WorldWideScience

Sample records for hadronic physics annual

  1. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisov D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  2. Low Energy Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pennington, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Ask a group of particle theorists about low energy hadron physics and they will say that this is a subject that belongs to the age of the dinosaurs. However, it is GeV physics that controls the outcome of every hadronic interaction at almost every energy. Confinement of quarks and gluons (and any other super-constituents) means that it is the femto-universe that determines what experiments detect. What we have to learn at the start of the 21st century is discussed.

  3. QCD and Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  4. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-08-07

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  5. Physics at future hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  6. Forward physics of hadronic colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    These lectures were given at the Baikal Summer School on Physics of Elementary Particles and Astrophysics in July 2012. They can be viewed as a concise introduction to hadronic diffraction, to the physics of the Pomeron and related topics.

  7. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  8. Topics in Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Alfred [Univ. of Wiscon, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2002-08-01

    Hadron production cross sections are calculated in the perturbative QCD frame work. Parton distribution functions are obtained from a strip-soliton model. The fragmentation functions are derived from the Lund model of string breaking.

  9. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  10. Hadron physics with KLOE-2

    CERN Document Server

    Czerwinski, Eryk; Babusci, D; Badoni, D; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bulychjev, S A; Campana, P; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; De Zorzi, G; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Hoistad, B; Iarocci, E; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kulikov, V V; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Loddo, F; Martemianov, M A; Martini, M; Matsyuk, M A; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moricciani, D; Morello, G; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Ranieri, A; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2010-01-01

    In the upcoming month the KLOE-2 data taking campaign will start at the upgraded DAFNE phi-factory of INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati. The main goal is to collect an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb^(-1) in 3-4 years in order to refine and extend the KLOE program on both kaon physics and hadron spectroscopy. Here the expected improvements on the results of hadron spectroscopy are presented and briefly discussed.

  11. B physics at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  12. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in bar...

  13. Hadron therapy physics and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an in-depth overview of the physics of hadron therapy, ranging from the history to the latest contributions to the subject. It covers the mechanisms of protons and carbon ions at the molecular level (DNA breaks and proteins 53BP1 and RPA), the physics and mathematics of accelerators (Cyclotron and Synchrotron), microdosimetry measurements (with new results so far achieved), and Monte Carlo simulations in hadron therapy using FLUKA (CERN) and MCHIT (FIAS) software. The text also includes information about proton therapy centers and carbon ion centers (PTCOG), as well as a comparison and discussion of both techniques in treatment planning and radiation monitoring. This brief is suitable for newcomers to medical physics as well as seasoned specialists in radiation oncology.

  14. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  15. Hadron physics from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Andreas [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2016-11-01

    Particle physics experiments at modern high luminosity particle accelerators achieve orders of magnitude higher count rates than what was possible ten or twenty years ago. This extremely large statistics allows to draw far reaching conclusions even from minute signals, provided that these signals are well understood by theory. This is, however, ever more difficult to achieve. Presently, technical and scientific progress in general and experimental progress in particle physics in particular, shows typically an exponential growth rate. For example, data acquisition and analysis are, among many other factor, driven by the development of ever more efficient computers and thus by Moore's law. Theory has to keep up with this development by also achieving an exponential increase in precision, which is only possible using powerful computers. This is true for both types of calculations, analytic ones as, e.g., in quantum field perturbation theory, and purely numerical ones as in Lattice QCD. As stated above such calculations are absolutely indispensable to make best use of the extremely costly large particle physics experiments. Thus, it is economically reasonable to invest a certain percentage of the cost of accelerators and experiments in related theory efforts. The basic ideas behind Lattice QCD simulations are the following: Because quarks and gluons can never be observed individually but are always ''confined'' into colorless hadrons, like the proton, all quark-gluon states can be expressed in two different systems of basis states, namely in a quark-gluon basis and the basis of hadron states. The proton, e.g., is an eigenstate of the latter, a specific quark-gluon configuration is part of the former. In the quark-gluon basis a physical hadron, like a proton, is given by an extremely complicated multi-particle wave function containing all effects of quantum fluctuations. This state is so complicated that it is basically impossible to model it

  16. Non-perturbative QCD and hadron physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos-Martínez, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    A brief exposition of contemporary non-perturbative methods based on the Schwinger-Dyson (SDE) and Bethe-Salpeter equations (BSE) of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and their application to hadron physics is given. These equations provide a non-perturbative continuum formulation of QCD and are a powerful and promising tool for the study of hadron physics. Results on some properties of hadrons based on this approach, with particular attention to the pion distribution amplitude, elastic, and transition electromagnetic form factors, and their comparison to experimental data are presented.

  17. Hadronic interactions and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, S R

    2008-01-01

    I give an overview of efforts in the last year to calculate interactions among hadrons using lattice QCD. Results discussed include the extraction of low-energy phase shifts and three-body interactions, and the study of pion and kaon condensation. A critical appraisal is offered of recent attempts to calculate nucleon-nucleon and nucleon-hyperon potentials on the lattice.

  18. Hadron Physics from Lattice QCD

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We sketch the basic ideas of the lattice regularization in Quantum Field Theory, the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations, and applications to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This approach enables the numerical measurement of observables at the non-perturbative level. We comment on selected results, with a focus on hadron masses and the link to Chiral Perturbation Theory. At last we address two outstanding issues: topological freezing and the sign problem.

  19. Hadron Physics at the COMPASS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interactions, in principle describes the interaction of quark and gluon fields. However, due to the self-coupling of the gluons, quarks and gluons are confined into hadrons and cannot exist as free particles. The quantitative understanding of this confinement phenomenon, which is responsible for about 98\\% of the mass of the visible universe, is one of the major open questions in particle physics. The measurement of the excitation spectrum of hadrons and of their properties gives valuable input to theory and phenomenology. In the Constituent Quark Model (CQM) two types of hadrons exist: mesons, made out of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which consist of three quarks. But more advanced QCD-inspired models and Lattice QCD calculations predict the existence of hadrons with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). The COMPASS experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large da...

  20. Physics projects of COMPASS with hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Faessler, M A

    1999-01-01

    COMPASS, a new state-of-the-art spectrometer to be installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron for experiments with muon and hadron beams, will be exposed to hadron beams with intensities up to 10/sup 8//sec and energies up to 280 GeV. The physics goals are to study the rare production of charmed hadrons, including doubly charmed baryons, in inelastic interactions, with particular interest in their semileptonic decays; to search for glueballs and hybrids in central and diffractive production. Predictions of chiral perturbation theory will be tested in Primakoff reactions. The spectrometer shall be equipped with excellent particle identification and tracking, with calorimetry, dedicated triggers and fast read-out. A significant improvement of light hadron spectroscopy - compared to previous measurements -can be achieved already in the initial phase of the experiment. (4 refs).

  1. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  2. Novel Perspectives for Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-03-09

    I discuss several novel and unexpected aspects of quantum chromodynamics. These include: (a) the nonperturbative origin of intrinsic strange, charm and bottom quarks in the nucleon at large x; the breakdown of pQCD factorization theorems due to the lensing effects of initial- and final-state interactions; (b) important corrections to pQCD scaling for inclusive reactions due to processes in which hadrons are created at high transverse momentum directly in the hard processes and their relation to the baryon anomaly in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions; and (c) the nonuniversality of quark distributions in nuclei. I also discuss some novel theoretical perspectives in QCD: (a) light-front holography - a relativistic color-confining first approximation to QCD based on the AdS/CFT correspondence principle; (b) the principle of maximum conformality - a method which determines the renormalization scale at finite order in perturbation theory yielding scheme independent results; (c) the replacement of quark and gluon vacuum condensates by 'in-hadron condensates' and how this helps to resolve the conflict between QCD vacuum and the cosmological constant.

  3. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (4/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  4. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (3/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  5. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  6. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  7. Future Prospects for Hadron Physics at PANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedner, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will be the major hadron physics experiment at the end of this decade. It has an ambitious far-reaching physics program that spans the most fascinating topics that are emerging in contemporary hadron physics. The universality of the antiproton annihilation process, with either protons or nuclei as targets, allows physicists to address questions like the structure of glueballs and hybrids; to clarify the nature of the X, Y and Z states; to investigate electromagnetic channels in order to measure form factors of the nucleon; and to provide theory with input with respect to non-perturbative aspects of QCD. The possibility to use different nuclear targets opens the window for charm physics with nuclei or for color transparency studies, as well as for an intensive hypernuclear physics program. Previous experimental experience has clearly demonstrated that the key to success lies in high levels of precision complemented with sophisticated analysis methods, only possible...

  8. On Some New Ideas in Hadron Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We shortly review a series of novel ideas on the physics of hadrons and nuclear matter. Despite being vastly different in scope and content, these models share a common attribute, in that they offer unconventional viewpoints on infrared QCD and nuclear phenomena. In a sense, they are reminiscent of the plethora of formulations that have been developed over the years on classical gravitation: many seemingly disparate approaches can be effectively used to describe and explore the same physics.

  9. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  10. Hadron physics at the COMPASS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-05-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interactions, in principle describes the interaction of quark and gluon fields. However, due to the self-coupling of the gluons, quarks and gluons are confined into hadrons and cannot exist as free particles. The quantitative understanding of this confinement phenomenon, which is responsible for about 98% of the mass of the visible universe, is one of the major open questions in particle physics. The measurement of the excitation spectrum of hadrons and of their properties gives valuable input to theory and phenomenology. In the Constituent Quark Model (CQM) two types of hadrons exist: mesons, made out of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which consist of three quarks. But more advanced QCD-inspired models and Lattice QCD calculations predict the existence of hadrons with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). The Compass experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large data sets, which allow to study light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unprecedented detail. The presented overview of the first results from this data set focuses in particular on the light meson sector and presents a detailed analysis of three-pion final states. A new JPC = 1++ state, the a1(1420), is observed with a mass and width in the ranges m = 1412 - 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 - 150MeV/c2.

  11. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  12. Intersections 2000: What's New in Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, James

    2000-08-07

    Hadron physics is that part of QCD dealing with hadron structure and vacuum structure, almost all of which is nonperturbative in nature. Some of the open problems in this field are outlined. The authors argue that hadron physics is a distinct subfield, no longer within particle physics, and not at all the same as classical nuclear physics. The authors believe that it needs to be better organized, and that a first step in doing so might be to establish hadron physics as a new division within the American Physical Society.

  13. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohini M Godbole

    2011-05-01

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with prospects in the near future at the LHC. I have added to the writeup, recent experimental results from the LHC which have become available since the time of the workshop.

  14. Beam physics in future electron hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Valloni, A; Klein, M; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    High-energy electron-hadron collisions could support a rich research programme in particle and nuclear physics. Several future projects are being proposed around the world, in particular eRHIC at BNL, MEIC at TJNAF in the US, and LHeC at CERN in Europe. This paper will highlight some of the accelerator physics issues, and describe related technical developments and challenges for these machines. In particular, optics design and beam dynamics studies are discussed, including longitudinal phase space manipulation, coherent synchrotron radiation, beam-beam kink instability, ion effects, as well as mitigation measures for beam break up and for space-charge induced emittance growth, all of which could limit the machine performance. Finally, first steps are presented towards an LHeC R&D facility, which should investigate relevant beam-physics processes.

  15. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  16. Hadronic Physics at CLEO-c

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, M R

    2008-01-01

    The charmonium system provides an opportunity to explore a wide variety of topics in hadronic physics. Studies of the properties of and transitions among cc-bar states yield insight into relativistic and non-perturbative QCD effects. At the same time, studies of the decays of charmonium states are a window into gluon dynamics and the role of glueball mixing in the production of light quark states. A collection of preliminary results utilizing the full CLEO-c psi(2S) data sample is presented including two-body branching fractions of chi_cJ decays, a precision measurement of the h_c mass, and results on the hindered M1 transition: psi(2S) -> gamma eta_c.

  17. Relativistic Few-Body Hadronic Physics Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzou, Wayne [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The goal of this research proposal was to use ``few-body'' methods to understand the structure and reactions of systems of interacting hadrons (neutrons, protons, mesons, quarks) over a broad range of energy scales. Realistic mathematical models of few-hadron systems have the advantage that they are sufficiently simple that they can be solved with mathematically controlled errors. These systems are also simple enough that it is possible to perform complete accurate experimental measurements on these systems. Comparison between theory and experiment puts strong constraints on the structure of the models. Even though these systems are ``simple'', both the experiments and computations push the limits of technology. The important property of ``few-body'' systems is that the ``cluster property'' implies that the interactions that appear in few-body systems are identical to the interactions that appear in complicated many-body systems. Of particular interest are models that correctly describe physics at distance scales that are sensitive to the internal structure of the individual nucleons. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle implies that in order to be sensitive to physics on distance scales that are a fraction of the proton or neutron radius, a relativistic treatment of quantum mechanics is necessary. The research supported by this grant involved 30 years of effort devoted to studying all aspects of interacting two and three-body systems. Realistic interactions were used to compute bound states of two- and three-nucleon, and two- and three-quark systems. Scattering observables for these systems were computed for a broad range of energies - from zero energy scattering to few GeV scattering, where experimental evidence of sub-nucleon degrees of freedom is beginning to appear. Benchmark calculations were produced, which when compared with calculations of other groups provided an essential check on these complicated calculations. In

  18. Nuclear Physics Department annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This annual report presents articles and abstracts published in foreign journals, covering the following subjects: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, applied physics, instrumentation, nonlinear phenomena and high energy physics

  19. Hadronic cross sections, elastic slope and physical bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagundes, D. A.; Menon, M. J. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    An almost model-independent parametrization for the ratio of the total hadronic cross section to elastic slope is discussed. Its applicability in studies of asymptotia and analyses of extensive air shower in cosmic-ray physics is also outlined.

  20. Hadronic Cross Sections, Elastic Slope and Physical Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fagundes, D A

    2012-01-01

    An almost model-independent parametrization for the ratio of the total hadronic cross section to elastic slope is discussed. Its applicability in studies of asymptotia and analyses of extensive air shower in cosmic-ray physics is also outlined.

  1. Lattice QCD as a tool of study for hadron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Atsushi [Hiroshima Univ., Information Media Center, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    I shall promote Lattice QCD as a tool of study for hadron physics and theoretical nuclear physics. After a brief introduction of the motivation, I will propose several research subjects for the purpose, i.e., 1. opposite parity spectroscopy, 2. hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon forces by Luescher formula, 3. {sigma} meson, 4. finite temperature: pole and screening masses of hadron, gluon screening mass, QGP transport coefficients, 5. finite density: QCD with SU(2) color, iso-vector chemical potential, response of hadron masses with respect to the chemical potential. (author)

  2. On Some Novel Ideas in Hadron Physics. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As a continuation of the preceding section, we shortly review a series of novel ideas on the physics of hadrons. In the present paper, emphasis is given on some different approaches to the hadron physics, which may be called as "programs" in the sense of Lakatos. For clarity, we only discuss geometrization program, symmetries/unification program, and phenomenology of inter-quark potential program.

  3. On Some Novel Ideas in Hadron Physics. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianto V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As a continuation of the preceding section, we shortly review a series of novel ideas on the physics of hadrons. In the present paper, emphasis is given on some different approaches to the hadron physics, which may be called as “programs” in the sense of Lakatos. For clarity, we only discuss geometrization program, symmetries / unification program, and phenomenology of inter-quark potential program.

  4. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  5. Recent results on hadron physics at KLOE

    CERN Document Server

    Babusci, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkest, L Caldeira; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gajos, A; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjold, L; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kacprzak, K; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Palladino, A; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2013-01-01

    One of the basic motivations of the KLOE and KLOE-2 collaborations is the test of fundamental symmetries and the search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model via the hadronic and leptonic decays of ground-state mesons and via their production in the fusion of virtual gamma quanta exchanged between colliding electrons and positrons. This contribution includes brief description of results of recent analysis of the KLOE data aimed at (i) the search for the dark matter boson, (ii) determination of the hadronic and light-by-light contributions to the g-2 muon anomaly and (iii) tests of QCD anomalies.

  6. Future prospects in nuclear physics and the Japanese hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metag, V. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.

    1998-05-01

    The Japanese Hadron Facility (JHF) will provide new perspectives for a broad research program covering nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter physics, material sciences, and life sciences. In this talk, the future prospects of nuclear physics, as they are discussed within the community, are addressed. Recommendations worked out by the study groups, evaluating the long term perspectives of GSI, have hereby been used as a guideline. Nuclear physics is considered here in a broad sense as the physics of extended structured objects bound by the strong interaction, i.e. mesons, baryons, and nuclei. Preference is given to those subfields which would benefit most from the new experimental possibilities to the JHF. Consequently, the structure of exotic nuclei and hypernuclei, the properties of compressed hadronic matter and medium modifications of hadrons, spectroscopy of mesons, glueballs and baryons, and the parton structure of the nucleon are addressed and analyzed with regard to their future physics potential. (orig.)

  7. Hadronic physics with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Cazon, L

    2015-01-01

    Extensive air showers are the result of billions of particle reactions initiated by single cosmic rays at ultra-high energy. Their characteristics are sensitive both to the mass of the primary cosmic ray and to the fine details of hadronic interactions. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays can be used to experimentally extend our knowledge on hadronic interactions in energy and kinematic regions beyond those tested by human-made accelerators. We report on how the Pierre Auger Observatory is able to measure the proton-air cross section for particle production at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 39 TeV and 56 TeV and also to constrain the new hadronic interaction models tuned after the results of the Large Hadron Collider, by measuring: the average shape of the electromagnetic longitudinal profile of air showers, the moments of the distribution of the depth at which they reach their maximum, and the content and production depth of muons in air showers with a primary center-of-mass energy per nucleon around and a...

  8. Status and hadron physics program of J-PARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozawa K.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Current status and hadron physics programs of Japan Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC are reported. Several physics programs are proposed at the Hadron Hall of J-PARC. Strangeness and hyper nuclear physics is undertaken at K1.8 beam line. Study of meson nucleon bound system is underway at K1.8BR beam line. After the earthquake, all beam line components and experimental setups are reassembled. Protons are successfully accelerated in the last December and hadron physics experiments are resumed in this February. In this manuscript, status of on-going experiment and near future plans of such physics programs are reported. Especially, a new beam line for a primary protons and high momentum secondary particles is proposed to study meson properties in nucleus.

  9. Physics with hadronic probes at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Ketzer, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and goals of the spectroscopy programme of COMPASS using hadron beams, and reports on first results from a short pilot run using a 190 GeV/c pion beam, carried out in 2004. A partial wave analysis of the reaction $\\pi^{−}N\\rightarrow\\pi^{-}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}N'$ shows significant production of a state with spin-exotic quantum numbers $J^{PC} =$ 1$^{−+}$ at 1.6GeV/c$^{2}$.

  10. The COMPASS Setup for Physics with Hadron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, Ph.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, Ana Sofia; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Rousse, J.Y.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This article describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  11. Strong interaction physics from hadronic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1997-08-01

    Hadronic atoms provide a unique laboratory for studying strong interactions and nuclear medium effects at zero kinetic energy. Previous results from analyses of strong-interaction data consisting of level shifts, widths and yields in π-, K -, p¯ and ∑ - atoms are reviewed. Recent results from fits to comprehensive sets of data in terms of density-dependent optical potentials that respect the low-density limit, where the interaction tends to the free hadron nucleon value, are discussed. The importance of using realistic nuclear density distributions is highlighted. The introduction of density dependence in most cases significantly improves the fit to the data and leads to some novel results. For K - atoms, a substantial attraction of order 200 MeV in nuclear matter is suggested, with interesting repercussions for K¯ condensation and the evolution of strangeness in high-density stars. For p¯ atoms it is found that a reasonable p-wave strength can be accommodated in the fitted optical potential, in agreement with the energy dependence observed for some low-energy p¯N reactions. For ∑ - atoms, the fitted potential becomes repulsive inside the nucleus, implying that Σ hyperons generally do not bind in nuclei in agreement with recent measurements. This repulsion significantly affects calculated masses of neutron stars.

  12. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Multimedia

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  13. Two-Photon Physics in Hadronic Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-11-01

    Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic electron-scattering are reviewed. The apparent discrepancy in the extraction of elastic nucleon form factors between unpolarized Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments is discussed, as well as the understanding of this puzzle in terms of two-photon exchange corrections. Calculations of such corrections both within partonic and hadronic frameworks are reviewed. In view of recent spin-dependent electron scattering data, the relation of the two-photon exchange process to the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen is critically examined. The imaginary part of the two-photon exchange amplitude as can be accessed from the beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is reviewed. Further extensions and open issues in this field are outlined.

  14. The legacy of the experimental hadron physics programme at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkin, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The experimental hadronic physics programme at the COoler SYnchrotron of the Forschungszentrum Juelich terminated at the end of 2014. After describing the accelerator and the associated facilities, a review is presented of the major achievements in the field realized over the twenty years of intense research activity.

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on B physics at hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, P. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Mishra, C.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)] [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Measurement of Angle {alpha}; Measurement of Angle {beta}; Measurement of Angle {gamma}; Other B Physics; Theory of Heavy Flavors; Charged Particle Tracking and Vertexing; e and {gamma} Detection; Muon Detection; Hadron ID; Electronics, DAQ, and Computing; and Machine Detector Interface. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the in Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Progress in Hadronic Physics Modelling in Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolakis, John; /CERN; Folger, Gunter; /CERN; Grichine, Vladimir; /CERN; Heikkinen, Aatos; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Howard, Alexander; /CERN; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; /CERN; Kaitaniemi, Pekka; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Koi, Tatsumi; /SLAC; Kosov, Mikhail; /CERN /Moscow, ITEP; Quesada, Jose Manuel; /Seville U.; Ribon, Alberto; /CERN; Uzhinsky, Vladimir; /CERN; Wright, Dennis; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Geant4 offers a set of models to simulate hadronic showers in calorimeters. Recent improvements to several models relevant to the modelling of hadronic showers are discussed. These include improved cross sections, a revision of the FTF model, the addition of quasi-elastic scattering to the QGS model, and enhancements in the nuclear precompound and de-excitation models. The validation of physics models against thin target experiments has been extended especially in the energy region 10 GeV and below. Examples of new validation results are shown.

  17. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics was held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai from 31 October to 4 November 2011. This workshop series, supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (BRNS, DAE), Govt. of India, began ten years ago with the first one being held at BARC, Mumbai in October 2002. The second one was held at Puri in 2005, organized jointly by Institute of Physics, Bhubneswar and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. The 3rd and 4th ones took place, respectively, at Shantineketan in 2006, organized by Visva Bharati University, and at Aligarh in 2008, organized by Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of the present workshop was to bring together the experts and young researchers in the field of hadron physics (both experiment and theory) and to have in-depth discussions on the current research activities in this field. The format of the workshop was: a series of review lectures by various experts from India and abroad, the presentation of advanced research results by researchers in the field, and a review of major experimental programs being planned and pursued in major laboratories in the field of hadron physics, with the aim of providing a platform for the young participants for interaction with their peers. The upcoming international FAIR facility at GSI is a unique future facility for studies of hadron physics in the charm sector and hyper nuclear physics. The Indian hadron physics community is involved in this mega science project and is working with the PANDA collaboration on the development of detectors, simulation and software tools for the hadron physics programme with antiprotons at FAIR. A one-day discussion session was held at this workshop to discuss India-PANDA activities, the current collaboration status and the work plan. This volume presents the workshop proceedings consisting of lectures and seminars which were delivered during the workshop. We are thankful to

  18. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and $B_c^+$ physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from $pp$ collisions at the LHC. During Run~1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the $Z_c(4430)^-$ as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest on spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as $X \\to J/\\psi \\phi$, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of $B_c^+$ physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor $\\bar{b}$ and $c$ quarks. A synopsis of the the latest results is given.

  19. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and BC + physics at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from pp collisions at the LHC. During Run 1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the Zc (4430) - as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest in spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as X → J/ψϕ, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of BC + physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor ̅b and c quarks. A synopsis of the latest results is given.

  20. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    June 6-15, 2007, CERN The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007 The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, extensively covered the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis t...

  1. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  2. Top quark physics at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Margaroli, F

    2015-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest fundamental particle known so far. As such, it is expected to play a crucial role in the study of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and the generation of mass, as well as to serve as an ideal window into new physics. The discovery of a Higgs boson provides us additional experimental opportunities to test our current understanding of top quarks physics. In this contribution I will discuss the status of top quark physics as of 2014, and present a few recent highlights.

  3. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Ghosh; A Nyffeler; V Ravindran

    2011-05-01

    This is a summary of the activities of the Physics at the LHC working group in the XIth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-XI) held at the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India in January 2010. We discuss the activities of each sub-working group on physics issues at colliders such as Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main issues discussed involve (1) results on W mass measurement and associated QCD uncertainties, (2) an attempt to understand the asymmetry measured at Tevatron in the top quark production, and (3) phenomenology of warped space dimension model.

  4. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  5. 3rd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at ...

  6. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN, Physics, Machine, Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphson, C

    2011-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new electron-hadron collider, the LHeC, in which electrons of $60$ to possibly $140$\\,GeV collide with LHC protons of $7000$\\,GeV. With an $ep$ design luminosity of about $10^{33}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, the Large Hadron Electron Collider exceeds the integrated luminosity collected at HERA by two orders of magnitude and the kinematic range by a factor of twenty in the four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements. These are projected to solve a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The LHeC thus becomes the world's cleanest high resolution microscope, designed to continue the path of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering into unknown areas of physics and kinematics. The physics ...

  7. Precision physics with heavy-flavoured hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of flavour dynamics is one of the key aims of elementary particle physics. The last 15 years have witnessed the triumph of the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism, which describes all flavour changing transitions of quarks in the Standard Model. This important milestone has been reached owing to a series of experiments, in particular to those operating at the so-called $B$ factories, at the Tevatron, and now at the LHC. We briefly review status and perspectives of flavour physics, highlighting the results where the LHC has given the most significant contributions, notably including the recent observation of the $B_s^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay.

  8. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  9. Theory overview of electroweak physics at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, John M

    2016-01-01

    This contribution summarizes some of the important theoretical progress that has been made in the arena of electroweak physics at hadron colliders. The focus is on developments that have sharpened theoretical predictions for final states produced through electroweak processes. Special attention is paid to new results that have been presented in the last year, since LHCP2015, as well as on key issues for future measurements at the LHC.

  10. Higgs Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will begin by summarising the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the LHC. I will then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with prospects in the near future at the LHC. In addition to the material covered in the presented talk, I have included in the writeup, a critical appraisal of the theoretical uncertainties in the Higgs cross-sections at the Tevatron as well as a discussion of the recent experimental results from the LHC which have become available since the time of the workshop.

  11. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Patrizia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606, USA and INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2014-11-11

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon 'tomography' through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  12. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Patrizia [JLAB

    2014-11-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon "tomography" through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  13. Physics of hot hadronic matter and quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-07-01

    This Introductory talk contains a brief review of the current status of theoretical and experimental activities related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we discuss latest lattice results on the phase transition, recent progress in chiral symmetry physics based on the theory of interacting instantons, new in the theory of QGP and of hot hadronic matter, mean p{sub t} and collective flow, the shape of p{sub t} distribution, strangeness production, J/{psi} suppression and {phi} enhancement, two puzzles connected with soft pion and soft photon enhancements, and some other ultrasoft'' phenomena. 56 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Group theory in particle, nuclear, and hadron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Syed Afsar

    2016-01-01

    This user-friendly book on group theory introduces topics in as simple a manner as possible and then gradually develops those topics into more advanced ones, eventually building up to the current state-of-the-art. By using simple examples from physics and mathematics, the advanced topics become logical extensions of ideas already introduced. In addition to being used as a textbook, this book would also be useful as a reference guide for graduates and researchers in particle, nuclear and hadron physics.

  15. Large Hadron Collider Physics (LHCP2017) conference | 15-20 May 2017 | Shanghai

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The fifth Annual Large Hadron Collider Physics will be held in Shanghai and hosted by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in the period of May 15-20, 2017. The main goal of the conference is to provide intense and lively discussions between experimenters and theorists in such research areas as the Standard Model Physics and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Heavy Quark Physics and Heavy Ion Physics as well as to share a recent progress in the high luminosity upgrades and future colliders developments.     The LHCP2017 website: http://lhcp2017.physics.sjtu.edu.cn/ Event date: 15 - 20 May 2017 Location: Shanghai, China

  16. Studies on implementation of pellet tracking in hadron physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyszniak A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A system for optical tracking of frozen hydrogen microsphere targets (pellets has been designed. It is intended for the upcoming hadron physics experiment PANDA at FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. With such a tracking system one can reconstruct the positions of the individual pellets at the time of a hadronic interaction in the offline event analysis. This gives information on the position of the primary interaction vertex with an accuracy of a few 100 µm, which is very useful e.g. for reconstruction of charged particle tracks and secondary vertices and for background suppression. A study has been done at the WASA detector setup (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany to check the possibility of classification of hadronic events as originating in pellets or in background. The study has been done based on the instantaneous rate a Long Range TDC which was used to determine if a pellet was present in the accelerator beam region. It was clearly shown that it is possible to distinguish the two event classes. Also, an experience was gained with operation of two synchronized systems operating in different time scales, as it will also be the case with the optical pellet tracking.

  17. The Future of Hadrons: The Nexus of Subatomic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris

    2011-09-01

    The author offers brief observations on matters discussed at the XIV International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy and explore prospects for hadron physics. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been validated as a new law of nature. It is internally consistent up to very high energies, and so could be a complete theory of the strong interactions. Whether QCD is the final answer for the strong interactions is a subject for continuing experimental tests, which are being extended in experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider. Beyond the comparison of perturbative calculations with experiment, it remains critically important to test the confinement hypothesis by searching for free quarks, or for signatures of unconfined color. Sensitive negative searches for quarks continue to be interesting, and the definitive observation of free quarks would be revolutionary. Breakdowns of factorization would compromise the utility of perturbative QCD. Other discoveries that would require small or large revisions to QCD include the observation of new kinds of colored matter beyond quarks and gluons, the discovery that quarks are composite, or evidence that SU(3){sub c} gauge symmetry is the vestige of a larger, spontaneously broken, color symmetry. While probing our underlying theory for weakness or new openings, we have plenty to do to apply QCD to myriad experimental settings, to learn its implications for matter under unusual conditions, and to become more adept at calculating its consequences. New experimental tools provide the means for progress on a very broad front.

  18. Revisiting the role of octonions in hadronic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdik, C.; Catto, S.; Gürcan, Y.; Khalfan, A.; Kurt, L.

    2017-03-01

    Octonions and their split versions are shown to be applicable to the solutions of a large number of problems in hadronic physics, from the foundations of exceptional groups that are used in grand unified theories, to heterotic strings, to the non-Desarguesian geometric property of space-time symmetries, twistors, harmonic superspace, conformal field theories, etc. Upon a brief review of these investigations we proceed to show how they are used in the unification of ancient and modern geometries, which in turn open new avenues for, and goes far beyond in providing, geometric foundations for the existence of internal symmetries such as color and flavor.

  19. Hadron Physics and QCD: Just the Basic Facts

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    With discovery of the Higgs boson, the Standard Model of Particle Physics became complete. Its formulation is a remarkable story; and the process of verification is continuing, with the most important chapter being the least well understood. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is that part of the Standard Model which is supposed to describe all of nuclear physics and yet, almost fifty years after the discovery of quarks, we are only just beginning to understand how QCD moulds the basic bricks for nuclei: pious, neutrons, protons. QCD is characterized by two emergent phenomena: confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB), whose implications are extraordinary. This contribution describes how DCSB, not the Higgs boson, generates more than 98% of the visible mass in the Universe, explains why confinement guarantees that condensates, those quantities that were commonly viewed as constant mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons, and elucidates a range of observable co...

  20. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  1. GEANT4 physics evaluation with testbeam data of the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Oberlack, H.; Salihagić, D.; Schacht, P.; Strizenec, P.

    2009-04-01

    The validation of GEANT4 physics models is done by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter with GEANT4 based simulations. Various physics lists for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. We present results of studies of the calorimeter performance parameters (like energy resolution and shower shapes) as well as results of investigations of the influence of the Birks' law and of cuts on the time of development of hadronic showers.

  2. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Pran; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O; Carena, M; Cavanaugh, R; Chang, S; Choi, Kiwoon; Csaki, C; Dawson, S; de Campos, F; De Roeck, A; Duhrssen, M; Eboli, O J.P; Ellis, J R; Flacher, H; Goldberg, H; Grimus, W; Haisch, U; Heinemeyer, S; Hirsch, M; Holmes, M; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G; Lavoura, L; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J; Lisanti, M; Lust, Dieter; Magro, M B; Mahbubani, R; Malinsky, M; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S; Muhlleitner, M M; Mukhopadhyaya, B; Neubert, M; Olive, K A; Perez, Gilad; Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T; Ponton, E; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F; Rauch, M; Restrepo, D; Rizzo, T G; Romao, J C; Ronga, F J; Santiago, Jose; Schechter, J; Senjanovic, G; Shao, J; Spira, M; Stieberger, S; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M P; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T R; Toharia, M; Wacker, J; Wagner, C E.M; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G; Zeppenfeld, D; Zurek, K

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory ...

  3. CAS Accelerator Physics (High-Power Hadron Machines) in Spain

    CERN Multimedia

    CAS

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and ESS-Bilbao jointly organised a specialised course on High-Power Hadron Machines, held at the Hotel Barceló Nervión in Bilbao, Spain, from 24 May to 2 June, 2011.   CERN Accelerator School students. After recapitulation lectures on the essentials of accelerator physics and review lectures on the different types of accelerators, the programme focussed on the challenges of designing and operating high-power facilities. The particular problems for RF systems, beam instrumentation, vacuum, cryogenics, collimators and beam dumps were examined. Activation of equipment, radioprotection and remote handling issues were also addressed. The school was very successful, with 69 participants of 22 nationalities. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and excellent quality of their lectures. In addition to the academic programme, the participants w...

  4. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; Smiesko, J.; Tokar, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction-the "intrinsic" quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ / Z / W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsic heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.

  5. Instantons and Spin-Flavor effects in Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kochelev, N I

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the role of instantons in the spectroscopy of ordinary and exotic hadrons as well as in high energy reactions. We argue that the instanton induced flavor- and spin-dependent quark-quark and quark-gluon interactions can explain many features of the hadron spectrum. The observed anomalous spin and flavor effects in various reactions with hadrons can also be understood within the instanton model for QCD vacuum.

  6. Geant4 hadronic physics validation with ATLAS Tile Calorimeter test-beam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa, C.; Constantinescu, S.; DiÅ£ǎ, S.

    2006-10-01

    We present comparison studies between Geant4 shower packages and ATLAS Tile Calorimeter test-beam data collected at CERN in H8 beam line at the SPS. Emphasis is put on hadronic physics lists and data concerning differences between Tilecal response to pions and protons of same energy. The ratio between the pure hadronic fraction of pion and the pure hadronic fraction of proton Fhπ/Fhp was estimated with Tilecal test-beam data and compared with Geant4 simulations.

  7. Summary of the very large hadron collider physics and detector workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.; Berger, M.; Brandt, A.; Eno, S. [and others

    1997-10-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV.

  8. Strong interactions and electromagnetism in low-energy hadron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, B.

    2002-10-01

    In the present work, we study various aspects of the entanglement of the strong and electromagnetic interactions as it is manifest in low-energy hadron physics. In the framework of chiral perturbation theory, two aspects are investigated: the test of the structure of baryons as probed by external electromagnetic currents, and the modification of reactions mediated by the strong interactions in the presence of internal (virtual) photons. In the first part of this work, we study the electromagnetic form factors of nucleons and the ground state baryon octet, as well as strangeness form factors of the nucleon. Emphasis is put on the comparison of a new relativistic scheme for the calculation of loop diagrams to the heavy-baryon formalism, and on the convergence of higher-order corrections in both schemes. The new scheme is shown to yield both a phenomenologically more successful description of the data and better convergence behaviour. In the second part, we study isospin violation in pion-kaon scattering as mediated by virtual photon effects and the light quark mass difference. This investigation is of particular importance for the extraction of scattering lengths from measurements of lifetime and energy levels in pion-kaon atoms. The isospin breaking corrections are shown to be small and sufficiently well under control. (orig.)

  9. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  10. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  11. Large Hadron Collider slideshow shows future of physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Kramer, S E

    2007-01-01

    "The European organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has been building the Large Hadron Collider for many years, but it's finally taking shape and prepping to operate at full power in 2008." (1/2 page)

  12. Strong Van der Waals force in the hadron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sawada, T

    2000-01-01

    Possible strong Van der Waals interaction between hadrons is searched in the P-wave amplitude of the pi-pi scattering by removing the cut of the two-pion exchange spectrum as well as the unitarity cut.

  13. FCC Based Lepton-Hadron and Photon-Hadron Colliders: Luminosity and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Acar, Y C; Beser, S; Karadeniz, H; Kaya, U; Oner, B B; Sultansoy, S

    2016-01-01

    Construction of future electron-positron colliders (or dedicated electron linac) and muon colliders (or dedicated muon ring) tangential to Future Circular Collider (FCC) will give opportunity to utilize highest energy proton and nucleus beams for lepton-hadron and photon-hadron collisions. Luminosity values of FCC based ep, \\mup, eA, \\muA, \\gammap and \\gammaA colliders are estimated. Multi-TeV center of mass energy ep colliders based on the FCC and linear colliders (LC) are considered in detail. Parameters of upgraded versions of the FCC proton beam are determined to optimize luminosity of electron-proton collisions keeping beam-beam effects in mind. Numerical calculations are performed using a currently being developed collision point simulator. It is shown that L_{ep}\\sim10^{32}\\,cm^{-2}s^{-1} can be achieved with LHeC-like upgrade of the FCC parameters.

  14. Physics Division annual report - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-07

    Summaries are given of progress accomplished for the year in the following areas: (1) Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Research; (2) Operation and Development of Atlas; (3) Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics Research; (4) Theoretical Physics Research; and (5) Atomic and Molecular Physics Research.

  15. Rapidity gaps and jets as a new-physics signature in very-high-energy hadron-hadron collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorken, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    In hadron-hadron collisions, production of Higgs bosons and other color-singlet systems can occur via fusion of electroweak bosons, occasionally leaving a ``rapidity gap'' in the underlying-event structure. This observation, due to Dokshitzer, Khoze, and Troyan, is studied to see whether it serves as a signature for detection of the Higgs bosons, etc. We find it is a very strong signature at subprocess c.m. energies in excess of a few TeV. The most serious problem with this strategy is the estimation of the fraction of events containing the rapidity gap; most of the time the gap is filled by soft interactions of spectator degrees of freedom. We also study this question and estimate this ``survival probability of the rapidity gap'' to be of order 5%, with an uncertainty of a factor 3. Ways of testing this estimate and further discussion of the underlying hard-diffraction physics are presented.

  16. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James Ritman

    2006-05-01

    As a result of the rapid rise of the coupling constant at low momentum transfers, perturbation theory is not an appropriate method to describe the strong interaction. In this kinematic regime other methods such as lattice QCD or effective field theories are more appropriate to investigate the appearance of a still unsettled phenomena: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. Furthermore, the confinement of quarks and gluons to hadrons allows crucial tests of fundamental symmetries that are inherent to the QCD Lagrangian but are broken in hadronic systems. Thus, high precision measurements of the production and decay of specific hadronic states provides decisive benchmarks to investigate the properties of QCD in this regime. A new series of experiments are being prepared using nearly full acceptance detectors for neutral and charged particles around internal targets in high intensity, phase-space-cooled hadronic beams. Later this year, it is planned to transfer the WASA detector from the CELSIUS to the COSY ring in order to measure the production and various decay channels of the and ' mesons, thereby investigating the violation of P, C, T, and combinations thereof, as well as isospin violation. The experimental and theoretical techniques employed here will provide an important basis to extend these investigations to the static and dynamical properties of hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. Additional related perspectives will be opened at the new facility ranging from the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter to measurements of the nucleon's transverse spin distribution in the valence quark region using polarized antiprotons.

  17. A new `hidden colour hypothesis' in hadron physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Afsar Abbas

    2006-05-01

    A new `hidden colour hypothesis' within the framework of QCD, as an extension of and in keeping with the spirit of the `colour singlet hypothesis' is hereby proposed. As such it should play a role in a consistent description of exotic hadrons, such as diquonia, pentaquarks, dibaryons etc. How these exotic hadrons are affected by this new hypothesis is discussed here. This new hypothesis suggests that the experimentalists may not be looking for single exotics but for composites of two or more of the same.

  18. Constraining gravity with hadron physics: neutron stars, modified gravity and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J

    2016-01-01

    The finding of Gravitational Waves by the aLIGO scientific and VIRGO collaborations opens opportunities to better test and understand strong interactions, both nuclear-hadronic and gravitational. Assuming General Relativity holds, one can constrain hadron physics at a neutron star. But precise knowledge of the Equation of State and transport properties in hadron matter can also be used to constrain the theory of gravity itself. I review a couple of these opportunities in the context of modified f(R) gravity, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and progress in the Equation of State of neutron matter from the chiral effective field theory of QCD.

  19. Constraining gravity with hadron physics: neutron stars, modified gravity and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2017-03-01

    The finding of Gravitational Waves (GW) by the aLIGO scientific and VIRGO collaborations opens opportunities to better test and understand strong interactions, both nuclear-hadronic and gravitational. Assuming General Relativity holds, one can constrain hadron physics at a neutron star. But precise knowledge of the Equation of State and transport properties in hadron matter can also be used to constrain the theory of gravity itself. I review a couple of these opportunities in the context of modified f (R) gravity, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and progress in the Equation of State of neutron matter from the chiral effective field theory of QCD.

  20. Physics division annual report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  1. Recent Developments And Validations in Geant4 Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.H.; Koi, T.; Folger, G.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kossov, M.; Starkov, N.; Heikkinen, A.; Wellisch, H.P.; /SLAC /CERN /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-02-12

    The Geant4 hadronic models cover the entire range of energies required by calorimeters in new and planned experiments. The extension and improvement of the elastic, cascade, parameterized and quark-gluon string models will be discussed. Such improvements include the extension to more particle types, a review and correction of cross sections, and a better treatment of energy and momentum conservation. Concurrent with this development has been a validation program which includes comparisons with double differential cross sections. An ongoing hadronic shower validation will also be discussed which includes the examination of longitudinal shower shapes and the performance of the above models as well as their interaction with electromagnetic processes such as multiple scattering.

  2. B physics at CDF - the Beauty of hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tonelli, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron p-pbar collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e+e- colliders. This provides an unique, rich, and highly rewarding program that is currently reaching full maturity. I report a few recent world-leading results on rare decays, CP-violation in Bs mixing, and b-> s penguin decays.

  3. The Hadronic Models for Cosmic Ray Physics: the FLUKA Code Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battistoni, G.; Garzelli, M.V.; Gadioli, E.; Muraro, S.; Sala, P.R.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Roesler, S.; Cerutti, F.; Ranft, J.; Pinsky, L.S.; Empl, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Villari, R.; /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /SLAC /CERN /Siegen U. /Houston U. /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati

    2007-01-31

    FLUKA is a general purpose Monte Carlo transport and interaction code used for fundamental physics and for a wide range of applications. These include Cosmic Ray Physics (muons, neutrinos, EAS, underground physics), both for basic research and applied studies in space and atmospheric flight dosimetry and radiation damage. A review of the hadronic models available in FLUKA and relevant for the description of cosmic ray air showers is presented in this paper. Recent updates concerning these models are discussed. The FLUKA capabilities in the simulation of the formation and propagation of EM and hadronic showers in the Earth's atmosphere are shown.

  4. GEANT4 Hadronic Physics Validation with Lhc Test-Beam Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa, Călin

    2005-02-01

    In the framework of the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) Simulation Physics Validation Project, we present first conclusions about the validation of the Geant4 hadronic physics lists based on comparisons with test-beam data collected with three LHC calorimeters: the ATLAS Tilecal, the ATLAS HEC and the CMS HCAL.

  5. Physics division annual report 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium

  6. B physics at CDF - the Beauty of hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonelli, Diego

    2010-11-01

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides an unique, rich, and highly rewarding program that is currently reaching full maturity. I report a few recent world-leading results on rare decays, CP-violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing, and b {yields} s penguin decays.

  7. B physics at CDF - the Beauty of hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonelli, D. [Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron pp-bar collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides an unique, rich, and highly rewarding program that is currently reaching full maturity. I report a few recent world-leading results on rare decays, CP-violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing, and b{yields}s penguin decays.

  8. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  9. Low $p_T$ Hadronic Physics with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072044

    2007-01-01

    The pixel detector of CMS can be used to reconstruct very low pT charged particles down to about 0.1 GeV/c. This can be achieved with good efficiency, resolution and negligible fake rate for elementary collisions. In case of central PbPb the fake rate can be kept low for pT>0.4 GeV/c. In addition, the detector can be employed for identification of neutral hadrons (V0s) and converted photons.

  10. 8th Workshop on Hadron Physics in China and Opportunities Worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Hadron Physics has drawn great interests from the Chinese nuclear and high-energy physics communities and has been one of the main research areas at major accelerator facilities in China. At the same time, the Chinese collaborations are playing increasingly important roles at international hadron physics facilities (Jefferson Lab, RHIC, COMPASS@CERN, J-PARC, …), in particular, at the recently upgraded 12 GeV-energy Jefferson Lab in US, which will provide a broad range of opportunities for frontier research in hadronic physics. Furthermore, the U.S. 2015 long range plan for nuclear science recommended Electron-Ion Colliders (EIC), as the highest priority for new facility construction after the completion of the FRIB as the next frontier for QCD physics. In China, an EIC@HIAF facility has been proposed by the Institute of Modern Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences to provide a powerful precision microscope for hadron physics study. In light of these new developments, the 8th workshop will be held at th...

  11. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne

  12. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, Igor M.

    2009-06-01

    The goals of the physics to be studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very impressive. Four major experimental installations are ready to compete in obtaining and analyzing the data from high-energy hadron collisions. The main hope is to answer the most intricate questions ever asked concerning the most fundamental problems of matter and its fundamental forces and space structure. The design of the LHC and its four detectors is briefly described. We then review the main facts revealed previously by experimentalists at other accelerators. The most pertinent topics and the stage-by-stage plans for LHC investigations are discussed. Further prospects for high-energy physics are outlined.

  13. Chiral symmetry and scalar meson in hadron and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kunihiro, T

    1995-01-01

    After giving a short introduction to the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with an anomaly term, we show the importance of the scalar-scalar correlation in the low-energy hadron dynamics, which correlation may be summarized by a scalar-isoscalar meson, the sigma meson. The discussion is based on the chiral quark model with the sigma-meson degrees of freedom. Possible experiments are proposed to produce the elusive meson in a nucleus and detect it. In relation to a precursory soft mode for the chiral transition, the reason is clarified why the dynamic properties of the superconductor may be described by the diffusive time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equation. We indicate the chiral symmetry plays a significant role also in nuclei; one may say that the stability of nuclei is due to the chiral symmetry of QCD.

  14. For Information: CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Applications are Now Open for the CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School August 9-18, 2006 Please go to the school web site http://hcpss.fnal.gov/ and follow the links to the Application process. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 8, 2006. Successful applicants and support awards will be announced shortly thereafter. Also available on the web is the tentative academic program of the school. The main goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers a broad picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. The emphasis of the first school will be on the physics potential of the first years of data taking at the LHC, and on the experimental and theoretical tools needed to exploit that potential. A series of lectures and informal discussions will include an introduction to the theoretical and phenomenological framework of hadron collisions, and current theoretical models of frontier physics, as...

  15. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  16. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Engelen

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly c

  17. Light-front quantum chromodynamics: A framework for the analysis of hadron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, B. L.G.; Bassetto, A.; Brodsky, S. J.; Broniowski, W.; Dalley, S.; Frederico, T.; Glazek, S. D.; Hiller, J. R.; Ji, C. -R.; Karmanov, V.; Kulshreshtha, D.; Mathiot, J. -F.; Melnitchouk, W.; Miller, G. A.; Papavassiliou, J.; Polyzou, W. N.; Stefanis, N.; Vary, J. P.; Ilderton, A.; Heinzl, T.

    2014-06-01

    An outstanding goal of physics is to find solutions that describe hadrons in the theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). For this goal, the light-front Hamiltonian formulation of QCD (LFQCD) is a complementary approach to the well-established lattice gauge method. LFQCD offers access to the hadrons nonperturbative quark and gluon amplitudes, which are directly testable in experiments at forefront facilities. We present an overview of the promises and challenges of LFQCD in the context of unsolved issues in QCD that require broadened and accelerated investigation. We identify specific goals of this approach and address its quantifiable uncertainties.

  18. Light-Front Quantum Chromodynamics: A framework for the analysis of hadron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, B L G; Brodsky, S J; Broniowski, W; Dalley, S; Frederico, T; Glazek, S D; Hiller, J R; Ji, C -R; Karmanov, V; Kulshreshtha, D; Mathiot, J -F; Melnitchouk, W; Miller, G A; Papavassiliou, J; Polyzou, W N; Stefanis, N G; Vary, J P; Ilderton, A; Heinzl, T

    2013-01-01

    An outstanding goal of physics is to find solutions that describe hadrons in the theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). For this goal, the light-front Hamiltonian formulation of QCD (LFQCD) is a complementary approach to the well-established lattice gauge method. LFQCD offers access to the hadrons' nonperturbative quark and gluon amplitudes, which are directly testable in experiments at existing and future facilities. We present an overview of the promises and challenges of LFQCD in the context of unsolved issues in QCD that require broadened and accelerated investigation. We identify specific goals of this approach and address its quantifiable uncertainties.

  19. The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter from construction toward physics

    CERN Document Server

    Adragna, P; Anderson, K; Antonaki, A; Batusov, V; Bednar, P; Binet, S; Biscarat, C; Blanchot, G; Bogush, A A; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Bosman, M; Bromberg, C; Budagov, Yu A; Caloba, L; Calvet, D; Carvalho, J; Castelo, J; Castillo, M V; Sforza, M C; Cavasinni, V; Cerqueira, A S; Chadelas, R; Costanzo, D; Cogswell, F; Constantinescu, S; Crouau, M; Cuenca, C; Damazio, D O; Daudon, F; David, M; Davidek, T; De, K; Del Prete, T; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dotti, A; Downing, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Errede, D; Errede, S; Farbin, A; Fassouliotis, D; Fedorko, I; Fenyuk, A; Ferdi, C; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, V; Fullana, E; Garde, V; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gildemeister, O; Gilewsky, V; Giangiobbe, V; Giokaris, N; Gomes, A; González, V; Grabskii, V; Grenier, P; Gris, P; Guarino, V; Guicheney, C; Sen-Gupta, A; Hakobyan, H; Haney, M; Henriques, A; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Hurwitz, M; Huston, J; Iglesias, C; And, K J; Junk, T; Karyukhin, A N; Khubua, J; Klereborn, J; Korolkov, I Ya; Krivkova, P; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Kurochkin, Yu; Kuzhir, P; Lambert, D; Le Compte, T; Lefèvre, R; Leitner, R; Lembesi, M; Li, J; Liablin, M; Lokajícek, M; Lomakin, Y; Amengual, J M L; Lupi, A; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Maliukov, S; Manousakis, A; Marques, C; Marroquim, F; Martin, F; Mazzoni, E; Montarou, G; Merritt, F S; Myagkov, A; Miller, R; Minashvili, I A; Miralles, L; Némécek, S; Nessi, M; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Onofre, A; Oreglia, M J; Pantea, D; Pallin, D; Pilcher, J E; Pina, J; Pinhão, J; Podlyski, F; Portell, X; Poveda, J; Price, L E; Pribyl, L; Proudfoot, J; Ramstedt, M; Reinmuth, G; Richards, R; Roda, C; Romanov, V; Rosnet, P; Roy, P; Rumiantsau, V; Russakovich, N; Salto, O; Salvachúa, B; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Satsunkevich, I S; Says, L P; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J L; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Shevtsov, P; Shochet, M; Da Silva, P; Silva, J; Simaitis, V; Sissakian, A N; Solodkov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosebee, M; Spanó, F; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E A; Starovoitov, P; Suk, M; Sykora, I; Tang, F; Tas, P; Teuscher, R; Tokar, S; Topilin, N; Torres, J; Tsulaia, V; Underwood, D; Usai, G; Valkár, S; Valls, J A; Vartapetian, A H; Vazeille, F; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Vivarelli, I; Volpi, M; White, A; Zaitsev, A; Zenine, A; Zenis, T

    2006-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. The construction phase of the calorimeter is nearly complete, and most of the effort now is directed toward the final assembly and commissioning in the underground experimental hall. The layout of the calorimeter and the tasks carried out during construction are described, first with a brief reminder of the requirements that drove the calorimeter design. During the last few years a comprehensive test-beam program has been followed in order to establish the calorimeter electromagnetic energy scale, to study its uniformity, and to compare real data to Monte Carlo simulation. The test-beam setup and first results from the data are described. During the test-beam period in 2004, lasting several months, data have been acquired with a complete slice of the central ATLAS calorimeter. The data collected in the test-beam are crucial in order to study...

  20. The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter from construction toward physics

    CERN Document Server

    Roda, C

    2004-01-01

    The tile calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. Almost all the work to build the calorimeter has been completed and most of the effort is now directed toward the final assembly and testing in the experimental area. The lay-out of the calorimeter and the tasks carried out during construction are described after a brief reminder of the requirements that drove the calorimeter design. During the last years a lot of work has also been put in the test accomplish the tests on beam to set the electromagnetic scale, to study its uniformity and to acquire data to tune the detector simulation. The test beam setup and selected results obtained from the acquired data are described. In this last year a few months long test on beam has been carried out acquiring data with a complete slice of the central ATLAS calorimeter. The data collected at the test on beam are crucial to study the algorithms to reco...

  1. Exploring Hadron Physics in Black Hole Formations: a New Promising Target of Neutrino Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2010-01-01

    The detection of neutrinos from massive stellar collapses can teach us a lot not only about source objects but also about microphysics working deep inside them. In this study we discuss quantitatively the possibility to extract information on the properties of dense and hot hadronic matter from neutrino signals coming out of black-hole-forming collapses of non-rotational massive stars. Based on our detailed numerical simulations we evaluate the event numbers for SuperKamiokande with neutrino oscillations being fully taken into account. We demonstrate that the event numbers from a Galactic event are large enough not only to detect it but also to distinguish one hadronic equation of state from another by our statistical method assuming the same progenitor model and non-rotation. This means that the massive stellar collapse can be a unique probe into hadron physics and will be a promising target of the nascent neutrino astronomy.

  2. Pluto{sup ++} - A Monte Carlo simulation tool for hadronic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagarlis, M.A.

    2000-07-01

    A versatile package for Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic interactions in C++ is presented, designed for compatibility with the ROOT analysis environment. Realistic models of resonance production, hadronic, and electromagnetic decays are implemented, motivated by the physics program of HADES. Empirical angular-distribution parametrizations for selected processes are utilized as well, such as resonance excitation in hadronic interactions, and nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering. The code comprises a self-contained framework for stand-alone principle simulations, including an extensive database of elementary particles and properties with support for additional user-input data, as well as utilities for the implementation of elementary detector setups and acceptance cuts. A standard interface for further on- and off-line processing of generated events with GEANT is also supplied. User-defined tasks via macros and derived classes are facilitated by the flexible design of the code, which in analysis mode may be employed for on-line fitting of experimental spectra. (orig.)

  3. Theory of heavy ion collision physics in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.

  4. New physics searches in the top quark sector in hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Pallabi

    2017-01-01

    Several theories beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics predict new and heavy particles yet to be observed in the hadron colliders. These particles are likely to decay through the heavy top quark, making it suitable as a probe for new physics phenomena. In this report the various experimental search strategies for such processes are discussed briefly. Important results from Tevatron, CMS and ATLAS experiments from the LHC are presented.

  5. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, June 6-15, 2007, CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis techniques and tools...

  6. 3rd CERN-Fermilab HadronCollider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    EP Department

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at Fermilab. Further enquiries should ...

  7. Hadron-hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-06-21

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

  8. Large Hadron Collider physics program Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, J B

    2000-01-01

    The LHC physics program at CERN addresses some of the fundamental issues in particle physics and CMS experiment would concentrate on them. The CMS detector is designed for the search of Standard Model Higgs boson in the whole possible mass range. Also it will be sensitive to Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric model and well adapted to searches for SUSY particles, new massive vector bosons, CP-violation in the B-system, search for substructure of quarks and leptons, etc. In the LHC heavy ion collisions the energy density would be well above the threshold for the possible formation of quark-gluon plasma. (15 refs).

  9. Large hadron collider physics program: Compact muon solenoid experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J B Singh

    2000-04-01

    The LHC physics program at CERN addresses some of the fundamental issues in particle physics and CMS experiment would concentrate on them. The CMS detector is designed for the search of Standard Model Higgs boson in the whole possible mass range. Also it will be sensitive to Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric model and well adapted to searches for SUSY particles, new massive vector bosons, CP-violation in -system, search for substructure of quarks and leptons, etc. In the LHC heavy ion collisions the energy density would be well above the threshold for the possible formation of quark–gluon plasma.

  10. Dijet physics with CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suvadeep Bose; on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    The results from various dijet distributions in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, with 2010 and 2011 data from the CMS experiment, are presented. The measurements of the dijet mass spectra, centrality ratio, azimuthal decorrelation and angular distribution are shown. Sensitivity of the phenomenological parameters used to model different event generators is also investigated. Prospects for observing evidence for new physics in these distributions are presented.

  11. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Hadronic EDM and New physics beyond standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear electric dipole moment is a very sensitive probe of CP violation beyond the standard model, and for light nuclei, it can be evaluated accurately using the few-body calculational methods. In this talk, we present the result of the evaluation of the electric dipole moment of 3-body and 4-body systems using the Gaussian expansion method in the ab initio approach and in the cluster model. We also give the future prospects for the discovery of new physics beyond it within the sensitivity of prepared experiments.

  13. Prospects of hadron and quark physics with electromagnetic probes. Proceedings of the second ELFE workshop on Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Hose, N.; Frois, B.; Guichon, P.A.M. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee; Pire, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Van de Wiele, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France). Division de Recherche Experimentale

    1996-07-01

    The last three days of the second ELFE workshop on confinement physics were devoted to the results of the work during the past year on the update and improvement of the physics case, the feasibility of the ELFE at DESY project(which combines the HERA ring used as a stretcher and a low duty factor 25 GeV electron linac which could be either a section of the TESLA collider or the injector of the foreseen short wave length free electron laser) as well as the development of the detectors. The participations have been decided into 5 copies: inclusive and semi-inclusive reactions; real photon physics, exclusive reactions; color transparency; detectors. (author)

  14. Validation of Geant4 hadronic physics models at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sunanda; Geant4 Hadronic Group

    2010-04-01

    GEANT4 provides a number of physics models at intermediate energies (corresponding to incident momenta in the range 1-20 GeV/c). Recently, these models have been validated with existing data from a number of experiments: (a) inclusive proton and neutron production with a variety of beams (π-, π+, p) at different energies between 1 and 9 GeV/c on a number of nuclear targets (from beryllium to uranium); (2) inclusive pion/kaon/proton production from 14.6 GeV/c proton beams on nuclear targets (from beryllium to gold); (3) inclusive pion production from pion beams between 3-13 GeV/c on a number of nuclear targets (from beryllium to lead). The results of simulation/data comparison for different GEANT4 models are discussed in the context of validating the models and determining their usage in physics lists for high energy application. Due to the increasing number of validations becoming available, and the requirement that they be done at regular intervals corresponding to the GEANT4 release schedule, automated methods of validation are being developed.

  15. Final Report, CONTRIBUTIONS TO STUDIES OF CP VIOLATION AND HADRONIC PHYSICS WITH THE BABAR COLLABORATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David Norvil [University of Louisville

    2013-07-25

    The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group has undertaken a long-term effort in understanding baryon production in elementary particle processes in the 10 GeV energy region. We have contributed significantly to the broad program of the BaBar Collaboration, particularly in support of computing, data visualization, and simulation. We report here on progress in the areas of service to the Collaboration and understanding of baryon production via measurement of inclusive hadronic particle spectra.

  16. Particle accelerators from Big Bang physics to hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical physicist Victor “Viki” Weisskopf, Director-General of CERN from 1961 to 1965, once “There are three kinds of physicists, namely the machine builders, the experimental physicists, and the theoretical physicists. […] The machine builders are the most important ones, because if they were not there, we would not get into this small-scale region of space. If we compare this with the discovery of America, the machine builders correspond to captains and ship builders who really developed the techniques at that time. The experimentalists were those fellows on the ships who sailed to the other side of the world and then landed on the new islands and wrote down what they saw. The theoretical physicists are those who stayed behind in Madrid and told Columbus that he was going to land in India.” Rather than focusing on the theoretical physicists, as most popular science books on particle physics do, this beautifully written and also entertaining book is different in that, firstly, the main foc...

  17. Calculation of hadronic transition amplitudes in charm physics; Berechnung hadronischer Uebergangsamplituden in der Charm-Physik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Christoph

    2011-09-23

    Transitions of charmed hadrons are of significant importance, since they provide possibilities to extract the CKM matrix elements V{sub cd} and V{sub cs} from experimental data as well as interesting channels to search for new physics effects. However, quarks are bound in hadrons, and it is necessary to describe this effect in a reliable way, to study the underlying flavour dynamics. For this, one has to use nonperturbative tools, to determine the corresponding transition amplitudes. The results of such calculations can furthermore be of use, to test the predictions of QCD and to contribute to a deeper understanding of the structure of hadrons. In this thesis two topics are investigated using the method of QCD light-cone sum rules (LCSRs). The first topic consists in the form factors of the semileptonic decays D {yields} {pi}l{nu}{sub l} and D {yields} Kl{nu}{sub l}, for which new results are calculated using up-to-date input values. Since LCSRs are not applicable in the whole range of kinematics, they are extrapolated by the use of appropriate parametrisations and the results agree well with experimental data. The second topic are the transitions of charmed baryons to a nucleon. Here the corresponding transition form factors and in addition the hadronic {lambda}{sub c}D{sup (*)}N and {sigma}{sub c}D{sup (*)}N coupling constants are calculated - the latter by the consideration of double dispersion relations. These coupling constants are of special interest for the description of hadronic interactions, like open charm production in proton-antiprotoncollisions. Furthermore there appears the problem, that both parity states of a baryon contribute to the considered functional representation, for which a consistent way to separate them is presented. (orig.)

  18. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orginos, Kostas [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Richards, David [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-02-05

    The solution of QCD on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this study, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  19. Physics perspectives of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riccati, L

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN will deliver ion beams up to centre of mass energies of the order of 5.5 TeV per nucleon, in case of lead. If compared to the available facilities for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions (SPS and RHIC) , this represents a huge step forward in terms of both volume and energy density that can be attained in nuclear interactions. ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only detector specifically designed for the physics of nuclear collisions at LHC, even though it can also study high cross section processes occurring in proton- proton collisions. The main goal of the experiment is to observe and study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter (quark gluon plasma - QGP). ALICE is conceived as a general purpose detector and will address most of the phenomena related to the QGP formation at LHC energies: to this purpose, a large fraction of the hadrons, leptons and photons produced in each interaction will be measure...

  20. Physics perspectives of the ALICE experiment at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Massimo Masera

    2003-04-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) under construction at CERN will deliver ion beams up to centre of mass energies of the order of 5.5 TeV per nucleon, in case of lead. If compared to the available facilities for the study of nucleus–nucleus collisions (SpS and RHIC), this represents a huge step forward in terms of both volume and energy density that can be attained in nuclear interactions. ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) is the only detector specifically designed for the physics of nuclear collisions at LHC, even though it can also study high cross-section processes occurring in proton–proton collisions. The main goal of the experiment is to observe and study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter (quark gluon plasma – QGP). ALICE is conceived as a general-purpose detector and will address most of the phenomena related to the QGP formation at LHC energies: for this purpose, a large fraction of the hadrons, leptons and photons produced in each interaction will be measured and identified.

  1. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  2. ANKE, a new facility for medium energy hadron physics at COSY-Juelich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsov, S.; Bechstedt, U.; Bothe, W.; Bongers, N.; Borchert, G.; Borgs, W.; Braeutigam, W.; Buescher, M. E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de; Cassing, W.; Chernyshev, V.; Chiladze, B.; Dietrich, J.; Drochner, M.; Dymov, S.; Erven, W.; Esser, R.; Franzen, A.; Golubeva, Ye.; Gotta, D.; Grande, T.; Grzonka, D.; Hardt, A.; Hartmann, M.; Hejny, V.; Horn, L. van; Jarczyk, L.; Junghans, H.; Kacharava, A.; Kamys, B.; Khoukaz, A.; Kirchner, T.; Klehr, F.; Klein, W.; Koch, H.R.; Komarov, V.I.; Kondratyuk, L.; Koptev, V.; Kopyto, S.; Krause, R.; Kravtsov, P.; Kruglov, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lang, N.; Langenhagen, N.; Lepges, A.; Ley, J.; Maier, R.; Martin, S.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Meyer, K.; Mikirtychiants, S.; Mueller, H.; Munhofen, P.; Mussgiller, A.; Nekipelov, M.; Nelyubin, V.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Petrus, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Prietzschk, B.; Probst, H.J.; Pysz, K.; Rathmann, F.; Rimarzig, B.; Rudy, Z.; Santo, R.; Paetz Schieck, H.; Schleichert, R.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, Chr.; Schneider, H.; Schwarz, U.; Seyfarth, H.; Sibirtsev, A.; Sieling, U.; Sistemich, K.; Selikov, A.; Stechemesser, H.; Stein, H.J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Watzlawik, K.-H.; Wuestner, P.; Yashenko, S.; Zalikhanov, B.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zwoll, K.; Zychor, I.; Schult, O.W.B.; Stroeher, H

    2001-04-21

    ANKE is a new experimental facility for the spectroscopy of products from proton-induced reactions on internal targets. It has recently been implemented in the accelerator ring of the cooler synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZ-Juelich), Germany. The device consists of three dipole magnets, various target installations and dedicated detection systems. It will enable a variety of hadron-physics experiments like meson production in elementary proton-nucleon processes and studies of medium modifications in proton-nucleus interactions.

  3. Search of New Physics with Boosted Higgs Boson in Hadronic Final States with ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Qi

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) confirms the validity of the Standard Model (SM) in the description of particle interactions at electroweak scale. However, radioactive corrections to the Higgs mass drives its value to the model's validity limit, indicating either extreme fine-tuning or the presence of new physics at higher energy scale. Since 2015, the LHC starts its Run 2 journey with unprecedented center of mass energy of 13 TeV. Along with increase in luminosity, this greatly extends the sensitivity of ATLAS experiment to heavy new particles at TeV scale. In particular, many new physics models beyond the Standard Model manifest themselves through significant coupling to the Higgs boson in decays of new particles to a Higgs boson and other SM particles. In this work, two searches for resonances decaying to either pair of Higgs bosons or a Higgs boson associated with another SM vector boson in all hadronic final states are presented using data collected by ATLAS during Run 2...

  4. Trends and Progress in Nuclear and Hadron Physics: A Straight or Winding Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, James P.; Adhikari, Lekha; Chen, Guangyao; Li, Meijian; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Qian, Wenyang; Spence, John R.; Tang, Shuo; Tuchin, Kirill; Zhao, Xingbo

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative calculations of the properties of hadrons and nuclei, with assessed uncertainties, have emerged as competitive with experimental measurements in a number of major cases. We may well be entering an era where theoretical predictions are critical for experimental progress. Cross-fertilization between the fields of relativistic hadronic structure and non-relativistic nuclear structure is readily apparent. Non-perturbative renormalization methods such as similarity renormalization group and Okubo-Lee-Suzuki schemes as well as many-body methods such as coupled cluster, configuration interaction and lattice simulation methods are now employed and advancing in both major areas of physics. New algorithms to apply these approaches on supercomputers are shared among these areas of physics. The roads to success have intertwined with each community taking the lead at various times in the recent past. We briefly sketch these fascinating paths and comment on some symbiotic relationships. We also overview some recent results from the Hamiltonian basis light-front quantization approach.

  5. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  6. Polarization experiments with hadronic and electromagnetic probes. [Annual] report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, V.

    1993-03-30

    The following research activities were carried out during the past year Calibration of focal plane polarimeter POMME up to 2.4 GeV at Saturne National Laboratory (LNS) in Saclay. Measurement of tensor analyzing power T{sub 20} and polarization transfer {kappa}{sub 0} at Saturne up to 2.1 GeV in elastic backward dp scattering {rvec d}p {yields} {rvec p}d. Measurement of tensor analyzing power T{sub 20} at synchrophasotron in Dubha up to 4.4 Gev in elastic backward dp scattering {rvec d}p {yields} pd. Resubmission of conditionally Approved G{sub EP} proposal 89-14 at CEBAF. Start construction of focal plane polarimeter (FPP) for CEBAF hall A hadron spectrometer. The planned work for the next year includes: Construction of FPP for CEBAF hall A hadron spectrometer; measurement of polarization transfer {kappa}{sub 0} and tensor analyzing power T{sub 20} in elastic backward dp scattering at Saturne; measurements of tensor analyzing power in {sup 1}H({sup 6}Li,d)X, {sup 1}H({sup 6}Li,{alpha})X, {sup 1}H({sup 6}Li,t)X and {sup 1}H({sup 6}Li,{sup 3}He)X reactions at Saturne; and study of polarization transfer in {sup 2}H({rvec e},e{prime}{rvec p})n reaction at Bates.

  7. Physics and Advanced Technologies 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, R

    2002-05-09

    The Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate was created in July 2000 by Bruce Tarter, Director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Director called for the new organization to execute and support programs that apply cutting-edge physics and advanced technology to develop integrated solutions to problems in national security, fusion energy, information science, health care, and other national grand challenges. When I was appointed a year later as the PAT Directorate's first Associate Director, I initiated a strategic planning project to develop a vision, mission, and long-term goals for the Directorate. We adopted the goal of becoming a leader in frontier physics and technology for twenty-first-century national security missions: Stockpile Stewardship, homeland security, energy independence, and the exploration of space. Our mission is to: (1) Help ensure the scientific excellence and vitality of the major LLNL programs through its leadership role in performing basic and applied multidisciplinary research and development with programmatic impact, and by recruiting and retaining science and technology leaders; (2) Create future opportunities and directions for LLNL and its major programs by growing new program areas and cutting-edge capabilities that are synergistic with, and supportive of, its national security mission; (3) Provide a direct conduit to the academic and high-tech industrial sectors for LLNL and its national security programs, through which the Laboratory gains access to frontier science and technology, and can impact the science and technology communities; (4) Leverage unique Laboratory capabilities, to advance the state universe. This inaugural PAT Annual Report begins a series that will chronicle our progress towards fulfilling this mission. I believe the report demonstrates that the PAT Directorate has a strong base of capabilities and accomplishments on which to build in meeting its goals. Some of the highlights

  8. QCD on the Light-Front. A Systematic Approach to Hadron Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter

    2014-06-01

    Light-front Hamiltonian theory, derived from the quantization of the QCD Lagrangian at fixed light-front time x + = x 0 + x 3, provides a rigorous frame-independent framework for solving nonperturbative QCD. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian H LF predict the hadronic mass spectrum, and the corresponding eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure, providing a direct connection to the QCD Lagrangian. In the semiclassical approximation the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrödinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. Remarkably, the potential U has a unique form of a harmonic oscillator potential if one requires that the chiral QCD action remains conformally invariant. A mass gap and the color confinement scale also arises when one extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light-front Hamiltonian theory. In the case of mesons, the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of H LF for zero quark mass satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion in the invariant variable , which is conjugate to the invariant mass squared . The result is a nonperturbative relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. Only one mass parameter appears. The corresponding light-front Dirac equation provides a dynamical and spectroscopic model of nucleons. The same light-front equations arise from the holographic mapping of the soft-wall model modification of AdS5 space with a unique dilaton profile to QCD

  9. Hadronic Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding hadronic interactions is crucial for investigating the properties of unstable hadrons, since measuring physical quantities for unstable hadrons including the resonance mass and decay width requires simultaneous calculations of final scattering states. Recent studies of hadronic scatterings and decays are reviewed from this point of view. The nuceon-nucleon and multi-nucleon interactions are very important to understand the formation of nucleus from the first principle of QCD. These interactions have been studied mainly by two methods, due originally to L\\"uscher and to HALQCD. The results obtained from the two methods are compared in three channels, $I=2$ two-pion, H-dibaryon, and two-nucleon channels. So far the results from the two methods for the two-nucleon channels are different even at the level of the presence or absence of bound states. We then discuss possible uncertainties in each method. Recent results on the binding energy for helium nuclei are also reviewed.

  10. PREFACE: Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, David; de Jager, Kees; Roberts, Craig; Sheldon, Paul; Swanson, Eric

    2007-06-01

    The Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics was held on 22-24 October 2006 at the Opryland Resort in Nashville, Tennessee. Keeping with tradition, the meeting was held in conjunction with the Fall meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. Approximately 90 physicists participated in the meeting, presenting 25 talks in seven plenary sessions and 48 talks in 11 parallel sessions. These sessions covered a wide range of topics related to strongly interacting matter. Among these were charm spectroscopy, gluonic exotics, nucleon resonance physics, RHIC physics, electroweak and spin physics, lattice QCD initiatives, and new facilities. Brad Tippens and Brad Keister provided perspective from the funding agencies. The organisers are extremely grateful to the following institutions for financial and logistical support: the American Physical Society, Jefferson Lab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Vanderbilt University. We thank the following persons for assisting in organising the parallel sessions: Ted Barnes, Jian-Ping Chen, Ed Kinney, Krishna Kumar, Harry Lee, Mike Leitch, Kam Seth, and Dennis Weygand. We also thank Gerald Ragghianti for designing the conference poster, Will Johns for managing the audio-visual equipment and for placing the talks on the web, Sandy Childress for administrative expertise, and Vanderbilt graduate students Eduardo Luiggi and Jesus Escamillad for their assistance. David Ernst, Kees de Jager, Craig Roberts (Chair), Paul Sheldon and Eric Swanson Editors

  11. Low Q[sup 2], high v neutrino physics (CVC, PCAC, hadron dominance)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z. (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Marage, P. (Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-04-10

    A critical review is given of the main theoretical bases and of the experimental results of neutrino physics at low four-momentum transfer (Q[sup 2] [le] 1 GeV[sup 2]) and high energy transfer (v [ge] a few GeV). The theoretical predictions for the vector current are first presented, using the CVC hypothesis and the hadron dominance model of Piketty and Stodolsky. The predictions for the axial current at very small Q[sup 2] values are discussed on the basis of the PCAC hypothesis (Adler's theorem), and extended for Q[sup 2] [le] 1 GeV[sup 2] in the lines of hadron dominance; the structure of the longitudinal component of the axial current is particularly discussed. Experimental data on neutrino and antineutrino interactions on nucleons are reviewed, in particular the total cross sections, which provide good tests of the PCAC hypothesis and of the model of Piketty and Stodolsky; also reviewed are the data on diffractive production of [pi], [rho] and [alpha][sub 1] mesons. The observation of shadowing, from the comparison of the total cross sections of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon and deuterium nuclei, is discussed in detail with emphasis on the predictions of the PCAC hypothesis, in the framework of the Glauber-Gribov model. Finally a review is given of the results on coherent neutrino and antineutrino interactions on atomic nuclei.

  12. Physics Division annual report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.; Henning, W.F.

    1994-08-01

    This is the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division Annual Report for the period April 1, 1993 to March 31, 1994. It summarizes work done in a number of different fields, both on site, and at other facilities. Chapters describe heavy ion nuclear physics research, operation and development of the ATLAS accelerator, medium-energy nuclear physics research, theoretical physics, and atomic and molecular physics research.

  13. Impact of the choice of physics list on GEANT4 simulations of hadronic showers in tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Speckmayer, P

    2010-01-01

    The development of pion induced showers in a large block of matter (tungsten, lead, iron) is simulated for pions from 1 to 50GeV. Two GEANT4 physics lists (QGSP BERT and QGSP BERT HP) are compared. The deposited energy at each step of the simulation is identified as visible, invisible or escaped. It will be shown, that for tungsten in most of the hadronic showers more than 90% of the energy is deposited visibly if QGSP BERT is used. This fraction drops to only 60% for QGSP BERT HP. The latter fraction is similar to lead, even when QGSP BERT is used for the simulation. The impact of this behaviour on the energy resolution of a sampling calorimeter with scintillator as active material is shown. Although more energy is deposited visibly for QGSP BERT than for QGSP BERT HP, the reconstructed energy resolution is about 5 to 10% percent better for the latter.

  14. Italian Physical Society b-hadron semileptonic decays with $\\tau$ leptons in final states in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Gianluca Siddi, Benedetto

    2017-01-01

    Lepton universality, described in the Standard Model, predicts equal coupling between gauge bosons and the three lepton families. SM extensions give additional interactions, implying in some cases a stronger coupling with the third generation of leptons. Semileptonic decays of b-hadrons provide a sensitive probe to such New Physics effects. The presence of additional charged Higgs bosons, required by such SM extensions, can have significant effect on the semileptonic decay rate of $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^{*+}τ^−\\bar{ν}_{τ}$ . The combination of experimental measurements give a deviation from the standard model prediction of about 4 σ. It is therefore important to perform additional measurements in this sector in order to improve the precision and confirm or disprove this deviation. Results obtained by LHCb on $B^0 \\to D^{*−}τ^+ ν_τ$ decays, where the τ decays leptonically, are reported. The LHCb perspectives with other final states are discussed.

  15. On the Deviation of the Standard Model Predictions in the Large Hadron Collider Experiments (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The newest Large Hadron Collider experiments targeting the search for New Physics manifested the possibility of new heavy particles. Such particles are not predicted in the framework of Standard Model, however their existence is lawful in the framework of another model based on J. A.Wheeler’s geometrodynamcs.

  16. Low Q2, High ν Neutrino Physics (cvc, Pcac, Hadron Dominance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Marage, P.

    A critical review is given of the main theoretical bases and of the experimental results of neutrino physics at low four-momentum transfer (Q2≤1 GeV2) and high energy transfer (ν≥a few GeV). The theoretical predictions for the vector current are first presented, using the CVC hypothesis and the hadron dominance model of Piketty and Stodolsky. The predictions for the axial current at very small Q2 values are discussed on the basis of the PCAC hypothesis (Adler’s theorem), and extended for Q2≲1 GeV2 in the lines of hadron dominance; the structure of the longitudinal component of the axial current is particularly discussed. Experimental data on neutrino and antineutrino interactions on nucleons are reviewed, in particular the total cross sections, which provide good tests of the PCAC hypothesis and of the model of Piketty and Stodolsky; also reviewed are the data on diffractive production of π, ρ and a1 mesons. The observation of shadowing, from the comparison of the total cross sections of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon and deuterium nuclei, is discussed in detail with emphasis on the predictions of the PCAC hypothesis, in the framework of the Glauber-Gribov model. Finally a review is given of the results on coherent neutrino and antineutrino interactions on atomic nuclei: • π meson production, by charged and neutral currents in several experiments, providing a detailed test of the PCAC hypothesis; • ρ meson production, providing a test of the CVC hypothesis in weak interactions; • a1 meson or nonresonant ρπ system production, allowing the study of the weak axial current structure.

  17. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1992--June 30 , 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, J.J.; Cohen, T.D.

    1993-07-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. The section on Hadrons in Nuclei reports research into the ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate decreases in nuclear matter, and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the Structure of Hadrons reports progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon. These results cover widely different approaches -- lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. Progress in Relativistic Nuclear Physics is reported on electromagnetic interactions in a relativistic bound state formalism, with applications to elastic electron scattering by deuterium, and on application of a two-body quasipotential equation to calculate the spectrum of mesons formed as bound states of a quark and antiquark. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium similar to that found from QCD sum rules. Calculations of three-body bound states with simple forms of relativistic dynamics are also discussed. The section on Heavy Ion Dynamics and Related Processes describes progress on the (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) problem and heavy-on dynamics. In particular, the sharp electrons observed in {beta}{sup +} irradiation of heavy atoms have recently been subsumed into the ``Composite Particle Scenario,`` generalizing the ``(e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}-Puzzle`` of the pairs from heavy ion collisions to the ``Sharp Lepton Problem.``

  18. Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David Norvil [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-06-30

    The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group contributed significantly to the success of the BaBar Experiment at SLAC and the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab. In particular, they have contributed to understanding hadronic processes in electron-positron annihilation and charged lepton flavor violation in a very rare muon conversion process. Both are high-precision undertakings at the Intensity Frontier of High Energy Physics.

  19. Supersymmetry phenomenology in the context of neutrino physics and the large hadron collider LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanussek, Marja

    2012-05-15

    Experimentally, it is well established that the Standard Model of particle physics requires an extension to accommodate the neutrino oscillation data, which indicates that at least two neutrinos are massive and that two of the neutrino mixing angles are large. Massive neutrinos are naturally present in a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model which includes lepton-number violating terms (the B3 MSSM). Furthermore, supersymmetry stabilizes the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and the scale of unified theories or the Planck scale. In this thesis, we study in detail how neutrino masses are generated in the B3 MSSM. We present a mechanism how the experimental neutrino oscillation data can be realized in this framework. Then we discuss how recently published data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be used to constrain the parameter space of this model. Furthermore, we present work on supersymmetric models where R-parity is conserved, considering scenarios with light stops in the light of collider physics and scenarios with near-massless neutralinos in connection with cosmological restrictions.

  20. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  1. Theoretical studies in medium-energy nuclear and hadronic physics. [Indiana Univ. Nuclear Theory Center and Department of Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, C J; Macfarlane, M H; Matsui, T; Serot, B D

    1993-01-01

    A proposal for theoretical nuclear physics research is made for the period April 1, 1993 through March 31, 1996. Research is proposed in the following areas: relativistic many-body theory of nuclei and nuclear matter, quasifree electroweak scattering and strange quarks in nuclei, dynamical effects in (e,e[prime]p) scattering at large momentum transfer, investigating the nucleon's parton sea with polarized leptoproduction, physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus[endash]nucleus collisions, QCD sum rules and hadronic properties, non-relativistic models of nuclear reactions, and spin and color correlations in a quark-exchange model of nuclear matter. Highlights of recent research, vitae of principal investigators, and lists of publications and invited talks are also given. Recent research dealt primarily with medium-energy nuclear physics, relativistic theories of nuclei and the nuclear response, the nuclear equation of state under extreme conditions, the dynamics of the quark[endash]gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and theories of the nucleon[endash]nucleon force.

  2. For information - Université de Genève : Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2005-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Faculte des sciences Section de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet - 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Mercredi 16 March SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE à 17h00 - Auditoire Stückelberg Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN Prof. Olivier Bruning / CERN The Large Hadron Collider project at CERN will bring the energy frontier of high energy particle physics back to Europe and with it push the accelerator technology into uncharted teritory. The talk presents the LHC project in the context of the past CERN accelerator developments and addresses the main challenges in terms of technology and accelerator physics. Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: A. Cervera Villanueva

  3. Constraints from the first LHC data on hadronic event generators for ultra-high energy cosmic-ray physics

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David; Pierog, Tanguy; Ostapchenko, Sergey; Werner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the primary energy and mass of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) generating extensive air-showers in the Earth's atmosphere, relies on the detailed modeling of hadronic multiparticle production at center-of-mass (c.m.) collision energies up to two orders of magnitude higher than those studied at particle colliders. The first Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data have extended by more than a factor of three the c.m. energies in which we have direct proton-proton measurements available to compare to hadronic models. In this work we compare LHC results on inclusive particle production at energies sqrt(s) = 0.9, 2.36, and 7 TeV to predictions of various hadronic Monte Carlo (MC) models used commonly in cosmic-ray (CR) physics (QGSJET, EPOS and SIBYLL). As a benchmark with a standard collider physics model we also show PYTHIA (and PHOJET) predictions with various parameter settings. While reasonable overall agreement is found for some of the MC, none of them reproduces consistently the sqrt(s) ...

  4. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: Physics with Hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Ian

    2011-04-01

    After many years of sustained effort, The LHC has started operation and physics results have started to be released. This marks the beginning of a new era in High Energy Physics during which the fundamental mechanism underlying the source of masses for the elextro-weak gauge bosons will be probed exhaustively. These results will, over the next decade, enable questions such as ``Does the Higgs boson exist?'' ``Are there extra space time dimensions,'' ``Is there supersymmetry?'' ``can dark matter be produced at a particle accelerator?'' to be addressed, and the large variety of theoretical ideas developed over the last 20 years to be ``weighed in the balance.'' My presentation will discuss some of the physics program of the ATLAS experiment, the discoveries that we expect to make in the next few years and their role in the ``weighing'' that will occur.

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory 1980 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelberger, E.G. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: astrophysics and cosmology, fundamental symmetries, nuclear structure and reactions, radiative capture, medium energy physics, heavy ion reactions, research by outside users, accelerators and ion sources, instrumentation and experimental techniques, and computers and computing. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  6. Nuclear Physics Laboratory 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelberger, E.G. (ed.)

    1979-07-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: astrophysics and cosmology, fundamental symmetries, nuclear structure, radiative capture, medium energy physics, heavy ion reactions, research by users and visitors, accelerator and ion source development, instrumentation and experimental techniques, and computers and computing. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  7. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01

    This document is the annual review of the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division for the period April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993. Work on the ATLAS device is covered, as well as work on a number of others in lab, as well as collaborative projects. Heavy ion nuclear physics research looked at quasi-elastic, and deep-inelastic reactions, cluster states, superdeformed nuclei, and nuclear shape effects. There were programs on accelerator mass spectroscopy, and accelerator and linac development. There were efforts in medium energy nuclear physics, weak interactions, theoretical nuclear and atomic physics, and experimental atomic and molecular physics based on accelerators and synchrotron radiation.

  8. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  9. Resonance poles and threshold energies for hadron physical problems by a model-independent universal algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; Wambach, Jochen; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-01-01

    We show how complex resonance poles and threshold energies for systems in hadron physics can be accurately obtained by using a method based on the Pad\\'{e}-approximant which was recently developed for the calculation of resonance poles for atomic and molecular auto-ionization systems. The main advantage of this method is the ability to calculate the resonance poles and threshold energies from \\emph{real} spectral data. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of this method we apply it here to an analytical model as well as to experimental data for the squared modulus of the vector pion form factor, the S0 partial wave amplitude for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering and the cross section ratio $R(s)$ for $e^+e^-$ collisions. The extracted values for the resonance poles of the $\\rho(770)$ and the $f_0(500)$ or $\\sigma$ meson are in very good agreement with the literature. When the data are noisy the prediction of decay thresholds proves to be less accurate but feasible.

  10. TaN, a molecular system for probing ${\\cal{P,T}}$-violating hadron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fleig, Timo; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    All-electron configuration interaction theory in the framework of the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian has been applied to the TaN molecule, a promising candidate in the search for Beyond-Standard-Model physics in both the hadron and the lepton sector of matter. We obtain in the first excited {$^3\\Delta_1$} state a ${\\cal{P,T}}$-odd effective electric field of $36.0 \\left[\\frac{\\rm GV}{\\rm cm}\\right]$, a scalar-pseudoscalar ${\\cal{P,T}}$-odd interaction constant of $32.8$ [kHz], and a nuclear magnetic-quadrupole moment interaction constant of $0.74$ [$\\frac{10^{33} {\\text{Hz}}}{e\\, {\\text{cm}}^2}$]. The latter interaction constant has been obtained with a new approach which we describe in detail. Using the same highly correlated all-electron wavefunctions with up to $2.5$ billion expansion terms, we obtain a parallel magnetic hyperfine interaction constant of $-2954$ [MHz] for the $\\rm {^{181}{T}a}$ nucleus, a very large molecule-frame electric dipole moment of $-4.91$ [Debye], and spectroscopic constants for the fo...

  11. A novel quark-field creation operator construction for hadronic physics in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Peardon, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Huey-Wen Lin, David Richards, John Bulava, Colin Morningstar, Keisuke Juge

    2009-09-01

    A new quark-field smearing algorithm is defined which enables efficient calculations of a broad range of hadron correlation functions. The technique applies a low-rank operator to define smooth fields, that are to be used in hadron creation operators. The resulting space of smooth fields is small enough that all elements of the reduced quark propagator can be computed exactly at reasonable computational cost. Correlations between arbitrary sources, including multi-hadron operators can be computed {\\em a posteriori} without requiring new lattice Dirac operator inversions. The method is tested on realistic lattice sizes with light dynamical quarks.

  12. A novel quark-field creation operator construction for hadronic physics in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Peardon, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Huey-Wen Lin, David Richards, John Bulava, Colin Morningstar, Keisuke Juge

    2009-09-01

    A new quark-field smearing algorithm is defined which enables efficient calculations of a broad range of hadron correlation functions. The technique applies a low-rank operator to define smooth fields, that are to be used in hadron creation operators. The resulting space of smooth fields is small enough that all elements of the reduced quark propagator can be computed exactly at reasonable computational cost. Correlations between arbitrary sources, including multi-hadron operators can be computed {\\em a posteriori} without requiring new lattice Dirac operator inversions. The method is tested on realistic lattice sizes with light dynamical quarks.

  13. Search for New Physics in Top Quark Production and Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumiceva, Francisco [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Our goal is to measure precisely the properties of the heaviest subatomic particle ever discovered, the top quark. In the proton-proton collisions at the LHC, top quarks are produced copiously. The largest set of top quarks recorded by the CMS detector make it an ideal laboratory to measure properties such as its mass and the rate at which pair of top quarks are produced in association with energetic photons. Quantum electrodynamics, or QED, describes the emission of light by charged particles and is the most precise physics theory ever devised. Typically this means light emitted by electrons, but any charged particles will do, such as the top quark. Studies of the light-emitting properties of top quarks help us to refine our current theoretical predictions at the finest level, and provide additional tools to study in more detail the recently discovered Higgs boson particle. However, during this process, the studies may reveal interesting features not yet observed. Deviations from the standard predictions would be a strong sign of something entirely new. These new physics theories are motivated to answer the current big mysteries in the universe such as what is the nature of mass or what is dark matter. As the LHC increases the collision energy and its luminosity, the detectors need to be improved to cope with these high-luminosity scenarios. New sensors will be installed in the hadron calorimeter detectors along with new front and end electronics at the end of 2016. We are testing and calibrating the new front-end readout electronics that will allow us to have more options to reduce the noise on these detectors. In order to do this calibration, we have developed a system that can inject electric charge in the full range of the charge integrator chip, the QIE ASICs.

  14. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K. [ed.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.

  15. Physics and Advanced Technologies 2003 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A; Sketchley, J

    2005-01-20

    The Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate overcame significant challenges in 2003 to deliver a wealth of scientific and programmatic milestones, and move toward closer alignment with programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We acted aggressively in enabling the PAT Directorate to contribute to future, growing Lawrence Livermore missions in homeland security and at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We made heavy investments to bring new capabilities to the Laboratory, to initiate collaborations with major Laboratory programs, and to align with future Laboratory directions. Consistent with our mission, we sought to ensure that Livermore programs have access to the best science and technology, today and tomorrow. For example, in a move aimed at revitalizing the Laboratory's expertise in nuclear and radiation detection, we brought the talented Measurement Sciences Group to Livermore from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, after its mission there had diminished. The transfer to our I Division entailed significant investment by PAT in equipment and infrastructure required by the group. In addition, the move occurred at a time when homeland security funding was expected, but not yet available. By the end of the year, though, the group was making crucial contributions to the radiation detection program at Livermore, and nearly every member was fully engaged in programmatic activities. Our V Division made a move of a different sort, relocating en masse from Building 121 to the NIF complex. This move was designed to enhance interaction and collaboration among high-energy-density experimental scientists at the Laboratory, a goal that is essential to the effective use of NIF in the future. Since then, V Division has become increasingly integrated with NIF activities. Division scientists are heavily involved in diagnostic development and fielding and are poised to perform equation-of-state and high-temperature hohlraum experiments in 2004

  16. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Brüning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Cetinkaya, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; De Roeck, A; d'Enterria, D; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinol, L; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Ten Kate, H; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  17. Hadronic matter at the edge: A survey of some theoretical approaches to the physics of the QCD phase diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years a wealth of high quality data has made possible to test current theoretical ideas about the properties of hadrons subject to extreme conditions of density and temperature. The relativistic heavy-ion program carried out at the CERN-SPS and under development at the BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC has provided results that probe the evolution of collisions of hadronic matter at high energies from the initially large density to the late dilute stages. In addition, QCD on the lattice has produced results complementing these findings with first principles calculations for observables in a regime where perturbative techniques cannot describe the nature of strongly coupled systems. This work aims to review some recent developments that make use of field theoretical methods to describe the physics of hadrons at finite temperature and density. I concentrate on two of the main topics that have been explored in the last few years: (1) The search for the structure of the phase diagram and (2) analytical signal...

  18. Performance of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter and the Physics of Electroweak Top Quark Production at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, D C

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the ATLAS experiment are currently under construction with first collisions expected in 2005. The performance of detector components built to the final ATLAS design specifications are evaluated in particle beams. In addition, detailed simulations are performed to estimate the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to various physical processes. This thesis is divided into two parts, with contributions to each of these types of performance studies. First, an analysis of the performance of the Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter (HEC) yields a pion energy resolution of s/E=78+/-2%/Eo( GeV) ⊕5.0+/-0.3% and an intrinsic electromagnetic to hadronic response ratio (e/h) of 1.6 +/- 0.1. Second, simulation studies have been performed to estimate the sensitivity of ATLAS to the measurement of Vtb and the polarization of the top quark from electroweak top production. Estimates from three independent channels yield statistical precisions of 0.5%, 2.2% and 2.8% after three years of low luminosi...

  19. Hadronic matter at the edge: A survey of some theoretical approaches to the physics of the QCD phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    In the past few years a wealth of high quality data has made possible to test current theoretical ideas about the properties of hadrons subject to extreme conditions of density and temperature. The relativistic heavy-ion program carried out at the CERN-SPS and under development at the BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC has provided results that probe the evolution of collisions of hadronic matter at high energies from the initially large density to the late dilute stages. In addition, QCD on the lattice has produced results complementing these findings with first principles calculations for observables in a regime where perturbative techniques cannot describe the nature of strongly coupled systems. This work aims to review some recent developments that make use of field theoretical methods to describe the physics of hadrons at finite temperature and density. I concentrate on two of the main topics that have been explored in the last few years: (1) The search for the structure of the phase diagram and (2) analytical signals linked to the chiral symmetry restoration/deconfinement.

  20. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  1. Hadronic decays of the Z sup 0 boson: Jet physics and tests of QCD with OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, S. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany))

    1991-08-01

    Several QCD plus hadronisation models are compared to measured event shape distributions and the model parameters are adjusted to the data. QCD shower models provide a detailed description of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays and, with the smae model parameters, of lower energy e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data as well. The momentum spectra of charged particles are consistent with the expectations of soft gluon coherence and Local Parton Hadron Duality. From a measurement of jet production rates, the strong coupling constant is determined to be, in second order perturbation theory, {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.116{+-}0.016. Jet production rates and 4-jet angular correlations provide evidence for the running of {alpha}{sub s} and for the nonabelian structure of QCD. (orig.).

  2. Hadronic Light by Light Contributions to the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment With Physical Pions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Luchang; Christ, Norman; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The current measurement of muonic $g - 2$ disagrees with the theoretical calculation by about 3 standard deviations. Hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP) and hadronic light by light (HLbL) are the two types of processes that contribute most to the theoretical uncertainty. The current value for HLbL is still given by models. I will describe results from a first-principles lattice calculation with a 139 MeV pion in a box of 5.5 fm extent. Our current numerical strategies, including noise reduction techniques, evaluating the HLbL amplitude at zero external momentum transfer, and important remaining challenges, in particular those associated with finite volume effects, will be discussed.

  3. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  4. Search for new physics in same-sign dilepton events in the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Muniz, Lana

    CMS results of the new physics search in same-sign dilepton events with b-tagged jets and missing transverse energy, / ET, are presented. These results cover the full 2012 dataset from the LHC at p s =8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$. Isolated same-sign dilepton events are comparatively easy to detect efficiently. They are predicted to be produced in abundance in some supersymmetry models, but are rarely produced in the Standard Model (SM) processes. Hence, this channel provides a very clean, low background, search for new physics. Multiple search regions defined by the observables / ET, hadronic energy (HT), and number of b-tagged jets are considered. The yield of events in the data agrees with the SM prediction, therefore exclusion limits at 95% C.L. are presented for various simplified SUSY models.

  5. Connected and leading disconnected hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment with physical pion mass

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Thomas; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Jin, Luchang; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report a lattice QCD calculation of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment at physical pion mass. The calculation includes the connected diagrams and the leading, quark-line-disconnected diagrams. We incorporate algorithmic improvements developed in our previous work. The calculation was performed on the $48^3 \\times 96$ ensemble generated with a physical-pion-mass and a 5.5 fm spatial extent by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the chiral, domain wall fermion (DWF) formulation. We find $a_\\mu^{\\text{HLbL}} = 5.35 (1.35) \\times 10^{- 10}$, where the error is statistical only. The finite-volume and finite lattice-spacing errors could be quite large and are the subject of on-going research. The omitted disconnected graphs, while expected to give a correction of order 10\\%, also need to be computed.

  6. Semi-Digital hadronic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laktineh, Imad, E-mail: laktineh@in2p3.f [Universite de Lyon, Universite de Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, IPNL 4 rue E.Fermi 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2009-04-01

    A new concept of high granularity hadronic calorimeter based on a semi-digital readout for future ILC experiments is presented. The aim of this concept is to provide the HCAL with a tracking capacity in addition to a good energy measurement resolution. The sensitive medium of this HCAL is made of very thin gas detectors. The readout is based on detector-embedded electronic boards equipped with low consumption daisy-chained 64-channel chips. The nice results obtained with a slice test made of small detectors show that the concept is successful and can be used to build a 1m3 semi-digital HCAL prototype.

  7. The Hadron Calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) (Proceedings to be published Nuclear Physics B)

    CERN Document Server

    Hagopian, V

    1997-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter of CMS is about 1,000 tons of copper and scintillator sandwich in a 4 tesla magnetic field. It will be built in three segments, the barrel surrounding the central portion and the two end caps. The scintillators will use a tower structure made of grooved megatiles with wavelength shifting ( WLS) fibers imbedded inside the grooves. The coverage extends to "eta" = 3.0 and is hermetic with very few gaps. The 1995 test beam data, taken inside a 3 tesla magnet, showed that it will work in a magnetic field and will require a tail catcher inside the muon system.

  8. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. A new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton--proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. This article summarizes what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  9. Probing new physics in diphoton production with proton tagging at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fichet, S; Kepka, O.; Lenzi, B.; Royon, C.; Saimpert, M.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivities to anomalous quartic photon couplings at the Large Hadron Collider are estimated using diphoton production via photon fusion. The tagging of the protons proves to be a very powerful tool to suppress the background and unprecedented sensitivities down to $6 \\cdot 10^{-15}$\\gev$^{-4}$ are obtained, providing a new window on extra dimensions and strongly-interacting composite states in the multi-TeV range. Generic contributions to quartic photon couplings from charged and neutral particles with arbitrary spin are also presented.

  10. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P. [and others

    1995-12-01

    This is the annual progress report of the University of Florida`s elementary particle physics group. The theoretical high energy physics group`s research covers a broad range of topics, including both theory and phenomenology. Present work of the experimental high energy physics group is directed toward the CLEO detector, with some effort going to B physics at Fermilab. The Axion Search project is participating in the operation of a large-scale axion detector at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with the University of Florida taking responsibility for this experiment`s high-resolution spectrometer`s assembly, programming, and installation, and planning to take shifts during operation of the detector in FY96. The report also includes a continuation of the University`s three-year proposal to the United States Department of Energy to upgrade the University`s high-energy physics computing equipment and to continue student support, system manager/programmer support, and maintenance. Report includes lists of presentations and publications by members of the group.

  11. Hadron Spectroscopy -- Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, E S

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of theoretical progress in hadron spectroscopy and nonperturbative QCD is presented. Attention is focussed on recent lattice gauge theory, the Dyson-Schwinger formalism, unquenching constituent models, and some beyond the Standard Model physics.

  12. Evolving images of the proton: Hadron physics over the past 40 years

    CERN Document Server

    Pennington, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Once upon a time, the world was simple: the proton contained three quarks, two {\\it ups} and a {\\it down}. How these give the proton its mass and its spin seemed obvious. Over the past forty years the proton has become more complicated, and how even these most obvious of its properties is explained in a universe of quarks, antiquarks and gluons remains a challenge. That this should be so should come as no surprise. Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of the strong interaction, is seemingly simple, and its consequences are straightforward in the domain of hard scattering where perturbation theory applies. However, the beauty of the hadron world is its diversity. The existence of hadrons, their properties, and their binding into nuclei do not appear in the Lagrangian of QCD. They all emerge as a result of its strong coupling. Strong coupling QCD creates complex phenomena, much richer than known 40 years ago: a richness that ensures colour confinement and accounts for more than 95\\% of the mass of the visible Uni...

  13. Section for nuclear physics and energy physics - Annual report January 1 to December 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    This annual report summarizes the research and development activities of the Section for Nuclear Physics and Energy Physics at the University of Oslo in 1997. It includes experimental and theoretical nuclear physics, as well as other fields of physics in which members of the section have participated. The report describes completed projects and work currently in progress. As in previous years, the experimental activities in nuclear physics have mainly been centered around the Cyclotron Laboratory with the SCANDITRONIX MC-35 Cyclotron. The main auxiliary equipment consists of a multi-detector system CACTUS, and presently with a unique locally designed silicon strip detector array SIRI. In experimental nuclear physics the section staff members are engaged within three main fields: nuclei at high temperature, high spin nuclear structure and high and intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  14. Section for nuclear physics and energy physics - Annual report January 1 to December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This annual report summarizes the research and development activities of the Section for Nuclear Physics and Energy Physics at the University of Oslo in 1996. It includes experimental and theoretical nuclear physics, as well as other fields of physics in which members of the section have participated. The report describes completed projects and work currently in progress. As in previous years, the experimental activities in nuclear physics have mainly been centered around the Cyclotron Laboratory with the SCANDITRONIX MC-35 Cyclotron. Using CACTUS multidetector system, several experiments have been completed. Some results have been published while more data remains to be analyzed. In experimental nuclear physics the section staff members are engaged within three main fields: nuclei at high temperature, high spin nuclear structure and high and intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  15. Study of radiation damage to the CMS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter and investigation into new physics using multi-boson measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Alberto [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This document is the final report for the U.S. D.O.E. Grant No. DE-SC0014088, which covers the period from May 15, 2015 to March 31, 2016. The funded research covered the study of multi-boson final states, culminated in the measurement of the W±γγ and, for the first time at an hadronic collider, of the Zγγ production cross sections. These processes, among the rarest multi-boson final states measurable by LHC experiments, allow us to investigate the possibility of new physics in a model-independent way, by looking for anomalies in the standard model couplings among electroweak bosons. In particular, these 3-boson final states access quartic gauge couplings; the W±γγ analysis performed as a part of this proposal sets limits on anomalies in the WWγγ quartic gauge coupling. The award also covered R&D activities to define a radiation-tolerant material to be used in the incoming upgrade of the CMS hadronic endcap calorimeter. In particular, the usage of a liquid-scintillator-based detector was investigated. The research work performed in this direction has been collected in a paper recently submitted for publication in the Journal of Instrumentation (JINST).

  16. Electronic properties of single crystal CVD diamond and its suitability for particle detection in hadron physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal

    2008-08-07

    This work presents the study on the suitability of single-crystal CVD diamond for particle-detection systems in present and future hadron physics experiments. Different characterization methods of the electrical and the structural properties were applied to gain a deeper understanding of the crystal quality and the charge transport properties of this novel semiconductor material. First measurements regarding the radiation tolerance of diamond were performed with sensors heavily irradiated with protons and neutrons. Finally, detector prototypes were fabricated and successfully tested in various experiments as time detectors for minimum ionizing particles as well as for spectroscopy of heavy ions at the energy ranges available at the SIS and the UNILAC facilities of GSI. (orig.)

  17. Second Annual Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allario, Frank (Editor); Temple, Doyle (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) held its Second Annual Forum on September 23-24, 1994. The forum consisted of two days of technical sessions with invited talks, submitted talks, and a student poster session. Participants in the technical sessions included students and researchers from CCNY/CUNY, Fisk University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Hampton University, University of Maryland, the Univeristy of Michigan, NASA Langley Research Center, North Caroline A and T University, Steven's Institute of Technology, and NAWC-Warminster. Topics included chaotic lasers, pumped optical filters, nonlinear responses in polythiophene and thiophene based thin films, crystal growth and spectroscopy, laser-induced photochromic centers, raman scattering in phorphyrin, superradiance, doped fluoride crystals, luminescence of terbium in silicate glass, and radiative and nonradiative transitions in rare-earth ions.

  18. Fractal aspects of hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Deppman, Airton

    2016-01-01

    The non extensive aspects of $p_T$ distributions obtained in high energy collisions are discussed in relation to possible fractal structure in hadrons, in the sense of the thermofractal structure recently introduced. The evidences of self-similarity in both theoretical and experimental works in High Energy and in Hadron Physics are discussed, to show that the idea of fractal structure of hadrons and fireballs have being under discussion for decades. The non extensive self-consistent thermodynamics and the thermofractal structure allow one to connect non extensivity to intermittence and possibly to parton distribution functions in a single theoretical framework.

  19. Who cares about particle physics? making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051327

    2016-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for particle physics, regularly makes the news. What kind of research happens at this international laboratory and how does it impact people's daily lives? Why is the discovery of the Higgs boson so important? Particle physics describes all matter found on Earth, in stars and all galaxies but it also tries to go beyond what is known to describe dark matter, a form of matter five times more prevalent than the known, regular matter. How do we know this mysterious dark matter exists and is there a chance it will be discovered soon? About sixty countries contributed to the construction of the gigantic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its immense detectors. Dive in to discover how international teams of researchers work together to push scientific knowledge forward. Here is a book written for every person who wishes to learn a little more about particle physics, without requiring prior scientific knowledge. It starts from the basics to build a solid understanding of current res...

  20. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 February 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) "Physics at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson" was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 26 February 2014. The agenda of the session, announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, listed the following reports: (1) Boos E E (Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Standard Model and predictions for the Higgs boson"; (2) Zaytsev A M (National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Moscow) "ATLAS experiment. The Higgs boson and the Standard Model"; (3) Lanyov A V (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region) "CMS collaboration results: Higgs boson and search for new physics"; (4) Kazakov D I (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region) "The Higgs boson has been found: what is next?" Papers written on the basis of oral reports 1, 3, and 4 are published below. An extensive review of the topic in item 2 will be published in an upcoming issue of Physics-Uspekhi. • Standard Model and predictions for the Higgs boson, E E Boos Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 9, Pages 912-923 • CMS collaboration results: Higgs boson and search for new physics, A V Lanyov Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 9, Pages 923-930 • The Higgs boson is found: what is next?, D I Kazakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 9, Pages 930-942

  1. Nuclear Physics Division Institute of Experimental Physics Warsaw University annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in 1994 are described. The report consist of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (12 articles); (ii) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers is also given. In the first, leading article of the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  3. Les Houches Guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, M.A

    2004-08-24

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  4. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Matt A.; Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, Kirsten

    2004-03-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  5. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of Warsaw University in 1995 are described. The report consists of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (11 articles); (ii) Instrumentation and Experimental Methods (9 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers are also given. The first, leading article in the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  6. New physics searches with b-hadrons at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, l; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Flavour changing neutral currents and precision measurements of CP violation are investigated in ATLAS as probes to new physics beyond the standard model. This talk presents the most recent results on the search for the rare decay B0s → μ+μ-, as well as providing the latest update on the study of the different angular amplitudes contributing to flavour tagged B0s → J/ψ (μ+μ-)φ (K+K-) decays. The latter analysis measures the CP-violating phase φs, as well as the average Bs meson lifetime Γs and the decay width difference ΔΓs.

  7. New physics searches with b-hadrons in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Flavour changing neutral currents and precision measurements of CP violation are investigated in ATLAS as probes to new physics beyond the standard model. This talk presents the most recent results on the search for the rare decay Bs (B0) -> mu+mu-, as well as providing the latest update on the study of the different angular amplitudes contributing to flavour tagged Bs -> J/psi phi (mu+mu-K+K-) decays. The latter analysis measures the CP-violating phase phi_s, as well as the average B_s meson lifetime Gamma_s and the decay width difference DeltaGamma_s.

  8. Search for new physics in the all-hadronic final state with the MT2 variable

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for new physics is performed using events with jets and a large transverse momentum imbalance, as measured through the $M_{T2}$ variable. The results are based on a sample of proton-proton collisions collected in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the CMS detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. No excess above the standard model background is observed. The results are interpreted as limits on the masses of potential new particles in a variety of simplified models of R-parity conserving supersymmetry. Depending on the details of the model, $95\\%$ CL lower limits on the gluino and light-flavor squark masses are placed up to $2025$ and $1550~\\mathrm{GeV}$, respectively. In the case of top (bottom) squarks, the mass limits are as high as $1070~(1175)~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  9. Bulk matter physics and its future at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippolyte, B. [Departement de Recherches Subatomiques, Universite Louis Pasteur, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Strasbourg (France)

    2009-07-15

    Measurements at low transverse momentum will be performed at the LHC for studying particle production mechanisms in pp and heavy-ion collisions. Some of the experimental capabilities for bulk matter physics are presented, focusing on tracking elements and particle identification. In order to anticipate the study of baryon production for both colliding systems at multi-TeV energies, measurements for identified species and recent model extrapolations are discussed. Several mechanisms are expected to compete for hadro-production in the low momentum region. For this reason, experimental observables that could be used for investigating multi-parton interactions and help understanding the ''underlying event'' content in the first pp collisions at the LHC are also mentioned. (orig.)

  10. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Stirling Physics Meeting 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Michael

    1999-09-01

    The 25th Annual Stirling Physics meeting took place on Thursday 20 May on a warm sunny day when the country setting of Stirling Campus could be seen at its best. A total of 225 participants from all sectors of physics education attended. There was an opportunity to view and discuss with exhibitors a wide range of state-of-the-art equipment and teaching materials both before and after the meeting. The theme of the meeting was `Maintaining Standards'. Gemmel Millar, Scottish Branch Secretary acting as Chairperson for the morning session and in anticipation of the first speaker, wondered if a new unit qualification, the `Planck' might be introduced. Half units would then be `Short Plancks' and how many Short Plancks must there be in a unit? Great stuff. Scottish Qualifications Authority Hugh McGill began with a brief history and description of the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Born on 1 April 1997 (a light frisson of amusement swept through the audience) it was a unification between SEB and SCOTVEC and has a range of responsibilities covering schools, further and higher education. It oversees Standard and Higher grades, HNC and HND and SVQs, and it has 500 full-time employees as well as some 13500 appointees who act as examiners, assessors and verifiers etc, without whom its remit could not be carried out. The committee structure of the Board was outlined, one each for national and higher national qualifications and a third for Scottish vocational qualifications. These will be served by a proposed 19 Advisory Groups. The Science Advisory Group will be the key body for advising SQA on strategic developments to ensure that qualifications meet the needs of both client groups and end users. A consultation paper `Added Value To Learning' was referred to, in which all qualifications available in Scotland are given parity of esteem on a rising 11-point scale. Mr McGill stated that standards would be best maintained by ensuring continuity in procedures developed over

  11. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, W.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report contains brief discusses on topics in the following areas: Research at atlas; operation and development of atlas; medium-energy nuclear physics and weak interactions; theoretical nuclear physics; and atomic and molecular physics research.

  12. Identifying multiquark hadrons from heavy ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  13. Hadron interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  14. American Association of Physics Teachers Annual Report, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Physics Teachers (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) mission is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of physics through teaching. Aspiring to advance the greater good through physics, AAPT strives to be the leading voice, primary resource, advocate of choice, and driving force in physics education, serving professionals who teach physics…

  15. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual progress report, September 1, 1991--September 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  16. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. (ed.)

    1989-08-01

    This document discusses the following main topics: Research at Atlas; Operation and Development of Atlas; Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics and Weak Interactions; Theoretical Nuclear Physics; Interactions of Fast Atomic and Molecular Ions with Solid and Gaseous Targets; Atomic Physics at Synchrotron Light Sources; Atomic Physics at Atlas and the ECR Source; Theoretical Atomic Physics; High-Resolution Laser-rf Spectroscopy of Atomic and Molecular Beams; and Fast Ion-Beam/Laser Studies of Atomic and Molecular Structure.

  17. R&D; studies on the hadronic calorimeter and physics simulations on the Standard Model and minimal supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs bosons in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Duru, Firdevs

    2007-01-01

    This thesis consists of two main parts: R&D; studies done on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Hadronic Calorimeter (HCAL) and physics simulations on the Higgs boson for a Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and a Standard Model (SM) channel. In the first part, the air core light guides used in the read-out system of the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter and the reflective materials used in them are studied. Then, tests and simulations were performed to find the most efficient way to collect Cerenkov light from the quartz plates, which are proposed as a substitute for the scintillator tiles in the Hadronic Endcap (HE) calorimeter due to radiation damage problems. In the second part physics simulations and their results are presented. The MSSM channel H/A[arrow right]ττ [arrow right]l l v v v v is studied to investigate the jet and missing transverse energy (MET) reconstruction of the CMS detector. The effects of the jet and MET corrections on the Higgs boson mass reconstruction are investigated. ...

  18. Joint annual meeting of the Swiss Physical and the Society Austrian Physical Society

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The next annual meeting, hosted by CERN, will take place from 21 - 25 August 2017 in Genève at two different locations. Starting at CERN on 21st with internal meetings of some of the participating societies, the 22nd will be dedicated to plenary and invited talks and more (see below). We will then move to the Centre International de Conférences de Genève (CICG) on 23 - 25 August where further plenary talks and all topical sessions will take place. The meeting is organised - as every two years - as a joint meeting with the Austrian Physical Society (ÖPG) and the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy (SSAA). The Swiss Institute of Particle Physics (CHIPP) will participate additionally to their usual 2-year rhythm. We also welcome for the first time the NCCR MARVEL (Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials). They all together guarantee an exciting conference covering physics at its best. Many thanks go to CERN for their generous help and support with the organisation.

  19. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  20. The large hadron computer

    CERN Multimedia

    Hirstius, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Plans for dealing with the torrent of data from the Large Hadron Collider's detectors have made the CERN particle-phycis lab, yet again, a pioneer in computing as well as physics. The author describes the challenges of processing and storing data in the age of petabyt science. (4 pages)

  1. Physics Division: Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-05-01

    This report summarizes the research programs of the Physics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar 1985. The Division's principal activities are research in theoretical and experimental high energy physics, and the development of tools such as sophisticated detectors to carry out that research. The physics activity also includes a program in astrophysics, and the efforts of the Particle Data Group whose compilations serve the worldwide high energy physics community. Finally, in addition to the physics program, there is a smaller but highly significant research effort in applied mathematics. Some specific topics included in this report are: Research on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, superconducting super collider, double beta decay, high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments, detector research and development, electroweak interactions, strong interaction, quantum field theory, superstrings and quantum gravity, vortex methods and turbulence and computational mathematics.

  2. Physics of the Cosmos Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Cardiff, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    What's in this Report? What's New? This fifth Program Annual Technology Report (PATR) summarizes the Programs technology development activities for fiscal year (FY) 2015. The PATR serves four purposes.1. Summarize the technology gaps identified by the astrophysics community;2. Present the results of this years technology gap prioritization by the PCOS Technology Management Board (TMB);3. Report on newly funded PCOS Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) projects; and4. Detail progress, current status, and activities planned for the coming year for all technologies supported by PCOS Supporting Research and Technology (SRT) funding in FY 2015. .

  3. Direct comparison of global fits to the B ->$ K^* $$\\mu^+\\mu^-$ data assuming hadronic corrections or new physics arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Neshatpour, S.; Hurth, T.; Mahmoudi, F.; Martinez Santos, D.

    The LHCb measurements on the B ->$ K^*$$\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ angular observables have shown slight deviations from their Standard Model predictions. The significance of the deviations in the B -> $K^*$$\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decay depends on the assumptions on the size of the non-factorisable power corrections. At present, there are no theoretical predictions on the size of these power corrections in order to identify whether the reason behind these anomalies is due to unknown hadronic corrections or New Physics effects. We have performed a statistical comparison of fitting the data to each of the possible explanations.

  4. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics. These activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current programs include in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in solar neutrino physics at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada and at SAGE in Russia, and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerators and reactor facilities around the world. Summaries of the individual research projects are included. Areas of research covered are: fundamental symmetries, weak interactions and nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; and atomic and molecular clusters.

  6. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trela, W.J. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO/sub 2/ laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  7. CERN Library | Pauline Gagnon presents the book "Who cares about particle physics? : making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN" | 15 September

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2016-01-01

    "Who cares about particle physics? : making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN ", by Pauline Gagnon. Thursday 15 September 2016, 16:00 - 17:30 in the CERN Library (Bldg 52 1-052) *Coffee will be served at 15:30* CERN, the European Laboratory for particle physics, regularly makes the news. What kind of research happens at this international laboratory and how does it impact people's daily lives? Why is the discovery of the Higgs boson so important? Particle physics describes all matter found on Earth, in stars and all galaxies but it also tries to go beyond what is known to describe dark matter, a form of matter five times more prevalent than the known, regular matter. How do we know this mysterious dark matter exists and is there a chance it will be discovered soon? About sixty countries contributed to the construction of the gigantic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its immense detectors. Dive in to discover how international teams of researchers...

  8. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1992-08-01

    Project aims for the past year have been to refine the cytogenetic based physical map of human chromosome 16. This has been achieved by extending the panel of mouse/human hybrids of chromosome 16 to over sixty hybrids and mapping approximately 250 DNA makers. The high resolution of this physical map, with an average distance between breakpoints of less than 1.6 Mb, and the availability of at least one STS in the majority of these intervals, will be the basis for constructing extensive contigs of cloned DNA.

  9. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, John G.; Ramirez, Maria G.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  10. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  11. The 18th Annual Condensed Matter Physics Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Don; Hutchinson, Wayne; Yazidjoglou, Nick; Stewart, Glen

    The Handbook contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations covering various aspects of condensed matter physics such as magnetism, superconductivity, semiconductor materials and their properties, as well as the use of nuclear techniques in studies of these materials. 162 contributions have been considered to be in the INIS subject scope and were indexed separately.

  12. B hadron properties at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Heredia De La Cruz, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of B hadron properties are crucial to improve or constrain models based on non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics, which provide predictions of mass, lifetime, cross section, polarization, and branching ratios (among several other properties) of B hadrons. Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_s$ and properties of rare B decays also provide many opportunities to search for new physics. This article presents some B hadron property results obtained by CMS using Run~I (2011-2012) data, and prospects for the Run~II (2015-2017) data taking period.

  13. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results, and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. The research carried out by the Group last year may be divided into three separate programs: (1) baryon spectroscopy, (2) investigations of charge symmetry and isospin invariance, and (3) tests of time reversal invariance. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research. An update of the group bibliography is given at the end.

  14. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

    1978-06-01

    Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards. (HLW)

  15. Physics Division annual report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The past year has seen several major advances in the Division`s research programs. In heavy-ion physics these include experiments with radioactive beams of interest to nuclear astrophysics, a first exploration of the structure of nuclei situated beyond the proton drip line, the discovery of new proton emitters--the heaviest known, the first unambiguous detection of discrete linking transitions between superdeformed and normal deformed states, and the impact of the APEX results which were the first to report, conclusively, no sign of the previously reported sharp electron positron sum lines. The medium energy nuclear physics program of the Division has led the first round of experiments at the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the study of color transparency in rho meson propagation at the HERMES experiment at DESY, and it has established nuclear polarization in a laser driven polarized hydrogen target. In atomic physics, the non-dipolar contribution to photoionization has been quantitatively established for the first time, the atomic physics beamline at the Argonne 7 GeV Advanced Photon Source was constructed and, by now, first experiments have been successfully performed. The theory program has pushed exact many-body calculations with fully realistic interactions (the Argonne v{sub 18} potential) to the seven-nucleon system, and interesting results have been obtained for the structure of deformed nuclei through meanfield calculations and for the structure of baryons with QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach. Brief summaries are given of the individual research programs.

  16. Hadron Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Faessler, Amand; Lee, Ian Woo; Lyubovitskij, Valery E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a possible interpretation of the open charm mesons $D_{s0}^*(2317)$, $D_{s1}(2460)$ and the hidden charm mesons X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4140) as hadron molecules. Using a phenomenological Lagrangian approach we review the strong and radiative decays of the $D_{s0}^* (2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ states. The X(3872) is assumed to consist dominantly of molecular hadronic components with an additional small admixture of a charmonium configuration. Determing the radiative ($\\gamma J/\\psi$ and $\\gamma \\psi(2s)$) and strong ($J/\\psi 2\\pi $ and $ J/\\psi 3\\pi$) decay modes we show that present experimental observation is consistent with the molecular structure assumption of the X(3872). Finally we give evidence for molecular interpretations of the Y(3940) and Y(4140) related to the observed strong decay modes $J/\\psi + \\omega$ or $J/\\psi + \\phi$, respectively.

  17. Hadronic Modeling of Blazars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidinger Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing systematic search for sources of extragalactic gamma rays has now revealed many blazars in which the very high energy output can not consistently be described as synchrotron self-Compton radiation. In this paper a self consistent hybrid model is described, explaining the very high energy radiation of those blazars as proton synchrotron radiation accompanied by photo-hadronic cascades. As the model includes all relevant radiative processes it naturally includes the synchrotron self-Compton case as well, depending on the chosen parameters. This paper focuses on rather high magnetic fields to be present within the jet, hence the hadronically dominated case. To discriminate the hadronic scenario against external photon fields being upscattered within the jet to produce the dominating gamma-ray output, the temporal behavior of blazars may be exploited with the presented model. Variability reveals both, the highly non-linear nature caused by the photohadronic cascades and typical timescales as well as fingerprints in the inter-band lightcurves of the involved hadrons. The modeling of two individual sources is shown : 1 ES 1011+496, a high frequency peaked blazar at redshift z = 0.212, which is well described within the hybrid scenario using physically reasonable parameters. The short term variability of the second example, namely 3C 454.3, a Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar at z = 0.859, reveals the limitations of the gamma-rays being highly dominated by proton synchrotron radiation.

  18. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P C Vinodkumar

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understanding heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multiquark hadrons the hadron molecular states etc., also will be reviewed. Various issues and challenges in understanding the physics and dynamics of the quarks at the hadronic dimensions are highlighted. Looking into the present and future experimental prospects at different heavy flavour laboratories like BES-III, CLEO-c, BaBar, Belle, LHC etc., the scope for theoretical extensions of the present knowledge of heavy flavour physics would be very demanding. In this context, many relevant contributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted.

  19. Annual report 1997. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, P.H.; Dannemand Andersen, P.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. (au)

  20. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems....... The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A sum......-mary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  1. Physics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    A brief overview of each of the several areas of research is given with a list of resulting publications. Areas of research include electron-positron annihilation, neutrino interactions, neutrinoless double beta decay of /sup 100/Mo, double beta decay of /sup 76/Ge, antiproton-proton interactions, right-handed gauge boson effects, muon decay asymmetry parameter measurements, supernovae detection, Nemesis search, and detector development. Areas of theoretical research include electroweak interactions, strong interactions, nonperturbative dynamics, supersymmetry, and cosmology and particle physics. 34 figs. (WRF)

  2. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  3. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  4. Connected and Leading Disconnected Hadronic Light-by-Light Contribution to the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment with a Physical Pion Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Thomas; Christ, Norman; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Jin, Luchang; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    We report a lattice QCD calculation of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment at a physical pion mass. The calculation includes the connected diagrams and the leading, quark-line-disconnected diagrams. We incorporate algorithmic improvements developed in our previous work. The calculation was performed on the 4 83×96 ensemble generated with a physical pion mass and a 5.5 fm spatial extent by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations using the chiral, domain wall fermion formulation. We find aμHLbL=5.35 (1.35 )×10-10 , where the error is statistical only. The finite-volume and finite lattice-spacing errors could be quite large and are the subject of ongoing research. The omitted disconnected graphs, while expected to give a correction of order 10%, also need to be computed.

  5. Health physics division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This annual progress report follows, as in the past, the organizational structure of the Health Physics Division. Each part is a report of work done by a section of the division: Assessment and Technology Section (Part I), headed by H.W. Dickson; Biological and Radiation Physics Section (Part II), H.A. Wright; Chemical Physics and Spectroscopy Section (Part III), W.R. Garrett; Emergency Technology Section (Part IV), C.V. Chester, Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section (Part V), K.E. Cowser; and the Analytic Dosimetry and Education Group (Part VI), J.E. Turner.

  6. 2nd Annual Conference of Bangladesh Medical Physics Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangladesh Medical Physics Society (BMPS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Following abstracts proceedings are available in PDF:Challenges in brachytherapy dosimetryEssentials of periodic QA in radiation therapyInterventional radiotherapy or brachytherapy: new challenges for a successful techniqueExternal beam radiotherapy and high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy treatment for carcinoma cervix practice in BPKMCH, Bharatpur, NepalTransition from 2D to 3D-CRT (NICRH experienceConformal HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer: comparison between boost and monotherapyImportance and procedures of quality control of diagnostic CT and CT simulator using for modern radiation therapyMedical physics and biomedical engineering education in Gono UniversityPlan verification in tomotherapy using 3D semiconductor detectorComparison of the miniaturized Co-60 and Ir-192 sources in HDR brachytherpy applicationsA Supine based cranio-spinal irradiation technique using moving field junctions radiotherapyStatistical variation and significance in the responses of thyroid follicular cells of two areas of Bangladesh due to radiotherapy into head and neck regionDetermining proper patient’s set-up parameters like IFD, gantry angles, and field width in Ca. breast to achieve precise treatment, in a center where TPS & simulators are not availableAccidental exposure of cancer patient and its preventionComparison of physical and enhanced dynamic wedges beam characteristics for 6 MV photon energy using pencil-beam convolution (PBC algorithmProcedure to set up a radiotherapy unit & low cost unit analysisPatient setup verification and quality control (QC of electronic portal imaging device (EPID

  7. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snover, K.; Fulton, B. [eds.

    1996-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington has for over 40 years supported a broad program of experimental physics research. Some highlights of the research activities during the past year are given. Work continues at a rapid pace toward completion of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in January 1997. Following four years of planning and development, installation of the acrylic vessel began last July and is now 50% complete, with final completion scheduled for September. The Russian-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) has completed a successful {sup 51}Cr neutrino source experiment. The first data from {sup 8}B decay have been taken in the Mass-8 CVC/Second Class Current study. The analysis of the measured barrier distributions for Ca-induced fission of prolate {sup 192}Os and oblate {sup 194}Pt has been completed. In a collaboration with a group from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre they have shown that fission anisotropies at energies well above the barrier are not influenced by the mass asymmetry of the entrance channel relative to the Businaro-Gallone critical asymmetry. They also have preliminary evidence at higher bombarding energy that noncompound nucleus fission scales with the mean square angular momentum, in contrast to previous suggestions. The authors have measured proton and alpha particle emission spectra from the decay of A {approximately} 200 compound nuclei at excitation energies of 50--100 MeV, and used these measurements to infer the nuclear temperature. The investigations of multiparticle Bose-Einstein interferometry have led to a new algorithm for putting Bose-Einstein and Coulomb correlations of up to 6th order into Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-relativistic collision events, and to a new fast algorithm for extracting event temperatures.

  8. National Society of Black Physicists XXV Annual Day of Scientific Lectures and 21st Annual Meeting - NSBP '98: The Next Generation/12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students - NCPBS '98: Physics/Life in Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKellar, Alan (ed.)

    1999-02-28

    The 12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held jointly with the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) March 4-8, 1998 in Lexington, Ky. The Proceedings consists of scientific talks and abstracts given by NSBP members and students attending the NCBPS meeting. One joint session of general scientific interest was held, with NCBPS students, NSBP members, and about 75 high school students from the state of Kentucky present. NCBPS session included ''How to get into Graduate School'', ''How to Survive in Graduate School'', and a Panel on ''Opportunities for Physics Graduates.'' The report by AIP: ''Survey of Participants of the 12th Annual NCBPS'' is included in the Proceedings.

  9. National Society of Black Physicists XXV Annual Day of Scientific Lectures and 21st Annual Meeting - NSBP '98: The Next Generation/12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students - NCPBS '98: Physics/Life in Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKellar, Alan (ed.)

    1999-02-28

    The 12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held jointly with the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) March 4-8, 1998 in Lexington, Ky. The Proceedings consists of scientific talks and abstracts given by NSBP members and students attending the NCBPS meeting. One joint session of general scientific interest was held, with NCBPS students, NSBP members, and about 75 high school students from the state of Kentucky present. NCBPS session included ''How to get into Graduate School'', ''How to Survive in Graduate School'', and a Panel on ''Opportunities for Physics Graduates.'' The report by AIP: ''Survey of Participants of the 12th Annual NCBPS'' is included in the Proceedings.

  10. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  11. 2009 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU Transparency Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R

    2010-04-14

    During the 2009 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. LLNL also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2009, there were 159 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 159 person-trips, 149 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 4 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 10 to UEIE itself. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2009, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency Program now has over fifteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  12. 2011 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU transparency Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R

    2012-04-30

    During the 2008 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. They also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2008, there were 158 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 158 person-trips, 148 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 6 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 8 to UEIE itself. There were three monitoring visits (source changes) that were back-to-back with a total of 24 monitors. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2008, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency now has thirteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  13. 2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2005-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

  14. Hadron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.

    1985-10-01

    Heavy quark systems and glueball candidates, the particles which are relevant to testing QCD, are discussed. The review begins with the heaviest spectroscopically observed quarks, the b anti-b bound states, including the chi state masses, spins, and hadronic widths and the non-relativistic potential models. Also, P states of c anti-c are mentioned. Other heavy states are also discussed in which heavy quarks combine with lighter ones. The gluonium candidates iota(1460), theta(1700), and g/sub T/(2200) are then covered. The very lightest mesons, pi-neutral and eta, are discussed. 133 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs. (LEW)

  15. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    In connection with personnel monitoring, there were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 55 employees received whole-body dose equivalent of one rem or greater. The highest whole-body dose equivalent to an employee was 2.8 rem. The highest internal exposure was less than one-half of a maximum permissible dose for any calendar quarter. During 1979, 57 portable health physics instruments were added to the inventory and 75 retired. The total number in service on January 1, 1979, was 977. With regards to environmental monitoring, there were no releases of gaseous waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. There were no releases of liquid radioactive waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.01 to 0.06 pCi/g, and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 pCi/g. Grass samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.001 to 0.010 pCi/g, and uranium-235 content ranged from 0.001 to 0.010 pCi/g. Two radiation incidents involving radioactive materials were recorded during 1979. This compares with 14 incidents in 1978. (ERB)

  16. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual grant progress report (FDP), January 15, 1993--January 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, D.B.

    1993-10-01

    Progress on seven tasks is reported. (I)UCLA hadronization model, antiproton decay, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis: In addition to these topics, work on CP and CPT phenomenology at a {phi} factory and letters of support on the hadronization project are included. (II)ICARUS detector and rare B decays with hadron beams and colliders: Developments are summarized and some typcial events as shown; in addition, the RD5 collaboration at CERN and the asymmetric {phi} factory project are sketched. (III)Theoretical physics: Feynman diagram calculations in gauge theory; supersymmetric standard model; effects of quantum gravity in breaking of global symmetries; models of quark and lepton substructure; renormalized field theory; large-scale structure in the universe and particle-astrophysics/early universe cosmology. (IV)H dibaryon search at BNL, kaon experiments (E799/KTeV) at Fermilab: Project design and some scatterplots are given. (V)UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab. (VI)Detectors for hadron physics at ultrahigh energy colliders: Scintillating fiber and visible light photon counter research. (VII)Administrative support and conference organization.

  17. Validation of Hadronic Models in GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koi, Tatsumi; Wright, Dennis H.; /SLAC; Folger, Gunter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; /CERN; Heikkinen, Aatos; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Truscott,; Lei, Fan; /QinetiQ; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

    2007-09-26

    Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

  18. Validation of hadronic models in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Koi, Tatsumi; Folger, Günter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; Heikkinen, Aatos; Truscott, Pete; Lei, Fan; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin-target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

  19. Measurements of hadron production at CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siklér F.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available First results on hadron production using the 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV data are presented. The topics covered include spectra and multiplicity distributions of charged hadrons, spectra of strange hadrons, angular and Bose-Einstein correlations of charged particles. This is just the beginning of a successful physics program at the LHC, with possible future discoveries.

  20. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics. Annual technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.

    1992-04-30

    The experimental high energy physics program is directed toward the execution of experiments that probe the basic constituents of matter and the forces between them. These experiments are carried out at national and international accelerator facilities. At the current time, we are primarily concentrating on the following projects: Direct photon production in hadronic reactions (Fermilab E706); Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field; The D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron collider; Deep inelastic neutrino- and electron-nucleon scattering at FNAL and SLAC; Nonlinear QED at critical field strengths at SLAC; The Experiments at KEK (AMY, 17keV neutrino); The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider; and SSC-related detector R&D on scintillating tile- and diamond-based calorimetry and microstrip tracking detectors.

  1. Theoretical studies in medium-energy nuclear and hadronic physics. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, C.J.; Macfarlane, M.H.; Matsui, Tetsuo; Serot, B.D.

    1991-12-03

    In the period covered by this report (April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992), work focused on six main areas: (1) Relativistic Theories of Nuclear Structure and Saturation, (2) Relativistic Descriptions of Proton-Nucleus and Electron-Nucleus Scattering, (3) Nonrelativistic Theory of Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions, (4) Relativistic Many-Body Theory at Finite Temperature and Density, (5) Neutrino Interactions in Dense Matter, (6) Quark Models of Nuclear and Quark Matter.

  2. Development in technology and medical physics in radiotherapy: special considerations hadron therapy; Evolucion de la tecnica y de la fisica medica en radioterapia: consideraciones especiales sobre hadronterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazai, A.; Losa, S.; Farias, R.; Cell, J. c.; Perez, J.; Olivera, G.; Galmarini, D.; Prezado, Y.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Sanchez Parcerisa, D.; Carbe, A.; Venencia, D.; Andreo, P.; Fourquet, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents some recent advances in technology and medical physics in the field of radiation oncology. If stands out the progress in anatomical and functional imaging, the availability of beams of photons and charged particles with multiples incidences on the patient, the conformal and monitoring device, as well as the software to calculate and to control the treatments. There is a description of concepts such as intensity modulation, image guided and adaptive radiation therapy, transit dosimetry, hadron therapy and the importance of research in radiation biology, including practical examples. It concludes with the need to evaluate the clinical relevance and the economical aspects of all this advances, as well as how to apply them to get personalized treatments in combination with molecular biology and to spread these benefits to large populations. (Author)

  3. Track reconstruction in dense environments and the search for new physics in the fully hadronic diboson channels with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00389298; Salzburger, Andreas

    With the increase in center-of-mass energy of the LHC to $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV for Run 2, events with dense environments are produced much more abundantly. In the core of highly energetic hadronic jets, the average separation of charged particles is comparable to the size of individual ATLAS inner detector elements. These dense environments may be produced by new physics processes or objects, including massive particles that decay to highly boosted bosons. However, this density can create confusion within the algorithms reconstructing charged particle trajectories (tracks), so careful optimization must be carried out to ensure that the track reconstruction performance in dense environments is not adversely affected. Such optimization will increase the possibility of discovery of new phenomena and allow higher precision measurements of the newly opened kinematic regime. This work describes a series of improvements to the ATLAS offline track reconstruction to enhance its performance in dense environments. The...

  4. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975. [LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.L. (ed.)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures. (RWR)

  5. [Research in theoretical nuclear physics]. [Annual progress report, July 1992--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapusta, J.I.

    1993-12-31

    The main subject of research was the physics of matter at energy densities greater than 0.15 GeV/fm{sup 3}. Theory encompasses the relativistic many-body/quantum field theory aspects of QCD and the electroweak interactions at these high energy densities, both in and out of thermal equilibrium. Applications range from neutron stars/pulsars to QCD and electroweak phase transitions in the early universe, from baryon number violation in cosmology to the description of nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN and at Brookhaven. Recent activity to understand the properties of matter at energy densities where the electroweak W and Z boson degrees of freedom are important is reported. This problem has applications to cosmology and has the potential to explain the baryon asymmetry produced in the big bang at energies where the particle degrees of freedom will soon be experimentally, probed. This problem is interesting for nuclear physics because of the techniques used in many-body, physics of nuclei and the quark-gluon plasma may be extended to this new problem. The was also interested in problems related to multiparticle production. This includes work on production of particles in heavy-ion collisions, the small x part, of the nuclear and hadron wave function, and multiparticle production induced by instantons in weakly coupled theories. These problems have applications in the heavy ion program at RHIC and the deep inelastic scattering experiments at HERA.

  6. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department.

  7. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January--31 December 1977. [LBL, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during 1977. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics, although there is a relatively small program of medium-energy research. The High Energy Physics research program in the Physics Division is concerned with fundamental research which will enable man to comprehend the nature of the physical world. The major effort is now directed toward experiments with positron-electron colliding beam at PEP. The Medium Energy Physics program is concerned with research using mesons and nucleons to probe the properties of matter. This research is concerned with the study of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, and the interactions between nuclei and electromagnetic radiation and mesons. The Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department engages in research in a variety of computer science and mathematics disciplines. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The Computer Center provides large-scale computational support to LBL's scientific programs. Descriptions of the various activities are quite short; references to published results are given. 24 figures. (RWR)

  8. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Kirejczyk, M.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1997 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  9. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University Annual Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1996 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; Experimental methods and instrumentation and the third part contains the list of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` by NPD director prof. Ch. Droste.

  10. Nuclear Physics Division - Inst. of Experimental Physics - Warsaw University - Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirejczyk, M.; Szeflinski, Z. [eds.

    1999-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Warsaw University Institute of Experimental Physics in year of 1998 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contains the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and list of published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  11. The Summary for Optimization of the Annular Coupled Structure Accelerating Module Physical Design for High Intensity Hadron Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Paramonov, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    The normal conducting Annular Coupled Structure (ACS) is applied for 190-400 MeV part of high intensity proton linac for the J-PARC. The ACS operating frequency is 972 MHz. The J-PARC ACS is strongly based on the results of previous investigations, especially results of Japan Hadron Project (JHP) research program in KEK. However, the design was revised and optimized to meet the requirements of reliability, operation efficiency and cost reduction. The cells shape of accelerating cells was optimized in total energy range to have high shunt impedance value together with the careful matching with the decreased coupling cells. The design of the bridge coupler cells was optimized to simplify mass production and shape of RF input cell together with matching window were optimized for higher operational reliability. Collected and adjusted all together, these modifications result in the significant effect. The ACS module design doesn't lose to another possible accelerating structures in RF parameters and dimensions. Pr...

  12. [High Energy Physics: Research in high energy physics]. Annual report, FY 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, B C

    1982-12-31

    This report discusses high energy physics research on: Quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; multiparticle spectrometers; inclusive scattering; Mark III detector; and cascade decays of phi resonances. (LSP)

  13. 2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

  14. 2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    2006-11-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

  15. Review on Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    I review some of the lattice results on spectroscopy and resonances in the past years. For the conventional hadron spectrum computations, focus has been put on the isospin breaking effects, QED effects, and simulations near the physical pion mass point. I then go through several single-channel scattering studies within L\\"uscher formalism, a method that has matured over the past few years. The topics cover light mesons and also the charmed mesons, with the latter case intimately related to the recently discovered exotic $XYZ$ particles. Other possible related formalisms that are available on the market are also discussed.

  16. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    This annual report describes the research work carried out by the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division during 1979. The major research effort of the Division remained High Energy Particle Physics with emphasis on preparing for experiments to be carried out at PEP. The largest effort in this field was for development and construction of the Time Projection Chamber, a powerful new particle detector. This work took a large fraction of the effort of the physics staff of the Division together with the equivalent of more than a hundred staff members in the Engineering Departments and shops. Research in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department of the Division (CSAM) has been rapidly expanding during the last few years. Cross fertilization of ideas and talents resulting from the diversity of effort in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division contributed to the software design for the Time Projection Chamber, made by the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department.

  17. Multiquark Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2016-01-01

    A number of candidate multiquark hadrons, i.e., particle resonances with substructures that are more complex than the quark-antiquark mesons and three-quark baryons that are prescribed in the textbooks, have recently been observed. In this talk I present: some recent preliminary BESIII results on the near-threshold behavior of sigma(e+e- --> Lambda Lambda-bar) that may or may not be related to multiquark mesons in the light- and strange-quark sectors; results from Belle and LHCb on the electrically charged, charmoniumlike Z(4430)^+ --> pi^+ psi ' resonance that necessarily has a four-quark substructure; and the recent LHCb discovery of the P_c(4380) and P_c(4450) hidden-charm resonances seen as a complex structure in the J/psi p invariant mass distribution for Lambda_b --> K^-J/psi p decays and necessarily have a five-quark substructure and are, therefore, prominent candidates for pentaquark baryons.

  18. $b$-hadron production at ATLAS and CMS experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De La Cruz Burelo, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We report on a selected number of studies performed by the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations on b -hadron production. Both experiments have a rich program on b -hadron physics exploiting the large cross section of b -hadrons at the high energies of the LHC.

  19. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given. (RWR)

  20. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  1. Belle II and Hadron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Križan, Peter, E-mail: peter.krizan@ijs.si [J. Stefan Institute and University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-08-15

    Asymmetric B factories, PEP-II with BaBar and KEKB with Belle, made a decisive contribution to flavour physics. In addition, they also observed a long list of new hadrons, some of which do not fit into the standard meson and baryon schemes. The next generation of B factories, the so called Super B factory will search for departures from the Standard model. For this task, a 50 times larger data sample is needed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 50 ab{sup −1}. With such a large data sample there are many more topics to explore, including searches for new and exotic hadrons, and investigation of their properties.

  2. Reco level Smin and subsystem Smin: improved global inclusive variables for measuring the new physics mass scale in MET events at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konar, Partha; /Florida U.; Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2011-08-11

    The variable {radical}s{sub min} was originally proposed in [1] as a model-independent, global and fully inclusive measure of the new physics mass scale in missing energy events at hadron colliders. In the original incarnation of {radical}s{sub min}, however, the connection to the new physics mass scale was blurred by the effects of the underlying event, most notably initial state radiation and multiple parton interactions. In this paper we advertize two improved variants of the {radical}s{sub min} variable, which overcome this problem. First we show that by evaluating the {radical}s{sub min} variable at the RECO level, in terms of the reconstructed objects in the event, the effects from the underlying event are significantly diminished and the nice correlation between the peak in the {radical}s{sub min}{sup (reco)} distribution and the new physics mass scale is restored. Secondly, the underlying event problem can be avoided altogether when the {radical}s{sub min} concept is applied to a subsystem of the event which does not involve any QCD jets. We supply an analytic formula for the resulting subsystem {radical}s{sub min}{sup (sub)} variable and show that its peak exhibits the usual correlation with the mass scale of the particles produced in the subsystem. Finally, we contrast {radical}s{sub min} to other popular inclusive variables such as H{sub T}, M{sub Tgen} and M{sub TTgen}. We illustrate our discussion with several examples from supersymmetry, and with dilepton events from top quark pair production.

  3. Physics Physics Annual Review, 1 April 1981-31 March 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-12-01

    In medium-energy pion physics, considerable progress has been made in understanding the propagation and absorption of pions (deltas) in the nuclear medium. An experiment to study neutrino oscillations is being planned at LAMPF with substantial involvement from Argonne. A major effort is being devoted to the scientific and technical considerations involved in proposing to build a multi-GeV C.W. electron accelerator: GEM at Argonne. In heavy-ion physics, the superconducting linac booster is being used with increasing scientific profit. Construction of the ATLAS facility began in FY 1982 and all progress has been on schedule. The importance of the time component of the weak axial-vector current has been studied through the ..beta.. decay of /sup 16/N. A precision measurement is under way of the /sup 7/Be(p,..gamma..) cross section, one of the key components in the solar neutrino anomaly. In nuclear theory, the coupled-channel code for treating heavy-ion inelastic scattering was completed and application to particular experiments began. Nuclear structure theory was applied to interpret decays of high-spin states and inelastic pion scattering. Results of particular interest were obtained in the nuclear force program where the inclusion of 3-body forces led to simultaneous improvement in the binding of /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He and saturation of nuclear matter. The atomic physics research consists of six experimental programs as follows: (1) dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets; (2) electron spectroscopy with fast atomic and molecular-ion beams; (3) beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions; (4) photoionization-photoelectron research; (5) high-resolution, laser-rf spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams; and (6) theoretical atomic physics. (WHK)

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: VOLUME 61 RIKEN-TODAI MINI-WORKSHOP ON ''TOPICS IN HADRON PHYSICS AT RHIC''. VOLUME 61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EN' YO,H.HAMAGAKI,H.HATSUDAT.WATANABA,Y.YAZAKI,K.

    2004-05-26

    The RIKEN-TODAI Mini-Workshop on ''Topics in Hadron Physics at RHIC'' was held on March 23rd and 24th, 2064 at the Nishina Memorial Hall of RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, Japan, sponsored by RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and TODAI (University of Tokyo). The workshop was planned when we learned that two distinguished theorists in hadron physics, Professors L. McLerran and S.H. Lee, would be visiting TODAI and/or RIKEN during the week of March 22-26. We asked them to give key talks at the beginning of the workshop and attend the sessions consisting of talks by young theorists in RIKEN, TODAI and other institutes in Japan and they kindly agreed on both. Considering the JPS meeting scheduled from March 27 through 30, we decided to have a.one-and-half-a-day workshop on March 23 and 24. The purpose of the workshop was to offer young researchers an opportunity to learn the forefront of hadron physics as well as to discuss their own works with the distinguished theorists.

  5. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  6. From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider: 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Directorate Office

    As a new era in particle physics approaches with the start of the LHC, a symposium to commemorate many significant events that have marked high-energy physics in the past 50 years will be held at CERN on 3-4 December 2009. The list of confirmed distinguished speakers reads like the Who’s Who of particle physics of the second half of the 20th Century, including the Nobel Laureates James Cronin, Jerome Friedman, Sheldon Glashow, David Gross, Gerardus ‘t Hooft, Leon Lederman, Burton Richter, Carlo Rubbia, Jack Steinberger, Samuel Ting, Martinus Veltman, Stephen Weinberg and Frank Wilczek. They will share with us memories of several landmark events that, over the past 50 years, have shaped our field of science. These events include the discovery of the J/ψ particle by Richter and Ting in the 1970s; the work of Glashow, Salam and Weinberg on the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interactions; the discovery of fundamental asymmetries in the K-meson sector by Cronin and Fitch...

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for Calendar Year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY92. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  9. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  11. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for Calendar Year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY92. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  12. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  13. General characteristics of hadron-hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kittel, E W

    2004-01-01

    Soft multiparticle production in hadron-hadron collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on its role as a standard for heavy-ion collisions at SPS and RHIC energies and as a bridge interpolating between the most simple e **+e**- and the most complex AA collisions.

  14. Recent developments in chiral dynamics of hadrons and hadrons in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Kaskulov, M; Roca, L; Sarkar, S; Strottman, D D; Vacas, M J V; Magas, V K; Ramos, A; Hernández, E

    2007-01-01

    In this talk I present recent developments in the field of hadronic physics and hadrons in the nuclear medium. I review the unitary chiral approach to meson baryon interaction and address the topics of the two dynamically generated $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonances, with experiments testing it, the $\\Lambda(1520)$ and $\\Delta(1700)$ resonances, plus the $\\Lambda(1520)$, $\\Sigma(1385)$ and $\\omega$ in the nuclear medium.

  15. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow.

  16. Recent hadronic resonance measurements at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Knospe, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion physics, measurements of short-lived hadronic resonances allow the properties of the hadronic phase of the collision to be studied. In addition, resonances can be used along with stable hadrons to study parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma and the mechanisms that shape hadron pT spectra at intermediate transverse momenta. Resonance measurements in small systems serve as a reference for heavy-ion collisions and contribute to searches for collective effects. An overview of recent results on hadronic resonance production measured in ALICE is presented. These results include the pT spectra and yields of the rho(770)0, K*(892)0, and phi(1020) mesons in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions at different energies as well as the Sigma(1385)+/- and Xi(1530)0 baryons in pp and p-Pb collisions.

  17. Production and Hadronization of Heavy Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Norrbin, E

    2000-01-01

    Heavy long-lived quarks, i.e. charm and bottom, are frequently studied both as tests of QCD and as probes for other physics aspects within and beyond the standard model. The long life-time implies that charm and bottom hadrons are formed and observed. This hadronization process cannot be studied in isolation, but depends on the production environment. Within the framework of the string model, a major effect is the drag from the other end of the string that the c/b quark belongs to. In extreme cases, a small-mass string can collapse to a single hadron, thereby giving a non-universal flavour composition to the produced hadrons. We here develop and present a detailed model for the charm/bottom hadronization process, involving the various aspects of string fragmentation and collapse, and put it in the context of several heavy-flavour production sources. Applications are presented from fixed-target to LHC energies.

  18. CMS Central Hadron Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Howard S.

    2001-01-01

    We present a description of the CMS central hadron calorimeter. We describe the production of the 1996 CMS hadron testbeam module. We show the results of the quality control tests of the testbeam module. We present some results of the 1995 CMS hadron testbeam.

  19. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Greek Physical Society Annual Student Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    In a continuation of last years` efforts, The Hellenic Union of Physicists organises for the 5th consecutive year its annual meeting for high-performing students across Greece. In this creative thinking meeting, students will have an excellent opportunity to acquire an in-depth understanding in contemporary physics issues and topics as well as in modern scientific knowledge and thinking in general. Moreover, they will be introduced to modern scientific methods and will practice critical thinking via live interaction with distinctive physicists. During this meeting, students will also connect live to the ATLAS control room to talk to a Greek physicist and learn about latest developments from the world`s largest physics laboratory.

  1. FY93 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    This is the annual report from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for the period October 1, 1992 to September 30, 1993. The report describes work done on TFTR during the year, as well as preparatory to beginning of D-T operations. Design work is ongoing on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) which is to test very long pulse operations of tokamak type devices. PBX has come back on line with additional ion-Bernstein power and lower-hybrid current drive. The theoretical program is also described, as well as other small scale programs, and the growing effort in collaboration on international design projects on ITER and future collaborations at a larger scale.

  2. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio [Lab. Naz. Frascati, Frascati, Italy; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4: Physical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braby, L.A.

    1994-08-01

    Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title ``Physical and Technological Research.`` The Field Task Program Studies reported in this document are grouped by budget category. Attention is focused on the following subject areas: dosimetry research; and radiological and chemical physics.

  4. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  5. [Hadron therapy in carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, Slavenka; Dalagija, Faruk

    2002-01-01

    According to some statistics, in the developed countries of west Europe, one in three of population will have an encounter with cancer and, only one in eight of this will have treated by use a linear accelerator. Conventional accelerator-based treatments use photon or electron or proton beams collimated to the tumour place. However, some tumors are resistant on this therapy, while others have complex shapes or are located around vital radiosensitive organs. In those cases it is necessary higher radiobiological efficiency and higher precision. New generation of hadron therapy accelerators are arming with light ions. This therapy is characterized with high precision, in millimeter range over complex volumes. That is also good example how particle physics can benefit medical treatments.

  6. Hadron accelerators for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Hywel; MacKay, Ranald; Peach, Ken; Smith, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Over the last twenty years the treatment of cancer with protons and light nuclei such as carbon ions has moved from being the preserve of research laboratories into widespread clinical use. A number of choices now exist for the creation and delivery of these particles, key amongst these being the adoption of pencil beam scanning using a rotating gantry; attention is now being given to what technologies will enable cheaper and more effective treatment in the future. In this article the physics and engineering used in these hadron therapy facilities is presented, and the research areas likely to lead to substantive improvements. The wider use of superconducting magnets is an emerging trend, whilst further ahead novel high-gradient acceleration techniques may enable much smaller treatment systems. Imaging techniques to improve the accuracy of treatment plans must also be developed hand-in-hand with future sources of particles, a notable example of which is proton computed tomography.

  7. Validation of electromagnetic and hadronic physical processes in the interaction of a proton beam with matter: A Solar Particle Events case study with an Al slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Filomena; Vardaci, Emanuele; Quarto, Maria; Roca, Vincenzo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2017-01-01

    In the study of the effectiveness of shielding materials against radiations, one of the main steps concerns with the validation of models describing the interaction processes of the radiation of interest with the material chosen for the shielding. This paper shows the results of the validation of electromagnetic and hadronic processes with the aim to contribute to the study of protection for astronauts against the radiations due to the Solar Particle Events, in particular to the selection of the optimal material for radiation shielding. The physics case deals with the interaction of a proton beam with an aluminum slab about 20 g/cm2 thick. Two specific applications, STP and DOSE, were developed by using Geant4 package. STP computes the radiations produced in the interaction and their stopping power; DOSE computes the absorbed dose from the stopping power calculated by STP. The validation process was performed in two steps. In the first one, the output of the STP code is compared to data available on NIST database; in the second one, the absorbed dose computed with DOSE is compared to the dose gathered during an experiment performed at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory involving the bombardment of an aluminum slab with a 1 GeV proton beam. The computing model has allowed us to correlate the size of the impinging beam profile to the dose measured before and after an Al slab. The sharp increase of the dose in the position right after the slab might be due to the stochastic nature of the trajectories of charged ions in matter which makes the radiation to emerge with non-zero transverse linear momentum. From the case examined here, we conclude that aluminum is not an efficient material for Solar Particle Event shielding.

  8. Exotic Hadrons from B Factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulsom, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. One of the most important discoveries was that of an apparent four-quark particle, named X(3872). It was the first of a growing X, Y, Z alphabet of exotic hadrons, now numbering more than a dozen, found by the e + e - collider experiments. These multi-quark states represent an unusual departure from the standard description that hadronic matter consists of only two or three quarks. These discoveries have led to the emergence of a new category of physics within heavy meson spectroscopy. This talk will review some of these key experimental results, and highlight the potential of the next generation B-Factory, Belle II, as it begins operation in the coming year.

  9. Charm-Hadron Production at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Miriam; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Recent results on charm hadron production are presented, using data recorded in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider and in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. These results include the production of charmonium and of open charm mesons, and their comparison with theoretical predictions. Measurements of the associated production of hidden or open charm mesons with additional quarkonium states are also presented.

  10. Academic Training Lecture: Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 30, 31 March and 1 April  2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 40-S2-A01 - Salle Andersson Jets at Hadron Colliders by Gavin Salam These three lectures will discuss how jets are defined at hadron colliders, the physics that is responsible for the internal structure of jets and the ways in which an understanding of jets may help in searches for new particles at the LHC.

  11. Hadrons and Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2002-06-01

    Before matter as we know it emerged, the universe was filled with the primordial state of hadronic matter called quark gluon plasma. This hot soup of quarks and gluon is effectively an inescapable consequence of our current knowledge about the fundamental hadronic interactions, quantum chromodynamics. This book covers the ongoing search to verify this prediction experimentally and discusses the physical properties of this novel form of matter.

  12. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  14. Hadrons in medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U Mosel

    2006-04-01

    In these lectures I first give the motivation for investigations of in-medium properties of hadrons. I discuss the relevant symmetries of QCD and how they might affect the observed hadron properties. I then discuss at length the observable consequences of in-medium changes of hadronic properties in reactions with elementary probes, and in particular photons, on nuclei. Here I put an emphasis on new experiments on changes of the - and -mesons in medium.

  15. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty

  16. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wiezcorek, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY93. The report is prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1993. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1993, PPPL had both of its two large tokamak devices in operation; the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991. TFTR began the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in December 1993 and set new records by producing over six million watts of energy. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In 1993, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFRR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was prepared for submittal to the regulatory agencies.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wiezcorek, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY93. The report is prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1993. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1993, PPPL had both of its two large tokamak devices in operation; the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991. TFTR began the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in December 1993 and set new records by producing over six million watts of energy. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In 1993, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFRR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was prepared for submittal to the regulatory agencies.

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY94. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1994. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that PPPL`s environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 195 1. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1994, PPPL had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification or PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991 and operated periodically during 1992 and 1993; it did not operate in 1994 for funding reasons. In December 1993, TFTR began conducting the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments and set new records by producing over ten @on watts of energy in 1994. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (T?X), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In December 1994, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFTR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was submitted to the regulatory agencies, and a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) was issued by DOE for these projects.

  20. Statistical Hadronization and Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechi, Jacopo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider some issues about the statistical model of the hadronization in a holographic approach. We introduce a Rindler like horizon in the bulk and we understand the string breaking as a tunneling event under this horizon. We calculate the hadron spectrum and we get a thermal......, and so statistical, shape for it....

  1. Toponium at hadronic colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finjord, J. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Girardi, G.; Sorba, P. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Mery, P. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1982-05-27

    We calculate hadronic toponium production by specific diagrams obeying colour conservation and charge conjugation. The resulting rates, though lower than those calculated using semi-local duality arguments are encouraging and may allow for toponium discovery at hadronic colliders currently in development.

  2. Evaporation/Hadronization Correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Allahbakhshi, Davood

    2016-01-01

    A holographic duality is proposed between black hole evaporation in the bulk and hadronization (confinement) in dual field theory. Information paradox is discussed in this duality. We also propose that the recently introduced semi black brane solution is holographically dual to a mixed plasma of quarks, gluons and hadrons in global equilibrium.

  3. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stencel, J.R.; Finley, V.L.

    1991-12-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for CY90. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951 and in 1990 had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation: namely, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification is undergoing new modifications and upgrades for future operation. A new machine, the Burning Plasma Experiment -- formerly called the Compact Ignition Tokamak -- is under conceptual design, and it is awaiting the approval of its draft Environmental Assessment report by DOE Headquarters. This report is required under the National Environmental Policy Act. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. 59 refs., 39 figs., 45 tabs.

  5. 6th Annual Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, January 18-20, 2013, Urbana, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, Kevin T. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    2016-04-28

    This document is the program for the 6th Annual Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, which was held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on January 18-20, 2013. The goals of the conference were to foster a culture in which undergraduate women are encouraged and supported to pursue, and also to succeed in, higher education in physics; to provide career information to students in physics and related fields; to give women the resources, motivation, and confidence to apply to graduate school and successfully complete a Ph.D. program in Physics; to provide information and dispel misconceptions about the application process for graduate school and the diverse employment opportunities in physics and related fields, enabling women to make more informed decisions about their goals and attain them; and to connect female physics students with successful female physicists to whom they can relate and who can act as inspirational role models and mentors.

  6. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University. Annual report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Texas A&M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A&M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  7. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1975--31 March 1976. [ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, G. T.

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of Physics Division activities in the following areas: the heavy-ion booster; medium-energy physics; heavy-ion physics; low-energy charged-particle physics; accelerator operations; neutron physics; theoretical nuclear physics, and atomic and molecular physics. A bibliography of publications amounts to 27 pages. (RWR)

  8. Exotic Hadron Bound State Production at Hadronic Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Yi; Liu, Yan-Rui; Meng, Lu; Si, Zon-Guo; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The non-relativistic wave function framework is applied to study the production and decay of the exotic hadrons which can be effectively described as bound states of other hadrons. The ingredient hadron production can be calculated by event generators. We investigate the production of exotic hadrons in the multiproduction processes at high energy hadronic colliders with the help of the event generators. We illustrate the crucial information such as their momentum distributions and production rate for the measurements at the large hadron collider. This study provides crucial information for the measurements of the relevant exotic hadrons.

  9. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    Since the beginning of 2007, HCAL has made significant progress in the installation and commissioning of both hardware and software. A large fraction of the physical Hadron Calorimeter modules have been installed in UX5. In fact, the only missing pieces are HE- and part of HO. The HB+/- were installed in the cryostat in March. HB scintillator layer-17 was installed above ground before the HB were lowered. The HB- scintillator layer-0 was installed immediately after completion of EB- installation. HF/HCAL Commissioning The commissioning and checkout of the HCAL readout electronics is also proceeding at a rapid pace in Bldg. 904 and USC55. All sixteen crates of HCAL VME readout electronics have been commissioned and certified for service. Fifteen are currently operating in the S2 level of USC55. The last crate is being used for firmware development in the Electronics Integration Facility in 904. All installed crates are interfaced to their VME computers and receive synchronous control from the fully-equipp...

  10. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipari Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the “high energy universe” is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma–rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non–perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ∼ 1020 eV, or a nucleon–nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  11. Hadron multiplicities at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Du Fresne Von Hohenesche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Quark fragmentation functions (FF) D h q ( z ; Q 2 ) describe final-state hadronisation of quarks q into hadrons h . The FFs can be extracted from hadron multiplicities produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. The COMPASS collaboration has recently measured charged hadron multiplicities for identified pions and kaons using a 160 GeV/c muon beam impinging on an isoscalar LiD target. The data cover a large kinematical range and provide an important input for global QCD analyses of world data at NLO, aiming at the determination of FFs. The latest results from COMPASS on pion multiplicities and pion fragmentation functions will be discussed.

  12. Statistical fluctuations and correlations in hadronic equilibrium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, Michael

    2010-06-17

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of fluctuation and correlation observables of hadronic equilibrium systems. The statistical hadronization model of high energy physics, in its ideal, i.e. non-interacting, gas approximation is investigated in different ensemble formulations. The hypothesis of thermal and chemical equilibrium in high energy interaction is tested against qualitative and quantitative predictions. (orig.)

  13. Light hadron, charmonium(-like) and bottomonium(-like) states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hai-Bo Li

    2012-10-01

    Hadron physics represents the study of strongly interacting matter in all its manifestations and understanding its properties and interactions. The interest in this field has been revitalized by the discovery of new light hadrons, charmonium- and bottomonium-like states. In this paper, the most recent experimental results from different experiments are reviewed.

  14. Improved interpolating fields for hadrons at non-vanishing momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Della Morte, Michele; Rae, Thomas D; Wittig, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that a reduction in the noise-to-signal ratio may be obtained for hadrons at non-zero momenta whilst maintaining a good overlap with the ground state through a generalisation of Gaussian/Wuppertal smearing. The use of an anisotropic smearing wavefunction is motivated by the physical picture of a boosted hadron.

  15. Weibull model of Multiplicity Distribution in hadron-hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Weibull distribution as a simple parametrization of charged particle multiplicities in hadron-hadron collisions at all available energies, ranging from ISR energies to the most recent LHC energies. In statistics, the Weibull distribution has wide applicability in natural processes involving fragmentation processes. This gives a natural connection to the available state-of-the-art models for multi-particle production in hadron hadron collisions involving QCD parton fragmentation and hadronization.

  16. Hadron production within PHSD

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Pierre; Palmese, Alessia; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We study the production of hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach that is extended to incorporate essentials aspects of chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) in the hadronic sector (via the Schwinger mechanism) on top of the deconfinement phase transition as implemented in PHSD. The essential impact of CSR is found in the Schwinger mechanism (for string decay) which fixes the ratio of strange to light quark production in the hadronic medium. Our studies provide a microscopic explanation for the maximum in the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio at about 30 A GeV which only shows up if in addition to CSR a deconfinement transition to partonic degrees-of-freedom is incorporated in the reaction dynamics.

  17. Melting Hadrons, Boiling Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. Finally in two appendices I present previously unpublished reports describing the early prediction of the different forms of hadron matter and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the initial prediction of strangeness and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP.

  18. Melting hadrons, boiling quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafelski, Johann [CERN-PH/TH, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); The University of Arizona, Department of Physics, Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. The material of this review is complemented by two early and unpublished reports containing the prediction of the different forms of hadron matter, and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the discussion of strangeness, and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP. (orig.)

  19. Testing Saturation at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, C

    2003-01-01

    We extend the saturation models a la Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff to cross-sections of hard processes initiated by virtual-gluon probes separated by large rapidity intervals at hadron colliders. We derive their analytic expressions and apply them to physical examples, such as saturation effects for Mueller-Navelet jets. By comparison to gamma*-gamma* cross-sections we find a more abrupt transition to saturation. We propose to study observables with a potentially clear saturation signal and to use heavy vector and flavored mesons as alternative virtual-gluon probes.

  20. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Albert De Roeck

    2012-10-01

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including top quarks. The results are based on data samples of up to 5.4 fb-1 for the Tevatron experiments and 1.1 fb−1 for the LHC experiments.

  1. Melting Hadrons, Boiling Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustra...

  2. Holography inspired stringy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in flat four dimensional space-time. The models are based on a "map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5 ×S5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line, a meson, a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the "string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best fits, write down certain predictions for higher excited hadrons and present attempts to identify glueballs.

  3. Nonequilibrium Photons as a Signature of Quark-hadron Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, D S; Lee, Da-Shin; Ng, Kin-Wang

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium photon production in the quark-hadron phase transition, using the Friedberg-Lee type solitons as a working model for quark-hadron physics. We propose that to search for nonequilibrium photons in the direct photon measurements of heavy-ion collisions may be a characteristic test of the transition from the quark-gluon to hadronic phases.

  4. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, G.; Price, T.; Watson, N. K.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; de la Taille, Ch.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range of 10-80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from GEANT4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  5. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Eigen, G; Watson, N.K.; Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Doren, B.van; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Alamillo, E.Calvo; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kolk, N.van der; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.C.; Cizel, J.B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; de Freitas, P.Mora; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Taille, Ch.de la; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range from 10 to 80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from Geant4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  6. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  7. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  8. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  9. Physical meaning of the equinoctial effect for semi-annual variation in geomagnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yoshida

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical meaning of the equinoctial effect for semi-annual variation in geomagnetic activity is investigated based on the three-hourly am index and solar wind parameters. When the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF in geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM coordinates is southward, am indices are well correlated with BsVx2, where Bs is the southward component of the IMF and Vx is the solar wind velocity in the sun-earth direction. The am-BsVx2 relationship, however, depends on the range of Vx2: the am in higher ranges of Vx2 tends to be larger than am in lower ranges of Vx2 for the same value of BsVx2 for both equinoctial and solstitial epochs. Using the data sets of the same Vx2 range, it is shown that distribution of points in the am-BsVx2 diagram at the solstitial epochs overlaps with that at the equinoctial epochs and the average am values in each BsVx2 bin in solstitial epochs are closely consistent with those in equinoctial epochs, if Vx2 for each point at solstices are reduced to Vx2sin2 (Ψ where Ψ is the geomagnetic colatitude of the sub-solar point. Further, it is shown that monthly averages of the am index in the long period is well correlated with the values of sin2(ψ for the middle day of each month. These findings indicate that the factor that contributes to the generation of geomagnetic disturbance is not the velocity of the solar wind, but the component of the solar wind velocity perpendicular to the dipole axis of the geomagnetic

  10. Physics Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1978. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This report contains information on the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, nuclear physics with neutrons, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, accelerator-based atomic physics, magnetic fusion energy-applied physics research, electron spectroscopy, and high-energy physics, as well as lists of publications, papers presented at meetings, and other general information. Sixty-two items containing significant information were abstracted and indexed individually. (RWR)

  11. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP).

  12. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  13. A branching model for hadronic air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Novotny, Vladimir; Ebr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple branching model for the development of hadronic showers in the Earth's atmosphere. Based on this model, we show how the size of the pionic component followed by muons can be estimated. Several aspects of the subsequent muonic component are also discussed. We focus on the energy evolution of the muon production depth. We also estimate the impact of the primary particle mass on the size of the hadronic component. Even though a precise calculation of the development of air showers must be left to complex Monte Carlo simulations, the proposed model can reveal qualitative insight into the air shower physics.

  14. Hadron Dragons strike again

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Dragon Boat team – the Hadron Dragons – achieved a fantastic result at the "Paddle for Cancer" Dragon Boat Festival at Lac de Joux on 6 September. CERN Hadron Dragons heading for the start line.Under blue skies and on a clear lake, the Hadron Dragons won 2nd place in a hard-fought final, following top times in the previous heats. In a close and dramatic race – neck-and-neck until the final 50 metres – the local Lac-de-Joux team managed to inch ahead at the last moment. The Hadron Dragons were delighted to take part in this festival. No one would turn down a day out in such a friendly and fun atmosphere, but the Dragons were also giving their support to cancer awareness and fund-raising in association with ESCA (English-Speaking Cancer Association of Geneva). Riding on their great success in recent competitions, the Hadron Dragons plan to enter the last Dragon Boat festival of 2009 in Annecy on 17-18 October. This will coincide with t...

  15. Hadron distributions at higher rapidity using the BRAHMS forward spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-07-15

    Different conditions, and therefore different physics, are expected to exist over the range of rapidities at RHIC. The BRAHMS Forward Spectrometer will measure identified hadron distributions up to y=4, giving it a unique place in the RHIC experimental program.

  16. SUMMARY OF THE 2006 HADRONIC SHOWER SIMULATION WORKSHOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-19

    The 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop, held September 6-8, 2006 at Fermi National Laboratory brought together an international assembly of experts in the field of hadronic shower development. The overall goal was to present the current understanding of the physics of hadronic showers, and to study examples of how this is measured in particle-physics calorimetry. The modeling of such events is critical, and the major Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA, GEANT, MARS, MCNPX, and PHTS were represented at the workshop. A wide range of physics, much of which is used by the simulation codes was also discussed, ranging from the hadronic CEM, LAQGSM, and DTUJET models, down to low energy neutronics capabilities. Special purpose codes and methodologies used for specific applications such as muon and neutrino physics were also shown. The results of a code benchmarking exercises were presented and extensively discussed. This paper summarizes the key topics presented in the workshop.

  17. Basics of particle therapy: introduction to hadrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, James S

    2008-10-01

    With the arrival of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy, radiation dose distributions in radiation oncology have improved dramatically over the past couple of decades. As part of a natural progression there recently has been a resurgence of interest in hadron therapy, specifically charged particle therapy, because of the even better dose distributions potentially achievable. In principle, using charged particle beams, radiation dose distributions can be achieved that surpass those possible with even the most sophisticated photon radiation delivery techniques. Certain charged particle beams might possess some biologic advantages in terms of tumor kill potential as well as this dosimetric advantage. The particles under consideration for such clinical applications all belong to the category of particles known as hadrons. This review introduces some of the elementary physics of the various hadron species previously used, currently used or being considered for future use in radiation oncology.

  18. A new slant on hadron structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Detmold; D B Leinweber; W Melnitchouk; A W Thomas; S V Wright

    2001-08-01

    Rather than regarding the restriction of current lattice QCD simulations to quark masses that are 5–10 times larger than those observed as a problem, we note that this presents a wonderful opportunity to deepen our understanding of QCD. Just as it has been possible to learn a great deal about QCD by treating c as a variable, so the study of hadron properties as a function of quark mass is leading us to a deeper appreciation of hadron structure. As examples we cite progress in using the chiral properties of QCD to connect hadron masses, magnetic moments, charge radii and structure functions calculated at large quark masses within lattice QCD with the values observed physically.

  19. Hadronic Contribution to $(g-2)_{\\mu}$

    CERN Document Server

    Höcker, A

    2001-01-01

    The recent precise measurement of the muon magnetic anomaly (g-2)_{mu} at BNL opens a window into possible new physics, provided the contribution from hadronic vacuum polarization is well understood. This talk summarizes the development in the evaluation of the leading order hadronic contributions. Significant improvement has been achieved in a series of analyses which is presented historically in three steps: (1), use of tau spectral functions in addition to e+e- cross sections, (2), extended use of perturbative QCD and (3), application of QCD sum rule techniques. The uncertainties, in particular concerning the CVC hypothesis used in step (1), and global quark-hadron duality employed in steps (2) and (3) are discussed. No new analysis results are given in these proceedings.

  20. First Results on Hadron Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS is dedicated to the study of hadron structure and dynamics. One goal of the physics programme using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particular the search for $J^{PC}$ exotic states and glueballs. After a short pilot run in 2004 (190 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ beam, lead target), we started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting unprecedented statistics using 190 GeV/c negative hadron beams on a liquid hydrogen target. A similar amount of data with 190 GeV/c positive hadron beams has been taken in 2009, as well as some data (negative beam) on nuclear targets. As a first result the observation of a significant $J^{PC}$ spin-exotic signal in the 2004 data -- consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$ -- was recently published. Our spectrometer features good coverage by electromagnetic calorimetry, crucial for the detection of final states involving $\\pi^0$, $\\eta$ or $\\eta'$, and the 2008/09 data provide an excellent opportunity for the simu...

  1. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1977--31 March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This review of research activity for the year ending in April 1978 contains information on the following subjects: the superconducting linac, medium-energy physics, heavy-ion physics, charged-particle research, accelerator operations, neutron physics, theoretical physics, and experimental atomic and molecular physics. Lists of publications and personnel are also given. Twenty-one items with significant data were abstracted and indexed individually. 58 figures, 4 tables. (RWR)

  2. Search for new physics in the fully hadronic t anti t channel at √(s)=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Corral, David E.

    2016-11-02

    A search for heavy resonances where two high transverse momentum top quarks decay hadronically and produce two large jets is carried out using data collected with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2015 at √(s)=13 TeV. The HEPTopTagger algorithm is used to reconstruct the t anti t invariant mass and to reduce the large multijet background. The large jets must contain exactly one b-tagged jet. The b-tagging performance is studied with track and calorimeter jets. The use of track jets for b-tagging increases the t anti t invariant mass tagging efficiency by a factor between 1.3 and 2 and S/√(B) by 40%. After the HEPTopTagger application, large jets where a top quark candidate is found, are cleaned from underlying event and pile-up activity and used for the t anti t invariant mass reconstruction. Using the cleaned large jets instead of the top quark candidate improves the t anti t invariant mass resolution. The multijet production is estimated using control regions in data. The t anti t invariant mass distribution is compared for data and Monte Carlo simulation and no significant deviations from the Standard Model predictions are found. Upper limits are set on the production cross section times branching fractions of Z{sup '} bosons resonances with masses between 0.75 TeV and 1.65 TeV at 95% C.L. Expected upper limits using an integrated luminosity of 11.5 fb{sup -1} collected during 2016 are set on the production cross section times branching fractions of Z{sup '} boson with masses between 0.83 TeV and 2.47 TeV at 95% C.L.

  3. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Jozef [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  4. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  5. Hadron therapy: history, status, prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenov, G. I.; Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2016-08-01

    A brief historical review is given of external radiation therapy (RT), one of the main cancer treatment methods along with surgery and chemotherapy. Cellular mechanisms of radiation damage are described. Special attention is paid to hadron (proton and ion) therapy, its history, results, problems, challenges, current trends, and prospects. Undeniably great contributions to proton therapy have been made by Russian researchers, notably at the experimental centers that have operated since the mid-20th century at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, the A I Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), and the B P Konstantinov Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics. A quarter of the global clinical experience was accumulated by 1990 at the world's largest ITEP-hosted multicabin proton therapy center.

  6. Hadron jets in perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, C.

    1982-11-01

    The subject of hadron jet studies, to judge by the work presented at this workshop, is a maturing field which is still gathering steam. The very detailed work being done in lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron collisions, the second-generation measurements being carried out at Fermilab, the CERN SPS, and the ISR, and the very high energy hard scatterings being observed at the CERN Collider all show enormous promise for increased understanding. Perhaps we shall yet reach that long-sought nirvana in which high-p/sub perpendicular/ collisions become truly simple.

  7. Review of Exotic Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    I review here the most recent results about the observation and the study of hadronic bound states that do not fit well in the standard quarkonium picture. Several new states have been observed in the last few years, at B-, tau-Factories and hadron colliders. For most of them, quantum number determinations are available and allow to develop the basis of a new spectroscopy based on exotic compounds like tetraquarks or meson molecules. Nonetheless, there is still a lot of work to do to complete the picture.

  8. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  9. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex IIIB: applied solid state physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuse, D. [ed.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The annual report presents F3B highlights and reports on progress achieved during 1966 in the field of nanotechnology, semiconductor quantum structure, optoelectronic devices, micro- and integrated optics, optical metrology, new installations. A list of publications is also presented. figs., tabs., refs.

  10. Physics Division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelson, P.H.

    1977-09-01

    The bulk of the Division's effort concerned nuclear physics and accelerator development, but work in the areas of nuclear data, research applicable to the magnetic fusion project, atomic and molecular physics, and high-energy physics is also recounted. Lists of publications, technical talks, personnel, etc., are included. Individual reports with sufficient data are abstracted separately. (RWR)

  11. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Task A: theoretical elementary particle physics; Task B: experimental elementary particle physics; Task C: axion project; Task G: experimental research in collider physics; and Task S: computer acquisition. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Strangeness in QGP: Hadronization Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Rafelski, Jan; Petran, Michal

    2014-01-01

    We review strangeness as signature of quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadronization process of a QGP fireball formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the entire range of today accessible reaction energies. We discuss energy dependence of the statistical hadronization parameters within the context of fast QGP hadronization. We find that QGP breakup occurs for all energies at the universal hadronization pressure $P = 80\\pm 3\\,\\mathrm{MeV/fm}^3 $.

  13. Particle Showers in a Highly Granular Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider. The hadron calorimeter uses small scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. The system with 7608 channels has been successfully operated in beam tests at DESY, CERN and Fermilab since 2006, and represents the first large scale tests of these devices in high energy physics experiments. The unprecedented granularity of the detector provides detailed information of the properties of hadronic showers, which helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. We will discuss results on longitudinal and lateral shower profiles compared to a variety of different shower models, and present studies of the energy reconstruction of hadronic showers using software compensation techniques.

  14. Triggering on hadronic tau decays: ATLAS meets the challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mark Scarcella; on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Hadronic tau decays play a crucial role in taking Standard Model (SM) measurements as well as in the search for physics beyond the SM. However, hadronic tau decays are difficult to identify and trigger on due to their resemblance to QCD jets. Given the large production crosssection of QCD processes, designing and operating a trigger system to efficiently select hadronic tau decays, while maintaining the rate within the bandwidth limits, is a difficult challenge. This contribution will summarize the status and performance of the ATLAS tau trigger system during the 2010–2011 data taking period. Different methods that have been explored to obtain the trigger efficiency curves from data will be shown. Finally, the status of the measurements, which include hadronic tau decays in the final state, will be summarized. In light of the vast statistics collected in 2011, future prospects for triggering on hadronic tau decays in this exciting new period of increased instantaneous luminosity will be presented.

  15. Weibull model of multiplicity distribution in hadron-hadron collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sadhana; Nandi, Basanta K.; Sett, Priyanka

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the use of the Weibull distribution as a simple parametrization of charged particle multiplicities in hadron-hadron collisions at all available energies, ranging from ISR energies to the most recent LHC energies. In statistics, the Weibull distribution has wide applicability in natural processes that involve fragmentation processes. This provides a natural connection to the available state-of-the-art models for multiparticle production in hadron-hadron collisions, which involve QCD parton fragmentation and hadronization. The Weibull distribution describes the multiplicity data at the most recent LHC energies better than the single negative binomial distribution.

  16. Workforce Projections 2010-2020: Annual Supply and Demand Forecasting Models for Physical Therapists Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Hack, Laurita M; Coulson, Elizabeth; Freburger, Janet; Johnson, Michael P; Katz, Richard; Kerwin, Joanne; Smith, Megan H; Wessman, Henry C Bud; Venskus, Diana G; Sinnott, Patricia L; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Health human resources continue to emerge as a critical health policy issue across the United States. The purpose of this study was to develop a strategy for modeling future workforce projections to serve as a basis for analyzing annual supply of and demand for physical therapists across the United States into 2020. A traditional stock-and-flow methodology or model was developed and populated with publicly available data to produce estimates of supply and demand for physical therapists by 2020. Supply was determined by adding the estimated number of physical therapists and the approximation of new graduates to the number of physical therapists who immigrated, minus US graduates who never passed the licensure examination, and an estimated attrition rate in any given year. Demand was determined by using projected US population with health care insurance multiplied by a demand ratio in any given year. The difference between projected supply and demand represented a shortage or surplus of physical therapists. Three separate projection models were developed based on best available data in the years 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. Based on these projections, demand for physical therapists in the United States outstrips supply under most assumptions. Workforce projection methodology research is based on assumptions using imperfect data; therefore, the results must be interpreted in terms of overall trends rather than as precise actuarial data-generated absolute numbers from specified forecasting. Outcomes of this projection study provide a foundation for discussion and debate regarding the most effective and efficient ways to influence supply-side variables so as to position physical therapists to meet current and future population demand. Attrition rates or permanent exits out of the profession can have important supply-side effects and appear to have an effect on predicting future shortage or surplus of physical therapists. © 2016 American Physical Therapy

  17. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1987--31 March 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This paper contains a description of the research project at Argonne National Laboratory over the past year (4/11/87--3/31/88). The major sections of this report in nuclear physics are: research at ATLAS; operation and development of TLAS: medium-energy nuclear physics and weak interactions; and theoretical nuclei physics. The major sections in atomic physics are: high-resolution laser-rf spectroscopy with beams of atoms, molecules and ions; beam-foil research, ion-beam laser interactions, and collision dynamics of heavy ions; interactions of fast atomic and molecular ions with solid and gaseous target; theoretical atomic physics; atomic physics at ATLAS; atomic physics using a synchrotron light source; and molecular structures and dynamics from coulomb-explosion measurements. (LSP)

  18. Better Hadronic Top Quark Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Tweedie, Brock

    2014-01-01

    Observables sensitive to top quark polarization are important for characterizing or even discovering new physics. The most powerful spin analyzer in top decay is the down-type fermion from the W, which in the case of leptonic decay allows for very clean measurements. However, in many applications it is useful to measure the polarization of hadronically decaying top quarks. Usually it is assumed that at most 50% of the spin analyzing power can be recovered in this case. This paper introduces a simple and truly optimal hadronic spin analyzer, with a power of 64% at leading-order. The improvement is demonstrated to be robust in a handful of simulated measurements, including the spins and spin correlations of boosted top quarks from multi-TeV top-antitop resonances, the spins of semi-boosted tops from chiral stop decays, and the potentially CP-violating spin correlations induced in continuum top pairs by color dipole operators. For the boosted studies, we explore jet substructure techniques that exhibit improved ...

  19. Speculations in hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, J M

    2005-01-01

    A selected survey is presented of the recent progress in hadron spectroscopy. This includes spin-singlet charmonium states, excitations of charmonium and open-charm mesons, double-charm baryons, and pentaquark candidates. Models proposing exotic bound states or resonances are reviewed. The sector of exotic mesons with two heavy quarks appears as particularly promising.

  20. Japan Hadron Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    1999-01-01

    Japan Hadron Facility (JHF) is a high-intensity proton accelerator complex consisting of a 200 MeV linac, a 3 GeV booster and a 50 GeV main ring. Its status and future possibilities of realizing a versatile antiproton facility at JHF are presented.

  1. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  2. Chasseur de hadrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Eytier, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Qu'aurait-il proposé comme solutions face aux déboires du LHC, le grand collisionneur du hadrons du CERN, arrêté peu après son démarrage à l'automne 2008? Lucien Edmond André Montanet était un des grands de la physique des particules. (2 pages)

  3. Hadron Spectroscopy with COMPASS – Newest Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerling Frank

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS investigates the structure and spectrum of hadrons by scattering high energetic hadrons and polarised muons off various fixed targets. During the years 2002–2007, COMPASS focused on nucleon spin physics using 160 GeV/c polarised µ+ beams on polarised deuteron and proton targets, including measurements of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin using longitudinal target polarisation as well as studies of transverse spin effects in the nucleon on a transversely polarised target. One major goal of the physics programme using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particular the search for JPC exotic states and glue-balls. COMPASS measures not only charged but also neutral final-state particles, allowing for investigation of new objects in different reactions and decay channels. In addition COMPASS can measure low-energy QCD constants like, e.g. the electromagnetic polarisability of the pion. Apart from a few days pilot run data taken in 2004 with a 190 GeV/c π− beam on a Pb target, showing a significant spin-exotic JPC = 1−+ resonance at around 1660 MeV/c2, COMPASS collected high statistics with negative and positive 190 GeV/c hadron beams on a proton (H2 and nuclear (Ni, Pb targets in 2008 and 2009. We give a selected overview of the newest results and discuss the status of various ongoing analyses.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory, annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4. Physical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1983 to the Office of Energy Research, includes those programs funded under the title Physical and Technological Research. The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped under the subheadings and each section is introduced by a divider page that indicates the Field Task Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1983. The reader should contact the principal investigators named or examine the publications cited for more details.

  5. 5th Annual Pan-European Science and Big Physics Symposium on March 5th, 2012, Zurich, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Balle, Ch

    2012-01-01

    The 5th Annual Pan-European Science and Big Physics Symposium on March 5th is a technical workshop that covers topics in the areas of control, measurement and diagnostics for accelerators, cyclotrons, tokamaks and telescopes. The symposium brings together over 60 scientists and engineers from major research labs around the world such as CERN, PSI, INFN, NPL, ESRF and other research institutions. Attend this event to share ideas and results and to learn from the presentations of your peers from different labs and experiments worldwide.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4. Physical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1986-02-01

    Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title ''Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped by budget category and each section is introduced by an abstract that indicates the Field Task Proposal/Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1985. The reader should contact the principal investigators named or examine the publications cited for more details.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 4, Physical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1988-06-01

    This 1987 annual report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1987. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. Part 4 includes those programs funded under the title ''Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped by budget category and each section is introduced by an abstract that indicates the Field Task Proposal/Agreement reported in that section.

  8. 46. Annual meeting of the German Society for Medical Physics. Abstracts; 46. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik. Abstractband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebich, Martin [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Zink, Klemens (ed.) [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Universitaetsklinikum Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2015-07-01

    The abstracts volume of the 46th annual meeting of the German Society for Medical Physics includes abstracts on the following issues: audiology; particle therapy: dosimetric and biological aspects; functional and molecular imaging; computerized tomography; dosimetry: 2D dosimetry and clinical dosimetry; MR imaging: cardio and lungs imaging; quality assurance in radiation therapy; brachytherapy/IORT; irradiation planning; functional and molecular imaging: methodic principles; dosimetry: dosimetric base data and Monte Carlo; adaptive and guided radiation therapy; irradiation planning; laser accelerated protons; brachytherapy/IORT: dosimetry; particle therapy: irradiation planning and imaging; stereotaxis and radiosurgery; radiation protection; dosimetry: detectors and small photon fields; MRT and MRS - neuroimaging; particle therapy: in vivo verification.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 4, Physical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1987-02-01

    This 1986 annual report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1986. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. Part 4 includes those programs funded under the title ''Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped by budget category and each section is introduced by an abstract that indicates the Field Task Proposal/Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1985.

  10. Interplay among transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark several left–right asymmetries are possible for the hadrons in the jet. When only one unpolarized hadron is selected, it exhibits an azimuthal modulation known as the Collins effect. When a pair of oppositely charged hadrons is observed, three asymmetries can be considered, a di-hadron asymmetry and two single hadron asymmetries. In lepton deep inelastic scattering on transversely polarized nucleons all these asymmetries are coupled with the transversity distribution. From the high statistics COMPASS data on oppositely charged hadron-pair production we have investigated for the first time the dependence of these three asymmetries on the difference of the azimuthal angles of the two hadrons. The similarity of transversity induced single and di-hadron asymmetries is discussed. A new analysis of the data allows quantitative relationships to be established among them, providing for the first time strong experimental indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven by a common physical process.

  11. Hadron Fragmentation Inside Jets in Hadronic Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, Tom; Vogelsang, Werner

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical next-to-leading order QCD calculation of the partonic cross sections for the process $pp\\rightarrow ({\\text{jet}} \\,h)X$, for which a specific hadron is observed inside a fully reconstructed jet. In order to obtain the analytical results, we assume the jet to be relatively narrow. We show that the results can be cast into a simple and systematic form based on suitable universal jet functions for the process. We confirm the validity of our calculation by comparing to previous results in the literature for which the next-to-leading order cross section was treated entirely numerically by Monte-Carlo integration techniques. We present phenomenological results for experiments at the LHC and at RHIC. These suggest that $pp\\rightarrow ({\\text{jet}} \\,h)X$ should enable very sensitive probes of fragmentation functions, especially of the one for gluons.

  12. Section for nuclear physics and energy physics. Annual report January 1 to December 31, 1998[Oslo Univ., Oslo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The SCANDITRONIX MC-35 cyclotron laboratory, including the Oslo Cyclotron, has been in operation since 1980. The main auxiliary equipment consists of the multi-detector system CACTUS. During the last years, new, high efficiency Ge(HP) detectors were purchased and integrated in the CACTUS detector array. In connection with that, the electronical setup was revised and altered. Several drawbacks of the old setup could be pointed out and eliminated. A test of the performance of all detector array elements was made with high accuracy. The total beamtime used for experiments in 1998 was 1051 hours. 52 days were used by the Nuclear Physics section, 70 days by the University of Oslo Nuclear Chemistry section and the Norwegian Cancer Hospital used the cyclotron for 12 days. 42 days were spent on maintenance. In experimental nuclear physics, the section members are engaged within three main fields of research: Nuclei at high temperature, high spin nuclear structure and high and intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  13. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of ..pi..N scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies. (GHT)

  14. High energy density physics with intense ion and laser beams. Annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyrich, K. (comp.)

    2004-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Laser plasma physics, plasma spectroscopy, beam interaction experiments, atomic and radiation physics, pulsed power applications, beam transport and accelerator research and development, properties of dense plasma, instabilities in beam-plasma interaction, beam transport in dense plasmas, short-pulse laser-matter interaction. (HSI)

  15. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1980-31 March 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Progress in nuclear physics research is reported in the following areas: medium-energy physics (pion reaction mechanisms, high-resolution studies and nuclear structure, and two-nucleon physics with pions and electrons); heavy-ion research at the tandem and superconducting linear accelerator (resonant structure in heavy-ion reactions, fusion cross sections, high angular momentum states in nuclei, and reaction mechanisms and distributions of reaction strengths); charged-particle research; neutron and photonuclear physics; theoretical physics (heavy-ion direct-reaction theory, nuclear shell theory and nuclear structure, nuclear matter and nuclear forces, intermediate-energy physics, microscopic calculations of high-energy collisions of heavy ions, and light ion direct reactions); the superconducting linac; accelerator operations; and GeV electron linac. Progress in atomic and molecular physics research is reported in the following areas: dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets, beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions, photoionization- photoelectron research, high-resolution laser rf spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams, moessbauer effect research, and theoretical atomic physics. Studies on interactions of energetic particles with solids are also described. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  16. Micromegas for imaging hadronic calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Cap, S; Chefdeville, M; Dalmaz, A; Drancourt, C; Espargiliere, A; Gaglione, R; Gallet, R; Geffroy, N; Jacquemier, J; Karyotakis, Y; Peltier, F; Prast, J; Vouters, G

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress in R&D of the Micromegas detectors for hadronic calorimetry including new engineering-technical solutions, electronics development, and accompanying simulation studies with emphasis on the comparison of the physics performance of the analog and digital readout is described. The developed prototypes are with 2 bit digital readout to exploit the Micromegas proportional mode and thus improve the calorimeter linearity. In addition, measurements of detection efficiency, hit multiplicity, and energy shower profiles obtained during the exposure of small size prototypes to radioactive source quanta, cosmic particles and accelerator beams are reported. Eventually, the status of a large scale chamber (1{\\times}1 m2) are also presented with prospective towards the construction of a 1 m3 digital calorimeter consisting of 40 such chambers.

  17. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1978-31 March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    A broad review is presented of work in the areas of nuclear physics research (the superconducting linac; medium-energy physics; heavy-ion research at the tandem and superconducting linac accelerators - resonant structures in heavy-ion reactions, fusion cross sections, high-angular-momentum-states in nuclei; charged-particle research; accelerator operations and development; neutron and photonuclear physics; theoretical physics - heavy-ion direct reactions, nuclear shell theory and nuclear structure, nuclear matter, intermediate-energy physics, dense nuclear matter and classical calculations of the high-energy collisions of heavy ions; radiative transitions and nuclear resonance reactions experimental atomic and molecular physics research (dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets, beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions, photoionization-photon-electron research, spectroscopy of free atoms, Moessbauer effect research, monochromatic x-ray beam project); and applied physics (interaction of energetic particles with solids scanning secondary-ion microprobe). Most of the reports are quite brief (about a page); 24 pages of references are included. 21 items with significant amounts of information are abstracted individually. (RWR)

  18. On the concept of local parton-hadron duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokshitzer, Yu.L.; Khoze, V.A.; Troyan, S.I. (Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Theoretical Physics AN SSSR, Leningrad (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1991-10-01

    In the last decade jet physics has been intensively studied at both e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadronic colliders. With the start of LEP activity a wealth of new data has become available. They show that the global features of hadronic jets systems (multiplicities, angular patterns of particle flows, inclusive energy spectra etc), calculated at the parton level, agree very well with the measured ones. This convincingly demonstrates the dominant role of the perturbative phase of jet evolution and strongly supports the hypothesis of local parton-hadron duality. (author).

  19. Updates on the optics of the future hadron-hadron collider FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Chance, Antoine; Dalena, Barbara; Holzer, Bernhard; Langner, Andy Sven; Schulte, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The FCC-hh (Future Hadron-Hadron Circular Collider) is one of the three options considered for the next generation accelerator in high-energy physics as recommended by the European Strategy Group. The layout of FCC-hh has been optimized to a more compact design following recommendations from civil engineering aspects. The updates on the first order and second order optics of the ring will be shown for collisions at the required centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. Special emphasis is put on the dispersion suppressors and general beam cleaning sections as well as first considerations of injection and extraction sections.

  20. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1999 are presented in this progress report. Theresearch in physics is concentrated on neutron...... and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small...

  1. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 2000 are presented in this progress report. Theresearch in physics is concentrated on neutron...... and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures.The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small...

  2. Hadrons and broken symmetries with WASA-at-COSY

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Schadmand; Wasa-at-Cosy

    2010-08-01

    The WASA Detector Facility is an internal experiment at the cooler synchrotron (COSY) in Jülich, Germany. The COSY accelerator provides proton and deuteron beams with momenta up to 3.7 GeV/c giving access to hadron physics including the strange quark sector. The physics program with the WASA detector involves hadron dynamics and hadron structure. Key experiments address fundamental symmetries and symmetry violations via the study of rare and not-so-rare meson decays. From the very first production run, results on the Dalitz plot slope parameter in the isospin violating → 30 decay have been obtained. The 30 final state is also used to study meson production mechanisms. Investigations of other decay modes of the -meson address , , and symmetries and combinations. Higher orders in chiral perturbation theory are probed with the → 0 decay. The status and plans for studying hadron structure with Dalitz decays of mesons are presented.

  3. Elastic scattering of hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2012-01-01

    When colliding, the high energy hadrons can either produce new particles or scatter elastically without change of their quantum num- bers and other particles produced. Namely elastic scattering of hadrons is considered in this review paper. Even though the inelastic processes dominate at high energies, the elastic scattering constitutes the notice- able part of the total cross section ranging between 18 and 25% with some increase at higher energies. The scattering proceeds mostly at small angles and reveals peculiar dependences at larger angles disclos- ing the geometrical structure of the colliding particles and di?erent dynamical mechanisms. The fast decreasing Gaussian peak at small angles is followed by the exponential (Orear) regime with some shoul- ders and dips and then by the power-like decrease. Results of various theoretical approaches are compared with exper- imental data. Phenomenological models pretending to describe this process are reviewed. The unitarity condition requires the exponen- tial re...

  4. [High energy physics research]: Annual performance report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992. [Northwestern Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, J; Block, M; Buchholz, D; Gobbi, B; Schellman, H; Buchholz, D; Rosen, J; Miller, D; Braaten, E; Chang, D; Oakes, R; Schellman, H

    1992-01-01

    The various segments of the Northwestern University high energy physics research program are reviewed. Work is centered around experimental studies done primarily at FNAL; associated theoretical efforts are included.

  5. Quark-Hadron Duality in Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally Melnitchouk; Rolf Ent; Cynthia Keppel

    2004-08-01

    The duality between partonic and hadronic descriptions of physical phenomena is one of the most remarkable features of strong interaction physics. A classic example of this is in electron-nucleon scattering, in which low-energy cross sections, when averaged over appropriate energy intervals, are found to exhibit the scaling behavior expected from perturbative QCD. We present a comprehensive review of data on structure functions in the resonance region, from which the global and local aspects of duality are quantified, including its flavor, spin and nuclear medium dependence. To interpret the experimental findings, we discuss various theoretical approaches which have been developed to understand the microscopic origins of quark-hadron duality in QCD. Examples from other reactions are used to place duality in a broader context, and future experimental and theoretical challenges are identified.

  6. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology ther...

  7. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2013

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomsonscattering. Within fusion technology there...

  8. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark (until 31-12- 2011: Association Euratom – Risø DTU) covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collecti...

  9. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  10. Hadrons in Nuclear Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosel Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the achievements of the project B.5, that deals with the calculation of in-medium properties of vector mesons and an analysis of their experimental signals, with a particular emphasis on the ω photoproduction data from CBELSA/TAPS. Other topics addressed include color transparency, pion electroproduction on nucleons, the Primakoff effect for nuclear targets and studies of hadronization at the EIC.

  11. Forward gluon production in hadron-hadron scattering with Pomeron loops

    CERN Document Server

    Iancu, E; Soyez, G

    2006-01-01

    We discuss new physical phenomena expected in particle production in hadron-hadron collisions at high energy, as a consequence of Pomeron loop effects in the evolution equations for the Color Glass Condensate. We focus on gluon production in asymmetric, `dilute-dense', collisions : a dilute projectile scatters off a dense hadronic target, whose gluon distribution is highly evolved. This situation is representative for particle production in proton-proton collisions at forward rapidities (say, at LHC) and admits a dipole factorization similar to that of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We show that at sufficiently large forward rapidities, where the Pomeron loop effects become important in the evolution of the target wavefunction, gluon production is dominated by `black spots' (saturated gluon configurations) up to very large values of the transverse momentum, well above the average saturation momentum in the target. In this regime, the produced gluon spectrum exhibits diffusive scaling, so like DIS at suffici...

  12. Isolated hard photon emission in hadronic Z 0 decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Akbari, H.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelov, T.; Antonov, L.; Abtreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Atamanchuk, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Bao, J.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Nattiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Behrens, J.; Beingessner, S.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocciolini, M.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brock, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Buisson, C.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Burq, J. P.; Busenitz, J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, F.; Cartacci, A. M.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.; Chen, M.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W. Y.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Chmeissani, M.; Chung, S.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Contin, A.; Crijns, F.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; Dhina, M.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Driever, T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, S. J.; Fackler, O.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.; Filthaut, F.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Foreman, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Friebel, W.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gele, D.; Gentile, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Göttlicher, P.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Grinnell, C.; Gruenewald, M.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Herten, G.; Herten, U.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jezequel, S.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, D.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Krivshich, A.; Kuijten, H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kunin, A.; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Leedom, I.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Lettry, J.; Leytens, X.; Li, C.; Li, P. J.; Li, X. G.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Linnhofer, D.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Malhotra, P. K.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mao, D. N.; Mao, Y. F.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marion, F.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Matsuda, T.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Meinholz, Th.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Newman, H.; Neyer, C.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Piere, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Produit, N.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Romero, L.; Rose, J.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Sajan, E.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmiemann, K.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schulte, S.; Schultze, K.; Schütte, J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Scott, I.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shen, D. Z.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Soderstrom, E.; Sopczak, A.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Starosta, R.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Summer, R. L.; Sun, L. Z.; Suter, H.; Sutton, R. L.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wahdwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, C. R.; Wang, G. H.; Wang, J. H.; Wang, Q. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weber, J.; Weill, R.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wenninger, J.; White, M.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, R. J.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, Y. G.; Wysłouch, B.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, Y. D.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yan, X. J.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Yang, K. S.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; Yin, Z. W.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.; L3 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    We report on a study of energetic, isolated photons in a sample of ∼ 320 000 Z 0 hadronic decays. Energetic isolated photons probe the short-distance structure of QCD. We compare our data with the prediction of several QCD-based calculations. A search for new processes with one or two photons in the hadronic final state is also presented. No evidence for physics beyond the standard model is found.

  13. The role of hadron resonances in hot hadronic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Hadron resonances can play a significant role in hot hadronic matter. Of particular interest for this workshop are the contributions of hyperon resonances. The question about how to quantify the effects of resonances is here addressed. In the framework of the hadron resonance gas, the chemically equilibrated case, relevant in the context of lattice QCD calculations, and the chemically frozen case relevant in heavy ion collisions are discussed.

  14. Hadron spectrum and hadrons in the nuclear medium

    CERN Document Server

    Vacas, M J V

    2006-01-01

    Some recent developments in chiral dynamics of hadrons and hadrons in a medium are presented. Unitary schemes based on chiral Lagrangians describe some hadronic states as being dynamically generated resonances. We discuss how standard quantum many body techniques can be used to calculate the properties of these dynamically generated and other hadrons in the nuclear medium. We present some results for vector mesons ($\\rho$ and $\\phi$), scalar mesons ($\\sigma$, $\\kappa$, $a_0(980)$, $f_0(980)$), the $\\Lambda(1520)$ and for the in-medium baryon-baryon interaction.

  15. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee. (ACR)

  16. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1998-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1997 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics in concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems in undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au). 129 ills., 213 refs.

  17. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebech, B. [ed.

    2000-02-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1999 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scalestructures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  18. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1998 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 2 tabs., 142 ills., 169 refs.

  19. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebech, B. [ed.

    2001-03-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 2000 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  20. Identification and energy calibration of hadronic tau lepton decays at the LHC arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Flechl, Martin

    The identification of hadronic tau lepton decays is an important requirement for the LHC physics program, both in terms of standard model measurements and the search for beyond-the-standard-model physics. The ATLAS and CMS algorithms for identification and energy calibration of hadronic tau lepton decays are conceptually different. They are described together with measurements of relevant performance figures.

  1. Physics Division annual review, 1 April 1985-31 March 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    The highlight of the Argonne Physics Division during the past year (1985/86) has been the completion and dedication of the final superconducting linac stages of the ATLAS system and the beginning of the research program that utilizes the full capabilities of that system. The transition to using the full ATLAS and the new experimental area has been a smooth one and the research program is beginning to bear fruit. The experimental facilities have also come into operation with three major components, consisting of the first stage of a gamma detection system incorporating an array of Compton-suppressed germanium detectors and BGO total energy detectors, a magnetic spectrograph of the Enge split-pole design, with a focal-plane detector system adapted to heavy ions, and a new scattering facility with a number of features. Interesting new data are emerging on quasi-elastic processes, on the transition between fission and quasi-fission and the study of nuclear structure at high spin. The past year has also seen the merging of the nuclear research in the Argonne Chemistry Division, mostly in heavy-ion and medium-energy nuclear physics, with the Physics Division. The merger is leading to full cooperation within the larger group and will help broaden and strengthen the total effort in nuclear physics. In medium-energy physics the year has seen the successful execution of an experiment at the SLAC NPAS station to study the delta resonance in nuclei. Progress is being made in the effort at Fermilab on deep inelastic muon scattering, on the development of a tensor polarized gas deuterium target for use with storage rings, and on the LAMPF neutrino oscillation experiment. In theoretical nuclear physics an effort is continuing on investigating the relevant degrees of freedom in the microscopic dynamics of nuclei and the importance of three-body forces. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Physics, computer science and mathematics division. Annual report, 1 January - 31 December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental physics research activities are described under the following headings: research on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation; research at Fermilab; search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson; the particle data center; high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments; detector and other research and development; publications and reports of other research; computation and communication; and engineering, evaluation, and support operations. Theoretical particle physics research and heavy ion fusion research are described. Also, activities of the Computer Science and Mathematics Department are summarized. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  3. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  4. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  6. The ATLAS Hadronic Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Brost, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach luminosities close to 10$^{\\mathrm{34}}$ cm$^{\\mathrm{-2}}$ s $^{\\mathrm{-1}}$, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analyses. Simplistic single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitation, despite the sophisticated algorithms used in the tau identification. The development of further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main challenges to allow a large program of physics analysis. The tau triggers provide many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model, and to get precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson decaying to tau-leptons. We present the performance of the hadronic tau trigger taken in Run 1 data with the ATLAS detector at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV pp collision. One of the major challenges is to sustain high efficiencies in events with multiple interactions. To do this we introduced faster tracking methods, multivariate selection techniques, and new t...

  7. First look at the PYTHIA8 hadronization program for neutrino interaction generators

    CERN Document Server

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh; Terri, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Current and future neutrino oscillation experiments utilize information of hadronic final states to improve sensitivities on oscillation parameters measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, neutrino interaction generators rely on the PYTHIA6 hadronization program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Next, we discuss the possibility to implement the PYTHIA8 program in neutrino interaction generators, including GENIE and NEUT. Finally, we show preliminary comparisons of PYTHIA8 predictions with neutrino hadron multiplicity data from bubble chamber experiments within the GENIE hadronization validation tool.

  8. Hadronic Shower Models in GEANT4: Validation Strategy and Results.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JohannesPeterWellisch

    2001-01-01

    Optimal exploitation of hadronic final states played a key role in successes of all recent hadron collider experiment in HEP,and the ability to use hadronic final states will continue to be one of the decisive issues during the analysis phase of the LHC experinents Monte Carlo implementations of hadronic shower models provided with GEANT4 facilitate the use of hadronic final states,and have been developed for many years.We will give an overview on the physics underlying hadronic shower simulation,discussing the three basic types of modelling;data driven,parametrisation driven,and theory driven modelling,and their respective implementation status in GEANT4.We will confront the different types of modelling with a validation suite for hadronic generators based on cross-sections measurements from thin target experiments,and expose the strength and weaknesses of the individual approaches.

  9. Research in elementary particle physics. Annual report, January 1--October 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  10. Educators Guide to Free Health, Physical Education and Recreation Materials; A Multimedia Guide. Sixth Annual Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkheimer, Foley A.; Alley, Louis E.

    The guide lists 2,955 free items, of which 1,336 are new in this edition, relevant to health, physical education, and recreation. Each item is listed under one of the categories, and is provided with information about type of medium, specifications of the product, a brief description of the product, and its cost and distributor. A title index, a…

  11. Educators Guide to Free Health, Physical Education and Recreation Materials. A Multimedia Guide. Ninth Annual Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkheimer, Foley A., Comp.

    This guide to free resource materials in health, physical education, and recreation was developed as a basic resource reference for instructors, coaches, recreation directors, and instructional materials center heads. It identifies selected existing resources (including films, filmstrips, slides, transparencies, tapes, scripts, and printed…

  12. Annual report of the activities of health physics in JAERI in 1999. April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities in fiscal year 1999 concerned with radiation protection which cover environmental monitoring of the facilities, radiation protection of workplace and workers, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and their technical development, carried out at the establishments of Tokai, Naka, Takasaki, Oarai, Kansai and Mutsu of JAERI. The report also covers the research activities of 4 research laboratories for Radiation Risk Analysis, Internal Dosimetry, External Dosimetry and Calibration Standards and Measurement which were authorized in Department of Health Physics in Tokai Establishment in April 1999. There are no occupational exposure and effluent release recorded exceeding the prescribed limits for effective dose equivalent and radioactive concentrations for gaseous release and liquid waste. In September 30 in 1999, the JCO criticality accident occurred in Tokai village and the Department of Health Physics of Tokai Establishment, Radiation Protection Division of Oarai Establishment and Safety Division of Naka Establishment took cooperative activities for surveying the level of radiation and radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection in terminating the criticality, sending specialists for the consultant of radiation protection to local government and others, surveying the radioactive contamination of the evacuated public, play ground of schools and others. The estimations of dose for the public and total fissions from the measurement of neutron activated samples collected near JCO were carried out at External Dosimetry Laboratory and Calibration Standards and Measurement Division respectively in Department of Health Physics of Tokai Establishment. (author)

  13. Annual report of the activities of health physics in JAERI in 1999. April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities in fiscal year 1999 concerned with radiation protection which cover environmental monitoring of the facilities, radiation protection of workplace and workers, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and their technical development, carried out at the establishments of Tokai, Naka, Takasaki, Oarai, Kansai and Mutsu of JAERI. The report also covers the research activities of 4 research laboratories for Radiation Risk Analysis, Internal Dosimetry, External Dosimetry and Calibration Standards and Measurement which were authorized in Department of Health Physics in Tokai Establishment in April 1999. There are no occupational exposure and effluent release recorded exceeding the prescribed limits for effective dose equivalent and radioactive concentrations for gaseous release and liquid waste. In September 30 in 1999, the JCO criticality accident occurred in Tokai village and the Department of Health Physics of Tokai Establishment, Radiation Protection Division of Oarai Establishment and Safety Division of Naka Establishment took cooperative activities for surveying the level of radiation and radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection in terminating the criticality, sending specialists for the consultant of radiation protection to local government and others, surveying the radioactive contamination of the evacuated public, play ground of schools and others. The estimations of dose for the public and total fissions from the measurement of neutron activated samples collected near JCO were carried out at External Dosimetry Laboratory and Calibration Standards and Measurement Division respectively in Department of Health Physics of Tokai Establishment. (author)

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  16. Formation time of hadronic resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitev Ivan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In heavy-ion collisions, formation time of hadrons of high transverse momentum can play a pivotal role in determining the perturbative dynamics of the final-state parton and particle system. We present methods to evaluate the formation times of light hadrons, hadronic resonances, open heavy flavor and quarkonia. Experimental implications of the short formation times of heavy particles are discussed in light of recent RHIC and LHC data.

  17. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, N.; Sahoo, B. K.; Yoshinaga, N.; Sato, T.; Asahi, K.; Das, B. P.

    2017-03-01

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested.

  18. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, N. [RIKEN, Wako, iTHES Research Group, Saitama (Japan); Far Eastern Federal University, Complex Simulation Group, School of Biomedicine, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Sahoo, B.K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Division, Ahmedabad (India); Yoshinaga, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama (Japan); Sato, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Asahi, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Das, B.P. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested. (orig.)

  19. Annual progress report of the Department of Solid State Physics 1 January -31 December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I.

    1997-01-01

    Research in the department is concerned with `Materials with Distinct Physical and Chemical Properties`. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 January to 31 December, 1996, are presented in this Progress Report. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to study a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics and include: two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering, heavy fermions, high T{sub c} superconductivity, phase transitions in model systems, precipitation phenomena, and nano-scale structures in various materials. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Related to these problems there is work going on in theory, Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 6 tabs., 144 ills., 197 refs.

  20. EBIT - Electronic Beam Ion Trap: N Divison experimental physics annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1996-10-01

    The multi-faceted research effort of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N-Division of the Physics and Space Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continues to contribute significant results to the physical sciences from studies with low energy very highly charged heavy ions. The EBIT program attracts a number of collaborators from the US and abroad for the different projects. The collaborations are partly carried out through participating graduate students demonstrating the excellent educational capabilities at the LLNL EBIT facilities. Moreover, participants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are engaged in the EBIT project. This report describes EBIT work for 1995 in atomic structure measurements and radiative transition probabilities, spectral diagnostics for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, ion/surface interaction studies, electron-ion interactions studies, retrap and ion collisions, and instrumental development.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters achieved in experimental devices for fiscal year 1992; tokamak fusion test reactor; princeton beta experiment-modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; tokamak physics experiment/steady-state advanced tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; plasma processing: Deposition and etching of thin films; pure electron plasma experiments; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; high-field magnet project; engineering department; environment, safety, and health and quality assurance; technology transfer; office of human resources and administration; PPPL invention disclosures for fiscal year 1992; office of resource management; graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: program in plasma science and technology; and science education program.

  2. Annual progress report of the Department of Solid State Physics 1 January - 31 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1996-01-01

    Research in the department is concerned with `Materials with Distinct Physical and Chemical Properties`. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 January to 31 December, 1995, are presented in this Progress Report. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to study a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics and include: two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering, heavy fermions, high T{sub c} superconductivity, phase transitions in model systems, precipitation phenomena, and nano-scale structures in various materials. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Related to these problems there is work going on in theory, Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 5 tabs., 135 ills., 163 refs.

  3. Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

  4. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E. (ed.)

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at LLNL is to enrich the opportunities of University of California campus researchers by making available to them some of the Laboratory's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific horizon of LLNL researchers by encouraging collaborative or interdisciplinary work with other UC scientists. The IGPP continues to emphasize three fields of research - geoscience, astrophysics, and high-pressure physics - each administered by a corresponding IGPP Research Center. Each Research Center coordinates the mini-grant work in its field, and also works with the appropriate LLNL programs and departments, which frequently can provide supplementary funding and facilities for IGPP projects. 62 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  6. Research in theoretical physics. Annual progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1992-12-01

    Progress made in the following areas is summarized: simulation of extensive air showers induced by interactions existing beyond the currently accepted ``Standard Model`` of elementary particle interactions; search for physics beyond the ``Standard Model`` in gluonic inclusive decays of heavy quarks; obtaining limits on the applicability of the special theory of relativity; an improved method of obtaining upper limits on the masses of primaries of extensive air showers associated with point sources in the sky. 8 figs., 1 tab., 73 refs.

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Years 2002 and 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley, Editor

    2004-12-22

    This report provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2002 and 2003 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2002 and 2003.

  8. Flavor-dependent eigenvolume interactions in hadron resonance gas and its implications for hadron yields at LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alba, P; Gorenstein, M I; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    We study the eigenvolume effects in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model on hadron yields at zero chemical potential. Using different mass-volume relations for strange and nonstrange hadrons we observe a remarkable improvement in the quality of the fit of the mean hadron multiplicities measured by the ALICE Collaboration in the central Pb+Pb collisions at the collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$~TeV. The fit within the point-particle HRG yields $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 27.1 / 8$ while the corresponding calculation within the eigevolume HRG with smaller radii for heavier strange hadrons yields a remarkably small $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 0.42 / 6$. This effect appears to be rather insensitive to the details in the implementation of the HRG model, including the variations in the hadron list, as well the variations in the excluded-volume mechanism. Our result shows that there are no anomalies in the description of the heavy-ion hadron yield data at LHC within the HRG model, as long as physical exte...

  9. Exotic hadron states

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T G; Kleiv, R T; Bulthuis, B; Harnett, D; Richards, T; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Many charmonium-like and bottomonium-like $XYZ$ resonances have been observed by the Belle, Babar, CLEO and BESIII collaborations in the past decade. They are difficult to fit in the conventional quark model and thus are considered as candidates of exotic hadrons, such as multi-quark states, meson molecules, and hybrids. In this talk, we first briefly introduce the method of QCD sum rules and then provide a short review of the mass spectra of the quarkonium-like tetraquark states and the heavy quarkonium hybrids in the QCD sum rules approach. Possible interpretations of the $XYZ$ resonances are briefly discussed.

  10. Hadronic Decays of Charm

    CERN Document Server

    Stenson, K

    2002-01-01

    Recent hadronic charm decay results from fixed-target experiments are presented. New measurements of the D0 to K-K+K-pi+ branching ratio are shown as are recent results from Dalitz plot fits to D+ to K-K+pi+, pi+pi-pi+, K-pi+pi+, K+pi-pi+ and D_s+ to pi+pi-pi+, K+pi-pi+. These fits include measurements of the masses and widths of several light resonances as well as strong evidence for the existence of two light scalar particles, the pipi resonance sigma and the Kpi resonance kappa.

  11. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  12. The large hadron computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirstius, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    In the mid-1990s, when CERN physicists made their first cautious estimates of the amount of data that experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) would produce, the microcomputer component manufacturer Intel had just released the Pentium Pro processor. Windows was the dominant operating system, although Linux was gaining momentum. CERN had recently made the World Wide Web public, but the system was still a long way from the all-encompassing network it is today. And a single gigabyte (109 bytes) of disk space cost several hundred dollars.

  13. B physics: measurement of the j/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1960 gev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2004-12-23

    The authors present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. They find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. They separate the fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T}(J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. They find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, they extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. They find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  14. Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model in Multi-jet Events Recorded with the ATLAS Detector in p-p collisions at center of Mass Energy = 8 TeV using the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kuhan

    A search for physics beyond the Standard Model with multi-jet signatures is presented using 20.3 inverse fb of proton-proton collision data recorded using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. An original fit and extrapolation technique is used to estimate the QCD multi-jet background. No statistically significant deviations from Standard Model predic- tions are observed. The results are interpreted in terms of model-independent lim- its on the fiducial production cross section of multi-jet events and model-dependent limits in the context of TeV-scale gravity. The fiducial limits at 95% confidence level on multi-jet production are as low as 0.16 fb and the exclusion power in threshold mass for black hole and string ball production varies from 4.6 to 6.2 TeV for par- ticular models. These results are amongst the most stringent limits on TeV-scale gravity to date.

  15. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”, or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh.

  16. Geant4 Hadronic Cascade Models and CMS Data Analysis : Computational Challenges in the LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkinen, Aatos

    This work belongs to the field of computational high-energy physics (HEP). The key methods used in this thesis work to meet the challenges raised by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) era experiments are object-orientation with software engineering, Monte Carlo simulation, the computer technology of clusters, and artificial neural networks. The first aspect discussed is the development of hadronic cascade models, used for the accurate simulation of medium-energy hadron-nucleus reactions, up to 10 GeV. These models are typically needed in hadronic calorimeter studies and in the estimation of radiation backgrounds. Various applications outside HEP include the medical field (such as hadron treatment simulations), space science (satellite shielding), and nuclear physics (spallation studies). Validation results are presented for several significant improvements released in Geant4 simulation tool, and the significance of the new models for computing in the Large Hadron Collider era is estimated. In particular, we es...

  17. Institute of Geophyics and Planetary Physics. Annual report for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F.J. [ed.

    1995-09-29

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside, and Irvine and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the six branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, high-pressure sciences, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and is structured around three research centers. The Center for Geosciences, headed by George Zandt and Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Center for High-Pressure Sciences, headed by William Nellis, sponsors research on the properties of planetary materials and on the synthesis and preparation of new materials using high-pressure processing.

  18. Containment and resolution of hadronic showers at the FCC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068766

    2016-01-01

    The particles produced at a potential Future Circular Collider with $\\sqrt{s}$ = 100 TeV are of unprecented energies. In this document we present the hadronic shower containment and resolution parametrizations based on Geant4 simulations for the Hadronic calorimetry needed for conceptual detector design at this energy. The Geant4 toolkit along with FTFP\\_BERT physics list are used in this study. Comparisons are made with test-beam data from the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter. These simulations motivate a 12 $\\lambda$ calorimeter in order to contain at 98% level TeV single hadron showers and multi-TeV jets and keep a pion energy resolution constant term of 3%.

  19. Containment and resolution of hadronic showers at the FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Carli, Tancredi; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    The particles produced at a potential Future Circular Collider with $\\sqrt{s}$ = 100 TeV are of unprecented energies. In this document we present the hadronic shower containment and resolution parametrizations based on Geant4 simulations for the Hadronic calorimetry needed for conceptual detector design at this energy. The Geant4 toolkit along with FTFP_BERT physics list are used in this study. Comparisons are made with test-beam data from the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter. These simulations motivate a 12 $\\lambda$ calorimeter in order to contain at 98% level TeV single hadron showers and multi-TeV jets and keep a pion energy resolution constant term of 3%.

  20. The DELPHI Detector (DEtector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification)

    CERN Multimedia

    Crawley, B; Munich, K; Mckay, R; Matorras, F; Joram, C; Malychev, V; Behrmann, A; Van dam, P; Drees, J K; Stocchi, A; Adam, W; Booth, P; Bilenki, M; Rosenberg, E I; Morton, G; Rames, J; Hahn, S; Cosme, G; Ventura, L; Marco, J; Tortosa martinez, P; Monge silvestri, R; Moreno, S; Phillips, H; Alekseev, G; Boudinov, E; Martinez rivero, C; Gitarskiy, L; Davenport, M; De clercq, C; Firestone, A; Myagkov, A; Belous, K; Haider, S; Hamilton, K M; Lamsa, J; Rahmani, M H; Malek, A; Hughes, G J; Peralta, L; Carroll, L; Fuster verdu, J A; Cossutti, F; Gorn, L; Yi, J I; Bertrand, D; Myatt, G; Richard, F; Shapkin, M; Hahn, F; Ferrer soria, A; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Sekulin, R; Timmermans, J; Baillon, P

    2002-01-01

    % DELPHI The DELPHI Detector (Detector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification) \\\\ \\\\DELPHI is a general purpose detector for physics at LEP on and above the Z$^0$, offering three-dimensional information on curvature and energy deposition with fine spatial granularity as well as identification of leptons and hadrons over most of the solid angle. A superconducting coil provides a 1.2~T solenoidal field of high uniformity. Tracking relies on the silicon vertex detector, the inner detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the outer detector and forward drift chambers. Electromagnetic showers are measured in the barrel with high granularity by the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) and in the endcaps by $ 1 ^0 $~x~$ 1 ^0 $ projective towers composed of lead glass as active material and phototriode read-out. Hadron identification is provided mainly by liquid and gas Ring Imaging Counters (RICH). The instrumented magnet yoke serves for hadron calorimetry and as filter for muons, which are identified in t...

  1. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Finley

    2000-03-06

    The results of the 1998 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1998. One significant initiative is the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) program that embraces environment, safety, and health principles as one.

  3. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia Finley

    2001-04-20

    The results of the 1999 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1999. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--an alternative energy source. 1999 marked the first year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. The 1999 performance of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''outstanding'' by the U.S. Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued early in 2000. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements, its successful management practices, and included high marks in a host of other areas including environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary

  5. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report for 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems....... The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary...

  6. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  7. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    CERN Document Server

    de Teramond, Guy F; Deur, Alexandre; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Sufian, Raza Sabbir

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron ...

  8. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Téramond Guy F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron sector.

  9. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Pedro (Costa Rica); Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deur, Alexandre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dosch, Hans Gunter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; Sufian, Raza Sabbir [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron sector.

  10. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00304670; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. Results on the calorimeter operation and performance are presented, including the calibration, stability, absolute energy scale, uniformity and time resolution. These results show that the TileCal performance is within the design requirements and has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results.

  11. Superconformal Algebraic Approach to Hadron Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Téramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deur, Alexandre; Dosch, Hans Günter; Sufian, Raza Sabbir

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental aspects of nonperturbative QCD dynamics which are not obvious from its classical Lagrangian, such as the emergence of a mass scale and confinement, the existence of a zero mass bound state, the appearance of universal Regge trajectories and the breaking of chiral symmetry are incorporated from the onset in an effective theory based on superconformal quantum mechanics and its embedding in a higher dimensional gravitational theory. In addition, superconformal quantum mechanics gives remarkable connections between the light meson and nucleon spectra. This new approach to hadron physics is also suitable to describe nonperturbative QCD observables based on structure functions, such as GPDs, which are not amenable to a first-principle computation. The formalism is also successful in the description of form factors, the nonperturbative behavior of the strong coupling and diffractive processes. We also discuss in this article how the framework can be extended rather successfully to the heavy-light hadron sector.

  12. Unraveling hadron structure with generalized parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Belitsky; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2004-10-01

    The recently introduced generalized parton distributions have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. They combine the features of form factors, parton densities and distribution amplitudes - the functions used for a long time in studies of hadronic structure. Generalized parton distributions are analogous to the phase-space Wigner quasi-probability function of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which encodes full information on a quantum-mechanical system. We give an extensive review of main achievements in the development of this formalism. We discuss physical interpretation and basic properties of generalized parton distributions, their modeling and QCD evolution in the leading and next-to-leading orders. We describe how these functions enter a wide class of exclusive reactions, such as electro- and photo-production of photons, lepton pairs, or mesons.

  13. Seventh annual National Conference of Black Physics students. Summary report, February 12--13, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 conference hosted a wide variety of presentations and activities. Continuing the NCBPS tradition, we offered technical physics presentations, tours of physics research facilities, a career and educational fair, technical presentations by students, dinner speakers and a dance. New this, year were the interactive workshops (described in the section entitled ``New Features``). We included a ``celebrity`` speaker -- Col. Fred Gregory, an African-American NASA astronaut This presentation was featured on the local TV news. There were two last minute changes to the program They included: the replacement of Howard Adams and Tim Childs with Sylvia Wilson and Warren Buck, respectively. Howard Adams was ill and canceled a couple of days in advance. He recommended Sylvia Wilson, also of the GEM Program, as a replacement speaker. The substitution worked quite well, especially since our program was lacking in female speakers. Tim Childs missed his flight so Warren Buck, who attended the conference as an observer, generously filled in at the last minute. We ran a brief survey of the corporate, governmental and educational recruiters who were part of our Career/Educational Fair. Of 15 recruiters, 9 responded to the survey. All who responded said they were pleased with the conference arrangements. See Appendix C for the complete results of the Survey for Recruiters.

  14. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  15. Hadron Spectroscopy in COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) aimed at studying the structure and spectrum of hadrons. In the naive Constituent Quark Model (CQM) mesons are bound states of quarks and antiquarks. QCD, however, predict the existence of hadrons beyond the CQM with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). One main goal of COMPASS is to search for these states. Particularly interesting are so called spin-exotic mesons which have J^{PC} quantum numbers forbidden for ordinary q\\bar{q} states. Its large acceptance, high resolution, and high-rate capability make the COMPASS experiment an excellent device to study the spectrum of light-quark mesons in diffractive and central production reactions up to masses of about 2.5 GeV. COMPASS is able to measure final states with charged as well as neutral particles, so that resonances can be studied ...

  16. A New Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2014-01-01

    QCD-motivated models for hadrons predict an assortment of "exotic" hadrons that have structures that are more complex than the quark-antiquark mesons and three-quark baryons of the original quark-parton model. These include pentaquark baryons, the six-quark H-dibaryon, and tetraquark, hybrid and glueball mesons. Despite extensive experimental searches, no unambiguous candidates for any of these exotic configurations have been identified. On the other hand, a number of meson states, one that seems to be a proton-antiproton bound state, and others that contain either charmed-anticharmed quark pairs or bottom-antibottom quark pairs, have been recently discovered that neither fit into the quark-antiquark meson picture nor match the expected properties of the QCD-inspired exotics. Here I briefly review results from a recent search for the H-dibaryon, and discuss some properties of the newly discovered states --the proton-antiproton state and the so-called XYZ mesons-- and compare them with expectations for convent...

  17. Annual report of the activities of health physics in JAERI in 2001. April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities in fiscal year 2001 concerned with radiation protection which cover environmental monitoring of the facilities, radiation protection of workplace and workers, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and their technical development, carried out at the establishments of Tokai, Naka, Takasaki, Oarai, Kansai and Mutsu of JAERI. The report also covers the research activities of 4 research laboratories, i.e., Radiation Risk Analysis, Internal Dosimetry, External Dosimetry and Calibration Standards and Measurement, in the Department of Health Physics in Tokai Research Establishment. There are no occupational exposure and effluent release recorded exceeding the prescribed limits for effective dose and radioactivity concentrations for gaseous release and liquid waste. As for the R and D activities at the Department of Health Physics in Tokai Research Establishment, studies were conducted focusing mainly on the themes concerning elucidation of low-dose radiation effect and radiation risk assessment, dose estimations and radiation protection on external and internal exposures for high-energy accelerator utilization, and establishment of neutron calibration fields using an accelerator and the measurement techniques related to their traceability. (author)

  18. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1981-December 1982. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    This document is the twelfth Annual Report of our Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry Program. Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. We chose these areas of study in view of our matic goals; that is to say, we chose them so that the eventual outcome of our work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support our research. First, we endeavor to determine theoretically and experimentally cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, we study the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry.

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2002-04-22

    The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface

  20. Heavy hadrons in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    Current studies on heavy hadrons in nuclear medium are reviewed with a summary of the basic theoretical concepts of QCD, namely chiral symmetry, heavy quark spin symmetry, and the effective Lagrangian approach. The nuclear matter is an interesting place to study the properties of heavy hadrons from many different points of view. We emphasize the importance of the following topics: (i) charm/bottom hadron-nucleon interaction, (ii) structure of charm/bottom nuclei, and (iii) QCD vacuum properties and hadron modifications in nuclear medium. We pick up three different groups of heavy hadrons, quarkonia (J / ψ, ϒ), heavy-light mesons (D/ D ¯ , B ¯ / B) and heavy baryons (Λc, Λb). The modifications of those hadrons in nuclear matter provide us with important information to investigate the essential properties of heavy hadrons. We also give the discussions about the heavy hadrons, not only in infinite nuclear matter, but also in finite-size atomic nuclei with finite baryon numbers, to serve future experiments.

  1. Heavy Hadrons in Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Current studies on heavy hadrons in nuclear medium are reviewed with a summary of the basic theoretical concepts of QCD, namely chiral symmetry, heavy quark spin symmetry, and the effective Lagrangian approach. The nuclear matter is an interesting place to study the properties of heavy hadrons from many different points of view. We emphasize the importance of the following topics: (i) charm/bottom hadron-nucleon interaction, (ii) structure of charm/bottom nuclei, and (iii) QCD vacuum properties and hadron modifications in nuclear medium. We pick up three different groups of heavy hadrons, quarkonia ($J/\\psi$, $\\Upsilon$), heavy-light mesons ($D$/$\\bar{D}$, $\\bar{B}$/$B$) and heavy baryons ($\\Lambda_{c}$, $\\Lambda_{b}$). The modifications of those hadrons in nuclear matter provide us with important information to investigate the essential properties of heavy hadrons. We also give the discussions about the heavy hadrons, not only in nuclear matter with infinite volume, but also in atomic nuclei with finite bary...

  2. Dijet imbalance in hadronic collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    The imbalance of dijets produced in hadronic collisions has been used to extract the average transverse momentum of partons inside the hadrons. In this paper we discuss new contributions to the dijet imbalance that could complicate or even hamper this extraction. They are due to polarization of init

  3. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  4. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavai, R. [Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, Bombay (India); Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  5. Workshop on heavy hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The recent developments in heavy hadron spectroscopy at LHCb have shown that LHCb has a unique potential in the field, combining hadronic production mechanisms to a powerful identification system. In this short workshop we focus on the recent results from LHCb and theoretical developments with attention to the future perspectives, in the context of the potential of current and future experiments.

  6. Review of hadrons in medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krein, Gastão [Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271 - Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-22

    I review the present status in the theoretical and phenomenological understanding of hadron properties in strongly interacting matter. The topics covered are the EMC effect, nucleon structure functions in cold nuclear matter, spectral properties of light vector mesons in hot and cold nuclear matter, and in-medium properties of heavy flavored hadrons.

  7. PACIAE 2.0: An Updated Parton and Hadron Cascade Model (Program) for Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA; Ben-hao; ZHOU; Dai-mei; YAN; Yu-liang; LI; Xiao-mei; FENG; Sheng-qing; DONG; Bao-guo; CAI; Xu

    2012-01-01

    <正>We have updated the parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE for the relativistic nuclear collisions, from based on JETSET 6.4 and PYTHIA 5.7, and referred to as PACIAE 2.0. The main physics concerning the stages of the parton initiation, parton rescattering, hadronization, and hadron rescattering were discussed. The structures of the programs were briefly explained. In addition, some calculated examples were compared with the experimental data. It turns out that this model (program) works well.

  8. Engineering and Physics Optimization of Breed and Burn Fast Reactor Systems: Annual and Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan D. Weaver; Theron Marshall; James Parry

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) contribution to the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project number 2002-005 was divided into reactor physics, and thermal-hydraulics and plant design. The research targeted credible physics and thermal-hydraulics models for a gas-cooled fast reactor, analyzing various fuel and in-core fuel cycle options to achieve a true breed and burn core, and performing a design basis Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis on that design. For the physics analysis, a 1/8 core model was created using different enrichments and simulated equilibrium fuel loadings. The model was used to locate the hot spot of the reactor, and the peak to average energy deposition at that location. The model was also used to create contour plots of the flux and energy deposition over the volume of the reactor. The eigenvalue over time was evaluated using three different fuel configurations with the same core geometry. The breeding capabilities of this configuration were excellent for a 7% U-235 model and good in both a plutonium model and a 14% U-235 model. Changing the fuel composition from the Pu fuel which provided about 78% U-238 for breeding to the 14% U-235 fuel with about 86% U-238 slowed the rate of decrease in the eigenvalue a noticeable amount. Switching to the 7% U-235 fuel with about 93% U-238 showed an increase in the eigenvalue over time. For the thermal-hydraulic analysis, the reactor design used was the one forwarded by the MIT team. This reactor design uses helium coolant, a Brayton cycle, and has a thermal power of 600 MW. The core design parameters were supplied by MIT; however, the other key reactor components that were necessary for a plausible simulation of a LOCA were not defined. The thermal-hydraulic and plant design research concentrated on determining reasonable values for those undefined components. The LOCA simulation was intended to provide insights on the influence of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS), the

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2004-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2001 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2001. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--a clean, alternative energy source. The Year 2001 marked the third year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. In 2001, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on- and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations; also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are water monitoring--precipitation, ground-, surface-, and waste-waters. PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report. Groundwater monitoring

  11. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Levine; V.L. Finley

    1998-03-01

    The results of the 1996 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1996, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) continued to conduct fusion experiments. Having set a world record on November 2, 1994, by achieving approximately 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power during the deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, researchers turned their attention to studying plasma science experiments, which included ''enhanced reverse shear techniques.'' Since November 1993, more than 700 tritium-fueled experiments were conducted, which generated more than 4 x 10(superscript 20) neutrons and 1.4 gigajoules of fusion energy. In 1996, the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''excellent'' by the US Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued in early 1997. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents) and petroleum hydrocarbons (past leaks of releases of diesel fuel from underground storage tanks). Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L. and Levine, J.D.

    1999-01-10

    The results of the 1997 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1997, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) completed fifteen years of fusion experiments begun in 1982. Over the course of three and half years of deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, PPPL set a world record of 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power, more than 700 tritium shots pulsed into the reactor vessel generating more than 5.6 x 1020 neutron and 1.6 gigajoules of fusion energy and researchers studied plasma science experimental data, which included "enhanced reverse shear techniques." As TFTR was completing its historic operations, PPPL participated with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington (Seattle) in a collaboration effort to design the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This next device, NSTX, is located in the former TFTR Hot Cell on D site, and it is designed to be a smaller and more economical torus fusion reactor. Construction of this device began in late 1997, and first plasma in scheduled for early 1999. For 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy in its Laboratory Appraisal report rated the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as "excellent." The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey

  13. Annual plankton dynamics in a coupled physical-biological model of the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, M. Angelica; Masson, Diane; Callendar, Wendy

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional coupled biophysical model was developed to study the dynamics of the plankton ecosystem in the Strait of Georgia (SoG) estuary. The ocean circulation component is an implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and the lower trophic level ecosystem is a nine-compartment Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model that includes two types of phytoplankton and of zooplankton. A three year hindcast (2007-2009) is used to examine the mean annual seasonal cycle of the local plankton dynamics. For realistic values of irradiance, wind forcing and fresh water fluxes, the model predicts a seasonal cycle of salinity, nutrients and plankton in reasonable agreement with observations. In particular, the model reproduces the main features of the estuarine circulation, the marked increase in phytoplankton biomass during spring followed by intermittent less intense blooms during summer and fall, as well as the seasonal pattern of zooplankton biomass. Model results show that primary production fluctuates between low values in January and high values in April, with an annual production of 270 ± 33 (gC m-2) in the SoG. Most primary production is fueled by nitrate (f-ratio of about 0.7). Upwelling is the main source of nitrate into the upper layer, while most of the nitrate entering the Strait is exported out by horizontal advection. Physical processes, such as freshwater inflow, wind events, tidal mixing, and horizontal transports are important in maintaining the high spatio-temporal variability of the local phytoplankton biomass and production. Horizontal variability is high during the growing season (March to September). In summer, phytoplankton concentrates near the surface, in the shallow mixed layer, resulting in sporadic nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth. In the northern portion of the strait, weaker summer winds and tidal currents lead to increased near-surface stratification which restricts nutrient fluxes and limit

  14. John H. Williams Laboratory of Nuclear Physics, University of Minnesota annual report, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done at the Williams Laboratory of the University of Minnesota during the period from August 1975 through 1976. The major part of this report describes recent results and work in progress in the nuclear physics research program. Work involving beams of light ions and light element targets is followed by work using heavier targets and then the experiments using beams of oxygen and fluorine ions. This heavy ion work occupies a larger portion of our program than in previous reports. The investigation of L-subshell ionization cross sections for heavy element targets and the studies of hyperfine splitting and isotope shifts are briefly described. The improved operation of the tandem Van de Graaff resulting from the installation of a new set of acceleration tubes and other modifications is discussed. The current state of the testing of an on-line mass spectrometer and the installation of a source producing a beam of tritons is described. The final sections of this report list personnel, degrees granted, and publications of the staff. Separate indexing has been prepared for 10 sections of this report for appearance in ERA.

  15. Hadronic Imaging Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Alexander; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Dubbers, Dirk

    This thesis focuses on a prototype of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter at the planned International Linear Collider optimized for the Particle Flow Approach. The 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths deep sandwich calorimeter was built by the CALICE collaboration and consists of 38 active plastic scintillator layers. Steel is used as absorber material and the active layers are subdivided into small tiles. In total 7608 tiles are read out individually via embedded Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The prototype is one of the first large scale applications of these novel and very promising miniature photodetectors. The work described in this thesis comprises the commissioning of the detector and the data acquisition with test beam particles over several months at CERN and Fermilab. The calibration of the calorimeter and the analysis of the recorded data is presented. A method to correct for the temperature dependent response of the SiPM has been developed and implemented. Its successful application shows that it...

  16. Hadron Spectroscopy at PANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Fioravanti, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    FAIR a new International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Reaserach, is under construction at Darmstadt, in Germany. This will provide scientists in the world with outstanding beams and experimental conditions for studying matter at the level of atoms, nuclei, and other subnuclear constituents. An antiproton beam with intensity up to 2x10$^7$ $\\bar{p}/s$ and high momentum resolution will be available at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) where the $\\bar{P}$ANDA (Antiproton Annihilation At Darmstadt) detector will be installed. In this paper we will illustrate the details of the $\\bar{P}$ANDA scientific program related to hadron spectroscopy, after a brief introduction about the FAIR facility and the $\\bar{P}$ANDA detector.

  17. Spectroscopy and Decay of $B$ Hadrons at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulini, Manfred

    2007-02-01

    The authors review recent results on heavy quark physics focusing on Run II measurements of B hadron spectroscopy and decay at the Tevatron. A wealth of new B physics measurements from CDF and D0 has been available. These include the spectroscopy of excited B states (B**, B**{sub s}) and the observation of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. The discussion of the decays of B hadrons and measurements of branching fractions focuses on charmless two-body decays of B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -}. They report several new B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay channels.

  18. The Higgs boson discovery at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Higgs boson physics. It offers the first in-depth review of the complete results in connection with the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and based on the full dataset for the years 2011 to 2012. The fundamental concepts and principles of Higgs physics are introduced and the important searches prior to the advent of the Large Hadron Collider are briefly summarized. Lastly, the discovery and first mensuration of the observed particle in the course of the CMS experiment are discussed in detail and compared to the results obtained in the ATLAS experiment.

  19. Annual report 2012. Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, A.L.; Fassbender, J.; Heera, V.; Helm, M. (eds.)

    2013-09-01

    In 2012 the HZDR, and in consequence also the Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research (IIM) including its Ion Beam Center (IBC), has undergone a scientific evaluation. The evaluation committee composed of the Scientific Advisory Board and numerous external experts in our field of research concluded that ''the overall quality of the scientific work is excellent'', that ''there are an impressive number of young scientists working enthusiastically on a variety of high-level projects'' and that ''the choice of these projects represents a clear underlying strategy and vision''. We feel honored and are proud that the external view on our scientific achievements is that extraordinary. In view of this outstanding result we would like to express our gratitude to all our staff members for their commitment and efforts. In the past year, we continued our integration into the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers (HGF) with our Institute mostly active in the research area ''Matter'', but also involved in a number of activities in the research area ''Energy''. In this respect, many consultations were held with the Helmholtz centers contributing to common research areas to precisely define the role we will play in the newly established HGF program ''From Matter to Materials and Life''. Our IBC has been recognized as a large-scale user facility for ion beam analysis and modification of materials, i.e., specializing on materials science. In particular, the IBC plays a prominent role in the recently approved Helmholtz Energy Materials Characterization Platform (HEMCP), which mainly concentrates on the development of dedicated analytical tools for the characterization of materials required for future energy technologies. The successes achieved by the IBC allows us to invest 7200 kEuro to further improve and strengthen the ion beam

  20. Annual report 2011. Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, A.L.; Fassbender, J.; Heera, V.; Helm, M. (eds.)

    2012-08-22

    The first year of membership of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) in the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers (HGF) was a year of many changes also for the Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research (IIM). The transition period, however, is not yet over, since the full integration of the Center into the HGF will only be completed in the next period of the so-called program-oriented funding (POF). This funding scheme addresses the six core research fields identified by the Helmholtz Association (Energy; Earth and Environment; Health; Key Technologies; Structure of Matter; Aeronautics, Space and Transport) to deal with the grand challenges faced by society, science and industry. Since the Institute has strong contributions to both core fields ''Key Technologies'' and ''Structure of Matter'', intense discussions were held amongst the leading scientists of the Institute, across the Institutes of the HZDR, and finally with leading scientists of other Helmholtz centers, to determine the most appropriate classification of the Institute's research. At the end we decided to establish ourselves in Structure of Matter, the core field in which most of the large-scale photon, neutron and ion facilities in Germany are located. As a consequence, the Ion Beam Center (IBC) of the Institute submitted an application to become a HGF recognized large-scale facility, providing more than 50% of its available beam time to external users. This application perfectly reflects the development of the IBC over more than a decade as a European Union funded infrastructure in the framework of the projects ''Center for Application of Ion Beams in Materials Research (AIM)'' (1998-2000, 2000-2003, 2006-2010) and subsequently as the coordinator of the integrated infrastructure initiative (I3) ''Support of Public and Industrial Research using Ion Beam Technology (SPIRIT)'' (2009