dose rate ranges between 0.1 and 4 mSv d -1 . In high inclination orbits, like that of the Mir Space Station and as is planned for the International Space Station, blood-forming organ (BFO) equivalent dose rates as high as 1.5 mSv d -1 . Thus, on a 1 y mission, a crew member could obtain a total dose of 0.55 Sv. Maximum equivalent dose rates measured in high altitude passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) were 10 mSv h -1 . For an interplanetary space mission (e.g., to Mars) annual doses from GCR alone range between 150 mSv y -1 at solar maximum and 580 mSv y -1 at solar minimum. Large SPE, like the October 1989 series, are more apt to occur in the years around solar maximum. In free space, such an event could contribute another 300 mSv, assuming that a warning system and safe haven can be effectively used with operational procedures to minimize crew exposures. Thus, the total dose for a 3 y mission to Mars could exceed 2 Sv

  14. Hadronic model for the non-thermal radiation from the binary system AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, W.

    2018-05-01

    AR Scorpii is a close binary system containing a rotation powered white dwarf and a low-mass M type companion star. This system shows non-thermal emission extending up to the X-ray energy range. We consider hybrid (lepto-hadronic) and pure hadronic models for the high energy non-thermal processes in this binary system. Relativistic electrons and hadrons are assumed to be accelerated in a strongly magnetised, turbulent region formed in collision of a rotating white dwarf magnetosphere and a magnetosphere/dense atmosphere of the M-dwarf star. We propose that the non-thermal X-ray emission is produced either by the primary electrons or the secondary e± pairs from decay of charged pions created in collisions of hadrons with the companion star atmosphere. We show that the accompanying γ-ray emission from decay of neutral pions, which are produced by these same protons, is expected to be on the detectability level of the present and/or the future satellite and Cherenkov telescopes. The γ-ray observations of the binary system AR Sco should allow us to constrain the efficiency of hadron and electron acceleration and also the details of the radiation processes.

  15. Radiation Damage in Silicon Detectors Caused by Hadronic and Electromagnetic Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E.; Stahl, J.; Pintilie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The report contains various aspects of radiation damage in silicon detectors subjected to high intensity hadron and electromagnetic irradiation. It focuses on improvements for the foreseen LHC applications, employing oxygenation of silicon wafers during detector processing (result from CERN-RD48). An updated survey on hadron induced damage is given in the first article. Several improvements are outlined especially with respect to antiannealing problems associated with detector storage during LHC maintenance periods. Open questions are outlined in the final section, among which are a full understanding of differences found between proton and neutron induced damage, process related effects changing the radiation tolerance in addition to the oxygen content and the lack of understanding the changed detector properties on the basis of damage induced point and cluster defects. In addition to float zone silicon, so far entirely used for detector fabrication,Czochralski silicon was also studied and first promising re...

  16. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, F.

    1998-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activities is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally ''clean'' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed: i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  17. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    1999-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activity is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally 'clean' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed. (i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. (ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  18. Radiation environment of the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    The radiation environment of the earth consists of natural and artificial radiation. This paper explains the distribution and some exposure examples of natural radiation and the relation between life and natural radiation. The earth was born before about 46 hundreds of millions of years. In the present earth, there are some natural radiations with long half-life originated by the earth. They are 232 Th (141 hundreds of millions of years of half-life), 238 U (45 hundreds of millions of years of half-life) and 40 K (13 hundreds of millions of years of half-life). Natural radiation (α-, β-, and γ-ray) from natural radionuclides exists everywhere in the earth. Natural radio nuclides are heat source of the earth, which is about 0.035 μcal/g/y. γ-ray from them is called as ''the earth's crust γ-ray'', which is about 55 nGy/h average of the world and about 50 nGy/h in Japan. The distribution of γ-ray is depended on the kinds of soil and rock. 222 Rn and 230 Rn are rare gases and the concentration of them in a room is larger than outside. Natural radiations originated from the cosmos are proton, ionizing components, neutron component with muon and electron, 3 H, 14 C and 10 Be. Effect of cosmic rays on birth of life, change of temperature, amount of cloud and ultra resistant cell are stated. (S.Y.)

  19. Analogy of QCD hadronization and Hawking-Unruh radiation at NICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasser Tawfik, Abdel [Modern University for Technology and Information (MTI), Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), Cairo (Egypt); World Laboratory for Cosmology And Particle Physics (WLCAPP), Cairo (Egypt); Academy for Scientific Research and Technology (ASRT), Network for Nuclear Sciences (NNS), Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    The proposed analogy of particle production from high-energy collisions and Hawking-Unruh radiation from black holes is extended to finite density (collisions) and finite electric charge (black holes). Assuming that the electric charge is directly proportional to the density (or the chemical potential), it becomes clear that for at least two freezeout conditions; constant s/T{sup 3} and E/N, the proposed analogy works very well. Dependence of radiation (freezeout) temperature on finite electric charge leads to an excellent estimation for kaon-to-pion ratio, for instance, especially in the energy range covered by NICA. The precise and complete measurements for various light-flavored particle yields and ratios are essential in characterizing Hawking-Unruh radiation from charged black holes and the QCD hadronization at finite density, as well. (orig.)

  20. Radiation effects in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  1. Proceeding of Radiation Safety and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Scientific Presentation of Radiation Safety and Environment was held on 20-21 august 1996 at Center of Research Atomic Energy Pasar Jum'at, Jakarta, Indonesia. Have presented 50 papers about Radiation Safety, dosimetry and standardization, environment protection and radiation effect

  2. Adaptation of radiation shielding code to space environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Koichi; Hara, Akihisa

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the trend to the development of space has heightened. To the development of space, many problems are related, and as one of them, there is the protection from cosmic ray. The cosmic ray is the radiation having ultrahigh energy, and there was not the radiation shielding design code that copes with cosmic ray so far. Therefore, the high energy radiation shielding design code for accelerators was improved so as to cope with the peculiarity that cosmic ray possesses. Moreover, the calculation of the radiation dose equivalent rate in the moon base to which the countermeasures against cosmic ray were taken was simulated by using the improved code. As the important countermeasures for the safety protection from radiation, the covering with regolith is carried out, and the effect of regolith was confirmed by using the improved code. Galactic cosmic ray, solar flare particles, radiation belt, the adaptation of the radiation shielding code HERMES to space environment, the improvement of the three-dimensional hadron cascade code HETCKFA-2 and the electromagnetic cascade code EGS 4-KFA, and the cosmic ray simulation are reported. (K.I.)

  3. What Can We Learn from Hadronic and Radiative Decays of Light Mesons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Bastian

    2013-04-01

    Chiral perturbation theory offers a powerful tool for the investigation of light pseudoscalar mesons. It incorporates the fundamental symmetries of QCD, interrelates various processes, and allows to link these to the light quark masses. Its shortcomings lie in a limited energy range: the radius of convergence of the chiral expansion is confined to below resonance scales. Furthermore, the strongest consequences of chiral symmetry are manifest for pseudoscalars (pions, kaons, eta) only: vector mesons, e.g., have a severe impact in particular for reactions involving photons. In this talk, I advocate dispersions relations as another model-independent tool to extend the applicability range of chiral perturbation theory. They even allow to tackle the physics of vector mesons in a rigorous way. It will be shown how dispersive methods can be used to resum large rescattering effects, and to provide model-independent links between hadronic and radiative decay modes. Examples to be discussed will include decays of the eta meson, giving access to light-quark-mass ratios or allowing to test the chiral anomaly; and meson transition form factors, which have an important impact on the hadronic light-by-light-scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  4. CERN 's large hadron collider : Radiation protection aspects of design and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Brugger, Markus; Menzel, Hans; Roesler, Stefan; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Full text: CERN, the world's largest particle physics laboratory provides high energy hadron beams for experiments exploring matter. For this purpose various accelerators are operated and in 2008 the last link will be added to the accelerator chain: beam will be injected into CERN 's new 'flagship', the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). From then on high energy physics experiments will exploit the LHC 's colliding beams of protons and lead ions with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and 1150 TeV, respectively. Radiation Protection aspects were taken into account during the whole duration of the design phase. Conservative design constraints were defined in 1996; some years later some of them, in particular with respect to the dose to occupational exposed workers, had to be readjusted to account for the latest development in CERN 's radiation protection rules and regulations. Numerous radiation protection studies had been performed to ensure a lay-out of the machine and its experiments in compliance with these constraints. These studies assessed all radiation risks related to the various beam-operation modes of the accelerator. In all cases external exposure was identified as the major risk: due to high energetic, mixed radiation fields during beam-on and due to beta and gamma radiation fields caused by induced radioactivity during beam-off. Counter measures were implemented like an optimized beam operation to limit beam losses, installation of thick shielding, prohibition of access to the major part of the LHC underground areas during beam-operation and optimization of the equipment and its handling during maintenance and repair. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations were performed to derive from the various beam loss scenarios the dose rates the workers will be exposed to. Individual and collective doses were projected based on the calculations and the maintenance scenarios provided by the teams concerned. In an iterative way the lay-out of the various regions were optimized

  5. Low-lying nuclear levels and radiative transitions in hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.; Kudryavtsev, A.E.; Lisin, V.I.; Mur, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    The analytic theory of nuclear level shifts permit the position of the nuclear level perturbing the Coulomb spectrum to be calculated on the basis of the magnitude of the level shift of a hadron atom. As an example the K -4 He atom is discussed. The experimental data on the 2p-level shift indicate that a weakly bound p-state with a binding energy and width epsilon approximately γ approximately 0.5 MeV may exist in the system. The probabilities for radiative transitions to this level and the cross section for its creation in a nuclear reaction with 6 Li are calculated. The possible existence of weakly coupled K - and anti p states for other light nuclei is discussed. An exact solution of the model Coulomb problem with short range interaction is obtained and this permits the limits of validity of the initial approximations to be determined

  6. The Near-Earth Space Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the effects of the Near-Earth space radiation environment on NASA missions. Included in this presentation is a review of The Earth s Trapped Radiation Environment, Solar Particle Events, Galactic Cosmic Rays and Comparison to Accelerator Facilities.

  7. TELEMETRY CIRCUITS IN A RADIATION ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olesen, H. L.

    1963-05-15

    Radiation effects are a serious problem for designers of space vehicle electronic equipment. By simulating the environment and irradiating various components and circuits, more and more data become available for engineering application. However, it is not possible to simulate the pulsed radiation environment correctly, because it is not possible to obtain the high radiation intensities occurring in the actual environment. The following represents experimental data obtained at radiation intensities >10/sup 12/ rad/sec. This is an intensity 4 to 5 orders of magnitude greater than previous experimental data. (auth)

  8. HERWIG for Hadron-Hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, M.H.

    1993-05-01

    HERWIG is a general-purpose particle physics event generator, which includes the simulation of any combination of hard lepton, hadron or photon scattering and soft hadron-hadron collisions in one package. It uses the parton-shower approach for initial-state and final-state QCD radiation, including colour coherence effects and azimuthal correlations both within and between jets. This article describes HERWIG version 5.6, and gives a brief review of the physics underlying HERWIG, with particular emphasis on hadron-hadron collisions. Details are given of the input and control parameters used by the program

  9. Radiation pollution of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benalashhar, Hanan Ali

    2006-01-01

    This paper interested in the topic of environmental pollution by radioactive materials due to several human activities. The meaning of human activities are nuclear tests and extraction of raw uranium, waste and reactor accidents, nuclear fuel and radon gas, and the peaceful uses of radiation. This paper points out the effects of environmental pollution by radiation and the means of reduction, and also illustrate the radiation pollution in the Arab region. (author)

  10. The radiation environment in underground workplaces of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, C; Kindl, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Active dose-monitoring of workplaces is crucial in order to operate a high-energy particle accelerator safely. As the mixed radiation fields that are expected in the environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very different from standard use-cases like in nuclear power plants, it is of highest importance to characterize and calibrate radiation monitoring equipment appropriately for their use in high energy mixed radiation fields. Due to their sensitivity to different particle types over a larger energy range high-pressure ionization chambers have already been used at CERN and they are foreseen to be included within the radiation monitoring system of the LHC. In the framework of this thesis a new method was developed which allows for appropriate field-specific calibration of these detectors using Monte Carlo simulations. Therefore, the application of common 238Pu-Be source based calibration in mixed radiation fields was studied and compared to more accurate field specific calibration based on FLUKA Mon...

  11. Behaviour of organic materials in radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tavlet, M

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effects in polymers are reminded together with the ageing factors. Radiation-ageing results are mainly discussed about thermosetting insulators, structural composites and cable-insulating materials. Some hints are given about high-voltage insulations, cooling fluids, organic scintillators and light-guides. Some parameters to be taken into account for the estimate of the lifetime of components in radiation environment are also shown. (23 refs).

  12. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  13. Development of environment radiation database management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jong Gyu; Chung, Chang Hwa; Ryu, Chan Ho; Lee, Jin Yeong; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Hun Sun [Daeduk College, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    In this development, we constructed a database for efficient data processing and operating of radiation-environment related data. Se developed the source documents retrieval system and the current status printing system that supports a radiation environment dta collection, pre-processing and analysis. And, we designed and implemented the user interfaces and DB access routines based on WWW service policies on KINS Intranet. It is expected that the developed system, which organizes the information related to environmental radiation data systematically can be utilize for the accurate interpretation, analysis and evaluation.

  14. Development of environment radiation database management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jong Gyu; Chung, Chang Hwa; Ryu, Chan Ho; Lee, Jin Yeong; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Hun Sun

    1999-03-01

    In this development, we constructed a database for efficient data processing and operating of radiation-environment related data. Se developed the source documents retrieval system and the current status printing system that supports a radiation environment dta collection, pre-processing and analysis. And, we designed and implemented the user interfaces and DB access routines based on WWW service policies on KINS Intranet. It is expected that the developed system, which organizes the information related to environmental radiation data systematically can be utilize for the accurate interpretation, analysis and evaluation

  15. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The ionizing radiation environment on the moon that contributes to the radiation hazard for astronauts consists of galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles and albedo particles from the lunar surface. We will present calculations of the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent to various organs in this environment during quiet times and during large solar particle events. We will evaluate the contribution of solar particles other than protons and the contributions of the various forms of albedo. We will use the results to determine which particle fluxes must be known in order to estimate the radiation hazard.

  16. Radiation environment of fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Next step device (experimental reactor), which is planned to succeed the large plasma experimental devices such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, generates radiation (neutron + gamma ray) during its operation. Radiation (neutronic) properties of the material are basis for the study on neutron utilization (energy recovery and tritium breeding), material selection (irradiation damage and lifetime evaluation) and radiation safety (personnel exposure and radiation waste). It is necessary, therefore, to predict radiation behaviour in the reactor correctly for the engineering design of the reactor. This report describes the outline of the radiation environment of the reactor based on the information obtained by the neutronic and shielding design calculation of the fusion experimental reactor (FER). (author)

  17. Global environment and radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazuto

    1991-01-01

    The present status of investigation of acid rain, stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse effect and their relations to radiation exposure are reported. Soil acidification increases transfer rates of radioactivities to plants which increases the population dose. There are two types of ozone depletion, conventional type and ozone hole type and the latter is much more serious than the former. In the greenhouse effect, although there are large uncertainties both in theoretical and observational sides, present predictions about the global warming will not be very far from reality. Environmental effects are wide-ranging and serious. Radon and thoron exhalation rates are affected by the global warming. The influence of the greenhouse effect on ozone depletion is to suppress depletion for conventional type and enhance depletion for ozone hole type. (author) 65 refs

  18. Optical fibres in the radiation environment of CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermain, E.

    2017-11-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (in Geneva, Switzerland), is home to a complex scientific instrument: the 27-kilometre Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collides beams of high-energy particles at close to the speed of light. Optical fibres are widely used at CERN, both in surface areas (e.g. for inter-building IT networks) and in the accelerator complex underground (e.g. for cryogenics, vacuum, safety systems). Optical fibres in the accelerator are exposed to mixed radiation fields (mainly composed of protons, pions, neutrons and other hadrons, gamma rays and electrons), with dose rates depending on the particular installation zone, and with radiation levels often significantly higher than those encountered in space. In the LHC and its injector chain radiation levels range from relatively low annual doses of a few Gy up to hundreds of kGy. Optical fibres suffer from Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA, expressed in dB per unit length) that affect light transmission and which depends on the irradiation conditions (e.g. dose rate, total dose, temperature). In the CERN accelerator complex, the failure of an optical link can affect the proper functionality of control or monitoring systems and induce the interruption of the accelerator operation. The qualification of optical fibres for installation in critical radiation areas is therefore crucial. Thus, all optical fibre types installed in radiation areas at CERN are subject to laboratory irradiation tests, in order to evaluate their RIA at different total dose and dose rates. This allows the selection of the appropriate optical fibre type (conventional or radiation resistant) compliant with the requirements of each installation. Irradiation tests are performed in collaboration with Fraunhofer INT (irradiation facilities and expert team in Euskirchen, Germany). Conventional off-the-shelf optical fibres can be installed for optical links exposed to low radiation levels (i.e. annual dose typically below few

  19. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Koller, Josef; Tokar, Robert L.; Chen, Yue; Henderson, Michael G.; Friedel, Reiner H.

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  20. The Radiation Environment of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Linsky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exoplanets are born and evolve in the radiation and particle environment created by their host star. The host star’s optical and infrared radiation heats the exoplanet’s lower atmosphere and surface, while the ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet and X-radiation control the photochemistry and mass loss from the exoplanet’s upper atmosphere. Stellar radiation, especially at the shorter wavelengths, changes dramatically as a host star evolves leading to changes in the planet’s atmosphere and habitability. This paper reviews the present state of our knowledge concerning the time-dependent radiation emitted by stars with convective zones, that is stars with spectral types F, G, K, and M, which comprise nearly all of the host stars of detected exoplanets.

  1. Radiation sources, radiation environment and risk level at Dubna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    The overall information about ionizing radiation sources, which form radiation environment and risk at Dubna, is introduced. Systematization of the measurement results is performed on the basis of the effective dose and losses of life expectancy. The contribution of different sources to total harm of Dubna inhabitants has been revealed. JINR sources carry in ∼ 4% from the total effective dose of natural and medicine radiation sources; the harm from them is much less than the harm from cigarette smoking. 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  2. Ionizing radiation environment for the TOMS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriente, M.; Maloy, J. O.; Vampola, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) will fly on several different spacecraft, each having an orbit which is approximately polar and 800-980 km in altitude. A description is given of the computer-based tools used for characterizing the spacecraft interactions with the ionizing radiation environment in orbit and the susceptibility requirements for ionizing radiation compatibility. The peak flux from the model was used to derive the expected radiation-induced noise in the South Atlantic Anomaly for the new TOMS instruments intended to fly on Advanced Earth Observatory System and Earth Probe.

  3. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar; Dolenc, Irena; Fretwurst, Eckhart; Hoenniger, Frank; Kramberger, Gregor; Moll, Michael; Nossarzewska, Elsbieta; Pintilie, Ioana; Roeder, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 μm had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E C -0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with 90 Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected. A charge collection efficiency of

  4. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany)]. E-mail: gunnar.lindstroem@desy.de; Dolenc, Irena [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Hoenniger, Frank [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Kramberger, Gregor [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Moll, Michael [CERN, Geneva, 1211 (Switzerland); Nossarzewska, Elsbieta [ITME, Institute for Electronocs Materials Technology, Warsaw, 01919 (Poland); Pintilie, Ioana [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest, 077125 (Romania); Roeder, Ralf [CiS Institute for Microsensors gGmbH, Erfurt, 99099 (Germany)

    2006-11-30

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 {mu}m had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of {phi} {sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E {sub C}-0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with {sup 90}Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected

  5. Development of radiation-tolerant components for the quench detection system at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitterling, Oliver

    2017-04-03

    This works describes the results of a three year project to improve the radiation tolerance of the Quench Protection System of the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Radiation-induced premature beam aborts have been a limiting factor for accelerator availability in the recent years. Furthermore, the future upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider to its High Luminosity phase will further increase the radiation load and has higher requirements for the overall machine availability. Therefore equipment groups like the Quench protection groups have used the last years to redesign many of their systems to fulfill those requirements. In support of the development of radiation-tolerant systems, several proton beam irradiation campaigns were conducted to determine the inherent radiation tolerance of a selection of varied electronic components. Using components from this selection a new Quench Protection System for the 600 A corrector magnets was developed. The radiation tolerance of this system was further improved by developing a filter and error correction system for all discovered failure modes. Furthermore, compliance of the new system with the specification was shown by simulating the behavior of the system using data taken from the irradiation campaigns. The resulting system is operational since the beginning of 2016 and has in the first 9 months of operation not shown a single radiation-induced failure. Using results from simulations and irradiation campaigns the predicted failure cross section for the full new 600 A Quench Protection System is 4.358±0.564.10{sup -10} cm{sup 2} which is one order of magnitude lower than the target set during the development of this system.

  6. Development of radiation-tolerant components for the quench detection system at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitterling, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    This works describes the results of a three year project to improve the radiation tolerance of the Quench Protection System of the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Radiation-induced premature beam aborts have been a limiting factor for accelerator availability in the recent years. Furthermore, the future upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider to its High Luminosity phase will further increase the radiation load and has higher requirements for the overall machine availability. Therefore equipment groups like the Quench protection groups have used the last years to redesign many of their systems to fulfill those requirements. In support of the development of radiation-tolerant systems, several proton beam irradiation campaigns were conducted to determine the inherent radiation tolerance of a selection of varied electronic components. Using components from this selection a new Quench Protection System for the 600 A corrector magnets was developed. The radiation tolerance of this system was further improved by developing a filter and error correction system for all discovered failure modes. Furthermore, compliance of the new system with the specification was shown by simulating the behavior of the system using data taken from the irradiation campaigns. The resulting system is operational since the beginning of 2016 and has in the first 9 months of operation not shown a single radiation-induced failure. Using results from simulations and irradiation campaigns the predicted failure cross section for the full new 600 A Quench Protection System is 4.358±0.564.10 -10 cm 2 which is one order of magnitude lower than the target set during the development of this system.

  7. Nuclear medicine and the environment: radiation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelter, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of radiation interactions on the environment may be considered from the perspective of the purely physical phenomena occurring or from the effects the interactions produce in organized biological systems. The physical processes by which radiation interacts with the environment are quite well defined. Although these processes differ depending upon the nature (either electromagnetic or particulate) of the primary radiation, the ultimate result is the production in the medium of high-speed, secondary charged particles. Some of the energy of these particles is absorbed by the medium, while a portion may be lost as bremsstrahlung. The energy that is absorbed produces excitation and ionization, which can be disruptive to biological systems. The effects produced by ionizing radiations at the biochemical, cellular, and organ level are less well defined. Nevertheless, available data indicate that certain generalizations are possible. For example, given the ubiquitous nature of water in tissues, macromolecules, regardless of their structural types, tend to serve as acceptors of the energy and products of water radiolysis. However, a deeper insight into the consequences of irradiation requires an understanding of the interplay of such parameters as the type and energy of the radiation, and the dose and rate of its application. Furthermore, at the cellular level, the type and age of the irradiated cells, the concentration of oxygen in their environment, and their cell-cycle phase are all important factors in determining the consequences of irradiation. 72 references

  8. Radiations in space and global environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguti, Takasi

    1994-01-01

    It has been well known that the global environment of the earth is basically determined by the radiation equilibrium of the earth atmosphere system embedded in the solar radiation. However, the surface temperature of about 15 degC on average is much higher than that determined by the radiation equilibrium. This is due to the so-called greenhouse gases in the atmosphere such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane and others. Also the global environment has evolved by interacting with the living things on the earth, for example, tree oxygen by photosynthesis, and a small amount of ozone protecting living things from the fetal damage due to solar ultraviolet radiation. The solar radiation of short wavelength, that is, ultraviolet to X-ray influences atmospheric constituents, and the thermal structure and dynamics of the atmosphere through chemical reaction. The solar energetic particles produced by solar flares precipitate in the polar regions, and the nitric oxides are produced by auroral X-ray. Auroral activities accelerate particles in the magnetosphere. All these radiations cause significant global changes. Human activities increase greenhouse gases rapidly and cause global warming, and atmospheric chloro-fluoro-carbon (CFC) makes the ozone hole. Now, human activities must be modified to match the natural cycle of materials. (K.I.)

  9. Radiation effects on materials in high-radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Mansur, L.K.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Parkin, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    A workshop on Radiation Effects on Materials in High-Radiation Environments was held in Salt Lake City, Utah (USA) from August 13 to 15, 1990 under the auspices of the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. The workshop focused on ceramics, alloys, and intermetallics and covered research needs and capabilities, recent experimental data, theory, and computer simulations. It was concluded that there is clearly a continuing scientific and technological need for fundamental knowledge on the underlying causes of radiation-induced property changes in materials. Furthermore, the success of many current and emerging nuclear-related technologies critically depend on renewed support for basic radiation-effects research, irradiation facilities, and training of scientists. The highlights of the workshop are reviewed and specific recommendations are made regarding research needs. (orig.)

  10. Electromagnetic and radiation environments: effects on pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouton, J.; Trochet, R.; Vicrey, J.; Sauvage, M.; Chauvenet, B.; Ostrovski, A.; Leroy, E.; Haug, R.; Dodinot, B.; Joffre, F.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays, medical care development allows many people to share the benefits of implanted pacemakers (PM). PM can be perturbed and even fall in complete breakdowns in an electromagnetic and radiation environment. A stimuli-dependent patient can thus be seriously in danger. This article presents the effect of ionizing radiation from either a cobalt-60 source or from a linear accelerator (Saturne 43) on 12 pacemakers. It seems that technological progress make electronic circuits more sensitive to the cumulated dose of radiation. This survey shows that pacemakers have great difficulties to sustain ionizing radiation doses that are commonly delivered to patients during therapies. Usually perturbed functioning appears suddenly and means a strong shift of stimuli that might lead to heart failure

  11. Radiation and environment - impact studies awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface Ekechukwu; Mohd. Zohadie Bardaie

    2005-01-01

    Radiation, which is simply defined as energy, that travels in the form of waves or particles has both positive and negative effects on humans. This has necessitated a careful study on how to create awareness on the 'two-edge sword'. Since radiation cannot be removed from our environment we, however, reduce our risks by controlling our exposure to it through various ways. Understanding radiation and radioactivity will help us make informed decisions about our exposure. Many difference types of radiation have range of energy that form electromagnetic spectrum. Their sources include nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons, and medicine. Others include, microwaves, radar, electrical power lines, cellular phones, and sunlight' and so on. However, the radiation used in nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and medicine has enough energy to break chemical bonds, and is referred to as 'ionizing radiation', which is dangerous to life. Because of this negative effect of radiation there is common fear and myths related to radiation, radioactivity, uranium mining and milling, and the nuclear industry. This radiation education and energy-environmental education attempt to dispel the common fears and myths relating to them in so far as there is perfect protection from harmful exposure and abuse. The design of an integrated unit of study radiation and environmental energy uses arts of language, life skills, skill designs, social studies and mathematical skills in creating understanding and abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry by the students without abuse or danger. The education unit is designed to assess materials for, factual information and appropriate language and identification of potential bias in environmental education materials and evaluate materials in perspective of cultural and ethnic upbringing. (author)

  12. Radiation protection of the environment - new trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P. P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent trends in the radiation protection of the environment focusing on basic changes of the protection philosophy from the egocentric to ecocentric approach are presented and discussed. The globalization of the economy is accompanied by global contamination of the environment that requires changes in the attitude of the protection of the total environment, i.e. protection of humans, fauna and flora, all ecosystems and the Earth in general, as well as the cosmic space. This complex approach is illustrated on the radiation protection of the environment that has always been in the forefront in developing protection philosophy, methodology and standards, which later has also been applied to the protection of the environment caused by non-radioactive contaminants, such as heavy metals and organic compounds. High radiation doses delivered to biota are illustrated on shellfish and fish collected in the Mururoa and Fangataufa lagoons (affected by series of nuclear weapons tests), and on fish in Novaya Zemlya bays (affected by dumping of nuclear reactors and radioactive wastes). On the methodological site an example is discussed focusing on the in situ sea-bed radionuclide mapping and seawater monitoring using submersible gamma-ray spectrometers operating with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors which has proved to be important pre-requisite for estimation of the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the water column and on the sea floor, as well as for optimisation of sediment sampling for studying the radionuclide distribution with depth

  13. The application of the Monte Carlo code FLUKA in radiation protection studies for the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Broggi, Francesco; Brugger, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The multi-purpose particle interaction and transport code FLUKA is integral part of all radiation protection studies for the design and operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is one of the very few codes available for this type of calculations which is capable to calculate in one and the same simulation proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at LHC energies as well as the entire hadronic and electromagnetic particle cascade initiated by secondary particles in detectors and beam-line components from TeV energies down to energies of thermal neutrons. The present paper reviews these capabilities of FLUKA in giving details of relevant physics models along with examples of radiation protection studies for the LHC such as shielding studies for underground areas occupied by personnel during LHC operation and the simulation of induced radioactivity around beam loss points. Integral part of the FLUKA development is a careful benchmarking of specific models as well as the code performance in complex, real life applications which is demonstrated with examples of studies relevant to radiation protection at the LHC. (author)

  14. Review Ionizing Radiation In The Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    Our environment is pervaded by ionizing radiation of natural origin including terrestrial radionuclides and extra-terrestrial sources but man's activities can increase radiation levels by acting on natural sources or by producing artificial radionuclides. The energy released by radionuclides can be measured. The amount of energy generated in our bodies from the radioactive decay of within- body radionuclides is called internal dose. External dose results from gamma rays emitted by terrestrial sources such as the ground, building materials and from extraterrestrial sources. The major contributors to human exposure are radon and its daughters in the air that we breathe. Ionizing radiation can penetrate into matter and thus, causing damage by interacting with the atoms and molecules of the medium. If the medium is living tissue, damage to cells can take place. Very large doses of radiation will result in serious tissue, damage that may lead to death of the organism. Lower doses may also be harmful and do not cause the immediate damage of high doses but instead act to increase the likelihood of developing cancer. So, exposure to ionizing radiation can have health consequences, which is why we are concerned about and, to a large extent, is why this review paper was written. Exposure to ionizing radiation should be kept as minimum as practically possible. People are advised to monitor the concentrations of radon in their houses. In addition, the levels of radionuclides in drinking water should also be monitored in accordance with the guidelines used in the USA

  15. Optical Fibers in Nuclear Reactor Radiation Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    1992-01-01

    A performance evaluation of fiber optics under radiation conditions similar to those encountered in nuclear power plants is reported. The evaluation was accomplished by the creation of an analytical model for atomic scale radiation damage in silica glass and by the execution of an extensive fiber performance measurement program. The analytic model calculates displacement and electronic damage rates for silica glass subjected to a specified nuclear reactor radiation environment. It accomplishes this by first generating the primary charged particle spectrum produced in silica irradiated in a nuclear reactor. The resultant spectra are then applied to the integral equations describing radiation damage in polyatomic solids. The experimental measurements were selected to span the range of fiber types, radiation environments, temperatures, and light powers expected to be used in nuclear power plants. The basic experimental protocol was to expose the optical fibers to either a nuclear reactor or a ^{60}Co radiation environment while simultaneously monitoring fiber light transmission. Experimental temperatures were either ~23 ^circC or ~100 ^circC and light powers were either -30 dBm or -60 dBm. Measurements were made at each of the three standard communications wavelengths (850 nm, 1300 nm, and 1550 nm). Several conclusions are made based on these performance measurements. First, even near the core of a nuclear reactor the vast majority of the dose to silica glass is due to gamma rays. Even with the much lower doses (factor of roughly 40) neutrons cause much more displacement damage than gamma rays (35 times the oxygen displacement rate and 500 times the silicon displacement rate). Even with neutrons having many times the displacement rate as compared with gamma rays, little if any difference is observed in the transmission losses for gamma only as compared to mixed neutron/gamma transmission losses. Therefore, atomic displacement is not a significant damage mechanism for

  16. Radiation diagnostics in extremely harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dona, H.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Williams, A.H.; McGurn, J.L.; Veeser, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent Trailmaster experiments have required to use of rather delicate radiation diagnostics in hostile environments. We have developed instrumentation for use high-explosive magnetic flux compression generators and near the noisy environment of high energy capacitor banks. These include some rather unique ''fly-away'' designs for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and other optical techniques for plasma temperature and field measurements. We will show some representative data and will also discuss an on-going program for the determination of magnetic field via atomic spectral line splitting and/or broadening

  17. Studies of new light resonances decaying into two hadronic jets produced in association with a radiated jet

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhiying

    This report presents combinatorics studies in the search for a resonance of below 800 GeV which decay product is a pair of hadronic jets from quarks. The resonance, predicted as a dark matter mediator, has couplings to dark matter particles as well as quarks and gluons. The resonance is created in association with a radiated object that can be either a photon or a jet. In the case of the radiation being a jet, the dijet from the resonance and the radiated jet cannot be distinguished. Choosing the wrong dijet to reconstruct the resonance decreases the sensitivity of the search. The study focuses on studies that help improve the search sensitivity. The signal samples used in this thesis are generated with Monte Carlo simulation and passed through the ATLAS detector simulation. Firstly, in an attempt to identify the jet from radiation, samples where a jet is radiated and a photon is radiated are compared. However, due to the differences in the sample generations, this attempt does not lead to a successful identi...

  18. The Global Environment Radiation Monitoring Network (GERMON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakheim, B.J.; Goellner, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a group of experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) met in France to discuss and develop the basic principles of a global environmental radiation monitoring network (GERMON). The basic functions of this network were to provide regular reports on environmental radiation levels and to be in a position to provide reliable and accurate radiation measurements on a quick and accurate radiation measurements on a quick turnaround basis in the event of a major radiation release. By 1992, although 58 countries had indicated an interest in becoming a part of the GERMON system, only 16 were providing data on a regular basis. This paper traces the history of GERMON from its inception in 1987 through its activities during 1993-4. It details the objectives of the network, describes functions, lists its participants, and presents obstacles in the current network. The paper examines the data requirements for radiological emergency preparedness and offers suggestions for the current system. The paper also describes the growing need for such a network. To add a domestic perspective, the authors present a summary of the environmental monitoring information system that was used by the NRC in 1986 in its analyses of the Chernobyl incident. Then we will use this 1986 experience to propose a method for the use of GERMON should a similar occasion arise in the future

  19. Use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS (Commercially available Off The Shelf) microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. They review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMs increases from 1.4 x 10 8 rad(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7 x 10 9 rad(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design of process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10--15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMs from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMs from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of COTS and radiation-hardened (RH) technology

  20. A safe radiation environment. Environmental Objective 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A safe radiation environment is one of the 15 environmental quality objectives that form the basis for developing a ecologically sustainable society within one generation. These objectives have been adopted by the Swedish parliament, and in the present report, the five different targets for reaching Objective 13 are defined. They are: (by year 2010) 1. The emissions of radioactive substances should be low enough to protect human beings, and the ecological diversity. 2. A generally accepted method for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive waste should be available, that does not impose any risks for human beings and for the environment. 3. Hazards to the society, human beings or the environment from radiological accidents should be eradicated, or at least severely minimized. 4. Hazards from electromagnetic fields should be understood and, if necessary, actions planned for improving the e-m field environment. 5. The number of skin cancers in year 2020 from solar radiation should not exceed those in year 2000

  1. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  2. Ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation in educational environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Takao; Otsubo, Tomonobu; Ikke, Satoshi; Taguchi, Noriko; Takeda, Rie

    2005-01-01

    By chance, we measured gamma dose rates in our school, and around the JCO Tokai Plant during the criticality on September 30 in 1999, with our GM survey meter. At that time, we made sure to estimate the position of criticality reaction (source point), and the source intensity of criticality reaction, with our own data, measured along the public roads, route 6 and local road 62. The intensity of gamma dose rates along the road was analyzed as Lorentz functions. At the time, there were no environmental radiation data about the criticality accident, or all the data, especially radioactivity and dose rates around the JCO Tokai Plant, was closed to the public. Recently, we are interested in the intensity of non-ionizing radiation, especially extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field, and electric field, in our environment. We adopted the same method to analyze the source position and source intensity of an ELF magnetic field and electric behind a wall. (author)

  3. Materials Degradation in the Jovian Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady; Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    The radiation environment of Jupiter represents a significant hazard for Europa Lander deorbit stage components, and presents a significant potential mission risk. The radiolytic degradation of ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidizer in solid propellants may affect its properties and performance. The Monte Carlo code MONSOL was used for modeling of laboratory experiments on the electron irradiation of propellant samples. An approach for flattening dose profiles along the depth of irradiated samples is proposed. Depth-dose distributions produced by Jovian electrons in multi-layer slabs of materials are calculated. It is found that the absorbed dose in a particular slab is significantly affected by backscattered electrons and photons from neighboring slabs. The dose and radiolytic decomposition of AP crystals are investigated and radiation-induced chemical yields and weight percent of radical products are reported.

  4. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-01-01

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space

  5. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  6. Study of radiation damage to the CMS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter and investigation into new physics using multi-boson measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This document is the final report for the U.S. D.O.E. Grant No. DE-SC0014088, which covers the period from May 15, 2015 to March 31, 2016. The funded research covered the study of multi-boson final states, culminated in the measurement of the W"+"-γγ and, for the first time at an hadronic collider, of the Z?? production cross sections. These processes, among the rarest multi-boson final states measurable by LHC experiments, allow us to investigate the possibility of new physics in a model-independent way, by looking for anomalies in the standard model couplings among electroweak bosons. In particular, these 3-boson final states access quartic gauge couplings; the W"+"-γγ analysis performed as a part of this proposal sets limits on anomalies in the WWγγ quartic gauge coupling. The award also covered R&D activities to define a radiation-tolerant material to be used in the incoming upgrade of the CMS hadronic endcap calorimeter. In particular, the usage of a liquid-scintillator-based detector was investigated. The research work performed in this direction has been collected in a paper recently submitted for publication in the Journal of Instrumentation (JINST).

  7. Study of radiation damage to the CMS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter and investigation into new physics using multi-boson measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Alberto [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This document is the final report for the U.S. D.O.E. Grant No. DE-SC0014088, which covers the period from May 15, 2015 to March 31, 2016. The funded research covered the study of multi-boson final states, culminated in the measurement of the W±γγ and, for the first time at an hadronic collider, of the Zγγ production cross sections. These processes, among the rarest multi-boson final states measurable by LHC experiments, allow us to investigate the possibility of new physics in a model-independent way, by looking for anomalies in the standard model couplings among electroweak bosons. In particular, these 3-boson final states access quartic gauge couplings; the W±γγ analysis performed as a part of this proposal sets limits on anomalies in the WWγγ quartic gauge coupling. The award also covered R&D activities to define a radiation-tolerant material to be used in the incoming upgrade of the CMS hadronic endcap calorimeter. In particular, the usage of a liquid-scintillator-based detector was investigated. The research work performed in this direction has been collected in a paper recently submitted for publication in the Journal of Instrumentation (JINST).

  8. Estimating induced-activation of SCT barrel-modules in the ATLAS radiation environment.

    CERN Document Server

    Buttar, C M; Dawson, I; Mandic, I; Moraes, A

    2002-01-01

    One of the consequences of operating detector systems in the harsh radiation environments of the ATLAS inner-detector will be radioactivation of the components. If the levels of radioactivity and corresponding dose rates are significant, then there will be implications for any access or maintenance operations. Given in this note are predictions for the radioactivation of SCT barrel-modules in the expected radiation environment of the inner-detector, based on both calculations and measurements. It is shown that both neutron-capture and high-energy hadron reactions must be taken into account. The predictions show that, from a radiological point of view, the SCT barrel-modules should not pose any serious problems.

  9. On-Line Radiation Test Facility for Industrial Equipment needed for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rausch, R

    1999-01-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will use superconducting magnets cooled down to 1.2 K. To preserve the superconductivity, the energy deposition dose levels in equipment located outside the cryostat, in the LHC tunnel, are calculated to be of the order of 1 to 10 Gy per year. At such dose levels, no major radiation-damage problems are to be expected, and the possibility of installing Commercial Of The Shelf (COTS) electronic equipment in the LHC tunnel along the accelerator is considered. To this purpose, industrial electronic equipment and circuits have to be qualified and tested against radiation to insure their long term stability and reliability. An on-line radiation test facility has been setup at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and a program of on-line tests for electronic equipment is ongoing. Equipment tested includes Industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) from several manufacturers, standard VME modules, Fieldbuses like Profibus, WorldFIP and CAN, various electro...

  10. Development of radiation processes for better environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majali, A.B.; Sabharwal, S.; Deshpande, R.S.; Sarma, K.S.S.; Bhardwaj, Y.K.; Dhanawade, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing population and industrialization, worldover, is placing escalating demands for the development of newer technologies that are environment friendly and minimize the pollution associated with the development. Radiation technology can be of benefit in reducing the pollution levels associated with many processes. The sulphur vulcanization method for natural rubber latex vulcanization results in the formation of considerable amounts of nitrosoamines, both in the product as well as in the factory environment. Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex has emerged as a commercially viable alternative to produce sulphur and nitrosoamine free rubber. A Co-60 γ-radiation based pilot plant has been functioning since April 1993 to produce vulcanized natural rubber latex (RVNRL) using acrylate monomers as sensitizer. The role of sensitizer, viz. n-butyl acrylate in the vulcanization process has been elucidated using the pulse radiolysis technique. Emission of toxic sulphur containing gases form an inevitable part of viscose-rayon process and this industry is in search of ways to reduce the associated pollution levels. The irradiation of cellulose results in cellulose activation and reduction in the degree of polymerization (DP). These effects can reduce the solvents required to dissolve the paper pulp. There is a keen interest in utilizing radiation technology in viscose rayon production. We have utilized the electron beam (EB) accelerator for reducing the degree of polymerization (DP) of paper pulp. Laboratory scale tests have been carried out to standardize the conditions for production of pulp having the desired DP by EB irradiation. The use of irradiated paper pulp can result in ∼40% reduction in the consumption of CS 2 in the process that can be beneficial in reducing the pollution associated with the process. PTFE waste can be recycled into a low molecular weight microfine powder by irradiation. An EB based process has been standardized to produce

  11. CMS hadronic forward calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Tests of quartz fiber prototypes, based on the detection of Cherenkov light from showering particles, demonstrate a detector possessing all of the desirable characteristics for a forward calorimeter. A prototype for the CMS experiment consists of 0.3 mm diameter fibers embedded in a copper matrix. The response to high energy (10-375 GeV) electrons, pions, protons and muons, the light yield, energy and position resolutions, and signal uniformity and linearity, are discussed. The signal generation mechanism gives this type of detector unique properties, especially for the detection of hadronic showers: Narrow, shallow shower profiles, hermeticity and extremely fast signals. The implications for measurements in the high-rate, high-radiation LHC environment are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Hadron accelerators in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, U.

    1996-01-01

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadron-therapy Project is then described in some detail, with reference ro both the National Centre for Oncological Hadron-therapy and the design of different types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large umber of hospitals. (author)

  13. Hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Kolar, P.; Kundrat, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain invited lectures and papers presente at the symposium. Attention was devoted to hadron interactions a high energy in QCD, to the structure and decay of hadrons, the production of hadrons and supersymmetric particles in e + e - and ep collisions, to perturbation theory in quantum field theory, and new supersymmetric extensions of relativistic algebra. (Z.J

  14. The Near-Earth Space Radiation for Electronics Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; LaBel, K. A.

    2004-01-01

    The earth's space radiation environment is described in terms of: a) charged particles as relevant to effects on spacecraft electronics, b) the nature and distribution of trapped and transiting radiation, and c) their effect on electronic components.

  15. Radiation protection considerations in the design of the LHC, CERN's large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Huhtinen, M.; Moritz, L.E.; Nakashima, H.; Potter, K.M.; Rollet, S.; Stevenson, G.R.; Zazula, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the radiological concerns which are being taken into account in the design of the LHC (CERN's future Large Hadron Collider). The machine will be built in the 27 km circumference ring tunnel of the existing LEP collider at CERN. The high intensity of the circulating beams (each containing more than 10 14 protons at 7 TeV) determines the thickness specification of the shielding of the main-ring tunnel, the precautions to be taken in the design of the beam dumps and their associated caverns and the radioactivity induced by the loss of protons in the main ring by inelastic beam-gas interactions. The high luminosity of the collider is designed to provide inelastic collision rates of 10 9 per second in each of the two principal detector installations, ATLAS and CMS. These collisions determine the shielding of the experimental areas, the radioactivity induced in both the detectors and in the machine components on either side of the experimental installations and, to some extent, the radioactivity induced in the beam-cleaning (scraper) systems. Some of the environmental issues raised by the project will be discussed. (author)

  16. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  17. Radiation in the human environment: health effects, safety and acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.; Anderer, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports selectively on three other aspects of radiation (used throughout to mean ionizing radiation) in the human environment: the human health effects of radiation, radiation safety policy and practices, and the acceptability of scientifically justified practices involving radiation exposures. Our argument is that the science of radiation biology, the judgemental techniques of radiation safety, and the social domain of radiation acceptability express different types of expertise that should complement - and not conflict with or substitute for - one another. Unfortunately, communication problems have arisen among these three communities and even between the various disciplines represented within a community. These problems have contributed greatly to the misperceptions many people have about radiation and which are frustrating a constructive dialogue on how radiation can be harnessed to benefit mankind. Our analysis seeks to assist those looking for a strategic perspective from which to reflect on their interaction with practices involving radiation exposures. (author)

  18. Coastal sea radiation environment and biodiversity protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Senming; Shang Zhaorong

    2009-01-01

    This paper characterizes the types, trend and the potential of radiation contamination in the sea against the development of nuclear power stations. Combined with the present status of radioactive contamination and marine biodiversity in China seas, it is pointed out that non-human radiation protection should be considered on the bases of marine biodiversity protection. Besides, the reference species for marine radiation protection and some viewpoints on the work of marine radiation protection in China are pro- posed. (authors)

  19. Radiative corrections to W+jet production at hadron colliders with a leptonic decay of the W boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasprzik, Tobias

    2009-08-31

    The production of W bosons and additional jets at hadron colliders is a topic of great phenomenological interest, because such processes have large cross sections and, owing to the clear decay signature of the W boson, can for instance be used to monitor and calibrate the collider's luminosity, as well as for a precise determination of the W-boson mass and width. Thus, a profound theoretical understanding of this process class is mandatory. In order to improve the accuracy of the theoretical predictions, this thesis is devoted to the calculation of the electroweak radiative corrections to the production of one W boson with one associated jet at the LHC and the Tevatron within the Standard Model. Since these corrections are at first evaluated on the parton level in a perturbative approach, we work in the parton model, where the hadronic cross section is obtained by folding the partonic contributions with the parton distribution functions that contain the non-perturbative information of the proton structure and have to be determined by experiment. We provide results for a stable W boson that is produced on its mass shell as well as for an intermediate (off-shell) W boson decaying into a charged lepton and a neutrino. For a consistent calculation of the next-to-leading order corrections, we have to take into account the virtual one-loop contributions, as well as the real bremsstrahlung corrections caused by radiation of one additional photon. Within both contributions, mass singularities appear that have to be treated with care within the numerical evaluation. In the calculation with a stable W boson in the final state, we use the method of phase-space slicing in order to exclude such singularities from the numerical phase-space integration and calculate them analytically in the problematic phase-space regions. For the off-shell calculation, however, we use the more sophisticated dipole subtraction technique to subtract the infrared-singular structures on the

  20. Radiative corrections to W+jet production at hadron colliders with a leptonic decay of the W boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasprzik, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    The production of W bosons and additional jets at hadron colliders is a topic of great phenomenological interest, because such processes have large cross sections and, owing to the clear decay signature of the W boson, can for instance be used to monitor and calibrate the collider's luminosity, as well as for a precise determination of the W-boson mass and width. Thus, a profound theoretical understanding of this process class is mandatory. In order to improve the accuracy of the theoretical predictions, this thesis is devoted to the calculation of the electroweak radiative corrections to the production of one W boson with one associated jet at the LHC and the Tevatron within the Standard Model. Since these corrections are at first evaluated on the parton level in a perturbative approach, we work in the parton model, where the hadronic cross section is obtained by folding the partonic contributions with the parton distribution functions that contain the non-perturbative information of the proton structure and have to be determined by experiment. We provide results for a stable W boson that is produced on its mass shell as well as for an intermediate (off-shell) W boson decaying into a charged lepton and a neutrino. For a consistent calculation of the next-to-leading order corrections, we have to take into account the virtual one-loop contributions, as well as the real bremsstrahlung corrections caused by radiation of one additional photon. Within both contributions, mass singularities appear that have to be treated with care within the numerical evaluation. In the calculation with a stable W boson in the final state, we use the method of phase-space slicing in order to exclude such singularities from the numerical phase-space integration and calculate them analytically in the problematic phase-space regions. For the off-shell calculation, however, we use the more sophisticated dipole subtraction technique to subtract the infrared-singular structures on the

  1. Radiation monitoring in the NPP environment, control of radioactivity in NPP-environment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Problems of radiation monitoring and control of the NPP-environment system (NPPES) are considered. Radiation control system at the NPP and in the environment provides for the control of the NPP, considered as the source of radioactive releases in the environment and for the environmental radiation climate control. It is shown, that the radiation control of the NPP-environment system must be based on the ecological normalization principles of the NPP environmental impacts. Ecological normalization should be individual for the NPP region of each ecosystem. The necessity to organize and conduct radiation ecological monitoring in the NPP regions is pointed out. Radiation ecological monitoring will provide for both environmental current radiation control and information for mathematical models, used in the NPPES radiation control

  2. Stability of semiconductor memory characteristics in a radiation environment

    OpenAIRE

    Fetahović, I.; Vujisić, M.; Stanković, K.; Dolićanin, E.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation defects in electronic device can occur in a process of its fabrication or during use. Miniaturization trends in industry and increase in level of integration of electronic components have negative affect on component's behavior in a radiation environment. The aim of this paper is to analyze radiation effects in semiconductor memories and to establish how ionizing radiation influences characteristics and functionality of semiconductor memories. Both the experimental procedure and sim...

  3. Photon radiation in e+e-→hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegerlehner, Fred; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Kolodziej, Karol

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e + e - annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  4. Radiation zoning for vacuum equipment of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Cruikshank, P; Forkel-Wirth, D; Jiménez, J M

    2010-01-01

    Beam losses in high-energy particle accelerators are responsible for beam lifetime degradation. In the LHC beam losses will create a shower of particles while interacting with materials from the beam pipes and surroundings, resulting in a partial activation of material in the tunnel. Efforts have been made during the accelerator design to monitor and to reduce the activation induced by beam losses. Traceability for all vacuum components has been established providing a tool to follow-up individually each component or subcomponents installed in the tunnel, regardless of their future destination e.g. recycling or disposal. In the latter case, the history of vacuum components will allow calculating the beam-induced activation and permit comparisons with in-situ and ex-situ measurements. This zoning will also help to reduce collective and individual radiation doses to personnel during interventions. The paper presents the vacuum system layout and describes the LHC vacuum zoning and its implementation using an ORA...

  5. Hadrons-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugrij, G.; Jenkovsky, L.; Martynov, E.

    1994-01-01

    These Proceedings contain the contributions to the Workshop HADRONS-94,held in Uzhgorod between September 7-11,1994. They covers the topics: - elastic and diffractive scattering of hadrons and nuclei; -small-x and spin physics; - meson and baryon spectroscopy; - dual and string models; - collective properties of the strongly interacting matter

  6. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Spectra of hadrons show various and complex structures due to the strong coupling constants of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) constituting its fundamental theory. For their understandings, two parameters, i.e., (1) the quark mass and (2) their excitation energies are playing important roles. In low energies, for example, rather simple structures similar to the positronium appear in the heavy quarks such as charms and bottoms. It has been, however, strongly suggested by the recent experiments that the molecular resonant state shows up when the threshold to decay to mesons is exceeded. On the other hand, chiral symmetry and its breaking play important roles in the dynamics of light quarks. Strange quarks are in between and show special behaviors. In the present lecture, the fundamental concept of the hadron spectroscopy based on the QCD is expounded to illustrate the present understandings and problems of the hadron spectroscopy. Sections are composed of 1. Introduction, 2. Fundamental Concepts (hadrons, quarks and QCD), 3. Quark models and exotic hadrons, 4. Lattice QCD and QCD sum rules. For sections 1 to 3, only outline of the concepts is described because of the limited space. Exotic hadrons, many quark pictures of light hadrons and number of quarks in hadrons are described briefly. (S. Funahashi)

  7. Hadrons-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugrij, G; Jenkovsky, L; Martynov, E [eds.

    1994-12-31

    These Proceedings contain the contributions to the Workshop HADRONS-94,held in Uzhgorod between September 7-11,1994. They covers the topics: - elastic and diffractive scattering of hadrons and nuclei; -small-x and spin physics; - meson and baryon spectroscopy; - dual and string models; - collective properties of the strongly interacting matter.

  8. Radiation and global environment. Consideration for the influence on ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Doi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2003-09-01

    This book is based on presentations at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) symposium of the same title held by the NIRS Research Center for Radiation Safety in December, 2002, is edited with somehow enlightening intention as well, and is composed from 6 parts of; 1. Reasons for concern for influence on ecosystems, 2. Behavior of substances in ecosystems, 3. Changes of global environments and life, 4. Various environmental stresses and living/eco-systems, 5. New development of evaluation studies on radiation effects, and 6. For the radiation protection of environments. The 1st part involves 3 chapters concerning studies on effects on ecosystems and radiation protection of environments; 2nd part, 4 chapters concerning behavior of radioactive and/or stable cesium and iodine in forest and environmental microorganisms, and behavior and effects of acidic substances; 3rd part, 2 chapters concerning terrestrial history and evolution/adaptation of livings; 4th part, 5 chapters concerning radiation stress, active oxygen, radiodurance/radio-resistant microorganisms, ultraviolet, and environmental hormones; 5th part, 6 chapters concerning effects on cells of environmental toxic substance and radiation, environmental stress evaluation by DNA micro-array, effects on taxis, use of microcosm, simulation of computational model ecosystem, and aquatic ecosystems; 6th part, 5 chapters concerning environmental radioecology, safety measures in high-level radioactive waste disposal under the ground, radiation protection of environments from radiation biology aspect, effects of chemicals, and aspect and strategy for radiation effects on environments. (N.I.)

  9. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Sagia, E; Silari, M

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on tar- get are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shi...

  10. Electric motors for use in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, T.U.D.; Mahmood, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    Requirements of electric motors for a nuclear plant and the effect of nuclear radiations on different parts of the motors are discussed. Feasibility of using locally-fabricated motors is also considered. (author)

  11. Suppression of radiation excitation in focusing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.; Ruth, R.D.

    1996-12-01

    Radiation damping and quantum excitation in an electron damping ring and a straight focusing channel are reviewed. They are found to be the two limiting cases in the study of a general bending and focusing combined system. In the intermediate regime where the radiation formation length is comparable to the betatron wavelength, quantum excitation can be exponentially suppressed by focusing field. This new regime may have interesting applications in the generation of ultra-low emittance beams

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Induced Radiation Sensitization Effects on Human Cancer Cells after Photon and Hadron Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariungerel Gerelchuluun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which has been widely utilized throughout the cancer research field. SAHA-induced radiosensitization in normal human fibroblasts AG1522 and lung carcinoma cells A549 were evaluated with a combination of γ-rays, proton, and carbon ion exposure. Growth delay was observed in both cell lines during SAHA treatment; 2 μM SAHA treatment decreased clonogenicity and induced cell cycle block in G1 phase but 0.2 μM SAHA treatment did not show either of them. Low LET (Linear Energy Transfer irradiated A549 cells showed radiosensitization effects on cell killing in cycling and G1 phase with 0.2 or 2 μM SAHA pretreatment. In contrast, minimal sensitization was observed in normal human cells after low and high LET radiation exposure. The potentially lethal damage repair was not affected by SAHA treatment. SAHA treatment reduced the rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance and suppressed RAD51 and RPA (Replication Protein A focus formation. Suppression of DNA double strand break repair by SAHA did not result in the differences of SAHA-induced radiosensitization between human cancer cells and normal cells. In conclusion, our results suggest SAHA treatment will sensitize cancer cells to low and high LET radiation with minimum effects to normal cells.

  13. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  14. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10 16 particles per cm 2 , which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10 15 particles per cm 2 .

  15. Behaviour of organic materials in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Ilie, S.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive radiation damage test program has been carried out in CERN for decades and many results have yet been published. Over the years, EPR/EPDM-based rubbers and polyolefin-based compounds used for cable insulation have been tested. Polyolefin-based compounds usually present an important dose-rate effect. This is related to the presence of oxygen, it may be combined with a temperature effect. On the other hand, it appears from many results that the degradation of cable insulations does not depend on the radiation type. Tests of insulating and structural materials after irradiation at cryogenic temperature have shown that there is no significant influence of the irradiation temperature on the radiation degradation of thermo-sets and composites, while the degradation of plastic films is even less severe as they are protected against oxidation. Some experiments about the synergy between irradiation and mechanical stress have shown that rubbers and composites under stress are more sensitive to radiation and degrade faster. Very strong synergetic effects between radiation and other parameters are observed in organic optical materials such as scintillators and optical fibres. For fluorocarbon cooling fluids, a special care must be paid to alkanes and hydro-fluoro-alkanes, which are usually present as impurities, and of which the C-H bonds content opens the way to the reactive hydrofluoric acid evolution during the radiolytic process

  16. Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

    1998-05-01

    The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

  17. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions

  18. Techniques for predicting environment electromagnetic radiation at satellite ground station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Peiji

    1987-01-01

    The measurement theories, techniques, and calculation methods on public exposure level of electromagnetic radiation at satellite ground station are described for the purpose of enviroment protection and research of EM compatibility. According to the results of the measurement and calculation, it is possible to predict the effects of electromagnetic radiation to environment at satellite ground station

  19. The case against protecting the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the (rarely heard) argument in favour of retention of the present system of radiation protection of the environment. There has been a recent trend in the radioecological and radiation protection community towards greater regulation of the effects of ionising radiations on biota. In particular, the often quoted International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) hypothesis that: If humans are protected from the effects of ionising radiation, then flora and fauna are also adequately protected has been criticised as being too anthropocentric and not adequate for protection of the environment. In this paper I will challenge this view, arguing firstly that this statement is almost always quoted out of its proper context, and secondly that the ICRP hypothesis does adequately protect the environment from the effects of ionising radiations. In view of the relatively insignificant effect of regulated releases of ionising radiation on the environment, the economic cost of further regulation will not result in a significant environmental benefit. Whilst empirical research to test the ICRP hypothesis should continue, until there is clear evidence against it, this simple and cost-effective approach should be retained. This would benefit the environment by directing scarce resources to more urgent environmental problems. (author)

  20. Optimized Radiator Geometries for Hot Lunar Thermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The optimum radiator configuration in hot lunar thermal environments is one in which the radiator is parallel to the ground and has no view to the hot lunar surface. However, typical spacecraft configurations have limited real estate available for top-mounted radiators, resulting in a desire to use the spacecraft's vertically oriented sides. Vertically oriented, flat panel radiators will have a large view factor to the lunar surface, and thus will be subjected to significant incident lunar infrared heat. Consequently, radiator fluid temperatures will need to exceed approximately 325 K (assuming standard spacecraft radiator optical properties) in order to provide positive heat rejection at lunar noon. Such temperatures are too high for crewed spacecraft applications in which a heat pump is to be avoided. A recent study of vertically oriented radiator configurations subjected to lunar noon thermal environments led to the discovery of a novel radiator concept that yielded positive heat rejection at lower fluid temperatures. This radiator configuration, called the Intense Thermal Infrared Reflector (ITIR), has exhibited superior performance to all previously analyzed concepts in terms of heat rejection in the lunar noon thermal environment. A key benefit of ITIR is the absence of louvers or other moving parts and its simple geometry (no parabolic shapes). ITIR consists of a specularly reflective shielding surface and a diffuse radiating surface joined to form a horizontally oriented V-shape (shielding surface on top). The point of intersection of these surfaces is defined by two angles, those which define the tilt of each surface with respect to the local horizontal. The optimum set of these angles is determined on a case-by-case basis. The idea assumes minimal conductive heat transfer between shielding and radiating surfaces, and a practical design would likely stack sets of these surfaces on top of one another to reduce radiator thickness.

  1. Integration of optical fibers in radiative environments: Advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.; Marcandella, C.; Bisutti, J.; Baggio, J.; Meunier, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We review the advantages and limitations for the integration of optical fibers in radiative environments. Optical fibers present numerous advantages for applications in harsh environments such as their electromagnetic immunity. This explains the increasing interest of the radiation effects community to evaluate their vulnerability for future facilities. However, it is also well-known that optical fibers suffer from a degradation of their macroscopic properties under irradiation. We illustrate the major mechanisms and parameters that govern the degradation mechanism, mainly the radiation-induced attenuation phenomena. We focus on the fiber transient radiation responses when exposed to the pulsed and mixed environment associated with the Megajoule class lasers devoted to the fusion by inertial confinement study. (authors)

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Wireless Communication Channels under Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Quan; Bari, Ataul; Deng, Changjian; Li, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Deployment of wireless systems in nuclear power plants has attracted a lot of attention recently. However, before wireless systems can be installed in a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of radiation environment on electromagnetic wave which is the communication media for all radio wave based wireless systems. This is particular important if the wireless systems are expected to work in a harsh and radioactive environment following a severe accident. This paper presents some results of an experiment for evaluating the effect of radiation on electromagnetic wave. The experiments involve placing transmitter antenna and receiver antenna in a hot cell with variable strength of radiation to study the attenuation effects of the radioactive media. The results indicate that radiation does not effect on the electromagnetic wave propagation. This fact should be considered during the design and deployment wireless systems in a potentially radioactive environment

  3. An evaluation on environment radiation impact of pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yingwei; Pu Gongxu; Li Jian

    1991-01-01

    The dose regulation, assessment scope and assessment method adopted by the environment impact evaluation for the pulsed reactor are discussed. The compute model, the compute programme and the compute result of the dose adopted for the model pulsed reactor are introduced. The probable environment radiation impact under normal status and accident status are also appraised

  4. Preliminary results of the experiment on the identification of cosmic hadrons usinq the X-ray transition radiation XTR-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avakyan, R.A.; Avakyan, K.M.; Alikhanyan, A.I.

    1974-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic hadrons with an energy of 300 GeV or more at the height of 3250 m above the sea level has been studied. The objective has been to determine the Nsub(π)/Nsub(p) ratio at the given energies. The device consists of a 830 g/cm 2 scintillation calorimeter and an X-ray transition radiation detector, comprising three sections of laminated medium each having 200 layers, and multi-filament proportional counters. The lower limit of the Nsub(π)/Nsub(p) ratio has been obtained, it is equal to 0.37+-0.16

  5. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y; Otani, N

    2003-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, strong radiation such as g-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were done using the He sup + sup 2 beam accelerated by Tandem in the W-MAST. The following results were obtained. 1) Neutron measurements using a rem counter yielded that dose equivalent was about 9.4 mSv/h at a position 100 cm from the Be target when the beam current of 15 MeV He sup 2 sup + was 0.8 mu A. Neutron measurement by means of Au and In foil activation method and by use of TLD element revealed that dose equivalents were to be 16-27 mu Sv/h for thermal neutron, and 30-41 mu Sv/h for sub-fast neutron (20 keV). Therefore, it was concluded that neutron field was mainly composed by fast neutron. 2) Linearity of the rem-counter out put vs neutron flux was valid under the condition that the count rate of the rem-counter was less than 10 kcps. 3) Computer simulation using NRESP c...

  6. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y

    2002-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, radiation such as gamma-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were carried out using the Tandem/Synchrotron accelerator. The following results were obtained: (1) Measurements of the gamma-ray emission using the NaI detector together with pile up rejection system revealed that the good signals without the pile up phenomena could be obtained in case of count rate less than 7 kc/s. On assumption that energy distribution function of the gamma-rays was proportional to be E exp(- E/T sub e sub f sub f), the effective temperature T sub e sub f sub f was estimated to be 0.8 - 0.9 MeV by use of non-linear least squares. (2) Doses of gamma-rays were measured using the TLD elements shielded by Pb sheets with various widths. The effective temperature T sub e sub f sub f estimated under the same experimental conditions described in (1) was 0.6-3 MeV. In an ac...

  7. Designing equipment for use in gamma radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-05-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Environment radiation protection - Synthesis and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    This document presents the principal progresses in the area of risk evaluation to environment in relation with radionuclides during the last five years. It is based on a comparison between the methods that exist for chemical products and this one in progress for radioactive products. The enlightened point concerns the methodologies developed at European scale. The basic concepts of the environmental risk assessment are presented and also its principal components. The knowledge relative to the criteria of environmental protection is presented. The differences between the chemical products and the radioactive products are taken into account. Finally, this document shows the feasibility of methods of risk assessment to ecosystems associated to the presence or release of radioactive substances i environment. (N.C.)

  9. On the Radiation Protection of the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soberhart, L. J.; Clausse, A.; D'Amato, E.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade, substantial advances in what is know as legal protection of the environment, -as a different matter from human being protection- have been made. Some national legislations include serious penalties against environmental damage. It is becoming customary to consider a serious offence any excess in the prescribed limits of radioactive materials release to the environment. What these limits mean, however, is not completely clear nowadays. According to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) the standards of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk, although, occasionally, individual members of non human species might be harmed. However the use of limits of radioactive releases resulting from the direct application of ICRP recommend limits as legal references for the applicable offences in environmental protection is certainly a misconception. In this paper a conceptual framework for the calculation of legal limits for environmental radioprotection are presented. The approach is based on an ecosystem perspective, assessing the impact of radioactive releases on the ecosystem dynamics and equilibrium. The method is based on functional groups models -i.e. groups of species that are selected from a number of criteria such as play similar rules in the chain of nutrients or have the same radiosensitivity- providing the basis for prescribed limits of the radioactive material release to the environment. The methodology is applied to a system of three functional groups in equilibrium, with is affected by radioactive intrusion. Different impacts on the equilibrium can be identified, depending on the amount of radioactive material released to the environment. It is shown how the concept of equilibrium breakdown can be applied in order to assess the radiological impact. (Author) 8 refs

  10. NPS-SCAT CONOPS and Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    flexibility, as well as allows players in the space market who would otherwise not be able to enter due to budgetary limitations. Important to NPS is...commercial market . Although the time frame for completing NPS-SCAT has not been as short as possible due to the nature of the learning environment on its...Program ( STP ) seeks flight opportunities for approved experiments. The current NPS- SCAT launch date offers ample time to finish and test the

  11. The development of advanced robotics technology in high radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jaiwan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo; Park, Soon Yong; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Jin Suk; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Moon, Byung Soo

    1997-07-01

    In the tele-operation technology using tele-presence in high radiation environment, stereo vision target tracking by centroid method, vergence control of stereo camera by moving vector method, stereo observing system by correlation method, horizontal moving axis stereo camera, and 3 dimensional information acquisition by stereo image is developed. Also, gesture image acquisition by computer vision and construction of virtual environment for remote work in nuclear power plant. In the development of intelligent control and monitoring technology for tele-robot in hazardous environment, the characteristics and principle of robot operation. And, robot end-effector tracking algorithm by centroid method and neural network method are developed for the observation and survey in hazardous environment. 3-dimensional information acquisition algorithm by structured light is developed. In the development of radiation hardened sensor technology, radiation-hardened camera module is designed and tested. And radiation characteristics of electric components is robot system is evaluated. Also 2-dimensional radiation monitoring system is developed. These advanced critical robot technology and telepresence techniques developed in this project can be applied to nozzle-dam installation /removal robot system, can be used to realize unmanned remotelization of nozzle-dam installation / removal task in steam generator of nuclear power plant, which can be contributed for people involved in extremely hazardous high radioactivity area to eliminate their exposure to radiation, enhance their task safety, and raise their working efficiency. (author). 75 refs., 21 tabs., 15 figs.

  12. The development of advanced robotics technology in high radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jaiwan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo; Park, Soon Yong; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Jin Suk; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Moon, Byung Soo.

    1997-07-01

    In the tele-operation technology using tele-presence in high radiation environment, stereo vision target tracking by centroid method, vergence control of stereo camera by moving vector method, stereo observing system by correlation method, horizontal moving axis stereo camera, and 3 dimensional information acquisition by stereo image is developed. Also, gesture image acquisition by computer vision and construction of virtual environment for remote work in nuclear power plant. In the development of intelligent control and monitoring technology for tele-robot in hazardous environment, the characteristics and principle of robot operation. And, robot end-effector tracking algorithm by centroid method and neural network method are developed for the observation and survey in hazardous environment. 3-dimensional information acquisition algorithm by structured light is developed. In the development of radiation hardened sensor technology, radiation-hardened camera module is designed and tested. And radiation characteristics of electric components is robot system is evaluated. Also 2-dimensional radiation monitoring system is developed. These advanced critical robot technology and telepresence techniques developed in this project can be applied to nozzle-dam installation /removal robot system, can be used to realize unmanned remotelization of nozzle-dam installation / removal task in steam generator of nuclear power plant, which can be contributed for people involved in extremely hazardous high radioactivity area to eliminate their exposure to radiation, enhance their task safety, and raise their working efficiency. (author). 75 refs., 21 tabs., 15 figs

  13. Mechanical reliability assessment of optical fibres in Radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, M.

    2006-01-01

    After more than two decades of intensive research and even some pioneering applications in space, optical fibres are now finding their way in various radiation environments, including both fission and future fusion nuclear-power plants, and high-energy physics experiments. For example, next to distributed monitoring applications of large nuclear infrastructures, fibre-optics can also be used for data communications during maintenance operations in the reactor vessel of the future ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), or for plasma diagnostics applications during operation of the reactor. These maintenance and diagnostics tasks require the optical fibres to withstand extremely high doses of radiation, up to MGy dose levels and temperatures above 150 degrees Celsius. The reliability assessment of fibre-optic systems for their qualification in nuclear environments often requires to meet stringent radiation tolerance levels. The majority of (usually accelerated) radiation assessments have so far focused on optical properties, such as wavelength-dependent radiation induced attenuation and radio-luminescence. The relation of these radiation effects with the fabrication methods and other environmental parameters has been the subject of years of research. Only a few results are available on the long-term evolution of mechanical properties of irradiated optical fibres. As a first step towards understanding the long-term reliability of fibre-optic composite cables in hostile radiation environments, we therefore performed dynamic fatigue tests with different commercial-grade optical fibres, both multi-mode and single-mode types

  14. Effect of radiation environment on radiation use efficiency and growth of sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bange, M.P.; Hammer, G.L.; Rickert, K.G.

    1997-01-01

    The level of incident radiation and the proportion of radiation that is diffuse affects radiation use efficiency (RUE) in crops. However, the degree of this effect, and its importance to growth and yield of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) have not been established. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of radiation environment on RUE, growth, and yield of sunflower. A fully irrigated crop was sown on an alluvial-prairie soil (Fluventic Haplustoll) and was exposed to three distinct radiation environments. In two treatments, the level of incident radiation was reduced by 14 and 20% by suspending two different types of polyethylene plastic films well above the crop. In addition to the reductions in incident radiation, the proportion of radiation that was diffuse was increased by about 14% in these treatments. Lower incident radiation and increased proportion of diffuse radiation had no effect on total biomass, phenology, leaf area, and the canopy light extinction coefficient (k = 0.89). However, yield was reduced in shaded treatments due to smaller grain size and lower harvest index. Although crop RUE measured over the entire crop cycle (1.25 g/MJ) did not differ significantly among treatments, there was a trend where RUE compensated for less intercepted incident radiation. Theoretical derivations of the response of RUE to different levels of incident radiation supported this finding. Shaded sunflower crops have the ability to produce biomass similar to unshaded crops by increasing RUE, but have lower harvest indices

  15. Gluonic hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1987-09-01

    The standard theory of colour forces (Quantum Chromodynamics) suggests that in addition to the familiar hadrons made of quarks, there should exist new states where coloured gluons play an essential dynamical role. The author reviews the theoretical predictions for the properties of these ''glueballs'' and of states containing resonating quarks and gluons. Attempts are made to highlight those features which are common to several models in the literature. Experimental candidates are confronted with the models. No clear cut signal for a gluonic hadron yet exists; consequently what future data are required to determine the constituency of some popular candidates is considered. (author)

  16. Possible sources of radiation in indoor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukanovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    More locations and building material will be needed to solve the housing needs, actually the future quantities will equal the total of all the previous building. And presently one quarter of the world population is already homeless. The development of human civilization in the new technological era goes on extremely quickly. In the search for new spaces, in the last decade of the 20th century, in town renovation planning the application of subterranean civil engineering is very popular. Below ground level, the new towns are built with many stories, with exclusively artificial light and artificial climate. There is not the slightest possibility of natural ventilation. These spaces have not been investigated as regards the contents of radon. Man is not adapted to spend most of the time in under artificial conditions. It is still to be discovered how it will affect humans and what is the degree of exposure to ionizing radiation in such conditions. It might be better to abandon underground construction before the adverse effects are proved. Previous mistakes in building must be overcome and new technologies applied as well as sustainable development in the future. (author)

  17. Research in radiation biology, in the environment, and in radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.; Myers, D.K.; Ophel, I.L.; Cowper, G.; Newcombe, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    Research in radiation biology at CRNL is concerned with: evaluation of the effects of low doses of radiation upon humans and other living organisms; the development of new methods for detecting the effects of radiation exposure in large populations; the continued development of improved methods by which radiation levels can be measured accurately and reliably; and evaluation of the effects of nuclear power use upon the environment. The present report summarizes our background knowledge of radiation hazards and describes current research activities in Biology and Health Physics Division at CRNL. (author)

  18. Memory behaviour in a radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucker, G.J.; Thurlow, L.

    1979-01-01

    Memory devices are often required for storage of data which must not be altered during a nuclear burst. If the properties of non-alterability and low power consumption during a standby mode of operation are combined, then the choice is narrowed down to static C-MOS bulk or silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) memories. Previous investigations have indicated that the SOS devices will achieve the maximum non-scrambling dose rate. However, it is interesting to determine the limitations of bulk as well as SOS devices for those programs where circumvention and refreshing of the memory is allowed. This article will present the results of an investigation of the characteristics of these memory types in a transient environment. (author)

  19. Effects of solar electromagnetic radiation on the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The general intent of this essay is to discuss the effect of solar electromagnetic radiation on the terrestrial environment. Instead of giving a systematic approach considering all environment processes where solar emission is the primary energy source and all important materials which have been generated by solar driven processes, the author sketches an impression of the range of the effects of solar radiation on the environment by surveying a number of topics of particular current interest, in varying levels of detail. These include atmospheric chemistry, some aspects of the transfer of radiation within the atmosphere, global energy balance and climate feedbacks, especially those due to clouds, impacts of fossil fuel energy use, evolution of early life processes, photosynthesis and plant productivity as it relates to photosynthesis and the global carbon cycle. (Auth.)

  20. SEL monitoring of the earth's energetic particle radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Environment Laboratory (SEL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) maintains instruments on board the GOES series of geostationary satellites, and aboard the NOAA/TIROS series of low-altitude, polar-orbiting satellites, which provide monitoring of the energetic particle radiation environment as well as monitoring the geostationary magnetic field and the solar x-ray flux. The data are used by the SEL Space Environment Services Center (SESC) to help provide real-time monitoring and forecasting of the state of the near earth environment and its disturbances, and to maintain a source of reliable information to research and operational activities of a variety of users

  1. Gerald: a general environment for radiation analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Ch.; Oliveira, P.I.E. de; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Adams, M.L.; Galan, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper describes the status of the GERALD interactive workbench for the analysis of radiation transport problems. GERALD basically guides the user through the various steps that are necessary to solve a radiation transport problem, and is aimed at education, research and industry. The advantages of such workbench are many: quality assurance of problem setup, interaction of the user with problem solution, preservation of theory and legacy research codes, and rapid proto-typing and testing of new methods. The environment is of general applicability catering for analytical, deterministic and stochastic analysis of the radiation problem and is not tied to one specific solution method or code. However, GERALD is being developed as a portable, modular, open source framework which renders itself quite naturally to the coupling of existing computational tools through specifically developed plug-ins. By offering a common route for setting up, solving and analyzing radiation transport problems GERALD offers the possibility of methods intercomparison and validation. Such flexible radiation transport environment will also facilitate the coupling of radiation physics methods to other physical phenomena and their application to other areas of application such as medical physics and the environment. (authors)

  2. Interactive intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, Thomas; Vanherpe, Liesbeth; Baudin, Mathieu; Theis, Chris; Braesch, Christian; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    A core issue during the planning of a maintenance intervention in a facility with ionizing radiation is the minimization of the integrated equivalent dose contracted by the maintenance workers during the intervention. In this work, we lay down the concepts for intervention planning in an irradiated environment and present a new software program for intervention planning, which provides interactive visualization of facilities and radiation levels, as well as tools for interactive trajectory planning. The software includes automatic calculation of the expected integrated equivalent radiation dose contracted during an intervention

  3. Interactive intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.fabry@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Vanherpe, Liesbeth [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Baudin, Mathieu [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); LCPI, ENSAM ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l' Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Theis, Chris [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Braesch, Christian [SYMME, Université de Savoie, Polytech Annecy-Chambry, 5 chemin de Bellevue, 74944 Annecy le Vieux (France); Feral, Bruno [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-04-21

    A core issue during the planning of a maintenance intervention in a facility with ionizing radiation is the minimization of the integrated equivalent dose contracted by the maintenance workers during the intervention. In this work, we lay down the concepts for intervention planning in an irradiated environment and present a new software program for intervention planning, which provides interactive visualization of facilities and radiation levels, as well as tools for interactive trajectory planning. The software includes automatic calculation of the expected integrated equivalent radiation dose contracted during an intervention.

  4. Role of natural radiation environment in earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.

    1980-01-01

    Natural ionizing radiations play an important role in a wide spectrum of earth sciences, including meteorology, geophysics, hydrology, atmospheric physics, and atmospheric chemistry. The nature and distribution of ionizing radiation sources and natural radionuclides in the atmospheric environment are summarized. The present status of the use of natural radioactive tracers for atmospheric studies is discussed. The effect of ionization produced by natural radiation sources on atmospheric electricity, the relationship of electrical and meteorological variables, and the possible effects of man-made releases of 85 Kr are considered. Experimental evidence is presented for the production of condensation nuclei by the combined effects of radon and sulfur dioxide

  5. Interactive intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas; Baudin, Mathieu; Theis, Chris; Braesch, Christian; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    A core issue during the planning of a maintenance intervention in a facility with ionizing radiation is the minimization of the integrated equivalent dose contracted by the maintenance workers during the intervention. In this work, we lay down the concepts for intervention planning in an irradiated environment and present a new software program for intervention planning, which provides interactive visualization of facilities and radiation levels, as well as tools for interactive trajectory planning. The software includes automatic calculation of the expected integrated equivalent radiation dose contracted during an intervention.

  6. Radiation chemistry and the environment: the radiation degradation of pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, K.; Laurence, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The chemistry of the degradation of organic pesticides, herbicides and fungicides in natural systems determines operationally important parameters such as withholding times before planting or consumption. Free radicals are being increasingly recognised as important in environmental chemistry and in aqueous systems the OH, H, and O 2 - radicals are believed to be relevant to the degradation of organic molecules. Sources of these radicals in natural aqueous systems have been suggested as photochemical or transition metal reactions involving dissolved organic species such as humic acids. We are undertaking a systematic study of the reactions of OH, H, and O 2 - radicals and halogen radical ions such as Cl 2 - , with important herbicides and fungicides in order to obtain rate constant data for modelling the possible reactions in field conditions and to establish whether the postulated reactions are capable of accounting for the disappearance of the materials in the environment. In addition to using gamma and pulse radiolysis to determine product yields, rate constants and the presence of reactive intermediates, we have begun to explore the stability and geometry of possible radial intermediates using Gaussian computations. At present six pesticides in current use in Australia are being studied. Our results for one of these, Inoxyl will be discussed. While electron transfer to or from the molecule is the initial reaction path for OH and H radicals, superoxide radical species are unreactive. (authors)

  7. Fifth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Swedjemark, G.A.; Baeverstam, U.; Lowder, W.M.; Miller, K.M.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1993-01-01

    The fifth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment organized a series of tutorial sessions. One of the five major fields concerned with the radon issue. The tutorials dealt with important issues of the radon problem and covered the following aspects: Cosmic and Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Measurement, Properties and Behaviour of Radon and Thoron and Their Decay Products in the Air, Radon and Radon Daughters Metrology: Basic Aspects Long Lived Radionuclides in the Environment, in Food and in Human Beings, Design and Analysis of Radon Surveys with Epidemiological Utility

  8. Do we need radiation protection for the living environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefner, A.; Voelkle, H.

    2003-01-01

    The protection of the living environment, i.e. non human species or non human organisms, is a condition for the long term human survival. This certainly is true also for radioactivity and ionizing radiation. The ICRP statement that fauna und flora are sufficiently protected if man is protected is valid in many cases but not in every one. The article gives some reflections on this subject from the point of view of practical radiation protection and some suggestions on how, if necessary, protection of the living environment could be put into practice. (orig.) [de

  9. About the training on radiation protection in health environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Armas, J.

    2007-01-01

    Paper education on Radiation Protection in health environments is essential to optimise the use of radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. The continuous increment in the number of available radiation emitting equipment in health environments and the generalisation of procedures, which imply important radiation exposures to patients, are expected to increase the overall doses to patients. A consequence of this will be the increment of harmful effects, especially, radiation induced cancer. General concern towards this respect has produced a generalisation of the requirements considered to be needed in a proper Radiation Protection education. Norms have been created for this purpose at both national and European level. here, the European and Spanish norms are reviewed. the applications of these norms are, also reviewed. Furthermore, the objectives of various platforms and European projects, aimed at improving the formation of health personnel on Radiation Protection, are presented. A conclusion of the review is that there exist significant differences in the syllabuses proposed for various professionals at different levels. Moreover, all the legislation collected in the norms has not been implemented in common practice. (Author) 24 refs

  10. Radiation exposure of airline crew members to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, G. E-mail: gianni.deangelis@iol.it; Caldora, M.; Santaquilani, M.; Scipione, R.; Verdecchia, A

    2001-06-01

    A study of radiation exposures in the ionizing radiation environment of the atmosphere is currently in progress for the Italian civil aviation flight personnel. After a description of the considered data sources/ the philosophy of the study is presented/ and an overview is given of the data processing with regard to flight routes/ the computational techniques for radiation dose evaluation along the flight paths and for the exposure matrix building/ along with an indication of the results that the study should provide.

  11. Utilization of SRNL-developed radiation-resistant polymer in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    The radiation-resistant polymer developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory is adaptable for multiple applications to enhance polymer endurance and effectiveness in radiation environments. SRNL offers to collaborate with TEPCO in evaluation, testing, and utilization of SRNL’s radiation-resistant polymer in the D&D of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Refinement of the scope and associated costs will be conducted in consultation with TECPO.

  12. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-15

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety.

  13. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-01

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety

  14. Preliminary design of CERN Future Circular Collider tunnel: first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantino, Angelo; Alía, Rubén García; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Brugger, Markus; Cerutti, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    As part of its post-LHC high energy physics program, CERN is conducting a study for a new proton-proton collider, called Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh), running at center-of-mass energies of up to 100 TeV in a new 100 km tunnel. The study includes a 90-350 GeV lepton collider (FCC-ee) as well as a lepton-hadron option (FCC-he). In this work, FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation was extensively used to perform a first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics in the FCC-hh tunnel. The model of the tunnel was created based on the original civil engineering studies already performed and further integrated in the existing FLUKA models of the beam line. The radiation levels in critical areas, such as the racks for electronics and cables, power converters, service areas, local tunnel extensions was evaluated.

  15. Preliminary design of CERN Future Circular Collider tunnel: first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Infantino Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of its post-LHC high energy physics program, CERN is conducting a study for a new proton-proton collider, called Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh, running at center-of-mass energies of up to 100 TeV in a new 100 km tunnel. The study includes a 90-350 GeV lepton collider (FCC-ee as well as a lepton-hadron option (FCC-he. In this work, FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation was extensively used to perform a first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics in the FCC-hh tunnel. The model of the tunnel was created based on the original civil engineering studies already performed and further integrated in the existing FLUKA models of the beam line. The radiation levels in critical areas, such as the racks for electronics and cables, power converters, service areas, local tunnel extensions was evaluated.

  16. Contribution to developing the environment radiation protection methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A. [Institute of Atomic Power Engineering NRNU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alexakhin, R.; Dubynina, M. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The environment sustainable development and biota protection, including the environment radiation protection are issues of nowadays interest in the society. An activity is ongoing on the development of a system of radiation protection for non-human biota. Anthropocentric and eco-centric principles are widely discussed. ICRP Publications 103, 108, 114 and many other reports and articles refer to the topic of environmental protection, reference animals and plants set, corresponding transfer parameters, dose models and derived consideration reference levels. There is still an open field for discussion of methods and approaches to get well-established procedure to assess environmental risks of radiation impacts to different organisms, populations and ecosystems. A huge work has been done by the ICRP and other organizations and research groups to develop and systematize approaches for this difficult subject. This activity, however, is not everywhere well-known and perceived, and more efforts are needed to bring ideas of eco-centric strategy in the environment radiation protection not only to public but to specialists in many countries as well. One of the main points of interest is an assessment of critical doses and doses rates for flora and fauna species. Some aspects of a possible procedure to find their estimates are studied in this work, including criteria for datasets of good quality, models of dose dependence, sensitivity of different umbrella endpoints and methods of original massive datasets treatment. Estimates are done based on information gathered in a database on radiation-induced effects in plants. Data on biological effects in plants (umbrella endpoints of reproductive potential, survival, morbidity, morphological, biochemical, and genetic effects) in dependence on dose and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been collected from reviewed publications and maintained in MS Access format. The database now contains about 7000 datasets and 25000 records

  17. Late effects from hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  18. Standardization of ionizing radiation in industry and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    In this account a new standardization system is described. This system is intended for the protection of environment, people and employees against the harmful consequences of ionizing radiation. This new system is based upon the actual knowledge of the harmful effects of ionizing radiation and joins to the starting points and objectives of the environment- and industry-protectional policies and is explained for both policies separately. The starting points and objectives are presented of the actual environment- and industry-protectional policies and of the radiation-protection policy pursued up till now. The harmful effects of radiation, the importance of the of the most recent scientific developments and the results of the investigation performed in the framework of this account, are described. Conclusions about these harmful affects are given. The systematics of the standardization are described. Subsequently are considered the radiation sources, their classification, the risk limits for regular situations and for large accidents, the justification principle and the ALARA-principle, emission- and product requirements, objectives for environment quality, standards for combat of the consequences of accidents, the policy with regard to 'building and dwelling' and finally standards for protection of employees. The consequences of the systematics of standardization, which are described in this account, are indicated for environment- as well as industry-protectional policy. Per radiation-source category the corresponding risks are indicated and at which term which continuation activities are necessary. The consequences for the set of instruments and some international aspects are considered. Finally the activity list gives a survey of the continuation activities and the terms at which these have to be carried out. (H.W.). 4 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  20. General impact of robotics and automation in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghdari, A.; Salehi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Robotics and automation systems in nuclear environments require special design considerations. This paper presents an overview of selected robotic systems already designed and developed for use in nuclear applications at some U.S. laboratories. It will further emphasize on tasks identification, operational constraints, special considerations in materials selection, and a general guideline for robotic systems design in radiation environments. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs

  1. Galileo Measurements of the Jovian Electron Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) has been used to map Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii (1 jovian radius = 71,400 km). The electron count rates from the instrument were averaged into 10-minute intervals over the energy range 0.2 MeV to 11 MeV to form an extensive database of observations of the jovian radiation belts between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and end of mission in 2003. These data were then used to provide differential flux estimates in the jovian equatorial plane as a function of radial distance (organized by magnetic L-shell position). These estimates provide the basis for an omni-directional, equatorial model of the jovian electron radiation environment. The comparison of these results with the original Divine model of jovian electron radiation and their implications for missions to Jupiter will be discussed. In particular, it was found that the electron dose predictions for a representative mission to Europa were about a factor of 2 lower than the Divine model estimates over the range of 100 to 1000 mils (2.54 to 25.4 mm) of aluminum shielding, but exceeded the Divine model by about 50% for thicker shielding for the assumed Europa orbiter trajectories. The findings are a significant step forward in understanding jovian electron radiation and represent a valuable tool for estimating the radiation environment to which jovian science and engineering hardware will be exposed.

  2. Wireless Communication Enhancement Methods for Mobile Robots in Radiation Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nattanmai Parasuraman, Ramviyas; Ferre, Manuel

    In hostile environments such as in scientific facilities where ionising radiation is a dominant hazard, reducing human interventions by increasing robotic operations are desirable. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has around 50 km of underground scientific facilities, where wireless mobile robots could help in the operation of the accelerator complex, e.g. in conducting remote inspections and radiation surveys in different areas. The main challenges to be considered here are not only that the robots should be able to go over long distances and operate for relatively long periods, but also the underground tunnel environment, the possible presence of electromagnetic fields, radiation effects, and the fact that the robots shall in no way interrupt the operation of the accelerators. Having a reliable and robust wireless communication system is essential for successful execution of such robotic missions and to avoid situations of manual recovery of the robots in the event that the robot runs ...

  3. Interplanetary Radiation and Internal Charging Environment Models for Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; NeegaardParker, Linda

    2005-01-01

    A Solar Sail Radiation Environment (SSRE) model has been developed for defining charged particle environments over an energy range from 0.01 keV to 1 MeV for hydrogen ions, helium ions, and electrons. The SSRE model provides the free field charged particle environment required for characterizing energy deposition per unit mass, charge deposition, and dose rate dependent conductivity processes required to evaluate radiation dose and internal (bulk) charging processes in the solar sail membrane in interplanetary space. Solar wind and energetic particle measurements from instruments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft in a solar, near-polar orbit provide the particle data over a range of heliospheric latitudes used to derive the environment that can be used for radiation and charging environments for both high inclination 0.5 AU Solar Polar Imager mission and the 1.0 AU L1 solar missions. This paper describes the techniques used to model comprehensive electron, proton, and helium spectra over the range of particle energies of significance to energy and charge deposition in thin (less than 25 micrometers) solar sail materials.

  4. European hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The European Hadron Facility (EHF) is a project for particle and nuclear physics in the 1990s which would consist of a fast cycling high intensity proton synchrotron of about 30 GeV primary energy and providing a varied spectrum of intense high quality secondary beams (polarized protons, pions, muons, kaons, antiprotons, neutrinos). The physics case of this project has been studied over the last two years by a European group of particle and nuclear physicists (EHF Study Group), whilst the conceptual design for the accelerator complex was worked out (and is still being worked on) by an international group of machine experts (EHF Design Study Group). Both aspects have been discussed in recent years in a series of working parties, topical seminars, and workshops held in Freiburg, Trieste, Heidelberg, Karlsruhe, Les Rasses and Villigen. This long series of meetings culminated in the International Conference on a European Hadron Facility held in Mainz from 10-14 March

  5. The biological effectiveness of heavy ion radiations in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    Although heavy ions are rarely encountered in the majority of terrestrial environments, the exposure of humans to this fascinating class of ionizing radiation is becoming more frequent. Long-duration spaceflight, new radiotherapeutic procedures and enhanced levels of radon, and other naturally-occurring alpha particle emitters, have all increased concern and stimulated interest recently within the radiological protection and radiobiological communities. Significant data concerning the long-term effects of low levels of heavy ions on mammalian systems are correspondingly scarce, leading to increased emphasis on modelling all aspects of the radiation-organism interaction. Contemporary radiation protection procedures reflect the need for a more fundamental understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the biological actions of such radiations. Major deficiencies exist in the current recommendations for assessment of relative effectiveness, the enhanced severity of the biological consequences instigated by heavy ions, over conventional sparsely ionizing radiations. In an attempt to remedy some of the inadequate concepts and assumptions presently employed and, simultaneously, to gain insight into the fundamental mechanisms behind the notion of radiation quality, a series of algorithms have been developed and executed as computer code, to evaluate the biological effectiveness of heavy ion radiation ''tracks'' according to a number of criteria. These include consideration of the spatial characteristics of physical energy deposition in idealised cellular structures (finite particle range, radial extension of tracks via δ-ray emission) and the likelihood of induction and mis-repair of severe molecular lesions (double-strand breaks, multiply-damaged sites). (author)

  6. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance fo participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors

  7. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of valuing the environment and implications for the definition of harm and monetary valuation of environmental goods; second, difficulties with scientific uncertainty and applications of the precautionary principle; and third, issues concerned with the distribution of risk and its relevance for participation in decision-making. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Dose rate effects in the radiation damage of the plastic scintillators of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00314584

    2016-10-07

    We present measurements of the reduction of light output by plastic scintillators irradiated in the CMS detector during the 8 TeV run of the Large Hadron Collider and show that they indicate a strong dose rate effect. The damage for a given dose is larger for lower dose rate exposures. The results agree with previous measurements of dose rate effects, but are stronger due to the very low dose rates probed. We show that the scaling with dose rate is consistent with that expected from diffusion effects.

  9. The radiation environment in Sweden; Straalmiljoen i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Paal; Carlsson, Monica; Falk, Rolf; Hubbard, Lynn; Leitz, Wolfram; Mjoenes, Lars; Moere, Hans; Nyblom, Leif; Soederman, Ann-Louise; Yuen Lasson, Katarina; Aakerblom, Gustav; Oehlen, Elisabeth

    2007-01-15

    The report describes, and reports data from, the monitoring of the radiation environment which has been conducted in Sweden since the 1950s. Average doses to the general public as well as to special groups of the public are also reported. Environmental monitoring concerning radiation has to a great extent focused on deposition and occurrence of radioactive elements originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. The average dose from {sup 137}Cs is very low, although it is somewhat higher in the group 'reindeer herders'. Surveys of naturally occurring radioactive elements in soil, drinking water and indoor air show that radiation from soil and building materials constitutes, besides medical use of radiation, the main part of the average total dose to the population. The dose from drinking water from drilled wells or from radon in indoor air may dominate the total dose in certain cases. Smoking increases the risk of radon considerably. UV-radiation has increased with 10 percent over the last 22 years at the location of the monitoring station. This is mainly explained by a decreased cloudiness. The exposure for UV is however more dependent on behaviour, and approximately 25 percent of the total exposure takes place abroad. Presently there are no time series concerning electromagnetic fields in the outdoor environment. However, measurements indicate levels well below the reference values.

  10. The radiation environment in Sweden; Straalmiljoen i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Paal; Carlsson, Monica; Falk, Rolf; Hubbard, Lynn; Leitz, Wolfram; Mjoenes, Lars; Moere, Hans; Nyblom, Leif; Soederman, Ann-Louise; Yuen Lasson, Katarina; Aakerblom, Gustav; Oehlen, Elisabeth

    2007-01-15

    The report describes, and reports data from, the monitoring of the radiation environment which has been conducted in Sweden since the 1950s. Average doses to the general public as well as to special groups of the public are also reported. Environmental monitoring concerning radiation has to a great extent focused on deposition and occurrence of radioactive elements originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. The average dose from {sup 137}Cs is very low, although it is somewhat higher in the group 'reindeer herders'. Surveys of naturally occurring radioactive elements in soil, drinking water and indoor air show that radiation from soil and building materials constitutes, besides medical use of radiation, the main part of the average total dose to the population. The dose from drinking water from drilled wells or from radon in indoor air may dominate the total dose in certain cases. Smoking increases the risk of radon considerably. UV-radiation has increased with 10 percent over the last 22 years at the location of the monitoring station. This is mainly explained by a decreased cloudiness. The exposure for UV is however more dependent on behaviour, and approximately 25 percent of the total exposure takes place abroad. Presently there are no time series concerning electromagnetic fields in the outdoor environment. However, measurements indicate levels well below the reference values.

  11. Modeling of the Martian environment for radiation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Wilson, J.W.; Clowdsley, M.S.; Qualls, G.D.; Singleterry, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    A model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) has been developed. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for conditions at Mars are transported through the Martian atmosphere down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g. CO 2 and H 2 O ices) along with its time variations throughout the Martian year. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. This site has been developed to provide the scientific and engineering communities with an interactive site containing a variety of environmental models, shield evaluation codes, and radiation response models to allow a thorough assessment of ionizing radiation risk for current and future space missions

  12. The Dynamics of the Atmospheric Radiation Environment at Aviation Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinopoulos, Epaminondas G.

    2004-01-01

    Single Event Effects vulnerability of on-board computers that regulate the: navigational, flight control, communication, and life support systems has become an issue in advanced modern aircraft, especially those that may be equipped with new technology devices in terabit memory banks (low voltage, nanometer feature size, gigabit integration). To address this concern, radiation spectrometers need to fly continually on a multitude of carriers over long periods of time so as to accumulate sufficient information that will broaden our understanding of the very dynamic and complex nature of the atmospheric radiation environment regarding: composition, spectral distribution, intensity, temporal variation, and spatial variation.

  13. Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

  14. Effects of radiation on coal mine environment -a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Varma, N.K.; Sahay, N.; Ahmad, I.

    2001-01-01

    Due to mass-scale industrialization, world's environment is being polluted every day endangering the existence of living beings on the earth. This has attracted the attention of environmental engineers, medical practitioners, planners and researchers throughout the world. Attempts are being made to make air, water and atmosphere clean and to prevent likely hazards arising out of various industrial activities. In addition, the radiation from natural sources is all around us and has been here since time immemorial. Coal miners have small occupational radiation which arise from naturally occurring radioactive substance(s) underground. The predominant source of natural radiation present in coal mines is the radon gas. This paper describes the origin of radon and its radiological hazards. An attempt has been made to review the status of the problem likely to be caused by the different radioactive elements present in Indian coal, coal ash and allied coal-based industries. (author)

  15. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: ethical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper identifies some of the main ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation and suggests ways in which ethics can aid in developing a system of protection. After a presentation of background on ethical theory and environmental ethics, three main issues related to practical environmental protection are discussed: First, the question of who or what has moral standing; second the appropriate level of protection; and third compatibility with other environmental stressors. In summary, the paper argues that there are strong ethical grounds for efforts to provide for the protection of the environment and that, all other things being equal, there is no reason to treat ionising radiation differently to other environmental stressors. (author)

  16. Astrobiological Effects of Stellar Radiation in Circumstellar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; Guinan, Edward F.; Kurucz, Robert L.

    2006-10-01

    The centerpiece of all life on Earth is carbon-based biochemistry. Previous scientific research has suggested that biochemistry based on carbon may also play a decisive role in extraterrestrial life forms, i.e., alien life outside of Earth, if existent. In the following, we explore if carbon-based macromolecules (such as DNA) in the environments of stars other than the Sun are able to survive the effects of energetic stellar radiation, such as UV-C in the wavelength band between 200 and 290 nm. We focus on main-sequence stars akin to the Sun, but of hotter (F-type stars) and cooler (K- and M-type stars) surface temperature. Emphasis is placed on investigating the radiative environment in stellar habitable zones (HZs). Stellar habitable zones have an important relevance in astrobiology because they constitute circumstellar regions in which a planet of suitable size can have surface temperatures for water to exist in liquid form.

  17. Hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.

    1984-01-01

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain

  18. Radiation studies on the microflora in a High-level radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahiera, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation sensitivities of microflora in the air environment of the irradiation room of the 60 CO industrial irradiation facility of NCRRT was studied. The isolated microflora was identified to be the Gram positive micrococci, and the gram positive bacilli: coagulans and laterosporous. The study of the dose-survival counts dependence of the colonies showed the existance of the combination of at least two groups of micro-organisms with different sensitivities to radiation. The value of the radiation resistant group was found to be 2.2 10kGy. A method is presented to estimate the amount of each group in the initial culture. A study of the dependence of radiation lethality on the dose rate of radiation on the aerobic dry microbes showed no significant effect in the dose-rate range from 330 down to 44 Gy.min

  19. The research of nuclear experiment radiation environment wireless alarm device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoqiong; Wang Pan; Fang Fang

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces based on monolithic integrated circuit's nuclear experiment radiation environment wireless alarm device's software and hardware design. The system by G-M tube, high-pressured module, signal conditioning circuit, power source module, monolithic integrated circuit and wireless transmission module is composed. The device has low power consumption, high performance, high accuracy detection, easy maintenance, small size, simple operation, and other features, and has a broad application prospects. (authors)

  20. Supervision of radiation environment management of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Mingyan

    2013-01-01

    Through literature and documents, the basis, content and implementation of the supervision of radiation environment management of nuclear facilities were defined. Such supervision was extensive and complicated with various tasks and overlapping duties, and had large social impact. Therefore, it was recommend to make further research on this supervision should be done, clarify and specify responsibilities of the executor of the supervision so as to achieve institutionalization, standardization and routinization of the supervision. (author)

  1. Review of the Radiation Environment in the Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, I

    2000-01-01

    The radiation environment in the inner detector has been simulated using the particle transport program FLUKA with a recent description of the ATLAS experiment. Given in this note are particle fluences and doses at positions relevant to the PIXEL, SCT and TRT detectors. In addition, studies are reported on in which 1) information concerning the optimisation of the inner detector neutron-moderators is obtained and 2) the impact of including additional vacuum-equipment is assessed.

  2. Buckling analysis of a cylindrical shell, under neutron radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arani, A. Ghorbanpour; Ahmadi, M.; Ahmadi, A.; Rastgoo, A.; Sepyani, H.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The work investigates the buckling of a shell in the neutron radiation environment. ► Radiation induced porosity in elastic materials affects the material's properties. ► The data based technique was used to determine the volume fraction porosity. ► The theoretical formulations are presented based on the classical shell theory (CST). ► It was concluded that both T and neutron induced swelling have significant effects. - Abstract: This research investigates the buckling of a cylindrical shell in the neutron radiation environment, subjected to combined static and periodic axial forces. Radiation induced porosity in elastic materials affects the thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of the materials. In this study, the data based technique was used to determine the volume fraction porosity, P, of shell material. A least-squares fit of the Young's module data yielded the estimated Young's modulus. The shell assumed made of iron irradiated in the range of 2–15e−7 dPa/s at 345–650 °C and theoretical formulations are presented based on the classical shell theory (CST). The research deals with the problem theoretically; keeping in mind that one means of generating relevant design data is to investigate prototype structures. A parametric study is followed and the stability of shell is discussed. It is concluded that both temperature and neutron induced swelling have significant effects on the buckling load.

  3. Monitoring of contamination of atmospheric environment by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Hiroaki

    1995-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution has become a worldwide problem regardless of developed industrial nations and developing countries. In particular, the pollution due to automobile exhaust gas, the carcinogenic particles in diesel exhaust and their relation to various respiratory diseases are the problems. Nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides in exhaust gas become the cause of acid rain. Radiation began to be utilized for the measurement of the concentration of floating particles and the amount of fallout dust, the forecast of the generation and diffusion of pollutants, the elucidation of the contribution of generation sources in wide areas and so on. In this report, the circumstances that radiation became to be utilized for monitoring atmospheric environment and the present status and the perspective of the radiation utilization in the field of the preservation of atmospheric environment are described. The progress of the method of measuring floating particles in Japan is explained. The automatic measurement of floating particles by β-ray absorption method and the application of β-ray absorption method to the measurement of the amount of fallout dust, generation source particles and the exposure to floating particles of individuals for health control are described. The utilization of radiation for real time monitoring, the investigation of the generation of blown-up dust, atmospheric diffusion experiment and the elucidation of the contribution of generation sources by PIXE radioactivation analysis are reported. (K.I.)

  4. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts.

  5. SPACE RADIATION ENVIRONMENT MONITORED BY KITSAT-1 AND KITSAT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Shin

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of space radiation experiments carried out on board the first two Korean technology demonstration microsatellites are presented in this paper. The first satellite, KITSAT-1, launched in August 1992, carries a radiation monitoring payload called cosmic ray experiment(CRE for characterizing the low-earth orbit(LEO radiation environment. The CRE consists of two sub-systems: the cosmic particle experiment (CPE and the total dose experiment(TDE. In addition, single event upset(SEUrates of the program memory and the RAM disk are also monitored. The second satellite, KITSAT-2, launched in September 1993, carries a newly developed 32-bit on-board computer(OBC, KASCOM(KAIST satellite computer in addition to OBC186. SEUs ocurred in the KASCOM, as well as in the program memory and RAM disk memory, have been monitored since the beginning of the satellite operation. These two satellites, which are very similar in structures but different in orbits, provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of the radiation environment characterized by the orbit.

  6. Predicted radiation environment of the Saturn baseline diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Lee, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport was used to predict the radiation environment of the Saturn accelerator for the baseline diode design. The x-ray output has been calculated, as well as energy deposition in CaF 2 thermoluminescent dosimetry and silicon. It is found that the design criteria for the radiation environment will be met and that approximately 10 kJ of x rays will be available for simulation experiments, if the diode provides a nominal beam of 2.0-MeV electrons for 20 ns with a peak current of 12.5 MA. The penalty in dose and x-ray output for operating below the nominal energy in order to obtain a softer spectrum is quantified. The penalty for using excessive electron equilibration in the standard packaging of the thermoluminescent dosimeters is shown to be negligible. An intrinsic lack of electron equilibration for silicon elements of components and subsystems is verified for Saturn environments, demonstrating the ambiguity of design criteria based on silicon deposition. Validation of an efficient next-event-estimator method for predicting energy deposition in equilibrated detectors/dosimetry is confirmed. Finally, direct-electron depositions in excess of 1 kJ/g are shown to be easily achievable. 34 refs., 30 figs

  7. Application of radiation and isotopes for a better environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA, working with governments and international bodies, is promoting the use of radiation technology and isotopes (nuclear techniques) in devising and implementing strategies for environmental sustainability. The number of nuclear techniques which can contribute to a better environment is very large. For practical purpose they can be schematically grouped into three categories, i.e. a) techniques for monitoring and assessing environmental pollution, b) techniques for reducing the environmental impact of increased productivity, c) techniques for the development of new resources in a more environmentally friendly manner. Examples in category a) are: the analysis of non-radioactive and radioactive pollutants, tracer techniques for pollutant transport studies, trace techniques for monitoring pesticide residues in food and the environment, climatic studies thorough isotopes in precipitation. Examples in category b) are: electron beam processing of combustion flue gases, the sterile insect technique for insect pest eradication and control, nitrogen fixation in crops and trees to optimise fertiliser use and combat desertification, tracer techniques for optimising fertiliser use, nuclear techniques for improving water management practices and reduce pollution of fresh water. Examples in category c) are : isotopes for studying the origin and flow of water, radiation mutation in plants for obtain crops with better agronomic characteristics including resistance to diseases. In this work examples and practical achievements of the most significant techniques and technologies for the improvement of the environment based on the use of radiation and isotopes are presented. (author)

  8. Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Ola, O. O.; Achuka, J. A.; Babarimisa, I. O.; Ayara, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ measurement of background radiation dose from selected dumpsites in Ota and its environs was done using Radialert Nuclear Radiation Monitor (Digilert 200). Ten measurements were taken from each dumpsite. The measured background radiation range between 0.015 mRhr-1 for AOD and 0.028 mRhr-1 for SUS dumpsites. The calculated annual equivalent doses vary between 1.31 mSvyr-1 for AOD and 2.28 mSv/yr for SUS dumpsites. The air absorbed dose calculated ranged from 150 nGyhr-1 to 280 nGy/hr for AOD and SUS dumpsites respectively with an average value of 217 nGyhr-1 for all the locations. All the estimated parameters were higher than permissible limit set for background radiation for the general public. Conclusively, the associated challenge and radiation burden posed by the wastes on the studied locations and scavengers is high. Therefore, there is need by the regulatory authorities to look into the way and how waste can be properly managed so as to alleviate the effects on the populace leaving and working in the dumpsites vicinity.

  9. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  10. Hadron coherent production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dremin, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    The process of the coherent production of hadrons analogous to Cherenkov radiation of photons is considered. Its appearence and qualitative treatment are possible now because it is known from experiment that the real part of the πp (and pp) forward elastic scattering amplitude is positive at high energies. The threshold behaviour of the process as well as very typical angular and psub(T)-distributions where psub(t)-transverse momentum corresponding to the ring structure of the target diagram at rather large angles and to high-psub(T) jet production are emphasized [ru

  11. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  12. Modification of GNPS environment radiation monitoring network system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lili; Cao Chunsheng

    1999-01-01

    GNPS Environment Radiation Continuous Monitoring System (KRS), the only real time on-line system of site radiation monitoring, was put into service in 1993 prior to the first loading the the plant. It is revealed through several years of operation that this system has some deficiencies such as inadequate real time monitoring means, no figure and diagram display function on the central computer, high failures, frequent failure warning signals, thus making the availability of the system at a low level. In recent years, with the rapid development of computer network technology and increasingly strict requirements on the NPP environment protection raised by the government and public, KRS modification had become necessary and urgent. In 1996, GNPS carried out modification work on the measuring geometry condition of γ radiation monitoring sub-station and lightening protection. To enhance the functions of real time monitoring and data auto-processing, further modification of the system was made in 1998, including the update of the software and hardware of KRS central processor, set-up of system computer local network and database. In this way, the system availability and monitoring quality are greatly improved and effective monitoring and analysis means are provided for gaseous release during normal operation and under accident condition

  13. Linear devices in combined high-level radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Vonno, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The design of precision analog integrated circuits for use in combined high-level radiation environments has traditionally been on a full-custom basis. The use of semicustom design methods has become prevalent in digital devices, with standard cell libraries and gate arrays readily available from multiple vendors. This paper addresses the application of semicustom design techniques to analog parts. In all cases the emphasis is on bipolar technology, since this provides an optimal combination of precision and radiation hardness. A mixed mode analog/digital (A/D) cell family for implementing semicustom designs is described, together with the fabrication process used. Specific processing and design methods are used to provide circuit hardness against neutron, total gamma dose, and transient gamma environments. Semicustom mixed analog/digital design is seen as an appropriate methodology for implementation of medium-performance mixed mode functions for radiation-hardened applications. This leads to trade-offs in process complexity and performance. Full custom design remains necessary for demanding applications such as high-speed A/D conversion and associated sample/hold functions. An A/D cell family optimized for hardness is described, together with the bipolar process used to implement it

  14. Environments with elevated radiation levels from natural radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    2000-01-01

    Some areas in the world have elevated levels of radioactive substances in the environment forming elevated radiation areas (ERAs) where public potential annual effective doses can exceed even the dose limit of radiation workers. Such radioactive substances are either terrestrial natural radioactivity added naturally in the soil or natural and/or man-made radioactivity from human activities added into the environment. If radioactivity is added naturally, elevated natural radiation areas (ENRAs) are formed. Based on the classification criteria introduced by the author, such regions are divided into static and dynamic areas. They are also classified in accordance with their level of potential effective dose to the public. Some main ENRAs are classified. Highlights are presented of the results of activity studies carried out in selected areas. The concepts discussed can also be applied to areas formed by human activities. The author suggests some guidelines for future studies, regulatory control and decision making, bearing in mind the need for harmonization of policies for regulatory control and remedial actions at sites to protect the public from environmental chronic exposures. (author)

  15. Performance limit of daytime radiative cooling in warm humid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Suichi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Daytime radiative cooling potentially offers efficient passive cooling, but the performance is naturally limited by the environment, such as the ambient temperature and humidity. Here, we investigate the performance limit of daytime radiative cooling under warm and humid conditions in Okayama, Japan. A cooling device, consisting of alternating layers of SiO2 and poly(methyl methacrylate on an Al mirror, is fabricated and characterized to demonstrate a high reflectance for sunlight and a selective thermal radiation in the mid-infrared region. In the temperature measurement under the sunlight irradiation, the device shows 3.4 °C cooler than a bare Al mirror, but 2.8 °C warmer than the ambient of 35 °C. The corresponding numerical analyses reveal that the atmospheric window in λ = 16 ∼ 25 μm is closed due to a high humidity, thereby limiting the net emission power of the device. Our study on the humidity influence on the cooling performance provides a general guide line of how one can achieve practical passive cooling in a warm humid environment.

  16. International news about radiation protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.

    2016-01-01

    The new European Basic Safety Standards in Radiation Protection (2013/59/Euratom) introduce 'environmental criteria' to protect human health in the long term. This innovation results from work in progress and from the recent positioning of international organizations and authorities in charge of radiation protection and its implementation, regarding the protection of wildlife against ionizing radiation. On the basis of the international state of the art, from the current regulatory context to existing approaches, the ERICA method has been identified as fully consistent with the ICRP approach and the most operational at the moment, due to its richness, flexibility and traceability. Most of the radiological risk assessments for wildlife published in the 5 last years used part or all of the ERICA approach, generally screening the radiological risk for wildlife from the first stage of the assessment, except for a few areas among those most impacted by radioactive contamination (Chernobyl area, uranium mining sites in Central Asia, etc.). This update of the knowledge in the field at the international level and the feedback on the analysis of regulatory files presented by nuclear operators led to 10 recommendations from the IRSN on the radiation protection of the environment and its implementation. (authors)

  17. Internal Charging Design Environments for the Earths Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts are a widely recognized threat to spacecraft because they penetrate lightly shielded vehicle hulls and deep into insulating materials where they accumulate to sufficient levels to produce electrostatic discharges. Strategies for evaluating the magnitude of the relativistic electron flux environment and its potential for producing ESD events are varied. Simple "rule of thumb" estimates such as the widely used 10(exp 10) e-/sq cm fluence within 10 hour threshold for the onset of pulsing in dielectric materials provide a quick estimate of when to expect charging issues. More sophisticated strategies based on models of the trapped electron flux within the Earth s magnetic field provide time dependent estimates of electron flux along spacecraft orbits and orbit integrate electron flux. Finally, measurements of electron flux can be used to demonstrate mean and extreme relativistic electron environments. This presentation will evaluate strategies used to specify energetic electron flux and fluence environments along spacecraft trajectories in the Earth s radiation belts.

  18. Radiation exposure of airline crew members to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, G. De; Ballard, T.; Lagorio, S.; Verdecchia, A.

    2000-01-01

    All risk assessment techniques for possible health effects from low dose rate radiation exposure should combine knowledge both of the radiation environment and of the biological response, whose effects (e.g. carcinogenesis) are usually evaluated through mathematical models and/or animal and cell experiments. Data on human exposure to low dose rate radiation exposure and its effects are not readily available, especially with regards to stochastic effects, related to carcinogenesis and therefore to cancer risks, for which the event probability increases with increasing radiation exposure. The largest source of such data might be airline flight personnel, if enrolled for studies on health effects induced by the cosmic-ray generated atmospheric ionizing radiation, whose total dose, increasing over the years, might cause delayed radiation-induced health effects, with the high-LET and highly ionizing neutron component typical of atmospheric radiation. In 1990 flight personnel has been given the status of 'occupationally exposed to radiation' by the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP), with a received radiation dose that is at least twice larger than that of the general population. The studies performed until now were limited in scope and cohort size, and moreover no information whatsoever on radiation occupational exposure (e.g. dose, flight hours, route haul, etc.) was used in the analysis, so no correlation has been until now possible between atmospheric ionizing radiation and (possibly radiation-induced) observed health effects. Our study addresses the issues, by considering all Italian civilian airline flight personnel, both cockpit and cabin crew members, with about 10,000 people selected, whose records on work history and actual flights (route, aircraft type, date, etc. for each individual flight for each person where possible) are considered. Data on actual flight routes and profiles have been obtained for the whole time frame. The actual dose

  19. Superconducting magnets in high radiation environments: Design problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Lorant, S.J.; Tillmann, E.

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Stanford Linear Collider Project, three high-field superconducting solenoid magnets are used to rotate the spin direction of a polarized electron beam. The magnets are installed in a high-radiation environment, where they will receive a dose of approximately 10 3 rad per hour, or 10 8 rad over their lifetimes. This level of radiation and the location in which the magnets are installed, some 10 meters below ground in contiguous tunnels, required careful selection of materials for the construction of the solenoids and their ancillary cryogenic equipment, as well as the development of compatible component designs. This paper describes the materials used and the design of the equipment appropriate for the application. Included are summaries of the physical and mechanical properties of the materials and how they behave when irradiated. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Sample Environment in Experiments using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B

    1984-01-01

    beam experiments with wavelength chosen at will from the continuous spectrum. Another type of insertion device, called undulator produces quasi-monochromatic radiation. The insertion devices enable the tailoring of the emitted S.R. to the requirements of the users and can be treated as the first......Modern electron (positron) storage rings are able to emit very intense X-ray radiation with a continuous spectrum extending to 0.1 A, from bending magnets and insertion devices (wavelength shifters and multipole wigglers). It can be used directly for white beam experiments and/or for monochromatic...... optical element of the beam line. This feature is especially important for experiments with samples in special environment because the latter imposes limitations both on scattering and absorption experiments. However, these limitations can be minimized in each case by finding the best match between...

  1. Mars Surface Ionizing Radiation Environment: Need for Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, R. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Suggs, R.

    1999-01-01

    Protection against the hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation remains an unresolved issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise [1]. The major uncertainty is the lack of data on biological response to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures but even a full understanding of the physical interaction of GCR with shielding and body tissues is not yet available and has a potentially large impact on mission costs. "The general opinion is that the initial flights should be short-stay missions performed as fast as possible (so-called 'Sprint' missions) to minimize crew exposure to the zero-g and space radiation environment, to ease requirements on system reliability, and to enhance the probability of mission success." The short-stay missions tend to have long transit times and may not be the best option due to the relatively long exposure to zero-g and ionizing radiation. On the other hand the short-transit missions tend to have long stays on the surface requiring an adequate knowledge of the surface radiation environment to estimate risks and to design shield configurations. Our knowledge of the surface environment is theoretically based and suffers from an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions of GCR with the Martian atmosphere, Martian surface, and intervening shield materials. An important component of Mars surface robotic exploration is the opportunity to test our understanding of the Mars surface environment. The Mars surface environment is generated by the interaction of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPEs) with the Mars atmosphere and Mars surface materials. In these interactions, multiple charged ions are reduced in size and secondary particles are generated, including neutrons. Upon impact with the Martian surface, the character of the interactions changes as a result of the differing nuclear constituents of the surface materials. Among the surface environment are many neutrons diffusing from

  2. Radiation Hardened Electronics Destined For Severe Nuclear Reactor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbert, Keith E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Clark, Lawrence T. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Post nuclear accident conditions represent a harsh environment for electronics. The full station blackout experience at Fukushima shows the necessity for emergency sensing capabilities in a radiation-enhanced environment. This NEET (Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies) research project developed radiation hardened by design (RHBD) electronics using commercially available technology that employs commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) devices and present generation circuit fabrication techniques to improve the total ionizing dose (TID) hardness of electronics. Such technology not only has applicability to severe accident conditions but also to facilities throughout the nuclear fuel cycle in which radiation tolerance is required. For example, with TID tolerance to megarads of dose, electronics could be deployed for long-term monitoring, inspection and decontamination missions. The present work has taken a two-pronged approach, specifically, development of both board and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) level RHBD techniques. The former path has focused on TID testing of representative microcontroller ICs with embedded flash (eFlash) memory, as well as standalone flash devices that utilize the same fabrication technologies. The standalone flash devices are less complicated, allowing better understanding of the TID response of the crucial circuits. Our TID experiments utilize biased components that are in-situ tested, and in full operation during irradiation. A potential pitfall in the qualification of memory circuits is the lack of rigorous testing of the possible memory states. For this reason, we employ test patterns that include all ones, all zeros, a checkerboard of zeros and ones, an inverse checkerboard, and random data. With experimental evidence of improved radiation response for unbiased versus biased conditions, a demonstration-level board using the COTS devices was constructed. Through a combination of redundancy and power gating, the demonstration

  3. Estimates of the radiation environment for a nuclear rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.; Manohara, H.M.; Williams, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Ambitious missions in deep space, such as manned expeditions to Mars, require nuclear propulsion if they are to be accomplished in a reasonable length of time. Current technology is adequate to support the use of nuclear fission as a source of energy for propulsion; however, problems associated with neutrons and gammas leaking from the rocket engine must be addressed. Before manned or unmanned space flights are attempted, an extensive ground test program on the rocket engine must be completed. This paper compares estimated radiation levels and nuclear heating rates in and around the rocket engine for both a ground test and space environments

  4. The radiation environment in the ATLAS inner detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, I

    2000-01-01

    The radiation environment in the inner detector has been simulated using the particle transport program FLUKA with a recent description of the ATLAS experiment. Given in this paper are particle fluences and doses at positions relevant to the three inner detector subsystems; the Pixel, SCT and TRT detectors. In addition, studies are reported on in which (1) information concerning the optimization of the inner detector neutron-moderators is obtained and (2) the impact of including additional vacuum-equipment material is assessed. (19 refs).

  5. Effect of ionizing radiation on the waste package environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

    1991-05-01

    The radiolytic production of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen acids and ammonia are discussed in relation to the expected environment in a high-level waste repository that may be constructed at the Yucca Mountain site if it is found to be suitable. Both literature data and repository-relevant data are summarized for air-water vapor systems. The limiting cases of a dry air and a pure water vapor gas phase are also discussed. Design guidelines and recommendations, based solely on the potential consequence of radiation enhancement of corrosion, are given. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation on the waste package environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic production of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen acids and ammonia are discussed in relation to the expected environment in a high-level waste repository that may be constructed at the Yucca Mountain site if it is found to be suitable. Both literature data and repository-relevant data are summarized for air-water vapor systems. The limiting cases of a dry air and a pure water vapor gas phase are also discussed. Design guidelines and recommendations, based solely on the potential consequence of radiation enhancement of corrosion, are given. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Evaluating a radiation monitor for mixed-field environments based on SRAM technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiligiannis, G; Bosio, A; Girard, P; Pravossoudovitch, S; Todri, A; Virazel, A; Mekki, J; Brugger, M; Wrobel, F; Saigne, F

    2014-01-01

    Instruments operating in particle accelerators and colliders are exposed to radiations that are composed of particles of different types and energies. Several of these instruments often embed devices that are not hardened against radiation effects. Thus, there is a strong need for mon- itoring the levels of radiation inside the mixed-field radiation areas, throughout different positions. Different metrics exist for measuring the radiation damage induced to electronic devices, such as the Total Ionizing Dose (TID), the Displacement Damage (DD) and of course the fluence of parti- cles for estimating the error rates of the electronic devices among other applications. In this paper, we propose an SRAM based monitor, that is used to define the fluence of High Energy Hadrons (HEH) by detecting Single Event Upsets in the memory array. We evaluated the device by testing it inside the H4IRRAD area of CERN, a test area that reproduces the radiation conditions inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel and its shield...

  8. Radiation exposure of man in the indoor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhaeusler, F.; Pohl, E.

    1982-01-01

    Indoor exposure of man represents the major component of the dose from the natural radiation environment (NRE). The different sources of the NRE and their complex superposition are discussed. Due to the use of radiologically disadvantageous material in or near the building, radon-rich tap water, specific architectural styles and decreased ventilation rates NRE-levels indoors have been found to even exceed the upper limit for professional exposure. The inadequacy of the existing international regulatory framework and specific local problems resulted in the establishment of national exposure limits. In general, no remedial action is recommended at levels below 50 μR/h for external gamma radiation, 10 mWL for internal radon daughter exposure. Several technical countermeasures reducing indoor gamma dose rates and radon levels have been developed for existing buildings. However, the use of some of the techniques is limited due to low cost-effectiveness or lack of long-term stability. Different techniques in order to achieve low indoor exposures for new buildings and financial aspects associated the application of radiation protection concepts are discussed

  9. The COMPASS Hadron Spectroscopy Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, A

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS for the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a large acceptance and high momentum resolution spectrometer including particle identification and calorimetry and is therefore ideal to access a broad range of different final states. Following the promising observation of a spin-exotic resonance during an earlier pilot run, COMPASS focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the years 2008 and 2009. A data set, world leading in terms of statistics and resolution, has been collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on either liquid hydrogen or nuclear targets. Spin-exotic meson and glueball candidates formed in both diffractive dissociation and central production are presently studied. Since the beam composition includes protons, the excited baryon spectrum is also accessible. Furthermore, Primakoff reactions have the potential to determine radiative widths of the resonances and to probe chiral pe...

  10. Characteristics of radiation field in living environment, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A series of environmental radiation survey was carried out on train lines within Tokyo metropolitan area to clarify the characteristics of radiation field in living environment. Eleven JR, 18 private and 10 subway lines were surveyed, which cover 97% of whole train lines in Tokyo district in terms of annual number of passengers. The characteristics of environmental radiation field on train lines were discussed. The mean absorbed dose rate in air due to γ-rays on the subway lines was higher than those on the JR and private lines. It is due to the difference in the radioactivity concentration and the distribution of surrounding materials as the γ-ray sources. On the other hand, the mean dose rate due to cosmic-rays on the subway lines was lower than those on the JR and private lines. It is due to the shielding effect of the upper materials such as soil or building materials of tunnels. The mean dose rates for the JR, private and subway lines were calculated using these obtained data. Though the ratio of mean dose rate of γ-rays to that of cosmic-rays for the subway lines was different from those for the JR and private lines, the sum of γ- and cosmic-ray dose rates for the JR, private and subway lines were comparable, 40∼50 nGy/h for any of them. These data will be useful for a precise and realistic evaluation of collective dose, considering the life style of the public and the variation characteristics of environmental radiation. (author)

  11. The Enceladus Ionizing Radiation Environment: Implications for Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, L. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Davila, A. F.; McKay, C.; Dartnell, L.

    2016-12-01

    Enceladus' subsurface ocean is a possible abode for life, but it is inaccessible with current technology. However, icy particles and vapor are being expelled into space through surface fractures known as Tiger Stripes, forming a large plume centered in the South Polar Terrains. Direct chemical analyses by Cassini have revealed salts and organic compounds in a significant fraction of plume particles, which suggests that the subsurface ocean is the main source of materials in the plume (i.e. frozen ocean spray). While smaller icy particles in the plume reach escape velocity and feed Saturn's E-ring, larger particles fall back on the moon's surface, where they accumulate as icy mantling deposits at practically all latitudes. The organic content of these fall-out materials could be of great astrobiological relevance. Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) that strike both Enceladus' surface and the lofted icy particles produce ionizing radiation in the form of high-energy electrons, protons, gamma rays, neutrons and muons. An additional source of ionizing radiation is the population of energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere. The effects of ionizing radiation in matter always involve the destruction of chemical bonds and the creation of free radicals. Both affect organic matter, and can damage or destroy biomarkers over time. Using ionizing radiation transport codes, we recreated the radiation environment on the surface of Enceladus, and evaluated its possible effects on organic matter (including biomarkers) in the icy mantling deposits. Here, we present full Monte-Carlo simulations of the nuclear reactions induced by the GCRs hitting Enceladus's surface using a code based on the GEANT-4 toolkit for the transport of particles. To model the GCR primary spectra for Z= 1-26 (protons to iron nuclei) we assumed the CREAME96 model under solar minimum, modified to take into account Enceladus' location. We considered bulk compositions of: i) pure water ice, ii) water ice

  12. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tubes for Tracking and Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mindur, Bartosz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of 300000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides 30 space points with 130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in a Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. We will present TRT modifications made for Run 2 for in areas: to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Radiation-induced gain changes in ...

  13. Charmed hadrons in nuclear medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, L.; Gamermann, D.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Molina, R.; Nieves, J.; Oset, E.; Ramos, A.

    We study the properties of charmed hadrons in dense matter within a coupled-channel approach which accounts for Pauli blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner We analyze the behaviour in this dense environment of dynamically-generated baryonic resonances as well as the

  14. Proceeding of Radiation Safety and Environment; Prosiding Presentasi Ilmiah Keselamatan Radiasi dan Lingkungan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Scientific Presentation of Radiation Safety and Environment was held on 20-21 august 1996 at Center of Research Atomic Energy Pasar Jum'at, Jakarta, Indonesia. Have presented 50 papers about Radiation Safety, dosimetry and standardization, environment protection and radiation effect.

  15. Radiation Environments for Future Human Exploration Throughout the Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N.; Gorby, M.; Linker, J.; Riley, P.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Spence, H. E.; Desai, M. I.; Mikic, Z.; Joyce, C. J.; Kozarev, K. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    mission durations. If the heliospheric magnetic field continues to weaken over time, as is likely, then allowable mission durations will decrease correspondingly. Thus, we examine the rapidly changing radiation environment and its implications for human exploration destinations throughout the inner solar system.

  16. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220535; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Man...

  17. Quantum chromodynamics and the dynamics of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1979-03-01

    The application of perturbative quantum chromodynamics to the dynamics of hadrons at short distance is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the role of the hadronic bound state. A number of new applications are discussed, including the modification to QCD scaling violations in structure functions due to hadronic binding; a discussion of coherence and binding corrections to the gluon and sea-quark distributions; QCD radiative corrections to dimensional counting rules for exclusive processes and hadronic form factors at large momentum transfer; generalized counting rules for inclusive processes; the special role of photon-induced reactions in QCD, especially applications to jet production in photon-photon collisions, and photon production at large transverse momentum. Also presented is a short review of the central problems in large P/sub T/ hadronic reactions and the distinguishing characteristics of gluon and quark jets. 163 references

  18. BNCT-RTPE: BNCT radiation treatment planning environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessol, D.E.; Wheeler, F.J.; Babcock, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Several improvements have been developed for the BNCT radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) during 1994. These improvements have been incorporated into Version 1.0 of BNCT-Rtpe which is currently installed at the INEL, BNL, Japanese Research Center (JRC), and Finland's Technical Research Center. Platforms supported by this software include Hewlett-Packard (HP), SUN, International Business Machines (IBM), and Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI). A draft version of the BNCT-Rtpe user manual is available. Version 1.1 of BNCT-Rtpe is scheduled for release in March 1995. It is anticipated that Version 2.x of BNCT-Rtpe, which includes the nonproprietary NURBS library and data structures, will be released in September 1995

  19. Application of laser cutting technology to high radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauley, K.A.; Mitchell, M.R.; Saget, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    A 2 kW Nd:YAG laser system manufactured by the Lumonics Corporation will be used to cut various metals during the fall of 1996 as part of a United States Department of Energy (DOE)-funded technology demonstration at the Hanford Site. The laser cutting demonstration will focus on an evaluation of two issues as the technology applies to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of aging nuclear facilities. An assessment will be made as to the ability of laser end effectors to be operated using electromechanical remote manipulators and the ability of both end effector and fiber optics to withstand the damage created by a high radiation field. The laser cutting demonstration will be conducted in two phases. The first phase will be a non-radioactive test to ensure the ability of hot cell remote manipulators to use the laser end effector to successfully cut the types of materials and geometries found in the hot cell. The second phase will introduce the laser end effector and the associated fiber optic cable into the hot cell radiation environment. The testing in the hot cell will investigate the degradation of the optical portions of the end effector and transmission cable in the high radiation field. The objective of the demonstration is to assess the cutting efficiency and life limitations of a laser cutting system for radioactive D ampersand D operations. A successful demonstration will, therefore, allow the laser cutting technology to be integrated into the baseline planning for the D ampersand D of DOE facilities throughout the nation

  20. Application of γ field theory based calculation method to the monitoring of mine nuclear radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yanjun; Liu Qingcheng; Liu Hongzhang; Qin Guoxiu

    2009-01-01

    In order to find the feasibility of calculating mine radiation dose based on γ field theory, this paper calculates the γ radiation dose of a mine by means of γ field theory based calculation method. The results show that the calculated radiation dose is of small error and can be used to monitor mine environment of nuclear radiation. (authors)

  1. Radiation protection for humans and environment. 50 years competence in the professional association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, Benno; Wilhelm, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The conference proceedings of the IRPA (International radiation protection association) annual meeting 2016 contain the contribution of invited referents, other contributions and poster contributions concerning radiation protection in nuclear facilities, radiation protection of the public and environment, radioactive waste management, uranium mining, environmental monitoring, natural radioactivity, and radiation protection laws and regulations.

  2. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation: IUR's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, P.; Brown, J. E.; Iospje, M.

    2004-01-01

    Sufficient information currently exists to introduce an overall framework for the protection of the environment from ionising radiation, drawing upon the large amount of radiobiological and radioecological information that has been gathered over the preceding decades. Nevertheless, there is a requirement to address numerous knowledge gaps and to improve upon existing databases. After the first presentation of a framework for the protection of the environment in 1999/2000 by the IUR, there has been activity to collate information and develop methodologies. This has allowed numerous recommendations to be made concerning future system development.. Although the transfer of radionuclides is quite well known within some food-chains, there are very few data on the behaviour of radionuclides in non-temperate zones and on uptake to species that do not form part of the human food chain. There is a need to develop both transfer models (flux, dynamic, ecosystem, etc.) and genotoxicological bio monitoring techniques that are capable of allowing impact assessments at a variety of species, population and ecosystem levels and that could also deal with other environmental stressors. Knowledge of the doses and effects of background radiation is lacking, as are dose-effect relationships, including information on RBE for a variety of species, doses and dose rates. The importance of various components of an environmental impact assessment can be explored, through the application of sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. An example of this type of analysis, for a marine system, demonstrated the importance of several radioecological parameters in the derivation of dose rates. However, although such examples provide insight, caution should be practiced in their interpretation. It is therefore suggested that further analyses are conducted in order to provide more robust priority lists for resource allocation. The recommendations made in this paper emphasize the need for further focussed

  3. Fibre optics compatibility with radiative environment inside PWR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.; Jucker, P.; Serre, J.

    1993-01-01

    Fibre optic links operating with multiplexed sensors data are potentially attractive for nuclear power plant applications. It hence became essential to test for radiation vulnerability not only transmission support -fibres- but also fibre-end electro-optical components which could be exposed to hostile environment, perhaps in worse conditions than fibres. Present paper gives results of multimode silica-based fibre behaviour during long-term steady-state low dose-rate gamma ray exposure - one year under 0.1 to 0.2 Gy/h. Studies concerned radiation-induced loss (ΔL) measurement of eight different commercially available fibres and bit error-rate (BER) recording of four 1 100 m length data links operating with a 100 m part exposed to gamma-rays. Main result is the good behaviour of pure silica-core fibres, especially a step-index polymer-clad fibre transmitting 850 nm light but also a graded-index fluorine-clad fibre for 1 300 nm window. Mean ΔL values are respectively 3 dB/km and 4.5 dB/km at the exposure end. Complementary result is no influence of gamma-ray exposure upon data link initial 10 -9 BER. (authors). 9 figs., 7 tabs., 26 refs

  4. Coherent and radiative couplings through two-dimensional structured environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, F.; Zambrini, R.

    2018-03-01

    We study coherent and radiative interactions induced among two or more quantum units by coupling them to two-dimensional (2D) lattices acting as structured environments. This model can be representative of atoms trapped near photonic crystal slabs, trapped ions in Coulomb crystals, or to surface acoustic waves on piezoelectric materials, cold atoms on state-dependent optical lattices, or even circuit QED architectures, to name a few. We compare coherent and radiative contributions for the isotropic and directional regimes of emission into the lattice, for infinite and finite lattices, highlighting their differences and existing pitfalls, e.g., related to long-time or large-lattice limits. We relate the phenomenon of directionality of emission with linear-shaped isofrequency manifolds in the dispersion relation, showing a simple way to disrupt it. For finite lattices, we study further details such as the scaling of resonant number of lattice modes for the isotropic and directional regimes, and relate this behavior with known van Hove singularities in the infinite lattice limit. Furthermore, we export the understanding of emission dynamics with the decay of entanglement for two quantum, atomic or bosonic, units coupled to the 2D lattice. We analyze in some detail completely subradiant configurations of more than two atoms, which can occur in the finite lattice scenario, in contrast with the infinite lattice case. Finally, we demonstrate that induced coherent interactions for dark states are zero for the finite lattice.

  5. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation. The development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. Proceedings of the third international symposium on the protection of the environment from ionising radiation (SPEIR 3). Unedited papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased, as evidenced by new and developing international policies for environmental protection, starting with the Rio Declaration of 1992. In the context of ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is largely based on providing for the protection of humans, but this is being critically reviewed in several international fora. It is in this context that the Third International Symposium on Protection of the Environment from Ionising Radiation (SPEIR 3) was held between 22 and 26 July 2002, in Darwin, Australia. The symposium focused on issues related to the development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. The symposium programme included sessions dedicated to: ongoing research on the effects, responses and mechanisms of the interactions of ionizing radiation with biota; policy and ethical dimensions of the development of a framework for environmental radiation protection; and the development and use of methods and models for evaluating radiation as a stressor to the environment. Three workshops were held to allow for detailed discussion of each of these subjects. This symposium was the third in a series. The first International Symposium on Ionising Radiation: Protection of the Natural Environment, was held in Stockholm, Sweden, 20-24 May 1996. This symposium was organized jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada, and the proceedings were published by the Akademitryck AB, Edsbruk, Sweden in 1996. The second International Symposium on Ionizing Radiation: Environmental Protection Approaches for Nuclear Facilities, was held in Ottawa, Canada, 10-14 May 1999, and was organized by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the Supervising Scientists Group of Environment Australia, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI). The proceedings were published in April

  6. Protection of the environment from ionising radiation. The development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. Proceedings of the third international symposium on the protection of the environment from ionising radiation (SPEIR 3). Unedited papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased, as evidenced by new and developing international policies for environmental protection, starting with the Rio Declaration of 1992. In the context of ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is largely based on providing for the protection of humans, but this is being critically reviewed in several international fora. It is in this context that the Third International Symposium on Protection of the Environment from Ionising Radiation (SPEIR 3) was held between 22 and 26 July 2002, in Darwin, Australia. The symposium focused on issues related to the development and application of a system of radiation protection for the environment. The symposium programme included sessions dedicated to: ongoing research on the effects, responses and mechanisms of the interactions of ionizing radiation with biota; policy and ethical dimensions of the development of a framework for environmental radiation protection; and the development and use of methods and models for evaluating radiation as a stressor to the environment. Three workshops were held to allow for detailed discussion of each of these subjects. This symposium was the third in a series. The first International Symposium on Ionising Radiation: Protection of the Natural Environment, was held in Stockholm, Sweden, 20-24 May 1996. This symposium was organized jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada, and the proceedings were published by the Akademitryck AB, Edsbruk, Sweden in 1996. The second International Symposium on Ionizing Radiation: Environmental Protection Approaches for Nuclear Facilities, was held in Ottawa, Canada, 10-14 May 1999, and was organized by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the Supervising Scientists Group of Environment Australia, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI). The proceedings were published in April

  7. Photon radiation in e{sup +}e{sup -}→hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Kolodziej, Karol [Univ. of Silesia, Katowice (Poland). Inst. of Physics

    2017-04-25

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  8. Photon radiation in e{sup +}e{sup -} → hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Kolodziej, Karol [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2017-04-15

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance. (orig.)

  9. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  10. The upgrade of the CMS hadron calorimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Strobbe, N

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the hadron calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently underway. The endcap sections will be upgraded in the winter of 2016–2017 and the barrel sections during the second LHC long shutdown in 2019. The existing photosensors will be replaced with about 16 000 new silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), resulting in the first large installation of SiPMs in a radiation environment. All associated front-end electronics will also be upgraded. This paper discusses the motivation for the upgrade and provides a description 17 of the new system, including the SiPMs with associated control electronics and the front-end readout cards.

  11. Cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevielle, J N

    1984-01-01

    First, the different instruments and techniques of cosmic particle detection are presented. Then the passage of the cosmic particles through the atmosphere is studied: electrons, photons, muons. The collective behavior of the different categories is also studied, the electromagnetic cascade is distinguished from the hadron cascade. Through the principal physical properties of the radiation and the medium, the ''mean'' aspects of the radiation are then successively dealt with out of the atmosphere, at different altitudes until the sea level, then at great depths. A chapter is devoted to cosmic radiation of more than 10,000 GeV, studied separately. Then solar radiation in universe is studied through their propagation in solar system and their origin. At last, the cosmic radiation effects are studied in environment (cosmic biophysics) and some applications of cosmic radiation are presented.

  12. Challenges in Hadron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2004-01-01

    The status of hadron physics at the end of the HADRON07 Conference is reviewed. The latest results presented at the conference, as well as those important developments in the field which were not represented, are included.

  13. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E T jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction

  14. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e + e - annihilation. The geometrical description of high-energy elastic scattering developed earlier is still in general agreement with experiments at the CERN-S bar ppS energies. A simple one-parameter expression for the blackness of bar pp system has been proposed recently which describes very well all existing data from ISR to S bar ppS energies. The geometrical description has also been extended to include processes of fragmentation and diffraction dissociation and other phenomena. In the past five years, a unified physical picture for multiparticle emission in hadron-hadron and e + e - collisions was developed. It focuses on the idea of the wide range of values for the total angular momentum in hadron-hadron collisions. An extension of this consideration yields a theory for the momentum distribution of the outgoing particles which agrees with bar pp and e + e - collision experiments. The results and conclusions of this theory have been extrapolated to higher energies and yielded many predictions which can be experimentally tested. 37 refs

  15. Hadron therapy physics and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an in-depth overview of the physics of hadron therapy, ranging from the history to the latest contributions to the subject. It covers the mechanisms of protons and carbon ions at the molecular level (DNA breaks and proteins 53BP1 and RPA), the physics and mathematics of accelerators (Cyclotron and Synchrotron), microdosimetry measurements (with new results so far achieved), and Monte Carlo simulations in hadron therapy using FLUKA (CERN) and MCHIT (FIAS) software. The text also includes information about proton therapy centers and carbon ion centers (PTCOG), as well as a comparison and discussion of both techniques in treatment planning and radiation monitoring. This brief is suitable for newcomers to medical physics as well as seasoned specialists in radiation oncology.

  16. Fifth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE - V). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Most of the 219 contributions Are on radon (to a much lesser extent: thoron) and its daughter products in dwellings and in the environment; on corresponding measuring instruments and - methods; on measurements done; and on radiation doses to professional workers and to the public. The section heading give a fairly good account of the subject matters treated. Measurement Techniques and Metrology (Nrs 1-33); Exposure to Natural Radiation in Non-Domestic Environments (34-56); Natural Radionuclides and Transfer Pathways (57-107); Radioactivity and Radiation in the Human Environment (108-183); Health Effects of Natural Radiation (184-205); Industrially Modified Levels of Radiation Exposure (206-219). (Quittner)

  17. Hadrons accelerators in the cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, U.; Silari, M.

    1998-01-01

    The use of hadrons accelerators ( protons and light ions) in the cancer therapy is tackled. After shorts introductory words about the medical reasons in favour of using charged heavy particles radiotherapy, an overall idea is given on the accelerators technology and on the guiding and focusing systems. The Italian project of hadron-therapy (the most important project of this kind in Europe) is introduced, with in reference the National Oncological Center of Hadron-therapy and the plans of two kinds of compact protons accelerators in order to introduce the therapy with protons in a great number of hospitals. Finally, the needs in radiation protection are discussed. (N.C.)

  18. CMS Central Hadron Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Howard S.

    2001-01-01

    We present a description of the CMS central hadron calorimeter. We describe the production of the 1996 CMS hadron testbeam module. We show the results of the quality control tests of the testbeam module. We present some results of the 1995 CMS hadron testbeam.

  19. Problems of hadron electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Certain directions of hadron electrodynamics referring to testing symmetry properties relatively to C-, P- and T-transformations; determination of fundamental electromagnetic characteristics of hadrons as well as to clarifying the dynamics of electromagnetic processes in which hadrons participate are analyzed briefly. 52 refs

  20. Hadron accelerators in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, U.; Silari, M.

    1997-01-01

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadrontherapy Project (the largest project of this type in Europe) is then described, with reference to both the National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy and the design of two types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large number of hospitals. Finally, the radiation protection requirements are discussed. (author)

  1. Inclusion of Radiation Environment Variability in Total Dose Hardness Assurance Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Stauffer, C.; Phan, A.; McClure, S. S.; Ladbury, R. L.; Pellish, J. A.; Campola, M. J.; LaBel, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Variability of the space radiation environment is investigated with regard to parts categorization for total dose hardness assurance methods. It is shown that it can have a significant impact. A modified approach is developed that uses current environment models more consistently and replaces the radiation design margin concept with one of failure probability during a mission.

  2. ABOUT INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT SCHEMES IMPACT RADIATION ENVIRONMENTS AND LOADS ON REINFORCED LAMELLAR STRUCTURAL MEMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafail B. Garibov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the model of deformation of fiber-reinforced concrete rectangular plate under the influence of radiation environments. In the calculation of the plate was considered different schemes impact of the applied external loads and radiation environments.

  3. Hadron--hadron reactions, high multiplicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebold, R.

    1978-09-01

    A coverage of results on high energy and high multiplicity hadron reactions, charm searches and related topics, ultrahigh energy events and exotic phenomena (cosmic rays), and the nuclear effects in high energy collisions and related topics is discussed. 67 references

  4. QCD-resummation and non-minimal flavour-violation for supersymmetric particle production at hadron colliders; Resommation des corrections radiatives QCD et violation de la saveur non-minimale pour la production de particules supersymetriques aupres des collisionneurs hadroniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuks, B

    2007-06-15

    Cross sections for supersymmetric particles production at hadron colliders have been extensively studied in the past at leading order and also at next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD. The radiative corrections include large logarithms which have to be re-summed to all orders in the strong coupling constant in order to get reliable perturbative results. In this work, we perform a first and extensive study of the resummation effects for supersymmetric particle pair production at hadron colliders. We focus on Drell-Yan like slepton-pair and slepton-sneutrino associated production in minimal supergravity and gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking scenarios, and present accurate transverse-momentum and invariant-mass distributions, as well as total cross sections. In non-minimal supersymmetric models, novel effects of flavour violation may occur. In this case, the flavour structure in the squark sector cannot be directly deduced from the trilinear Yukawa couplings of the fermion and Higgs supermultiplets. We perform a precise numerical analysis of the experimentally allowed parameter space in the case of minimal supergravity scenarios with non-minimal flavour violation, looking for regions allowed by low-energy, electroweak precision, and cosmological data. Leading order cross sections for the production of squarks and gauginos at hadron colliders are implemented in a flexible computer program, allowing us to study in detail the dependence of these cross sections on flavour violation. (author)

  5. Simulations of depleted CMOS sensors for high-radiation environments

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, J.; Bhat, S.; Breugnon, P.; Caicedo, I.; Chen, Z.; Degerli, Y.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Guilloux, F.; Hemperek, T.; Hirono, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Moustakas, K.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.; Rymaszewski, P.; Schwemling, P.; Wang, M.; Wang, T.; Wermes, N.; Zhang, L.

    2017-01-01

    After the Phase II upgrade for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the increased luminosity requests a new upgraded Inner Tracker (ITk) for the ATLAS experiment. As a possible option for the ATLAS ITk, a new pixel detector based on High Voltage/High Resistivity CMOS (HV/HR CMOS) technology is under study. Meanwhile, a new CMOS pixel sensor is also under development for the tracker of Circular Electron Position Collider (CEPC). In order to explore the sensor electric properties, such as the breakdown voltage and charge collection efficiency, 2D/3D Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations have been performed carefully for the above mentioned both of prototypes. In this paper, the guard-ring simulation for a HV/HR CMOS sensor developed for the ATLAS ITk and the charge collection efficiency simulation for a CMOS sensor explored for the CEPC tracker will be discussed in details. Some comparisons between the simulations and the latest measurements will also be addressed.

  6. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F; Sisworo, E L; Maha, M; Ismachin, M; Hilmy, N; Sumatra, M; Mugiono,; Wandowo,; Soebianto, Y S [Center for Application of Isotopes and Radiation, National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  7. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  8. Effects of Polarization–Maintaining Fibre Degrading on Precision of Fibre Optic Gyroscopes in Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Xiao; De-Wen, Liu; Yang, Liu; Xiao-Su, Yi; Lin, Cong

    2008-01-01

    In the space environment, the precision of fibre optic gyroscopes (FOGs) degrades because of space radiation. Photonic components of FOGs are affected by radiation, especially the polarization-maintaining (PM) fibre coil. In relation to the space radiation environment characteristic, we have carried out a series of radiation experiments on a PM fibre coil with 60 Co radiation source at different dose rates. Based on the experimental results, the formula between the PM-fibre loss and radiation dose rate is built, and the relation between the precision of FOG and radiation dose is obtained accordingly. The results strongly show that the precision of our FOG degrades owing to the attenuation of the polarization-maintaining fibre, which provides theoretical foundation for the radiation-resistant design of the FOG

  9. Radiation, waves, fields. Causes and effects on environment and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    1990-01-01

    The book discusses static electricity, alternating electric fields, magnetostatic fields, alternating magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, optical and ionizing radiation and their hazards and health effects. Each chapter presents basic physical and biological concepts and describes the common radiation sources and their biological effects. Each chapter also contains hints for everyday behaviour as well as in-depth information an specific scientific approaches for assessing biological effects; the latter are addressed to all expert readers working in these fields. There is a special chapter on the problem of so-called 'terrestrial radiation'. (orig.) With 88 figs., 31 tabs [de

  10. Control of the radiation environment and the worker in high-energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The philosophy behind the prediction, measurement, monitoring and limitation by access control of the radiation hazard in high-energy accelerator facilities is compared with that which could be employed for controlling similar hazards due to cosmic radiation in civil aircraft flights. Special mention is made of computer simulations of the radiation environment as a means of predicting necessary control measures, of the reliability and integration of radiation measuring devices into control procedures and of the relevance of different access control procedures. (author)

  11. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  12. Very high energy nuclear collisions: the asymptotic hadron spectrum, anti-nuclei, hyper-nuclei, and quark phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1978-01-01

    The possibilities of hadron production are considered. Included are hadrons never to be discovered, relevance of the study, means of production, thermodynamics of hadronic matter, three examples of hadronic spectra, the temperature, composition of the initial fireball, expansion of the fireball, pre-freeze-out radiation, antinuclei, hypernuclei, and the quark phase. 17 references

  13. Hadron reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Martin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of hadron scattering at high energies are reviewed in such a way as to combine the ideas of the parton model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with Regge theory and phenomenology. After a brief introduction to QCD and the basic features of hadron scattering data, scaling and the dimensional counting rules, the parton structure of hadrons, and the parton model for large momentum transfer processes, including scaling violations are discussed. Hadronic jets and the use of parton ideas in soft scattering processes are examined, attention being paid to Regge theory and its applications in exclusive and inclusive reactions, the relationship to parton exchange being stressed. The mechanisms of hadron production which build up cross sections, and hence the underlying Regge singularities, and the possible overlap of Regge and scaling regions are discussed. It is concluded that the key to understanding hadron reaction mechanisms seems to lie in the marriage of Regge theory with QCD. (author)

  14. RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AT AVIATION ALTITUDES AND IN SPACE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sihver, L.; Ploc, Ondřej; Puchalska, M.; Ambrožová, Iva; Kubančák, Ján; Kyselová, Dagmar; Shurshakov, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 477-483 ISSN 0144-8420 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cosmic radiation * radiation field * on-board spacecraft Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  15. The ionizing radiation environment of LDEF prerecovery predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, John W., Jr.; Derrickson, James H.; Parnell, T. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was exposed to several sources of ionizing radiation while in orbit. The principal ones were trapped belt protons and electrons, galactic cosmic rays, and albedo particles (protons and neutrons) from the atmosphere. Large solar flares in 1989 may have caused a small contribution. Prior to the recovery of the spacecraft, a number of calculations and estimates were made to predict the radiation exposure of the spacecraft and experiments. These were made to assess whether measurable radiation effects might exist, and to plan the analysis of the large number of radiation measurements available on the LDEF. Calculations and estimates of total dose, particle fluences, linear energy transfer spectra, and induced radioactivity were made. The principal sources of radiation is described, and the preflight predictions are summarized.

  16. Hadron correlations from recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Quark recombination is a successful model to describe the hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma. Jet-like dihadron correlations measured at RHIC provide a challenge for this picture. We discuss how correlations between hadrons can arise from correlations between partons before hadronization. An enhancement of correlations through the recombination process, similar to the enhancement of elliptic flow is found. Hot spots from completely or partially quenched jets are a likely source of such parton correlations.

  17. Hadron Physics at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The new FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The hadron physics program centers around the the high-energy storage ring HESR for antiprotons and the PANDA experiment that is integrated in it. The physics program includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics, electromagnetic processes and charm in nuclei.

  18. Density oscillations within hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.; Barshay, S.

    1976-01-01

    In models of extended hadrons, in which small bits of matter carrying charge and effective mass exist confined within a medium, oscillations in the matter density may occur. A way of investigating this possibility experimentally in high-energy hadron-hadron elastic diffraction scattering is suggested, and the effect is illustrated by examining some existing data which might be relevant to the question [fr

  19. Radiation in the living environment: sources, exposure and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Rashi

    2013-01-01

    We are living in a milieu of radiations and continuously exposed to radiations from natural sources from conception to death. We are exposed to radiation from Sun and outer space, radioactive materials present in the earth, house we live in, buildings and workplace, food we eat and air we breath. Each flake of snow, grain of soil, drop of rain, a flower, and even each man in the street is a source of this radiation. Even our own bodies contain naturally occurring radioactive elements. The general belief is that the radiations are harmful and everybody is scared of the same. The cancer is the most important concern on account of exposure to Ionizing Radiation which is initiated by the damage to DNA. The level of exposure depends on the environmental and working conditions and may vary from low to moderate to high and depending on the same the exposed humans can be classified as general public, non nuclear workers (NNW) and nuclear workers (NW). Though, the LNT theory which is considered to be the radiation paradigm considers all radiation at all levels to be harmful and the -severity of the deleterious effect increases with the increase in dose, however, the available literature, data and reports (epidemiological and experimental) speaks otherwise particularly at low levels. The purpose of this paper is to address the question, whether the radiation is harmful at all levels or it is simply media hype and the truth is different, and to promote harmony with nature and to improve our quality of life with the knowledge that cancer mortality rates decrease following exposure to LLIR. Various sources of radiation exposure and the subsequent consequences will be discussed. (author)

  20. Structure of hadrons. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Knoll, J.; Noerenberg, W.; Wambach, J.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Hadronic reactions and resonances, structure of mesons, baryons, glueballs, and hybrids, physics with strange and charmed quarks, future projects and facilities. (HSI)

  1. Hadron particle theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Radiation therapy with ''hadrons'' (protons, neutrons, pions, ions) has accrued a 55-year track record, with by now over 30,000 patients having received treatments with one of these particles. Very good, and in some cases spectacular results are leading to growth in the field in specific well-defined directions. The most noted contributor to success has been the ability to better define and control the radiation field produced with these particles, to increase the dose delivered to the treatment volume while achieving a high degree of sparing of normal tissue. An additional benefit is the highly-ionizing, character of certain beams, leading to creater cell-killing potential for tumor lines that have historically been very resistant to radiation treatments. Until recently these treatments have been delivered in laboratories and research centers whose primary, or original mission was physics research. With maturity in the field has come both the desire to provide beam facilities more accessible to the clinical setting, of a hospital, as well as achieving, highly-efficient, reliable and economical accelerator and beam-delivery systems that can make maximum advantage of the physical characteristics of these particle beams. Considerable work in technology development is now leading, to the implementation of many of these ideas, and a new generation of clinically-oriented facilities is beginning to appear. We will discuss both the physical, clinical and technological considerations that are driving these designs, as well as highlighting, specific examples of new facilities that are either now treating, patients or that will be doing so in the near future

  2. Radiation technologies and techniques friendly for environment and men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Walis, L.

    1995-01-01

    Development of radiation technologies and techniques in Poland has been shown. Especially thermoshrinkable olefins with shape memory, fast thermistors and radiation sterilization have been presented. Also the radiometric gages produced in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw for air monitoring have been described. A broad group of radiotracer techniques being used for environmental study have been presented as well. Radiation technologies with electron beam use for flue gas purification, sewage sludge hygienization and food processing have been shown and their development has been discussed

  3. Development of clean environment conservation technology by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myunjoo; Kim, Tak Hyun; Jung, In Ha

    2012-04-01

    This report is aim to develop the technology for environmental conservation by radiation. It is consisted of two research parts. One is development of wastewater disinfection technology by radiation and the other is development of livestock waste treatment technology by radiation. For the development of wastewater disinfection technology disinfect ion process, technology for treatment of toxic organic chemicals and assessment of ecological toxicity, technology for treatment of endocrine disrupting chemicals and assessment of genetic safety were developed. For the development of livestock waste treatment technology, process for simultaneous removal of nutrients, technology for disinfection and quality enhancement of livestock waste compost, technology for reduction of composting periods, monitoring of toxic organic compounds, pretreatment technology for organic toxic chemicals and enhancement of biological treatment efficiencies were developed. Based on basic research, advanced livestock wastewater treatment process using radiation was established

  4. The influence of fragmentation models in the production of hadron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The analysis of electron–positron annihilations to hadrons at high energies shows that apart from two-jet events, there are also signs of three-jet events which are interpreted according to the QCD, as a gluon radiated by a quark. In this paper, we investigate the fragmentation of quarks and gluons to hadron jets. We show ...

  5. Environment and health: 3. Ozone depletion and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Gruijl, F.R.; Van der Leun, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is responsible for a variety of familiar photochemical reactions, including photochemical smog, bleaching of paints and decay of plastics. Conjugated bonds in organic molecules such as proteins and DNA absorb the UV radiation, which can damage these molecules. By a fortunate evolutionary event, the oxygen produced by photosynthesis forms a filter in the outer reaches of our atmosphere that absorbs the most energetic and harmful UV radiation, with wavelengths below 240 nm (in the UVC band [wavelength 100-280 nm]). In the process, the oxygen molecules split up and recombine to form ozone (Fig. 1). This ratified ozone layer (spread out between 10 and 50 Ion in the stratosphere but only 3 mm thick were it compressed at ground level) in turn efficiently absorbs UV radiation of higher wavelengths (tip to about 310 nm). A part of the UV radiation in the UVB band (wavelength 280-315 nm) still reaches ground level and is absorbed in sufficient amounts to have deleterious effects on cells. The less energetic radiation in the UVA band (wavelength 315-400 nm, bordering the visible band [wavelength 400-800 nm]) is not absorbed by ozone and reaches ground level without much attenuation through a clear atmosphere (i.e., no clouds, no air pollution). Although not completely innocuous, the UVA radiation in sunlight is much less photochemically active and therefore generally less harmful than UVB radiation. Life on earth has adapted itself to the UV stress, particularly UVB stress, fbr example by forming protective UV-absorbing surface layers, by repairing cell damage or by replacing damaged cells entirely. Human skin shows all of these adaptive features. Our eyes are less well adapted, but dicy, are shielded by the brows and by squinting. (author)

  6. Degradation of electrical insulation of polyethylene under thermal and radiation environment, (4). [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shuhei; Murabayashi, Fumio; Sawa, Goro [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan); Yamaguchi, Shinji; Ieda, Masayuki

    1982-12-01

    Although the quality assurance guideline for the cables used for the safety and protection systems of nuclear power plants is given by IEEE Standards 323 and 383-1974, in addition, it is important to clarify the aging process under the complex environment of heat and radiation and the equivalence of the accelerated aging test of insulating materials. The authors performed the sequential (H.T-..gamma.. or ..gamma..-HT) and simultaneous (..gamma.., HT) application of respective aging factors of heat and radiation to non-additive low density polyethylene films by changing dose rate as the first stage, to clarify the dose rate dependence of the aging. They mainly investigated the dielectric properties, and forwarded investigation based on the change of carbonyl group by infrared spectrometry and residual free radicals by ESR analysis. In the samples irradiated with ..gamma..-ray only and those irradiated with ..gamma..-ray after thermal treatment for 7 hours at 90 deg C, the absorption coefficient ..cap alpha.. of carbonyl group increased with dose in the range from 3 Mrad to 60 Mrad, and both samples showed approximately the same ..cap alpha.. value. The ..cap alpha.. value of the samples thermally treated after irradiation was larger than that of the samples treated in the reverse order, and the difference between them increased with the increase of dose. The values of dielectric tangent delta at room temperature and 1 kHz for the samples (..gamma..) and (HT-..gamma..) increased with dose, and were almost the same, but those for the samples (..gamma..-HT) and (..gamma.., HT) were larger than the former two.

  7. Experimental checking results of mathematical modeling of the radiation environment sensor based on diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladchenkov, E V; Kolyubin, V A; Nedosekin, P G; Zaharchenko, K V; Ibragimov, R F; Kadilin, V V; Tyurin, E M

    2017-01-01

    Were conducted a series of experiments, the purpose of which had to verify the mathematical model of the radiation environment sensor. Theoretical values of the beta particles count rate from 90 Sr - 90 Y source registered by radiation environment sensor was compared with the experimental one. Theoretical (calculated) count rate of beta particles was found with using the developed mathematical model of the radiation environment sensor. Deviation of the calculated values of the beta particle count rate does not exceed 10% from the experimental. (paper)

  8. Hadron production at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwitters, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    A report is given of the knowledge obtained from SPEAR about hadron production in e + e - annihilation since the discovery of the new particles. Included are the SPEAR magnetic detector, the total cross sections, mean charged multiplicity and energy, inclusive momentum spectra, and hadron angular distribution

  9. LOS ALAMOS: Hadron future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, David J.

    1992-01-01

    At a Workshop on the Future of Hadron Facilities, held on 15-16 August at Los Alamos National Laboratory, several speakers pointed out that the US physics community carrying out fixed target experiments with hadron beam had not been as successful with funding as it deserved. To rectify this, they said, the community should be better organized and present a more united front

  10. Hadron-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the space-time structure of the sub-atomic world and attempts to construct the fields of the constitutents of the hadrons. Then it is attempted to construct the fields of the hadrons from these micro-fields. (autho r). 24 refs

  11. Statistical Hadronization and Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechi, Jacopo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider some issues about the statistical model of the hadronization in a holographic approach. We introduce a Rindler like horizon in the bulk and we understand the string breaking as a tunneling event under this horizon. We calculate the hadron spectrum and we get a thermal...

  12. Perspectives in hadron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, J.M. [Universite Joseph Fourier-IN2P3-CNRS, Lab. de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-07-01

    A brief survey is presented of selected recent results on hadron spectroscopy and related theoretical studies. Among the new hadron states, some of them are good candidates for exotic structures: chiral partners of ground-states, hybrid mesons (quark, antiquark and constituent gluon), four-quark states, or meson-meson molecules.

  13. LOS ALAMOS: Hadron future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, David J.

    1992-11-15

    At a Workshop on the Future of Hadron Facilities, held on 15-16 August at Los Alamos National Laboratory, several speakers pointed out that the US physics community carrying out fixed target experiments with hadron beam had not been as successful with funding as it deserved. To rectify this, they said, the community should be better organized and present a more united front.

  14. Firetube model and hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareth, R.A.M.S.; Kodama, T.; Portes Junior, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    A new version of the fire tube model is developed to describe hadron-hadron collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. Several improvements are introduced in order to include the longitudinal expansion of intermediate fireballs, which remedies the overestimates of the transverse momenta in the previous version. It is found that, within a wide range of incident energies, the model describes well the experimental data for the single particle rapidity distribution, two-body correlations in the pseudo-rapidity, transverse momentum spectra of pions and kaons, the leading particle spectra and the K/π ratio. (author)

  15. Measuring radiation environment in LHC or anywhere else, on your computer screen with Medipix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijne, Erik H.M., E-mail: erik.heijne@cern.ch [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Ballabriga Sune, Rafael; Campbell, Michael [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Leroy, Claude [Université de Montréal (Canada); Llopart, Xavier [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Martin, Jean-Pierre [Université de Montréal (Canada); Pospisil, Stanislav; Solc, Jaroslav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Soueid, Paul [Université de Montréal (Canada); Suk, Michal [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Tlustos, Lukas [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Wong, Winnie [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland)

    2013-01-21

    The Medipix family of chips use on-pixel pulse processing front-ends, digitization and counters to produce images of radiation. The devices have been derived from developments for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics experiments at CERN. With the miniaturization of the associated readout system a new method of dosimetry becomes accessible, where single radiation quanta are detected and imaged. Several examples of dose measurements at highly differing dose rates are presented here: monitoring of background radiation on earth, in a flying airplane and in the ATLAS experiment at LHC. During proton collision runs as well as during the stops of the accelerator the dose can be measured, including characterization of different types of radiation. Thanks to the noiseless method of quantum imaging dosimetry, a large dynamic range can be achieved, employing only this single device. The dose rate extends from recording only a few quanta in hours, up to hundreds of quanta recorded in a fraction of a ms. With complementary methods for the analysis of the exposed image frames, one can cover 14 orders of magnitude.

  16. Hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative picture of high energy hadron-nucleus collision process, emerging from the analysis of experimental data, is presented. Appropriate description procedure giving a possibility of reproducing various characteristics of this process in terms of the data on elementary hadron-nucleon interaction is proposed. Formula reproducing hadron-nucleus collision cross sections is derived. Inelastic collision cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus reactions at wide energy interval are calculated for Pb, Ag, and Al targets. A-dependence of cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions at nearly 50 GeV/c momentum were calculated and compared with existing experimental data. Energy dependence of cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions is determined simply by energy dependence of corresponding cross sections for hadron-nucleon collisions; A-dependence is determined simply by nuclear sizes and nucleon density distributions in nuclei

  17. Measurement of gamma radiation doses in nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochvar, I.A.; Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Sergeeva, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the problems of measuring gamma radiation dose values and the dose distribution in the nuclear power plant area with the aim of estimating the extent of their effect on the population. Presented are the dosimeters applied, their distribution throughout the controlled area, time of measurement. The distribution of gamma radiation doses over the controlled area and the dose alteration with the increase of the distance from the release source are shown. The results of measurements are investigated. The conclusion is made that operating nuclear power plants do not cause any increase in the gamma radiation dose over the area. Recommendations for clarifying the techniques for using dose-meters and decreasing measurement errors are given [ru

  18. Some technologically enhanced exposures to natural radiation environment in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.; Mishra, U.C.

    1982-01-01

    A summary of results of gamma spectrometric measurements of natural radioactivity in a number of coal and flyash samples from thermal power plants and phosphatic fertilizer samples collected from various fertilizer plants in India are presented. These constitute the sources of technologically enhanced exposures to natural radiation. A brief description of sampling and measurement procedures is given. The radiation doses to the population from coal burning for electricity generation have been calculated using the method outlined in UNSCEAR report of 1979 with corrections for local population density. The external radiation dose to the farmers has been calculated on the basis of usage of phosphatic fertilizers for rice, wheat, millets and sugarcane crops for the normal agricultural practices

  19. Uranium mining and processing: their radiation impact into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapczuk, Peter; Zoriy, Petro; Dederichs, Herbert; Lennartz, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Based on Thorium and Uranium determination in soil and plants samples collected in the region of Aktau, Kazakhstan the distribution pattern of environmental pollution by these elements was correlated with the radiation dose. The main radiation source was the waste deposit of the equipment used by the uranium processing (dose higher than 5 μSv/h). The mining area and also the transportation way from mine to the uranium factory has also an radiation impact which is difficult to estimate. Based on the data found by plants and soil samples all the area under study has a higher pollution level by Thorium and Uranium than the control area (about 0.1μSv/h). Due to observed strong wind blowing in different directions it is possible that the particle of uranium ore has been transported for long distance and polluted the plants and upper soil layer. The further investigations should get more information about this supposition. (author)

  20. Design and "As Flown" Radiation Environments for Materials in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph; McWilliams, Brett; Altstatt, Richard; Koontz, Steven

    2006-01-01

    A conservative design approach was adopted by the International Space Station Program for specifying total ionizing radiation dose requirements for use in selecting and qualifying materials for construction of the International Space Station. The total ionizing dose design environment included in SSP 30512 Space Station Ionizing Radiation Design Environment is based on trapped proton and electron fluence derived from the solar maximum versions of the AE-8 and AP-8 models, respectively, specified for a circular orbit at 500 km altitude and 51.7 degree inclination. Since launch, the range of altitudes utilized for Space Station operations vary from a minimum of approximately 330 km to a maximum of approximately 405 km with a mean operational altitude less than 400 km. The design environment, therefore, overestimates the radiation environment because the particle flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly is the primary contributor to radiation dose in low Earth orbit and flux within the Anomaly is altitude dependent. In addition, a 2X multiplier is often applied to the design environment to cover effects from the contributions of galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particle events, geomagnetic storms, and uncertainties in the trapped radiation models which are not explicitly included in the design environment. Application of this environment may give radiation dose overestimates on the order of 1OX to 30X for materials exposed to the space environment, suggesting that materials originally qualified for ten year exposures on orbit may be used for longer periods without replacement. In this paper we evaluate the "as flown" radiation environments derived from historical records of the ISS flight trajectory since launch and compare the results with the SSP 30512 design environment to document the magnitude of the radiation dose overestimate provided by the design environment. "As flown" environments are obtained from application of the AE-8/AP-8 trapped particle models along

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice after seed ground simulated radiation and spaceflight explains the radiation effects of space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Jinming; Liang, Shujian; Lei, Huang; Shenyi, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing

    In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed space-flights with ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and found that the protein expression profiles were changed after seed space environment exposures. Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved. Rice seed is in the process of dormant of plant development, showing high resistance against stresses, so the highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to seeds. To further investigate the radiation effects of space environment, we performed on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and compared between the proteomes of seed irra-diated plants and seed spaceflight (20th recoverable satellite) plants from the same rice variety. Space ionization shows low-dose but high energy particle effects, for searching the particle effects, ground radiations with the same low-dose (2mGy) but different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3KeV/µm-C, 30KeV/µm-C, 31KeV/µm-Ne, 62.2KeV/µm-C, 500Kev/µm-Fe) were performed; using 2-D DIGE coupled with clustering and principle component analysis (PCA) for data process and comparison, we found that the holistic protein expression patterns of plants irradiated by LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles were most similar to spaceflight. In addition, although space environment presents a low-dose radiation (0.177 mGy/day on the satellite), the equivalent simulated radiation dose effects should still be evaluated: radiations of LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles with different cumulative doses (2mGy, 20mGy, 200mGy, 2000mGy) were further carried out and resulted that the 2mGy radiation still shared most similar proteomic profiles with spaceflight, confirming the low-dose effects of space radiation. Therefore, in the protein expression level

  2. LHCb: Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Karacson, M

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of all aspects of the radiation field of the LHCb experiment is needed to understand the impact of the unprecedented radiation levels to which its detector and electronics are exposed to. The methodology on how this is done is described. Analysis of the measurements of active and passive sensors of various types which are distributed in and around the detector will be carried out. Appropriate cross calibrations will be applied and comparisons between them will be performed. Critical comparisons with simulation results obtained with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are also an essential element of the study.

  3. Applications of isotopes and radiation in conservation of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to review present knowledge of the applications of radiation, radioisotopes and nuclear methods of analysis in the monitoring and control of environmental pollution and in reducing emissions of environmentally toxic substances. The scientific programme covered a wide range of different applications of nuclear technology, such as flue gas purification, radiation processing of liquid and solid wastes, radiotracer studies and nuclear analytical techniques and their applications. The symposium was attended by 92 participants representing 31 IAEA Member States. Separate abstracts were prepared for 46 of the papers in this volume. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Natural radiation aspects of low-monazite environment (Preprint No. IT-17)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyengar, M A.R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Kalpakkam (India). Environmental Survey Lab.

    1989-01-01

    This paper highlights some of the salient features of low-monazite environment of Kalpakkam and discuss their significance in the assessment of the overall radiation exposures of the general population. (author). 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported.

  6. Secondary particle in background levels and effects on detectors at future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, T.

    1993-06-01

    The next generation of hadron colliders, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will operate at high center-of-mass energies and luminosities. Namely, for the SSC (LHC) √s = 40 TeV (√s = 16 TeV) and L = 10 33 cm -2 s -1 (L = 3 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 ). These conditions will result in the production of large backgrounds as well as radiation environments. Ascertaining the backgrounds, in terms of the production of secondary charged and neutral particles, and the radiation environments are important considerations for the detectors proposed for these colliders. An initial investigation of the radiation levels in the SSC detectors was undertaken by D. Groom and colleagues, in the context of the ''task force on radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions.'' The method consisted essentially of an analytic approach, using standard descriptions of average events in conjunction with simulations of secondary processes. Following Groom's work, extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed to address the issues of backgrounds and radiation environments for the GEM and SD C3 experiments proposed at the SSC, and for the ATLAS and CMS experiments planned for the LHC. The purpose of the present article is to give a brief summary of some aspects of the methods, assumptions, and calculations performed to date (principally for the SSC detectors), and to stress the relevance of such calculations to the detectors proposed for the study of B-physics in particular

  7. Proceedings. Protection of the natural environment. International symposium on ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.; Johansson, Gunnar; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Luening, M.

    1996-01-01

    The symposium was organised jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute and the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada. The programme was organised around six major topics: Biological effects of ionising radiation; Ecological effects of ionising radiation; Behaviour and transport of radionuclides in the natural environment; Criteria for environmental protection; Assessment methodology; and Social and economic aspects. All 86 contributions (excluding the opening addresses) have been separately indexed

  8. The report on 'effects of radiation on the environment' from UNSCEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) concluded, in response to some expressions of concern, that it would be opportune to provide an independent examination of: the current situation regarding the radiation exposure of the natural environment; and the basis available for assessing the potential impact on the environment of incremental exposures from human activities. The final report is about to be published and this paper gives a brief summary of the important points and conclusions. (author)

  9. Isotopes and radiations in agriculture and environment research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, M.S.; Sachdev, P.; Deb, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    The use of isotope and radiation techniques in agriculture and environmental research has considerably helped in meeting the challenges of increasing crop and animal production. The present compilation presents the state of the art on the use of these techniques particularly in the context of current research and development programmes in this field. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Using a Commercial Ethernet PHY Device in a Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jeremy; Arani, Michael; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This work involved placing a commercial Ethernet PHY on its own power boundary, with limited current supply, and providing detection methods to determine when the device is not operating and when it needs either a reset or power-cycle. The device must be radiation-tested and free of destructive latchup errors. The commercial Ethernet PHY's own power boundary must be supplied by a current-limited power regulator that must have an enable (for power cycling), and its maximum power output must not exceed the PHY's input requirements, thus preventing damage to the device. A regulator with configurable output limits and short-circuit protection (such as the RHFL4913, rad hard positive voltage regulator family) is ideal. This will prevent a catastrophic failure due to radiation (such as a short between the commercial device's power and ground) from taking down the board's main power. Logic provided on the board will detect errors in the PHY. An FPGA (field-programmable gate array) with embedded Ethernet MAC (Media Access Control) will work well. The error detection includes monitoring the PHY's interrupt line, and the status of the Ethernet's switched power. When the PHY is determined to be non-functional, the logic device resets the PHY, which will often clear radiation induced errors. If this doesn't work, the logic device power-cycles the FPGA by toggling the regulator's enable input. This should clear almost all radiation induced errors provided the device is not latched up.

  11. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose

  12. Lithium-drifted silicon for harsh radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J.; Buttar, C.; Brozel, M.; Keffous, A.; Cheriet, A.; Bourenane, K.; Bourenane, A.; Kezzoula, F.; Menari, H.

    2008-06-01

    A model describing the passivation by Li atoms of acceptors arising from radiation damage in Si detectors has been developed. Our studies indicate that it is possible to produce a protocol that will allow the in-situ recovery of lithium-drifted Si particle detectors under irradiation by high-energy particles. Our model for particle damage recovery is supported by preliminary results on the recovery of old, degraded detectors.

  13. Lithium-drifted silicon for harsh radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.grant@physics.gla.ac.uk; Buttar, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Brozel, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS81TS (United Kingdom); Keffous, A.; Cheriet, A.; Bourenane, K.; Bourenane, A.; Kezzoula, F.; Menari, H. [Unite de Developpment de la Technologie du Silicium, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    2008-06-11

    A model describing the passivation by Li atoms of acceptors arising from radiation damage in Si detectors has been developed. Our studies indicate that it is possible to produce a protocol that will allow the in-situ recovery of lithium-drifted Si particle detectors under irradiation by high-energy particles. Our model for particle damage recovery is supported by preliminary results on the recovery of old, degraded detectors.

  14. MARS15 Simulation of Radiation Environment at the ESS Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Eidelman, Yu. I. [Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Rakhno, I. L. [Fermilab; Tchelidze, L. [ESS, Lund; Tropin, I. S. [Fermilab

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive studies with the MARS15(2016) Monte-Carlo code are described on evaluation of prompt and residual radiation levels induced by nominal and accidental beam losses in the 5-MW, 2-GeV European Spallation Source (ESS) Linac. These are to provide a basis for radiation shielding design verification through the accelerator complex. The calculation model is based on the latest engineering design and includes a sophisticated algorithm for particle tracking in the machine RF cavities as well as a well-established model of the beam loss. Substantial efforts were put in solving the deep-penetration problem for the thick shielding around the tunnel with numerous complex penetrations. It allowed us to study in detail not only the prompt dose, but also component and air activation, radiation loads on the soil outside the tunnel, and skyshine studies for the complicated 3-D surface above the machine. Among the other things, the newest features in MARS15 (2016), such as a ROOT-based beamline builder and a TENDL-based event generator for nuclear interactions below 100 MeV, were very useful in this challenging application

  15. Single photons, dileptons and hadrons from relativistic heavy ion collisions and quark-hadron phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, D K

    2001-01-01

    The production of single photons in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS as measured by the WA98 experiment is analysed. A quark gluon plasma is assumed to be formed initially, which expands, cools, hadronizes, and undergoes freeze-out. A rich hadronic equation of state is used and the transverse expansion of the interacting system is taken into account. The recent estimates of photon production in quark-matter (at two loop level) along with the dominant reactions in the hadronic matter leading to photons are used. About half of the radiated photons are seen to have a thermal origin. The same treatment and the initial conditions provide a very good description to hadronic spectra measured by several groups and the intermediate mass dileptons measured by the NA50 experiment, lending a strong support to the conclusion that quark gluon plasma has been formed in these collisions. Predictions for RHIC and LHC energies are also given. (37 refs).

  16. Atmospheric radiation environment analyses based-on CCD camera at various mountain altitudes and underground sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cavoli Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discriminate secondary atmospheric particles and identify muons by measuring the natural radiative environment in atmospheric and underground locations. A CCD camera has been used as a cosmic ray sensor. The Low Noise Underground Laboratory of Rustrel (LSBB, France gives the access to a unique low-noise scientific environment deep enough to ensure the screening from the neutron and proton radiative components. Analyses of the charge levels in pixels of the CCD camera induced by radiation events and cartographies of the charge events versus the hit pixel are proposed.

  17. The radiation performance standard. A presentation model for ionizing radiation in the living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaap, L.E.J.J.; Bosmans, G.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Hendriks, Ch.F.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the so-called radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) the total radioactivity from building constructions which contributes to the indoor radiation dose can be calculated. The SPN is implemented with related boundary values and is part of the Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit') in the Netherlands. The model, presented in this book, forms the basis of a new Dutch radiation protection standard, to be published by the Dutch Institute for Standardization NEN (formerly NNI). 14 refs

  18. Hadron spectroscopy 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    With much particle physics research using particle beams to probe the behaviour of the quark constituents deep inside nucleons and other strongly interacting particles (hadrons), it is easy to overlook the progress being made through hadron spectroscopy – the search for and classification of rare particles – and the way it has increased our understanding of quark physics. One way of remedying this was to attend the stimulating and encouraging Hadron 87 meeting held earlier this year at the Japanese KEK Laboratory, where Jonathan Rosner from Chicago's Enrico Fermi Institute gave the concluding talk

  19. Hadron spectroscopy 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-09-15

    With much particle physics research using particle beams to probe the behaviour of the quark constituents deep inside nucleons and other strongly interacting particles (hadrons), it is easy to overlook the progress being made through hadron spectroscopy – the search for and classification of rare particles – and the way it has increased our understanding of quark physics. One way of remedying this was to attend the stimulating and encouraging Hadron 87 meeting held earlier this year at the Japanese KEK Laboratory, where Jonathan Rosner from Chicago's Enrico Fermi Institute gave the concluding talk.

  20. Radiation environment assessment, measurement and its impact on health and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Panwar, Brijandra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Present paper deals with Radiation Environment Assessment, Measurement and its Impact on Health, its meaning and in particular with sustainable development perspective. Health and Environment appears to be different subjects and concepts, but in reality they are interrelated and interdependent. One cannot exist without the other. For good health hygienic environment is a sine qua non. Article 3 of Universal Declaration of Human Right 1948 incorporates the right to life. It has been interpreted by the international court that the word life does not means simply to live but it means to live with dignity and in well and pollution and radiation free environment which is a gift of nature on this universe. There is no doubt about the nuclear revolution that has taken place and has made life of human beings worth living on this earth with comfort. It is growing development of the nation. But in the process the development that has been done at the cost of human life, public health and environment which will prove fatal in the long run. So there is a need for Sustainable Development of the human and environment of the world. Precisely and concisely, the sustainable development is a process that meets the needs of the present without compromising ability of future generations to meet their own needs. A hygienic and redaction free environment will ensure the better Health of the people. Environment and nuclear power plant can coexist. The harmonization of the two needs has led to the concept of Radiation Environment Assessment and sustainable development, so much so that it has become the most significant and focal point of environmental legislation relating to the same. Sustainable development, simply put, is a process in which development can be sustained over generations effects of radiation on humans and on the environment. Finally, this paper deals with the impact of radiation on environment and the need of sustainable development for achieving a better human. (author)

  1. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach

  2. Bullying among radiation therapists: effects on job performance and work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Johnson, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    To identify the effects of workplace bullying in the radiation therapy department on job performance and explore the environment and morale of individuals who work with a bully. A quantitative research study was designed to assess the prevalence and effects of bullying in the radiation therapy workplace. A total of 308 radiation therapists participated in the study for a return rate of 46%. Of those, 194 indicated that workplace bullying was present either in their current workplace or in a previous radiation therapy environment and that it negatively affected job performance and satisfaction. Findings of this study indicate a need for evaluation of the radiation therapy workplace, education on how to identify and prevent bullying behavior, and better communication among members of the radiation therapy environment. Participants indicated that working in a hostile environment led to forgetfulness, ineffective communication, and perceived discrepancies in promotion and treatment by management. Any bullying behavior contributes to an overall toxic work environment, which is unhealthy and unsafe for patients and therapists. Those who manage therapists should promote a culture of safety and embrace their staff's independence.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallows, S., E-mail: sophie.mallows@cern.ch [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kurochkin, I. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton–proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarized, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  4. Development of model for assessment of radiation discharge to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhaorong; Wu Hao; Liu Hua

    2003-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) establish basic and detailed requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure, in which, particularly emphasize to 'make an assessment of the nature, magnitude and likelihood of the exposure attributed to the source'. It is clear that the assessment of the consequential radiation exposure arising from any releases of radioactive materials to the environment will have to rely on some form of model. This paper summary recent progress in radiation protection policy and radioecology research and primary concludes the basis requirements in assessment model development

  5. Application to the conservation of RF tags in the radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraura, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kunio; Takahashi, Naoki; Sakurai, Kouichi

    2011-01-01

    RF tags that are implemented RFID technology as tag has been used in various fields. Tags have been developed, such as resistance to chemicals and high temperature resistant RF tags are also used in specialized fields. The RF tag apply to the existing nuclear field, had been concerned about the effects of radiation to the RF tags. Now, since the RF tag with a goal to develop radiation-proof, we have examined, such as applying for maintenance of nuclear facilities under radiation environment. We report the results and RF tags to be radiation resistant. (author)

  6. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068566; Bayshev, I.; Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M.; Kurochkin, I.; Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarised, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  8. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  9. Environmental radiation monitoring on the CERN sites and in the CERN environment during 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtyla, P; Wittekind, D

    1999-04-15

    As a consequence of changes in the administrative structure of TIS Division in 1996 and 1997, the Environmental Section was integrated into the TIS Technical Services and Environment Group that also looks after the non-radiation parameters in the CERN releases and environment. However, it remains the duty of the Radiation Protection Group (RP) to define the environmental programme for radiation and radioactivity, and of the leader of RP to report its results both inside and outside CERN. Part I of this Annual Report describes the results of measurements which are relevant for assessing the radiological impact of CERN's activities on the environment and the population living in the vicinity of the CERN sites. Measurements of radioactivity released into the atmosphere and into water, as well as measurements of stray radiation at or near the CERN site boundaries, are reported.

  10. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  11. Radiation and Internal Charging Environments for Thin Dielectrics in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Altstatt, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft designs using solar sails for propulsion or thin membranes to shade instruments from the sun to achieve cryogenic operating temperatures are being considered for a number of missions in the next decades. A common feature of these designs are thin dielectric materials that will be exposed to the solar wind, solar energetic particle events, and the distant magnetotail plasma environments encountered by spacecraft in orbit about the Earth-Sun L2 point. This paper will discuss the relevant radiation and internal charging environments developed to support spacecraft design for both total dose radiation effects as well as dose rate dependent phenomenon, such as internal charging in the solar wind and distant magnetotail environments. We will describe the development of radiation and internal charging environment models based on nearly a complete solar cycle of Ulysses solar wind plasma measurements over a complete range of heliocentric latitudes and the early years of the Geotail mission where distant magnetotail plasma environments were sampled beyond X(sub GSE) = -100 Re to nearly L2 (X(sub GSE) -236 Re). Example applications of the environment models are shown to demonstrate the radiation and internal charging environments of thin materials exposed to the interplanetary space plasma environments.

  12. Radiation Safety Management Guidelines for PET-CT: Focus on Behavior and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Wook; Han, Eun Ok

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose is to specify behavior and environmental factors aimed at reducing the exposed dosage caused by PET-CT and to develop radiation safety management guidelines adequate for domestic circumstances. We have used a multistep-multimethod as the methodological approach to design and to carry out the research both in quality and quantity, including an analysis on previous studies, professional consultations and a survey. The survey includes responses from 139 practitioners in charged of 109 PET-CTs installed throughout Korea(reported by the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2010). The research use 156 questions using Cronbach's α (alpha) coefficients which were: 0.818 for 'the necessity of setting and installing the radiation protective environment'; 0.916 for 'the necessity of radiation protection', 'setting and installing the radiation protective environment'; and 0.885 for 'radiation protection'. The check list, derived from the radiation safety management guidelines focused on behavior and environment, was composed of 20 items for the radiation protective environment: including 5 items for the patient; 4 items for the guardian; 3 items for the radiologist; and 8 items applied to everyone involved; for a total of 26 items for the radiation protective behavior including: 12 items for the patient; 1 item for the guardian, 7 items for the radiologist; and 6 items applied to everyone involved. The specific check list is shown in (Table 5-6). Since our country has no safety management guidelines of its own to reduce the exposed dosage caused by PET-CTs, we believe the guidelines developed through this study means great deal to the field as it is not only appropriate for domestic circumstances, but also contains specific check lists for each target who may be exposed to radiation in regards to behavior and environment.

  13. FCC-hh Hadron Collider - Parameter Scenarios and Staging Options

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, F; Syphers, M J

    2015-01-01

    FCC-hh is a proposed future energy-frontier hadron collider, based on dipole magnets with a field around 16 T installed in a new tunnel with a circumference of about 100 km, which would provide proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV, as well as heavy-ion collisions at the equivalent energy. The FCC-hh should deliver a high integrated proton-proton luminosity at the level of several 100 fb−1 per year, or more. The challenges for operating FCC-hh with high beam current and at high luminosity include the heat load from synchrotron radiation in a cold environment, the radiation from collision debris around the interaction region, and machine protection. In this paper, starting from the FCC-hh design baseline parameters we explore different approaches for increasing the integrated luminosity, and discuss the impact of key individual pa- rameters, such as the turnaround time. We also present some injector considerations and options for early hadron-collider operation.

  14. Integration of the environment into the system of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higley, K.

    2018-01-01

    In 2005 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) embarked on an effort to ensure that the system for environmental radiological protection would be reconcilable with that for radiological protection of man, and with the approaches used for protection of the environment from other potential hazards

  15. Development of n+-in-p large-area silicon microstrip sensors for very high radiation environments – ATLAS12 design and initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Y.; Edwards, S.O.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A.; Kierstead, J.; Lynn, D.; Carter, J.R.; Hommels, L.B.A.; Robinson, D.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Tackmann, K.; Betancourt, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Wiik-Fucks, L.; Clark, A.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing a novel radiation-tolerant n + -in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments, aiming for application in the high luminosity large hadron collider. The sensors are fabricated in 6 in., p-type, float-zone wafers, where large-area strip sensor designs are laid out together with a number of miniature sensors. Radiation tolerance has been studied with ATLAS07 sensors and with independent structures. The ATLAS07 design was developed into new ATLAS12 designs. The ATLAS12A large-area sensor is made towards an axial strip sensor and the ATLAS12M towards a stereo strip sensor. New features to the ATLAS12 sensors are two dicing lines: standard edge space of 910 μm and slim edge space of 450 μm, a gated punch-through protection structure, and connection of orphan strips in a triangular corner of stereo strips. We report the design of the ATLAS12 layouts and initial measurements of the leakage current after dicing and the resistivity of the wafers

  16. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm 2 ).

  17. QCD and hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    I give a brief and selective overview of QCD as it pertains to determining hadron structure, and the relevant directions in this field for nuclear theory. This document is intended to start discussion about priorities, not end it

  18. Hadron physics at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferbel, T.

    1976-01-01

    Recent experimental results from studies of hadron interactions at Fermilab are surveyed. Elastic, total and charge-exchange cross section measurements, diffractive phenomena, and inclusive production, using nuclear as well as hydrogen targets, are discussed in these lectures

  19. Spin in hadron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The following topics were ealt with: Hadron physics with proton and deuteron probes, physics projects with Georgian participation, spin physics with antiprotons and leptons, spin filtering experiments, ISTC projects, technical issues for FAIR. (HSI)

  20. Hadron multiplicities at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Fresne von Hohenesche, Nicolas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Quark fragmentation functions (FF) D{sub q}{sup h}(z,Q{sup 2}) describe final-state hadronization of quarks q into hadrons h. The FFs can be extracted from hadron multiplicities produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. The COMPASS collaboration has recently measured charged hadron multiplicities for identified pions and kaons using a 160 GeV/c muon beam impinging on an iso-scalar target. The data cover a large kinematical range and provide an important input for global QCD analyses of world data at NLO, aiming at the determination of FFs in particular in the strange quark sector. The newest results from COMPASS on pion and kaon multiplicities will be presented.

  1. Hadronic production of glueballs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Local Gauge Invariance of SU(3)/sub c/ and color confinement would require that the only hadrons in the world be glueballs. However, when we add the quarks and obtain QCD it is experimentally clear that quark built states mask the expected glueballs. Thus discovery of glueballs is essential for the viability of QCD. Papers presented at the 1983 International Europhysics Conference on High Energy Physics on the hadronic production of glueballs and searches for glueballs are reviewed

  2. Hadronic jets an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Banfi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics is an incredibly rich subject detailing the narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon in a particle physics or heavy ion experiment. This book is a general overview of jet physics for scientists not directly involved in the field. It presents the basic experimental and theoretical problems arising when dealing with jets, and describing the solutions proposed in recent years.

  3. Hadronization in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, G.; Blok, H.P.; Boudard, A.; Kopeliovich, B.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of the space time structure of quark propagation and hadronization is proposed by studying particle production in deep-inelastic scattering of electrons from nucleons and nuclei with high statistics. A 15 to 30 GeV electron beam impinging on targets of hydrogen, deuterium, helium, carbon and lead is planned to be used and the final state hadrons are to be detected in a large solid angle device. (authors). 48 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Hadron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.

    1981-03-01

    The x dependence of hadron structure functions is investigated. If quarks can exist in very low mass states (10 MeV for d and u quarks) the pion structure function is predicted to behave like (1-x) and not (1-x) 2 in a x-region around 1. Relativistic and non-relativistic quark bound state pictures of hadrons are considered together with their relation with the Q 2 evolution of structure functions. Good agreement with data is in general obtained

  5. Color models of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, O.W.; Nelson, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    The evidence for a three-valued 'color' degree of freedom in hadron physics is reviewed. The structure of color models is discussed. Consequences of color models for elementary particle physics are discussed, including saturation properties of hadronic states, π 0 →2γ and related decays, leptoproduction, and lepton pair annihilation. Signatures are given which distinguish theories with isolated colored particles from those in which color is permanently bound. (Auth.)

  6. Charmed hadrons in nuclear medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolos, L.; Gamermann, D.; Molina, R.; Nieves, J.; Oset, E.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Ramos, A.

    2010-01-01

    We study the properties of charmed hadrons in dense matter within a coupled-channel approach which accounts for Pauli blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We analyze the behaviour in this dense environment of dynamically-generated baryonic resonances as well as the open-charm meson spectral functions. We discuss the implications of the in-medium properties of open-charm mesons on the D s0 (2317) and the predicted X(3700) scalar resonances. (authors)

  7. Measurement and simulation of the radiation environment in the lower atmosphere for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioch, Christian Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Flying personnel is occupationally exposed to rather high radiation levels due to secondary cosmic radiation. Therefore, the radiation environment induced in the lower atmosphere by galactic and solar cosmic radiation was characterized by means of particle transport calculations using GEANT4. These calculations were validated with continuous measurements of the energy spectra of secondary neutrons with Bonner sphere spectrometers at the Zugspitze mountain and near the North Pole. The response of these instruments was determined with GEANT4 and for the first time experimentally verified at high neutron energies (244 and 387 MeV). Route doses for aircrews along typical long-haul flights were determined for galactic and solar cosmic radiation using most recent data on the magnetospheric field and primary cosmic radiation.

  8. Gluon bremsstrahlung and elastic scattering of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povh, B.

    2001-01-01

    The differential and the total cross sections in high energy hadron-proton interactions give a beautiful insight in the low Q 2 structure of the nucleon. The cross section is composed of two parts: a large energy independent part corresponding to the interaction of the valence quark with the target without gluon radiation and an energy dependent part caused by gluon bremsstrahlung. The gluons are located at small transverse distances of about 0.3 fm from the valence quarks. The model with two scales, the size of the hadron (R 2 ∼ 1 fm 2 ) and the size of the gluonic cloud (r 0 2 ∼ 0.1 fm 2 ), correctly predicts the total and the differential cross sections and the behaviour of diffractive dissociation in hadronic and deep inelastic events. (orig.)

  9. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  10. Prediction of LDEF exposure to the ionizing radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J. W.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of the LDEF mission's trapped proton and electron and galactic cosmic ray proton exposures have been made using the currently accepted models with improved resolution near mission end and better modeling of solar cycle effects. An extension of previous calculations, to provide a more definitive description of the LDEF exposure to ionizing radiation, is represented by trapped proton and electron flux as a function of mission time, presented considering altitude and solar activity variation during the mission and the change in galactic cosmic ray proton flux over the mission. Modifications of the AP8MAX and AP8MIN fluence led to a reduction of fluence by 20%. A modified interpolation model developed by Daly and Evans resulted in 30% higher dose and activation levels, which better agreed with measured values than results predicted using the Vette model.

  11. Measurement of radionuclides in the environment via Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author has developed an alternate approach to the measurement of some beta-emitting nuclides that utilizes the luminescence generated by the Cherenkov process. The luminescence, now known as Cherenkov radiation, was shown to be generated when a charged particle passes through a transparent medium at a speed that exceeds the phase velocity of light in the same medium. Cherenkov emission is different from most other luminescence processes in that it is a purely physical phenomenon. One consequence of this is that Cherenkov systems are free of chemical quenching effects. Conventional methods of analysis for environmental levels of beta-emitting radionuclides are often tedious, time-consuming, and expensive. The Cherenkov method is fast, requires very little operator attention, and is much less expensive to perform

  12. Probing leptophilic dark sectors with hadronic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Kavanagh, Bradley J.; Panci, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    We study vector portal dark matter models where the mediator couples only to leptons. In spite of the lack of tree-level couplings to colored states, radiative effects generate interactions with quark fields that could give rise to a signal in current and future experiments. We identify such experimental signatures: scattering of nuclei in dark matter direct detection; resonant production of lepton-antilepton pairs at the Large Hadron Collider; and hadronic final states in dark matter indirect searches. Furthermore, radiative effects also generate an irreducible mass mixing between the vector mediator and the Z boson, severely bounded by ElectroWeak Precision Tests. We use current experimental results to put bounds on this class of models, accounting for both radiatively induced and tree-level processes. Remarkably, the former often overwhelm the latter.

  13. Evidences for two scales in hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Povh, B.

    2007-01-01

    Some unusual features observed in hadronic collisions at high energies can be understood assuming that gluons in hadrons are located within small spots occupying only about 10% of the hadrons' area. Such a conjecture about the presence of two scales in hadrons helps to explain the following: why diffractive gluon radiation is so suppressed; why the triple-Pomeron coupling shows no t dependence; why total hadronic cross sections rise so slowly with energy; why diffraction cones shrink so slowly, and why α P ' R ' ; why the transition from hard to soft regimes in the structure functions occurs at rather large Q 2 ; why the observed Cronin effect at collider energies is so weak; why hard reactions sensitive to primordial parton motion (direct photon, Drell-Yan dileptons, heavy flavors, back-to-back dihadrons, seagull effect, etc.) demand such a large transverse momenta of the projectile partons, which is not explained by next-to-leading order calculations; why the onset of nuclear shadowing for gluons is so delayed compared to quarks; and why shadowing is so weak

  14. Radiation therapists' and radiation oncology medical physicists' perceptions of work and the working environment in Australia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, G K B; McKay, J; Hegney, D G; Breen, Lauren J; Berg, M; Ebert, M A; Davis, M; Kearvell, R

    2017-09-01

    Workforce recruitment and retention are issues in radiation oncology. The working environment is likely to have an impact on retention; however, there is a lack of research in this area. The objectives of this study were to: investigate radiation therapists' (RTs) and radiation oncology medical physicists' (ROMPs) perceptions of work and the working environment; and determine the factors that influence the ability of RTs and ROMPs to undertake their work and how these factors affect recruitment and retention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used. Twenty-eight RTs and 21 ROMPs participated. The overarching themes were delivering care, support in work, working conditions and lifestyle. The overarching themes were mostly consistent across both groups; however, the exemplars reflected the different roles and perspectives of RTs and ROMPs. Participants described the importance they placed on treating patients and improving their lives. Working conditions were sometimes difficult with participants reporting pressure at work, large workloads and longer hours and overtime. Insufficient staff numbers impacted on the effectiveness of staff, the working environment and intentions to stay. Staff satisfaction is likely to be improved if changes are made to the working environment. We make recommendations that may assist departments to support RTs and ROMPs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Australia's proactive approach to radiation protection of the environment: how integrated is it with radiation protection of humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, G A; Grzechnik, M; Tinker, R; Larsson, C M

    2018-01-01

    Australia's regulatory framework has evolved over the past decade from the assumption that protection of humans implies protection of the environment to the situation now where radiological impacts on non-human species (wildlife) are considered in their own right. In an Australian context, there was a recognised need for specific national guidance on protection of non-human species, for which the uranium mining industry provides the major backdrop. National guidance supported by publications of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (Radiation Protection Series) provides clear and consistent advice to operators and regulators on protection of non-human species, including advice on specific assessment methods and models, and how these might be applied in an Australian context. These approaches and the supporting assessment tools provide a mechanism for industry to assess and demonstrate compliance with the environmental protection objectives of relevant legislation, and to meet stakeholder expectations that radiological protection of the environment is taken into consideration in accordance with international best practice. Experiences from the past 5-10 years, and examples of where the approach to radiation protection of the environment has been well integrated or presented some challenges will be discussed. Future challenges in addressing protection of the environment in existing exposure situations will also be discussed.

  16. Ionising radiations - an ecological problem of indoor architectural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukanovic, M.

    1995-01-01

    Architectural buildings are assessed not only for their esthetic characteristics but human settlements are considered now, as ecosystems and homes and flats as habitats (bio tops). Because of that healthy environment and influences of nonpolluting factors are of a great importance. The use of appropriate building materials harmless to health, contrary to the use of those that emit radon with its ionising effects and consequent health hazards, is of a great importance, too. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of investigation of building materials before their use, as well as the importance of quality control of soil where the construction is planned. (author)

  17. Hazards of ionizing radiations for human beings and environment with respect to nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, Felix; Jung, Jennifer Jana; Schultmann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, nuclear fission is used to produce electricity. On the one hand, the low emission of CO_2 is often mentioned as an advantage of this technology. On the other hand, warnings about the dangers of nuclear fission are mentioned. Consequently, an overview about the dangers of ionizing radiation to human beings as well as animals and the environment is important. However, the focus will be on possible health effects for humans with regards to nuclear power plants. In nuclear power plants, both natural types of radiation and artificially produced radiation occur. During normal operation, it is possible that small quantities of this ionizing radiation are released to the environment. In case of nuclear disasters or faults during decommissioning and dismantling processes the consequences of thereby emitted quantities can be even more severe. Reference nuclides vary by reactor type, operating stage and respective incident. At the beginning, different types of radiation and their characteristics and effects on the affected organism are explained. Sensitive organs are emphasized in this context. The individual risk is determined by numerous factors and therefore cannot be predicted. Based on scientific studies and medical publications the hazards of ionizing radiation are compiled. Effects of high exposure of ionizing radiation are well-investigated. Scientists are still divided over the connection between several diseases and the exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. For this reason, the positions of different international organizations are critically contrasted in this study.

  18. Quark-model study of the hadron structure and the hadron-hadron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, A; Caramés, T F; Vijande, J; Garcilazo, H

    2011-01-01

    Recent results of hadron spectroscopy and hadron-hadron interaction within a quark model framework are reviewed. Higher order Fock space components are considered based on new experimental data on low-energy hadron phenomenology. The purpose of this study is to obtain a coherent description of the low-energy hadron phenomenology to constrain QCD phenomenological models and try to learn about low-energy realizations of the theory.

  19. Artificial Neural Networks For Hadron Hadron Cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELMashad, M.; ELBakry, M.Y.; Tantawy, M.; Habashy, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years artificial neural networks (ANN ) have emerged as a mature and viable framework with many applications in various areas. Artificial neural networks theory is sometimes used to refer to a branch of computational science that uses neural networks as models to either simulate or analyze complex phenomena and/or study the principles of operation of neural networks analytically. In this work a model of hadron- hadron collision using the ANN technique is present, the hadron- hadron based ANN model calculates the cross sections of hadron- hadron collision. The results amply demonstrate the feasibility of such new technique in extracting the collision features and prove its effectiveness

  20. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O'Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h -1 (1 rad d -1 ). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h -1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h -1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  1. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [Uniiversity of Nevada, Las Vegas; Haber, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  2. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation

  3. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  4. Radiation protection instrumentation. Monitoring equipment. Radioactive aerosols in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This international standard applies to portable or installed equipment for continuous monitoring of radioactive aerosols in the environment in normal and emergency conditions. Monitoring involves continuous sampling and, where desirable, automatic start of sampling. The document applies particularly to the following assignments: (i) determination of the volume activity of radionuclides in the form of aerosols, either per time unit, along with its time changes, or in the integral form over a longer time period such as 24 h, and measurement of the volume sampled; (ii) triggering a warning alarm signal if the preset volume activity or time integral of the volume activity of aerosols has been exceeded. The document deals with radioactive aerosol monitor design, testing procedures, and documentation. Appended tables refer to the reference and normal testing conditions, tests in normal testing conditions, tests during changes of the affecting quantities, and tests of the air circuit. (P.A.)

  5. Radiation Mapping in Post-Disaster Environments Using an Autonomous Helicopter

    OpenAIRE

    Towler, Jerry; Krawiec, Bryan; Kochersberger, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Recent events have highlighted the need for unmanned remote sensing in dangerous areas, particularly where structures have collapsed or explosions have occurred, to limit hazards to first responders and increase their efficiency in planning response operations. In the case of the Fukushima nuclear reactor explosion, an unmanned helicopter capable of obtaining overhead images, gathering radiation measurements, and mapping both the structural and radiation content of the environment would have ...

  6. Spectral functions from hadronic τ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davier, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Hadronic decays of the τ lepton provide a clean environment to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by romances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonpertubative contributions. the τ vector spectral functions for the 2π and 4π final states are used together with e p+ e p- data in order to compute vacuum polarization integrals occurring in the calculations of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the running of the electromagnetic coupling

  7. Hadron Dragons strike again

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Dragon Boat team – the Hadron Dragons – achieved a fantastic result at the "Paddle for Cancer" Dragon Boat Festival at Lac de Joux on 6 September. CERN Hadron Dragons heading for the start line.Under blue skies and on a clear lake, the Hadron Dragons won 2nd place in a hard-fought final, following top times in the previous heats. In a close and dramatic race – neck-and-neck until the final 50 metres – the local Lac-de-Joux team managed to inch ahead at the last moment. The Hadron Dragons were delighted to take part in this festival. No one would turn down a day out in such a friendly and fun atmosphere, but the Dragons were also giving their support to cancer awareness and fund-raising in association with ESCA (English-Speaking Cancer Association of Geneva). Riding on their great success in recent competitions, the Hadron Dragons plan to enter the last Dragon Boat festival of 2009 in Annecy on 17-18 October. This will coincide with t...

  8. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansruedi Voelkle

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  9. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansruedi Voelkle [Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Environmental Radioactivity Section, c/o Physics Department, University of Fribourg Chemin du Musee 3, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  10. Interactive Visual Intervention Planning: Interactive Visualization for Intervention Planning in Particle Accelerator Environments with Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabry, Thomas; Feral, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Intervention planning is crucial for maintenance operations in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation, during which the radiation dose contracted by maintenance workers should be reduced to a minimum. In this context, we discuss the visualization aspects of a new software tool, which integrates interactive exploration of a scene depicting an accelerator facility augmented with residual radiation level simulations, with the visualization of intervention data such as the followed trajectory and maintenance tasks. The visualization of each of these aspects has its effect on the final predicted contracted radiation dose. In this context, we explore the possible benefits of a user study, with the goal of enhancing the visual conditions in which the intervention planner using the software tool is minimizing the radiation dose.

  11. A study on the life extension of polymer materials under radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. J.; Park, S. W.; Cho, S. H.; Hong, S. S

    2000-12-01

    The object of this study is to improve the stability and the economic profit by reducing the radiation-induced degradation rate of polymer material used under the radiation environment. So far, the resistance to radiation-induced oxidation of a polymer has been improved by the stabilizers. They can play an important role in the anti-oxidants that interrupt the radical-mediated oxidation chain reaction. The stabilization effect could be larger than that achieved in an inert-atmosphere irradiation. Stabilization is a function of stabilizer concentration up to a certain threshold, but it is not further improved above this concentration. Beyond the threshold, the rate of radiation-induced oxidation goes up to the rate that is characteristic for the unstabilized polymer. To make up for this weakness, a technique depositing a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the polymer surface was developed for protecting the radiation-induced oxidation in the air.

  12. The Plan for Investigating the Radiation Environment around the KAERI Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo

    2007-11-15

    The investigation of the radiation environment is carried out broadly for the environmental radiation measurement, analyses of the environmental radioactivity and radiological assessment for the public. Environmental radiation dose is measured by a continuous and a portable environmental radiation monitor (ERM) in the range of the radius of 30 km from the sites. And the accumulated radiation dose is measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). The environmental radioactivity on gross alpha and gross beta, Uranium, Tritium, Strontium, and gamma-radionuclides are analyzed routinely in the various samples such as air particulate, air iodine, air moisture, soil, sediment, pine needle, rainwater, surface water, underground water, fallout, farm products, and stock farm products. Effective dose assessment by monitoring results is performed to obtain the public confidence.

  13. A study on the life extension of polymer materials under radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. J.; Park, S. W.; Cho, S. H.; Hong, S. S.

    2000-12-01

    The object of this study is to improve the stability and the economic profit by reducing the radiation-induced degradation rate of polymer material used under the radiation environment. So far, the resistance to radiation-induced oxidation of a polymer has been improved by the stabilizers. They can play an important role in the anti-oxidants that interrupt the radical-mediated oxidation chain reaction. The stabilization effect could be larger than that achieved in an inert-atmosphere irradiation. Stabilization is a function of stabilizer concentration up to a certain threshold, but it is not further improved above this concentration. Beyond the threshold, the rate of radiation-induced oxidation goes up to the rate that is characteristic for the unstabilized polymer. To make up for this weakness, a technique depositing a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the polymer surface was developed for protecting the radiation-induced oxidation in the air

  14. Radiative transitions from Rydberg states of lithium atoms in a blackbody radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, I. L.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2012-05-01

    The radiative widths induced by blackbody radiation (BBR) were investigated for Rydberg states with principal quantum number up to n = 1000 in S-, P- and D-series of the neutral lithium atom at temperatures T = 100-3000 K. The rates of BBR-induced decays and excitations were compared with the rates of spontaneous decays. Simple analytical approximations are proposed for accurate estimations of the ratio of thermally induced decay (excitation) rates to spontaneous decay rates in wide ranges of states and temperatures.

  15. Radiation processing of agricultural products: status and potential contribution to a cleaner environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidot, M.

    1979-01-01

    The current status of radiation processing of agricultural products is briefly reviewed with special regard to those processes which may contribute to a cleaner environment. Radurization of poultry feed and poultry meat is shown to be a major contributor to the reduction of a significant public health problem-salmonellosis. Radiation sterilized animal feeds can be produced by processing garbage - a major environmental pollutant. Radicidation and radappertization are effective processes in the treatment of sludges and waste water, to prevent pollution of seas or ground. Radiation processes can effectively replace fungicides and insecticides in the treatment of agricultural crops and thus reduce environmental pollution. (author)

  16. The application of entropy weight TOPSIS method to optimal points in monitoring the Xinjiang radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Guangwen; Hu Youhua; Liu Qian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the application of the entropy weight TOPSIS method to optimal layout points in monitoring the Xinjiang radiation environment has been indroduced. With the help of SAS software, It has been found that the method is more ideal and feasible. The method can provide a reference for us to monitor radiation environment in the same regions further. As the method could bring great convenience and greatly reduce the inspecting work, it is very simple, flexible and effective for a comprehensive evaluation. (authors)

  17. The natural radiation environment of marine organisms and aspects of the human food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhed, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    This article is based on a paper presented at the SRP meeting on the Natural Radiation Environment, March 1982. The concentrations of some of the natural radionuclides in various components of the marine environment are described and the contributions which these make to the radiation exposure of both marine organisms and man are discussed. It is indicated that radium-226 is a useful tracer of oceanic processes and a potential means of verifying the models being developed to predict the radiological consequences of the disposal of radioactive wastes into the deep ocean. (author)

  18. Radiation-Induced Damage and Recovery of Ultra-Nanocrystalline Diamond: Toward Applications in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Aiden A; Filevich, Jorge; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Botman, Aurélien; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2017-11-15

    Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) is increasingly being used in the fabrication of devices and coatings due to its excellent tribological properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Here, we study its response to irradiation with kiloelectronvolt electrons as a controlled model for extreme ionizing environments. Real time Raman spectroscopy reveals that the radiation-damage mechanism entails dehydrogenation of UNCD grain boundaries, and we show that the damage can be recovered by annealing at 883 K. Our results have significant practical implications for the implementation of UNCD in extreme environment applications, and indicate that the films can be used as radiation sensors.

  19. Estimating the solar radiation environment on the soil surface between rows using crop canopy architectural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuge, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Kuroda, M.; Funakoshi, T.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is quantification of the solar radiation in the farmland located in the hilly and mountainous areas, considering the effect of the shelter adjacent to the field, such as the forest (This effect is called as the edge-effect in this study.). To evaluate the edge-effect on the solar radiation environment in the farmland, solar radiations are measured at the center and edge of the study site adjacent to the forest. The simulation model is composed, coupling with the fish-eye projection method and procedure for the separating direct and diffuse solar radiations. Using this model, the diurnal solar radiations are simulated at the center and edge of the study site. The simulation result showed good agreement with the observation. The spatial distribution of the solar radiation in an observational field is quantified by this method, considering the edge-effect. The simulation result indicated that the solar radiation environment on the field surface is affected by the shelter adjacent to the field and the field direction. (author)

  20. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M Dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Mauas, Pablo; hide

    2013-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyman-alpha line fluxes comprise approximately 37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; approximately greater than 10(exp3) times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyman-alpha and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyman-alpha. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyman-alpha)/F(Mg II) = 10(exp3). The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be approximately 0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, greather than 10(exp3) times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%.500% on 10(exp2)-10(exp3) s timescales. This effect should be taken

  1. THE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AROUND M DWARF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Stocke, John T.; Bushinsky, Rachel [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tian, Feng [Center for Earth System Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Desert, Jean-Michel [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela [Instituto de Astronomsica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Walkowicz, Lucianne M., E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No 'UV-quiet' M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Ly{alpha} emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Ly{alpha} line fluxes comprise {approx}37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; {approx}>10{sup 3} times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Ly{alpha} and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Ly{alpha}. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Ly{alpha})/F(Mg II) = 10 {+-} 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, is shown to be {approx}0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >10{sup 3} times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV

  2. The radiation monitoring of environment around place of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovina, E.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Large success was attained in the field of radiation protection of research nuclear center, but it is necessary to carry out works in this way around place of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes too. Moreover, for protection of environment it is necessary to control radiation condition of system (radioactive wastes of nuclear center - environment). There is large amount of natural and man-made radionuclides in environment and it is important to solve problem to control individual radionuclides, polluting natural environment. Also, it is necessary to control concentrations of specific radionuclides, which are marks of definite radioactive source. The radionuclides 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 60 Co, 141 Ce, 144 Ce, 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 131 I and natural radionuclides of uranium, thorium and their products of decay are basic radionuclides. The 57 Co, 35 S, 32 P are considered also basic radionuclides taking into consideration specialization of our Institute. The basic problems of control of environment are following: observation of radioactive pollution level of environment objects; estimation of radioactive pollution level with the purpose of warning of possible negative consequences; investigation of dynamics of radioactivity and prognosis of radioactive pollution of environment objects; influence on sources of radioactive pollution. There is large volume information, characterizing radiation condition of environment around research nuclear center and around place of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes. The bank of environment object analysis result date was build for investigation of information. The system of protection around location of treatment and storage of radioactive wastes and around nuclear center consists of control of radioactive wastes, superficial and underground water, soil, plants, atmospheric precipitation. There are analysis of total β- activity, α-activity and γ-spectrometry. This control includes estimation of throw down values

  3. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that t he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... . In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved

  4. A perspective on the ICRP approach to Radiation protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    The ICRP, in response to concerns by the environmental community, has begun the process of addressing radiation protection of non-human species. Concerns have been raised that the current framework for radiation protection fails to adequately protect the environment. Although most everyone agrees that some change to the ICRP radiation protection framework is called for, the extent of the revision is debatable. In May 2000, the ICRP set up a Task Group to provide advice on the development of a policy for the protection of the environment and to suggest a framework for environmental protection based on scientific, ethical, and philosophical principles. Based on Task Group input, ICRP intends to develop a framework for protection of the environment that can be integrated into an overall system of protection. This paper explores four major issues that serve to identify questions that ICRP should consider in its 2005 recommendations regarding radiation protection of the environment: (1) the role of ICRP, (2) defining the environment and criteria for protection, (3) the framework for environmental protection, and (4) risk management. (author)

  5. Existing condition assessment of radiation environment quality in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiaang; Li Fusheng; Chen Yingmin; Zhu Jianguo; Lu Feng; Song Gang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the radiactivity levels of Jinan dwellings and the indoor environment quality. Methods: Using the self made Measurement Cups of Indoor Environmental Radioactivity Evaluation (MCIERE) (ZL 200620082698.7) to measure the gamma ray dose rate, 222 Rn activity concentration, 220 Rn activity concentration and EECTn. Results: The geometric mean of 222 Rn activity concentrations that showed a clear lognoxmal distribution tendency in 411 rooms of Jinan was 45 Bq ·m -3 , the range which was from 18 to 203 Bq·m -3 . The geometric mean of 220 Rn activity concentration that was also nearly lognormal distribution in 203 rooms of Jinan was 16 Bq·m -3 and the range of the activity coneentratons was from 1 to 167 Bq· m -3 . The geometric mean of EECT, that was nearly lognormal distribution in 204 rooms of Jinan was 1.082 Bq ·m -3 , the range was from 0.015 to 10.230 Bq·m -3 . The arithmetic mean of the gamma ray dose rate that was nearly Gaussian distribution in 412 rooms of Jinan was 0.106 μSv·h -1 , the concentration range from 0.041 to 0.167 μSv·h -1 . Conclusion: The internal irradiation annual effective dose caused by 222 Rn and its progeny, 220 Rn and its progeny and of Jinan inhabitant was 1.189 mSv, the external irradiation annual effective close caused by the gamma ray from the ground and buildings was 0.743 mSv. The mean total annual effective dose was 2.187 mSv and the highest annual effective dose level was above 5 mSv. (authors)

  6. Hadron spectroscopy in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Palano, Antimo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed. In particular the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the $J/\\psi p$ system, the possible existence of four-quark states decaying to $J/\\psi \\phi$ and the confirmation of resonant nature of the $Z_c(4430)^−$ mesonic state are discussed. In the sector of charmed baryons, the observation of five new $\\Omega_c$ states, the observation of the $\\Xi^+_{cc}$ and the study of charmed baryons decaying to $D^0 p$ are presented.

  7. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  8. Pairing in hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.

    1981-08-01

    A many-body approach to hadron structure is presented, in which we consider two parton species: spin-0 (b-partons), and spin-1/2 (f-partons). We extend a boson and a fermion pairing scheme for the b-, and f-partons respectively, into a Yang-Mills gauge theory. The main feature of this theory is that the gauge field is not identified with the usual gluon field variable in QCD. We study the confinement problem of the hadron constituents, and obtain, for low temperatures, partons that are confined by energy gaps. As the critical temperatures for the corresponding phase transitions are approached, the energy gap gradually disappears, and confinement is lost. The theory goes beyond the non-relativistic harmonic oscillator quark model, in the sense of giving physical reasons why a non-relativistic approximation is adequate in describing the internal dynamics of hadron structure. (author)

  9. Secondary particle background levels and effects on detectors at future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, T.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of hadron colliders, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will operate at high center-of-mass energies and luminosities. Namely, for the SSC(LHC) √s=40TeV (√s=16TeV) and L=10 33 cm -2 s -1 (L=3x10 34 cm -2 s -1 ). These conditions will result in the production of large backgrounds as well as radiation environments. Ascertaining the backgrounds, in terms of the production of secondary charged and neutral particles, and the radiation environments are important considerations for the detectors proposed for these colliders. An initial investigation of the radiation levels in the SSC detectors was undertaken by D. Groom and colleagues, in the context of the open-quotes task force on radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions.close quotes The method consisted essentially of an analytic approach, using standard descriptions of average events in conjunction with simulations of secondary processes

  10. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.T.

    1979-03-01

    Work on high energy hadron-hadron collisions in the geometrical model, performed under the DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-09-0946, is summarized. Specific items studied include the behavior of elastic hadron scatterings at super high energies and the existence of many dips, the computation of meson radii in the geometrical model, and the hadronic matter current effects in inelastic two-body collisions

  11. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  12. Approach to reducing the effect of bone—coal power station on radiation environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIShi-Ying; GUPei-Long; 等

    2002-01-01

    The effect of two bone-coal power stations(6MWe) on environment was investigated within the scope of the dose contribution caused by various radionucildes in different ways.It is found that the best measures to reduce the effect of bone-coal power station on radiation environment include to select a fine boiler system and a comprehensive utilization of the bone-coal cinder(BCC),soot and ash in the catchers.

  13. Approach to reducing the effect of bone-coal power station on radiation environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of two bone-coal power stations (6 MWe) on environment wasinvestigated within the scope of the dose contribution caused by various radionucildes in different ways. It is found that the best measures to reduce the effect of bone-coal power station on radiation environment include to select a fine boiler system and a comprehensive utilization of the bone-coal cinder (BCC), soot and ash in the catchers.

  14. Development of the control system of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector and of a test environment for quality-assurance of its front-end electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mercado Pérez, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Within this thesis, the detector control system (DCS) for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has been developed. The TRD DCS is fully implemented as a detector oriented hierarchy of objects behaving as finite state machines. It controls and monitors over 65 thousand front-end electronics (FEE) units, a few hundred low voltage and one thousand high voltage channels, and other sub-systems such as cooling and gas. Commissioning of the TRD DCS took place during several runs with ALICE using cosmic events. Another part of this thesis describes the development of a test environment for large-scale production quality-assurance of over 4 thousand FEE read-out boards containing in total about 1.2 million read-out channels. The hardware and software components are described in detail. Additionally, a series of performance studies were carried out earlier including radiation tolerance tests of the TRAP chip which is the core component of the TRD FEE.

  15. Development of the control system of the ALICE transition radiation detector and of a test environment for quality-assurance of its front-end electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado Perez, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Within this thesis, the detector control system (DCS) for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has been developed. The TRD DCS is fully implemented as a detector oriented hierarchy of objects behaving as finite state machines. It controls and monitors over 65 thousand front-end electronics (FEE) units, a few hundred low voltage and one thousand high voltage channels, and other sub-systems such as cooling and gas. Commissioning of the TRD DCS took place during several runs with ALICE using cosmic events. Another part of this thesis describes the development of a test environment for large-scale production quality-assurance of over 4 thousand FEE read-out boards containing in total about 1.2 million read-out channels. The hardware and software components are described in detail. Additionally, a series of performance studies were carried out earlier including radiation tolerance tests of the TRAP chip which is the core component of the TRD FEE. (orig.)

  16. Development of the control system of the ALICE transition radiation detector and of a test environment for quality-assurance of its front-end electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado Perez, Jorge

    2008-11-10

    Within this thesis, the detector control system (DCS) for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has been developed. The TRD DCS is fully implemented as a detector oriented hierarchy of objects behaving as finite state machines. It controls and monitors over 65 thousand front-end electronics (FEE) units, a few hundred low voltage and one thousand high voltage channels, and other sub-systems such as cooling and gas. Commissioning of the TRD DCS took place during several runs with ALICE using cosmic events. Another part of this thesis describes the development of a test environment for large-scale production quality-assurance of over 4 thousand FEE read-out boards containing in total about 1.2 million read-out channels. The hardware and software components are described in detail. Additionally, a series of performance studies were carried out earlier including radiation tolerance tests of the TRAP chip which is the core component of the TRD FEE. (orig.)

  17. Hadron jets in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1982-11-01

    The subject of hadron jet studies, to judge by the work presented at this workshop, is a maturing field which is still gathering steam. The very detailed work being done in lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron collisions, the second-generation measurements being carried out at Fermilab, the CERN SPS, and the ISR, and the very high energy hard scatterings being observed at the CERN Collider all show enormous promise for increased understanding. Perhaps we shall yet reach that long-sought nirvana in which high-p/sub perpendicular/ collisions become truly simple

  18. Composite hadron models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    Composite models of hadrons are considered. The main attention is paid to the Sakata, S model. In the framework of the model it is presupposed that proton, neutron and Λ particle are the fundamental particles. Theoretical studies of unknown fundamental constituents of a substance have led to the creation of the quark model. In the framework of the quark model using the theory of SU(6)-symmetry the classification of mesons and baryons is considered. Using the quark model relations between hadron masses, their spins and electromagnetic properties are explained. The problem of three-colour model with many flavours is briefly presented

  19. High intensity hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics

  20. WORKSHOPS: Hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    'Hadron facilities' – high intensity (typically a hundred microamps), medium energy (30-60 GeV) machines producing intense secondary beams of pions, kaons, etc., are being widely touted as a profitable research avenue to supplement what is learned through the thrust for higher and higher energies. This interest was reflected at an International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As well as invited talks describing the various projects being pushed in the US, Europe and Japan, the meeting included working groups covering linacs, beam dynamics, hardware, radiofrequency, polarized beams and experimental facilities

  1. Large transverse momenta phenomena in hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCubbin, N.A.

    1981-05-01

    The production of particles with large transverse momentum in high energy hadron-hadron collisions is reviewed. The emphasis is placed on the experimental results. These results are discussed in terms of present theoretical ideas on interactions between hadronic constituents, but no attempt is made to review the theoretical work in a comprehensive manner. (author)

  2. Radiation effects on man health, environment, safety, security. Global Chernobyl mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bebeshko, V.; Bazyka, D.; Volovik, S.; Loganovsky, K.; Sushko, V.; Siedow, J.; Cohen, H.; Ginsburg, G.; Chao, N.; Chute, J.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objectives: Ionizing radiation is a primordial terrestrial and extraterrestrial background and archetypal environmental stress-factor for life origin, evolution, and existence. We all live in radiation world inevitably involving nuclear energy production, nuclear weapon, nuclear navy, radioactive waste, pertinent medical diagnostics and treatment, etc with connected certain probability of relevant accidents and terrorist attack, space and jet travels, high natural background radiation, etc - actual and potential sources of radiation exposures and effects. State-of- the art integral fundamental research on radiation effects on man health, environment, safety, and security (REMHESS) is nowadays paramount necessity and challenge. Methods and results: In given generalized conceptual framework unique 20 years Chernobyl multidimensional research and databases for radiation effects on man's all organism systems represent invaluable original basis and resources for mapping Chernobyl data and REMHESS challenge. Granted by DOE brand new Chernobyl Research and Service Project based on 'Sarcophagus-II' (Object 'Shelter') workers only one in radiation history baseline cohort, corresponding biorepository prospective dynamic data, integrated conceptual database system, and 'state of the art' 'omics' (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics) analysis is designed specifically for coherent addressing global REMHESS problems. In this connection 'Sarcophagus-II' is only one unique universal model. Conclusions: The fundamental goals of novel strategic Project and global Chernobyl mapping are to determine specific 'omics' signatures of radiation for man depending of exposure peculiarity to understand ultimate molecular mechanisms of radiation effects, gene environment interactions, etiology of organisms systems disorders and diseases, and to develop new biomarkers and countermeasures to protect man health in the framework of global REMHESS challenge

  3. Quark models in hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, Shashikant C.

    2007-01-01

    In this talk, we review the role played by the quark models in the study of interaction of strong, weak and electromagnetic probes with hadrons at intermediate and high momentum transfers. By hadrons, we mean individual nucleons as well as nuclei. We argue that at these momentum transfers, the structure of hadrons plays an important role. The hadron structure of the hadrons is because of the underlying quark structure of hadrons and therefore the quark models play an important role in determining the hadron structure. Further, the properties of hadrons are likely to change when these are placed in nuclear medium and this change should arise from the underlying quark structure. We shall consider some quark models to look into these aspects. (author)

  4. Virtual reality: electromagnetic decays and new hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The electromagnetic Coulomb processes and their application to study of radiative decays of hadrons and to the search for some exotic states are discussed. The Coulomb processes h + (Z, A) → (Z, A) involving collisions with virtual photons are photoproduction reactions on primary hadrons h. With pion, kaon or hyperon beams it is possible to study photoproduction on unstable targets (π, Κ, Υ). The results of several experiments for direct study of rare radiation decays of mesons are presented. The main features of the Coulomb production and coherent background reactions governed by strong interactions are considered. The main results of the Primakoff production study are summarized with some recent data in the SELEX experiment at E L = 600 eV obtained by means of Fermilab Tevatron. The SPHINX experiment allows to obtain new information on exotic baryons and other states [ru

  5. Radiation protection of the environment: anthropocentric and eco-centric principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexakhin, R.M.; Fesenko, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    The second half of the 20. century was dominated in the field of radiation protection by the anthropocentric concept stated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). According to this concept 'if radiation standards protect man then biota are also adequately protected from ionizing radiation'. At the end of the 20. beginning of the 21. centuries in the area of radiation protection of nature an eco-centric strategy is beginning to develop where emphasis has swung to the protection of biota in their environment. Inadequacy of ICRP's anthropocentric concept is reported. Issues are discussed such as ecological dosimetry, non-equi-dose irradiation of man and biota, criteria for estimating radiation induced changes in biota and man, as well as the need to harmonize permissible exposure doses to man and biota. An urgent need is stressed to develop a single (synthetic) concept of radiation protection which simultaneously ensures protection of human health and biota well-being in their environment. This concept is to be based on the recognition of the integrity of socio-natural ecosystems where man and biota are considered as a unity. (author)

  6. Cooperative effect of radiation and vapor environments on the deterioration of insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Yasuo; Okada, Sohei; Yagi, Toshiaki; Ito, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kenzo; Tamura, Naoyuki

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results and speculations are described on the cooperative effect of radiation and vapor environments for the deterioration of insulator cable cladding materials such as polyethylene chlorosulphonate, ethylene propylene rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, chloroprene and silicone rubber, by the separate, simultaneous or subsequent exposure of the above-mentioned two kinds of exposure factors. These experiment was carried out by considering main environmental factors in the LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. Radiation experiment was made by employing 60 Co source of 9.7 kGy/h at a room-temperature air condition. Vapor environment exposure was conducted by the conditions of 120 to 160 deg C steam-saturated air conditions and others. With the experimental results described on the characteristics of the five kinds of the above-mentioned insulator materials in radiation and saturated vapor conditions, the following conclusions were obtained. Acceleration of deterioration by the cooperative action of radiation and saturated vapor was found for the examined materials except the cross-linked polyethylene. In the subsequent exposure of radiation and saturated vapor, deterioration behavior was dependent on insulator materials and component ratios of the insulator materials. For the cross-linked polyethylene, annealing effect by heat was found, and the effect was less significent in the simultaneous exposure. Restoration phenomenon was found in the cross-linked polyethylene even in the saturated vapor exposure stage of the subsequent exposure conditions of radiation exposure followed by saturated vapor. (Takagi, S.)

  7. Experimental Characterization of a Composite Morphing Radiator Prototype in a Relevant Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagne, Christopher L.; Chong, Jorge B.; Whitcomb, John D.; Hartl, Darren J.; Erickson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    For future long duration space missions, crewed vehicles will require advanced thermal control systems to maintain a desired internal environment temperature in spite of a large range of internal and external heat loads. Current radiators are only able to achieve turndown ratios (i.e. the ratio between the radiator's maximum and minimum heat rejection rates) of approximately 3:1. Upcoming missions will require radiators capable of 12:1 turndown ratios. A radiator with the ability to alter shape could significantly increase turndown capacity. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) offer promising qualities for this endeavor, namely their temperature-dependent phase change and capacity for work. In 2015, the first ever morphing radiator prototype was constructed in which SMA actuators passively altered the radiator shape in response to a thermal load. This work describes a follow-on endeavor to demonstrate a similar concept using highly thermally conductive composite materials. Numerous versions of this new concept were tested in a thermal vacuum environment and successfully demonstrated morphing behavior and variable heat rejection, achieving a turndown ratio of 4.84:1. A summary of these thermal experiments and their results are provided herein.

  8. The Martian surface radiation environment – a comparison of models and MSL/RAD measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL has been measuring the radiation environment on the surface of Mars since August 6th 2012. MSL-RAD is the first instrument to provide detailed information about charged and neutral particle spectra and dose rates on the Martian surface, and one of the primary objectives of the RAD investigation is to help improve and validate current radiation transport models. Aims: Applying different numerical transport models with boundary conditions derived from the MSL-RAD environment the goal of this work was to both provide predictions for the particle spectra and the radiation exposure on the Martian surface complementing the RAD sensitive range and, at the same time, validate the results with the experimental data, where applicable. Such validated models can be used to predict dose rates for future manned missions as well as for performing shield optimization studies. Methods: Several particle transport models (GEANT4, PHITS, HZETRN/OLTARIS were used to predict the particle flux and the corresponding radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic radiation on Mars. From the calculated particle spectra the dose rates on the surface are estimated. Results: Calculations of particle spectra and dose rates induced by galactic cosmic radiation on the Martian surface are presented. Although good agreement is found in many cases for the different transport codes, GEANT4, PHITS, and HZETRN/OLTARIS, some models still show large, sometimes order of magnitude discrepancies in certain particle spectra. We have found that RAD data is helping to make better choices of input parameters and physical models. Elements of these validated models can be applied to more detailed studies on how the radiation environment is influenced by solar modulation, Martian atmosphere and soil, and changes due to the Martian seasonal pressure cycle. By extending the range of the calculated particle

  9. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-01-01

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  10. Radiation Impact to Environment of Non-nuclear Industry in Hunan,Hubei and Jiangxi Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Wei-jie; CHENG; Wei-ya

    2015-01-01

    According to the gas,liquid effluent monitoring and survey results of non nuclear industry in Hunan,Hubei and Jiangxi provinces,the radiation effects of which on the surrounding environment were analysis and evaluation.Evaluation industrials includes three coal-fired power plants,two rare earth ores,two cement factories,one

  11. International symposium on radiation technology for conservation of the environment. Extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This document includes extended synopses of 54 presentations given at the International Symposium on Radiation Technology for the conservation of the Environment held in Zakopane (near Cracow), Poland, 8-12 September 1997. Each presentation is separately indexed. Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Radiation environment measurements and single event upset observations in sun-synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, C.S.; Sims, A.J.; Farren, J.; Stephen, J.; Underwood, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on analysis of data from the Cosmic Radiation Environment and Dosimetry experiment (CREDO) carried in sun-synchronous polar orbit on UoSat-3 which shows the influence of cosmic rays, trapped protons and solar particles and allows comparison with device behavior

  13. Environmental radiation monitoring on the CERN sites and in the CERN environment during 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtyla, P; Wittekind, D

    1998-04-10

    As a consequence of changes in the administrative structure of TIS Division in 1996 and 1997, the Environmental Section was integrated into the TIS Technical Services and Environment Group that also looks after the non-radiation parameters in the CERN releases and environment. However, it remains the duty of the Radiation Protection Group to define the environmental programme for radiation and radioactivity, and to report its results both inside and outside CERN. In 1997, the environmental programme was slightly modified after discussions with the Sektion zur Ueberwachung der Radioaktivitaet (SUeR) in Fribourg. Gamma spectroscopy analyses of moss and water plants collected once per year in the rivers l'Allondon, Le Lion, Le Nant d'Avril and La Versoix were added. Moss and water plants were chosen as they are sensitive indicators of the presence of natural and man-made radioactivity in the environment. Part I of this Annual Report describes the results of measurements which are relevant for assessing the radiological impact of CERN's activities on the environment and the population living in the vicinity of the CERN sites. Measurements of radioactivity released into the atmosphere and into water, as well as measurements of stray radiation at or near the CERN site boundaries, are reported.

  14. International symposium on radiation technology for conservation of the environment. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This document includes extended synopses of 54 presentations given at the International Symposium on Radiation Technology for the conservation of the Environment held in Zakopane near Cracow), Poland, 8-12 September 1997. Each presentation is separately indexed. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. The retention characteristics of nonvolatile SNOS memory transistors in a radiation environment: Experiment and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhorter, P.J.; Miller, S.L.; Dellin, T.A.; Axness, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data and a model to accurately and quantitatively predict the data are presented for retention of SNOS memory devices over a wide range of dose rates. A wide range of SNOS stack geometries are examined. The model is designed to aid in screening nonvolatile memories for use in a radiation environment

  16. A Method for Estimating the Probability of Floating Gate Prompt Charge Loss in a Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Since advancing technology has been producing smaller structures in electronic circuits, the floating gates in modern flash memories are becoming susceptible to prompt charge loss from ionizing radiation environments found in space. A method for estimating the risk of a charge-loss event is given.

  17. System-Level Model for OFDM WiMAX Transceiver in Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Alim, O.; Elboghdadly, N.; Ashour, M.M.; Elaskary, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    WiMAX (Worldwide Inter operability for Microwave Access), an evolving standard for point-to-multipoint wireless networking, works for the l ast mile c onnections for replacing optical fiber technology network but with no need for adding more infra structure within crowded areas. Optical fiber technology is seriously considered for communication and monitoring applications in space and around nuclear reactors. Space and nuclear environments are characterized, in particular, by the presence of ionizing radiation fields. Therefore the influence of radiation on such networks needs to be investigated. This paper has the objective of building a System level model for a WiMAX OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) based transceiver. Modeling irradiation noise as an external effect added to the Additive White Gaussian noise (AWGN). Then analyze, discuss the results based on qualitatively performance evaluation using BER calculations for radiation environment

  18. The high resolution spaghetti hadron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenni, P.; Sonderegger, P.; Paar, H.P.; Wigmans, R.

    1987-01-01

    It is proposed to build a prototype for a hadron calorimeter with scintillating plastic fibres as active material. The absorber material is lead. Provided that these components are used in the appropriate volume ratio, excellent performance may be expected, e.g. an energy resolution of 30%/√E for jet detection. The proposed design offers additional advantages compared to the classical sandwich calorimeter structures in terms of granularity, hermiticity, uniformity, compactness, readout, radiation resistivity, stability and calibration. 22 refs.; 7 figs

  19. Hadronization of dense partonic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The parton recombination model has turned out to be a valuable tool to describe hadronization in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. I review the model and revisit recent progress in our understanding of hadron correlations. I also discuss higher Fock states in the hadrons, possible violations of the elliptic flow scaling and recombination effects in more dilute systems.

  20. Flat beams in a 50 TeV hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Harrison, M.; Pilat, F.; Syphers, M.

    1997-01-01

    The basic beam dynamics of a next generation 50 x 50 TeV hadron collider based on a high field magnet approach have been outlined over the past several years. Radiation damping not only produces small emittances, but also flat beams, just as in electron machines. Based on open-quotes Snowmass 96close quotes parameters, we investigate the issues associated with flat beams in very high energy hadron colliders

  1. Effects of alpha and gamma radiation on glass reaction in an unsaturated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Young, J.E.; Bates, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation may effect the long-term performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water. The present study examines (1) the effects of alpha or gamma irradiation in a water vapor environment, and (2) the influence of radiolytic products on glass reaction. Results indicate that nitric and organic acids form in an irradiated water vapor environment and are dissolved in thin films of condensed water. Glass samples exposed to these conditions react faster and have a different assemblage of secondary phases than glasses exposed to nonirradiated water vapor environments. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. High energy hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    High energy and small momentum transfer 2 'yields' 2 hadronic scattering processes are described in the physical framework of particle exchange. Particle production in high energy collisions is considered with emphasis on the features of inclusive reactions though with some remarks on exclusive processes. (U.K.)

  3. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  4. Digital Hadron Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilki, Burak

    2018-03-01

    The Particle Flow Algorithms attempt to measure each particle in a hadronic jet individually, using the detector providing the best energy/momentum resolution. Therefore, the spatial segmentation of the calorimeter plays a crucial role. In this context, the CALICE Collaboration developed the Digital Hadron Calorimeter. The Digital Hadron Calorimeter uses Resistive Plate Chambers as active media and has a 1-bit resolution (digital) readout of 1 × 1 cm2 pads. The calorimeter was tested with steel and tungsten absorber structures, as well as with no absorber structure, at the Fermilab and CERN test beam facilities over several years. In addition to conventional calorimetric measurements, the Digital Hadron Calorimeter offers detailed measurements of event shapes, rigorous tests of simulation models and various tools for improved performance due to its very high spatial granularity. Here we report on the results from the analysis of pion and positron events. Results of comparisons with the Monte Carlo simulations are also discussed. The analysis demonstrates the unique utilization of detailed event topologies.

  5. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  6. Chasseur de hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Eytier, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Qu'aurait-il proposé comme solutions face aux déboires du LHC, le grand collisionneur du hadrons du CERN, arrêté peu après son démarrage à l'automne 2008? Lucien Edmond André Montanet était un des grands de la physique des particules. (2 pages)

  7. Hadrons in medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    manifestly the symmetries of the underlying theory of strong interactions, i.e. ..... Note that such a picture, in which the self-energies of hadrons are generated by ..... An experimental verification of this prediction would be a major step forward in.

  8. Hadronic cascade processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Kripfganz, J.; Moehring, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The analytical treatment of hadronic decay cascades within the framework of the statistical bootstrap model is demonstrated on the basis of a simple variant. Selected problems for a more comprehensive formulation of the model such as angular momentum conservation, quantum statistical effects, and the immediate applicability to particle production processes at high energies are discussed in detail

  9. The large hadron computer

    CERN Multimedia

    Hirstius, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Plans for dealing with the torrent of data from the Large Hadron Collider's detectors have made the CERN particle-phycis lab, yet again, a pioneer in computing as well as physics. The author describes the challenges of processing and storing data in the age of petabyt science. (4 pages)

  10. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  11. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  12. Overview of a radiation safety program in a district style medical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the eight components of a radiation safety program in a large health care facility spread out over several campuses in a large geographic area in Nova Scotia. The main focus is based on those areas that are regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and generally encompass nuclear medicine and radiation therapy operations. X-ray operations are regulated provincially, but the general operational principles of an effective radiation safety program can be applied in all these areas. The main components covered include the set up of an organizational structure that operates separately from individual departments, general items expected from reports to corporate management or regulators, and some examples of the front-line expectations for those in individual departments. The review is not all encompassing, but should give organizations some insight of the magnitude of a radiation safety program in a district style environment. (author)

  13. CMS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade R&D Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif. A.; Onel, Yasar

    2012-01-01

    Due to an expected increase in radiation damage in LHC, we propose to replace the active material of the CMS Hadronic EndCap calorimeters with radiation hard quartz plate. Quartz is proven to be radiation hard with radiation damage tests using electron, proton, neutron and gamma beams. However, the light produced in quartz is from Cerenkov process, which yields drastically fewer photons than scintillators. To increase the light collection efficiency we pursue two separate methods: First metho...

  14. Short term ionizing radiation impact on charge-coupled devices in radiation environment of high-intensity heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, A.; Mustafin, E.; Ensinger, W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a first approach on studies of the results of short term ionizing radiation impact on charge-coupled device (CCD) chips in conditions typical for high-intensity ion accelerator areas. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices are a topical issue for high-intensity accelerator projects. In particular it concerns CCD cameras that are widely used for beam profile monitoring and surveillance in high radiation environment. 65 CCD cameras are going to be installed in the FAIR machines. It is necessary to have good understanding of radiation effects and their contribution to measured signal in CCD chips. A phenomenon of single event upset (SEU) in CCD chips is studied in the following experiment. By SEU in CCD chip we mean an event when an ionizing particle hits the CCD matrix cell and produces electron-hole pairs that are then collected and converted to a signal that is higher than certain level defined by author. Practically, it means that a certain cell will appear as a bright pixel on the resulting image from a chip. (authors)

  15. Terrain and Radiation Mapping in Post-Disaster Environments Using an Autonomous Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kochersberger

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have highlighted the need for unmanned remote sensing in dangerous areas, particularly where structures have collapsed or explosions have occurred, to limit hazards to first responders and increase their efficiency in planning response operations. In the case of the Fukushima nuclear reactor explosion, an unmanned helicopter capable of obtaining overhead images, gathering radiation measurements, and mapping both the structural and radiation content of the environment would have given the response team invaluable data early in the disaster, thereby allowing them to understand the extent of the damage and areas where dangers to personnel existed. With this motivation, the Unmanned Systems Lab at Virginia Tech has developed a remote sensing system for radiation detection and aerial imaging using a 90 kg autonomous helicopter and sensing payloads for the radiation detection and imaging operations. The radiation payload, which is the sensor of focus in this paper, consists of a scintillating type detector with associated software and novel search algorithms to rapidly and effectively map and locate sources of high radiation intensity. By incorporating this sensing technology into an unmanned aerial vehicle system, crucial situational awareness can be gathered about a post-disaster environment and response efforts can be expedited. This paper details the radiation mapping and localization capabilities of this system as well as the testing of the various search algorithms using simulated radiation data. The various components of the system have been flight tested over a several-year period and a new production flight platform has been built to enhance reliability and maintainability. The new system is based on the Aeroscout B1-100 helicopter platform, which has a one-hour flight endurance and uses a COFDM radio system that gives the helicopter an effective range of 7 km.

  16. Effects of ozone depletion and UV-B radiation on humans and the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, K.R. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Centre for Toxicology

    2008-03-15

    This paper summarized current research related to the effects of ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation on human health and the environment. Effects included direct responses in human as well as effects on biogeochemistry and the environmental cycling of substances. UV radiation has many harmful effects on the skin, eyes, and immune systems of humans. Skin cancer is a leading cause of death among fair-skinned populations exposed to UV radiation. The role of UV radiation in cataract formation was discussed, as well as issues related to the suppression of immune responses. The link between sunlight exposure and vitamin D levels in human populations was examined. The effects of UV radiation on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems were reviewed. Issues related to biogeochemistry and atmospheric processes were discussed. The review suggested that changes in the intensity of solar UV radiation due to ozone depletion will have important repercussions for all organisms on the planet. It was concluded that the combined effects of UV-B radiation and climate change will not be easy to predict. 201 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Nuclear explosives, ionizin.o. radiation and the effects on the biota of the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Vincent; Ward Whicker, F.

    1980-01-01

    After giving a general discussion of nuclear explosives, weapons testing and peaceful use of nuclear explosives under Plowshare project, ecological studies carried out at weapon test sites and Plowshare project sites in United States are reviewed. It is noted that though considerable data are available on the behaviour of radionuclides in natural environments on these sites, only a few observations of effects of ionizing radiations on the biota of the natural environments of these sites have been made. The major effects on the natural environments of these sites have been attributed to physical effects of nuclear detonations and site preparation. These effects are physical destruction of plants and animals and habitat modification such as soil disturbances. Recolonization of ground zeros and adjacent areas is observed to follow the successional pattern unique to the site. Observed effects of ionizing radiation on shrubs in the vicinity of cratering tests appear to be inconsequential when one considers the ecosystem as a whole. (M.G.B.)

  18. Are Hadrons and Nuclei Open Systems ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musulmanbekov, G.

    1998-01-01

    Fulltext We propose to consider the structure of hadrons in the frame of stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics, or stochastic theory, which is based on classical mechanics in stochastic environment. This environment is associated with subquantal vacuum. Stochastic theory is a classical physics without the hypothesis that there are isolated systems in the universe. It has been shown by some authors that stochastic theory is justified by fractal space-time considerations. In our approach hadron is a set of embedded into stochastic vacuum (SV) valence quarks (VQ) ( quark-antiquark in mesons and three quarks in baryons ) oscillating near center of proper frame of the hadron VQ being placed into SV behaves itself as a dislocation (antidislocation) in solids or vortex ( antivortex ) in liquids. Effective interaction between VQs comes from specific polarization of SV around VQs leading to outside suppression on VQs. Polarization of SV around VQ characterizes the distribution of hardonic matter inside a hadron. Oscillation motion of VQs around the origin, going from their interaction with SV, is strongly correlated. VQs being in equilibrium with SV exchange energy at all times with it. Neighborhood of two or more nucleons changes SV polarization around their VQs in such a way that they tend to occupy the state with minimum energy arrange crystalline like structure. Therefore the behavior of hadrons and nuclei is typical for open systems exchanging energy with environment .In this approach the relation between constituent (nonrelativistic ) quarks and current ( relativistic) ones becomes clear and transparent, because it composes the features of both NRQM and bag models. It gives qualitative and in some cases quantitative description of experimental facts concerning nucleon and nuclear structure searched in scattering experiments. Some proposals and predictions for future experiments are given

  19. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Young, K.G.; Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Parr, H.

    1992-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain needed information and calculational procedures used in performing predications for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. These calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented

  20. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.G.; Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Paar, H.

    1993-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain desired information and calculational procedures used in performing predictions for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. The calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented

  1. Use of micronucleus test in the assessment of radiation effects in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Edvaldo F. de; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Lima, Pedro A. de S.; Amancio, Francisco F.; Melo, Ana Maria M. de A.; Silva, Edvane B. da; Silva, Ronaldo C. da

    2011-01-01

    The study of the effects of radioactive substances on the environment is accomplished by radioecology. This science has played an important role in combating all forms of pollution. The uncontrolled use of physical and chemical agents has been a concern for environmental regulatory agencies, due to the serious damage to ecosystems. Aquatic organisms are exposed to a variety of pollutants harmful to aquatic systems. The mollusks Biomphalaria glabrata has been featured as a bioindicator to possess characteristics such as short reproductive cycle ease of maintenance in the laboratory and low maintenance cost. The micronucleus assay has been shown to be a great test to identify mutagenic effects caused by physical and chemical agents. In this study the frequency of micronuclei in haemocytes of Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to high doses of 60 Co gamma radiation contributing to a further standardization of this test as an indicator of the presence of radioactive contamination in aquatic environments. The young adult snails of Biomphalaria glabrata were divided into groups and subjected to a dose of 0 (control), 40 and 60 Gy of gamma radiation. The results showed that snails irradiated with 40 Gy showed a smaller number of haemocytes, whereas those exposed to 60 Gy had a greater quantity of these cells compared to control group. It can be concluded that the morphological analysis and the frequency of micronuclei in haemocytes of Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation may be used in studies of the action of high doses of radiation in aquatic environments (author)

  2. Assessing the effects of ultraviolet radiation on the photosynthetic potential in Archean marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alonso, Dailé; Baetens, Jan M.; Cardenas, Rolando; de Baets, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the photosynthesis model presented by Avila et al. in 2013 is extended and more scenarios inhabited by ancient cyanobacteria are investigated to quantify the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on their photosynthetic potential in marine environments of the Archean eon. We consider ferrous ions as blockers of UV during the Early Archean, while the absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a is used to quantify the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by photosynthetic organisms. UV could have induced photoinhibition at the water surface, thereby strongly affecting the species with low light use efficiency. A higher photosynthetic potential in early marine environments was shown than in the Late Archean as a consequence of the attenuation of UVC and UVB by iron ions, which probably played an important role in the protection of ancient free-floating bacteria from high-intensity UV radiation. Photosynthetic organisms in Archean coastal and ocean environments were probably abundant in the first 5 and 25 m of the water column, respectively. However, species with a relatively high efficiency in the use of light could have inhabited ocean waters up to a depth of 200 m and show a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum near 60 m depth. We show that the electromagnetic radiation from the Sun, both UV and visible light, could have determined the vertical distribution of Archean marine photosynthetic organisms.

  3. Radiation technology for conservation of the environment. Proceedings of a symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    In September 1997 the IAEA held an International Symposium in Zakopane, Poland, on the applications of radiation technology in conservation of environment. The symposium attended 110 participants representing 38 Member States. The objective was to review the status of current developments and applications of radiation processing in the control of environment pollution and to discuss future developments. The scientific programme covered a wide range of different applications of radiation technology, such as purification of exhaust gases, decontamination of wastewater from industrial and municipal sources, sewage sludge treatment, disinfection and detoxication of solid waste, recycling and the treatment of plastic and solid waste. The document contains full presentations. The symposium (56 papers) was held in 10 sessions as follows: Purification of Exhaust Gases (8 papers); Radiation Chemistry and the Environment (5 papers); Purification and Decontamination of Water (10 papers); Sewage Sludge Treatment (6 papers); Biomedical Applications (5 papers); Recycling and Treatment of Plastic and Solid Wastes (4 papers); Facilities (4 papers); Quality Assurance, Quality Control (4 papers); Transfer of Technology through Technical Co-Operation (5 papers); Curing, Cross-Linking and Grafting (5 papers). A separate abstract and indexing were provided for each paper

  4. Radiation technology for conservation of the environment. Proceedings of a symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    In September 1997 the IAEA held an International Symposium in Zakopane, Poland, on the applications of radiation technology in conservation of environment. The symposium attended 110 participants representing 38 Member States. The objective was to review the status of current developments and applications of radiation processing in the control of environment pollution and to discuss future developments. The scientific programme covered a wide range of different applications of radiation technology, such as purification of exhaust gases, decontamination of wastewater from industrial and municipal sources, sewage sludge treatment, disinfection and detoxication of solid waste, recycling and the treatment of plastic and solid waste. The document contains full presentations. The symposium (56 papers) was held in 10 sessions as follows: Purification of Exhaust Gases (8 papers); Radiation Chemistry and the Environment (5 papers); Purification and Decontamination of Water (10 papers); Sewage Sludge Treatment (6 papers); Biomedical Applications (5 papers); Recycling and Treatment of Plastic and Solid Wastes (4 papers); Facilities (4 papers); Quality Assurance, Quality Control (4 papers); Transfer of Technology through Technical Co-Operation (5 papers); Curing, Cross-Linking and Grafting (5 papers). A separate abstract and indexing were provided for each paper Refs, figs, tabs

  5. International conference on the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    An International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the European Commission (EC) and the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, from 6-10 October 2003. This Conference will be hosted by the Government of Sweden through the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). This publication contains contributed papers submitted on issues within the scope of the conference, which were accepted following a review by the Conference Programme Committee. The primary objective of this Conference is to foster information exchange, with the aim of promoting the development of a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to ionizing radiation. This Conference is one in a series of meetings organized by, or held in co-operation with, the IAEA on this subject. It will include a review of recent developments in this area, and consideration of their implications for future work at national and international levels. The topics on which contributed papers were requested are as follows: Existing environmental protection approaches; Development of an international assessment framework; The scientific basis for environmental radiation assessment; Development of management approaches.

  6. Radiation-induced apoptosis in different pH environments in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung-Sik; Park, Heon J.; Lyons, John C.; Griffin, Robert J.; Auger, Elizabeth A.; Song, Chang W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of environmental pH on the radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro was investigated. Methods and Materials: Mammary adenocarcinoma cells of A/J mice (SCK cells) were irradiated with γ-rays using a 137 Cs irradiator and incubated in media of different pHs. After incubation at 37 deg. C for 24-120 h the extent of apoptosis was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis, TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, flow cytometry, and release of 3 H from 3 H-thymidine labeled cells. The clonogenicity of the cells irradiated in different pH medium was determined, and the progression of cells through the cell cycle after irradiation in different pHs was also determined with flow cytometry. Results: Irradiation with 2-12 Gy of γ-rays induced apoptosis in SCK cells in pH 7.5 medium within 48 h as judged from the results of four different assays mentioned. Radiation-induced apoptosis declined as the medium pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.4. Specifically, the radiation-induced degradation of DNA including the early DNA breaks, as determined with the TUNEL method, progressively declined as the medium pH was lowered so that little DNA fragmentation occurred 48 h after irradiation with 12 Gy in pH 6.6 medium. When the cells were irradiated and incubated for 48 h in pH 6.6 medium and the medium was replaced with pH 7.5 medium, DNA fragmentation promptly occurred. DNA fragmentation also occurred even in pH 6.6 medium when the cells were irradiated and maintained in pH 7.5 medium for 8 h or longer post-irradiation before incubation in pH 6.6 medium. The radiation-induced G 2 arrest in pH 6.6 medium lasted markedly longer than that in pH 7.5 medium. Conclusion: Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCK cells in vitro is reversibly suppressed in an acidic environment. Taking the results of four different assays together, it was concluded that early step(s) in the apoptotic pathway, probably the DNA break or upstream of DNA break, is

  7. GaN-Based High Temperature and Radiation-Hard Electronics for Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Liao, Anna; Lung, Gerald; Gallegos, Manuel; Hatakeh, Toshiro; Harris, Richard D.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Smythe, William D.

    2010-01-01

    We develop novel GaN-based high temperature and radiation-hard electronics to realize data acquisition electronics and transmitters suitable for operations in harsh planetary environments. In this paper, we discuss our research on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors that are targeted for 500 (sup o)C operation and >2 Mrad radiation hardness. For the target device performance, we develop Schottky-free AlGaN/GaN MOS transistors, where a gate electrode is processed in a MOS layout using an Al2O3 gate dielectric layer....

  8. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that {sup t}he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... {sup .} In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved.

  9. CONSTRAINING THE RADIATION AND PLASMA ENVIRONMENT OF THE KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY HABITABLE-ZONE PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mason, Paul A. [New Mexico State University—DACC, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A. [FACom—Instituto de Física—FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2016-02-20

    The discovery of many planets using the Kepler telescope includes 10 planets orbiting eight binary stars. Three binaries, Kepler-16, Kepler-47, and Kepler-453, have at least one planet in the circumbinary habitable zone (BHZ). We constrain the level of high-energy radiation and the plasma environment in the BHZ of these systems. With this aim, BHZ limits in these Kepler binaries are calculated as a function of time, and the habitability lifetimes are estimated for hypothetical terrestrial planets and/or moons within the BHZ. With the time-dependent BHZ limits established, a self-consistent model is developed describing the evolution of stellar activity and radiation properties as proxies for stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres. Modeling binary stellar rotation evolution, including the effect of tidal interaction between stars in binaries, is key to establishing the environment around these systems. We find that Kepler-16 and its binary analogs provide a plasma environment favorable for the survival of atmospheres of putative Mars-sized planets and exomoons. Tides have modified the rotation of the stars in Kepler-47, making its radiation environment less harsh in comparison to the solar system. This is a good example of the mechanism first proposed by Mason et al. Kepler-453 has an environment similar to that of the solar system with slightly better than Earth radiation conditions at the inner edge of the BHZ. These results can be reproduced and even reparameterized as stellar evolution and binary tidal models progress, using our online tool http://bhmcalc.net.

  10. CONSTRAINING THE RADIATION AND PLASMA ENVIRONMENT OF THE KEPLER CIRCUMBINARY HABITABLE-ZONE PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Mason, Paul A.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of many planets using the Kepler telescope includes 10 planets orbiting eight binary stars. Three binaries, Kepler-16, Kepler-47, and Kepler-453, have at least one planet in the circumbinary habitable zone (BHZ). We constrain the level of high-energy radiation and the plasma environment in the BHZ of these systems. With this aim, BHZ limits in these Kepler binaries are calculated as a function of time, and the habitability lifetimes are estimated for hypothetical terrestrial planets and/or moons within the BHZ. With the time-dependent BHZ limits established, a self-consistent model is developed describing the evolution of stellar activity and radiation properties as proxies for stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres. Modeling binary stellar rotation evolution, including the effect of tidal interaction between stars in binaries, is key to establishing the environment around these systems. We find that Kepler-16 and its binary analogs provide a plasma environment favorable for the survival of atmospheres of putative Mars-sized planets and exomoons. Tides have modified the rotation of the stars in Kepler-47, making its radiation environment less harsh in comparison to the solar system. This is a good example of the mechanism first proposed by Mason et al. Kepler-453 has an environment similar to that of the solar system with slightly better than Earth radiation conditions at the inner edge of the BHZ. These results can be reproduced and even reparameterized as stellar evolution and binary tidal models progress, using our online tool http://bhmcalc.net

  11. Experimental tests of QCD: Deep inelastic scattering, e+e- annihilation and hard hadron-hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansl-Kozanecka, T.

    1992-01-01

    In this set of lectures the author examines phenomenological aspects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) which are relevant for lepton-hadron, electron-positron, and hadron-hadron collisions. He points how the strength of the strong coupling constant, αs, makes QCD calculations converge much more slowly in powers of αs, and missing higher order terms must be carefully estimated. The most stringent test of QCD can be performed in deep inelastic lepton scattering and in e + e - annihilation. In deep inelastic scattering the virtual γ or W/Z are used as a probe of the nucleon structure. They couple to quarks, not gluons. Only the incoming and outgoing lepton have to be measured. The hadronic fluid state does not have to be analyzed. In e + e - annihilation the virtual γ or Z 0 decays to lepton and quark pairs. The branching ratio into quarks is a counter for the number of colours available, the detailed structure of the final state reflects the radiation of gluons as the initial quark-antiquark separate from each other. Quarks and gluons are observed here, though in the presence of hadron formation. Hard hadron-hadron, or parton-parton collisions provide cross sections dominated by the gluon component, which is only weakly measured in deep inelastic collisions. Recent experimental results in these three areas are reviewed, and compared to QCD calculations. Scaling violations and analysis of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. QCD in e + e - branching to hadrons is reviewed near the Z 0 resonance, and a number of cross sections and jet related properties which can be calculated as a function of the single parameter αs are reviewed. Hadron-hadron collisions are reviewed for three processes; jet production, direct photon production, and high p perpendicular W/Z boson production

  12. Micro Penning Trap for Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring in High Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Javiera; Bollen, Georg; Gulyuz, Kerim; Ringle, Ryan; Bado, Philippe; Dugan, Mark; Lebit Team; Translume Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities for rare isotope beams, like FRIB at MSU, are constructed, there is a need for new instrumentation to monitor magnetic fields in beam magnets that can withstand the higher radiation level. Currently NMR probes, the instruments used extensively to monitor magnetic fields, do not have a long lifespans in radiation-high environments. Therefore, a radiation-hard replacement is needed. We propose to use Penning trap mass spectrometry techniques to make high precision magnetic field measurements. Our Penning microtrap will be radiation resistant as all of the vital electronics will be at a safe distance from the radiation. The trap itself is made from materials not subject to radiation damage. Penning trap mass spectrometers can determine the magnetic field by measuring the cyclotron frequency of an ion with a known mass and charge. This principle is used on the Low Energy Beam Ion Trap (LEBIT) minitrap at NSCL which is the foundation for the microtrap. We have partnered with Translume, who specialize in glass micro-fabrication, to develop a microtrap in fused-silica glass. A microtrap is finished and ready for testing at NSCL with all of the electronic and hardware components setup. DOE Phase II SBIR Award No. DE-SC0011313, NSF Award Number 1062410 REU in Physics, NSF under Grant No. PHY-1102511.

  13. Additional measurements of the radiation environment at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.R.; Reedy, R.C.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    Foil activation dosimetry experiments were conducted in a ''rabbit'' system at the completed Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF). The ''raffit'' system contains four tubes spaced radially outward 0.12, 0.18, 0.27, and 0.38 meters off beam centerline. Foils were irradiated for 3 to 62 hours to measure the neutron flux and energy spectrum radially from beam centerline, along the beamline, and the effect of the Isotope Production (IP) target loadings on the neutron flux in the neutron irradiation locations. Irradiations showed a decrease in the radial flux by a factor of 6 in 0.15 meters of iron outside the IP targets. An enchancement was seen in the 24-keV energy region outside 0.15 meters. There was little difference in the shape of the spectra outside the IP targets and the beam stop with the exception of the high energy tail (energies above 20 MeV). The decrease in the high energy tail outside the beam stop is due to the degradation of the energy of the proton beam in the IP targets. Irradiations outside the beam stop with zero and eight IP targets gave the same spectral shape with the exception of the high energy tail. The magnitude of the integral flux decreased by a factor of 2 when eight IP targets were present. Irradiations with five ''rabbits'' stacked on top of each other showed no difference in the integral flux below, on and above beam centerline

  14. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  15. Japanese Hadron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) is aimed at producing various kinds of unstable secondary beams based on high-intensity protons from a new accelerator complex. The 1 GeV protons, first produced from a 1 GeV linac, are transferred to a compressor/stretcher ring, where a sharply-pulsed beam or a stretched continuous beam will be produced. The pulsed beam will be used for a pulsed muon source (M arena) and a spallation neutron source (N arena). A part of the proton beam will be used to produce unstable nuclei, which will be accelerated to several MeV/nucleon (E arena). The purpose and impact of JHP will be described in view of future applications of hadronic beams to nuclear energy and material science. (author)

  16. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, C.E.; Seymour, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biology

  17. Modern state of the application of ionizing radiation for protection of environment. 1. Ionizing radiation sources. Purification of natural and drinking water (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, AK.

    2000-01-01

    Review of modern state of the application of ionizing radiations for protection of environment and natural and drinking water purification is presented. Building of installations with electron accelerators with summarized power of beam ∼0.6 MW signifies that application of ionizing radiation for ecological needs increase. It is pointed out that extensible application of electron accelerators is explained by their safety and efficiency as compared with gamma-sources. New information about ionizing radiation sources, radiation-chemical purification of polluted natural and drinking water, mechanisms of processes taking place during treatment by ionizing radiations are generalized [ru

  18. Hadron beams and accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    There were four sessions on Hadron Beams and Accelerators with 7 talks on Siberian Snakes and spin rotators, 3 talks on polarization build-up of unpolarized beams in storage rings and 5. 9, and 3 talks on low, medium, and high energy polarimeters, respectively. In this paper I will briefly describe a few highlights from these sessions, giving emphasis to topics which I think will play an important role in the future

  19. Hadron beams and accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    There were four sessions on Hadron Beams and Accelerators with 7 talks on Siberian Snakes and spin rotators, 3 talks on polarization build-up of unpolarized beams in storage rings and 5, 9, and 3 talks on low, medium, and high energy polarimeters, respectively. In this paper I will briefly describe a few highlights from these sessions, giving emphasis to topics which I think will play an important role in the future. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  1. Quadrupole moments of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.

    1985-01-01

    In chiral bag model an expression is obtained for the quark wave functions with account of color and pion interaction of quarks. The quadrupole moments of nonstrange hadrons are calculated. Quadrupole moment of nucleon isobar is found to be Q(Δ)=-6.3x10 -28 esub(Δ)(cm)sup(2). Fredictions of the chiral bag model are in strong disagreement with the non-relativistic quark model

  2. Electromagnetic polarizabilities of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic polarizabilities of hadrons are reviewed, after a discussion of classical analogues. Differences between relativistic and non-relativistic approaches can lead to conflicts with conventional nuclear physics sum rules and calculational techniques. The nucleon polarizabilities are discussed in the context of the non-relativistic valence quark model, which provides a good qualitative description. The recently measured pion polarizabilities are discussed in the context of chiral symmetry and quark-loop models. 58 refs., 5 figs

  3. Protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The acceptability of practices which involve the release of radionuclides into the environment, and of situations where residual radionuclides from accidents or improperly controlled practices exist in the environment, are generally assessed on the basis of implied radiation doses to humans. This approach is consistent with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which include the statement that 'the standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk'. The general applicability of this statement has been explored in previous IAEA and other publications. These concluded that the statement is generally valid but that reliance upon human based radiological protection criteria may not be adequate for all possible space or time scales. In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is being challenged in some IAEA Member States and proposals are being made for strategies which provide for explicit protection of the environment. The present publication represents a first step towards establishing an internationally accepted philosophy and associated methodology for protecting the environment against ionizing radiations. The report reviews the various related issues and examines possible approaches to establishing criteria. It is intended for use in stimulating discussion on the subject in Member States. For its part, the IAEA intends to continue a programme of work in this area with the long term objective of providing specific recommendations on primary protection criteria and methods for

  4. QCD and Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  5. Hadronization, spin and lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Yuval; Nachshon, Itay

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of lifetimes can be done in two ways. For very short lived particles, the width can be measured. For long lived ones, the lifetime can be directly measured, for example, using a displaced vertex. Practically, the lifetime cannot be extracted for particles with intermediate lifetimes. We show that for such cases information about the lifetime can be extracted for heavy colored particles that can be produced with known polarization. For example, a t-like particle with intermediate lifetime hadronizes into a superposition of the lowest two hadronic states, T* and T (the equivalent of B* and B). Depolarization effects are governed by time scales that are much longer than the hadronization time scale, Λ QCD -1 . After a time of order 1/Δm, with Δm≡m(T*)-m(T), half of the initial polarization is lost. The polarization is totally lost after a time of order 1/Γ γ , with Γ γ = Γ(T* → Tγ). Thus, by comparing the initial and final polarization, we get information on the particle's lifetime.

  6. Supersymmetry at hadron supercolliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzialo, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    At the next generation of hadron supercolliders, the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) and the European Large Hadron Collider (LHC), protons will be collided at such high energy to allow the creation of new particles with masses greater those that have been previously created in the laboratory. One of the most important questions to be resolved at these accelerators is whether or not any supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model is manifest below the TeV scale. It is expected that the strongly-interacting supersymmetric particles, the gluinos and squarks, will be pair-produced in the most abundance there. Light gluinos primarily decay into quarks and the lightest supersymmetric particle, which is assumed to escape detection; this gives the classic supersymmetric signature of events with large missing momentum. It is known, however, that for gluinos of masses larger than just 100 GeV this process is no longer the preferred gluino decay channel. New signals must therefore be sought to either detect these particles, or to set meaningful lower mass limits. It is in this work that such new detection strategies for supersymmetry at hadron supercolliders are proposed. Gluino and squark production rates and decay channels are studied in a model-independent fashion over the entire theoretical mass range of interest. New experimental signatures are proposed and compared with sources of background over a wide region of the parameter space that characterizes different supersymmetric models

  7. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilki, Burak

    2011-01-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 , the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm x 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R and D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  8. Star tracker and vision systems performance in a high radiation environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Riis, Troels; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    A part of the payload of the second Ariane 5 prototype vehicle to be launched by Arianespace, was a small technology demonstration satellite. On October 30th, 1997, this test satellite, dubbed Teamsat, was launched into Geostationary Transfer Orbit and would as such pass the Van Allen radiation...... belts twice per orbit. One of the experiments onboard Teamsat was the so-called Autonomous Vision System (AVS). The AVS instrument is a fully autonomous star tracker with several advanced features for non-stellar object detection and tracking, real-time image compression and transmission. The objectives...... for the AVS in Teamsat were to test these functions, to validate their autonomous operation in space, and to assess the operational constraints of a high radiation environment on such processes. This paper describes the AVS experiment, and the radiation flux experienced onboard TEAMSAT. This overview...

  9. Effects of solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Watson, Phillip; Maughan, Ronald J

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity and thermoregulatory responses in a hot environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70 % maximum oxygen uptake until exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30 °C and 50 % relative humidity. Volunteers were tested under four solar radiation conditions: 800, 500, 250 and 0 W/m(2). Exercise time to exhaustion was less on the 800 W/m(2) trial (23 ± 4 min) than on all the other trials (500 W/m(2) 30 ± 7 min; P 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher on the 800 W/m(2) trial than the 250 and 0 W/m(2) trials (P solar radiation increases.

  10. Combined environment aging effects: radiation-thermal degradation of polyvinylchloride and polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.; Gillen, K.T.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented for a case of polymer aging in which powerful synergisms are found between radiation and temperature. This effect was observed with formulations of polyvinylchloride and polyethylene and occurred in simultaneous and sequential radiation-thermal experiments. Dose rate dependencies, which appear to be mechanistically related to the synergism, were also found. The evidence indicates that these aging effects are mediated by a thermally induced breakdown of peroxides initially formed by the radiation. Similar effects could be important to material degradation in a variety of other types of combined-stress environment. A new technique, which uses PH 3 treatment of intact polymer specimens to test for the importance of peroxides in the pathway that leads to changes in macroscopic tensile properties, is described

  11. Potentials of ionizing radiation in reducing hazards to man and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullie, W C; Van Laerhoven, M J.A.M.; Kroes, R

    1991-07-01

    The main goal of the title study was to compare a relevant number of conventional processes and technologies for a range of uses with the application of ionizing radiation technology. Special emphasis is given to the hazardous effects of contemporary processes and chemicals on man and environment and to the potential role of the radiation processing technology, gamma irradiation in particular, in reducing these hazards. Based on their quantities and on (eco)toxicological criteria, four fields of application were identified a priori as potentially of interest for radiation processing. These fields of application are food preservation, sterilization and sanitization of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, waste water and drinking water disinfection, and disinfection of sewage sludge and infectious hospital waste. Other fields of application as mentioned above are discussed in a more general matter. 12 figs., 31 tabs., 4 apps., refs.

  12. Radiation environment of the LHCb Calorimeters in 2010-2013 (under review)

    CERN Document Server

    Corti, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    A set of passive and active radiation detectors has been installed around and in between the LHCb calorimeter subsystems to measure different aspects of the radiation environment. Cross calibrations between various types of measurements are performed and correlated with the evolving run conditions. Measurements are compared to FLUKA simulation estimates and an evaluation of the reliability of the simulation in different running scenarios is provided. The simulation is based on a detailed geometry of the LHCb experiment and reflects the conditions of Run1 with 7 and 8 TeV CM proton-proton collision energies. A carefully characterised simulation of radiation levels in the LHCb experiment is essential in providing input for technical choices in view of the planned upgrade of the experiment for operation at higher luminosity.

  13. Implications for space radiation environment models from CREAM and CREDO measurements over half a solar cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, C.S.; Truscott, P.R.; Peerless, C.L.; Watson, C.J.; Evans, H.E.; Knight, P.; Cosby, M.; Underwood, C.; Cousins, T.; Noulty, R.; Maag, C.

    1999-01-01

    Flight data obtained between 1990 and 1997 from the Cosmic Radiation Environment Monitors CREAM and CREDO carried on UoSAT-3, Space Shuttle, STRV-1a (Space Technology Research Vehicle) and APEX (Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiment Spacecraft) provide coverage over half a solar cycle. The modulation of cosmic rays and evolution of the South Atlantic Anomaly are observed, the former comprising a factor of three increase at high latitudes and the latter a general increase accompanied by a north-westward drift. Comparison of particle fluxes and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra is made with improved environment and radiation transport calculations which account for shield distributions and secondary particles. While there is an encouraging convergence between predictions and observations, significant improvements are still required, particularly in the treatment of locally produced secondary particles. Solar-particle events during this time period have LET spectra significantly below the October 1989 event which has been proposed as a worst case model

  14. Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of radiation: biological basis of radiation-environment interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined due to ambiguity at low doses caused by limitations in statistical power and information available on interplay with environment. To deal with these problems, a novel non-parametric statistics was developed based on artificial neural networks theorem and applied to cancer and non-cancer risk in A-bomb survivors. The analysis revealed several unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal radiation dose alone. They include (1) threshold that varies with organ, gender and age, including cardiovascular diseases, (2) prevalence of infectious diseases, and (3) suppression of pathogenesis of HTLV1. The threshold is unique as it is manifested as negative excess relative risk, a reduction of spontaneous rate at low doses. The response is consistent with currently emerging laboratory data on DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice and its sustainability as epigenetic memory in accordance with histone code theory. In response to DSB, of radiation or DNA replication arrest origin, distinct and competitively operating repair pathways are instigated. Activation by low doses of restitution-directed canonical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) suppresses both error-prone alternative end-joining (Alt-NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The latter two present major pathways to mutagenesis at stalled replication folk associated with endogenous and exogenous genotoxin such as tobacco smoke metabolites and AID-associated somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in Ig gene. Suppression of these error-prone pathways by low doses of low LET radiation is consistent with the reduction of cancer occurrence by environmental genotoxin, immunodiversity and stable integration of retrovirus DNA, providing a significant modulator of dose linearity at low doses. Whole picture may bring about a new landscape of cancer and non-cancer molecular epidemiology which

  15. The use of gamma ray data to define the natural radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The natural radiation environment is the major source of radiation exposure to man and consists of both internal and external sources. The most significant internal sources are the radioactive elements 40 K and 222 Rn which are taken into the body. The external sources are cosmic rays and naturally occurring radioactive isotopes of the 40 K, 238 U, and 232 Th decay series, some or all of which can be found in the ground, in construction materials, and in the air. This report has been prepared to provide a guide for the use of existing gamma ray survey data to define the natural radiation environment, but will only be concerned with the gamma ray exposure resulting from radiation originating in geological materials. The type of data needed to produce maps are available as a result of airborne, carborne, and ground gamma ray surveys in many parts of the world. Although most of these data were acquired for uranium and other mineral exploration and geological mapping purposes, they can be used to provide background radioactivity information. Standardized survey data can be compiled to produce regional maps of gamma ray air dose rates as well as single radioelement maps. Compilation procedures may use either manual or computer techniques. Although this work will primarily be done as national compilations, it will open the possibility of the compilation of radioelement geochemical maps on a regional and global scale. 48 refs, figs and tabs

  16. The role of hadron resonances in hot hadronic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Hadron resonances can play a significant role in hot hadronic matter. Of particular interest for this workshop are the contributions of hyperon resonances. The question about how to quantify the effects of resonances is here addressed. In the framework of the hadron resonance gas, the chemically equilibrated case, relevant in the context of lattice QCD calculations, and the chemically frozen case relevant in heavy ion collisions are discussed.

  17. Assessment of environmental gamma radiation levels in the environs of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.G.; Takale, R.A.; Swarnkar, M.; Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the assessment of the environmental impact of the Indian nuclear power programme, radiation surveys are being carried out on continuous basis in the environs of all the nuclear facilities in India using Thermoluminescent Dosimeters. This paper discusses the environmental gamma radiation levels based on the analysis of data generated for year 1989-2009 at twenty-eight locations currently being monitored in and around the environs of NAPS using passive dosimeter. Of these, six are within the exclusion zone (1.6 km) while the remaining twenty two locations are spread over an aerial distance of twenty six km from reactor stack. The annual background gamma levels for NAPS site beyond 1.6 km exclusion zone based on twenty-two monitoring locations are evaluated and seen to be 1.20 ± 0.15 mGy/a. This is comparable with earlier reported pre-operational value 1.24 ± 0.26 mGy/a. From this it can be said that the reactor operations have not contributed to any increase in the gamma radiation levels in the environs of the NAPS region. (author)

  18. Natural radiation, protection against its effects and maintaining safe natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassan, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity and its consequences is an issue that needs the global concern, as practices bringing such radioactive materials closer to human environment through mining, building, industrial applications and food production and preservation is continuously increasing, in addition to the daily consumption in foods such as banana, carrot, potato and drinking water. Although it has direct and indirect impacts affecting human health that in some cases lead to the loss of lives and polluting natural environment, it is an inevitable task that necessitates devising some means of its minimization and protection against its hazardous effects. This could be achieved by the use of expertise ideas and by the creation of awareness and sharing related information with the people concerned and the general public. This paper gives an overview on the radiation present in natural environment, its sources, mechanism of its effects. The paper compares the radiation dose limits with the average doses from these sources in order to raise the challenges facing researchers, governments and the general individuals with regard to this issue. The paper also proposed applicable solutions to reduce the risks due to the exposure to natural radiation to ground level. (author)

  19. Radiation protection of the environment. State of the art and recommendations by the IRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Simon-Cornu, M.; Baudry, M.; Deschamps, P.; Gariel, J.C.; Lecomte, J.F.; Paquet, F.; Renaud, P.; Schuler, M.

    2016-01-01

    This report notably aims at helping the GPRADE (Groupe permanent d'experts en radioprotection, pour les applications industrielles et de recherche des rayonnements ionisants, et en environnement - Permanent group of experts in radiation protection for industrial and research applications of ionizing radiations, and in environment) to build up its opinion on the French management of methods and technical regulations for the assessment of the radiological risk for the environment, or for the national transposition of the 2013/59/Euratom European directive. After a brief overview of the international, European and French legal context, the report proposes an overview of the state of the art: history, definitions, principles, regulation of radiation protection of the environment in different countries. It presents the main approaches and compares them: the CIPR approach, the Erica approach (the most used in Europe). It also discusses the compatibility of main approaches to the assessment of the radiological risk for ecosystems. It reports applications and returns on experience at the international level and within the frame of the IRSN commitment in planned, existing or emergency situations. Recommendations are formulated

  20. Calibration of the CMS hadron calorimeter in Run 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeeva, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.

    2018-03-01

    Various calibration techniques for the CMS Hadron calorimeter in Run 2 and the results of calibration using 2016 collision data are presented. The radiation damage corrections, intercalibration of different channels using the phi-symmetry technique for barrel, endcap and forward calorimeter regions are described, as well as the intercalibration with muons of the outer hadron calorimeter. The achieved intercalibration precision is within 3%. The in situ energy scale calibration is performed in the barrel and endcap regions using isolated charged hadrons and in the forward calorimeter using the Zarrow ee process. The impact of pileup and the developed technique of correction for pileup is also discussed. The achieved uncertainty of the response to hadrons is 3.4% in the barrel and 2.6% in the endcap region (at the pseudorapidity range |η|<2) and is dominated by the systematic uncertainty due to pileup contributions.

  1. Calibration of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Chadeeva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Various calibration techniques for the CMS Hadron calorimeter in Run2 and the results of calibration using 2016 collision data are presented. The radiation damage corrections, intercalibration of different channels using the phi-symmetry technique for barrel, endcap and forward calorimeter regions are described, as well as the intercalibration with muons of the outer hadron calorimeter. The achieved intercalibration precision is within 3\\%. The {\\it in situ} energy scale calibration is performed in the barrel and endcap regions using isolated charged hadrons and in the forward calorimeter using the Z$\\rightarrow ee$ process. The impact of pileup and the developed technique of correction for pileup is also discussed. The achieved uncertainty of the response to hadrons is 3.4\\% in the barrel and 2.6\\% in the endcap region (at $\\vert \\eta \\vert < 2$) and is dominated by the systematic uncertainty due to pileup contributions.

  2. Characterization of the radiation environment of the inner heliosphere using LRO/CRaTER and EMMREM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Colin J.

    2016-08-01

    I provide a characterization of the radiation environment of the inner heliosphere from mid-2009 to present using measurements made by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and modelling provided by the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM). In the course of this study, I analyze solar energetic particle (SEP) radiation in the form of four major solar events that occurred during this time range as well as the evolution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) modulation over a period in which relatively calm solar conditions have resulted in the highest GCR fluxes measured in the space age. Using CRaTER measurements taken during three major solar events that occurred in 2012, I demonstrate a validation of the online PREDICCS system (Predictions of radiation from REleASE, EMMREM, and Data Incorporating CRaTER, COSTEP, and other SEP measurements), which uses EMMREM to provide near real-time radiation modelling at the Earth, Moon and Mars, finding PREDICCS to be quite accurate in modelling the peak dose rates and total accumulated doses for major solar events. Having demonstrated the accuracy of PREDICCS/EMMREM in modelling SEP events, EMMREM is used to provide an analysis of the potential radiation hazard of the extreme solar event observed by STEREO A on 23 July 2012, an event which has drawn comparisons to the historic Carrington event due to the exceptional size and record speed of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection associated with it. Such an event might be viewed as something like a worst case scenario in terms of the threat of SEP radiation to astronauts, however the evidence shown here suggests that, with the benefit of heavy protective shielding, astronauts would not have been exposed to levels of radiation that approach NASA's permissible exposure limits. These findings add to a mounting set of evidence which suggests that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the largest radiation

  3. FPGAs operating in a radiation environment: lessons learned from FPGAs in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirthlin, M J

    2013-01-01

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are increasingly being used as a key component of digital systems because of their in-field reprogrammability, low non-recurring engineering costs (NRE), and relatively short design cycle. Recently, there has been great interest in using FPGAs within spacecraft. FPGAs, like all semiconductor devices, are susceptible to the effects of radiation. There is an active research community investigating the effects of radiation on FPGAs and developing methods to mitigate against these effects. There has been significant progress over the last decade in the understanding and developing FPGA technology that is resistant to the effects of radiation. The success of FPGAs within spacecraft suggests that FPGAs may be used in particle physics experiments where radiation levels are considerable higher than the conventional terrestrial earth environment. This paper will summarize the effects of radiation on FPGAs, methods to mitigate against these effects, provide a case study of a successful FPGA system operating in space, and discuss the issues that will affect the use of FPGAs within particle physics experiments.

  4. A study on the life extension of polymer materials under radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. J; Park, S. W.; Jung, K. S.; Cho, S. H.; Seo, H. S.

    2001-12-01

    The object of this project is to improve the stability and the economics by reducing the radiation-induced oxidation as a factor of degradation of polymer materials used under the radiation environment. In order to attain the objective of this study and to check the effect of diamond-like carbon(DLC) coating on the anti-oxidation reaction, polymer specimens such as ABS, Acryl, Polycarbonate, Polyethylene, Polypropylene, PVC coating DLC thin layer were exposed to high-level gamma radiation, and their irradiation effects were investigated. A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method was adopted in fabricating a DLC thin film on the polymer specimens, which were irradiated with the non-DLC film deposited specimens under the gamma radiation emitted from Co-60 source from 1x10 5 to 1x10 8 rads exposure. According to the characterization of irradiated specimens from the elapsed time of minimum 4 hours to a maximum of 105 days after the irradiation, the DLC deposition on the polymer surface was revealed to contribute to the improvement on the resistance of the radiation-induced oxidation in this study

  5. Particle interaction and displacement damage in silicon devices operated in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Claude; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Silicon is used in radiation detectors and electronic devices. Nowadays, these devices achieving submicron technology are parts of integrated circuits of large to very large scale integration (VLSI). Silicon and silicon-based devices are commonly operated in many fields including particle physics experiments, nuclear medicine and space. Some of these fields present adverse radiation environments that may affect the operation of the devices. The particle energy deposition mechanisms by ionization and non-ionization processes are reviewed as well as the radiation-induced damage and its effect on device parameters evolution, depending on particle type, energy and fluence. The temporary or permanent damage inflicted by a single particle (single event effect) to electronic devices or integrated circuits is treated separately from the total ionizing dose (TID) effect for which the accumulated fluence causes degradation and from the displacement damage induced by the non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) deposition. Understanding of radiation effects on silicon devices has an impact on their design and allows the prediction of a specific device behaviour when exposed to a radiation field of interest

  6. Proceedings of the international conference on radiation environment - assessment, measurement and its impact: abstract and souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The international conference on radiation environment-assessment, measurement and its impact is a major step for evolving a consensual perspective on the future course of research in radiation physics and safety aspects in the entire country and global village in wider perspectives. The attempt is to welcome novel ideas and identify the strategies for enhancing safe lives without comprising the immense benefits of radiation sciences. The conference would present progress in radiation physics research. This international conference would strengthen the chain of research activities as well act as a catalyst. In the wake of the disaster at Fukushima, Japan such research activities are the need of the hour. While radiation hazards are immense and one might be quite impulsive in criticizing the so called radiation word, but we have to invite knowledge heads all over to further this science, despite its hazards, so that it may cater to the needs of young generation in present era. The discussion between learned teachers, far sighted scientists and scholars is very relevant and need of the hour. It is expected that a sharing of the current international experiences in radiation physics research through this international exposure will help in enriching understanding of our requirements in a globalised world. We must harness maximum benefit out of this science. It is quite encouraging that the main objective of the seminar is to probe critically the state of the art expertise available and hence deciphering the future prospects available with the field which can be achieved given proper utilization of the available resources. This conference touches many such aspects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim; Stickland, David; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector ef fi ciency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, becaus...

  8. Micro-and nanodosimetry for radiobiological planning in radiotherapy and cancer risk assessment in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Microdosimetry and nanodosimetry can provide unique information for prediction of radiobiological properties of radiation, which is important in radiation therapy for accurate dose planning and in radiation protection for cancer induction risk assessment. This demand measurements of the pattern of energies deposited by ionizing radiation on cellular scale and DNA levels.Silicon microelectronics technology is offering a unique opportunity for replacing gas proportional counters (TEPC) with miniature detectors for regional microdosimetry. Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology has been used for the development of arrays of micron size sensitive volumes for modelling energy deposited in biological cells. The challenge in silicon microdosimetry is the development of well defined sensitive volume (SV) and full charge collection deposited by ionizing radiation in the SV. First generation SOI microdosimeters were developed at CMRP and investigated in a wide range of radiation fields for proton and neutron therapies and recently on isotopic neutron sources and heavy ions with energy up to lGeV/jj,m which are typical for deep space radiation environment. Microdosimetric spectra were obtained in a phantom that are well matched to TEPC and Monte Carlo simulations. Evidence that radiations with the same LET exhibit different biological effects demand development of new sensors sensitive to the track structure of ions or the type of particle for prediction of radiobiological effect of radiation using radiobiological models. New monolithic Si AE-E telescope of cellular size for simultaneous regional microdosimetry and particle identification will be presented and results will be discussed. The new design of the SOI microdosimeter is based on 3D micron and submicron size of Si SVs. This approach allows improvement in the accuracy of the Si microdosimetry because of full charge collection and the ability to measure low LET as low as 0.01 keV/jjm, which is similar to TEPC

  9. Quantum chromodynamics and hadron jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokshitser, Y.L.; Dyakonov, D.I.

    1979-07-01

    These lectures are devoted to the description of the various properties of hard scattering processes with the participation of hadrons in the framework of Quantum Chromodynamics. We discuss in detail the validity and region of applicability of perturbation theory applied to hadron processes. Particular attention is paid to the question of the structure of quark and gluon jets produced in hard processes (as an example, e + e - annihilation into hadrons). In addition to giving a pedagogical review, we also present new results. (orig.)

  10. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  11. Distributed optical fibre temperature measurements in a low dose rate radiation environment based on Rayleigh backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, A.; Gussarov, A.; Wuilpart, M.; Fotiadi, A. A.; Liokumovich, L. B.; Kotov, O. I.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Tomashuk, A. L.; Deschoutheete, T.; Mégret, P.

    2012-04-01

    On-line monitoring of environmental conditions in nuclear facilities is becoming a more and more important problem. Standard electronic sensors are not the ideal solution due to radiation sensitivity and difficulties in installation of multiple sensors. In contrast, radiation-hard optical fibres can sustain very high radiation doses and also naturally offer multi-point or distributed monitoring of external perturbations. Multiple local electro-mechanical sensors can be replaced by just one measuring fibre. At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world 1. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of major NPP components can threaten plant safety and also plant life. Among those elements, cables are vital components of I&C systems in NPPs. To ensure their safe operation and predict remaining life, environmental monitoring is necessary. In particular, temperature and radiation dose are considered to be the two most important parameters. The aim of this paper is to assess experimentally the feasibility of optical fibre temperature measurements in a low doserate radiation environment, using a commercially available reflectometer based on Rayleigh backscattering. Four different fibres were installed in the Sub-Pile Room of the BR2 Material testing nuclear reactor in Mol, Belgium. This place is man-accessible during the reactor shut-down, allowing easy fibre installation. When the reactor operates, the dose-rates in the room are in a range 0.005-5 Gy/h with temperatures of 40-60 °C, depending on the location. Such a surrounding is not much different to some "hot" environments in NPPs, where I&C cables are located.

  12. Ten Thousand Years of Environment Assessment Using Synchrotron Radiation Micro Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, K.; Ide-Ektessabi, A.; Koizumi, A.; Azechi, M.

    2003-08-01

    The environment surrounding human has changed through civilization and industrialization, and through these developments, problems including the pollution from heavy metals such as lead and mercury have arisen. In this study, we analyzed major and trace elements in modern and prehistoric teeth by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis using synchrotron radiation micro beam, in order to assess the changes of the environment through the civilization and the industrialization and their affects to the human. It is suggested that teeth accumulate elements in the mineral phase, hydroxiapatite, during their formation, and because there are no significant turnovers, teeth are concerned to be indicators of the environment of the donor. We first analyzed the elements on the surface of tooth from modern individual and tooth from human remains of Jomon period to assess the heavy metal concentration and effect of the diagenesis. The adhering ground elements on the prehistoric teeth showed high amount of Ti, Fe, Mn and other metallic elements.

  13. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Moritz; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Stickland, David

    2013-12-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors.

  14. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Londergan, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this Workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves and Gyulassy; the fourth session Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and η physics are reviewed by the organizers of the Eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the Workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics

  15. New hadronic currents in TAUOLA: for confrontation with the experimental data

    CERN Document Server

    Was, Z

    2012-01-01

    The status of implementation of new hadronic currents into the Monte Carlo system for simulation of tau-lepton production and decay in high-energy accelerator experiments is reviewed. Since the tau-lepton conference in 2010 substantial progress was achieved: (i) For the TAUOLA Monte Carlo generator of tau-lepton decays, automated and simultaneous use of many versions of form factors for the calculation of optional weights for fits was developed and checked to work in the Belle and BaBar software environment. Alternative parameterizations of hadronic currents based on the Resonance Chiral approach are available now. This was achieved for more than 88% of the total tau hadronic width. (ii) the TAUOLA universal interface based on HepMC (the C++ event record) is available. This is the case for C++ users of PHOTOS Monte Carlo for radiative corrections in decays, as well. An algorithm for weighted events to explore spin effects in analysis of hard processes was prepared. (iii) Kernels featuring a complete first-ord...

  16. Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allott, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Dear Sir: I read with interest the paper by W C Camplin, G P Brownless, G D Round, K Winpenny and G J Hunt from the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) on 'Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated methods' in the December 2002 issue of this journal (J. Radiol. Prot. 22 371-88). The Environment Agency has a keen interest in the development of a robust methodology for assessing total doses which have been received by members of the public from authorised discharges of radioactive substances to the environment. Total dose in this context means the dose received from all authorised discharges and all exposure pathways (e.g. inhalation, external irradiation from radionuclides in sediment/soil, direct radiation from operations on a nuclear site, consumption of food etc). I chair a 'total retrospective dose assessment' working group with representatives from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), Food Standards Agency (FSA), National Radiological Protection Board, CEFAS and BNFL which began discussing precisely this issue during 2002. This group is a sub-group of the National Dose Assessment Working Group which was set up in April 2002 (J. Radiol. Prot. 22 318-9). The Environment Agency, Food Standards Agency and the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate previously undertook joint research into the most appropriate methodology to use for total dose assessment (J J Hancox, S J Stansby and M C Thorne 2002 The Development of a Methodology to Assess Population Doses from Multiple Source and Exposure Pathways of Radioactivity (Environment Agency R and D Technical Report P3-070/TR). This work came to broadly the same conclusion as the work by CEFAS, that an individual dose method is probably the most appropriate method to use. This research and that undertaken by CEFAS will help the total retrospective dose assessment working group refine a set of principles and a methodology for the

  17. Charm from hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1979-04-15

    Ever since the discovery of charmed mesons in electron-positron annihilations at SLAC and DESY, a considerable effort has gone into looking for them in other types of reactions. Both neutrino interactions and photoproduction have provided further data on the production and decay of D mesons, but little has emerged concerning purely hadronic studies.some results from a CERN/Collège de France/Heidelberg/Karlsruhe collaboration using the Split Field Magnet at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) now show definite signs of D meson production in proton-proton collisions.

  18. New Hadronic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccini, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years the field of hadron spectroscopy has seen renewed interest due to the publication, initially mostly from B-Factories, of evidences of states that do not match regular spectroscopy, but are rather candidates for bound states with additional quarks or gluons (four quarks for tetraquarks and molecules and two quarks and gluons for hybrids). A huge effort in understanding the nature of this new states and in building a new spectroscopy is ongoing. This paper reviews the experimental and theoretical state of the art on heavy quarkonium exotic spectroscopy, with particular attention on the steps towards a global picture.

  19. Aspects of hadronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the current phenomenological models of hadron structure, whose theoretical basis is the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), is presented. A short introduction to the QCD permits to focalize the relevant properties which are attached to those models. Following, bag-like models (in particular, MIT bag and chiral extensions) and potential-like models among them the Karl and Isgur non-relativistic model and a semi-relativistic model, free of the Klein paradox, with equal scalar-vetorial mixture of confinement potential are shortly studied. Enphasis is given to the baryons, treated, basically, as three-quarks systems. (L.C.) [pt

  20. QCD and hadronic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, G.

    1989-01-01

    This series of lectures is devoted to review ot he connections between QCD and string theories. One reviews the phenomenological models leading to string pictures in non perturbative QCD and the string effects, related to soft gluon coherence, which arise in perturbative QCD. One tries to build a string theory which goes to QCD at the zero slope limit. A specific model, based on superstring theories is shown to agree with QCD four point amplitudes at the Born approximation and with one loop corrections. One shows how this approach can provide a theoretical framework to account for the phenomenological property of parton-hadron duality.(author)

  1. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  2. Space Radiation Environment Prediction for VLSI microelectronics devices onboard a LEO Satellite using OMERE-Trad Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    This tutorial/survey paper presents the assessment/determination of level of hazard/threat to emerging microelectronics devices in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space radiation environment with perigee at 300 Km, apogee at 600Km altitude having different orbital inclinations to predict the reliability of onboard Bulk Built-In Current Sensor (BBICS) fabricated in 350nm technology node at OptMA Lab. UFMG Brazil. In this context, the various parameters for space radiation environment have been analyzed to characterize the ionizing radiation environment effects on proposed BBICS. The Space radiation environment has been modeled in the form of particles trapped in Van-Allen radiation belts(RBs), Energetic Solar Particles Events (ESPE) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) where as its potential effects on Device- Under-Test (DUT) has been predicted in terms of Total Ionizing Dose (TID), Single-Event Effects (SEE) and Displacement Damage Dose (DDD). Finally, the required mitigation techniques including necessary shielding requirements to avoid undesirable effects of radiation environment at device level has been estimated /determined with assumed standard thickness of Aluminum shielding. In order to evaluate space radiation environment and analyze energetic particles effects on BBICS, OMERE toolkit developed by TRAD was utilized.

  3. Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

    1999-07-07

    This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10{sup 8} rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10{sup 9} rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology.

  4. Radiation Environments and Exposure Considerations for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, William M.; Low, Nora M.; Zillmer, Andrew; Johnson, Gregory A.; Normand, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is the next generation (RTG) being developed by DOE to provide reliable, long-life electric power for NASA's planetary exploration programs. The MMRTG is being developed by Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne and Teledyne Energy Systems Incorporated (TESI) for use on currently planned and projected flyby, orbital and planet landing missions. This is a significant departure from the design philosophy of the past which was to match specific mission requirements to RTG design capabilities. Undefined mission requirements provide a challenge to system designers by forcing them to put a design envelope around 'all possible missions'. These multi-mission requirements include internal and external radiation sources. Internal sources include the particles ejected by decaying Pu-238 and its daughters plus particles resulting from the interaction of these particles with other MMRTG materials. External sources include the full spectrum of charged particle radiation surrounding planets with magnetic fields and the surfaces of extraterrestrial objects not shielded by magnetic fields. The paper presents the results of investigations into the environments outlined above and the impact of radiation exposure on potential materials to be used on MMRTG and ground support personnel. Mission requirements were also reviewed to evaluate total integrated dose and to project potential shielding requirements for materials. Much of the information on mission shielding requirements was provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The primary result is an ionizing radiation design curve which indicates the limits to which a particular mission can take the MMRTG in terms of ionizing radiation exposure. Estimates of personnel radiation exposure during ground handling are also provided

  5. Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10 8 rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10 9 rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology

  6. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthoff, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.guthoff@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Süd, P.O. Box 6980, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Afanaciev, Konstantin [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); NC PHEP BSU, Minsk (Belarus); Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, 1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Boer, Wim de [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Süd, P.O. Box 6980, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lange, Wolfgang [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lohmann, Wolfgang [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Brandenburgische Technische Universität, Postfach 101344, 03013 Cottbus (Germany); Stickland, David [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors. -- Highlights: •The BCM system and its diamond detectors at the CMS experiment of the LHC are presented. •Detectors show a decreased signal strength with increasing integrated luminosity. •CCD measurements using constant HV and alternating HV to prevent polarization are compared. •TCT measurements show a decreasing signal when polarization builds up. •Polarization effects are a likely

  7. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthoff, Moritz; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Dabrowski, Anne; Boer, Wim de; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Stickland, David

    2013-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors. -- Highlights: •The BCM system and its diamond detectors at the CMS experiment of the LHC are presented. •Detectors show a decreased signal strength with increasing integrated luminosity. •CCD measurements using constant HV and alternating HV to prevent polarization are compared. •TCT measurements show a decreasing signal when polarization builds up. •Polarization effects are a likely

  8. Material and cultural assets. Part of radiation protection of the environment?; Sach- und Kulturgueter. Teil eines Strahlenschutzes der Umwelt?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellermann, R.G. [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Loebner, W.

    2015-07-01

    Since several years the protection of the environment has been discussed at various international levels as part of radiation protection. ICRP has published a number of recommendations which relate primarily to the evaluation of radiation exposures to non-human species. Nevertheless, not least because of the declaratory mention of the environment in national legislative documents, the question arises how the environment can be integrated into the radiation protection or whether the radiation protection must be even expanded to new fields. A less discussed aspect here covers material and cultural assets that are classified in environmental law as objects worthy of protection. The paper describes some issues that arise in this context and outlines a framework for the consideration of material assets in radiation protection.

  9. Gas-to-particle conversion in the atmospheric environment by radiation-induced and photochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years a fascinating new area of research involving ionizing radiations and photochemistry in gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere has been developing at a rapid pace. Two problems of major interest and concern in which this is of paramount importance are: (1) radiation induced and photochemical aerosol formation in the stratosphere and, (2) role of radiations and photochemistry in smog formation. The peak in cosmic ray intensity and significant solar UV flux in the stratosphere lead to complex variety of reactions involving major and trace constituents in this region of the atmosphere, and some of these reactions are of vital importance in aerosol formation. The problem is of great current interest because the pollutant gases from industrial sources and future SST operations entering the stratosphere could increase the aerosol burden in the stratosphere and affect the solar energy input of the troposphere with consequent ecological and climatic changes. On the other hand, in the nuclear era, the atmospheric releases from reactors and processing plants could lead to changes in the cloud nucleation behaviour of the environment and possible increase in smog formation in the areas with significant levels of radiations and conventional pollutants. A review of the earlier work, current status of the problem, and conventional pollutants. A review of the earlier work, current status of the problem, and some recent results of the experiments conducted in the author's laboratory are presented. The possible mechanisms of gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere have been explained

  10. Confinement and hadron-hadron interactions by general relativistic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recami, Erasmo

    By postulating covariance of physical laws under global dilations, one can describe gravitational and strong interactions in a unified way. Namely, in terms of the new discrete dilational degree of freedom, our cosmos and hadrons can be regarded as finite, similar systems. And a discrete hierarchy of finite ``universes'' may be defined, which are governed by fields with strengths inversally proportional to their radii; in each universe an Equivalence Principle holds, so that the relevant field can be there geometrized. Scaled-down Einstein equations -with cosmological term- are assumed to hold inside hadrons (= strong micro-cosmoses); and they yield in a natural way classical confinement, as well as ``asymptotic freedom'', of the hadron constituents. In other words, the association of strong micro-universes of Friedmann type with hadrons (i.e., applying the methods of General Relativity to subnuclear particle physics) allows avoiding recourse to phenomenological models such as the Bag Model. Inside hadrons we have to deal with a tensorial field (= strong gravity), and hadron constituents are supposed to exchange spin-2 ``gluons''. Our approach allows us also to write down a tensorial, bi-scale field theory of hadron-hadron interactions, based on modified Einstein-type equations here proposed for strong interactions in our space. We obtain in particular: (i) the correct Yukawa behaviour of the strong scalar potential at the static limit and for r>~l fm; (ii) the value of hadron radii. As a byproduct, we derive a whole ``numerology'', connecting our gravitational cosmos with the strong micro-cosmoses (hadrons), such that it does imply no variation of G with the epoch. Finally, since a structute of the ``micro-universe'' type seems to be characteristic even of leptons, a hope for the future is including also weak interactions in our classical unification of the fundamental forces.

  11. New hadron spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    QCD-motivated models for hadrons predict an assortment of "exotic" hadrons that have structures that are more complex than the quark-antiquark mesons and three-quark baryons of the original quark-parton model. These include pentaquark baryons, the six-quark H-dibaryon, and tetraquark and glueball mesons. Despite extensive experimental searches, no unambiguous candidates for any of these exotic configurations have yet to be identified. On the other hand, a number of meson states, one that seems to be a proton-antiproton bound state, and others that contain either charmed-anticharmed quark pairs or bottom-antibottom quark pairs, have been recently discovered that neither fit into the quark-antiquark meson picture nor match the expected properties of the QCD-inspired exotics. Here I briefly review results from a recent search for the H-dibaryon, and discuss some properties of the newly discovered states –the so-called XYZ mesons– and compare them with expectations for conventional quark-antiquark mesons and the predicted QCD-exotic states. (author)

  12. Hadronic laws from QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of progress in deriving the effective action for hadronic physics, S[π, ρ, ω, .., anti N, N, ..], from the fundamental defining action of QCD, S[anti q, q, A μ a ]. This is a problem in quantum field theory and the most success so far has been achieved using functional integral calculus (FIC) techniques. This formulates the problem as an exercise in changing the variables of integration in the functional integrals, from those of the quark and gluon fields to those of the (bare) meson and baryon fields. The appropriate variables are determined by the dynamics of QCD, and the final hadronic variables (essentially the 'normal modes' of QCD) are local fields describing the 'centre-of-mass' motion of extended bound states of quarks. The quarks are extensively dressed by the gluons, and the detailed aspects of the hidden chiral symmetry emerge naturally from the formalism. Particular attention is given to covariant integral equations which determine bare nucleon structure (i.e. in the quenched approximation). These equations, which arise from the closed double-helix diagrams of the FIC analysis, describe the baryons in terms of quark-diquark structure, in the form of Faddeev equations. This hadronisation of QCD also generates the dressing of these baryons by the pions, and the non-local πNN coupling. (orig.)

  13. The LHCb hadron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhelyadin, R.I.

    2002-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) is designed for the LHCb experiment. The main purpose of the detector is to provide data for the L0 hadron trigger. The HCAL is designed as consisting of two symmetric movable parts of about 500 ton in total getting in touch in operation position without non-instrumented zones. The lateral dimensions of an active area are X=8.4 m width, Y=6.8 m height, and is distanced from the interaction point at Z=13.33 m. Both halves are assembled from stacked up modules. An internal structure consisting of thin iron plates interspaced with scintillating tiles has been chosen. Attention is paid to optimize the detector according to the requirements of the experiment, reducing the spending needed for its construction. Different construction technologies are being discussed. The calorimeter properties have been extensively studied with a variety of prototype on the accelerator beam. The calibration with a radioactive source and module-0 construction experience is discussed

  14. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed [it

  15. Reality of dielectric materials in special environment with radiation and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In this report, the results of investigation by the expert committee on the title problem in the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan from April, 1989 to March, 1992 are summarized. The objectives were to collect the data on the deterioration of dielectric and insulation materials in the special environment including radiation, to investigate the deterioration mechanism, and to grasp the state of development of the materials which can withstand special environment. The actual conditions of temperature, humidity and radiation in nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, spaceships, accelerator facilities and nuclear fusion experiment facilities are reported. As the new materials which can withstand special environment, the properties of aromatic engineering plastics such as polyimide, PEEK and others, no-halogen incombustible materials, thermoplastic polyurethane, ethylene propylene rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, ceramics, high temperature superconductors, fiber-reinforced composite materials, silica glass and quartz optical fibers are shown. The factors of material deterioration, the method of forecasting lifetime and the examples are explained. The new methods of measuring material properties such as ion microprobe, positron annihilation, scanning tunnel microscopes, optical detection magnetic resonance and so on are explained. (K.I.)

  16. A regional study of the radiation environment of Greenham Common, Newbury District and surrounding areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This study was commissioned by Newbury District Council and Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council in response to public concern following disclosures about events at Greenham Common in the 1950s, and the suspicion that there may have been an accident involving a nuclear weapon leading to off-site contamination at the airbase. The Greenham Common airbase is at an advanced stage of decommissioning with parts of the site already re-developed for industrial and leisure purposes and material being removed for use in construction of the Newbury by-pass. The success of such developments is critically dependent on public confidence in the quality of the environment, both near the site, and more generally throughout the area. For this reason the study was commissioned with the aims of: I. defining the radiation environment of the whole district and parts of its surrounding areas. II. examining whether there is any evidence of radioactive contamination in the vicinity of the Greenham Common airbase. III. assessing the evidence that there may have been a release of nuclear material from the site. The work involved a collaboration between scientists from the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, who conducted gamma ray surveys to define the general radiation environment of the area, and Scientists from the University of Southampton who collected an extensive range of samples for high sensitivity radiochemical analyses. This report presents their findings and main conclusions, together with a discussion of the background to the study and its implications. (Author)

  17. The NASA/National Space Science Data Center trapped radiation environment model program, 1964 - 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vette, J.I.

    1991-11-01

    The major effort that NASA, initially with the help of the United States Air Force (USAF), carried out for 27 years to synthesize the experimental and theoretical results of space research related to energetic charged particles into a quantitative description of the terrestrial trapped radiation environment in the form of model environments is detailed. The effort is called the Trapped Radiation Environment Modeling Program (TREMP). In chapter 2 the historical background leading to the establishment of this program is given. Also, the purpose of this modeling program as established by the founders of the program is discussed. This is followed in chapter 3 by the philosophy and approach that was applied in this program throughout its lifetime. As will be seen, this philosophy led to the continuation of the program long after it would have expired. The highlights of the accomplishments are presented in chapter 4. A view to future possible efforts in this arena is given in chapter 5, mainly to pass on to future workers the differences that are perceived from these many years of experience. Chapter 6 is an appendix that details the chronology of the development of TREMP. Finally, the references, which document the work accomplished over these years, are presented in chapter 7

  18. The Plateau de Bure ASTEP Platform Test in natural radiation environment of electronic components and circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autran, J.L.; Munteanu, D.; Sauze, S.; Roche, Ph.; Gasiot, G.; Borel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Reducing the size of microelectronic devices and increasing the integration density of circuits lead (following the famous Moore's law) to an increased sensitivity of circuits to natural terrestrial radiation environment. - Such sensitivity to atmospheric particles (mainly neutrons) can cause non-destructive (soft-errors) or destructive (latch-up) failures in most electronic circuits, including volatile static memories (SRAM), object of the research work carried out since 2004 on the European Test Platform ASTER. - This paper presents in details the ASTEP platform, its location, the instruments (neutron monitor of the Plateau de Bure) and the experiences (memory tester) currently installed on the Plateau de Bure. In a second part, we also report a synthesis of the key results concerning the natural radiation sensitivity of SRAM fabricated in 130 nm and 65 nm bulk silicon technologies. (authors)

  19. Multiscale modeling of radiation damage in Fe-based alloys in the fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Marian, J.; Ventelon, L.; Young-Vandersall, J.A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferritic alloys represent a technologically important class of candidate materials for fusion first wall and blanket structures. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of defect accumulation and microstructure evolution, and the corresponding effects on mechanical properties is required to predict their in-service structural performance limits. The physical processes involved in radiation damage, and its effects on mechanical properties, are inherently multiscale and hierarchical, spanning length and time scales from the atomic nucleus to meters and picosecond to decades. In this paper, we present a multiscale modeling methodology to describe radiation effects within the fusion energy environment. Selected results from atomic scale investigation are presented, focusing on (i) the mechanisms of self-interstitial dislocation loop formation with Burgers vector of a in iron relative to vanadium, (ii) helium transport and (iii) the interaction between helium and small self-interstitial clusters in iron, and (iv) dislocation-helium bubble interactions in fcc aluminum

  20. Development of a magnetic diagnostic suitable for the ITER radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, P.; Le-Luyer, A.; Malard, P.; Pastor, P.; Fournier, Y.; Lister, J. B.; Moret, J. M.; Testa, D.; Toussaint, M.; Chitarin, G.; Delogu, R.; Galo, A.; Peruzzo, S.; Romero, J.; Vila, R.; Brichard, B.; Bolshakova, I.; Duran, I.; Encheva, A.; Vayakis, G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic diagnostics of the ITER tokamak must fulfill demanding specifications, because their accuracy and reliability affects margins to the machine engineering limits and therefore operational flexibility. This paper describes the challenging issues related to the implementation of the magnetic diagnostics in a tokamak environment. We focus on nuclear radiations as they can significantly affect the measurement through Radiation Induced Electromotive Force (RIEMF) or Thermally Induced Electromotive Force (TIEMF). Thermal modeling of magnetic sensors and associated design studies are also reported as the thermal gradient in the sensors must be reduced to avoid TIEMF. Alternative magnetic sensors such as fiber optic current sensors (FOCS) or steady state magnetic field sensors are also discussed because they serve as a backup to the usual inductive magnetic measurements. We conclude by a brief review of the development needs for magnetic diagnostics. (authors)