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Sample records for h5n1 ns1 protein

  1. Expression of surface-bound nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein of influenza virus A H5N1 on Lactobacillus casei strain C1.

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    Tan, T S; Syed Hassan, S; Yap, W B

    2017-06-01

    The study aimed to construct a recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing the nonstructural (NS) 1 protein of influenza A virus H5N1 on its cell wall. The NS1 gene was first amplified and fused to the pSGANC332 expression plasmid. The NS1 protein expression was carried out by Lact. casei strain C1. PCR screening and DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of recombinant pSG-NS1-ANC332 plasmid in Lact. casei. The plasmid was stably maintained (98·94 ± 1·65%) by the bacterium within the first 20 generations without selective pressure. The NS1 was expressed as a 49-kDa protein in association with the anchoring peptide. The yield was 1·325 ± 0·065 μg mg(-1) of bacterial cells. Lactobacillus casei expressing the NS1 on its cell wall was red-fluorescently stained, but the staining was not observed on Lact. casei carrying the empty pSGANC332. The results implied that Lact. casei strain C1 is a promising host for the expression of surface-bound NS1 protein using the pSGANC332 expression plasmid. The study has demonstrated, for the first time, the expression of nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus H5N1 on the cell wall of Lactobacillus casei using the pSGANC332 expression plasmid. Display of NS1 protein on the bacterial cell wall was evident under an immunofluorescence microscopic observation. Lactobacillus casei carrying the NS1 protein could be developed into a universal oral influenza vaccine since the NS1 is highly conserved among influenza viruses. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Inability of NS1 protein from an H5N1 influenza virus to activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway correlates to the enhanced virus replication upon PI3K inhibition

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    Li Weizhong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, activated during influenza A virus infection, can promote viral replication via multiple mechanisms. Direct binding of NS1 protein to p85β subunit of PI3K is required for activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. Binding and subsequent activation of PI3K is believed to be a conserved character of influenza A virus NS1 protein. Sequence variation of NS1 proteins in different influenza A viruses led us to investigate possible deviation from the conservativeness. Results In the present study, NS1 proteins from four different influenza A virus subtypes/strains were tested for their ability to bind p85β subunit of PI3K and to activate PI3K/Akt. All NS1 proteins efficiently bound to p85β and activated PI3K/Akt, with the exception of NS1 protein from an H5N1 virus (A/Chicken/Guangdong/1/05, abbreviated as GD05, which bound to p85β but failed to activate PI3K/Akt, implying that as-yet-unidentified domain(s in NS1 may alternatively mediate the activation of PI3K. Moreover, PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, did not suppress but significantly increased the replication of GD05 virus. Conclusions Our study indicates that activation of PI3K/Akt by NS1 protein is not highly conserved among influenza A viruses and inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway as an anti-influenza strategy may not work for all influenza A viruses.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of a replication-deficient intranasal DeltaNS1 H5N1 influenza vaccine.

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    Julia Romanova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We developed a novel intranasal influenza vaccine approach that is based on the construction of replication-deficient vaccine viruses that lack the entire NS1 gene (DeltaNS1 virus. We previously showed that these viruses undergo abortive replication in the respiratory tract of animals. The local release of type I interferons and other cytokines and chemokines in the upper respiratory tract may have a "self-adjuvant effect", in turn increasing vaccine immunogenicity. As a result, DeltaNS1 viruses elicit strong B- and T- cell mediated immune responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied this technology to the development of a pandemic H5N1 vaccine candidate. The vaccine virus was constructed by reverse genetics in Vero cells, as a 5:3 reassortant, encoding four proteins HA, NA, M1, and M2 of the A/Vietnam/1203/04 virus while the remaining genes were derived from IVR-116. The HA cleavage site was modified in a trypsin dependent manner, serving as the second attenuation factor in addition to the deleted NS1 gene. The vaccine candidate was able to grow in the Vero cells that were cultivated in a serum free medium to titers exceeding 8 log(10 TCID(50/ml. The vaccine virus was replication deficient in interferon competent cells and did not lead to viral shedding in the vaccinated animals. The studies performed in three animal models confirmed the safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine. Intranasal immunization protected ferrets and mice from being infected with influenza H5 viruses of different clades. In a primate model (Macaca mulatta, one dose of vaccine delivered intranasally was sufficient for the induction of antibodies against homologous A/Vietnam/1203/04 and heterologous A/Indonesia/5/05 H5N1 strains. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings show that intranasal immunization with the replication deficient H5N1 DeltaNS1 vaccine candidate is sufficient to induce a protective immune response against H5N1 viruses. This approach

  4. Development of a dual-protective live attenuated vaccine against H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses by modifying the NS1 gene.

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    Choi, Eun-hye; Song, Min-Suk; Park, Su-Jin; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Baek, Yun Hee; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Semi; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Chul-Joong; Choi, Young Ki

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H9N2 viruses in poultry have caused serious economic losses and raised concerns for human health due to the risk of zoonotic transmission. However, licensed H5N1 and H9N2 vaccines for animals and humans have not been developed. Thus, to develop a dual H5N1 and H9N2 live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), the HA and NA genes from a virulent mouse-adapted avian H5N2 (A/WB/Korea/ma81/06) virus and a recently isolated chicken H9N2 (A/CK/Korea/116/06) virus, respectively, were introduced into the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone expressing truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-73, NS1-86, NS1-101, NS1-122) but still possessing a full-length NS gene. Two H5N2/NS1-LAIV viruses (H5N2/NS1-86 and H5N2/NS1-101) were highly attenuated compared with the full-length and remaining H5N2/NS-LAIV viruses in a mouse model. Furthermore, viruses containing NS1 modifications were found to induce more IFN-β activation than viruses with full-length NS1 proteins and were correspondingly attenuated in mice. Intranasal vaccination with a single dose (10(4.0) PFU/ml) of these viruses completely protected mice from a lethal challenge with the homologous A/WB/Korea/ma81/06 (H5N2), heterologous highly pathogenic A/EM/Korea/W149/06 (H5N1), and heterosubtypic highly virulent mouse-adapted H9N2 viruses. This study clearly demonstrates that the modified H5N2/NS1-LAIV viruses attenuated through the introduction of mutations in the NS1 coding region display characteristics that are desirable for live attenuated vaccines and hold potential as vaccine candidates for mammalian hosts.

  5. Genetic analysis of nonstructural genes (NS1 and NS2) of H9N2 and H5N1 viruses recently isolated in Israel.

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    Banet-Noach, Caroline; Panshin, Alexander; Golender, Natalia; Simanov, Lubov; Rozenblut, Ezra; Pokamunski, Shimon; Pirak, Michael; Tendler, Yevgenii; García, Maricarmen; Gelman, Boris; Pasternak, Ruslan; Perk, Shimon

    2007-04-01

    The avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 affects wild birds, domestic poultry, swine, and humans; it has circulated amongst domestic poultry in Israel during the last 6 years. The H5N1 virus was recorded in Israel for the first time in March 2006. Nonstructural (NS) genes and NS proteins are important in the life cycle of the avian influenza viruses. In the present study, NS genes of 21 examples of H9N2 and of two examples of H5N1 avian influenza viruses, isolated in Israel during 2000-2006, were completely sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. All the H9N2 isolates fell into a single group that, in turn, was subdivided into three subgroups in accordance with the time of isolation; their NS1 and NS2 proteins possessed 230 and 121 amino acids, respectively. The NS1 protein of the H5N1 isolates had five amino acid deletions, which was typical of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses isolated in various countries during 2005-2006. Comparative analysis showed that the NS proteins of the H9N2 Israeli isolates contained few amino acid sequences associated with high pathogenicity or human host specificity.

  6. In silico approach towards H5N1 virus protein and transcriptomics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arli Parikesit

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... integration of both protein-based and transcriptomics for H5N1 analysis are indeed feasible. Key words: H5N1, protein-based .... The fund-saving nature of in silico prediction of sequence specific therapeutics would .... therapeutic small interfering RNA molecules targeting diverse strains of influenza A virus.

  7. In silico approach towards H5N1 virus protein and transcriptomics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H5N1 influenza A virus is a serious threat to human population. With a considerable mortality rate, strategies for coping with the infection are being developed. Our research group and some others investigated the potential therapeutic and preventive measures for tackling H5N1 infections. Protein based and transcriptomics ...

  8. Genetic characteristic of protein membran of avian influenza viruses H5N1 subtype

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    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2008 there were findings about the antigenic drift on AI virus due to vaccination and the AI H5N1 subtype viruses which was similar to H5N1 viruses in human. The findings indicated that the AI viruses continue and undergoing to mutate and try to adapt with their environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the mutation of recent AI viruses (2009 on the membran protein namely Hemagglutinin (HA, Neuraminidase (NA and Matrix 2 (M2. In this study RT-PCR – sequencing methods and genetic analysis for the protein membran of AI viruses were used. Result revealed that there were specific mutation belong to AI 2009 viruses on HA and NA protein such as AI virus mutation in 2008 which was isolated from backyard chicken. The mutations were non synonimous and not caused by immunological pressure. Furthermore, M2 analysis indicated that the viruses were resistant to amantadine.

  9. Acid stability of the hemagglutinin protein regulates H5N1 influenza virus pathogenicity.

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    Rebecca M DuBois

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to threaten agriculture and human health. Here, we use biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to reveal how amino-acid variations in the hemagglutinin (HA protein contribute to the pathogenicity of H5N1 influenza virus in chickens. HA proteins from highly pathogenic (HP A/chicken/Hong Kong/YU562/2001 and moderately pathogenic (MP A/goose/Hong Kong/437-10/1999 isolates of H5N1 were found to be expressed and cleaved in similar amounts, and both proteins had similar receptor-binding properties. However, amino-acid variations at positions 104 and 115 in the vestigial esterase sub-domain of the HA1 receptor-binding domain (RBD were found to modulate the pH of HA activation such that the HP and MP HA proteins are activated for membrane fusion at pH 5.7 and 5.3, respectively. In general, an increase in H5N1 pathogenicity in chickens was found to correlate with an increase in the pH of HA activation for mutant and chimeric HA proteins in the observed range of pH 5.2 to 6.0. We determined a crystal structure of the MP HA protein at 2.50 Å resolution and two structures of HP HA at 2.95 and 3.10 Å resolution. Residues 104 and 115 that modulate the acid stability of the HA protein are situated at the N- and C-termini of the 110-helix in the vestigial esterase sub-domain, which interacts with the B loop of the HA2 stalk domain. Interactions between the 110-helix and the stalk domain appear to be important in regulating HA protein acid stability, which in turn modulates influenza virus replication and pathogenesis. Overall, an optimal activation pH of the HA protein is found to be necessary for high pathogenicity by H5N1 influenza virus in avian species.

  10. COMPARATIVE MODELLING PROTEIN VAKSIN NA BTB H5N1 MENGGUNAKAN SWISS MODEL

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    Fitri Amelia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine sequence of Neuraminidase BTB from previous research was studied by using swiss model server. Protein template was gotten from RSCB database by comparing the vaccine sequence with PDB database. HTY protein was used as a template for this vaccine. Template had 0.00e-1 E value, and 97% identity. The protein vaccine that has been modelled by swiss model had  good quality as immune inducer. Base on ramachandran plot analysis, protein model 1, 2, and 3 have amino acid residues in favoured region higher than 70%. They are 82,0% and 78,2%. Model 1 has the lowest non glysine amino acid residues in disallowed region area, that is 0%.   3D Structure of vaccine had 2086  hits of similarity with database on NCBI   Key words: comparing modelling, H5N1 vaccine, swiss model

  11. Glycosylation of the Hemagglutinin Protein of H5N1 Influenza Virus Increases Its Virulence in Mice by Exacerbating the Host Immune Response.

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    Zhao, Dongming; Liang, Libin; Wang, Shuai; Nakao, Tomomi; Li, Yanbing; Liu, Liling; Guan, Yuntao; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Bu, Zhigao; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2017-04-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to circulate in nature and threaten public health. Although several viral determinants and host factors that influence the virulence of HPAI H5N1 viruses in mammals have been identified, the detailed molecular mechanism remains poorly defined and requires further clarification. In our previous studies, we characterized two naturally isolated HPAI H5N1 viruses that had similar viral genomes but differed substantially in their lethality in mice. In this study, we explored the molecular determinants and potential mechanism for this difference in virulence. By using reverse genetics, we found that a single amino acid at position 158 of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein substantially affected the systemic replication and pathogenicity of these H5N1 influenza viruses in mice. We further found that the G158N mutation introduced an N-linked glycosylation at positions 158 to 160 of the HA protein and that this N-linked glycosylation enhanced viral productivity in infected mammalian cells and induced stronger host immune and inflammatory responses to viral infection. These findings further our understanding of the determinants of pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses in mammals.IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to evolve in nature and threaten human health. Key mutations in the virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein or reassortment with other pandemic viruses endow HPAI H5N1 viruses with the potential for aerosol transmissibility in mammals. A thorough understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of these viruses will help us to develop more effective control strategies; however, such mechanisms and virulent determinants for H5N1 influenza viruses have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we identified glycosylation at positions 158 to 160 of the HA protein of two naturally occurring H5N1 viruses as an important virulence determinant. This glycosylation event enhanced viral

  12. Generation of monoclonal antibodies reactive against subtype specific conserved B-cell epitopes on haemagglutinin protein of influenza virus H5N1.

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    Fiebig, Petra; Shehata, Awad A; Liebert, Uwe G

    2015-03-02

    H5-specific monoclonal antibodies may serve as valuable tools for rapid diagnosis of H5N1 avian influenza virus. Therefore, conserved H5-specific sequences of the haemagglutinin (HA) protein were expressed in Pichia pastoris and used for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The two mAbs, FD6 and HE4, were strongly reactive against native HA protein and exhibited specificity for subtype H5. By epitope mapping linear epitopes of mAbs were identified that are highly conserved among influenza A virus of subtype H5. Additionally no sequence similarities to homologous regions on HA proteins of other influenza A virus subtypes (i.e. H1, H3, H7, H9) were detected by sequence alignment analysis. Both mAbs did not cross react with native or denatured HA proteins of other influenza A virus subtypes. Furthermore, using ELISA and immunofluorescence test mAb FD6 reacted only to the native H5 protein of recently circulating highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses but not to low pathogenic H5N1 isolates. In conclusion, the use of the two mAbs in non-molecular tests like antigen-capture-ELISA appears promising for detecting influenza A H5N1 virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptive mutations in the nuclear export protein of human-derived H5N1 strains facilitate a polymerase activity-enhancing conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Reuther (Peter); S. Giese (Sebastian); H.M. Götz (Hannelore); N. Kilb (Normann); B. Mänz (Benjamin); L. Brunotte (Linda); M. Schwemmle (Martin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe nuclear export protein (NEP) (NS2) of the highly pathogenic human-derived H5N1 strain A/Thailand/1(KAN-1)/2004 with the adaptive mutation M16I greatly enhances the polymerase activity in human cells in a concentration-dependent manner. While low NEP levels enhance the polymerase

  14. D701N mutation in the PB2 protein contributes to the pathogenicity of H5N1 avian influenza viruses but not transmissibility in guinea pigs.

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    Jiao, Peirong; Wei, Liangmeng; Song, Yafen; Cui, Jin; Song, Hui; Cao, Lan; Yuan, Runyu; Luo, Kaijian; Liao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) of clade 2.3.2 has been circulating in waterfowl in Southern China since 2003. Our previous studies showed that certain H5N1 HPAIV isolates within clade 2.3.2 from Southern China had high pathogenicity in different birds. Guinea pigs have been successfully used as models to evaluate the transmissibility of AIVs and other species of influenza viruses in mammalian hosts. However, few studies have reported pathogenicity and transmissibility of H5N1 HPAIVs of this clade in guinea pigs. In this study, we selected an H5N1 HPAIV isolate, A/duck/Guangdong/357/2008, to investigate the pathogenicity and transmissibility of the virus in guinea pigs. The virus had high pathogenicity in mice; additionally, it only replicated in some tissues of the guinea pigs without production of clinical signs, but was transmissible among guinea pigs. Interestingly, virus isolates from co-caged guinea pigs had the D701N mutation in the PB2 protein. These mutant viruses showed higher pathogenicity in mice and higher replication capability in guinea pigs but did not demonstrate enhanced the transmissibility among guinea pigs. These findings indicate the transmission of the H5N1 virus between mammals could induce virus mutations, and the mutant viruses might have higher pathogenicity in mammals without higher transmissibility. Therefore, the continued evaluation of the pathogenicity and transmissibility of avian influenza virus (AIVs) in mammals is critical to the understanding of the evolutionary characteristics of AIVs and the emergence of potential pandemic strains.

  15. D701N mutation in the PB2 protein contributes to the pathogenicity of H5N1 avian influenza viruses but not transmissibility in guinea pigs

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    Peirong eJiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV of clade 2.3.2 has been circulating in waterfowl in Southern China since 2003. Our previous studies showed that certain H5N1 HPAIV isolates within clade 2.3.2 from Southern China had high pathogenicity in different birds. Guinea pigs have been successfully used as models to evaluate the transmissibility of AIVs and other species of influenza viruses in mammalian hosts. However, few studies have reported pathogenicity and transmissibility of H5N1 HPAIVs of this clade in guinea pigs. In this study, we selected an H5N1 HPAIV isolate, A/duck/Guangdong/357/2008, to investigate the pathogenicity and transmissibility of the virus in guinea pigs. The virus had high pathogenicity in mice; additionally, it only replicated in some tissues of the guinea pigs without production of clinical signs, but was transmissible among guinea pigs. Interestingly, virus isolates from co-caged guinea pigs had the D701N mutation in the PB2 protein. These mutant viruses showed higher pathogenicity in mice and higher replication capability in guinea pigs but did not demonstrate enhanced the transmissibility among guinea pigs. These findings indicate the transmission of the H5N1 virus between mammals could induce virus mutations, and the mutant viruses might have higher pathogenicity in mammals without higher transmissibility. Therefore, the continued evaluation of the pathogenicity and transmissibility of avian influenza virus (AIVs in mammals is critical to the understanding of the evolutionary characteristics of AIVs and the emergence of potential pandemic strains.

  16. A novel hemagglutinin protein produced in bacteria protects chickens against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses by inducing H5 subtype-specific neutralizing antibodies

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    Sączyńska, Violetta; Romanik, Agnieszka; Florys, Katarzyna; Cecuda-Adamczewska, Violetta; Kęsik-Brodacka, Małgorzata; Śmietanka, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Monika; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna; Minta, Zenon; Szewczyk, Bogusław; Płucienniczak, Grażyna; Płucienniczak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The highly pathogenic (HP) H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) cause a mortality rate of up to 100% in infected chickens and pose a permanent pandemic threat. Attempts to obtain effective vaccines against H5N1 HPAIVs have focused on hemagglutinin (HA), an immunodominant viral antigen capable of eliciting neutralizing antibodies. The vast majority of vaccine projects have been performed using eukaryotic expression systems. In contrast, we used a bacterial expression system to produce vaccine HA protein (bacterial HA) according to our own design. The HA protein with the sequence of the H5N1 HPAIV strain was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli, recovered in the form of inclusion bodies and refolded by dilution between two chromatographic purification steps. Antigenicity studies showed that the resulting antigen, referred to as rH5-E. coli, preserves conformational epitopes targeted by antibodies specific for H5-subtype HAs, inhibiting hemagglutination and/or neutralizing influenza viruses in vitro. The proper conformation of this protein and its ability to form functional oligomers were confirmed by a hemagglutination test. Consistent with the biochemical characteristics, prime-boost immunizations with adjuvanted rH5-E. coli protected 100% and 70% of specific pathogen-free, layer-type chickens against challenge with homologous and heterologous H5N1 HPAIVs, respectively. The observed protection was related to the positivity in the FluAC H5 test (IDVet) but not to hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titers. Due to full protection, the effective contact transmission of the homologous challenge virus did not occur. Survivors from both challenges did not or only transiently shed the viruses, as established by viral RNA detection in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. Our results demonstrate that vaccination with rH5-E. coli could confer control of H5N1 HPAIV infection and transmission rates in chicken flocks, accompanied by reduced virus shedding. Moreover, the role of

  17. Production of H5N1 influenza virus matrix protein 2 ectodomain protein bodies in tobacco plants and in insect cells as a candidate universal influenza vaccine

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    Sandiswa Mbewana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The spread of influenza A viruses is partially controlled and prevented by vaccination. The matrix protein 2 ectodomain (M2e is the most conserved sequence in influenza A viruses, and is therefore a good potential target for a vaccine to protect against multiple virus subtypes. We explored the feasibility of a M2e-based universal influenza A vaccine candidate based on the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus, H5N1. A synthetic M2e gene was human and plant codon optimised and fused in-frame with a sequence encoding the N-terminal proline-rich domain (Zera® of the γ-zein protein of maize. Zera®M2e was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana and Sf21 baculovirus / insect cell expression systems, and Zera®M2e protein bodies (PBs were successfully produced in both expression systems. The plant-produced Zera®M2e PBs were purified and injected into Balb/c mice. Western blot analysis using insect cell-produced Zera®M2e PBs and multiple tandem M2e sequences (5xM2e fused with the avian influenza H5N1 transmembrane and cytosolic tail (5xM2e_tHA confirmed the presence of M2e-specific antibodies in immunised mice sera. The immunogenicity of the Zera®M2e indicates that our plant-produced protein has potential as an inexpensive universal influenza A vaccine.

  18. Different immunity elicited by recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin proteins containing pauci-mannose, high-mannose, or complex type N-glycans.

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    Shih-Chang Lin

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses can result in poultry and occasionally in human mortality. A safe and effective H5N1 vaccine is urgently needed to reduce the pandemic potential. Hemagglutinin (HA, a major envelope protein accounting for approximately 80% of spikes in influenza virus, is often used as a major antigen for subunit vaccine development. In this study, we conducted a systematic study of the immune response against influenza virus infection following immunization with recombinant HA proteins expressed in insect (Sf9 cells, insect cells that contain exogenous genes for elaborating N-linked glycans (Mimic and mammalian cells (CHO. While the antibody titers are higher with the insect cell derived HA proteins, the neutralization and HA inhibition titers are much higher with the mammalian cell produced HA proteins. Recombinant HA proteins containing tri- or tetra-antennary complex, terminally sialylated and asialyated-galactose type N-glycans induced better protective immunity in mice to lethal challenge. The results are highly relevant to issues that should be considered in the production of fragment vaccines.

  19. Influenza virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 disrupts interferon signaling.

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    Danlin Jia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs function as the first line of defense against viral infections by modulating cell growth, establishing an antiviral state and influencing the activation of various immune cells. Viruses such as influenza have developed mechanisms to evade this defense mechanism and during infection with influenza A viruses, the non-structural protein 1 (NS1 encoded by the virus genome suppresses induction of IFNs-α/β. Here we show that expression of avian H5N1 NS1 in HeLa cells leads to a block in IFN signaling. H5N1 NS1 reduces IFN-inducible tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT2 and STAT3 and inhibits the nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT2 and the formation of IFN-inducible STAT1:1-, STAT1:3- and STAT3:3- DNA complexes. Inhibition of IFN-inducible STAT signaling by NS1 in HeLa cells is, in part, a consequence of NS1-mediated inhibition of expression of the IFN receptor subunit, IFNAR1. In support of this NS1-mediated inhibition, we observed a reduction in expression of ifnar1 in ex vivo human non-tumor lung tissues infected with H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. Moreover, H1N1 and H5N1 virus infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages led to inhibition of both ifnar1 and ifnar2 expression. In addition, NS1 expression induces up-regulation of the JAK/STAT inhibitors, SOCS1 and SOCS3. By contrast, treatment of ex vivo human lung tissues with IFN-α results in the up-regulation of a number of IFN-stimulated genes and inhibits both H5N1 and H1N1 virus replication. The data suggest that NS1 can directly interfere with IFN signaling to enhance viral replication, but that treatment with IFN can nevertheless override these inhibitory effects to block H5N1 and H1N1 virus infections.

  20. Immune escape mutants of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 selected using polyclonal sera: Identification of key amino acids in the HA protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitaras, I.; Kalthof, D.; Beer, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of Avian Influenza (AI) viruses – especially of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 subtype – is a major issue for the poultry industry. HPAI H5N1 epidemics are associated with huge economic losses and are sometimes connected to human morbidity and mortality. Vaccination

  1. Oral Delivery of a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Expressing Influenza A Virus Proteins Protects Mice against H5N1 and H1N1 Viral Infection.

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    Zenglin Pei

    Full Text Available Attenuated strains of invasive enteric bacteria, such as Salmonella, represent promising gene delivery agents for nucleic acid-based vaccines as they can be administrated orally. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. We showed that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient gene transfer activity for HA and NA expression and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we evaluated the immune responses and protection induced by the constructed Salmonella-based vaccine. Our study showed that the Salmonella-based vaccine induced significant production of anti-HA serum IgG and mucosal IgA, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells in orally vaccinated mice. Furthermore, mice orally vaccinated with the Salmonella vaccine expressing viral HA and NA proteins were completely protected from lethal challenge of highly pathogenic H5N1 as well as H1N1 influenza viruses while none of the animals treated with the Salmonella vaccine carrying the empty expression vector with no viral antigen expression was protected. These results suggest that the Salmonella-based vaccine elicits strong antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and provides effective immune protection against multiple strains of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the feasibility of developing novel attenuated Salmonella strains as new oral vaccine vectors against influenza viruses.

  2. Avian Influenza A (H5N1)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-27

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Tim Uyeki discusses H5N1, a subtype of influenza A virus. This highly pathogenic H5N1 virus doesn't usually infect people, although some rare infections with H5N1 viruses have occurred in humans. We need to use a comprehensive strategy to prevent the spread of H5N1 virus among birds, including having human health and animal health work closely together.  Created: 5/27/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/27/2009.

  3. Induction of protection against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses using a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (ASP-1) adjuvant.

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    Zhao, Guangyu; Du, Lanying; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Shihui; Lin, Yongping; Chen, Min; Kou, Zhihua; He, Yuxian; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Zhou, Yusen

    2010-10-18

    Our previous studies have shown the adjuvanticity of an Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein, Ov-ASP-1 (ASP-1), when administered in an aqueous formulation with bystander vaccine antigens or commercial vaccines. In this study, we reported a novel formulation that took advantage of the protein nature of the ASP-1 adjuvant by creating recombinant fusion protein vaccines linking the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) consensus sequence of H5N1 influenza viruses with the ASP-1 adjuvant. Two recombinant fusion proteins designated M2e-ASP-1 and M2e3-ASP-1 were studied, in which ASP-1 was fused with one or three tandem copies of the M2e antigen. Our results show that these novel recombinant influenza vaccines, particularly M2e3-ASP-1, induced strong anti-M2e-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the established mouse model. Furthermore, M2e3-ASP-1 was able to provide significant cross-clade protection against divergent H5N1 viruses. Consequently, this study has demonstrated a potential novel vaccine formulation that could provide a complementary prophylactic strategy in preventing the threat of future influenza outbreak resulting from rapid evolution of the H5N1 virus and co-circulation of multiple antigenic variants in various regions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intranasal vaccination of recombinant H5N1 HA1 proteins fused with foldon and Fc induces strong mucosal immune responses with neutralizing activity: Implication for developing novel mucosal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Li, Ye; Guo, Yan; Wang, Lili; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Yusen; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus remains a threat to public health because of its continued spread in poultry in some countries and its ability to infect humans with high mortality rate, calling for the development of effective and safe vaccines against H5N1 infection. Here, we constructed 4 candidate vaccines by fusing H5N1 hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) with foldon (HA1-Fd), human IgG Fc (HA1-Fc), foldon and Fc (HA1-FdFc) or His-tag (HA1-His). We then compared their ability to induce mucosal immune responses and neutralizing antibodies in the presence or absence of Poly(I:C) and CpG adjuvants via the intranasal route. Without an adjuvant, HA1-FdFc could elicit appreciable humoral immune responses and local mucosal IgA antibodies in immunized mice, while other vaccine candidates only induced background immune responses. In the presence of Poly(I:C) and CpG, both HA1-Fd and HA1-Fc elicited much higher levels of serum IgG and local mucosal IgA antibodies than HA1-His. Poly(I:C) and CpG could also augment the neutralizing antibody responses induced by these 4 vaccine candidates in the order of HA1-FdFc > HA1-Fc > HA1-Fd > HA1-His. These results suggest that both Fd and Fc potentiate the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1 protein and that Poly(I:C) and CpG serve as efficient mucosal adjuvants in promoting efficacy of these vaccine candidates to induce strong systemic and local antibody responses and potent neutralizing antibodies, providing a useful strategy to develop effective and safe mucosal H5N1 vaccines.

  5. Characterization of avian influenza H5N1 virosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatchai Sarachai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to prepare and characterize virosome containing envelope proteins of the avian influenza (H5N1 virus. The virosome was prepared by the solubilization of virus with octaethyleneglycol mono (n-dodecyl ether (C12E8 followed by detergent removal with SM2 Bio-Beads. Biochemical analysis by SDS-PAGE and western blotting, indicated that avian influenza H5N1 virosome had similar characteristics to the parent virus and contained both the hemagglutinin (HA, 60-75 kDa and neuraminidase (NA, 220 kDa protein, with preserved biological activity, such as hemagglutination activity. The virosome structure was analyzed by negative stained transmission electron microscope (TEM demonstrated that the spherical shapes of vesicles with surface glycoprotein spikes were harbored. In conclusion, the biophysical properties of the virosome were similar to the parent virus, and the use of octaethyleneglycol mono (n-dodecyl ether to solubilize viral membrane, followed by removal of detergent using polymer beads adsorption (Bio-Beads SM2 was the preferable method for obtaining avian influenza virosome. The outcome of this study might be useful for further development veterinary virus vaccines.

  6. Genetic characterization of H5N1 influenza A viruses isolated from zoo tigers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonsin, Alongkorn; Payungporn, Sunchai; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Suradhat, Sanipa; Pariyothorn, Nuananong; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Damrongwantanapokin, Sudarat; Buranathai, Chantanee; Chaisingh, Arunee; Songserm, Thaweesak; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-01-20

    The H5N1 avian influenza virus outbreak among zoo tigers in mid-October 2004, with 45 animals dead, indicated that the avian influenza virus could cause lethal infection in a large mammalian species apart from humans. In this outbreak investigation, six H5N1 isolates were identified and two isolates (A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T3/04 and A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T7/04) were selected for whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 gene segments showed that the viruses clustered within the lineage of H5N1 avian isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the viruses displayed polybasic amino acids at the cleavage site, identical to those of the 2004 H5N1 isolates, which by definition are highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). In addition, sequence analyses revealed that the viruses isolated from tigers harbored few genetic changes compared with the viruses having infected chicken, humans, tigers and a leopard isolated from the early 2004 H5N1 outbreaks. Sequence analyses also showed that the tiger H5N1 isolated in October 2004 was more closely related to the chicken H5N1 isolated in July than that from January. Interestingly, all the 6 tiger H5N1 isolates contained a lysine substitution at position 627 of the PB2 protein similar to the human, but distinct from the original avian isolates.

  7. Shortening the unstructured, interdomain region of the non-structural protein NS1 of an avian H1N1 influenza virus increases its replication and pathogenicity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Sascha; Soubieux, Denis; Marty, Hélène; Esnault, Evelyne; Hoffmann, Thomas W; Chandenier, Margaux; Lion, Adrien; Kut, Emmanuel; Quéré, Pascale; Larcher, Thibaut; Ledevin, Mireille; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia; Marc, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Currently circulating H5N1 influenza viruses have undergone a complex evolution since the appearance of their progenitor A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 in 1996. After the eradication of the H5N1 viruses that emerged in Hong Kong in 1997 (HK/97 viruses), new genotypes of H5N1 viruses emerged in the same region in 2000 that were more pathogenic for both chickens and mice than HK/97 viruses. These, as well as virtually all highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses since 2000, harbour a deletion of aa 80-84 in the unstructured region of the non-structural (NS) protein NS1 linking its RNA-binding domain to its effector domain. NS segments harbouring this mutation have since been found in non-H5N1 viruses and we asked whether this 5 aa deletion could have a general effect not limited to the NS1 of H5N1 viruses. We genetically engineered this deletion in the NS segment of a duck-origin avian H1N1 virus, and compared the in vivo and in vitro properties of the WT and NSdel8084 viruses. In experimentally infected chickens, the NSdel8084 virus showed both an increased replication potential and an increased pathogenicity. This in vivo phenotype was correlated with a higher replicative efficiency in vitro, both in embryonated eggs and in a chicken lung epithelial cell line. Our data demonstrated that the increased replicative potential conferred by this small deletion was a general feature not restricted to NS1 from H5N1 viruses and suggested that viruses acquiring this mutation may be selected positively in the future. © 2014 The Authors.

  8. Ducks: the "Trojan horses" of H5N1 influenza

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Negovetich, Nicholas J; Forrest, Heather L; Webster, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    .... While the HP Asian H5N1 viruses are 100% lethal for chickens and other gallinaceous poultry, the absence of disease signs in some duck species has led to the concept that ducks are the "Trojan horses" of H5N1 in their surreptitious...

  9. Ducks: the "Trojan horses" of H5N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Negovetich, Nicholas J; Forrest, Heather L; Webster, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    Wild ducks are the main reservoir of influenza A viruses that can be transmitted to domestic poultry and mammals, including humans. Of the 16 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses, only the H5 and H7 subtypes cause highly pathogenic (HP) influenza in the natural hosts. Several duck species are naturally resistant to HP Asian H5N1 influenza viruses. These duck species can shed and spread virus from both the respiratory and intestinal tracts while showing few or no disease signs. While the HP Asian H5N1 viruses are 100% lethal for chickens and other gallinaceous poultry, the absence of disease signs in some duck species has led to the concept that ducks are the "Trojan horses" of H5N1 in their surreptitious spread of virus. An important unresolved issue is whether the HP H5N1 viruses are maintained in the wild duck population of the world. Here, we review the ecology and pathobiology of ducks infected with influenza A viruses and ducks' role in the maintenance and spread of HP H5N1 viruses. We also identify the key questions about the role of ducks that must be resolved in order to understand the emergence and control of pandemic influenza. It is generally accepted that wild duck species can spread HP H5N1 viruses, but there is insufficient evidence to show that ducks maintain these viruses and transfer them from one generation to the next.

  10. Lemna (duckweed) expressed hemagglutinin from avian influenza H5N1 protects chickens against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last two decades, transgenic plants have been explored as safe and cost effective alternative expression platforms for producing recombinant proteins. In this study, a synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1)...

  11. Avian Influenza H5N1 in Tigers and Leopards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Kuiken, Thijs; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Payungporn, Sunchai; Noppornpanth, Suwanna; Wattanodorn, Sumitra; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Pattanarangsan, Rattapan; Arya, Nlin; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Influenza virus is not known to affect wild felids. We demonstrate that avian influenza A (H5N1) virus caused severe pneumonia in tigers and leopards that fed on infected poultry carcasses. This finding extends the host range of influenza virus and has implications for influenza virus epidemiology and wildlife conservation. PMID:15663858

  12. AVIAN INFLUENZA A/H5N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Veselinovic

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO regards avian influenza A/H5N1 as a global public health threat with pandemic potential. Between 2003 and October 12, 2007, WHO registered 331 laboratory-confirmed cases (202 fatal of human H5N1 infection. Human-to-human transmission has not been recorded yet. In the possible future, H5N1 pandemic, primary viral pneumonia would be the dominant clinical feature. Compli-cations include the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal and multiorgan failure. The characteristic laboratory findings are lymphopenia, with the alteration of CD4+/CD8+ index, thrombocytopenia and ’’cytokine storm’’. Specimens for laboratory diagnosis include pharyngeal swabs, nasal swabs, tracheal aspirate (or bronchoalveolar lavage and serum (acute and convalescent. Virus isolation by cell culture is considered the "gold standard" of influenza diagnostics. Identification of infected cells is performed by direct or indirect immunofluorescence (DFA, IFA, enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA or PCR-based methods. Mchip, a microarray which enables the detection and subtypisation based on M gene segment, is the recent breakthrough in H5N1 diagnostics. WHO Rapid Advice Guideline Panel on avian influenza, formed in 2006, defined the guidelines for chemoprophylaxis and therapy of human H5N1 infection. The most promissing primary treatment is oseltamivir. Vigorous antiviral activity against all subtypes of both A and B influenca viruses has been confirmed by in vitro studies. WHO has identified the antigenic and genetic characteristics of the viruses suitable for the development of the vaccine. More than 40 clinical trials have already been carried out or are ongoing. In spite of the promising results, WHO is expressing concern regarding inadequate global capacity for the vaccine production.

  13. Clinical vaccine development for H5N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Christopher H; Rininger, Joseph A; Baldwin, Susan L

    2013-07-01

    H5N1 is a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that can cause severe disease and death in humans. H5N1 is spreading rapidly in bird populations and there is great concern that this virus will begin to transmit between people and cause a global crisis. Vaccines are the cornerstone strategy for combating avian influenza but there are complex challenges for pandemic preparedness including the unpredictability of the vaccine target and the manufacturing requirement for rapid deployment. The less-than-optimal response against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic unmasked the limitations associated with influenza vaccine production and in 2010, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology re-emphasized the need for new recombinant-based vaccines and adjuvants that can shorten production cycles, maximize immunogenicity and satisfy global demand. In this article, the authors review the efforts spent in developing an effective vaccine for H5N1 influenza and summarize clinical studies that highlight the progress made to date.

  14. Avian Influenza H5N1 Transmission in Households, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusriastuti, Rita; Sampurno, Ondri Dwi; Purba, Wilfried; Misriyah; Santoso, Hari; Bratasena, Arie; Maruf, Anas; Sariwati, Elvieda; Setiawaty, Vivi; Glass, Kathryn; Lokuge, Kamalini; Kelly, Paul M.; Kandun, I. Nyoman

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease transmission patterns are needed to inform public health interventions, but remain largely unknown for avian influenza H5N1 virus infections. A recent study on the 139 outbreaks detected in Indonesia between 2005 and 2009 found that the type of exposure to sources of H5N1 virus for both the index case and their household members impacted the risk of additional cases in the household. This study describes the disease transmission patterns in those outbreak households. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared cases (n = 177) and contacts (n = 496) in the 113 sporadic and 26 cluster outbreaks detected between July 2005 and July 2009 to estimate attack rates and disease intervals. We used final size household models to fit transmission parameters to data on household size, cases and blood-related household contacts to assess the relative contribution of zoonotic and human-to-human transmission of the virus, as well as the reproduction number for human virus transmission. The overall household attack rate was 18.3% and secondary attack rate was 5.5%. Secondary attack rate remained stable as household size increased. The mean interval between onset of subsequent cases in outbreaks was 5.6 days. The transmission model found that human transmission was very rare, with a reproduction number between 0.1 and 0.25, and the upper confidence bounds below 0.4. Transmission model fit was best when the denominator population was restricted to blood-related household contacts of index cases. Conclusions/Significance The study only found strong support for human transmission of the virus when a single large cluster was included in the transmission model. The reproduction number was well below the threshold for sustained transmission. This study provides baseline information on the transmission dynamics for the current zoonotic virus and can be used to detect and define signatures of a virus with increasing capacity for human-to-human transmission. PMID

  15. Epitope Sequences in Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Barboza Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is a multi-functional glycoprotein with essential functions both in viral replication and modulation of host innate immune responses. NS1 has been established as a good surrogate marker for infection. In the present study, we generated four anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies against recombinant NS1 protein from dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2, which were used to map three NS1 epitopes. The sequence 193AVHADMGYWIESALNDT209 was recognized by monoclonal antibodies 2H5 and 4H1BC, which also cross-reacted with Zika virus (ZIKV protein. On the other hand, the sequence 25VHTWTEQYKFQPES38 was recognized by mAb 4F6 that did not cross react with ZIKV. Lastly, a previously unidentified DENV2 NS1-specific epitope, represented by the sequence 127ELHNQTFLIDGPETAEC143, is described in the present study after reaction with mAb 4H2, which also did not cross react with ZIKV. The selection and characterization of the epitope, specificity of anti-NS1 mAbs, may contribute to the development of diagnostic tools able to differentiate DENV and ZIKV infections.

  16. Induction of long-term protective immune responses by influenza H5N1 virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Moo Kang

    Full Text Available Recurrent outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus pose a threat of eventually causing a pandemic. Early vaccination of the population would be the single most effective measure for the control of an emerging influenza pandemic.Influenza virus-like particles (VLPs produced in insect cell-culture substrates do not depend on the availability of fertile eggs for vaccine manufacturing. We produced VLPs containing influenza A/Viet Nam1203/04 (H5N1 hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and matrix proteins, and investigated their preclinical immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Mice immunized intranasally with H5N1 VLPs developed high levels of H5N1 specific antibodies and were 100% protected against a high dose of homologous H5N1 virus infection at 30 weeks after immunization. Protection is likely to be correlated with humoral and cellular immunologic memory at systemic and mucosal sites as evidenced by rapid anamnestic responses to re-stimulation with viral antigen in vivo and in vitro.These results provide support for clinical evaluation of H5N1 VLP vaccination as a public health intervention to mitigate a possible pandemic of H5N1 influenza.

  17. Aptamer-Based ELISA Assay for Highly Specific and Sensitive Detection of Zika NS1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hyun; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2017-12-05

    We report here a few Zika NS1-binding ssDNA aptamers selected using the conventional SELEX protocol, and their application in an ELISA assay for sensitive diagnosis of Zika NS1 protein. Among the aptamers identified, aptamers 2 and 10 could recognize different binding epitopes of Zika NS1 protein. This complementary in binding site, when coupled with an extraordinarily high binding affinity by 2 (41-nt, KD = 45 pM) and high specificity by 10, was used successfully to construct an ELISA-based assay where 2 and 10 serve as the capture and detection agents, respectively, giving rise to a highly specific detection of Zika NS1 with a detection limit of 100 ng/mL in buffer. Further testing of a few in-house anti-Zika NS1 antibodies show that 2 could also pair with an anti-Zika NS1 antibody. Such aptamer-antibody pairing not only lowers the detection sensitivity by 3 orders of magnitude to 0.1 ng/mL in buffer but also enable highly sensitive detection of as low as 1 and 10 ng/mL of Zika NS1 to be carried out in 10% and 100% human serum, respectively. These results suggest that the selected aptamers would be useful for medical diagnosis of Zika virus infection in various aptamer-based diagnostic devices including ELISA assay.

  18. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  19. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  20. An H5N1 influenza DNA vaccine for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mortimer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 is a potent pandemic threat because of its frequent transmission from birds to humans and the increasing possibility of human to human transmission. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic it was clear that rapid influenza vaccine production is a problem worldwide. Additionally, developing countries like South Africa generally cannot produce their own influenza vaccines because the traditional egg-based vaccine production method currently employed is too lengthy and too difficult to establish. As part of an exercise aimed at exploring the feasibility of producing emergency response influenza vaccines, we investigated an experimental DNA vaccine to the H5N1 influenza virus. We focused on the virion haemagglutinin, because it elicits the primary neutralising immune response following infection. Accordingly, we developed an H5N1 DNA vaccine with full-length and truncated versions of the haemagglutinin gene, to match previously developed protein candidates. Vaccinated mice developed a strong antibody response to the haemagglutinin protein. In addition, the full-length H5 gene elicited high haemagglutination inhibition titres in mice, indicating that it has potential as a candidate pandemic vaccine for South Africa.

  1. A transient homotypic interaction model for the influenza A virus NS1 protein effector domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S Kerry

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus NS1 protein is a multifunctional virulence factor consisting of an RNA binding domain (RBD, a short linker, an effector domain (ED, and a C-terminal 'tail'. Although poorly understood, NS1 multimerization may autoregulate its actions. While RBD dimerization seems functionally conserved, two possible apo ED dimers have been proposed (helix-helix and strand-strand. Here, we analyze all available RBD, ED, and full-length NS1 structures, including four novel crystal structures obtained using EDs from divergent human and avian viruses, as well as two forms of a monomeric ED mutant. The data reveal the helix-helix interface as the only strictly conserved ED homodimeric contact. Furthermore, a mutant NS1 unable to form the helix-helix dimer is compromised in its ability to bind dsRNA efficiently, implying that ED multimerization influences RBD activity. Our bioinformatical work also suggests that the helix-helix interface is variable and transient, thereby allowing two ED monomers to twist relative to one another and possibly separate. In this regard, we found a mAb that recognizes NS1 via a residue completely buried within the ED helix-helix interface, and which may help highlight potential different conformational populations of NS1 (putatively termed 'helix-closed' and 'helix-open' in virus-infected cells. 'Helix-closed' conformations appear to enhance dsRNA binding, and 'helix-open' conformations allow otherwise inaccessible interactions with host factors. Our data support a new model of NS1 regulation in which the RBD remains dimeric throughout infection, while the ED switches between several quaternary states in order to expand its functional space. Such a concept may be applicable to other small multifunctional proteins.

  2. Development of Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccines against Outbreaks of H5N1 Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglei Yi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several global outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus have increased the urgency of developing effective and safe vaccines against H5N1. Compared with H5N1 inactivated vaccines used widely, H5N1 live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs have advantages in vaccine efficacy, dose-saving formula, long-lasting effect, ease of administration and some cross-protective immunity. Furthermore, H5N1 LAIVs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, especially including improved IgA production at the mucosa. The current trend of H5N1 LAIVs development is toward cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive or replication-defective vaccines, and moreover, H5N1 LAIVs plus mucosal adjuvants are promising candidates. This review provides an update on the advantages and development of H5N1 live-attenuated influenza vaccines.

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus interferon antagonist NS1 protein suppresses and skews the human T lymphocyte response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Munir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV NS1 protein, an antagonist of host type I interferon (IFN-I production and signaling, has a suppressive effect on the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC that was only partly dependent on released IFN-I. Here we investigated whether NS1 affects the ability of DC to activate CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Human DC were infected with RSV deletion mutants lacking the NS1 and/or NS2 genes and assayed for the ability to activate autologous T cells in vitro, which were analyzed by multi-color flow cytometry. Deletion of the NS1, but not NS2, protein resulted in three major effects: (i an increased activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells that express CD103, a tissue homing integrin that directs CD8+ T cells to mucosal epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and triggers cytolytic activity; (ii an increased activation and proliferation of Th17 cells, which have recently been shown to have anti-viral effects and also indirectly attract neutrophils; and (iii decreased activation of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells--which are associated with enhanced RSV disease--and reduced proliferation of total CD4+ T cells. Except for total CD4+ T cell proliferation, none of the T cell effects appeared to be due to increased IFN-I signaling. In the infected DC, deletion of the NS1 and NS2 genes strongly up-regulated the expression of cytokines and other molecules involved in DC maturation. This was partly IFN-I-independent, and thus might account for the T cell effects. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the NS1 protein suppresses proliferation and activation of two of the protective cell populations (CD103+ CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells, and promotes proliferation and activation of Th2 cells that can enhance RSV disease.

  4. Electrochemical lateral flow immunosensor for detection and quantification of dengue NS1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinawang, Prima Dewi; Rai, Varun; Ionescu, Rodica E; Marks, Robert S

    2016-03-15

    An Electrochemical Lateral Flow Immunosensor (ELFI) is developed combining screen-printed gold electrodes (SPGE) enabling quantification together with the convenience of a lateral flow test strip. A cellulose glassy fiber paper conjugate pad retains the marker immunoelectroactive nanobeads which will bind to the target analyte of interest. The specific immunorecognition event continues to occur along the lateral flow bed until reaching the SPGE-capture antibodies at the end of the cellulosic lateral flow strip. The rationale of the immunoassay consists in the analyte antigen NS1 protein being captured selectively and specifically by the dengue NS1 antibody conjugated onto the immunonanobeads thus forming an immunocomplex. With the aid of a running buffer, the immunocomplexes flow and reach the immuno-conjugated electrode surface and form specific sandwich-type detection due to specific, molecular recognition, while unbound beads move along past the electrodes. The successful sandwich immunocomplex formation is then recorded electrochemically. Specific detection of NS1 is translated into an electrochemical signal contributed by a redox label present on the bead-immobilized detection dengue NS1 antibody while a proportional increase of faradic current is observed with increase in analyte NS1 protein concentration. The first generation ELFI prototype is simply assembled in a cassette and successfully demonstrates wide linear range over a concentration range of 1-25 ng/mL with an ultrasensitive detection limit of 0.5 ng/mL for the qualitative and quantitative detection of analyte dengue NS1 protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetically engineered, biarsenically labeled influenza virus allows visualization of viral NS1 protein in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Lu, Xinya; Li, Junwei; Bérubé, Nathalie; Giest, Kerri-Lane; Liu, Qiang; Anderson, Deborah H; Zhou, Yan

    2010-07-01

    Real-time fluorescence imaging of viral proteins in living cells provides a valuable means to study virus-host interactions. The challenge of generating replication-competent fluorescent influenza A virus is that the segmented genome does not allow fusion of a fluorescent protein gene to any viral gene. Here, we introduced the tetracysteine (TC) biarsenical labeling system into influenza virus in order to fluorescently label viral protein in the virus life cycle. We generated infectious influenza A viruses bearing a small TC tag (CCPGCC) in the loop/linker regions of the NS1 proteins. In the background of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8) virus, the TC tag can be inserted into NS1 after amino acid 52 (AA52) (PR8-410), AA79 (PR8-412), or AA102 (PR8-413) or the TC tag can be inserted and replace amino acids 79 to 84 (AA79-84) (PR8-411). Although PR8-410, PR8-411, and PR8-412 viruses are attenuated than the wild-type (WT) virus to some extent in multiple-cycle infection, their growth potential is similar to that of the WT virus during a single cycle of infection, and their NS1 subcellular localization and viral protein synthesis rate are quite similar to those of the WT virus. Furthermore, labeling with membrane-permeable biarsenical dye resulted in fluorescent NS1 protein in the context of virus infection. We could exploit this strategy on NS1 protein of A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1) (Tx91) by successfully rescuing a TC-tagged virus, Tx91-445, which carries the TC tag replacement of AA79-84. The infectivity of Tx91-445 virus was similar to that of WT Tx91 during multiple cycles of replication and a single cycle of replication. The NS1 protein derived from Tx91-445 can be fluorescently labeled in living cells. Finally, with biarsenical labeling, the engineered replication-competent virus allowed us to visualize NS1 protein nuclear import in virus-infected cells in real time.

  6. Detection of antibodies against porcine parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 may distinguish between vaccinated and infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Eva Smedegaard; Madsen, Knud Gert; Nielsen, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The humoral antibody response against the nonstructural protein NS1 and the structural protein VP2 of porcine parvovirus (PPV) was evaluated by immuno-peroxidase test (IPT) and enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant PPV antigens. The coding sequence for NS1 and VP2 was inser......The humoral antibody response against the nonstructural protein NS1 and the structural protein VP2 of porcine parvovirus (PPV) was evaluated by immuno-peroxidase test (IPT) and enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant PPV antigens. The coding sequence for NS1 and VP2...... against rNS1 could only be detected in infected pigs and NS1 may in this way allow the specific detection of infected animals. Analysis of serum samples collected up to 18 days post infection (p.i.) from four pigs experimentally infected with PPV showed that antibodies against rNS1 and rVP2 could in all...

  7. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the NS1 protein of non-cultured influenza B virus strains circulating in Singapore

    KAUST Repository

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan

    2016-08-04

    In this study we compared the NS1 protein of Influenza B/Lee/40 and several non-cultured Influenza B virus clinical strains detected in Singapore. In B/Lee/40 virus-infected cells and in cells expressing the recombinant B/Lee/40 NS1 protein a full-length 35 kDa NS1 protein and a 23 kDa NS1 protein species (p23) were detected. Mutational analysis of the NS1 gene indicated that p23 was generated by a novel cleavage event within the linker domain between an aspartic acid and proline at amino acid residues at positions 92 and 93 respectively (DP92–93), and that p23 contained the first 92 amino acids of the NS1 protein. Sequence analysis of the Singapore strains indicated the presence of either DP92–93 or NP92–93 in the NS1 protein, but protein expression analysis showed that p23 was only detected in NS1 proteins with DP92–93.. An additional adjacent proline residue at position 94 (P94) was present in some strains and correlated with increased p23 levels, suggesting that P94 has a synergistic effect on the cleavage of the NS1 protein. The first 145 amino acids of the NS1 protein are required for inhibition of ISG15-mediated ubiquitination, and our analysis showed that Influenza B viruses circulating in Singapore with DP92–93 expressed truncated NS1 proteins and may differ in their capacity to inhibit ISG15 activity. Thus, DP92–93 in the NS1 protein may confer a disadvantage to Influenza B viruses circulating in the human population and interestingly the low frequency of DP92–93detection in the NS1 protein since 2004 is consistent with this suggestion.

  8. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  9. Multiple introductions of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses into Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Rabiul Alam, SM; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; McClenaghan, Laura; Rubrum, Adam; Franks, John; Seiler, Patrick; Jeevan, Trushar; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 and low pathogenic H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic to poultry markets in Bangladesh and have cocirculated since 2008. H9N2 influenza viruses circulated constantly in the poultry markets, whereas highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses occurred sporadically, with peaks of activity in cooler months. Thirty highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from poultry were characterized by antigenic, molecular, and phylogenetic analyses. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses from clades 2.2.2 and 2.3.2.1 were isolated from live bird markets only. Phylogenetic analysis of the 30 H5N1 isolates revealed multiple introductions of H5N1 influenza viruses in Bangladesh. There was no reassortment between the local H9N2 influenza viruses and H5N1 genotype, despite their prolonged cocirculation. However, we detected two reassortant H5N1 viruses, carrying the M gene from the Chinese H9N2 lineage, which briefly circulated in the Bangladesh poultry markets and then disappeared. On the other hand, interclade reassortment occurred within H5N1 lineages and played a role in the genesis of the currently dominant H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh. Few ‘human-like' mutations in H5N1 may account for the limited number of human cases. Antigenically, clade 2.3.2.1 H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh have evolved since their introduction and are currently mainly homogenous, and show evidence of recent antigenic drift. Although reassortants containing H9N2 genes were detected in live poultry markets in Bangladesh, these reassortants failed to supplant the dominant H5N1 lineage. PMID:26038508

  10. Human mesenchymal stromal cells reduce influenza A H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael C W; Kuok, Denise I T; Leung, Connie Y H; Hui, Kenrie P Y; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Lau, Eric H Y; Nicholls, John M; Fang, Xiaohui; Guan, Yi; Lee, Jae W; Chan, Renee W Y; Webster, Robert G; Matthay, Michael A; Peiris, J S Malik

    2016-03-29

    Influenza can cause acute lung injury. Because immune responses often play a role, antivirals may not ensure a successful outcome. To identify pathogenic mechanisms and potential adjunctive therapeutic options, we compared the extent to which avian influenza A/H5N1 virus and seasonal influenza A/H1N1 virus impair alveolar fluid clearance and protein permeability in an in vitro model of acute lung injury, defined the role of virus-induced soluble mediators in these injury effects, and demonstrated that the effects are prevented or reduced by bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. We verified the in vivo relevance of these findings in mice experimentally infected with influenza A/H5N1. We found that, in vitro, the alveolar epithelium's protein permeability and fluid clearance were dysregulated by soluble immune mediators released upon infection with avian (A/Hong Kong/483/97, H5N1) but not seasonal (A/Hong Kong/54/98, H1N1) influenza virus. The reduced alveolar fluid transport associated with down-regulation of sodium and chloride transporters was prevented or reduced by coculture with mesenchymal stromal cells. In vivo, treatment of aged H5N1-infected mice with mesenchymal stromal cells increased their likelihood of survival. We conclude that mesenchymal stromal cells significantly reduce the impairment of alveolar fluid clearance induced by A/H5N1 infection in vitro and prevent or reduce A/H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vivo. This potential adjunctive therapy for severe influenza-induced lung disease warrants rapid clinical investigation.

  11. Histopathological evaluation of the diversity of cells susceptible to H5N1 virulent avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Haru; Yasui, Fumihiko; Munekata, Keisuke; Takagi-Kamiya, Asako; Munakata, Tsubasa; Nomura, Namiko; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    Patients infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses (H5N1 HPAIV) show diffuse alveolar damage. However, the temporal progression of tissue damage and repair after viral infection remains poorly defined. Therefore, we assessed the sequential histopathological characteristics of mouse lung after intranasal infection with H5N1 HPAIV or H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1 pdm). We determined the amount and localization of virus in the lung through IHC staining and in situ hybridization. IHC used antibodies raised against the virus protein and antibodies specific for macrophages, type II pneumocytes, or proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In situ hybridization used RNA probes against both viral RNA and mRNA encoding the nucleoprotein and the hemagglutinin protein. H5N1 HPAIV infection and replication were observed in multiple lung cell types and might result in rapid progression of lung injury. Both type II pneumocytes and macrophages proliferated after H5N1 HPAIV infection. However, the abundant macrophages failed to block the viral attack, and proliferation of type II pneumocytes failed to restore the damaged alveoli. In contrast, mice infected with H1N1 pdm exhibited modest proliferation of type II pneumocytes and macrophages and slight alveolar damage. These results suggest that the virulence of H5N1 HPAIV results from the wide range of cell tropism of the virus, excessive virus replication, and rapid development of diffuse alveolar damage. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multivalent HA DNA vaccination protects against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza infection in chickens and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rao

    Full Text Available Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 in avian species increase the risk of reassortment and adaptation to humans. The ability to contain its spread in chickens would reduce this threat and help maintain the capacity for egg-based vaccine production. While vaccines offer the potential to control avian disease, a major concern of current vaccines is their potency and inability to protect against evolving avian influenza viruses.The ability of DNA vaccines encoding hemagglutinin (HA proteins from different HPAI H5N1 serotypes was evaluated for its ability to elicit neutralizing antibodies and to protect against homologous and heterologous HPAI H5N1 strain challenge in mice and chickens after DNA immunization by needle and syringe or with a pressure injection device. These vaccines elicited antibodies that neutralized multiple strains of HPAI H5N1 when given in combinations containing up to 10 HAs. The response was dose-dependent, and breadth was determined by the choice of the influenza virus HA in the vaccine. Monovalent and trivalent HA vaccines were tested first in mice and conferred protection against lethal H5N1 A/Vietnam/1203/2004 challenge 68 weeks after vaccination. In chickens, protection was observed against heterologous strains of HPAI H5N1 after vaccination with a trivalent H5 serotype DNA vaccine with doses as low as 5 microg DNA given twice either by intramuscular needle injection or with a needle-free device.DNA vaccines offer a generic approach to influenza virus immunization applicable to multiple animal species. In addition, the ability to substitute plasmids encoding different strains enables rapid adaptation of the vaccine to newly evolving field isolates.

  13. Protection from avian influenza H5N1 virus infection with antibody-impregnated filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukamoto Masaya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is worldwide concern over the possibility of a new influenza pandemic originating from the highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses. We herein demonstrate that functional air filters impregnated with ostrich antibodies against the hemagglutinin of the H5N1 virus protect chickens from death by H5N1 transmission. These results suggest that the use of ostrich antibody-impregnated filters might be a powerful way to prevent the transmission of H5N1.

  14. Screen Anti-influenza Lead Compounds That Target the PAC Subunit of H5N1 Viral RNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junfeng; Li, Qian; Liang, Huanhuan; Tang, Yalin; Liu, Yingfang

    2012-01-01

    The avian influenza (H5N1) viral RNA polymerase protein PAC was used as a target to screen nine chlorogenic acid derivatives for their polymerase inhibitor activity. Among them, seven compounds were PAC ligands, and four inhibited influenza RNA polymerase activity. These results aid in the design of anti-influenza agents based on caffeoylquinic acid. PMID:22936968

  15. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew, E-mail: apekosz@jhsph.edu

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  16. Efficacy of an AS03A-adjuvanted split H5N1 influenza vaccine against an antigenically distinct low pathogenic H5N1 virus in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel R; Baras, Benoît; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Jacob, Valérie; Planty, Camille; Giannini, Sandra L; Mossman, Sally; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2012-08-10

    We used the pig model of influenza to examine the efficacy of an AS03(A)-adjuvanted split H5N1 (A/Indonesia/05/2005) vaccine against challenge with a low pathogenic (LP) H5N1 avian influenza (AI) virus (duck/Minnesota/1525/1981) with only 85% amino acid homology in its HA1. Influenza seronegative pigs were vaccinated twice intramuscularly with adjuvanted vaccine at 3 antigen doses, unadjuvanted vaccine or placebo. All pigs were challenged 4 weeks after the second vaccination and euthanized 2 days later. After 2 vaccinations, all pigs in the adjuvanted vaccine groups had high hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody titers to the vaccine strain (160-640), and lower antibody titers to the A/Vietnam/1194/04 H5N1 strain and to 2 LP H5 viruses with 90-91% amino acid homology to the vaccine strain (20-160). Eight out of 12 pigs had HI titers (10-20) to the challenge virus immediately before challenge. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibodies to the challenge virus were detected in most pigs (7/12) and virus neutralizing antibodies in all pigs. There was no antigen-dose dependent effect on the antibody response among the pigs immunized with adjuvanted H5N1 vaccines. After challenge, these pigs showed a complete clinical protection, reduced lung lesions and a significant protection against virus replication in the respiratory tract. Though the challenge virus showed only moderate replication efficiency in pigs, our study suggests that AS03(A)-adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine may confer a broader protection than generally assumed. The pros and cons of the pig as an H5N1 challenge model are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic versus antigenic differences among highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Ben; Reemers, Sylvia; Dortmans, Jos; Vries, de Erik; Jong, de Mart; Zande, van de Saskia; Rottier, Peter J.M.; Haan, de Cornelis A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses display a remarkable genetic and antigenic diversity. We examined to what extent genetic distances between several H5N1 viruses from different clades correlate with antigenic differences and vaccine performance. H5-specific antisera were generated,

  18. Virulence of H5N1 Influenza Virus in Cattle Egrets (Bubulcus Ibis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, Do Quy; Dung, Nguyen Tien; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2011-01-01

    for insect control in households. In this study, six Cattle Egrets were experimentally infected intranasally with highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) A/duck/Vietnam/40D/04 (H5N1) to investigate a possible epidemiologic role for Cattle Egrets in outbreaks of H5N1 AI in Vietnam. The Cattle Egrets were...

  19. Avian influenza (H5N1) susceptibility and receptors in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, van der R.; Tacken, M.G.J.; Ruuls-van Stalle, E.M.F.; Koch, G.; Rooij, van E.M.A.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.

    2007-01-01

    Inoculation of influenza (H5N1) into beagles resulted in virus excretion and rapid seroconversion with no disease. Binding studies that used labeled influenza (H5N1) showed virus attachment to higher and lower respiratory tract tissues. Thus, dogs that are subclinically infected with influenza

  20. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated H5N1 vaccine in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufang Fan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The continued spread of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses among poultry and wild birds, together with the emergence of drug-resistant variants and the possibility of human-to-human transmission, has spurred attempts to develop an effective vaccine. Inactivated subvirion or whole-virion H5N1 vaccines have shown promising immunogenicity in clinical trials, but their ability to elicit protective immunity in unprimed human populations remains unknown. A cold-adapted, live attenuated vaccine with the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of an H5N1 virus A/VN/1203/2004 (clade 1 was protective against the pulmonary replication of homologous and heterologous wild-type H5N1 viruses in mice and ferrets. In this study, we used reverse genetics to produce a cold-adapted, live attenuated H5N1 vaccine (AH/AAca that contains HA and NA genes from a recent H5N1 isolate, A/Anhui/2/05 virus (AH/05 (clade 2.3, and the backbone of the cold-adapted influenza H2N2 A/AnnArbor/6/60 virus (AAca. AH/AAca was attenuated in chickens, mice, and monkeys, and it induced robust neutralizing antibody responses as well as HA-specific CD4+ T cell immune responses in rhesus macaques immunized twice intranasally. Importantly, the vaccinated macaques were fully protected from challenge with either the homologous AH/05 virus or a heterologous H5N1 virus, A/bar-headed goose/Qinghai/3/05 (BHG/05; clade 2.2. These results demonstrate for the first time that a cold-adapted H5N1 vaccine can elicit protective immunity against highly pathogenic H5N1 virus infection in a nonhuman primate model and provide a compelling argument for further testing of double immunization with live attenuated H5N1 vaccines in human trials.

  1. Identification of one B-cell epitope from NS1 protein of duck Tembusu virus with monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Ti

    Full Text Available This study describes the identification of one linear B-cell epitope on TMUV NS1 protein with monoclonal antibody (mAb 3G2 by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In this study, NS1 protein was expressed in prokaryotic expression system and purified. One mAb against NS1 protein was generated from Balb/c mice immunized with recombinant protein NS1. A set of 35 partially-overlapping polypeptides covering the entire NS1 protein was expressed with PGEX-6P-1 vector and screened with mAb 3G2. One polypeptide against the mAb was acquired and identified by indirect ELISA and western-blot. To map the epitope accurately, one or two amino acid residues were removed from the carboxy and amino terminal of polypeptide sequentially. A series of truncated oligopeptides were expressed and purified. The minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope was recognized and identified with mAb 3G2. The accurate linear B-cell epitope was 269DEKEIV274 located in NS1 protein. Furthermore, sequence alignment showed that the epitope was highly conserved and specific among TMUV strains and other flavivirus respectively. The linear B-cell epitope of TMUV NS1 protein could benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  2. Vaccination of macaques with adjuvanted formalin-inactivated influenza A virus (H5N1) vaccines: Protection against H5N1 challenge without disease enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ruat (Caroline); C. Caillet (Catherine); A. Bidaut (Alexandre); J.H. Simon (James); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the ability of adjuvanted, inactivated split-virion influenza A virus (H5N1) vaccines to protect against infection and demonstrated that the disease exacerbation phenomenon seen with adjuvanted formaldehyde-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus and measles virus

  3. Inhibition of the Membrane Attack Complex by Dengue Virus NS1 through Interaction with Vitronectin and Terminal Complement Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Jonas Nascimento; da Silva, Emiliana Mandarano; Allonso, Diego; Coelho, Diego Rodrigues; Andrade, Iamara da Silva; de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Menezes, Joice Lima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2016-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a major public health problem. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein that associates with membranes and is also secreted into the plasma in DENV-infected patients. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We first identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV2 NS1 binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was further assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The NS1-VN complex was also detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the DENV2 NS1 protein, either by itself or by interacting with VN, hinders the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and C9 polymerization. Finally, we showed that DENV2, West Nile virus (WNV), and Zika virus (ZIKV) NS1 proteins produced in mammalian cells inhibited C9 polymerization. Taken together, our results points to a role for NS1 as a terminal pathway inhibitor of the complement system. Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease nowadays and is caused by dengue virus (DENV). The flavivirus NS1 glycoprotein has been characterized functionally as a complement evasion protein that can attenuate the activation of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which DENV NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV NS1 binding partner, and the NS1-VN complex was detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the NS1-VN complex inhibited membrane attack complex (MAC) formation, thus interfering with the complement terminal pathway. Interestingly

  4. Isolation and characterization of influenza A virus (subtype H5N1) that caused the first highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak in chicken in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, S C; Dahal, N; Nagarajan, S; Tosh, C; Murugkar, H V; Rinzin, K; Sharma, B; Jain, R; Katare, M; Patil, S; Khandia, R; Syed, Z; Tripathi, S; Behera, P; Kumar, M; Kulkarni, D D; Krishna, Lal

    2012-02-24

    We characterized Influenza A/H5N1 virus that caused the first outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in chickens in Bhutan in 2010. The virus was highly virulent to chicken, killing them within two days of the experimental inoculation with an intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) of 2.88. For genetic and phylogenetic analyses, complete genome sequencing of 4 viral isolates was carried out. The isolates revealed multiple basic amino acids at their hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage site, similar to other "Qinghai-like" H5N1 isolates. The receptor-binding site of HA molecule contained avian-like amino acids ((222)Q and (224)G). The isolates also contained amino acid residue K at position 627 of the PB2 protein, and other markers in NS 1 and PB1 proteins, highlighting the risk to mammals. However, the isolates were sensitive to influenza drugs presently available in the market. The sequence analysis indicated that the Bhutan viruses shared 99.1-100% nucleotide homology in all the eight genes among themselves and 2010 chicken isolate from Bangladesh (A/chicken/Bangladesh/1151-11/2010) indicating common progenitor virus. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Bhutan isolates belonged to sub-clade 2.2.3 (EMA 3) and shared common progenitor virus with the 2010 Bangladesh virus. Based on the evidence of phylogeny and molecular markers, it could be concluded that the outbreaks in Bhutan and Bangladesh in 2010 were due to independent introductions of the virus probably through migratory birds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Endothelial cell tropism is a determinant of H5N1 pathogenesis in mammalian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smanla Tundup

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the unusually high virulence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in mammalian species remains unknown. Here, we investigated if the cell tropism of H5N1 virus is a determinant of enhanced virulence in mammalian species. We engineered H5N1 viruses with restricted cell tropism through the exploitation of cell type-specific microRNA expression by incorporating microRNA target sites into the viral genome. Restriction of H5N1 replication in endothelial cells via miR-126 ameliorated disease symptoms, prevented systemic viral spread and limited mortality, despite showing similar levels of peak viral replication in the lungs as compared to control virus-infected mice. Similarly, restriction of H5N1 replication in endothelial cells resulted in ameliorated disease symptoms and decreased viral spread in ferrets. Our studies demonstrate that H5N1 infection of endothelial cells results in excessive production of cytokines and reduces endothelial barrier integrity in the lungs, which culminates in vascular leakage and viral pneumonia. Importantly, our studies suggest a need for a combinational therapy that targets viral components, suppresses host immune responses, and improves endothelial barrier integrity for the treatment of highly pathogenic H5N1 virus infections.

  6. Spatio-temporal dynamics of global H5N1 outbreaks match bird migration patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Si

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in poultry, wild birds and humans, poses a significant pandemic threat and a serious public health risk. An efficient surveillance and disease control system relies on the understanding of the dispersion patterns and spreading mechanisms of the virus. A space-time cluster analysis of H5N1 outbreaks was used to identify spatio-temporal patterns at a global scale and over an extended period of time. Potential mechanisms explaining the spread of the H5N1 virus, and the role of wild birds, were analyzed. Between December 2003 and December 2006, three global epidemic phases of H5N1 influenza were identified. These H5N1 outbreaks showed a clear seasonal pattern, with a high density of outbreaks in winter and early spring (i.e., October to March. In phase I and II only the East Asia Australian flyway was affected. During phase III, the H5N1 viruses started to appear in four other flyways: the Central Asian flyway, the Black Sea Mediterranean flyway, the East Atlantic flyway and the East Africa West Asian flyway. Six disease cluster patterns along these flyways were found to be associated with the seasonal migration of wild birds. The spread of the H5N1 virus, as demonstrated by the space-time clusters, was associated with the patterns of migration of wild birds. Wild birds may therefore play an important role in the spread of H5N1 over long distances. Disease clusters were also detected at sites where wild birds are known to overwinter and at times when migratory birds were present. This leads to the suggestion that wild birds may also be involved in spreading the H5N1 virus over short distances.

  7. Computational Identification of Antibody Epitopes on the Dengue Virus NS1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martina L; Legge, Fiona S; Lebani, Kebaneilwe; Mahler, Stephen M; Young, Paul R; Watterson, Daniel; Treutlein, Herbert R; Zeng, Jun

    2017-04-10

    We have previously described a method to predict antigenic epitopes on proteins recognized by specific antibodies. Here we have applied this method to identify epitopes on the NS1 proteins of the four Dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) that are bound by a small panel of monoclonal antibodies 1H7.4, 1G5.3 and Gus2. Several epitope regions were predicted for these antibodies and these were found to reflect the experimentally observed reactivities. The known binding epitopes on DENV2 for the antibodies 1H7.4 and 1G5.3 were identified, revealing the reasons for the serotype specificity of 1H7.4 and 1G5.3, and the non-selectivity of Gus2. As DENV NS1 is critical for virus replication and a key vaccine candidate, epitope prediction will be valuable in designing appropriate vaccine control strategies. The ability to predict potential epitopes by computational methods significantly reduces the amount of experimental work required to screen peptide libraries for epitope mapping.

  8. The changing nature of avian influenza A virus (H5N1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yohei; Ibrahim, Madiha S; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 has been endemic in some bird species since its emergence in 1996 and its ecology, genetics and antigenic properties have continued to evolve. This has allowed diverse virus strains to emerge in endemic areas with altered receptor specificity, including a new H5 sublineage with enhanced binding affinity to the human-type receptor. The pandemic potential of H5N1 viruses is alarming and may be increasing. We review here the complex dynamics and changing nature of the H5N1 virus that may contribute to the emergence of pandemic strains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. First introduction of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses in wild and domestic birds in Denmark, Northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabell Susanne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2005 highly pathogenic (HP avian influenza A H5N1 viruses have spread from Asia to Africa and Europe infecting poultry, humans and wild birds. HP H5N1 virus was isolated in Denmark for the first time in March 2006. A total of 44 wild birds were found positive for the HP H5N1 infection. In addition, one case was reported in a backyard poultry flock. Results Full-genome characterisation of nine isolates revealed that the Danish H5N1 viruses were highly similar to German H5N1 isolates in all genes from the same time period. The haemagglutinin gene grouped phylogenetically in H5 clade 2 subclade 2 and closest relatives besides the German isolates were isolates from Croatia in 2005, Nigeria and Niger in 2006 and isolates from Astrakhan in Russia 2006. The German and Danish isolates shared unique substitutions in the NA, PB1 and NS2 proteins. Conclusion The first case of HP H5N1 infection of wild and domestic birds in Denmark was experienced in March 2006. This is the first full genome characterisation of HP H5N1 avian influenza A virus in the Nordic countries. The Danish viruses from this time period have their origin from the wild bird strains from Qinghai in 2005. These viruses may have been introduced to the Northern Europe through unusual migration due to the cold weather in Eastern Europe at that time.

  10. The NS1 Protein from Influenza Virus Stimulates Translation Initiation by Enhancing Ribosome Recruitment to mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthu, Baptiste; Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; Traversier, Aurélien; Corbin, Antoine; Balvay, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2017-10-27

    The non-structural protein NS1 of influenza A viruses exerts pleiotropic functions during infection. Among these functions, NS1 was shown to be involved in the control of both viral and cellular translation; however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be determined. Thus, we have revisited the role of NS1 in translation by using a combination of influenza infection, mRNA reporter transfection, and in vitro functional and biochemical assays. Our data show that the NS1 protein is able to enhance the translation of virtually all tested mRNAs with the exception of constructs bearing the Dicistroviruses Internal ribosome entry segment (IRESes) (DCV and CrPV), suggesting a role at the level of translation initiation. The domain of NS1 required for translation stimulation was mapped to the RNA binding amino-terminal motif of the protein with residues R38 and K41 being critical for activity. Although we show that NS1 can bind directly to mRNAs, it does not correlate with its ability to stimulate translation. This activity rather relies on the property of NS1 to associate with ribosomes and to recruit them to target mRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated H5N1 vaccine in nonhuman primates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fan, Shufang; Gao, Yuwei; Shinya, Kyoko; Li, Chris Kafai; Li, Yanbing; Shi, Jianzhong; Jiang, Yongping; Suo, Yongbing; Tong, Tiegang; Zhong, Gongxun; Song, Jiasheng; Zhang, Ying; Tian, Guobin; Guan, Yuntao; Xu, Xiao-Ning; Bu, Zhigao; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2009-01-01

    The continued spread of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses among poultry and wild birds, together with the emergence of drug-resistant variants and the possibility of human-to-human transmission...

  12. Virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza a subtype H5N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikesit, A. A.; Ardiansah, B.; Handayani, D. M.; Tambunan, U. S. F.; Kerami, D.

    2016-02-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 poses a significant threat to animal and human health worldwide. The number of H5N1 infection in Indonesia is the highest during 2005-2013, with a mortality rate up to 83%. A mutation that occurred in H5N1 strain made it resistant to commercial antiviral agents such as oseltamivir and zanamivir, so the more potent antiviral agent is needed. In this study, virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of H5N1 was conducted. Total 491 flavonoid compound obtained from HerbalDB were screened. Molecular docking was performed using MOE 2008.10. This research resulted in Guajavin B as the best ligand.

  13. Roles of the phosphorylation of specific serines and threonines in the NS1 protein of human influenza A viruses.

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    Hsiang, Tien-Ying; Zhou, Ligang; Krug, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate that phosphorylation of the NS1 protein of a human influenza A virus occurs not only at the threonine (T) at position 215 but also at serines (Ss), specifically at positions 42 and 48. By generating recombinant influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) viruses that encode mutant NS1 proteins, we determined the roles of these phosphorylations in virus replication. At position 215 only a T-to-A substitution attenuated replication, whereas other substitutions (T to E to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, T to N, and T to P, the amino acid in avian influenza A virus NS1 proteins) had no effect. We conclude that attenuation resulting from the T-to-A substitution at position 215 is attributable to a deleterious structural change in the NS1 protein that is not caused by other amino acid substitutions and that phosphorylation of T215 does not affect virus replication. At position 48 neither an S-to-A substitution nor an S-to-D substitution that mimics constitutive phosphorylation affected virus replication. In contrast, at position 42, an S-to-D, but not an S-to-A, substitution caused attenuation. The S-to-D substitution eliminates detectable double-stranded RNA binding by the NS1 protein, accounting for attenuation of virus replication. We show that protein kinase C α (PKCα) catalyzes S42 phosphorylation. Consequently, the only phosphorylation of the NS1 protein of this human influenza A virus that regulates its replication is S42 phosphorylation catalyzed by PKCα. In contrast, phosphorylation of Ts or Ss in the NS1 protein of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was not detected, indicating that NS1 phosphorylation probably does not play any role in the replication of this virus.

  14. Using Knowledge Fusion to Analyze Avian Influenza H5N1 in East and Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Erjia; Haining, Robert; Li, Chi Pang; Yu, Zuguo; Waye, Miu Yee; Chu, Ka Hou; Leung, Yee

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, a disease associated with high rates of mortality in infected human populations, poses a serious threat to public health in many parts of the world. This article reports findings from a study aimed at improving our understanding of the spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza, H5N1, risk in East-Southeast Asia where the disease is both persistent and devastating. Though many disciplines have made important contributions to our understanding of H5N1, it remains a challenge to integrate knowledge from different disciplines. This study applies genetic analysis that identifies the evolution of the H5N1 virus in space and time, epidemiological analysis that determines socio-ecological factors associated with H5N1 occurrence, and statistical analysis that identifies outbreak clusters, and then applies a methodology to formally integrate the findings of the three sets of methodologies. The present study is novel in two respects. First it makes the initiative attempt to use genetic sequences and space-time data to create a space-time phylogenetic tree to estimate and map the virus' ability to spread. Second, by integrating the results we are able to generate insights into the space-time occurrence and spread of H5N1 that we believe have a higher level of corroboration than is possible when analysis is based on only one methodology. Our research identifies links between the occurrence of H5N1 by area and a set of socio-ecological factors including altitude, population density, poultry density, and the shortest path distances to inland water, coastlines, migrating routes, railways, and roads. This study seeks to lay a solid foundation for the interdisciplinary study of this and other influenza outbreaks. It will provide substantive information for containing H5N1 outbreaks. PMID:22615729

  15. Seroprevalensi Avian influenza H5N1 pada Unggas di Kabupaten Aceh Utara

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    Darmawi Darmawi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Seroprevalence of avian influenza H5N1 in birds in north aceh district ABSTRACT. Avian influenza virus H5N1 infections are an important cause of diseases in humans and several animal species, including birds. The present study conducted to investigate the seroprevalence Avian Influenza H5N1 in native birds from 15 sub-districts of North Aceh.  This study utilized 1108 serum samples collected from the axilaris vein (left or right of birds. The standard Hemaglutination Inhibition (HI assay was conducted at Microbiology Laboratory Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Syiah Kuala University to determined serum antibody possitive or negative reaction against Avian influenza H5N1. The result showed that seroprevalence Avian influenza H5N1 virus was 4,7 % in North Aceh District. There were nine sub-districts were tested positively by HI test. However, the serum collected from six sub-districts did not react (negative against Avian influenza H5N1. Based on the results we obtained, a conclusion that natural infection by Avian influenza virus in native birds occured in part of North Aceh District.

  16. Insights into Human Astrocyte Response to H5N1 Infection by Microarray Analysis

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    Xian Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus infects not only the respiratory system but also the central nervous system (CNS, leading to influenza-associated encephalopathy and encephalitis. Astrocytes are essential for brain homeostasis and neuronal function. These cells can also be infected by influenza virus. However, genome-wide changes in response to influenza viral infection in astrocytes have not been defined. In this study, we performed gene profiling of human astrocytes in response to H5N1. Innate immune and pro-inflammatory responses were strongly activated at 24 h post-infection (hpi. Antiviral genes, as well as several cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, were robustly induced. Phosphorylation of p65 and p38 can be activated by viral infection, suggesting their potential critical roles in H5N1-induced pro-inflammatory response. Moreover, H5N1 infection significantly upregulated the gene expressions related to the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway at 24 hpi, such as MC2R, CHRNG, P2RY13, GABRA1, and HRH2, which participant in synaptic transmission and may take part in CNS disorders induced by H5N1 infection. Targeting key components of innate immune response and the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway may provide a strategy to control H5N1-induced encephalopathy and encephalitis. This research can contribute to the understanding of H5N1 pathogenesis in astrocytes.

  17. Purification and production of monospecific antibody to the hemagglutinin from Subtype H5N1 influenza virus

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    Simson Tarigan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to purify the hemagglutinin from H5N1 virus and to generate monospecific antibody appropriate for production of sensitive and specific immunoassay for H5N1 avian influenza. For this purpose, a local isolate H5N1 virus (A/Ck/West Java/Hamd/2006 was propagated in chicken embryos. The viral pellet was dissolved in a Triton-X-100 solution, undissolved viral particles were pelleted by ultracentrifuge, and the supernatant containing viral surface glycoproteins (Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase was collected. The neuraminidase in the supernatant was absorbed by passing the supernatant through an Oxamic-acid-superose column. After dialyzing extensively, the filtrate was further fractionated with an anion exchange chromatography (Q-sepharose column. Proteins adsorbed by the column were eluted stepwisely with 0.10, 0.25, 0.25 and 0.75 M NaCl in 20 mM Tris, ph 8. Hemagglutinin (H5 was found to be eluted from the column with the 0.5 M NaCl elution buffer. The purified H5 was free from other viral proteins based on immunoassays using commercial antibodies to H5N1 nucleoprotein and neuraminidase. When used as ELISA’s coating antigen, the purified H5 proved to be sensitive and specific for hemagglutinin H5. Cross reactions with other type-A-influenza virus, H6, H7 dan H9, were negligibly low. For the production of monospecific antiserum, the purified H5 was separated with SDS-PAGE, the band containing the H5 monomer was cut out , homogenised and injected into rabbits. The antiserum was capable of detecting the presence of inactivated H5N1 virus in a very dilute suspension, with a detection limit of 0.04 heagglutination (HA unit. The purified hemagglutinin and the serum raised against it should be useful for developing specific, sensitive and affordable immunoassay for H5N1 avian influenza.

  18. An H5N1 M2e-based multiple antigenic peptide vaccine confers heterosubtypic protection from lethal infection with pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus

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    Yu Hong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A 2009 global influenza pandemic caused by a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus has posted an increasing threat of a potential pandemic by the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus, driving us to develop an influenza vaccine which confers cross-protection against both H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. Previously, we have shown that a tetra-branched multiple antigenic peptide (MAP vaccine based on the extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e from H5N1 virus (H5N1-M2e-MAP induced strong immune responses and cross-protection against different clades of HPAI H5N1 viruses. In this report, we investigated whether such M2e-MAP presenting the H5N1-M2e consensus sequence can afford heterosubtypic protection from lethal challenge with the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. Results Our results demonstrated that H5N1-M2e-MAP plus Freund's or aluminum adjuvant induced strong cross-reactive IgG antibody responses against M2e of the pandemic H1N1 virus which contains one amino acid variation with M2e of H5N1 at position 13. These cross-reactive antibodies may maintain for 6 months and bounced back quickly to the previous high level after the 2nd boost administered 2 weeks before virus challenge. H5N1-M2e-MAP could afford heterosubtypic protection against lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus, showing significant decrease of viral replications and obvious alleviation of histopathological damages in the challenged mouse lungs. 100% and 80% of the H5N1-M2e-MAP-vaccinated mice with Freund's and aluminum adjuvant, respectively, survived the lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus. Conclusions Our results suggest that H5N1-M2e-MAP has a great potential to prevent the threat from re-emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza and possible novel influenza pandemic due to the reassortment of HPAI H5N1 virus with the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus.

  19. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of H5N1 influenza vaccine based on baculovirus surface display system of Bombyx mori.

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    Rongzhong Jin

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus (H5N1 has caused serious infections in human beings. This virus has the potential to emerge as a pandemic threat in humans. Effective vaccines against H5N1 virus are needed. A recombinant Bombyx mori baculovirus, Bmg64HA, was constructed for the expression of HA protein of H5N1 influenza virus displaying on the viral envelope surface. The HA protein accounted for approximately 3% of the total viral proteins in silkworm pupae infected with the recombinant virus. Using a series of separation and purification methods, pure Bmgp64HA virus was isolated from these silkworm pupae bioreactors. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant was used for an H5N1 influenza vaccine. Immunization with this vaccine at doses of 2 mg/kg and 0.67 mg/kg was carried out to induce the production of neutralizing antibodies, which protected monkeys against influenza virus infection. At these doses, the vaccine induced 1:40 antibody titers in 50% and 67% of the monkeys, respectively. The results of safety evaluation indicated that the vaccine did not cause any toxicity at the dosage as large as 3.2 mg/kg in cynomolgus monkeys and 1.6 mg/kg in mice. The results of dose safety evaluation of vaccine indicated that the safe dose of the vaccine were higher than 0.375 mg/kg in rats and 3.2 mg/kg in cynomolgus monkeys. Our work showed the vaccine may be a candidate for a highly effective, cheap, and safe influenza vaccine for use in humans.

  1. Waterfowl potential as resevoirs of high pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses

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    R Susanti

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The high population of waterfowl subsequently with the high case fatality of poultry and people in West Java regency caused by HPAI H5N1 can raise possibility that waterfowl was a natural reservoir. This research aimed to prove that waterfowl in West Java served as reservoir of AI virus (primarily H5N1 and also identify the virus pathotype based on cleavage site of amino acid sequence. Cloacal swab sample was obtained from healthy and unvaccinated waterfowl from Sukabumi and Bogor Regency. Cloacal swab was propagated in 9 days old embryonic chicken eggs. Allantoic fluid was harvested at the 4th day of incubation and then tested for hemagglutination, and positive isolate continued with virus sub-typing using PCR method. H5 gene from H5N1 isolate then sequenced using dideoxy termination method. Multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences were analysed using MEGA-3.1 program. Sub-typing using PCR method indicated the existence of 25 strain H5N1, 16 strain HxN1, 4 strain H5Nx and 9 virus ND. Characterization of cleavage site amino acid sequence indicated that all H5N1 sample were pathogenic with sequence QRERRRKKR (23 sample dan QRESRRKKR (2 sample. Waterfowl was HPAI H5N1 virus reservoir. Asymptomatic infection in waterfowl, but the virus shedding gradually occurred and therefore it became potential source of H5N1 virus infection. Our findings suggest that immediate action is needed to prevent the transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from the apparently healthy waterfowl into terrestrial poultry or human.

  2. Estimation of transmission parameters of H5N1 avian influenza virus in chickens.

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    Annemarie Bouma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research efforts, little is yet known about key epidemiological parameters of H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza viruses in their avian hosts. Here we show how these parameters can be estimated using a limited number of birds in experimental transmission studies. Our quantitative estimates, based on Bayesian methods of inference, reveal that (i the period of latency of H5N1 influenza virus in unvaccinated chickens is short (mean: 0.24 days; 95% credible interval: 0.099-0.48 days; (ii the infectious period of H5N1 virus in unvaccinated chickens is approximately 2 days (mean: 2.1 days; 95%CI: 1.8-2.3 days; (iii the reproduction number of H5N1 virus in unvaccinated chickens need not be high (mean: 1.6; 95%CI: 0.90-2.5, although the virus is expected to spread rapidly because it has a short generation interval in unvaccinated chickens (mean: 1.3 days; 95%CI: 1.0-1.5 days; and (iv vaccination with genetically and antigenically distant H5N2 vaccines can effectively halt transmission. Simulations based on the estimated parameters indicate that herd immunity may be obtained if at least 80% of chickens in a flock are vaccinated. We discuss the implications for the control of H5N1 avian influenza virus in areas where it is endemic.

  3. Isolation and characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from donkeys

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    Abdel-Ghany Ahmad E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic H5N1 is a major avian pathogen that crosses species barriers and seriously affects humans as well as some mammals. It mutates in an intensified manner and is considered a potential candidate for the possible next pandemic with all the catastrophic consequences. Methods Nasal swabs were collected from donkeys suffered from respiratory distress. The virus was isolated from the pooled nasal swabs in specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs (SPF-ECE. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing of both haemagglutingin and neuraminidase were performed. H5 seroconversion was screened using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay on 105 donkey serum samples. Results We demonstrated that H5N1 jumped from poultry to another mammalian host; donkeys. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus clustered within the lineage of H5N1 from Egypt, closely related to 2009 isolates. It harboured few genetic changes compared to the closely related viruses from avian and humans. The neuraminidase lacks oseltamivir resistant mutations. Interestingly, HI screening for antibodies to H5 haemagglutinins in donkeys revealed high exposure rate. Conclusions These findings extend the host range of the H5N1 influenza virus, possess implications for influenza virus epidemiology and highlight the need for the systematic surveillance of H5N1 in animals in the vicinity of backyard poultry units especially in endemic areas.

  4. Greater virulence of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in cats than in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heui Man; Park, Eun Hye; Yum, Jung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus continues to infect animals and humans. We compared the infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 virus in domestic cats and dogs to find out which animal is more susceptible to H5N1 influenza virus. When cats and dogs were infected with the H5N1 virus, cats suffered from severe outcomes including death, whereas dogs did not show any mortality. Viruses were shed in the nose and rectum of cats and in the nose of dogs. Viruses were detected in brain, lung, kidney, intestine, liver, and serum in the infected cats, but only in the lung in the infected dogs. Genes encoding inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Toll-like receptors, and apoptotic factors were more highly expressed in the lungs of cats than in those of dogs. Our results suggest that the intensive monitoring of dogs is necessary to prevent human infection by H5N1 influenza virus, since infected dogs may not show clear clinical signs, in contrast to infected cats.

  5. Rapid and highly informative diagnostic assay for H5N1 influenza viruses.

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    Nader Pourmand

    Full Text Available A highly discriminative and information-rich diagnostic assay for H5N1 avian influenza would meet immediate patient care needs and provide valuable information for public health interventions, e.g., tracking of new and more dangerous variants by geographic area as well as avian-to-human or human-to-human transmission. In the present study, we have designed a rapid assay based on multilocus nucleic acid sequencing that focuses on the biologically significant regions of the H5N1 hemagglutinin gene. This allows the prediction of viral strain, clade, receptor binding properties, low- or high-pathogenicity cleavage site and glycosylation status. H5 HA genes were selected from nine known high-pathogenicity avian influenza subtype H5N1 viruses, based on their diversity in biologically significant regions of hemagglutinin and/or their ability to cause infection in humans. We devised a consensus pre-programmed pyrosequencing strategy, which may be used as a faster, more accurate alternative to de novo sequencing. The available data suggest that the assay described here is a reliable, rapid, information-rich and cost-effective approach for definitive diagnosis of H5N1 avian influenza. Knowledge of the predicted functional sequences of the HA will enhance H5N1 avian influenza surveillance efforts.

  6. Environmental risk factors associated with H5N1 HPAI in Ramsar wetlands of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Irene; Jesús Muñoz, Ma; Martínez, Marta; de la Torre, Ana

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify environmental characteristics of European Ramsar wetlands, which are natural habitats for waterbirds, that could have contributed as risk factors for H5N1 HPAI (highly pathogenic avian influenza) in water birds (2006-2009). Ramsar wetlands in which H5N1 outbreaks were reported were considered infected (positive), and a case-control study was conducted using a logistic regression model in order to identify environmental risk factors associated with disease. Forestry (odds ratio, OR = 6.90) and important area for water birds with mixosaline water (OR = 6.31), as well as distance to the nearest positive wetland (OR = 0.66), which was included into the model to adjust for spatial dependence, were associated with status of the wetlands. The model was used to estimate the risk for H5N1 HPAI on each European Ramsar wetland. Results will help to identify wetlands at high risk for H5N1 HPAI infection, wetlands that could be selectively targeted as part of a surveillance program aimed at early detection and prevention of future H5N1 HPAI epidemics.

  7. Transforming growth factor-β: activation by neuraminidase and role in highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza pathogenesis.

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    Christina M Carlson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, a multifunctional cytokine regulating several immunologic processes, is expressed by virtually all cells as a biologically inactive molecule termed latent TGF-β (LTGF-β. We have previously shown that TGF-β activity increases during influenza virus infection in mice and suggested that the neuraminidase (NA protein mediates this activation. In the current study, we determined the mechanism of activation of LTGF-β by NA from the influenza virus A/Gray Teal/Australia/2/1979 by mobility shift and enzyme inhibition assays. We also investigated whether exogenous TGF-β administered via a replication-deficient adenovirus vector provides protection from H5N1 influenza pathogenesis and whether depletion of TGF-β during virus infection increases morbidity in mice. We found that both the influenza and bacterial NA activate LTGF-β by removing sialic acid motifs from LTGF-β, each NA being specific for the sialic acid linkages cleaved. Further, NA likely activates LTGF-β primarily via its enzymatic activity, but proteases might also play a role in this process. Several influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1, H1N2, H3N2, H5N9, H6N1, and H7N3 except the highly pathogenic H5N1 strains activated LTGF-β in vitro and in vivo. Addition of exogenous TGF-β to H5N1 influenza virus-infected mice delayed mortality and reduced viral titers whereas neutralization of TGF-β during H5N1 and pandemic 2009 H1N1 infection increased morbidity. Together, these data show that microbe-associated NAs can directly activate LTGF-β and that TGF-β plays a pivotal role protecting the host from influenza pathogenesis.

  8. Highly immunogenic prime–boost DNA vaccination protects chickens against challenge with homologous and heterologous H5N1 virus

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    Anna Stachyra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs cause huge economic losses in the poultry industry because of high mortality rate in infected flocks and trade restrictions. Protective antibodies, directed mainly against hemagglutinin (HA, are the primary means of protection against influenza outbreaks. A recombinant DNA vaccine based on the sequence of H5 HA from the H5N1/A/swan/Poland/305-135V08/2006 strain of HPAIV was prepared. Sequence manipulation included deletion of the proteolytic cleavage site to improve protein stability, codon usage optimization to improve translation and stability of RNA in host cells, and cloning into a commercially available vector to enable expression in animal cells. Naked plasmid DNA was complexed with a liposomal carrier and the immunization followed the prime–boost strategy. The immunogenic potential of the DNA vaccine was first proved in broilers in near-to-field conditions resembling a commercial farm. Next, the protective activity of the vaccine was confirmed in SPF layer-type chickens. Experimental infections (challenge experiments indicated that 100% of vaccinated chickens were protected against H5N1 of the same clade and that 70% of them were protected against H5N1 influenza virus of a different clade. Moreover, the DNA vaccine significantly limited (or even eliminated transmission of the virus to contact control chickens. Two intramuscular doses of DNA vaccine encoding H5 HA induced a strong protective response in immunized chicken. The effective protection lasted for a minimum 8 weeks after the second dose of the vaccine and was not limited to the homologous H5N1 virus. In addition, the vaccine reduced shedding of the virus.

  9. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

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    Wentian Chen

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  10. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

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    Chen, Wentian; Sun, Shisheng; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs) are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA) on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA) receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  11. Biological fitness and natural selection of amantadine resistant variants of avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

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    Abdelwhab, E M; Veits, Jutta; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2017-01-15

    Outbreaks caused by the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus (A/H5N1) devastated the poultry industry in several countries and posed a significant pandemic threat. In addition to culling of infected poultry and vaccination, amantadine has been applied in poultry in some countries to control the spread of the virus. The prevalence of the amantadine resistance marker at position 31 (Ser31Asn) of the M2 protein increased over time. However, little is known about the biological fitness and selection of H5N1 amantadine resistant strains over their sensitive counterparts. Here, using reverse genetics we investigated the biological impact of Ser31Asn in M2 commonly seen in viruses in clade 2.2.1.1 in farmed poultry in Egypt. Findings of the current study indicated that the resistance to amantadine conferred by Asn31 evolved rapidly after the application of amantadine in commercial poultry. Both the resistant and sensitive strains replicated at similar levels in avian cell culture. Asn31 increased virus entry into the cells and cell-to-cell spread and was genetically stable for several passages in cell culture. Moreover, upon co-infection of cell culture resistant strains dominated sensitive viruses even in the absence of selection by amantadine. Together, rapid emergence, stability and domination of amantadine-resistant variants over sensitive strains limit the efficacy of amantadine in poultry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Seasonal patterns in human A (H5N1 virus infection: analysis of global cases.

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    Maya B Mathur

    Full Text Available Human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI A (H5N1 have high mortality. Despite abundant data on seasonal patterns in influenza epidemics, it is unknown whether similar patterns exist for human HPAI H5N1 cases worldwide. Such knowledge could help decrease avian-to-human transmission through increased prevention and control activities during peak periods.We performed a systematic search of published human HPAI H5N1 cases to date, collecting month, year, country, season, hemisphere, and climate data. We used negative binomial regression to predict changes in case incidence as a function of season. To investigate hemisphere as a potential moderator, we used AIC and the likelihood-ratio test to compare the season-only model to nested models including a main effect or interaction with hemisphere. Finally, we visually assessed replication of seasonal patterns across climate groups based on the Köppen-Geiger climate classification.We identified 617 human cases (611 with complete seasonal data occurring in 15 countries in Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Case occurrence was much higher in winter (n = 285, p = 0.03 than summer (n = 64, and the winter peak occurred across diverse climate groups. There was no significant interaction between hemisphere and season.Across diverse climates, HPAI H5N1 virus infection in humans increases significantly in winter. This is consistent with increased poultry outbreaks and HPAI H5N1 virus transmission during cold and dry conditions. Prioritizing prevention and control activities among poultry and focusing public health messaging to reduce poultry exposures during winter months may help to reduce zoonotic transmission of HPAI H5N1 virus in resource-limited settings.

  13. Isolation of avian influenza H5N1 virus from vaccinated commercial layer flock in Egypt

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    El-Zoghby Elham F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uninterrupted transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1 of clade 2.2.1 in Egypt since 2006 resulted in establishment of two main genetic clusters. The 2.2.1/C group where all recent human and majority of backyard origin viruses clustered together, meanwhile the majority of viruses derived from vaccinated poultry in commercial farms grouped in 2.2.1.1 clade. Findings In the present investigation, an HPAIV H5N1 was isolated from twenty weeks old layers chickens that were vaccinated with a homologous H5N1 vaccine at 1, 7 and 16 weeks old. At twenty weeks of age, birds showed cyanosis of comb and wattle, decrease in egg production and up to 27% mortality. Examined serum samples showed low antibody titer in HI test (Log2 3.2± 4.2. The hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of the isolated virus were closely related to viruses in 2.2.1/C group isolated from poultry in live bird market (LBM and backyards or from infected people. Conspicuous mutations in the HA and NA genes including a deletion within the receptor binding domain in the HA globular head region were observed. Conclusions Despite repeated vaccination of layer chickens using a homologous H5N1 vaccine, infection with HPAIV H5N1 resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. In endemic countries like Egypt, rigorous control measures including enforcement of biosecurity, culling of infected birds and constant update of vaccine virus strains are highly required to prevent circulation of HPAIV H5N1 between backyard birds, commercial poultry, LBM and humans.

  14. Proteome Response of Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Cells to Recombinant H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses with Different Neuraminidase Stalk Lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Ming, Fan; Huang, Huimin; Guo, Kelei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin; Zhou, Hongbo

    2017-01-12

    The variation on neuraminidase (NA) stalk region of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in virulence change in animals. In our previous studies, the special NA stalk-motif of H5N1 viruses has been demonstrated to play a significant role in the high virulence and pathogenicity in chickens. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of viruses with different NA stalk remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response of chicken cells to recombinant H5N1 virus with stalk-short NA (rNA-wt) and the stalkless NA mutant virus (rSD20). 208 proteins with differential abundance profiles were identified differentially expressed (DE), and these proteins were mainly related to stress response, transcription regulation, transport, metabolic process, cellular component and cytoskeleton. Through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA), the significant biological functions of DE proteins represented included Post-Translational Modification, Protein Folding, DNA Replication, Recombination and Repair. It was interesting to find that most DE proteins were involved in the TGF-β mediated functional network. Moreover, the specific DE proteins may play important roles in the innate immune responses and H5N1 virus replication. Our data provide important information regarding the comparable host response to H5N1 influenza virus infection with different NA stalk lengths.

  15. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses carry virulence determinants beyond the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bogs

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV originate from avirulent precursors but differ from all other influenza viruses by the presence of a polybasic cleavage site in their hemagglutinins (HA of subtype H5 or H7. In this study, we investigated the ability of a low-pathogenic avian H5N1 strain to transform into an HPAIV. Using reverse genetics, we replaced the monobasic HA cleavage site of the low-pathogenic strain A/Teal/Germany/Wv632/2005 (H5N1 (TG05 by a polybasic motif from an HPAIV (TG05(poly. To elucidate the virulence potential of all viral genes of HPAIV, we generated two reassortants carrying the HA from the HPAIV A/Swan/Germany/R65/06 (H5N1 (R65 plus the remaining genes from TG05 (TG05-HA(R65 or in reversed composition the mutated TG05 HA plus the R65 genes (R65-HA(TG05poly. In vitro, TG05(poly and both reassortants were able to replicate without the addition of trypsin, which is characteristic for HPAIV. Moreover, in contrast to avirulent TG05, the variants TG05(poly, TG05-HA(R65, and R65-HA(TG05poly are pathogenic in chicken to an increasing degree. Whereas the HA cleavage site mutant TG05(poly led to temporary non-lethal disease in all animals, the reassortant TG05-HA(R65 caused death in 3 of 10 animals. Furthermore, the reassortant R65-HA(TG05poly displayed the highest lethality as 8 of 10 chickens died, resembling "natural" HPAIV strains. Taken together, acquisition of a polybasic HA cleavage site is only one necessary step for evolution of low-pathogenic H5N1 strains into HPAIV. However, these low-pathogenic strains may already have cryptic virulence potential. Moreover, besides the polybasic cleavage site, the additional virulence determinants of H5N1 HPAIV are located within the HA itself and in other viral proteins.

  16. Phylogeography of influenza A H5N1 clade 2.2.1.1 in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza A H5N1 has killed millions of birds and raises serious public health concern because of its potential to spread to humans and cause a global pandemic. While the early focus was in Asia, recent evidence suggests that Egypt is a new epicenter for the disease. This includes characterization of a variant clade 2.2.1.1, which has been found almost exclusively in Egypt. We analyzed 226 HA and 92 NA sequences with an emphasis on the H5N1 2.2.1.1 strains in Egypt using a Bayesian discrete phylogeography approach. This allowed modeling of virus dispersion between Egyptian governorates including the most likely origin. Results Phylogeography models of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) suggest Ash Sharqiyah as the origin of virus spread, however the support is weak based on Kullback–Leibler values of 0.09 for HA and 0.01 for NA. Association Index (AI) values and Parsimony Scores (PS) were significant (p-value Phylogeography can highlight the drivers of H5N1 emergence and spread. This knowledge can be used to target public health efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality. For Egypt, future work should focus on using data about vaccination and live bird markets in phylogeography models to study their impact on H5N1 diffusion within the country. PMID:24325606

  17. Non-Attenuation Of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 By ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian influenza H5N1 represents one of the most researched viruses in laboratories world-wide in recent times with regards to its epidemiology, ecology, biology and geography. The virus has caused 409 human cases and 256 human fatalities to date. Some laboratory activities and other lab related works predispose ...

  18. Serosurvey of antibody to highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian influenza is a disease of economic and public health importance that has been described in most domestic animals and humans. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 epidemic in Nigeria was observed in agro-ecological zones where pigs and chickens are raised in shared environment with chances of ...

  19. Rapid detection of the avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype in Egypt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influenza A virus continue to cause widespread morbidity and mortality. The unprecedented spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in Egypt is threatening poultry and public health systems. Effective diagnosis and control management are needed to control the disease. To this end, polyclonal ...

  20. Avian influenza H5N1 viral and bird migration networks in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huaivu; Zhou, Sen; Dong, Lu; Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Cui, Yujun; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Xiao, Xiangming; Wu, Yarong; Cazelles, Bernard; Huang, Shanqian; Yang, Ruifu; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The spatial spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and its long-term persistence in Asia have resulted in avian influenza panzootics and enormous economic losses in the poultry sector. However, an understanding of the regional long-distance transmission and seasonal patterns of the virus is still lacking. In this study, we present a phylogeographic approach to reconstruct the viral migration network. We show that within each wild fowl migratory flyway, the timing of H5N1 outbreaks and viral migrations are closely associated, but little viral transmission was observed between the flyways. The bird migration network is shown to better reflect the observed viral gene sequence data than other networks and contributes to seasonal H5N1 epidemics in local regions and its large-scale transmission along flyways. These findings have potentially far-reaching consequences, improving our understanding of how bird migration drives the periodic reemergence of H5N1 in Asia.

  1. Rapid detection of the avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype in Egypt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr

    Influenza A virus continue to cause widespread morbidity and mortality. The unprecedented spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in Egypt is threatening poultry and public health systems. Effective diagnosis and control management are needed to control the disease. To this end, polyclonal ...

  2. Probable tiger-to-tiger transmission of avian influenza H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Damrongwatanapokin, Sudarat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Nanthapornphiphat, Kamonchart; Ratanamungklanon, Somchuan; Tunak, Eakchai; Songserm, Thaweesak; Vivatthanavanich, Veravit; Lekdumrongsak, Thawat; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Tunhikorn, Schwann; Poovorawan, Yong

    2005-05-01

    During the second outbreak of avian influenza H5N1 in Thailand, probable horizontal transmission among tigers was demonstrated in the tiger zoo. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of those viruses showed no differences from the first isolate obtained in January 2004. This finding has implications for influenza virus epidemiology and pathogenicity in mammals.

  3. Spatio-temporal dynamics of global H5N1 outbreaks match bird migration patterns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Si, Y

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in poultry, wild birds and humans, poses a significant pandemic threat and a serious public health risk. An efficient surveillance and disease control system relies on the understanding...

  4. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) in frozen duck carcasses, Germany, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Timm C; Teuffert, Jürgen; Starick, Elke; Gethmann, Jörn; Grund, Christian; Fereidouni, Sasan; Durban, Markus; Bogner, Karl Heinz; Neubauer-Juric, Antonie; Repper, Reinhard; Hlinak, Andreas; Engelhardt, Andreas; Nöckler, Axel; Smietanka, Krzysztof; Minta, Zenon; Kramer, Matthias; Globig, Anja; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Conraths, Franz J; Beer, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We conducted phylogenetic and epidemiologic analyses to determine sources of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), subtype H5N1, in poultry holdings in 2007 in Germany, and a suspected incursion of HPAIV into the food chain through contaminated deep-frozen duck carcasses. In summer 2007, HPAIV (H5N1) outbreaks in 3 poultry holdings in Germany were temporally, spatially, and phylogenetically linked to outbreaks in wild aquatic birds. Detection of HPAIV (H5N1) in frozen duck carcass samples of retained slaughter batches of 1 farm indicated that silent infection had occurred for some time before the incidental detection. Phylogenetic analysis established a direct epidemiologic link between HPAIV isolated from duck meat and strains isolated from 3 further outbreaks in December 2007 in backyard chickens that had access to uncooked offal from commercial deep-frozen duck carcasses. Measures that will prevent such undetected introduction of HPAIV (H5N1) into the food chain are urgently required.

  5. Influenza A H5N1 and HIV co-infection: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Cameron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of adaptive immunity in severe influenza is poorly understood. The occurrence of influenza A/H5N1 in a patient with HIV provided a rare opportunity to investigate this. Case Presentation A 30-year-old male was admitted on day 4 of influenza-like-illness with tachycardia, tachypnea, hypoxemia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Influenza A/H5N1 and HIV tests were positive and the patient was treated with Oseltamivir and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Initially his condition improved coinciding with virus clearance by day 6. He clinically deteriorated as of day 10 with fever recrudescence and increasing neutrophil counts and died on day 16. His admission CD4 count was 100/μl and decreased until virus was cleared. CD8 T cells shifted to a CD27+CD28- phenotype. Plasma chemokine and cytokine levels were similar to those found previously in fatal H5N1. Conclusions The course of H5N1 infection was not notably different from other cases. Virus was cleared despite profound CD4 T cell depletion and aberrant CD8 T cell activation but this may have increased susceptibility to a fatal secondary infection.

  6. Probable Tiger-to-Tiger Transmission of Avian Influenza H5N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Damrongwatanapokin, Sudarat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Nanthapornphiphat, Kamonchart; Ratanamungklanon, Somchuan; Tunak, Eakchai; Songserm, Thaweesak; Vivatthanavanich, Veravit; Lekdumrongsak, Thawat; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Tunhikorn, Schwann

    2005-01-01

    During the second outbreak of avian influenza H5N1 in Thailand, probable horizontal transmission among tigers was demonstrated in the tiger zoo. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of those viruses showed no differences from the first isolate obtained in January 2004. This finding has implications for influenza virus epidemiology and pathogenicity in mammals. PMID:15890122

  7. Localization of the nonstructural protein NS1 in bluetongue virus-infected cells and its presence in virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, B T; Hyatt, A D; White, J R

    1988-04-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies to the nonstructural protein NS1 of an Australian isolate of bluetongue virus (BTV) have been used in immunofluoresence and immunogold procedures to locate NS1 in virus-infected cells and cytoskeletons. The antibodies fall into three groups indicating that NS1 contains at least three antigenic sites. One group consists of four antibodies which react solely with cytoskeleton-associated virus-specific tubules. A second group contains one antibody which reacts with cytoskeleton-associated virus particles, released viruses, and purified virus and core particles. Two antibodies constituting a third group react with both tubules and cytoskeleton-associated and released virus particles. NS1 was found in [35S]methionine-labeled, purified virus and core particles. Immunofluorescence tests reveal that those antibodies which react with virus particles also bind to cytoskeleton-associated virus inclusion bodies (VIB). The nature of this association was examined by probing cytoskeletons of BTV-infected cells with antibodies to NS1 and protein A-gold. VIB observed in thin sections were not uniformly labeled. Gold was associated with fibrillar arrays found around virus particles either leaving or in close proximity to the VIB. Fibrillar material was not found in association with all virus particles elsewhere in the cell and this suggests that fibril-virus complexes may be intermediate in virus morphogenesis.

  8. Cell mediated immune responses following revaccination with an influenza A/H5N1 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbawuike, Innocent N; Atmar, Robert L; Patel, Shital M; Corry, David B; Winokur, Patricia L; Brady, Rebecca C; Chen, Wilbur H; Edwards, Kathryn M; Creech, C Buddy; Walter, Emmanuel B; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Goll, Johannes B; Hill, Heather; Keitel, Wendy A

    2016-01-20

    The study aims were to determine whether inactivated influenza A/H5N1 vaccine administration elicited cell mediated immune (CMI) responses and the impact of adjuvant, vaccine dose and subject age on these responses. Adults who were previously primed with either adjuvanted or unadjuvanted, inactivated, A/H5N1/Vietnam/1203/2004 (Clade 1) vaccine or unprimed (received placebo) in previous vaccine studies were randomized to receive one (primed) or two (unprimed) 15- or 90-mcg doses of inactivated, A/H5N1/Indonesia/05/05 (Clade 2) vaccine. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected and analyzed from a subset of vaccinees to assess CMI responses using IFN-γ and granzyme B ELISPOT assays. Cytokine measurements were performed on PBMC supernatants after stimulation with H5N1 virus. PBMCs were available from 177 participants; 88 and 89 received 15-mcg and 90-mcg of unadjuvanted clade 2 vaccine, respectively. Following H5N1 clade 1 stimulation, IFN-γ but not granzyme B normalized spot-forming cell numbers had statistically significant increased numbers at each of the post-vaccination timepoints compared to baseline in pooled analyses of all vaccine doses and age groups. Clade 2 stimulation resulted in statistically significant increased numbers of IFN-γ cells only 180 days following the last vaccination. Responses were similar among younger and older study participants, as were responses among those primed with alum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted clade 1 H5N1 vaccines. The dosage of clade 2 vaccine did not impact CMI responses among primed subjects, but responses were statistically significantly greater in unprimed recipients of the 90-mcg dosage compared to unprimed recipients of the 15-mcg dosage. IFN-γ levels in the supernatants of stimulated PBMC were strongly correlated with IFN-γ ELISPOT results. CMI responses occur in adults administered influenza A/H5N1 inactivated influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. H5N1 surveillance in migratory birds in Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoops, Arthur C; Barbara, Katie A; Indrawan, Mochamad; Ibrahim, Ima N; Petrus, Wicaksana B; Wijaya, Susan; Farzeli, Arik; Antonjaya, Ungke; Sin, Lim W; Hidayatullah, N; Kristanto, Ige; Tampubolon, A M; Purnama, S; Supriatna, Adam; Burgess, Timothy H; Williams, Maya; Putnam, Shannon D; Tobias, Steve; Blair, Patrick J

    2009-12-01

    We sought to elucidate the role of migratory birds in transmission of H5N1 in an enzoonotic area. Resident, captive, and migratory birds were sampled at five sites in Java, Indonesia. Mist nets were used to trap birds. Birds were identified to species. RNA was extracted from swabs and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) conducted for the HA and M genes of H5N1. Antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemagglutination inhibition test. Between October 2006 and September 2007, a total of 4,067 captive, resident, and migratory birds comprising 98 species in 23 genera were sampled. The most commonly collected birds were the common sandpiper (6% of total), striated heron (3%), and the domestic chicken (14%). The overall prevalence of H5N1 antibodies was 5.3%. A significantly higher percentage of captive birds (16.1%) showed antibody evidence of H5N1 exposure when compared to migratory or resident birds. The greatest number of seropositive birds in each category were Muschovy duck (captive), striated heron (resident), and the Pacific golden plover (migratory). Seven apparently well captive birds yielded molecular evidence of H5N1 infection. Following amplification, the HA, NA, and M genes were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene showed that the isolates were 97% similar to EU124153.1 A/chicken/West Java/Garut May 2006, an isolate obtained in a similar region of West Java. While no known markers of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance were found within the NA gene, M segment analysis revealed the V27A mutation known to confer resistance to adamantanes. Our results demonstrate moderate serologic evidence of H5N1 infection in captive birds, sampled in five sites in Java, Indonesia, but only occasional infection in resident and migratory birds. These data imply that in an enzoonotic region of Indonesia the role of migratory birds in transmission of H5N1 is limited.

  10. Immunostimulatory motifs enhance antiviral siRNAs targeting highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron R Stewart

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is endemic in many regions around the world and remains a significant pandemic threat. To date H5N1 has claimed almost 300 human lives worldwide, with a mortality rate of 60% and has caused the death or culling of hundreds of millions of poultry since its initial outbreak in 1997. We have designed multi-functional RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics targeting H5N1 that degrade viral mRNA via the RNAi pathway while at the same time augmenting the host antiviral response by inducing host type I interferon (IFN production. Moreover, we have identified two factors critical for maximising the immunostimulatory properties of short interfering (siRNAs in chicken cells (i mode of synthesis and (ii nucleoside sequence to augment the response to virus. The 5-bp nucleoside sequence 5'-UGUGU-3' is a key determinant in inducing high levels of expression of IFN-α, -β, -λ and interleukin 1-β in chicken cells. Positioning of this 5'-UGUGU-3' motif at the 5'-end of the sense strand of siRNAs, but not the 3'-end, resulted in a rapid and enhanced induction of type I IFN. An anti-H5N1 avian influenza siRNA directed against the PB1 gene (PB1-2257 tagged with 5'-UGUGU-3' induced type I IFN earlier and to a greater extent compared to a non-tagged PB1-2257. Tested against H5N1 in vitro, the tagged PB1-2257 was more effective than non-tagged PB1-2257. These data demonstrate the ability of an immunostimulatory motif to improve the performance of an RNAi-based antiviral, a finding that may influence the design of future RNAi-based anti-influenza therapeutics.

  11. Highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N1 virus survival in complex artificial aquatic biotopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viseth Srey Horm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Very little is known regarding the persistence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses in aquatic environments in tropical countries, although environmental materials have been suggested to play a role as reservoirs and sources of transmission for H5N1 viruses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The survival of HPAI H5N1 viruses in experimental aquatic biotopes (water, mud, aquatic flora and fauna relevant to field conditions in Cambodia was investigated. Artificial aquatic biotopes, including simple ones containing only mud and water, and complex biotopes involving the presence of aquatic flora and fauna, were set up. They were experimentally contaminated with H5N1 virus. The persistence of HPAI H5N1 virus (local avian and human isolates was determined by virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs and by real-time reverse-polymerase chain reaction. Persistence of infectious virus did not exceed 4 days, and was only identified in rain water. No infectious virus particles were detected in pond and lake water or mud even when high inoculum doses were used. However, viral RNA persisted up to 20 days in rain water and 7 days in pond or lake water. Viral RNA was also detected in mud samples, up to 14 days post-contamination in several cases. Infectious virus and viral RNA was detected in few cases in the aquatic fauna and flora, especially in bivalves and labyrinth fish, although these organisms seemed to be mostly passive carriers of the virus rather than host allowing virus replication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although several factors for the survival and persistence of HPAI viruses in the environment are still to be elucidated, and are particularly hard to control in laboratory conditions, our results, along with previous data, support the idea that environmental surveillance is of major relevance for avian influenza control programs.

  12. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinh Huu Nguyen

    Full Text Available H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010 and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014, were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010 and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014, which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail.

  13. Public health concerns of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 endemicity in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olubunmi Gabriel Fasanmi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1 was first officially reported in Africa in 2006; thereafter this virus has spread rapidly from Nigeria to 11 other African countries. This study was aimed at utilizing data from confirmed laboratory reports to carry out a qualitative evaluation of the factors responsible for HPAI H5N1 persistence in Africa and the public health implications; and to suggest appropriate control measures. Relevant publications were sought from data banks and repositories of FAO, OIE, WHO, and Google scholars. Substantiated data on HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry in Africa and in humans across the world were mined. HPAI H5N1 affects poultry and human populations, with Egypt having highest human cases (346 globally. Nigeria had a reinfection from 2014 to 2015, with outbreaks in Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Niger, Nigeria, and Burkina Faso throughout 2016 unabated. The persistence of this virus in Africa is attributed to the survivability of HPAIV, ability to evolve other subtypes through genetic reassortment, poor biosecurity compliance at the live bird markets and poultry farms, husbandry methods and multispecies livestock farming, poultry vaccinations, and continuous shedding of HPAIV, transboundary transmission of HPAIV through poultry trades; and transcontinental migratory birds. There is, therefore, the need for African nations to realistically reassess their status, through regular surveillance and be transparent with HPAI H5N1 outbreak data. Also, it is important to have an understanding of HPAIV migration dynamics which will be helpful in epidemiological modeling, disease prevention, control and eradication measures.

  14. Human mesenchymal stromal cells reduce influenza A H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Michael C. W.; Kuok, Denise I. T.; Leung, Connie Y. H.; Hui, Kenrie P. Y.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Nicholls, John M.; Fang, Xiaohui; Guan, Yi; Lee, Jae W.; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Webster, Robert G.; Matthay, Michael A.; Peiris, J. S. Malik

    2016-01-01

    Influenza can cause acute lung injury. Because immune responses often play a role, antivirals may not ensure a successful outcome. To identify pathogenic mechanisms and potential adjunctive therapeutic options, we compared the extent to which avian influenza A/H5N1 virus and seasonal influenza A/H1N1 virus impair alveolar fluid clearance and protein permeability in an in vitro model of acute lung injury, defined the role of virus-induced soluble mediators in these injury effects, and demonstr...

  15. Ecological Determinants of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) Outbreaks in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed S. U.; Ersbøll, Annette K.; Biswas, Paritosh K.; Christensen, Jens P.; Hannan, Abu S. M. A.; Toft, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Background The agro-ecology and poultry husbandry of the south Asian and south-east Asian countries share common features, however, with noticeable differences. Hence, the ecological determinants associated with risk of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI-H5N1) outbreaks are expected to differ between Bangladesh and e.g., Thailand and Vietnam. The primary aim of the current study was to establish ecological determinants associated with the risk of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks at subdistrict level in Bangladesh. The secondary aim was to explore the performance of two different statistical modeling approaches for unmeasured spatially correlated variation. Methodology/Principal Findings An ecological study at subdistrict level in Bangladesh was performed with 138 subdistricts with HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks during 2007–2008, and 326 subdistricts with no outbreaks. The association between ecological determinants and HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks was examined using a generalized linear mixed model. Spatial clustering of the ecological data was modeled using 1) an intrinsic conditional autoregressive (ICAR) model at subdistrict level considering their first order neighbors, and 2) a multilevel (ML) model with subdistricts nested within districts. Ecological determinants significantly associated with risk of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks at subdistrict level were migratory birds' staging areas, river network, household density, literacy rate, poultry density, live bird markets, and highway network. Predictive risk maps were derived based on the resulting models. The resulting models indicate that the ML model absorbed some of the covariate effect of the ICAR model because of the neighbor structure implied in the two different models. Conclusions/Significance The study identified a new set of ecological determinants related to river networks, migratory birds' staging areas and literacy rate in addition to already known risk factors, and clarified that the generalized concept of free grazing duck and

  16. Functional Evolution of Influenza Virus NS1 Protein in Currently Circulating Human 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amelia M; Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-09-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus emerged in humans, causing a global pandemic. It was previously shown that the NS1 protein from this human 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus was an effective interferon (IFN) antagonist but could not inhibit general host gene expression, unlike other NS1 proteins from seasonal human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Here we show that the NS1 protein from currently circulating pH1N1 viruses has evolved to encode 6 amino acid changes (E55K, L90I, I123V, E125D, K131E, and N205S) with respect to the original protein. Notably, these 6 residue changes restore the ability of pH1N1 NS1 to inhibit general host gene expression, mainly by their ability to restore binding to the cellular factor CPSF30. This is the first report describing the ability of the pH1N1 NS1 protein to naturally acquire mutations that restore this function. Importantly, a recombinant pH1N1 virus containing these 6 amino acid changes in the NS1 protein (pH1N1/NSs-6mut) inhibited host IFN and proinflammatory responses to a greater extent than that with the parental virus (pH1N1/NS1-wt), yet virus titers were not significantly increased in cell cultures or in mouse lungs, and the disease was partially attenuated. The pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus grew similarly to pH1N1/NSs-wt in mouse lungs, but infection with pH1N1/NSs-6mut induced lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, likely due to a general inhibition of gene expression mediated by the mutated NS1 protein. This lower level of inflammation induced by the pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus likely accounts for the attenuated disease phenotype and may represent a host-virus adaptation affecting influenza virus pathogenesis.IMPORTANCE Seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) are among the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans. In addition, occasional pandemics are caused when IAVs circulating in other species emerge in the human population. In 2009, a swine-origin H1N1 IAV (pH1N1) was transmitted to humans, infecting people then and up

  17. Ecological determinants of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) outbreaks in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Syed Sayeem Uddin; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Biswas, Paritosh K.

    2012-01-01

    between Bangladesh and e. g., Thailand and Vietnam. The primary aim of the current study was to establish ecological determinants associated with the risk of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks at subdistrict level in Bangladesh. The secondary aim was to explore the performance of two different statistical modeling...... approaches for unmeasured spatially correlated variation. Methodology/Principal Findings: An ecological study at subdistrict level in Bangladesh was performed with 138 subdistricts with HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks during 2007-2008, and 326 subdistricts with no outbreaks. The association between ecological...... to river networks, migratory birds' staging areas and literacy rate in addition to already known risk factors, and clarified that the generalized concept of free grazing duck and duck-rice cultivation interacted ecology are not significant determinants for Bangladesh. These findings will refine current...

  18. Innate immunity to H5N1 influenza viruses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Irene; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2012-12-01

    Avian influenza virus infections in the human population are rare due to their inefficient direct human-to-human transmission. However, when humans are infected, a strong inflammatory response is usually induced, characterized by elevated levels of cytokines and chemokines in serum, believed to be important in the severe pathogenesis that develops in a high proportion of these patients. Extensive research has been performed to understand the molecular viral mechanisms involved in the H5N1 pathogenesis in humans, providing interesting insights about the virus-host interaction and the regulation of the innate immune response by these highly pathogenic viruses. In this review we summarize and discuss the most important findings in this field, focusing mainly on H5N1 virulence factors and their impact on the modulation of the innate immunity in humans.

  19. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbherr, Stefan J; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  20. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

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    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  1. Avian influenza virus (H5N1; effects of physico-chemical factors on its survival

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    Hameed Sajid

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present study was performed to determine the effects of physical and chemical agents on infective potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 (local strain virus recently isolated in Pakistan during 2006 outbreak. H5N1 virus having titer 108.3 ELD50/ml was mixed with sterilized peptone water to get final dilution of 4HA units and then exposed to physical (temperature, pH and ultraviolet light and chemical (formalin, phenol crystals, iodine crystals, CID 20, virkon®-S, zeptin 10%, KEPCIDE 300, KEPCIDE 400, lifebuoy, surf excel and caustic soda agents. Harvested amnio-allantoic fluid (AAF from embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with H5N1 treated virus (0.2 ml/egg was subjected to haemagglutination (HA and haemagglutination inhibition (HI tests. H5N1 virus lost infectivity after 30 min at 56°C, after 1 day at 28°C but remained viable for more than 100 days at 4°C. Acidic pH (1, 3 and basic pH (11, 13 were virucidal after 6 h contact time; however virus retained infectivity at pH 5 (18 h, 7 and 9 (more than 24 h. UV light was proved ineffectual in inactivating virus completely even after 60 min. Soap (lifebuoy®, detergent (surf excel® and alkali (caustic soda destroyed infectivity after 5 min at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% dilution. All commercially available disinfectants inactivated virus at recommended concentrations. Results of present study would be helpful in implementing bio-security measures at farms/hatcheries levels in the wake of avian influenza virus (AIV outbreak.

  2. Avian influenza virus (H5N1); effects of physico-chemical factors on its survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad Akbar; Abubakar, Muhammad; Hameed, Sajid; Hassan, Shamsul

    2009-03-28

    Present study was performed to determine the effects of physical and chemical agents on infective potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 (local strain) virus recently isolated in Pakistan during 2006 outbreak. H5N1 virus having titer 10(8.3) ELD(50)/ml was mixed with sterilized peptone water to get final dilution of 4HA units and then exposed to physical (temperature, pH and ultraviolet light) and chemical (formalin, phenol crystals, iodine crystals, CID 20, virkon-S, zeptin 10%, KEPCIDE 300, KEPCIDE 400, lifebuoy, surf excel and caustic soda) agents. Harvested amnio-allantoic fluid (AAF) from embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with H5N1 treated virus (0.2 ml/egg) was subjected to haemagglutination (HA) and haemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests. H5N1 virus lost infectivity after 30 min at 56 degrees C, after 1 day at 28 degrees C but remained viable for more than 100 days at 4 degrees C. Acidic pH (1, 3) and basic pH (11, 13) were virucidal after 6 h contact time; however virus retained infectivity at pH 5 (18 h), 7 and 9 (more than 24 h). UV light was proved ineffectual in inactivating virus completely even after 60 min. Soap (lifebuoy), detergent (surf excel) and alkali (caustic soda) destroyed infectivity after 5 min at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% dilution. All commercially available disinfectants inactivated virus at recommended concentrations. Results of present study would be helpful in implementing bio-security measures at farms/hatcheries levels in the wake of avian influenza virus (AIV) outbreak.

  3. Amantadine resistance among highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aron; Sood, Richa; Chanu, Kh Victoria; Bhatia, Sandeep; Khandia, Rekha; Pateriya, A K; Nagarajan, S; Dimri, U; Kulkarni, D D

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is the major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Matrix 2 (M2) inhibitors (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the two classes of antiviral agents that are specifically active against influenza viruses and are used for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infections. Amantadine targets the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus and interrupts virus life cycle through blockade of hydrogen ion influx. This prevents uncoating of the virus in infected host cells which impedes the release of ribonucleoprotein required for transcription and replication of virion in the nucleus. The present study was carried out to review the status of amantadine resistance in H5N1 viruses isolated from India and to study their replicative capability. Results of the study revealed resistance to amantadine in antiviral assay among four H5N1 viruses out of which two viruses had Serine 31 Asparagine (AGT-AAT i.e., S31N) mutation and two had Valine 27 Alanine (GTT-GCT i.e., V27A) mutation. The four resistant viruses not only exhibited significant difference in effective concentration 50% (EC50) values of amantadine hydrochloride from that of susceptible viruses (P amantadine could also be demonstrated in a simple HA test after replication of the viruses in MDCK cells in presence of amantadine. The study identifies the correlation between in vitro antiviral assay and presence of established molecular markers of resistance, the retention of replicative capacity in the presence of amantadine hydrochloride by the resistant viruses and the emergence of resistant mutations against amantadine among avian influenza viruses (H5N1) without selective drug pressure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple Introductions of Avian Influenza Viruses (H5N1), Laos, 2009–2010

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    Phommachanh, Phouvong; Naipospos, Tri Satya Putri; McKenzie, Joanna; Chanthavisouk, Chintana; Pathammavong, Som; Darnell, Daniel; Meeduangchanh, Phetlamphone; Rubrum, Adam M.; Souriya, Mahanakhone; Khambounheuang, Bounkhouang; Webby, Richard J.; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Webster, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (H5N1) of clades 2.3.4.1, 2.3.4.2, and 2.3.2.1 were introduced into Laos in 2009–2010. To investigate these viruses, we conducted active surveillance of poultry during March 2010. We detected viruses throughout Laos, including several interclade reassortants and 2 subgroups of clade 2.3.4, one of which caused an outbreak in May 2010. PMID:22710372

  5. Pre-clinical development of cell culture (Vero)-derived H5N1 pandemic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M Keith; Kistner, Otfried; Barrett, P Noel

    2008-05-01

    The rapid spread of avian influenza (H5N1) and its transmission to humans has raised the possibility of an imminent pandemic and concerns over the ability of standard influenza vaccine production methods to supply sufficient amounts of an effective vaccine. We report here on a robust and flexible strategy which uses wild-type virus grown in a continuous cell culture (Vero) system to produce an inactivated whole virus vaccine. Candidate vaccines based on clade 1 and clade 2 influenza H5N1 strains, produced at a variety of manufacturing scales, were demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in animal models without the need for adjuvant. The vaccines induce cross-neutralising antibodies and are protective in a mouse challenge model not only against the homologous virus but against other H5N1 strains, including those from other clades. These data indicate that cell culture-grown, whole virus vaccines, based on the wild-type virus, allow the rapid high-yield production of a candidate pandemic vaccine.

  6. Circulation of avian influenza H5N1 in live bird markets in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwhab, E M; Selim, A A; Arafa, A; Galal, S; Kilany, W H; Hassan, M K; Aly, M M; Hafez, M H

    2010-06-01

    The poultry meat trade in Egypt depends mainly on live bird markets (LBMs) because of insufficient slaughterhouses, lack of marketing infrastructure, and cultural preference for consumption of freshly slaughtered poultry. There are two types of LBMs in Egypt: retail shops and traditional LBMs where minimal, if any, food safety standards or veterinary inspection are implemented. Before January 2009, LBMs were considered to be a missing link in the epidemiology of avian influenza in Egypt. This incited us to initiate this surveillance to better understand the perpetuation of H5N1 and the risk of infection in poultry markets. Seventy-one out of 573 (12.4%) examined LBMs were positive for the H5N1 subtype by real-time--quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) from January to April 2009. Where a 70.4% detection rate from LBMs had waterfowl only as a solitary sold species, a 26.8% detection rate from LBMs had waterfowl mixed with chicken and/or turkey, and 2.8% from LBMs had only turkey. Higher incidence, 40.8%, of positive LBMs was recorded during the cold month of February and concentrated mainly in the highly populated Nile Delta. These findings revealed wide circulation of H5N1 avian influenza virus in LBMs in Egypt, which poses a threat to public health and the poultry industry. Long-term control measures are required, and routine surveillance of bird markets should be conducted year-round.

  7. Influenza A aviária (H5N1: a gripe do frango Avian influenza A (H5N1: the bird flu

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    Cássio da Cunha Ibiapina

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivo rever a literatura sobre o vírus influenza A aviária (H5N1. O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado nos bancos de dados eletrônicos Medline, MD Consult, HighWire, Medscape e Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Literatura Latinoamericana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, e por pesquisa direta, referentes aos últimos dez anos. Foram selecionados 32 artigos originais abordando os surtos recentes de infecção por um subtipo de vírus influenza A aviária, o H5N1, em criações de aves domésticas na Ásia, que resultaram em importantes prejuízos econômicos e repercussões em saúde pública, além de casos de infecção humana de alta letalidade. A maioria dos casos está associada com a exposição direta a aves infectadas ou superfícies contaminadas com excrementos dessas aves, porém foi confirmada a transmissão entre humanos. O período de incubação foi de dois a quatro dias. As manifestações clínicas variaram de infecção assintomática e doença leve do trato respiratório superior a pneumonia grave e falência múltipla de órgãos. A radiografia de tórax pode apresentar infiltrado intersticial bilateral, colapso lobar, consolidação focal e broncograma aéreo sem derrame pleural. A presença de linfopenia indica pior prognóstico. O tratamento de suporte parece ser o único tratamento aceitável. Os fatores de risco para mau prognóstico incluem idade avançada, demora na hospitalização, envolvimento do trato respiratório inferior, baixa contagem de leucócitos totais e linfopenia à admissão. Controlar os surtos em aves domésticas e o contato entre seres humanos e tais aves deve ser a prioridade no manejo da doença em nível de saúde pública, e medidas e conhecimentos acerca da doença devem ser amplamente divulgados.The objective of this study was to review the literature related to avian influenza A (H5N1. The bibliographic research was

  8. Feasibility of single-shot H5N1 influenza vaccine in ferrets, macaques and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldens, J G M; Glansbeek, H L; Hilgers, L A T; Haenen, B; Stittelaar, K J; Osterhaus, A D M E; van den Bosch, J F

    2010-11-29

    The feasibility of a single-shot, low-dose vaccination against pandemic influenza was investigated. The immunogenicity and safety of whole inactivated, cell culture-derived H5N1 virus plus CoVaccine HT™ as adjuvant was tested in various animal species. In ferrets, doses of 4.0 and 7.5 μg H5N1 (NIBRG-14; A/Vietnam/1194/04; clade 1) without adjuvant gave low geometric mean haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres (GMTs) of 21-65 three weeks after intramuscular (IM) injection. The addition of 0.25-4 mg CoVaccine HT™ resulted in GMTs of 255-1470 corresponding with 4-25-fold increases. A second immunization caused GMTs of 8914-23,525 two weeks later, which confirmed strong priming. One out of 8 ferrets injected with antigen alone and 5 out of 32 ferrets injected with adjuvanted H5N1 demonstrated minimal transient, local reactions and two animals immunized with adjuvanted H5N1 exhibited increased body temperature one day after injection. In macaques, 5 μg H5N1 with CoVaccine HT™ or aluminium hydroxide as adjuvant elicited GMTs of 172 and 11, respectively three weeks later. A second immunization resulted in GMTs of 1751 and 123, respectively four weeks later. Analysis of cross-reactivity of antibodies after the first immunization with NIBRG-14 adjuvanted plus CoVaccine HT™ revealed GMTs of 69 against NIBRG-23 (A/turkey/Turkey/1/05; clade 2.2) and 42 against IBCDC-RG-2 (A/Indonesia/5/05-like; clade 2.1.3) while titres with aluminium hydroxide were rabbits. Groups of 6 or 9 male and female animals were immunized IM three times at three week intervals. None of the animals exerted treatment-related adverse reactions during the study or at necropsy 3 or 4 days after treatment. We concluded that a low dose of whole inactivated influenza virus plus CoVaccine HT™ is a promising, single-shot vaccine against pandemic influenza. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Protection level of AI H5N1 vaccine clade 2.1.3 commercial against AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 virus from Ducks to SPF chicken in laboratory conditions

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    Indriani R

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI subtype H5N1 clade 2.3.2 has infected chickens in farms, causing mortality and a decrease in egg production. Vaccination is one of the strategies to control disease of AI subtype H5N1. AI H5N1 clade 2.1.3 vaccine is available commercially. The effectiveness of two vaccines of AI H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (product A and B, and AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 (Sukoharjo against AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 (Sukoharjo virus SPF chickens was tested in laboratory. Four groups of SPF chickens were used in this study, there were (1 vaccinated with H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (product A, (2 vaccinated with H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (product B, (3 vaccinated with AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 and (4 unvaccinated (as a control. Each vaccinated group consisted of 10 chicken except 8 chicken for control group. SPF chicken were vaccinated with 1 dose of vaccine at 3 weeks olds, and then after 3 weeks post vaccination (at 6 weeks olds. All group of chicken were challenged with 106 EID50 per 0.1 ml via intranasal. The results showed, chicken vaccinated with H5N1 clade 2.1.3 product A and B gave 100 and 80% protection respectively, but showed challenged virus shedding, whereas vaccine of H5N1 clade 2.3.2 gave 100% protection from mortality and without virus shedding. Vaccines of AI H5N1 clade 2.1.3 product A was better than vaccine product B, and when chicken vaccinated against H5N1 clade 2.3.2, H5N1 clade 2.3.2 vaccine was the best to be used. In order to protect chicken from AI subtype H5N1 clade 2.1.3 and 2.3.2 in the field, a bivalent vaccine of H5N1 clade 2.1.3 and 2.3.2 subtypes should be developed.

  10. Characterization of the amantadine-resistant H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza variants isolated from quails in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoying; Luo, Jing; Zhou, Kai; Wu, Bin; Peng, Chao; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2014-10-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have spread in poultry and wild birds in Asia, Europe, and Africa since 2003. To evaluate the role of quails in the evolution of influenza A virus, we characterized three H5N1 viruses isolated from quails (QA viruses) in southern China. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three QA viruses derived from the A/goose/Guangdong/1/96-like lineage and most closely related to HA clade 4 A/chicken/Hong Kong/31.4/02-like viruses. Molecular analysis suggested that QA viruses and clade 4 H5N1 viruses carried consistent residue signatures, such as the characteristic M2 Ser31Asn amantadine-resistance mutation, implying a common origin of these viruses. As revealed by viral pathogenicity tests, these QA viruses could replicate in intranasally infected mice, but were not lethal to them, showing low pathogenicity in mammals. However, they killed all intravenously inoculated chickens, showing high pathogenicity in poultry. Results from amantadine sensitivity tests of wild-type QA viruses and their reverse genetic viruses demonstrated that all QA viruses were resistant to amantadine, and the M2 Ser31Asn mutation was determined as the most likely cause of the increased amantadine-resistance of H5N1 QA viruses. Our study confirmed experimentally that the amino acid at residue 31 in the M2 protein plays a major role in determining the amantadine-resistance phenotype of H5N1 influenza viruses. Our findings provide further evidence that quails may play important roles in the evolution of influenza A viruses, which raises concerns over possible transmissions of H5N1 viruses among poultry, wild birds, and humans.

  11. Human parvovirus B19 nonstructural protein NS1 activates NLRP3 inflammasome signaling in adult‑onset Still's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Gung, Ning-Rong; Hung, Wei-Ting; Tzang, Bor-Show; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2018-02-01

    Dysregulation of inflammasomes serves a pathogenic role in autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs) and adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has been categorized as an AID. The present study investigated the expression of NLR family pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRPs) inflammasome in patients with AOSD, the effect of inflammasome inhibitors on NLRP3 signaling and whether human parvovirus B19‑associated antigens can activate NLRP3 in patients with AOSD. mRNA expression levels of NLRPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 34 patients with AOSD and 14 healthy individuals were determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression of NLRP3 was evaluated by western blotting. Supernatant cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. Among the NLRPs investigated in the present study, NLRP3 transcripts were markedly elevated and expression of NLRP2, NLRP7 and NLRP12 was decreased in patients with AOSD compared with the controls. Treatment with NLRP3 inhibitors significantly reduced downstream NLRP3 signaling in PBMCs form patients with AOSD. B19‑nonstructural protein (NS)1 stimulation of PBMCs from patients with AOSD induced significant upregulation of transcript levels of NLRP3, caspase‑1 and interleukin (IL)‑1β compared with PBMCs from healthy controls. B19‑NS1 stimulation of PBMCs from patients with AOSD induced significant increase in supernatant levels of IL‑1β and protein expression of NLRP3, caspase‑1, IL‑1β, and IL‑18 compared with healthy controls. Elevated expression of NLRP3 and its downstream inflammasome signaling components in patients with AOSD indicated a potential pathogenic role of B19‑NS1. Thus, B19‑NS1 may induce expression of IL‑1β and IL‑18 through activation of caspase‑1‑associated NLRP3‑inflammasome in AOSD.

  12. SEROLOGI DAN VIROLOGI VIRUS AVIAN INFLUENZA H5N1 PADA KUCING JALANAN DI KOTA BOGOR

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    Sri Murtini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is a known pathogen in birds. Recently, the virus has been reported to cause sporadic fatal disease in tigers, leopards, and other exotic felids as well as domestic cats in Thailand. The present study was carried out to investigate the presence of AI H5N1 virus infection in stray cats roaming around residential, traditional and chicken farms in Bogor, West Java. Ninety serum samples were tested using HI test to screened for the presence of antibody to AI H5N1. Virus isolation was done in SPF embrionated chicken eggs and identify using HI, AGP and RT-PCR. The results showed that 18,9% of stray cats developed antibodies against H5 with geometric mean titre 23,1 . Stray cats lived in traditional markets 18–40% developed antibodies in the titre ranging from 22,8 to 24,5. Only two out of nine stray cats which lived in chicken farm developed low antibody titres again H5 (21. None of the stray cats lived in residencial area have developed antibodies against H5. This study revealed that stray cats have been contact with AI H5. Avian influenza H5 viruses were isolated in eight out of 33 pooled of rectal swab samples. The viral cleavage site sequences are CCTCAAAGAGAGAGC AGAAGAAAGAAGAGAGGT which represent amino acid sequences of PQRESRRKKRG. Based on the cleavage site sequence, the isolates are similar with the AI H5 virus subtype isolated from human in Indonesia during 2005–2007

  13. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1: pathways of exposure at the animal-human interface, a systematic review.

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    Maria D Van Kerkhove

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threat posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses to humans remains significant, given the continued occurrence of sporadic human cases (499 human cases in 15 countries with a high case fatality rate (approximately 60%, the endemicity in poultry populations in several countries, and the potential for reassortment with the newly emerging 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. Therefore, we review risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated the risk factors associated with increased risk of H5N1 infection among humans who were exposed to H5N1 viruses. Our review shows that most H5N1 cases are attributed to exposure to sick poultry. Most cases are sporadic, while occasional limited human-to-human transmission occurs. The most commonly identified factors associated with H5N1 virus infection included exposure through contact with infected blood or bodily fluids of infected poultry via food preparation practices; touching and caring for infected poultry; [corrected] exposure to H5N1 via swimming or bathing in potentially virus laden ponds; and exposure to H5N1 at live bird markets. CONCLUSIONS: Research has demonstrated that despite frequent and widespread contact with poultry, transmission of the H5N1 virus from poultry to humans is rare. Available research has identified several risk factors that may be associated with infection including close direct contact with poultry and transmission via the environment. However, several important data gaps remain that limit our understanding of the epidemiology of H5N1 in humans. Although infection in humans with H5N1 remains rare, human cases continue to be reported and H5N1 is now considered endemic among poultry in parts of Asia and in Egypt, providing opportunities for additional human infections and for the acquisition of virus mutations that may lead to more efficient spread among humans and other mammalian species

  14. Kecenderungan Objektivitas Pemberitaan Epidemi Virus H5N1 dalam International Herald Tribune Online

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    Birgitta Bestari Puspita

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Newspapers have to be objective in representing the news to the audience. This research wanted to measure the objectivity’s tendency of the news about H5N1 virus, which attacked Indonesia in year 2003. The news’ objectivities on International Herald Tribune from January 2005 until December 2006 were being measured with the Westerstahl’s Objectivity’s Principle and content analysis as the method. There are 2 dimensions in Westerstahl’s Objectivity’s Principle. First is factuality, which consists of truth and relevance, and the second one is impartiality which consists of balance and neutral presentation.  Abstrak: Surat kabar harus obyektif dalam menyajikan berita kepada audiens. Riset ini ingin mengukur kecenderungan obyektivitas berita tentang virus H5N1 yang melanda Indonesia pada tahun 2003. Obyektivitas berita diukur berdasar prinsip-prinsip obyektivitas Westerstahl dan menggunakan metode analisis isi. Ada dua dimensi dalam prinsip-prinsip obyektivitas Westerstahl. Pertama adalah faktualitas yang terdiri dari kebenaran dan relevansi, dan yang kedua adalah imparsialitas yang terdiri dari keseimbangan dan penyajian yang netral.

  15. Metapopulation dynamics enable persistence of influenza A, including A/H5N1, in poultry.

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    Parviez Rana Hosseini

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic influenza A/H5N1 has persistently but sporadically caused human illness and death since 1997. Yet it is still unclear how this pathogen is able to persist globally. While wild birds seem to be a genetic reservoir for influenza A, they do not seem to be the main source of human illness. Here, we highlight the role that domestic poultry may play in maintaining A/H5N1 globally, using theoretical models of spatial population structure in poultry populations. We find that a metapopulation of moderately sized poultry flocks can sustain the pathogen in a finite poultry population for over two years. Our results suggest that it is possible that moderately intensive backyard farms could sustain the pathogen indefinitely in real systems. This fits a pattern that has been observed from many empirical systems. Rather than just employing standard culling procedures to control the disease, our model suggests ways that poultry production systems may be modified.

  16. Avian Influenza H5N1 and the Wild Bird Trade in Hanoi, Vietnam

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    F. Brooks-Moizer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife trade and emerging infectious diseases pose significant threats to human and animal health and global biodiversity. Legal and illegal trade in domestic and wild birds has played a significant role in the global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, which has killed more than 240 people, many millions of poultry, and an unknown number of wild birds and mammals, including endangered species, since 2003. This 2007 study provides evidence for a significant decline in the scale of the wild bird trade in Hanoi since previous surveys in 2000 (39.7% decline and 2003 (74.1% decline. We attribute this to the enforcement of Vietnam's Law 169/2005/QD UBND, introduced in 2005, which prohibits the movement and sale of wild and ornamental birds in cities. Nevertheless, 91.3% (21/23 of bird vendors perceived no risk of H5N1 infection from their birds, and the trade continues, albeit at reduced levels, in open market shops. These findings highlight the importance of continued law enforcement to maintain this trade reduction and the associated benefits to human and animal health and biodiversity conservation.

  17. A rapid Flp-In system for expression of secreted H5N1 influenza hemagglutinin vaccine immunogen in mammalian cells.

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    Hanxin Lu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuing transmissions of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses in poultry and humans underscores the need for a rapid response to potential pandemic in the form of vaccine. Recombinant technologies for production of immunogenic hemagglutinin (HA could provide an advantage over the traditional inactivated vaccine manufacturing process. Generation of stably transfected mammalian cells secreting properly folded HA proteins is important for scalable controlled manufacturing.We have developed a Flp-In based 293 stable cell lines through targeted site-specific recombination for expression of secreted hemagglutinin (HA proteins and evaluated their immunogenicity. H5N1 globular domain HA1(1-330 and HA0(1-500 proteins were purified from the supernatants of 293 Flp-In stable cell lines. Both proteins were properly folded as confirmed by binding to H5N1-neutralizing conformation-dependent human monoclonal antibodies. The HA0 (with unmodified cleavage site was monomeric, while the HA1 contained oligomeric forms. Upon rabbit immunization, both HA proteins elicited neutralizing antibodies against the homologous virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004, clade 1 as well as cross-neutralizing antibodies against heterologous H5N1 clade 2 strains, including A/Indonesia/5/2005. These results exceeded the human antibody responses against the inactivated sub-virion H5N1 vaccine.Our data suggest that the 293 Flp-In system could serve as a platform for rapid expression of HA immunogens in mammalian cells from emerging influenza strains.

  18. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus inf...

  19. Risk Factors Associated with Subclinical Human Infection with Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus—Cambodia, 2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirenda Vong; Sowath Ly; Maria D. Van Kerkhove; Jenna Achenbach; Davun Holl; Philippe Buchy; San Sorn; Heng Seng; Timothy M. Uyeki; Touch Sok; Jacqueline M. Katz

    2009-01-01

    Background. We conducted investigations in 2 villages in Cambodia where outbreaks of influenza H5N1 occurred among humans and poultry to determine the frequency of and risk factors for H5N1 virus transmission. Methods. During May 2006...

  20. Unusually High Mortality in Waterfowl Caused by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Najmul; Sturm-Ramirez, K.; Khan, S. U.

    2017-01-01

    Mortality in ducks and geese caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) infection had not been previously identified in Bangladesh. In June-July 2011, we investigated mortality in ducks, geese and chickens with suspected H5N1 infection in a north-eastern district of the country to identify...

  1. Spatio-temporal magnitude and direction of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) outbreaks in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Syed Sayeem Uddin; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Biswas, Paritosh K.

    2011-01-01

    The number of outbreaks of HPAI-H5N1 reported by Bangladesh from 2007 through 2011 placed the country among the highest reported numbers worldwide. However, so far, the understanding of the epidemic progression, direction, intensity, persistence and risk variation of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks over space...... and time in Bangladesh remains limited....

  2. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reperant, Leslie A; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Amerongen, Geert; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Watson, Simon; Palser, Anne; Kellam, Paul; Eissens, Anko C; Frijlink, Hendrik W; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Frijlink, Henderik

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknown. To assess

  3. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection--influence on receptor binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S.; Childs, Robert A.; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A.; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J.; Martin, Stephen R.; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J.; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S.; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J.; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J.; Hay, Alan J.; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.; Feizi, Ten

    2013-01-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of

  4. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); S. Watson (Sarah)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely

  5. Cross-protection against lethal H5N1 challenge ferrets with an adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Baras (Benoît); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); J.H. Simon (James); R.J.M.M. Thoolen (Robert); S.P. Mossman (Sally); F.H. Pistoor (Frank); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.A. Wettendorff (Martine); E. Hanon (Emmanuel); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Unprecedented spread between birds and mammals of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAI) of the H5N1 subtype has resulted in hundreds of human infections with a high fatality rate. This has highlighted the urgent need for the development of H5N1 vaccines that can be

  6. Avian Influenza a (H5N1 Infection with Respiratory Failure and Meningoencephalitis in a Canadian Traveller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Rajabali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an urban centre in Alberta, an otherwise healthy 28-year-old woman presented to hospital with pleuritic chest and abdominal pain after returning from Beijing, China. After several days, this was followed by headache, confusion and, ultimately, respiratory failure, coma and death. Microbiology yielded influenza A subtype H5N1 from various body sites and neuroimaging was consistent with meningoencephalitis. While H5N1 infections in humans have been reported in Asia since 1997, this is the first documented case of H5N1 influenza in the Western Hemisphere. The present case demonstrated the typical manifestation of H5N1 influenza but, for the first time, also confirmed previous suggestions from human and animal studies that H5N1 is neurotropic and can manifest with neurological symptoms and meningoencephalitis.

  7. The special neuraminidase stalk-motif responsible for increased virulence and pathogenesis of H5N1 influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Zhou

    Full Text Available The variation of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in gradually increased virulence in poultry, and human cases continue to accumulate. The neuraminidase (NA stalk region of influenza virus varies considerably and may associate with its virulence. The NA stalk region of all N1 subtype influenza A viruses can be divided into six different stalk-motifs, H5N1/2004-like (NA-wt, WSN-like, H5N1/97-like, PR/8-like, H7N1/99-like and H5N1/96-like. The NA-wt is a special NA stalk-motif which was first observed in H5N1 influenza virus in 2000, with a 20-amino acid deletion in the 49(th to 68(th positions of the stalk region. Here we show that there is a gradual increase of the special NA stalk-motif in H5N1 isolates from 2000 to 2007, and notably, the special stalk-motif is observed in all 173 H5N1 human isolates from 2004 to 2007. The recombinant H5N1 virus with the special stalk-motif possesses the highest virulence and pathogenicity in chicken and mice, while the recombinant viruses with the other stalk-motifs display attenuated phenotype. This indicates that the special stalk-motif has contributed to the high virulence and pathogenicity of H5N1 isolates since 2000. The gradually increasing emergence of the special NA stalk-motif in H5N1 isolates, especially in human isolates, deserves attention by all.

  8. Kinetic Characterization of PB1-F2-Mediated Immunopathology during Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymarie, Olivier; Jouvion, Grégory; Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Chevalier, Christophe; Lorin, Valérie; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Da Costa, Bruno; Delmas, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The PB1-F2 protein encoded by influenza A viruses can contribute to virulence, a feature that is dependent of its sequence polymorphism. Whereas PB1-F2 from some H1N1 viruses were shown to exacerbate the inflammatory response within the airways, the contribution of PB1-F2 to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) virulence in mammals remains poorly described. Using a H5N1 HPAIV strain isolated from duck and its PB1-F2 knocked-out mutant, we characterized the dynamics of PB1-F2-associated host response in a murine model of lethal pneumonia. The mean time of death was 10 days for the two viruses, allowing us to perform global transcriptomic analyses and detailed histological investigations of the infected lungs at multiple time points. At day 2 post-infection (pi), while no histopathological lesion was observed, PB1-F2 expression resulted in a significant inhibition of cellular pathways involved in macrophage activation and in a transcriptomic signature suggesting that it promotes damage to the epithelial barrier. At day 4 pi, the gene profile associated with PB1-F2 expression revealed dysfunctions in NK cells activity. At day 8 pi, PB1-F2 expression was strongly associated with increased transcription of genes encoding chemokines and cytokines implicated in the recruitment of granulocytes, as well as expression of a number of genes encoding enzymes expressed by neutrophils. These transcriptomic data were fully supported by the histopathological analysis of the mice lungs which evidenced more severe inflammatory lesions and enhanced recruitment of neutrophils in the context of PB1-F2 expression, and thus provided a functional corroboration to the insight obtained in this work. In summary, our study shows that PB1-F2 of H5N1 HPAIV markedly influences the expression of the host transcriptome in a different way than its H1N1 counterparts: H5N1 PB1-F2 first delays the initial immune response but increases the pulmonary inflammatory response during the late

  9. Vectors based on modified vaccinia Ankara expressing influenza H5N1 hemagglutinin induce substantial cross-clade protective immunity.

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    Annett Hessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses are continuing to evolve with a potential threat for an influenza pandemic. So far, the H5N1 influenza viruses have not widely circulated in humans and therefore constitute a high risk for the non immune population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-protective potential of the hemagglutinins of five H5N1 strains of divergent clades using a live attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vector vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The replication-deficient MVA virus was used to express influenza hemagglutinin (HA proteins. Specifically, recombinant MVA viruses expressing the HA genes of the clade 1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN/1203, the clade 2.1.3 virus A/Indonesia/5/2005 (IN5/05, the clade 2.2 viruses A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 (TT01/05 and A/chicken/Egypt/3/2006 (CE/06, and the clade 2.3.4 virus A/Anhui/1/2005 (AH1/05 were constructed. These experimental live vaccines were assessed in a lethal mouse model. Mice vaccinated with the VN/1203 hemagglutinin-expressing MVA induced excellent protection against all the above mentioned clades. Also mice vaccinated with the IN5/05 HA expressing MVA induced substantial protection against homologous and heterologous AH1/05 challenge. After vaccination with the CE/06 HA expressing MVA, mice were fully protected against clade 2.2 challenge and partially protected against challenge of other clades. Mice vaccinated with AH1/05 HA expressing MVA vectors were only partially protected against homologous and heterologous challenge. The live vaccines induced substantial amounts of neutralizing antibodies, mainly directed against the homologous challenge virus, and high levels of HA-specific IFN-γ secreting CD4 and CD8 T-cells against epitopes conserved among the H5 clades and subclades. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The highest level of cross-protection was induced by the HA derived from the VN/1203 strain, suggesting that pandemic H5 vaccines

  10. Improvement of H5N1 influenza vaccine viruses: influence of internal gene segments of avian and human origin on production and hemagglutinin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Marion; de Jonge, Jørgen; Laue, Michael; Wolff, Thorsten

    2011-07-18

    The H5N1-clade 1 influenza vaccine strain NIBRG-14 produces exceptionally low amounts of antigen, a problem recently encountered also for initial pandemic H1N1-2009 vaccine seeds. Here, we report on a strategy that may contribute to overcome this obstacle. Influenza vaccine viruses usually consist of two segments coding for the antigenic HA and NA proteins of a wild-type strain and the six residual internal gene segments of the vaccine donor strain A/PR/8/34 (PR8). To enhance the antigen yield from H5N1 vaccine virus we generated by reverse genetics a set of PR8-based reassortant viruses expressing the HA and NA segments of the prototypic strain A/Vietnam/1203/2004 and additional replacements of the internal M or PB1 genes of PR8. The reassortants were compared to the parental PR8 and H5N1 viruses in terms of growth in embryonated chicken eggs and the amount of incorporated antigenic HA protein. Compared to NIBRG-14, three out of six viruses displayed an increased replication in embryonated chicken eggs and higher HA content that was also maintained after ether/detergent extraction of virions. Electron microscopic analysis showed that the reassortment hardly affected particle shape and size. Two selected H5N1 reassortant viruses were investigated concerning their pathogenicity in ferrets and found to behave as low pathogenic as the PR8 donor strain. In conclusion, this study shows that replication and antigen content of PR8-derived H5N1 influenza vaccine viruses can be improved by incorporation of heterologous internal gene segments without compromising their attenuated character. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  12. Spatial distribution and risk factors of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Martin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 was first encountered in 1996 in Guangdong province (China and started spreading throughout Asia and the western Palearctic in 2004-2006. Compared to several other countries where the HPAI H5N1 distribution has been studied in some detail, little is known about the environmental correlates of the HPAI H5N1 distribution in China. HPAI H5N1 clinical disease outbreaks, and HPAI virus (HPAIV H5N1 isolated from active risk-based surveillance sampling of domestic poultry (referred to as HPAIV H5N1 surveillance positives in this manuscript were modeled separately using seven risk variables: chicken, domestic waterfowl population density, proportion of land covered by rice or surface water, cropping intensity, elevation, and human population density. We used bootstrapped logistic regression and boosted regression trees (BRT with cross-validation to identify the weight of each variable, to assess the predictive power of the models, and to map the distribution of HPAI H5N1 risk. HPAI H5N1 clinical disease outbreak occurrence in domestic poultry was mainly associated with chicken density, human population density, and elevation. In contrast, HPAIV H5N1 infection identified by risk-based surveillance was associated with domestic waterfowl density, human population density, and the proportion of land covered by surface water. Both models had a high explanatory power (mean AUC ranging from 0.864 to 0.967. The map of HPAIV H5N1 risk distribution based on active surveillance data emphasized areas south of the Yangtze River, while the distribution of reported outbreak risk extended further North, where the density of poultry and humans is higher. We quantified the statistical association between HPAI H5N1 outbreak, HPAIV distribution and post-vaccination levels of seropositivity (percentage of effective post-vaccination seroconversion in vaccinated birds and found that provinces with either outbreaks or HPAIV H5N1

  13. Smartphone-Based Fluorescent Diagnostic System for Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seon-Ju; Choi, Kyunghan; Cuc, Bui Thi; Hong, Nguyen Ngoc; Bao, Duong Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Le, Mai Quynh; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Thach, Nguyen Co; Mallik, Shyam Kumar; Kim, Hak Sung; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Choi, Hak Soo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yu, Kyoungsik; Park, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Field diagnostic tools for avian influenza (AI) are indispensable for the prevention and controlled management of highly pathogenic AI-related diseases. More accurate, faster and networked on-site monitoring is demanded to detect such AI viruses with high sensitivity as well as to maintain up-to-date information about their geographical transmission. In this work, we assessed the clinical and field-level performance of a smartphone-based fluorescent diagnostic device with an efficient reflective light collection module using a coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay. By application of an optimized bioconjugate, a smartphone-based diagnostic device had a two-fold higher detectability as compared to that of the table-top fluorescence strip reader for three different AI subtypes (H5N3, H7N1, and H9N2). Additionally, in a clinical study of H5N1-confirmed patients, the smartphone-based diagnostic device showed a sensitivity of 96.55% (28/29) [95% confidence interval (CI): 82.24 to 99.91] and a specificity of 98.55% (68/69) (95% CI: 92.19 to 99.96). The measurement results from the distributed individual smartphones were wirelessly transmitted via short messaging service and collected by a centralized database system for further information processing and data mining. Smartphone-based diagnosis provided highly sensitive measurement results for H5N1 detection within 15 minutes. Because of its high sensitivity, portability and automatic reporting feature, the proposed device will enable agile identification of patients and efficient control of AI dissemination. PMID:26877781

  14. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification.

  15. [Engineering by reverse genetics and characterization of the new reassortant influenza virus strain H5N1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeberezhnyĭ, A D; Grebennikova, T V; Vorkunova, G K; Yuzhakov, A G; Kostina, L V; Norkina, S N; Aliper, T I; Nepoklonov, E A; Lvov, D K

    2014-01-01

    Reverse genetics was applied to engineering of the reassortantvaccine candidate strain against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of the H5 subtype. The new strain recPR8-H5N1 contains the HA gene from the Russian HPAIV A/Kurgan/05/2005 (H5N1), the NA and internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). The strain recPR8-H5N1 demonstrated the antigenic specificity (H5), high proliferation rate in 12 days chicken embryos, and was lethal for the embryos in 36 hours. An inactivated emulsified vaccine based on the strain recPR8-H5N1 elicited high antibody titers and protected 6-week-old chickens from lethal challenge with the HPAIV A/Kurgan/05/2005 (H5N1) on day 21 after single immunization. Infection of non-vaccinated birds with the strain recPR8-H5N1 did not cause any pathology, and the virus was not detected using PCR in blood and cloacal swabs on day 7 p.i. Specific weak seroconversion caused by infection with the strain recPR8-H5N1 was detected on day 14 p.i. As a result, a new influenza virus strain was obtained with modified properties.

  16. Describing the hexapeptide identity platform between the influenza A H5N1 and Homo sapiens proteomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Kanduc

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Darja KanducDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bari, ItalyAbstract: We searched the primary sequence of influenza A H5N1 polyprotein for hexamer amino acid sequences shared with human proteins using the Protein International Resource database and the exact peptide matching analysis program. We find that the viral polyprotein shares numerous hexapeptides with the human proteome. The human proteins involved in the viral overlap are represented by antigens associated with basic cell functions such as proliferation, development, and differentiation. Of special importance, many human proteins that share peptide sequences with influenza A polyprotein are antigens such as reelin, neurexin I-a, myosin-IXa, Bardet–Biedl syndrome 10 protein, Williams syndrome transcription factor, disrupted in schizophrenia 1 protein, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 chromosomal region candidate gene 17 protein, fragile X mental retardation 2 protein, and jouberin. That is, the viral-vs-human overlap involves human proteins that, when altered, have been reported to be potentially associated with multiple neurological disorders that can include autism, epilepsy, obesity, dystonia, ataxia–telangiectasia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sensorineural deafness, sudden infant death syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and myelination. The present data are discussed as a possible molecular basis for understanding influenza A viral escape from immunosurveillance and for defining anti-influenza immune-therapeutic approaches devoid of collateral adverse events.Keywords: peptide sharing, neurological disorders, host-pathogen relationships, viral escape from immunosurveillance

  17. A model to control the epidemic of H5N1 influenza at the source

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    Li KS

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No country is fully prepared for a 1918-like pandemic influenza. Averting a pandemic of H5N1 influenza virus depends on the successful control of its endemicity, outbreaks in poultry and occasional spillage into human which carries a case-fatality rate of over 50%. The use of perimetric depopulation and vaccination has failed to halt the spread of the epidemic. Blanket vaccination for all poultry over a large geographical area is difficult. A combination of moratorium, segregation of water fowls from chickens and vaccination have been proved to be effective in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR since 2002 despite endemicity and outbreaks in neighbouring regions. Systematic surveillance in southern China showed that ducks and geese are the primary reservoirs which transmit the virus to chickens, minor poultry and even migratory birds. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesize that this combination of moratorium, poultry segregation and targeted vaccination if successfully adapted to an affected district or province in any geographical region with high endemicity would set an example for the control in other regions. Testing the hypothesis A planned one-off moratorium of 3 weeks at the hottest month of the year should decrease the environmental burden as a source of re-infection. Backyard farms will then be re-populated by hatchlings from virus-free chickens and minor poultry only. Targeted immunization of the ducks and geese present only in the industrial farms and also the chickens would be strictly implemented as blanket immunization of all backyard poultry is almost impossible. Freely grazing ducks and geese would not be allowed until neutralizing antibodies of H5 subtype virus is achieved. As a proof of concept, a simple mathematical model with susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR structure of coupled epidemics between aquatic birds (mainly ducks and geese and chickens was used to estimate

  18. A model to control the epidemic of H5N1 influenza at the source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y; Chen, H; Li, Ks; Riley, S; Leung, Gm; Webster, R; Peiris, Jsm; Yuen, Ky

    2007-11-13

    No country is fully prepared for a 1918-like pandemic influenza. Averting a pandemic of H5N1 influenza virus depends on the successful control of its endemicity, outbreaks in poultry and occasional spillage into human which carries a case-fatality rate of over 50%. The use of perimetric depopulation and vaccination has failed to halt the spread of the epidemic. Blanket vaccination for all poultry over a large geographical area is difficult. A combination of moratorium, segregation of water fowls from chickens and vaccination have been proved to be effective in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) since 2002 despite endemicity and outbreaks in neighbouring regions. Systematic surveillance in southern China showed that ducks and geese are the primary reservoirs which transmit the virus to chickens, minor poultry and even migratory birds. We hypothesize that this combination of moratorium, poultry segregation and targeted vaccination if successfully adapted to an affected district or province in any geographical region with high endemicity would set an example for the control in other regions. A planned one-off moratorium of 3 weeks at the hottest month of the year should decrease the environmental burden as a source of re-infection. Backyard farms will then be re-populated by hatchlings from virus-free chickens and minor poultry only. Targeted immunization of the ducks and geese present only in the industrial farms and also the chickens would be strictly implemented as blanket immunization of all backyard poultry is almost impossible. Freely grazing ducks and geese would not be allowed until neutralizing antibodies of H5 subtype virus is achieved. As a proof of concept, a simple mathematical model with susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) structure of coupled epidemics between aquatic birds (mainly ducks and geese) and chickens was used to estimate transmissibility within and between these two poultry populations. In the field the hypothesis is tested

  19. Progress toward a universal H5N1 vaccine: a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-expressing trivalent hemagglutinin vaccine.

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    Mookkan Prabakaran

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of new sublineages of H5N1 influenza poses the greatest challenge in control of H5N1 infection by currently existing vaccines. To overcome this, an MVAtor vector expressing three H5HA antigens A/Vietnam/1203/04, A/Indonesia/669/06 and A/Anhui/01/05 (MVAtor-tri-HA vector was developed to elicit broad cross-protection against diverse clades by covering amino acid variations in the major neutralizing epitopes of HA among H5N1 subtypes.BALB/c mice and guinea pigs were immunized i.m. with 8×107 TCID50/animal of MVAtor-tri-HA vector. The immunogenicity and cross-protective immunity of the MVAtor-tri-HA vector was evaluated against diverse clades of H5N1 strains.The results showed that mice immunized with MVAtor-tri-HA vector induced robust cross-neutralizing immunity to diverse H5N1 clades. In addition, the MVAtor-tri-HA vector completely protected against 10 MLD50 of a divergent clade of H5N1 infection (clade 7. Importantly, the serological surveillance of post-vaccinated guinea pig sera demonstrated that MVAtor-tri-HA vector was able to elicit strong cross-clade neutralizing immunity against twenty different H5N1 strains from six clades that emerged between 1997 and 2012.The present findings revealed that incorporation of carefully selected HA genes from divergent H5N1 strains within a single vector could be an effective approach in developing a vaccine with broad coverage to prevent infection during a pandemic situation.

  20. Clinical characteristics of 26 human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 virus infection in China.

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    Hongjie Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 virus infection continue to increase globally, available clinical data on H5N1 cases are limited. We conducted a retrospective study of 26 confirmed human H5N1 cases identified through surveillance in China from October 2005 through April 2008. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data were collected from hospital medical records of H5N1 cases and analyzed. The median age was 29 years (range 6-62 and 58% were female. Many H5N1 cases reported fever (92% and cough (58% at illness onset, and had lower respiratory findings of tachypnea and dyspnea at admission. All cases progressed rapidly to bilateral pneumonia. Clinical complications included acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, 81%, cardiac failure (50%, elevated aminotransaminases (43%, and renal dysfunction (17%. Fatal cases had a lower median nadir platelet count (64.5 x 10(9 cells/L vs 93.0 x 10(9 cells/L, p = 0.02, higher median peak lactic dehydrogenase (LDH level (1982.5 U/L vs 1230.0 U/L, p = 0.001, higher percentage of ARDS (94% [n = 16] vs 56% [n = 5], p = 0.034 and more frequent cardiac failure (71% [n = 12] vs 11% [n = 1], p = 0.011 than nonfatal cases. A higher proportion of patients who received antiviral drugs survived compared to untreated (67% [8/12] vs 7% [1/14], p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clinical course of Chinese H5N1 cases is characterized by fever and cough initially, with rapid progression to lower respiratory disease. Decreased platelet count, elevated LDH level, ARDS and cardiac failure were associated with fatal outcomes. Clinical management of H5N1 cases should be standardized in China to include early antiviral treatment for suspected H5N1 cases.

  1. Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Domestic Green-Winged Teal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chaochao; Liu, Qian; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-08-15

    An avian influenza virus strain, A/domestic green-winged teal/Hunan/3450/2006(H5N1) (DGW-T3450), was isolated from domestic green-winged teals. Genome analysis demonstrated that DGW-T3450 is a novel reassortant strain. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of this strain originated from H5N1 viruses circulating in poultry, while its remaining genes are derived from multiple ancestors, including viruses like those that infect wild birds.

  2. Avian influenza (H5N1 virus of clade 2.3.2 in domestic poultry in India.

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    Shanmuga Nagarajan

    Full Text Available South Asia has experienced regular outbreaks of H5N1 avian influenza virus since its first detection in India and Pakistan in February, 2006. Till 2009, the outbreaks in this region were due to clade 2.2 H5N1 virus. In 2010, Nepal reported the first outbreak of clade 2.3.2 virus in South Asia. In February 2011, two outbreaks of H5N1 virus were reported in the State of Tripura in India. The antigenic and genetic analyses of seven H5N1 viruses isolated during these outbreaks were carried out. Antigenic analysis confirmed 64 to 256-fold reduction in cross reactivity compared with clade 2.2 viruses. The intravenous pathogenicity index of the isolates ranged from 2.80-2.95 indicating high pathogenicity to chickens. Sequencing of all the eight gene-segments of seven H5N1 viruses isolated in these outbreaks was carried out. The predicted amino acid sequence analysis revealed high pathogenicity to chickens and susceptibility to the antivirals, amantadine and oseltamivir. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these viruses belong to clade 2.3.2.1 and were distinct to the clade 2.3.2.1 viruses isolated in Nepal. Identification of new clade 2.3.2 H5N1 viruses in South Asia is reminiscent of the introduction of clade 2.2 viruses in this region in 2006/7. It is now important to monitor whether the clade 2.3.2.1 is replacing clade 2.2 in this region or co-circulating with it. Continued co-circulation of various subclades of the H5N1 virus which are more adapted to land based poultry in a highly populated region such as South Asia increases the risk of evolution of pandemic H5N1 strains.

  3. Genetic Characterization of Clade 2.3.2.1 Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses, Indonesia, 2012

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    Hartawan, Risza; Pudjiatmoko; Wibawa, Hendra; Hardiman; Balish, Amanda; Donis, Ruben; Davis, C. Todd; Samaan, Gina

    2014-01-01

    After reports of unusually high mortality rates among ducks on farms in Java Island, Indonesia, in September 2012, influenza A(H5N1) viruses were detected and characterized. Sequence analyses revealed all genes clustered with contemporary clade 2.3.2.1 viruses, rather than enzootic clade 2.1.3 viruses, indicating the introduction of an exotic H5N1 clade into Indonesia. PMID:24656213

  4. A targeted investigation to demonstrate the freedom of West Timor from HPAI H5N1.

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    Bulu, Petrus Malo; Robertson, Ian D; Geong, Maria

    2018-02-01

    In early 2004 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus caused major outbreaks of disease in poultry in Indonesia. The disease was first reported in West Timor in eastern Indonesia in the same year, resulting in the death of approximately one hundred chickens from both commercial and backyard farms; however no evidence of disease has subsequently been reported in West Timor since 2007. A targeted survey was undertaken in 2013 in 2 districts of West Timor. Three hundred village and commercial poultry (292 chickens and 8 Muscovy ducks) from 10 villages and 5 live bird markets (LBMs) were sampled between August and October 2013. Swabs of the cloaca and trachea of the sampled birds were tested using the Anigen ® Rapid Test (Bionote). All samples were negative on testing (0%; 95%CI: 0.0-1.2%). From these results it was concluded with a high level of confidence (100%, 95%CI: 99.988, 100) that this population is not infected, and these results, along with a lack of clinical evidence of disease, support the conclusion that West Timor was free from HPAI infection at the time of the survey. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiological and clinical course of pneumonia in patients with avian influenza H5N1

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    Bay, Ali [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey)]. E-mail: bayalibay@yahoo.com; Etlik, Omer [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Oner, A. Faik [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey); Unal, Ozkan [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Arslan, Halil [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Bora, Aydin [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Davran, Ramazan [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Yuca, Sevil Ari [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey); Dogan, Murat [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    Introduction: We evaluated chest X-ray and clinical findings of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to influenza H5N1 and presented the radiological findings and clinical course of the infection. Materials and methods: Between December 2005 and February 2006, eight hospitalized patients (median age 10, 5-15 years) with avian-flu were evaluated in this study. All patients were evaluated with chest X-ray and four of them with CT scan. Post mortem pathological characterization were also available for three of the patients. Results: A rapidly progressive pneumonia with high mortality rate was observed especially for cases with late admission. The major radiologic abnormalities were extensive pneumonic infiltration with segmental and multifocal distribution, mostly located in lower zones of the lung. No pleural effusion and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted. Conclusion: Avian flu may be presented as rapidly progressive pneumonia. The chest radiography has an important role in diagnosis and should be obtained daily because of rapid change of the findings that may necessitate prompt action.

  6. Survival of H5N1 influenza virus in water and its inactivation by chemical methods.

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    Mihai, Maria Elena; Tecu, Cristina; Ivanciuc, Alina Elena; Necula, Gheorghe; Lupulescu, Emilia; Onu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The ability of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) to survive in surface water has been assessed in experimental laboratory conditions, based on non-pathogenic avian reassortant model, by titration of infectivity (TCID50) at different time intervals, in three different types of water. The effect of different chemicals on AIV's survival was assessed using the same type of experimental model. After exposure to the chemical, followed by growth on a suitable substrate, the AIV was quantified by a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The reassortant virus persisted, and remained infective in aquatic environments, for 12 days at 22-35 degrees C and up to 20 days at 4 degrees C, irrespective of the type of water, supporting the hypothesis of a potential risk for transmitting the virus among birds and contaminating the household water via common sources of water. A significant decrease for AIV persistence models was recorded for sea water, after 12 days, at 35 degrees C. An effective inactivation has been shown when using commercially available products based on glutaraldehyde and penta potassium bis (peroxy mono sulphate) bis(sulphate), respectively. This rapid and safe method for decontamination, developed in this study, might be helpful in implementation of biosafety measures in laboratory and farms against AIV.

  7. Seroprevalence of antibodies against highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 virus among poultry workers in Bangladesh, 2009.

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    Sharifa Nasreen

    Full Text Available We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2009 to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors for highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 [HPAI H5N1] virus antibodies among poultry workers at farms and live bird markets with confirmed/suspected poultry outbreaks during 2009 in Bangladesh. We tested sera by microneutralization assay using A/Bangladesh/207095/2008 (H5N1; clade 2.2.2 virus with confirmation by horse red blood cell hemagglutination inhibition and H5-specific Western blot assays. We enrolled 212 workers from 87 farms and 210 workers from three live bird markets. One hundred and two farm workers (48% culled poultry. One hundred and ninety-three farm workers (91% and 178 market workers (85% reported direct contact with poultry that died during a laboratory confirmed HPAI H5N1 poultry farm outbreak or market poultry die-offs from suspected HPAI H5N1. Despite exposure to sick poultry, no farm or market poultry workers were seropositive for HPAI H5N1 virus antibodies (95% confidence interval 0-1%.

  8. Fatal influenza A (H5N1) virus Infection in zoo-housed Tigers in Yunnan Province, China.

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    Hu, Tingsong; Zhao, Huanyun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wendong; Kong, Qiang; Zhang, Zhixiao; Cui, Qinghua; Qiu, Wei; Deng, Bo; Fan, Quanshui; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2016-05-10

    From 2014 to 2015, three cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection occurred in zoo-housed north-east China tigers (Panthera tigris ssp.altaica) and four tigers died of respiratory distress in succession in Yunnan Province, China. We isolated and characterized three highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses from these tigers. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that A/tiger /Yunnan /tig1404 /2014(H5N1) belongs to the provisional subclade 2.3.4.4e which were novel reassortant influenza A (H5N1) viruses with six internal genes from avian influenza A (H5N2) viruses. The HA gene of the isolated A/tiger /Yunnan /tig1412 /2014(H5N1) virus belongs to the subclade 2.3.2.1b. The isolated A/tiger /Yunnan /tig1508/2015 (H5N1) virus was a novel reassortant influenza A (H5N1) virus with three internal genes (PB2, PB1 and M) from H9N2 virus and belongs to the subclade 2.3.2.1c.

  9. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Struck Migratory Birds in China in 2015.

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    Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Zhenjie; Liu, Wenjun; Yin, Yanbo; Hong, Jianmin; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Haiming; Wong, Gary; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yunfeng; Ru, Wendong; Gao, Ruyi; Liu, Di; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Gao, George F; Shi, Weifeng; Lei, Fumin

    2015-08-11

    Approximately 100 migratory birds, including whooper swans and pochards, were found dead in the Sanmenxia Reservoir Area of China during January 2015. The causative agent behind this outbreak was identified as H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV). Genetic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that this Sanmenxia H5N1 virus was a novel reassortant, possessing a Clade 2.3.2.1c HA gene and a H9N2-derived PB2 gene. Sanmenxia Clade 2.3.2.1c-like H5N1 viruses possess the closest genetic identity to A/Alberta/01/2014 (H5N1), which recently caused a fatal respiratory infection in Canada with signs of meningoencephalitis, a highly unusual symptom with influenza infections in humans. Furthermore, this virus was shown to be highly pathogenic to both birds and mammals, and demonstrate tropism for the nervous system. Due to the geographical location of Sanmenxia, these novel H5N1 viruses also have the potential to be imported to other regions through the migration of wild birds, similar to the H5N1 outbreak amongst migratory birds in Qinghai Lake during 2005. Therefore, further investigation and monitoring is required to prevent this novel reassortant virus from becoming a new threat to public health.

  10. Lethal infection by a novel reassortant H5N1 avian influenza A virus in a zoo-housed tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shang; Shi, Jianzhong; Qi, Xian; Huang, Guoqing; Chen, Hualan; Lu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    In early 2013, a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) in a zoo died of respiratory distress. All specimens from the tiger were positive for HPAI H5N1, which were detected by real-time PCR, including nose swab, throat swab, tracheal swab, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, aquae pericardii and cerebrospinal fluid. One stain of virus, A/Tiger/JS/1/2013, was isolated from the lung sample. Pathogenicity experiments showed that the isolate was able to replicate and cause death in mice. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that HA and NA of A/Tiger/JS/1/2013 clustered with A/duck/Vietnam/OIE-2202/2012 (H5N1), which belongs to clade 2.3.2.1. Interestingly, the gene segment PB2 shared 98% homology with A/wild duck/Korea/CSM-28/20/2010 (H4N6), which suggested that A/Tiger/JS/1/2013 is a novel reassortant H5N1 subtype virus. Immunohistochemical analysis also confirmed that the tiger was infected by this new reassortant HPAI H5N1 virus. Overall, our results showed that this Bengal tiger was infected by a novel reassortant H5N1, suggesting that the H5N1 virus can successfully cross species barriers from avian to mammal through reassortment. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Basis for the Sequence-specific Recognition of Human ISG15 by the NS1 Protein of Influenza B Virus

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    R Guan; L Ma; P Leonard; B Amer; H Sridharan; C Zhao; R Krug; G Montelione

    2011-12-31

    Interferon-induced ISG15 conjugation plays an important antiviral role against several viruses, including influenza viruses. The NS1 protein of influenza B virus (NS1B) specifically binds only human and nonhuman primate ISG15s and inhibits their conjugation. To elucidate the structural basis for the sequence-specific recognition of human ISG15, we determined the crystal structure of the complex formed between human ISG15 and the N-terminal region of NS1B (NS1B-NTR). The NS1B-NTR homodimer interacts with two ISG15 molecules in the crystal and also in solution. The two ISG15-binding sites on the NS1B-NTR dimer are composed of residues from both chains, namely residues in the RNA-binding domain (RBD) from one chain, and residues in the linker between the RBD and the effector domain from the other chain. The primary contact region of NS1B-NTR on ISG15 is composed of residues at the junction of the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain and the short linker region between the two Ubl domains, explaining why the sequence of the short linker in human and nonhuman primate ISG15s is essential for the species-specific binding of these ISG15s. In addition, the crystal structure identifies NS1B-NTR binding sites in the N-terminal Ubl domain of ISG15, and shows that there are essentially no contacts with the C-terminal Ubl domain of ISG15. Consequently, NS1B-NTR binding to ISG15 would not occlude access of the C-terminal Ubl domain of ISG15 to its conjugating enzymes. Nonetheless, transfection assays show that NS1B-NTR binding of ISG15 is responsible for the inhibition of interferon-induced ISG15 conjugation in cells.

  12. Produksi IgY Antivirus Avian Influenza H5N1 dan Prospek Pemanfaatannya dalam Pengebalan Pasif

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    I Wayan Teguh Wibawan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin Y (IgY in yolk has been shown in several studies to prevent both bacterial and viralinfections. This research was conducted to find evidence that IgY specific against avian influenza virus(AIV of H5N1 subtype can be produced in a large quantity in egg yolk. Laying hens were vaccinated withAI killed-vaccine (IPB-Shigeta. The IgY was purified using affinity chromatograpy technique, and anti-H5activity was measured using a standard haemaglutination inhibition (HI and agar gel immunodifusion.The concentration of IgY was calculated, and the protein pattern was detected using polyacrilamid gel(AGID electrophoresis (PAGE. Anti H5 antibody as high as 27 – 29 HI units was detected and produce aspecific line of precipitation in AGID. The concentration of IgY was 7.89 mg/ml. Purified specific IgY consistof 6 main protein bands with molecular weights ranging from 35 to 225 kD. These proteins were sensitiveto heat treatment (75oC for 30 minutes, to acid condition (pH2 as well as the pepsin and trypsin. Theseresults indicated the possibility of using specific IgY for passive immunisation to prevent AIV infection oras immunotherapeutic applications for AI treatment in humans.

  13. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008

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    Junaidi Akhmad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. Results All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1, clade 2.1.3 (80, and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3 that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. Conclusions The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to

  14. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibawa, Hendra; Henning, Joerg; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Junaidi, Akhmad; Bingham, John; Daniels, Peter; Meers, Joanne

    2011-09-07

    Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1), clade 2.1.3 (80), and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3) that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to chickens over the study period suggests that ducks are

  15. Avian Influenza H5N1 Surveillance and its Dynamics in Poultry in Live Bird Markets, Egypt.

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    ElMasry, I; Elshiekh, H; Abdlenabi, A; Saad, A; Arafa, A; Fasina, F O; Lubroth, J; Jobre, Y M

    2017-06-01

    H5N1, a highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 HPAI), is an endemic disease that is significant for public health in Egypt. Live bird markets (LBMs) are widespread in Egypt and play an important role in HPAI disease dynamics. The aim of the study was to evaluate the H5N1 HPAI prevalence in representative LBMs from 2009 to 2014, assess the effects of other variables and evaluate past outbreaks and human cases. It was found that ducks and geese are high-risk species and that the prevalence of H5N1 HPAI was higher immediately after the political crises of 2011. The end of a calendar year (June to December) was a high-risk period for positive samples, and the risk in urban LBMs was twice the risk in rural LBMs. Winter and political unrest was associated with higher H5N1 HPAI prevalence. Both human and poultry populations will continue to rise in Egypt, so continued poultry outbreaks are likely to be linked to more human cases. LBMs will continue to play a role in the dynamics of poultry disease in Egypt, and there is a need to reorganize markets in terms of biosecurity and traceability. It may also be beneficial to reduce inter-governorate inter-regional movements associated with poultry trade through promotion of regional trade or in the alternative provide sanitary features along the poultry market chain to reduce the speed of H5N1 HPAI infections. Policy formulation, design and enforcement must be pro-poor, and consideration of the sociocultural and economic realities in Egypt is important. The LBMs provide ideal platforms to carry out sound surveillance plans and mitigate zoonotic risks of H5N1 HPAI to humans. © 2015 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Characterizing wild bird contact and seropositivity to highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in Alaskan residents.

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    Reed, Carrie; Bruden, Dana; Byrd, Kathy K; Veguilla, Vic; Bruce, Michael; Hurlburt, Debby; Wang, David; Holiday, Crystal; Hancock, Kathy; Ortiz, Justin R; Klejka, Joe; Katz, Jacqueline M; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2014-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) H5N1 viruses have infected poultry and wild birds on three continents with more than 600 reported human cases (59% mortality) since 2003. Wild aquatic birds are the natural reservoir for avian influenza A viruses, and migratory birds have been documented with HPAI H5N1 virus infection. Since 2005, clade 2.2 HPAI H5N1 viruses have spread from Asia to many countries. We conducted a cross-sectional seroepidemiological survey in Anchorage and western Alaska to identify possible behaviors associated with migratory bird exposure and measure seropositivity to HPAI H5N1. We enrolled rural subsistence bird hunters and their families, urban sport hunters, wildlife biologists, and a comparison group without bird contact. We interviewed participants regarding their exposures to wild birds and collected blood to perform serologic testing for antibodies against a clade 2.2 HPAI H5N1 virus strain. Hunters and wildlife biologists reported exposures to wild migratory birds that may confer risk of infection with avian influenza A viruses, although none of the 916 participants had evidence of seropositivity to HPAI H5N1. We characterized wild bird contact among Alaskans and behaviors that may influence risk of infection with avian influenza A viruses. Such knowledge can inform surveillance and risk communication surrounding HPAI H5N1 and other influenza viruses in a population with exposure to wild birds at a crossroads of intercontinental migratory flyways. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Wild bird migration across the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau: a transmission route for highly pathogenic H5N1.

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    Diann J Prosser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Qinghai Lake in central China has been at the center of debate on whether wild birds play a role in circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1. In 2005, an unprecedented epizootic at Qinghai Lake killed more than 6000 migratory birds including over 3000 bar-headed geese (Anser indicus. H5N1 subsequently spread to Europe and Africa, and in following years has re-emerged in wild birds along the Central Asia flyway several times. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the potential involvement of wild birds in the spread of H5N1, we studied the movements of bar-headed geese marked with GPS satellite transmitters at Qinghai Lake in relation to virus outbreaks and disease risk factors. We discovered a previously undocumented migratory pathway between Qinghai Lake and the Lhasa Valley of Tibet where 93% of the 29 marked geese overwintered. From 2003-2009, sixteen outbreaks in poultry or wild birds were confirmed on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and the majority were located within the migratory pathway of the geese. Spatial and temporal concordance between goose movements and three potential H5N1 virus sources (poultry farms, a captive bar-headed goose facility, and H5N1 outbreak locations indicated ample opportunities existed for virus spillover and infection of migratory geese on the wintering grounds. Their potential as a vector of H5N1 was supported by rapid migration movements of some geese and genetic relatedness of H5N1 virus isolated from geese in Tibet and Qinghai Lake. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to compare phylogenetics of the virus with spatial ecology of its host, and the combined results suggest that wild birds play a role in the spread of H5N1 in this region. However, the strength of the evidence would be improved with additional sequences from both poultry and wild birds on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau where H5N1 has a clear stronghold.

  18. MERS-CoV and H5N1 influenza virus antagonize antigen presentation by altering the epigenetic landscape

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    Menachery, Vineet D.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Casey, Cameron P.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Weitz, Karl K.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sims, Amy C.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph S.

    2018-01-16

    Convergent evolution dictates that diverse groups of viruses will target both similar and distinct host pathways in order to manipulate the immune response and improve infection. In this study, we sought to leverage this uneven viral antagonism to identify critical host factors that govern disease outcome. Utilizing a systems based approach, we examined differential regulation of IFNγ dependent genes following infection with highly pathogenic viruses including influenza (H5N1-VN1203, H1N1-CA04) and coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV). Categorizing by function, we observed down regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation following both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Further examination revealed global down regulation of antigen presentation genes and was confirmed by proteomics for both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Importantly, epigenetic analysis suggested that DNA methylation rather than histone modification plays a crucial role in MERS-CoV mediated antagonism of antigen presentation genes; in contrast, H5N1-VN1203 likely utilizes a combination of epigenetic mechanisms to target antigen presentation. Together, the results indicate a common approach utilized by H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV to modulate antigen presentation and the host adaptive immune response.

  19. Evolutionary and Ecological Dynamics of Transboundary Disease Caused by H5N1 Virus in Southeast Asia.

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    Wei, K; Lin, Y; Xie, D

    2015-06-01

    Southeast Asia has been the breeding ground for many emerging diseases in the past decade, and it is in this region that new genetic variants of HPAI H5N1 viruses have been emerging. Cross-border movement of animals accelerates the spread of H5N1, and the changing environmental conditions also exert strong selective pressure on the viruses. The transboundary zoonotic diseases caused by H5N1 pose a serious and continual threat to global economy and public health. Here, we divided the H5N1 viruses isolated in Southeast Asia during 2003-2009 into four groups according to their phylogenetic relationships among HA gene sequences. Molecular evolution analysis suggests populations in expansion rather than a positive selection for group 2 and group 3, yet group 4 is under strong positive selection. Site 193 was found to be a potential glycosylation site and located in receptor-binding domain. Note that site 193 tends to appear in avian isolates instead of human strains. Population dynamics analysis reveals that the effective population size of infections in Southeast Asia has undergone three obvious increases, and the results are consistent with the epidemiological analysis. Ecological and phylogeographical analyses show that agro-ecological environments, migratory birds, domestic waterfowl, especially free-ranging ducks, are crucial in the occurrence, maintenance and spread of H5N1 virus. The epidemiological links between Indonesia and Suphanburi observed suggest that viruses in Indonesia were originated from multiple introductions. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Ecology and geography of avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 transmission in the Middle East and northeastern Africa

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    Peterson A Townsend

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza strain H5N1 ("HPAI-H5N1" has spread broadly in the past decade, and is now the focus of considerable concern. We tested the hypothesis that spatial distributions of HPAI-H5N1 cases are related consistently and predictably to coarse-scale environmental features in the Middle East and northeastern Africa. We used ecological niche models to relate virus occurrences to 8 km resolution digital data layers summarizing parameters of monthly surface reflectance and landform. Predictive challenges included a variety of spatial stratification schemes in which models were challenged to predict case distributions in broadly unsampled areas. Results In almost all tests, HPAI-H5N1 cases were indeed occurring under predictable sets of environmental conditions, generally predicted absent from areas with low NDVI values and minimal seasonal variation, and present in areas with a broad range of and appreciable seasonal variation in NDVI values. Although we documented significant predictive ability of our models, even between our study region and West Africa, case occurrences in the Arabian Peninsula appear to follow a distinct environmental regime. Conclusion Overall, we documented a variable environmental "fingerprint" for areas suitable for HPAI-H5N1 transmission.

  1. Re-emergence of amantadine-resistant variants among highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in Egypt.

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    El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Bagato, Ola; Kandeil, Ahmed; Mostafa, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sara H; Hassanneen, Hamdi M; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus continues to undergo substantial evolution. Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is a major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Numerous studies have focused on the genetic and evolutionary dynamics of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes; however, studies on the susceptibility of HPAI H5N1 viruses to amantadine and genetic diversity of the matrix (M) gene are limited. Accordingly, we studied the amantadine susceptibility of the HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated in Egypt during 2006-2015 based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. We analyzed data on 253 virus sequences and constructed a phylogenetic tree to calculate selective pressures on sites in the M2 gene associated with amantadine-resistance among different clades. Selection pressure was identified in the transmembrane domain of M2 gene at positions 27 and 31. Amantadine-resistant variants emerged in 2007 but were not circulating between 2012 and 2014. By 2015, amantadine-resistant HPAI H5N1 viruses re-emerged. This may be associated with the uncontrolled prescription of amantadine for prophylaxis and control of avian influenza infections in the poultry farm sector in Egypt. More epidemiological research is required to verify this observation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Activation of TLR2 and TLR6 by Dengue NS1 Protein and Its Implications in the Immunopathogenesis of Dengue Virus Infection.

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    Jincheng Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DV infection is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease and its manifestation has been shown to be contributed in part by the host immune responses. In this study, pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and TLR6 were found to be up-regulated in DV-infected human PBMC using immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry and Western blot analyses. Using ELISA, IL-6 and TNF-α, cytokines downstream of TLR2 and TLR6 signaling pathways were also found to be up-regulated in DV-infected PBMC. IL-6 and TNF-α production by PBMC were reduced when TLR2 and TLR6 were blocked using TLR2 and TLR6 neutralizing antibodies during DV infection. These results suggested that signaling pathways of TLR2 and TLR6 were activated during DV infection and its activation contributed to IL-6 and TNF-α production. DV NS1 protein was found to significantly increase the production of IL-6 and TNF-α when added to PBMC. The amount of IL-6 and TNF-α stimulated by DV NS1 protein was reduced when TLR2 and TLR6 were blocked, suggesting that DV NS1 protein is the viral protein responsible for the activation of TLR2 and TLR6 during DV infection. Secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP reporter assay was used to further confirm activation of TLR2 and TLR6 by DV NS1 protein. In addition, DV-infected and DV NS1 protein-treated TLR6-/- mice have higher survivability compared to DV-infected and DV NS1 protein-treated wild-type mice. Hence, activation of TLR6 via DV NS1 protein could potentially play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of DV infection.

  3. Expression of Two N1 Clones with Single Amino Acid Dissimilarity of Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus

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    RISZA HARTAWAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two clones of N1 gene derived from isolate A/Dk/Tangerang/Bbalitvet-ACIAR-TE11/2007 (H5N1 exhibit single mismatch of amino acid sequence at position 242 that is threonine and methionine for the clone #3 and #5, respectively. In order to evaluate the effect of the amino acid substitution, these clones were inserted into two different expression vectors that are pEGFP-C1 and pcDNA-3.3 TOPO® TA cloning. Subsequently, the respective recombinant clones were transfected into eukaryotic cells, including CEF, RK13 and VERO using Lipofectamine ‘plus’ reagent. As a result, the clone #3 retaining atypical sequence showed lower expression level rather than the clone #15 in both vectors and all type of cells. The 3D conformational modelling revealed that the mutation occurs in the inner part of glycoprotein embedded within envelope or matrix. Therefore, the missense mutation seems has no effect on the antigenic properties of neuraminidase but this substitution by any means causes lethal mutagenesis in the individual gene expression by reducing level of protein transcript.

  4. Specific Mutations in H5N1 Mainly Impact the Magnitude and Velocity of the Host Response in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchitchek, Nicholas; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Josset, Laurence; Gralinski, Lisa; Becavin, Christophe; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Ferris, Martin T.; Totura, Allison L.; Li, Chengjun; Neumann, Gabriele; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.

    2013-07-29

    Influenza infection causes respiratory disease that can lead to death. The complex interplay between virus-encoded and host-specific pathogenicity regulators is not well-understood. By analyzing a collection of mouse lung samples infected by A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1; VN1203) influenza, we characterized a signature of transcripts and proteins associated with the kinetics of the host response. Using a new geometrical representation method and two criteria, we show that infection concentrations and four specific mutations in VN1203 mainly impact on the magnitude and velocity of the host response kinetics, rather than on specific sets of genes up- and down-regulated. We observed similar kinetic effects using A/California/04/2009 (H1N1)-infected samples, and we show that these effects correlate with mice morbidity and viral titer measurements. Speed and extent of changes in the host response between days 1 and 2 post-infection were attenuated for each VN1203 mutant compared to the wild-type, except for PB1-F2 deletion at a high dose, which was associated with high virulence. This indicates that the host response in that time frame is critical and that immunomodulatory therapeutics should specifically be applied during the early days post-infection.

  5. Bayesian Inference Reveals Host-Specific Contributions to the Epidemic Expansion of Influenza A H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Suchard, Marc A; Baele, Guy; Gilbert, Marius; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Since its first isolation in 1996 in Guangdong, China, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 has circulated in avian hosts for almost two decades and spread to more than 60 countries worldwide. The role of different avian hosts and the domestic-wild bird interface has been critical in shaping the complex HPAIV H5N1 disease ecology, but remains difficult to ascertain. To shed light on the large-scale H5N1 transmission patterns and disentangle the contributions of different avian hosts on the tempo and mode of HPAIV H5N1 dispersal, we apply Bayesian evolutionary inference techniques to comprehensive sets of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase gene sequences sampled between 1996 and 2011 throughout Asia and Russia. Our analyses demonstrate that the large-scale H5N1 transmission dynamics are structured according to different avian flyways, and that the incursion of the Central Asian flyway specifically was driven by Anatidae hosts coinciding with rapid rate of spread and an epidemic wavefront acceleration. This also resulted in long-distance dispersal that is likely to be explained by wild bird migration. We identify a significant degree of asymmetry in the large-scale transmission dynamics between Anatidae and Phasianidae, with the latter largely representing poultry as an evolutionary sink. A joint analysis of host dynamics and continuous spatial diffusion demonstrates that the rate of viral dispersal and host diffusivity is significantly higher for Anatidae compared with Phasianidae. These findings complement risk modeling studies and satellite tracking of wild birds in demonstrating a continental-scale structuring into areas of H5N1 persistence that are connected through migratory waterfowl. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Preparasi Imunoglobulin G Kelinci sebagai Antigen Penginduksi Antibodi Spesifik Terhadap Virus Avian Influenza H5N1 Strain Legok

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    Ketut Karuni Nyanakumari Natih

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to prepare rabbit Immunoglobulin G as anti-idiotype antibody (Ab2 ofAvian Influenza Virus (AIV H5N1. A polyclonal antibody was collected from guinea pigs immunized withinactivated AI vaccine H5N1of Legok strain. Antibody of H5N1 AI in serum was detected by Agar gelprecipitation test (AGPT and an Inhibition Hemmaglutination test (IHT. The highest titre of antibodywas obtained one week after the third immunization. Serum of guinea pigs containing IgG was purifiedusing the Montage Antibody purification kit & spin column with Prosep A media (Millipore. The AI H5N1IgG concentration was 8 mg/ml. AI H5N1 IgG, was then digested with pepsin to obtain F(ab2 fraction andwas called Ab1. The concentration of IgG and F(ab2 and purity of IgG were determined by UVspectrophotometer which showed Ab1 concentration 1 mg/ml. Molecular weight was estimated by sodiumdodecyl sulfate- polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Ab2 was produced by immunization ofrabbit with Ab1. The first immunization was carried out by subcutaneous injection with 500 ?g of Ab1emulsified in Complete Freund Adjuvant. The immunization was repeated with the same dose of Ab1emulsified in Incomplete Freund Adjuvan at 1 week intervals. One week after the second immunization,rabbit’s serum was harvested and IgG was purified using the Montage Antibody purification kit & spincolumn with Prosep A media (Millipore. The rabbit IgG, called Ab2, was an anti-idiotypic antibody againstAIV-H5N1. In AGPT, a precipitation line appeared between Ab1 and Ab2. A partial reaction appearedbetween Ab2 and the AI H5N1 antigen was also detected. The results indicated that Ab2 is a possiblecandidate of imunogen for protection against an AI virus H5N1 infection.

  7. Vaccination with virus-like particles containing H5 antigens from three H5N1 clades protects chickens from H5N1 and H5N8 influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, especially H5N1 strains, represent a public health threat and cause widespread morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a promising novel vaccine approach to control avian influenza including HPAI...

  8. Multiplex Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction untuk Deteksi Cepat Virus Flu Burung H5N1 (MULTIPLEX REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR RAPID DETECTION OF H5N1 AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS

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    Raden Wasito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 (AIV H5N1 is highly pathogenic and fatal in poultry. The virusis still endemic with low virulence rate, although it may play a critical role in causing high morbidity andmortality rates in poultry in Indonesia. In general, diagnostic approach for AIV H5N1 is based onconventional serological and viral isolation methods that have the potential to produce consumings oftime and relatively expensive cost within the laboratory without compromising test utility. Thus, amolecular approach of multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR was developedand applied for the detection of matrix gene type A influenza viruses, AIV subtype subtype H5hemagglutinin gene with simultaneous detection of N1 nucleoprotein gene. Thirty sera specimens fromthe diseased commercial chickens that were specifically amplified positive-RT-PCR for AIV H5N1 wereselected for mRT-PCR. The mRT-PCR products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis and consistedof DNA fragments of AIV of 245 bp, 545 bp and 343 bp for M, H5 and N1 genes, respectively. Thus, themRT-PCR that can rapidly differentiate simultaneously between these genes is very important for thecontrol and even eradication of AIV transmission in poultry in Indonesia.

  9. MVA-based H5N1 vaccine affords cross-clade protection in mice against influenza A/H5N1 viruses at low doses and after single immunization.

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    Joost H C M Kreijtz

    Full Text Available Human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype, frequently reported since 2003, result in high morbidity and mortality. It is feared that these viruses become pandemic, therefore the development of safe and effective vaccines is desirable. MVA-based H5N1 vaccines already proved to be effective when two immunizations with high doses were used. Dose-sparing strategies would increase the number of people that can be vaccinated when the amount of vaccine preparations that can be produced is limited. Furthermore, protective immunity is induced ideally after a single immunization. Therefore the minimal requirements for induction of protective immunity with a MVA-based H5N1 vaccine were assessed in mice. To this end, mice were vaccinated once or twice with descending doses of a recombinant MVA expressing the HA gene of influenza virus A/Vietnam/1194/04. The protective efficacy was determined after challenge infection with the homologous clade 1 virus and a heterologous virus derived from clade 2.1, A/Indonesia/5/05 by assessing weight loss, virus replication and histopathological changes. It was concluded that MVA-based vaccines allowed significant dose-sparing and afford cross-clade protection, also after a single immunization, which are favorable properties for an H5N1 vaccine candidate.

  10. The reliability of DIVA test based on M2e peptide exceed those based on HA2 or NS1 peptides

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    Simson Tarigan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important disadvantage of vaccination against avian influenza is that it cannot protect vaccinated birds against infection. When vaccinated poultry are heavily exposed to the virus, prolonged, unrecognised, subclinical infection may persist on the farm. The condition can only be serologically monitored by a DIVA (differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals test, whereas conventional diagnostic tests cannot be used. The DIVA tests based on an antibody response following virus replication is the most appropriate approach. For H5N1 influenza such antibodies includes those to the M2e and NS1 proteins and an epitope on the HA2 subunit (HA_488-516. The purpose of this study was to compare the magnitude of the antibody response in chickens vaccinated and infected with an H5N1 virus strain. For that purpose, sera collected from naïve, vaccinated and infected birds, at 1, 2-3, ≥4 weeks post challenge were used. Antibodies were measured by ELISA using biotinylated synthetic peptides as coating antigens. The peptides used include four NS1 peptides corresponding to different regions of the NS1 protein and HA_488-516and M2e peptides. Peptides were coated onto microtitre plates either directly or via a streptavidin bridge. The results showed that vaccination did not cause antibody conversion to any of the peptides, where as challenged birds developed a high antibody response to M2e but, low response to the NS1 and HA2 peptides. Antibodies to the later peptides were detected only by the streptavidin-peptide ELISA. The ELISA based on NS1 or HA_488-516 peptides, therefore, are not reliable for use as DIVA test in H5N1 avian influenza virus infection

  11. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

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    Surender Khurana

    Full Text Available A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR. Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1 and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1 HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2 and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  12. Maternal immunity against avian influenza H5N1 in chickens: limited protection and interference with vaccine efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.A.; Rosema, S.; Zoelen-Bos, van D.J.; Kemper-Venema, S.

    2011-01-01

    After avian influenza (AI) vaccination, hens will produce progeny chickens with maternally derived AI-specific antibodies. In the present study we examined the effect of maternal immunity in young chickens on the protection against highly pathogenic AI H5N1 virus infection and on the effectiveness

  13. Human influenza A H5N1 in Indonesia: health care service-associated delays in treatment initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisasmito, Wiku; Aisyah, Dewi Nur; Aditama, Tjandra Yoga; Kusriastuti, Rita; Trihono; Suwandono, Agus; Sampurno, Ondri Dwi; Prasenohadi; Sapada, Nurshanty A; Mamahit, M J N; Swenson, Anna; Dreyer, Nancy A; Coker, Richard

    2013-06-11

    Indonesia has had more recorded human cases of influenza A H5N1 than any other country, with one of the world's highest case fatality rates. Understanding barriers to treatment may help ensure life-saving influenza-specific treatment is provided early enough to meaningfully improve clinical outcomes. Data for this observational study of humans infected with influenza A H5N1 were obtained primarily from Ministry of Health, Provincial and District Health Office clinical records. Data included time from symptom onset to presentation for medical care, source of medical care provided, influenza virology, time to initiation of influenza-specific treatment with antiviral drugs, and survival. Data on 124 human cases of virologically confirmed avian influenza were collected between September 2005 and December 2010, representing 73% of all reported Indonesia cases. The median time from health service presentation to antiviral drug initiation was 7.0 days. Time to viral testing was highly correlated with starting antiviral treatment (p influenza H5N1 in Indonesia appear related to delays in diagnosis rather than presentation to health care settings. Either cases are not suspected of being H5N1 cases until nearly one week after presenting for medical care, or viral testing and/or antiviral treatment is not available where patients are presenting for care. Health system delays have increased since 2007.

  14. Progress in control of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza and the future for eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, L D

    2012-12-01

    Three broad factors, occurring concurrently, prevent elimination of highly pathogenic avian influenza caused by viruses of the H5N1 subtype (H5N1 HPAI) in countries and subregions where infection has remained endemic. These factors are the nature of the poultry sector, the quality of veterinary and animal production services (both public and private) serving the poultry industry, and the extent and level of commitment at all levels to virus elimination. Most of these countries have developed and adopted programs for progressive control of H5N1 HPAI, focused on the local factors hindering elimination of the viruses. Based on the rate of implementation of these measures over the last 5 to 7 yr (during which time there has been unprecedented financial and technical support from the international donor community), it is not expected that global eradication of H5N1 HPAI viruses can be achieved within the next 10 yr. If the "classical" approach to control, based around early case detection and culling, were adopted in a zone containing millions of free-running ducks, the work load required to complete even the first round of testing would exceed existing capacity. There would be no guarantees of sustained success locally, especially if the viruses are not eradicated regionally.

  15. Adaptation of High-Growth Influenza H5N1 Vaccine Virus in Vero Cells: Implications for Pandemic Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Liang; Yeh, Wei-Zhou; Weng, Tsai-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Shuan; Chong, Pele; Lee, Min-Shi

    2011-01-01

    Current egg-based influenza vaccine production technology can't promptly meet the global demand during an influenza pandemic as shown in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Moreover, its manufacturing capacity would be vulnerable during pandemics caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Therefore, vaccine production using mammalian cell technology is becoming attractive. Current influenza H5N1 vaccine strain (NIBRG-14), a reassortant virus between A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1) virus and egg-adapted high-growth A/PR/8/1934 virus, could grow efficiently in eggs and MDCK cells but not Vero cells which is the most popular cell line for manufacturing human vaccines. After serial passages and plaque purifications of the NIBRG-14 vaccine virus in Vero cells, one high-growth virus strain (Vero-15) was generated and can grow over 108 TCID50/ml. In conclusion, one high-growth H5N1 vaccine virus was generated in Vero cells, which can be used to manufacture influenza H5N1 vaccines and prepare reassortant vaccine viruses for other influenza A subtypes. PMID:22022351

  16. Adaptation of high-growth influenza H5N1 vaccine virus in Vero cells: implications for pandemic preparedness.

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    Yu-Fen Tseng

    Full Text Available Current egg-based influenza vaccine production technology can't promptly meet the global demand during an influenza pandemic as shown in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Moreover, its manufacturing capacity would be vulnerable during pandemics caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Therefore, vaccine production using mammalian cell technology is becoming attractive. Current influenza H5N1 vaccine strain (NIBRG-14, a reassortant virus between A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1 virus and egg-adapted high-growth A/PR/8/1934 virus, could grow efficiently in eggs and MDCK cells but not Vero cells which is the most popular cell line for manufacturing human vaccines. After serial passages and plaque purifications of the NIBRG-14 vaccine virus in Vero cells, one high-growth virus strain (Vero-15 was generated and can grow over 10(8 TCID(50/ml. In conclusion, one high-growth H5N1 vaccine virus was generated in Vero cells, which can be used to manufacture influenza H5N1 vaccines and prepare reassortant vaccine viruses for other influenza A subtypes.

  17. Victims and vectors: highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 and the ecology of wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Muzaffar, Sabir Bin; Hill, Nichola J.; Yan, Baoping; Xiao, Xiangming; Lei, Fumin; Li, Tianxian; Schwarzbach, Steven E.; Howell, Judd A.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses has raised concerns about the role of wild birds in the spread and persistence of the disease. In 2005, an outbreak of the highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 killed more than 6,000 wild waterbirds at Qinghai Lake, China. Outbreaks have continued to periodically occur in wild birds at Qinghai Lake and elsewhere in Central China and Mongolia. This region has few poultry but is a major migration and breeding area for waterbirds in the Central Asian Flyway, although relatively little is known about migratory movements of different species and connectivity of their wetland habitats. The scientific debate has focused on the role of waterbirds in the epidemiology, maintenance and spread of HPAI H5N1: to what extent are they victims affected by the disease, or vectors that have a role in disease transmission? In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of wild bird involvement in the ecology of HPAI H5N1. Specifically, we present details on: (1) origin of HPAI H5N1; (2) waterbirds as LPAI reservoirs and evolution into HPAI; (3) the role of waterbirds in virus spread and persistence; (4) key biogeographic regions of outbreak; and (5) applying an ecological research perspective to studying AIVs in wild waterbirds and their ecosystems.

  18. Different environmental drivers of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and wild birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Si, Y.; Boer, de W.F.; Gong, P.

    2013-01-01

    A large number of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and wild birds have been reported in Europe since 2005. Distinct spatial patterns in poultry and wild birds suggest that different environmental drivers and potentially different spread mechanisms are operating.

  19. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in wildlife: diagnostics, epidemiology and molecular characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keawcharoen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 outbreaks have been reported in Southeast Asia causing high mortality in poultry and have also been found to cross the species barrier infecting human and other mammalian species. Thailand is one of the countries severely affected by

  20. Experimental infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in black-headed gulls (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ramis (Antonio); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); R. Vanderstichel (R.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHistorically, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) rarely resulted in infection or clinical disease in wild birds. However, since 2002, disease and mortality from natural HPAIV H5N1 infection have been observed in wild birds including gulls. We performed an experimental

  1. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection--influence on receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J; Martin, Stephen R; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J; Hay, Alan J; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D; Feizi, Ten

    2013-12-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process. Copyright © 2013 The Authros. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Host-specific exposure and fatal neurologic disease in wild raptors from highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 during the 2006 outbreak in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); O. Krone (Oliver); P.U. Wolf (Peter U.); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractRaptors may contract highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 by hunting or scavenging infected prey. However, natural H5N1 infection in raptors is rarely reported. Therefore, we tested raptors found dead during an H5N1 outbreak in wild waterbirds in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania,

  3. Determination of efficacious vaccine seed strains for use against Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses through antigenic cartography and in vivo challenge studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 2006, there have been reported outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in vaccinated chickens in Africa and Asia. This study provides experimental data for selection of efficacious H5N1 vaccine seed strains against recently circulating strains of H5N1 HPAI viruses in Egypt....

  4. Cross-protection against lethal H5N1 challenge in ferrets with an adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine.

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    Benoît Baras

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unprecedented spread between birds and mammals of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAI of the H5N1 subtype has resulted in hundreds of human infections with a high fatality rate. This has highlighted the urgent need for the development of H5N1 vaccines that can be produced rapidly and in sufficient quantities. Potential pandemic inactivated vaccines will ideally induce substantial intra-subtypic cross-protection in humans to warrant the option of use, either prior to or just after the start of a pandemic outbreak. In the present study, we evaluated a split H5N1 A/H5N1/Vietnam/1194/04, clade 1 candidate vaccine, adjuvanted with a proprietary oil-in- water emulsion based Adjuvant System proven to be well-tolerated and highly immunogenic in the human (Leroux-Roels et al. (2007 The Lancet 370:580-589, for its ability to induce intra-subtypic cross-protection against clade 2 H5N1/A/Indonesia/5/05 challenge in ferrets. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All ferrets in control groups receiving non-adjuvanted vaccine or adjuvant alone failed to develop specific or cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies and all died or had to be euthanized within four days of virus challenge. Two doses of adjuvanted split H5N1 vaccine containing >or=1.7 microg HA induced neutralizing antibodies in the majority of ferrets to both clade 1 (17/23 (74% responders and clade 2 viruses (14/23 (61% responders, and 96% (22/23 of vaccinees survived the lethal challenge. Furthermore lung virus loads and viral shedding in the upper respiratory tract were reduced in vaccinated animals relative to controls suggesting that vaccination might also confer a reduced risk of viral transmission. CONCLUSION: These protection data in a stringent challenge model in association with an excellent clinical profile highlight the potential of this adjuvanted H5N1 candidate vaccine as an effective tool in pandemic preparedness.

  5. Development of a new candidate H5N1 avian influenza virus for pre-pandemic vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Maines, Taronna R; Swayne, David E; O'Neill, Eduardo; Davis, C Todd; Van-Hoven, Neal; Balish, Amanda; Yu, Hong-jie; Katz, Jacqueline M; Klimov, Alexander; Cox, Nancy; Li, De-xin; Wang, Yu; Guo, Yuan-ji; Yang, Wei-zhong; Donis, Ruben O; Shu, Yue-long

    2009-11-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses currently circulating in birds have caused hundreds of human infections, and pose a significant pandemic threat. Vaccines are a major component of the public health preparedness for this likely event. The rapid evolution of H5N1 viruses has resulted in the emergence of multiple clades with distinct antigenic characteristics that require clade-specific vaccines. A variant H5N1 virus termed clade 2.3.4 emerged in 2005 and has caused multiple fatal infections. Vaccine candidates that match the antigenic properties of variant viruses are necessary because inactivated influenza vaccines elicit strain-specific protection. To address the need for a suitable seed for manufacturing a clade 2.3.4 vaccine, we developed a new H5N1 pre-pandemic candidate vaccine by reverse genetics and evaluated its safety and replication in vitro and in vivo. A reassortant virus termed, Anhui/PR8, was produced by reverse genetics in compliance with WHO pandemic vaccine development guidelines and contains six genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 as well as the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin (HA) genomic segments from the A/Anhui/01/2005 virus. The multi-basic cleavage site of HA was removed to reduce virulence. The reassortant Anhui/PR8 grows well in eggs and is avirulent to chicken and ferrets but retains the antigenicity of the parental A/Anhui/01/2005 virus. These results indicate that the Anhui/PR8 reassortant lost a major virulent determinant and it is suitable for its use in vaccine manufacturing and as a reference vaccine virus against the H5N1 clade 2.3.4 viruses circulating in eastern China, Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos.

  6. Structure-Guided Functional Annotation of the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Reveals Dynamic Evolution of the p85β-Binding Site during Circulation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Antonio M; Domingues, Patricia; Zell, Roland; Hale, Benjamin G

    2017-11-01

    Rational characterization of virulence and host-adaptive markers in the multifunctional influenza A virus NS1 protein is hindered by a lack of comprehensive knowledge about NS1-host protein protein interfaces. Here, we surveyed the impact of amino acid variation in NS1 at its structurally defined binding site for host p85β, a regulator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Structure-guided alanine scanning of all viral residues at this interface defined 10 positions contributing to the interaction, with residues 89, 95, 98, 133, 145, and 162 being the most important. A bioinformatic study of >24,000 publicly available NS1 sequences derived from viruses infecting different hosts highlighted several prevalent amino acid variants at the p85β interface that either enhanced (I95) or weakened (N135, T145, L161, Y161, S164) p85β binding. Interestingly, analysis of viruses circulating in humans since the 1918 pandemic revealed the temporal acquisition of functionally relevant variants at this interface. I95 (which enhanced p85β binding) quickly became prevalent in the 1940s and experimentally conferred a fitness advantage to a recombinant 1930s-based H1N1 virus in human lung epithelial cells. Surprisingly, H1N1 and H3N2 viruses recently acquired T145 or N135, respectively, which diminished p85β binding but apparently not the overall fitness in the human population. Evolutionary analyses revealed covariation of the NS1-p85β binding phenotype in humans with functional changes at multiple residues in other viral proteins, suggesting an unexplored compensatory or synergistic interplay between phenotypes in vivo Overall, our data provide a resource to understand the consequences of the NS1-p85β binding spectrum of different influenza viruses and highlight the dynamic evolution of this property in viruses circulating in humans.IMPORTANCE In humans, influenza A viruses are responsible for causing seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. These viruses also

  7. Genome-Wide Mutagenesis of Dengue Virus Reveals Plasticity of the NS1 Protein and Enables Generation of Infectious Tagged Reporter Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Nicholas S; Johnson, Stephen M; Eltahla, Auda A; Aloi, Maria; Aloia, Amanda L; McDevitt, Christopher A; Bull, Rowena A; Beard, Michael R

    2017-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major global pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. An improved understanding of the regions within the DENV genome and its encoded proteins that are required for the virus replication cycle will expedite the development of urgently required therapeutics and vaccines. We subjected an infectious DENV genome to unbiased insertional mutagenesis and used next-generation sequencing to identify sites that tolerate 15-nucleotide insertions during the virus replication cycle in hepatic cell culture. This revealed that the regions within capsid, NS1, and the 3' untranslated region were the most tolerant of insertions. In contrast, prM- and NS2A-encoding regions were largely intolerant of insertions. Notably, the multifunctional NS1 protein readily tolerated insertions in regions within the Wing, connector, and β-ladder domains with minimal effects on viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. Using this information, we generated infectious reporter viruses, including a variant encoding the APEX2 electron microscopy tag in NS1 that uniquely enabled high-resolution imaging of its localization to the surface and interior of viral replication vesicles. In addition, we generated a tagged virus bearing an mScarlet fluorescent protein insertion in NS1 that, despite an impact on fitness, enabled live cell imaging of NS1 localization and traffic in infected cells. Overall, this genome-wide profile of DENV genome flexibility may be further dissected and exploited in reporter virus generation and antiviral strategies.IMPORTANCE Regions of genetic flexibility in viral genomes can be exploited in the generation of reporter virus tools and should arguably be avoided in antiviral drug and vaccine design. Here, we subjected the DENV genome to high-throughput insertional mutagenesis to identify regions of genetic flexibility and enable tagged reporter virus generation. In particular, the

  8. The K186E Amino Acid Substitution in the Canine Influenza Virus H3N8 NS1 Protein Restores Its Ability To Inhibit Host Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Chauché, Caroline; DeDiego, Marta L; Topham, David J; Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-11-15

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) are the causative agents of canine influenza, a contagious respiratory disease in dogs, and include the equine-origin H3N8 and the avian-origin H3N2 viruses. Influenza A virus (IAV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a virulence factor essential for counteracting the innate immune response. Here, we evaluated the ability of H3N8 CIV NS1 to inhibit host innate immune responses. We found that H3N8 CIV NS1 was able to efficiently counteract interferon (IFN) responses but was unable to block general gene expression in human or canine cells. Such ability was restored by a single amino acid substitution in position 186 (K186E) that resulted in NS1 binding to the 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA processing. We also examined the frequency distribution of K186 and E186 among H3N8 CIVs and equine influenza viruses (EIVs), the ancestors of H3N8 CIV, and experimentally determined the impact of amino acid 186 in the ability of different CIV and EIV NS1s to inhibit general gene expression. In all cases, the presence of E186 was responsible for the control of host gene expression. In contrast, the NS1 protein of H3N2 CIV harbors E186 and blocks general gene expression in canine cells. Altogether, our results confirm previous studies on the strain-dependent ability of NS1 to block general gene expression. Moreover, the observed polymorphism on amino acid 186 between H3N8 and H3N2 CIVs might be the result of adaptive changes acquired during long-term circulation of avian-origin IAVs in mammals.IMPORTANCE Canine influenza is a respiratory disease of dogs caused by two CIV subtypes, the H3N8 and H3N2 viruses, of equine and avian origins, respectively. Influenza NS1 is the main viral factor responsible for the control of host innate immune responses, and changes in NS1 can play an important role in host adaptation. Here we assessed the ability of H3N8 CIV NS1 to inhibit

  9. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...... receptor binding domain mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of two H5N1 viruses and evaluated changes in receptor binding specificity by glycan microarray analysis. The impact of these mutations on replication efficiency was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Although certain mutations switched...... the receptor binding preference of the H5 HA, the rescued mutant viruses displayed reduced replication in vitro and delayed peak virus shedding in ferrets. An improvement in transmission efficiency was not observed with any of the mutants compared to the parental viruses, indicating that alternative molecular...

  10. Complete genome analysis of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus isolated from a tiger in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Hassan; Juan, Huang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Yufeng; Li, TianXian; Du, Yijun; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    An influenza A virus (A/Tig/SH/01/2005 (H5N1) was isolated from lung tissue samples of a dead zoo tiger with respiratory disease in China in July 2005. Complete genome analysis indicated that the isolate was highly identical to an H5N1 virus isolated from a migratory duck at Poyang lake in China in that year. The genotype of the isolate was K,G,D,5J,F,1J,F,1E, and phylogenetically it was a clade 2.2 virus. Molecular characterization of all of the gene segments revealed characteristics of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses. These results may help to identify molecular determinants of virulence and highlight the necessity for continuous surveillance.

  11. Isolation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus from Saker Falcons (Falco cherrug in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henju Marjuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that birds of prey are susceptible to fatal infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus. We studied the antigenic, molecular, phylogenetic, and pathogenic properties of 2 HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from dead falcons in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait in 2005 and 2007, respectively. Phylogenetic and antigenic analyses grouped both isolates in clade 2.2 (Qinghai-like viruses. However, the viruses appeared to have spread westward via different flyways. It remains unknown how these viruses spread so rapidly from Qinghai after the 2005 outbreak and how they were introduced into falcons in these two countries. The H5N1 outbreaks in the Middle East are believed by some to be mediated by wild migratory birds. However, sporting falcons may be at additional risk from the illegal import of live quail to feed them.

  12. ISOLASI DAN IDENTIFIKASI VIRUS AVIAN INFLUENZA SUBTIPE H5N1 DI PETERNAKAN TRADISIONAL KECAMATAN GUNUNGPATI SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Ari Wibowo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Avian Influenza (AI atau yang lebih dikenal dengan flu burung disebabkan oleh virus influenza yang bermutasi menjadi patogen. Penelitian tentang isolasi dan identifikasi virus AI subtipe H5N1 perlu dilakukan untuk mengetahui keberadaan virus tersebut khususnya di kecamatan Gunungpati. Desain penelitian adalah eks ploratif dengan pengumpulan sampel usap kloaka secara acak di lima kelurahan di kecamatan Gunungpati. Sampel usap kloaka ditumbuhkan pada telur ayam berembrio SPF, kemudian diisolasi RNA-nya dilanjutkan dengan identifikasi subtipe virus AI menggunakan Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT–PCR dengan primer pendeteksi gen H5 dan N1. Hasil positif apabila visualisasi hasil elektroforesis dari produk PCR menunjukkan pita-pita spesifik panjang 219 bp untuk H5 dan 131 bp untuk gen N1-nya. Limapuluh sampel usap kloaka yang diisolasi dari lima kelurahan di Gunungpati, delapan isolat positif VAI dan enam diantaranya positif H5N1 dengan angka prevalensi 12%. Isolat positif berasal dari 2 spesies itik (16,67%, 2 dari entok (11,76% dan 2 dari angsa (18,18%. Dari lima kelurahan yang diambil sampelnya, tiga kelurahan ditemukan positif virus H5N1 masing-masing kelurahan Sekaran (6,67%, Kalisegoro (16,67% dan Pakintelan (15,78%. Unggas-unggas air di peternakan unggas tradisional berpotensi sebagai penularan virus AI, khususnya subtipe H5N1.Avian Influenza (AI or better known as bird flu is caused by influenza viruses that mutate into a pathogen. Research on the isolation and the identification of H5N1 subtype needed to be carried out to determine the presence of the virus, particularly in the subdistrict of Gunungpati. The study design was explorative by collecting cloacal swab samples randomly from five villages in Gunungpati. The cloacal swab samples were cultured in embryonated SPF chicken eggs, then the RNA was isolated and followed by the identification of AI virus subtype using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT

  13. Intranasal H5N1 vaccines, adjuvanted with chitosan derivatives, protect ferrets against highly pathogenic influenza intranasal and intratracheal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J Mann

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective efficacy of two intranasal chitosan (CSN and TM-CSN adjuvanted H5N1 Influenza vaccines against highly pathogenic avian Influenza (HPAI intratracheal and intranasal challenge in a ferret model. Six groups of 6 ferrets were intranasally vaccinated twice, 21 days apart, with either placebo, antigen alone, CSN adjuvanted antigen, or TM-CSN adjuvanted antigen. Homologous and intra-subtypic antibody cross-reacting responses were assessed. Ferrets were inoculated intratracheally (all treatments or intranasally (CSN adjuvanted and placebo treatments only with clade 1 HPAI A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1 virus 28 days after the second vaccination and subsequently monitored for morbidity and mortality outcomes. Clinical signs were assessed and nasal as well as throat swabs were taken daily for virology. Samples of lung tissue, nasal turbinates, brain, and olfactory bulb were analysed for the presence of virus and examined for histolopathological findings. In contrast to animals vaccinated with antigen alone, the CSN and TM-CSN adjuvanted vaccines induced high levels of antibodies, protected ferrets from death, reduced viral replication and abrogated disease after intratracheal challenge, and in the case of CSN after intranasal challenge. In particular, the TM-CSN adjuvanted vaccine was highly effective at eliciting protective immunity from intratracheal challenge; serologically, protective titres were demonstrable after one vaccination. The 2-dose schedule with TM-CSN vaccine also induced cross-reactive antibodies to clade 2.1 and 2.2 H5N1 viruses. Furthermore ferrets immunised with TM-CSN had no detectable virus in the respiratory tract or brain, whereas there were signs of virus in the throat and lungs, albeit at significantly reduced levels, in CSN vaccinated animals. This study demonstrated for the first time that CSN and in particular TM-CSN adjuvanted intranasal vaccines have the potential to protect against significant

  14. Mutations in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that confer binding to human tracheal airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Ayora-Talavera

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence in 2009 of a swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus as the first pandemic of the 21st Century is a timely reminder of the international public health impact of influenza viruses, even those associated with mild disease. The widespread distribution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in the avian population has spawned concern that it may give rise to a human influenza pandemic. The mortality rate associated with occasional human infection by H5N1 virus approximates 60%, suggesting that an H5N1 pandemic would be devastating to global health and economy. To date, the H5N1 virus has not acquired the propensity to transmit efficiently between humans. The reasons behind this are unclear, especially given the high mutation rate associated with influenza virus replication. Here we used a panel of recombinant H5 hemagglutinin (HA variants to demonstrate the potential for H5 HA to bind human airway epithelium, the predominant target tissue for influenza virus infection and spread. While parental H5 HA exhibited limited binding to human tracheal epithelium, introduction of selected mutations converted the binding profile to that of a current human influenza strain HA. Strikingly, these amino-acid changes required multiple simultaneous mutations in the genomes of naturally occurring H5 isolates. Moreover, H5 HAs bearing intermediate sequences failed to bind airway tissues and likely represent mutations that are an evolutionary "dead end." We conclude that, although genetic changes that adapt H5 to human airways can be demonstrated, they may not readily arise during natural virus replication. This genetic barrier limits the likelihood that current H5 viruses will originate a human pandemic.

  15. Dryocrassin ABBA, a novel active substance for use against amantadine-resistance H5N1 avian Influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbo Ou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of multi-drug resistant highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV strains highlights the urgent need for strategies for the prevention and control of avian influenza virus. The aim of our current study is to evaluate the antiviral activity of dryocrassin ABBA isolated from Rhizoma Dryopteridis Crassirhizomatis (RDC against an amantadine-resistant H5N1 (A/Chicken/Hebei/706/2005 strain in a mouse model. Post inoculation with HPAIV H5N1 virus in mice, the survival rate was 87%, 80% and 60% respectively in the 33mg/kg, 18mg/kg and 12.5 mg/kg Dryocrassin ABBA-treated groups. On the other hand, the survival rate was 53% and 20%, respectively in the amantadine-treated group and untreated group. Mice administered dryocrassin ABBA or amantadine showed a significant weight increase compared to the untreated group. Moreover, 33 mg/kg and 18 mg/kg dryocrassin ABBA have decreased lung index (P>0.05 and virus loads (P<0.01 compared to the untreated group on day 7. Also, on day 7 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ decreased significantly (P<0.01 while anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and MCP-1 were increased significantly (P<0.01 in the 33 mg/kg and 18 mg/kg dryocrassin ABBA-treated groups compared to the amantadine group and the untreated group. Moreover, the concentrations of IL-12 in drug-treated groups were significantly (P<0.01 lowered compared with the untreated group. Based on the above we conclude that orally administered dryocrassin ABBA provided mice protection against avian influenza virus H5N1 by inhibiting inflammation and reducing virus loads. Dryocrassin ABBA is a potential novel lead compound which had antiviral effects on amantadine-resistant avian influenza virus H5N1 infection.

  16. Establishing a laboratory network of influenza diagnosis in Indonesia: an experience from the avian flu (H5N1) outbreak

    OpenAIRE

    Setiawaty V; Pangesti KN; Sampurno OD

    2012-01-01

    Vivi Setiawaty, Krisna NA Pangesti, Ondri D SampurnoNational Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, the Republic of Indonesia, Jakarta, IndonesiaAbstract: Indonesia has been part of the global influenza surveillance since the establishment of a National Influenza Center (NIC) at the National Institute of Health Research and Development (NIHRD) by the Indonesian Ministry of Health in 1975. When the outbreak of avian influenza A (H5N1) occurred, the NIC and US Naval M...

  17. Neurovirulence of H5N1 infection in ferrets is mediated by multifocal replication in distinct permissive neuronal cell regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Plourde

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI, subtype H5N1, remains an emergent threat to the human population. While respiratory disease is a hallmark of influenza infection, H5N1 has a high incidence of neurological sequelae in many animal species and sporadically in humans. We elucidate the temporal/spatial infection of H5N1 in the brain of ferrets following a low dose, intranasal infection of two HPAI strains of varying neurovirulence and lethality. A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN1203 induced mortality in 100% of infected ferrets while A/Hong Kong/483/1997 (HK483 induced lethality in only 20% of ferrets, with death occurring significantly later following infection. Neurological signs were prominent in VN1203 infection, but not HK483, with seizures observed three days post challenge and torticollis or paresis at later time points. VN1203 and HK483 replication kinetics were similar in primary differentiated ferret nasal turbinate cells, and similar viral titers were measured in the nasal turbinates of infected ferrets. Pulmonary viral titers were not different between strains and pathological findings in the lungs were similar in severity. VN1203 replicated to high titers in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, and brain stem; whereas HK483 was not recovered in these tissues. VN1203 was identified adjacent to and within the olfactory nerve tract, and multifocal infection was observed throughout the frontal cortex and cerebrum. VN1203 was also detected throughout the cerebellum, specifically in Purkinje cells and regions that coordinate voluntary movements. These findings suggest the increased lethality of VN1203 in ferrets is due to increased replication in brain regions important in higher order function and explains the neurological signs observed during H5N1 neurovirulence.

  18. The prevelence of H5N1 influenza virus on poultry at traditional market in Semarang Indonesia

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    R. Susanti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional market is a potential source of the spread of avian influenza virus. This research is aimed to determine the prevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV subtype H5N1 on poultry sold in traditional market in Semarang City. Fifty-five poultry samples sold in six traditional markets in Semarang City; i.e. Karangayu market, Mangkang market, Gunungpati market, Rejomulyo market, Gayamsari market and Karimata market taken from its cloaca swab. Further, cloacal swab samples grown in pathogen-free chicken embryos aged nine days. Then, it incubated for four days at 37 °C. Allantoic fluid then collected and tested to agglutinate red blood cells. RNA extracted from the samples showed haemagglutination activity. Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR applied to identify the subtype of AIV using the specific primer H5 and N1. The PCR product resulted from RT-PCR then visualized using electrophoresis. The results showed that four AIV subtype H5N1 isolates have successfully isolated from cloacal swab samples (7.27% with the distribution of 2 isolates were from Mangkang Market (28.57%, 1 isolate was from Rejomulyo Market (7.69% and 1 isolate was from Karimata Market. The prevalence of AIV subtype H5N1 was 28.57% in Mangkang market, 7.69% in Rejomulyo market and 9.09% in Karimata market. The prevalence values of each species were 7.89% in chicken and 9.09% in the wild duck. According to this result, poultry sold in traditional market in Semarang have a potential source of AIV subtype H5N1.

  19. Migratory status is not related to the susceptibility to HPAIV H5N1 in an insectivorous passerine species.

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    Donata Kalthoff

    Full Text Available Migratory birds have evolved elaborate physiological adaptations to travelling, the implications for their susceptibility to avian influenza are however unknown. Three groups of stonechats (Saxicola torquata from (I strongly migrating, (II weakly migrating and (III non-migrating populations were experimentally infected with HPAIV H5N1. The different bird groups of this insectivorous passerine species were infected in autumn, when the migrating populations clearly exhibit migratory restlessness. Following infection, all animals succumbed to the disease from 3 through 7 days post inoculation. Viral shedding, antigen distribution in tissues, and survival time did not differ between the three populations. However, notably, endothelial tropism of the HPAIV infection was exclusively seen in the group of resident birds. In conclusion, our data document for the first time the high susceptibility of an insectivorous passerine species to H5N1 infection, and the epidemiological role of these passerine birds is probably limited due to their high sensitivity to HPAIV H5N1 infection. Despite pronounced inherited differences in migratory status, the groups were generally indistinguishable in their susceptibility, survival time, clinical symptoms and viral shedding. Nevertheless, the migratory status partly influenced pathogenesis in the way of viral tropism.

  20. Modeling and roles of meteorological factors in outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Paritosh K; Islam, Md Zohorul; Debnath, Nitish C; Yamage, Mat

    2014-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) is a deadly zoonotic pathogen. Its persistence in poultry in several countries is a potential threat: a mutant or genetically reassorted progenitor might cause a human pandemic. Its world-wide eradication from poultry is important to protect public health. The global trend of outbreaks of influenza attributable to HPAI H5N1 shows a clear seasonality. Meteorological factors might be associated with such trend but have not been studied. For the first time, we analyze the role of meteorological factors in the occurrences of HPAI outbreaks in Bangladesh. We employed autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and multiplicative seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) to assess the roles of different meteorological factors in outbreaks of HPAI. Outbreaks were modeled best when multiplicative seasonality was incorporated. Incorporation of any meteorological variable(s) as inputs did not improve the performance of any multivariable models, but relative humidity (RH) was a significant covariate in several ARIMA and SARIMA models with different autoregressive and moving average orders. The variable cloud cover was also a significant covariate in two SARIMA models, but air temperature along with RH might be a predictor when moving average (MA) order at lag 1 month is considered.

  1. Vaccination with Astragalus and Ginseng Polysaccharides Improves Immune Response of Chickens against H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus

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    Auwalu Yusuf Abdullahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of astragalus and ginseng polysaccharides (APS, GPS on immune response and improvement of H5N1 vaccine, 360-day-old broilers were randomly divided into 8 groups of 45 chicks, comprising APS groups (1–3; GPS groups (4–6; vaccine group (7; and blank control (8 (without polysaccharide and vaccine. From day 12 after hatch groups 1–3 were given APS and groups 4–6 with GPS both at 100, 200, and 400 (mg/kg, respectively. At day 15 after hatch, groups 1–7 were vaccinated with 0.3 mL H5N1 vaccine subcutaneously; daily weight gain (DWG and serum Ig antibody (by HI-test were measured on 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after vaccination. Serum antibody titers and expression of cytokines (IL-2, IL-10, I FN-γ, and TNF were determined by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results revealed that all the polysaccharide groups were numerically increased in antibody levels and the expression of cytokines was significant (P<0.05 in the APS and GPS groups compared to corresponding vaccine group and blank control. DWG was higher (P<0.05 in 400 mg/kg APS groups than control groups. Thus oral supplements of GPS and APS have shown their potential in the improvement of immune response and could be used as adjuvant in a formulation of H5N1 vaccine.

  2. Modeling and roles of meteorological factors in outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paritosh K Biswas

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1 is a deadly zoonotic pathogen. Its persistence in poultry in several countries is a potential threat: a mutant or genetically reassorted progenitor might cause a human pandemic. Its world-wide eradication from poultry is important to protect public health. The global trend of outbreaks of influenza attributable to HPAI H5N1 shows a clear seasonality. Meteorological factors might be associated with such trend but have not been studied. For the first time, we analyze the role of meteorological factors in the occurrences of HPAI outbreaks in Bangladesh. We employed autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA and multiplicative seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA to assess the roles of different meteorological factors in outbreaks of HPAI. Outbreaks were modeled best when multiplicative seasonality was incorporated. Incorporation of any meteorological variable(s as inputs did not improve the performance of any multivariable models, but relative humidity (RH was a significant covariate in several ARIMA and SARIMA models with different autoregressive and moving average orders. The variable cloud cover was also a significant covariate in two SARIMA models, but air temperature along with RH might be a predictor when moving average (MA order at lag 1 month is considered.

  3. Defining "Sector 3" Poultry Layer Farms in Relation to H5N1-HPAI-An Example from Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Peter A; Wibowo, Michael Haryadi; Tarigan, Simson; Artanto, Sidna; Rosyid, Murni Nurhasanah; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2016-05-01

    To help guide surveillance and control of highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5N1 (H5N1-HPAI), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2004 devised a poultry farm classification system based on a combination of production and biosecurity practices. Four "Sectors" were defined, and this scheme has been widely adopted within Indonesia to guide national surveillance and control strategies. Nevertheless, little detailed research into the robustness of this classification system has been conducted, particularly as it relates to independent, small to medium-sized commercial poultry farms (Sector 3). Through an analysis of questionnaire data collected as part of a survey of layer farms in western and central Java, all of which were classified as Sector 3 by local veterinarians, we provide benchmark data on what defines this sector. A multivariate analysis of the dataset, using hierarchical cluster analysis, identified three groupings of the farms, which were defined by a combination of production-and biosecurity-related variables, particularly those related to farm size and (the lack of) washing and disinfection practices. Nevertheless, the relationship between production-related variables and positive biosecurity practices was poor, and larger farms did not have an overall higher total biosecurity score than small or medium-sized ones. Further research is required to define the properties of poultry farms in Indonesia that are most closely related to effective biosecurity and the prevention of H5N1-HPAI.

  4. In vitro inactivation of two Egyptian A/H5N1 viruses by four commercial chemical disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Eman; Abd El-Hamid, Hatem S; Awad, Ashraf M; Zessin, Karl-Hans; Abdelwhab, E M; Hafez, Hafez M

    2014-09-01

    The highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus (A/H5N1) devastated the poultry industry and posed a serious health threat. Cleaning and disinfection are essential parts of preventative and postoutbreak management of A/H5N1 infections in poultry. In this preliminary study, we used suspension and carrier tests to evaluate the impact of concentration, time of exposure, surface porosity, and organic matter on the ability of four commercial chemical disinfectants to inactivate two A/H5N1 viruses of clade 2.2.1 isolated in 2006 and 2010 from broiler flocks in Egypt. Viruses were incubated with 0.5%, 1%, and 2% of formalin, glutaraldehyde, TH4, and Virkon S for 15, 30, 60, and 120 min at room temperature (22 +/- 2 C). In suspension tests, in the absence of organic matter, all disinfectants, at each concentration, except Virkon S 0.5%, effectively inactivated virus suspensions after a 15-min exposure time. In the presence of organic matter, the use of low concentrations of formalin (0.5%), glutaraldehyde (0.5%), or Virkon S (0.5%) was not sufficient to inactivate the viruses after 15 min. In gauze carrier tests, only formalin at any concentration for 15 min was sufficient to inactivate the viruses, whereas different concentrations or exposure times were required for glutaraldehyde (0.5% for 60 min), TH4 (0.5% for 30 min), and Virkon S (0.5% for 60 min or 1% for 30 min). In wood carrier tests, total inactivation of the virus was obtained at concentrations of 0.5% for 30 min (formalin and TH4) or 60 min (glutaraldehyde and Virkon S). This study emphasizes the need to use high concentrations of and/or extended time of exposure to disinfectants for efficient inactivation of A/H5N1, particularly in the presence of organic matter or different surfaces, which are common in poultry operations. In addition, it seemed that the virus isolated in 2010 was more resistant to disinfectants than the isolate from 2006 when wood was used as a carrier.

  5. A comparison of clinical and epidemiological characteristics of fatal human infections with H5N1 and human influenza viruses in Thailand, 2004-2006.

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    Vivek Shinde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The National Avian Influenza Surveillance (NAIS system detected human H5N1 cases in Thailand from 2004-2006. Using NAIS data, we identified risk factors for death among H5N1 cases and described differences between H5N1 and human (seasonal influenza cases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: NAIS identified 11,641 suspect H5N1 cases (e.g. persons with fever and respiratory symptoms or pneumonia, and exposure to sick or dead poultry. All suspect H5N1 cases were tested with polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays for influenza A(H5N1 and human influenza viruses. NAIS detected 25 H5N1 and 2074 human influenza cases; 17 (68% and 22 (1% were fatal, respectively. We collected detailed information from medical records on all H5N1 cases, all fatal human influenza cases, and a sampled subset of 230 hospitalized non-fatal human influenza cases drawn from provinces with ≥1 H5N1 case or human influenza fatality. Fatal versus non-fatal H5N1 cases were more likely to present with low white blood cell (p = 0.05, lymphocyte (p<0.02, and platelet counts (p<0.01; have elevated liver enzymes (p = 0.05; and progress to circulatory (p<0.001 and respiratory failure (p<0.001. There were no differences in age, medical conditions, or antiviral treatment between fatal and non-fatal H5N1 cases. Compared to a sample of human influenza cases, all H5N1 cases had direct exposure to sick or dead birds (60% vs. 100%, p<0.05. Fatal H5N1 and fatal human influenza cases were similar clinically except that fatal H5N1 cases more commonly: had fever (p<0.001, vomiting (p<0.01, low white blood cell counts (p<0.01, received oseltamivir (71% vs. 23%, p<.001, but less often had ≥1 chronic medical conditions (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of diagnostic testing during an influenza A(H5N1 epizootic, a few epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings might provide clues to help target H5N1 control efforts. Severe human influenza and H5N1 cases were clinically similar, and

  6. AMINO-TERMINUS OF POLYMERASE BASIC-2 OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS OF H5N1 SUBTYPE ISOLATED FROM VARIOUS ANIMAL SPECIES IN INDONESIA

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    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The information on pathogenicity and adaptation factors of avian influenza virus (AIV in mammalsis very inportant in an effort to reduce the risk of avian influenza (AI pandemic in the future. Polymerasegene complex appears to be the major factors for adaptation of AIV to certain animal species. A preliminarystudy on role of non-coding region (NCR and amino-terminus of polymerase-basic 2 (PB2 is presented.Purified viral RNA of AIV isolated from chicken, duck, pig, and quail of Bali and Yogyakarta was reversetranscribed into cDNA and amplified using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCRusing PB-2 universal forward primer and specifically designed backward primer. The result showed thatall AIV’s H5N1 isolated from chicken, duck, quail, and pig, posed PB2 amino-terminus typical for IndonesianAIV H5N1. However, polymorphic amino acids of the protein fragment did not show any species specificmotive, with the exception of the pig isolate Sw/Tabanan/2006 which had specific substitution of D16E,H17Q, M40I, and H124Y.

  7. VP2, VP7, and NS1 proteins of bluetongue virus targeted in avian reovirus muNS-Mi microspheres elicit a protective immune response in IFNAR(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Otero-Romero, Iria; de la Poza, Francisco; Menaya-Vargas, Rebeca; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Benavente, Javier; Martínez-Costas, José M; Ortego, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Vaccination is critical for controlling the spread of bluetongue virus (BTV). The inactivated BTV vaccines that are now being used in Europe are effective in preventing outbreaks of BTV but secondary effects associated to repetitive inoculation of aluminum-containing adjuvants and the need to develop safer, cross-reactive, and more efficacious vaccines with differential diagnostic capability have re-stimulated the interest in developing improved vaccination strategies against BTV. We have engineered a subunit BTV vaccine candidate based on proteins VP2, VP7, and NS1 of BTV-4 incorporated into avian reovirus (ARV) muNS-Mi microspheres (MS-VP2/MS-VP7/MS-NS1). IFNAR(-/-) mice immunized with MS-VP2/MS-VP7/MS-NS1 without adjuvant generated significant levels of neutralizing antibodies specific to BTV-4. In addition, vaccination stimulated specific T cell responses, predominantly CD4+, against the virus. Immunized mice were fully protected against a homologous challenge with a lethal dose of BTV-4 and partially cross-protected against a heterologous challenge with a lethal dose of BTV-1. These results support MS-VP2/MS-VP7/MS-NS1 as a promising subunit vaccine candidate against multiple serotypes of BTV as well as the use of microspheres as an alternative delivery method with potent intrinsic adjuvant activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High-yield production of a stable Vero cell-based vaccine candidate against the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1

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    Zhou, Fangye; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Lei; Song, Shaohui; Zhang, Xinwen; Li, Weidong; Jiang, Shude [No. 5, Department of Bioproducts, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Pecking Union Medical College, Jiaoling Avenue 935, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650102, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yue, E-mail: euy-tokyo@umin.ac.jp [National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Yingxin Lane 100, Xicheng District, Beijing 100052, People' s Republic of China (China); Liao, Guoyang, E-mail: liaogy@21cn.com [No. 5, Department of Bioproducts, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Pecking Union Medical College, Jiaoling Avenue 935, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650102, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine with stable high yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable high yield derived from the YNVa H3N2 backbone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H5N1/YNVa has a similar safety and immunogenicity to H5N1delta. -- Abstract: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses pose a global pandemic threat, for which rapid large-scale vaccine production technology is critical for prevention and control. Because chickens are highly susceptible to HPAI viruses, the supply of chicken embryos for vaccine production might be depleted during a virus outbreak. Therefore, developing HPAI virus vaccines using other technologies is critical. Meeting vaccine demand using the Vero cell-based fermentation process has been hindered by low stability and yield. In this study, a Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine candidate (H5N1/YNVa) with stable high yield was achieved by reassortment of the Vero-adapted (Va) high growth A/Yunnan/1/2005(H3N2) (YNVa) virus with the A/Anhui/1/2005(H5N1) attenuated influenza vaccine strain (H5N1delta) using the 6/2 method. The reassorted H5N1/YNVa vaccine maintained a high hemagglutination (HA) titer of 1024. Furthermore, H5N1/YNVa displayed low pathogenicity and uniform immunogenicity compared to that of the parent virus.

  9. Combination Therapy Using Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies Protects Mice from Lethal H5N1 Infection and Prevents Formation of Escape Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Mookkan Prabakaran; Nayana Prabhu; Fang He; Qian Hongliang; Hui-Ting Ho; Jia Qiang; Tao Meng; Michael Goutama; Jimmy Kwang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given that there is a possibility of a human H5N1 pandemic and the fact that the recent H5N1 viruses are resistant to the anti-viral drugs, newer strategies for effective therapy are warranted. Previous studies show that single mAbs in immune prophylaxis can be protective against H5N1 infection. But a single mAb may not be effective in neutralization of a broad range of different strains of H5N1 and control of potential neutralization escape mutants. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We...

  10. Collective resistance to HPAI H5N1 surveillance in the Thai cockfighting community: Insights from a social anthropology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde C; Figuié, Muriel; Kovitvadhi, Attawit; Valeix, Sophie; Wongnarkpet, Sirichai; Poolkhet, Chaithep; Kasemsuwan, Suwicha; Ducrot, Christian; Roger, François; Binot, Aurélie

    2015-06-01

    Farmers may organize themselves to collectively manage risks such as animal diseases. Our study shows some evidence of such organization among fighting cock owners in Thailand. Fighting cocks were specifically targeted by HPAI (Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza) H5N1 surveillance and control measures in Thailand because they were thought to pose a high risk of spreading diseases. In this work, we used a social-anthropological approach to gain an inside view of the issues associated with HPAI H5N1 surveillance in the cockfighting community in Thailand. Based on a qualitative analysis of data collected through in-depth interviews and observation of cockfighters' practices, we found that fighting cock owners share a sense of belonging to the same community based on a common culture, values, interests, practices, and internal rules, including rules to manage poultry diseases. During the HPAI H5N1 outbreaks, these rules may have contributed to mitigating the potential risk associated with the intense movements of fighting cocks inside the country. Nevertheless, this community, despite the high awareness and know-how of its members regarding poultry diseases, has shown a strong reluctance to comply with HPAI surveillance programs. We suggest that this reluctance is due to important gaps between the logic and rationales underlying surveillance and those associated with cockfighting activities. Our study highlights the need for multi and trans-disciplinary research involving the social sciences to analyze interactions between stakeholders and the collective actions implemented by communities to face risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in black-headed gulls (Chroicocephalus ridibundus).

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    Ramis, Antonio; van Amerongen, Geert; van de Bildt, Marco; Leijten, Loneke; Vanderstichel, Raphael; Osterhaus, Albert; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-08-19

    Historically, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) rarely resulted in infection or clinical disease in wild birds. However, since 2002, disease and mortality from natural HPAIV H5N1 infection have been observed in wild birds including gulls. We performed an experimental HPAIV H5N1 infection of black-headed gulls (Chroicocephalus ridibundus) to determine their susceptibility to infection and disease from this virus, pattern of viral shedding, clinical signs, pathological changes and viral tissue distribution. We inoculated sixteen black-headed gulls with 1 × 10(4) median tissue culture infectious dose HPAIV H5N1 (A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005) intratracheally and intraesophageally. Birds were monitored daily until 12 days post inoculation (dpi). Oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected daily to detect viral shedding. Necropsies from birds were performed at 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 12 dpi. Sampling from selected tissues was done for histopathology, immunohistochemical detection of viral antigen, PCR, and viral isolation. Our study shows that all inoculated birds were productively infected, developed systemic disease, and had a high morbidity and mortality rate. Virus was detected mainly in the respiratory tract on the first days after inoculation, and then concentrated more in pancreas and central nervous system from 4 dpi onwards. Birds shed infectious virus until 7 dpi from the pharynx and 6 dpi from the cloaca. We conclude that black-headed gulls are highly susceptible to disease with a high mortality rate and are thus more likely to act as sentinel species for the presence of the virus than as long-distance carriers of the virus to new geographical areas.

  12. Spatio-temporal magnitude and direction of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 outbreaks in Bangladesh.

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    Syed S U Ahmed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of outbreaks of HPAI-H5N1 reported by Bangladesh from 2007 through 2011 placed the country among the highest reported numbers worldwide. However, so far, the understanding of the epidemic progression, direction, intensity, persistence and risk variation of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks over space and time in Bangladesh remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the magnitude and spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 virus outbreaks over space and time in poultry from 2007 to 2009 in Bangladesh, we applied descriptive and analytical spatial statistics. Temporal distribution of the outbreaks revealed three independent waves of outbreaks that were clustered during winter and spring. The descriptive analyses revealed that the magnitude of the second wave was the highest as compared to the first and third waves. Exploratory mapping of the infected flocks revealed that the highest intensity and magnitude of the outbreaks was systematic and persistent in an oblique line that connects south-east to north-west through the central part of the country. The line follows the Brahmaputra-Meghna river system, the junction between Central Asian and East Asian flyways, and the major poultry trading route in Bangladesh. Moreover, several important migratory bird areas were identified along the line. Geostatistical analysis revealed significant latitudinal directions of outbreak progressions that have similarity to the detected line of intensity and magnitude. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The line of magnitude and direction indicate the necessity of mobilizing maximum resources on this line to strengthen the existing surveillance.

  13. Analysis of the crow lung transcriptome in response to infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Mishra, Anamika; Ranaware, Pradip B; Kolte, Atul P; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Burt, David W; Raut, Ashwin Ashok

    2015-03-15

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus, currently circulating in Asia, causes severe disease in domestic poultry as well as wild birds like crow. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in crows and other wild birds is not well known. Thus, as a step to explore it, a comprehensive global gene expression analysis was performed on crow lungs, infected with HPAI H5N1 crow isolate (A/Crow/India/11TI11/2011) using high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) (GS FLX Titanium XLR70). The reference genome of crow is not available, so RNA seq analysis was performed on the basis of a de novo assembled transcriptome. The RNA seq result shows, 4052 genes were expressed uniquely in noninfected, 6277 genes were expressed uniquely in HPAIV infected sample and of the 6814 genes expressed in both samples, 2279 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Our transcriptome profile data allows for the ability to understand the molecular mechanism behind the recent lethal HPAIV outbreak in crows which was, until recently, thought to cause lethal infections only in gallinaceous birds such as chickens, but not in wild birds. The pattern of differentially expressed genes suggest that this isolate of H5N1 virus evades the host innate immune response by attenuating interferon (IFN)-inducible signalling possibly by down regulating the signalling from type I IFN (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2) and type II IFN receptors, upregulation of the signalling inhibitors suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3 and altering the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs). This may be the reason for disease and mortality in crows. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Survival of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus in Tissues Derived from Experimentally Infected Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Mase, Masaji

    2017-08-15

    Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been a severe threat to the poultry industry since its emergence in 1996. The carcass or tissues derived from infected birds may present the risk of the virus spreading to humans, animals, and the surrounding environment. In this study, we investigated the survival of the virus in feather, muscle, and liver tissues collected from six chickens (Gallus gallus) experimentally infected with HPAI H5N1 virus. The tissues were stored at +4°C or +20°C, and viral isolation was performed at different times for 360 days. The maximum periods for viral survival were observed in samples stored at +4°C in all tissue types and were 240 days in feather tissues, 160 days in muscle, and 20 days in liver. The viral infectivity at +20°C was maintained for a maximum of 30 days in the feather tissues, 20 days in muscle, and 3 days in liver. The viral inactivation rates partly overlapped in the feather and muscle tissues at the two temperatures. The virus was inactivated rapidly in the liver. Our experimental results indicate that the tissue type and temperature can greatly influence the survival of HPAI H5N1 virus in the tissues of infected chickens.IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype can cause massive losses of poultry, and people need to handle a large number of chicken carcasses contaminated with the virus at outbreak sites. This study evaluated how long the virus can keep its infectivity in the three types of tissues derived from chickens infected with the virus. Our experimental results indicate that the virus can survive in tissues for a specific period of time depending on the tissue type and temperature. Our results are valuable for better understanding of viral ecology in the environment and for reducing the risk of the virus spreading via bird tissues contaminated with the virus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Unusually High Mortality in Waterfowl Caused by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, N.; Sturm-Ramirez, K.; Khan, S. U.; Rahman, M. Z.; Sarkar, S.; Poh, M. K.; Shivaprasad, H. L.; Kalam, M. A.; Paul, S. K.; Karmakar, P. C.; Balish, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Mamun, A. A.; Mikolon, A. B.; Davis, C. T.; Rahman, M.; Donis, R. O.; Heffelfinger, J. D.; Luby, S. P.; Zeidner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mortality in ducks and geese caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) infection had not been previously identified in Bangladesh. In June–July 2011, we investigated mortality in ducks, geese and chickens with suspected H5N1 infection in a north-eastern district of the country to identify the aetiologic agent and extent of the outbreak and identify possible associated human infections. We surveyed households and farms with affected poultry flocks in six villages in Netrokona district and collected cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs from sick birds and tissue samples from dead poultry. We conducted a survey in three of these villages to identify suspected human influenza-like illness cases and collected nasopharyngeal and throat swabs. We tested all swabs by real-time RT-PCR, sequenced cultured viruses, and examined tissue samples by histopathology and immunohistochemistry to detect and characterize influenza virus infection. In the six villages, among the 240 surveyed households and 11 small-scale farms, 61% (1789/2930) of chickens, 47% (4816/10 184) of ducks and 73% (358/493) of geese died within 14 days preceding the investigation. Of 70 sick poultry swabbed, 80% (56/70) had detectable RNA for influenza A/H5, including 89% (49/55) of ducks, 40% (2/5) of geese and 50% (5/10) of chickens. We isolated virus from six of 25 samples; sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase gene of these six isolates indicated clade 2.3.2.1a of H5N1 virus. Histopathological changes and immunohistochemistry staining of avian influenza viral antigens were recognized in the brain, pancreas and intestines of ducks and chickens. We identified ten human cases showing signs compatible with influenza-like illness; four were positive for influenza A/H3; however, none were positive for influenza A/H5. The recently introduced H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1a virus caused unusually high mortality in ducks and geese. Heightened surveillance in poultry is warranted to guide

  16. Efficacy of a heterologous vaccine and adjuvant in ferrets challenged with influenza virus H5N1

    OpenAIRE

    Vela, Eric M.; Buccellato, Mathew A.; Tordoff, Kevin; Stark, Greg; Bigger, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Vela et?al. (2012) Efficacy of a heterologous vaccine and adjuvant in ferrets challenged with influenza virus H5N1. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(5), 328?340. Background? In 1997, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses caused outbreaks of disease in domestic poultry markets in Hong Kong. The virus has also been detected in infected poultry in Europe and Africa. Objective? The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of a heterologo...

  17. The creation of a contagious H5N1 influenza virus: implications for the education of life scientists

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    T. Novossiolova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper contends that the ongoing controversy surrounding the creation of a contagious H5N1 influenza virus has already exposed the severe limitations of the possibility of preventing the hostile misuse of the life scien­ces by dint of oversight of proposals and publications. It further argues that in order to prevent the potential wholesale militarisation of the life sciences, it is essential that life scientists become aware of their responsibilities within the context of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC and actively contribute their expertise to strengthening the biological weapons non-proliferation regime.

  18. Some novel insights into the binding of oseltamivir and zanamivir to H5N1 and N9 influenza virus neuraminidases:a homology modeling and flexible docking study

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    MARIJA L. MIHAJLOVIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the recent pandemic threat by the worldwide spread of H5N1 avian influenza, novel insights into the mechanism of ligand binding and interaction between various inhibitors (zanamivir – ZMV, oseltamivir – OTV, 2,3-didehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid – DANA, peramivir – PMV and neuraminidases (NA are of vital importance for the structure-based design of new anti-viral drugs. To address this issue, three-dimensional models of H5N1-NA and N9-NA were generated by homology modeling. Traditional residues within the active site throughout the family of NA protein structures were found to be highly conserved in H5N1-NA. A subtle variation between lipophilic and hydrophilic environments in H5N1-NA with respect to N9-NA was observed, thus shedding more light on the high resistance of some H5N1 strains to various NA inhibitors. Based on these models, an ArgusLab4/AScore flexible docking study was performed. The conformational differences between OTV bound to H5N1-NA and OTV bound to N9-NA were structurally identified and quantified. A slight difference of less than 1 kcal mol-1 between the OTV-N9 and OTV-N1 binding free energies is in agreement with the experimentally predicted free energy difference. The conformational differences between ZMV and OTV bound to either H5N1-NA or N9-NA were structurally identified. The binding free energies of the ZMV complexes, being slightly higher than those of OTV, are not in agreement with what was previously proposed using homology modeling. The differences between ZMV and OTV are suggested to be ascribed to the presence/absence of Asn166 in the active cavity of ZMV/OTV in H5N1-NA, and to the presence/absence of Ser165 in the binding site of ZMV/OTV in N9-NA. The charge distribution was evaluated using the semi-empirical AM1 method. The trends of the AM1 charges of the ZMV and OTV side chains in the complexes deviate from those previously reported.

  19. Computational analysis and determination of a highly conserved surface exposed segment in H5N1 avian flu and H1N1 swine flu neuraminidase

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    Nandy Ashesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalytic activity of influenza neuraminidase (NA facilitates elution of progeny virions from infected cells and prevents their self-aggregation mediated by the catalytic site located in the body region. Research on the active site of the molecule has led to development of effective inhibitors like oseltamivir, zanamivir etc, but the high rate of mutation and interspecies reassortment in viral sequences and the recent reports of oseltamivir resistant strains underlines the importance of determining additional target sites for developing future antiviral compounds. In a recent computational study of 173 H5N1 NA gene sequences we had identified a 50-base highly conserved region in 3'-terminal end of the NA gene. Results We extend the graphical and numerical analyses to a larger number of H5N1 NA sequences (514 and H1N1 swine flu sequences (425 accessed from GenBank. We use a 2D graphical representation model for the gene sequences and a Graphical Sliding Window Method (GSWM for protein sequences scanning the sequences as a block of 16 amino acids at a time. Using a protein sequence descriptor defined in our model, the protein sliding scan method allowed us to compare the different strains for block level variability, which showed significant statistical correlation to average solvent accessibility of the residue blocks; single amino acid position variability results in no correlation, indicating the impact of stretch variability in chemical environment. Close to the C-terminal end the GSWM showed less descriptor-variability with increased average solvent accessibility (ASA that is also supported by conserved predicted secondary structure of 3' terminal RNA and visual evidence from 3D crystallographic structure. Conclusion The identified terminal segment, strongly conserved in both RNA and protein sequences, is especially significant as it is surface exposed and structural chemistry reveals the probable role of this stretch in

  20. An induced pocket for the binding of potent fusion inhibitor CL-385319 with H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

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    Runming Li

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA plays crucial roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Therefore, HA is a potential target for developing anti-influenza drugs. Recently, we characterized a novel inhibitor of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, CL-385319, which specifically inhibits HA-mediated viral entry. Studies presented here identified the critical binding residues for CL-385319, which clustered in the stem region of the HA trimer by site-directed mutagenesis. Extensive computational simulations, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM_GBSA calculations, charge density and Laplacian calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the binding of CL-385319 to H5N1 influenza virus HA. It was found that the recognition and binding of CL-385319 to HA proceeds by a process of "induced fit" whereby the binding pocket is formed during their interaction. Occupation of this pocket by CL-385319 stabilizes the neutral pH structure of hemagglutinin, thus inhibiting the conformational rearrangements required for membrane fusion. This "induced fit" pocket may be a target for structure-based design of more potent influenza fusion inhibitors.

  1. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt

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    Sean G. Young

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC 0.991.

  2. A Phase-Intensity Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Avian Influenza A (H5N1 Detection

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    Chi Lok Wong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a phase-intensity surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor and demonstrate its use for avian influenza A (H5N1 antibody biomarker detection. The sensor probes the intensity variation produced by the steep phase response at surface plasmon excitation. The prism sensor head is fixed between a pair of polarizers with a perpendicular orientation angle and a forbidden transmission path. At SPR, a steep phase change is introduced between the p- and s-polarized light, and this rotates the polarization ellipse of the transmission beam. This allows the light at resonance to be transmitted and a corresponding intensity change to be detected. Neither time-consuming interference fringe analysis nor a phase extraction process is required. In refractive index sensing experiments, the sensor resolution was determined to be 6.3 × 10−6 refractive index values (RIU. The sensor has been further applied for H5N1 antibody biomarker detection, and the sensor resolution was determined to be 193.3 ng mL−1, compared to 1 μg mL−1 and 0.5 μg mL−1, as reported in literature for influenza antibody detection using commercial Biacore systems. It represents a 517.3% and 258.7% improvement in detection limit, respectively. With the unique features of label-free, real-time, and sensitive detection, the phase-intensity SPR biosensor has promising potential applications in influenza detection.

  3. A Phase-Intensity Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Chua, Marissa; Mittman, Heather; Choo, Li Xian; Lim, Hann Qian; Olivo, Malini

    2017-10-16

    In this paper, we present a phase-intensity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor and demonstrate its use for avian influenza A (H5N1) antibody biomarker detection. The sensor probes the intensity variation produced by the steep phase response at surface plasmon excitation. The prism sensor head is fixed between a pair of polarizers with a perpendicular orientation angle and a forbidden transmission path. At SPR, a steep phase change is introduced between the p- and s-polarized light, and this rotates the polarization ellipse of the transmission beam. This allows the light at resonance to be transmitted and a corresponding intensity change to be detected. Neither time-consuming interference fringe analysis nor a phase extraction process is required. In refractive index sensing experiments, the sensor resolution was determined to be 6.3 × 10-6 refractive index values (RIU). The sensor has been further applied for H5N1 antibody biomarker detection, and the sensor resolution was determined to be 193.3 ng mL-1, compared to 1 μg mL-1 and 0.5 μg mL-1, as reported in literature for influenza antibody detection using commercial Biacore systems. It represents a 517.3% and 258.7% improvement in detection limit, respectively. With the unique features of label-free, real-time, and sensitive detection, the phase-intensity SPR biosensor has promising potential applications in influenza detection.

  4. Establishing a laboratory network of influenza diagnosis in Indonesia: an experience from the avian flu (H5N1 outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiawaty V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Vivi Setiawaty, Krisna NA Pangesti, Ondri D SampurnoNational Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, the Republic of Indonesia, Jakarta, IndonesiaAbstract: Indonesia has been part of the global influenza surveillance since the establishment of a National Influenza Center (NIC at the National Institute of Health Research and Development (NIHRD by the Indonesian Ministry of Health in 1975. When the outbreak of avian influenza A (H5N1 occurred, the NIC and US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 were the only diagnostic laboratories equipped for etiology confirmation. The large geographical area of the Republic of Indonesia poses a real challenge to provide prompt and accurate diagnosis nationally. This was the main reason to establish a laboratory network for H5N1 diagnosis in Indonesia. Currently, 44 laboratories have been included in the network capable of performing polymerase chain reaction testing for influenza A. Diagnostic equipment and standard procedures of biosafety and biosecurity of handling specimens have been adopted largely from World Health Organization recommendations.Keywords: influenza, laboratory, networking

  5. Environmental sampling for avian influenza virus A (H5N1) in live-bird markets, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriani, Risa; Samaan, Gina; Gultom, Anita; Loth, Leo; Irianti, Sri; Indryani, Sri; Adjid, Rma; Dharmayanti, Ni Luh Putu Indi; Weaver, John; Mumford, Elizabeth; Lokuge, Kamalini; Kelly, Paul M; Darminto

    2010-12-01

    To identify environmental sites commonly contaminated by avian influenza virus A (H5N1) in live-bird markets in Indonesia, we investigated 83 markets in 3 provinces in Indonesia. At each market, samples were collected from up to 27 poultry-related sites to assess the extent of contamination. Samples were tested by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and virus isolation. A questionnaire was used to ascertain types of birds in the market, general infrastructure, and work practices. Thirty-nine (47%) markets showed contamination with avian influenza virus in ≥ 1 of the sites sampled. Risk factors were slaughtering birds in the market and being located in West Java province. Protective factors included daily removal of waste and zoning that segregated poultry-related work flow areas. These results can aid in the design of evidence-based programs concerning environmental sanitation, food safety, and surveillance to reduce the risk for avian influenza virus A (H5N1) transmission in live-bird markets.

  6. Noroviruses Co-opt the Function of Host Proteins VAPA and VAPB for Replication via a Phenylalanine–Phenylalanine-Acidic-Tract-Motif Mimic in Nonstructural Viral Protein NS1/2

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    Broc T. McCune

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Norovirus genus contains important human pathogens, but the role of host pathways in norovirus replication is largely unknown. Murine noroviruses provide the opportunity to study norovirus replication in cell culture and in small animals. The human norovirus nonstructural protein NS1/2 interacts with the host protein VAMP-associated protein A (VAPA, but the significance of the NS1/2-VAPA interaction is unexplored. Here we report decreased murine norovirus replication in VAPA- and VAPB-deficient cells. We characterized the role of VAPA in detail. VAPA was required for the efficiency of a step(s in the viral replication cycle after entry of viral RNA into the cytoplasm but before the synthesis of viral minus-sense RNA. The interaction of VAPA with viral NS1/2 proteins is conserved between murine and human noroviruses. Murine norovirus NS1/2 directly bound the major sperm protein (MSP domain of VAPA through its NS1 domain. Mutations within NS1 that disrupted interaction with VAPA inhibited viral replication. Structural analysis revealed that the viral NS1 domain contains a mimic of the phenylalanine–phenylalanine-acidic-tract (FFAT motif that enables host proteins to bind to the VAPA MSP domain. The NS1/2-FFAT mimic region interacted with the VAPA-MSP domain in a manner similar to that seen with bona fide host FFAT motifs. Amino acids in the FFAT mimic region of the NS1 domain that are important for viral replication are highly conserved across murine norovirus strains. Thus, VAPA interaction with a norovirus protein that functionally mimics host FFAT motifs is important for murine norovirus replication.

  7. Influenza A Virus Virulence Depends on Two Amino Acids in the N-Terminal Domain of Its NS1 Protein To Facilitate Inhibition of the RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierhorn, Kristina L.; Jolmes, Fabian; Bespalowa, Julia; Saenger, Sandra; Peteranderl, Christin; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Mielke, Maja; Budt, Matthias; Pleschka, Stephan; Herrmann, Andreas; Herold, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) has broad antiviral activity inducing translational shutdown of viral and cellular genes and is therefore targeted by various viral proteins to facilitate pathogen propagation. The pleiotropic NS1 protein of influenza A virus acts as silencer of PKR activation and ensures high-level viral replication and virulence. However, the exact manner of this inhibition remains controversial. To elucidate the structural requirements within the NS1 protein for PKR inhibition, we generated a set of mutant viruses, identifying highly conserved arginine residues 35 and 46 within the NS1 N terminus as being most critical not only for binding to and blocking activation of PKR but also for efficient virus propagation. Biochemical and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based interaction studies showed that mutation of R35 or R46 allowed formation of NS1 dimers but eliminated any detectable binding to PKR as well as to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Using in vitro and in vivo approaches to phenotypic restoration, we demonstrated the essential role of the NS1 N terminus for blocking PKR. The strong attenuation conferred by NS1 mutation R35A or R46A was substantially alleviated by stable knockdown of PKR in human cells. Intriguingly, both NS1 mutant viruses did not trigger any signs of disease in PKR+/+ mice, but replicated to high titers in lungs of PKR−/− mice and caused lethal infections. These data not only establish the NS1 N terminus as highly critical for neutralization of PKR's antiviral activity but also identify this blockade as an indispensable contribution of NS1 to the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus inhibits activation of the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) by means of its nonstructural NS1 protein, but the underlying mode of inhibition is debated. Using mutational analysis, we identified arginine residues 35 and 46 within the N-terminal NS1 domain as highly critical for binding to and functional

  8. Mutations Driving Airborne Transmission of A/H5N1 Virus in Mammals Cause Substantial Attenuation in Chickens only when combined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Richard (Mathilde); S. Herfst (Sander); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); D. de Meulder (Dennis); P. Lexmond (Pascal); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractA/H5N1 influenza viruses pose a threat to human and animal health. A fully avian A/H5N1 influenza virus was previously shown to acquire airborne transmissibility between ferrets upon accumulation of five or six substitutions that affected three traits: polymerase activity,

  9. Reassortment between Avian H5N1 and Human Influenza Viruses Is Mainly Restricted to the Matrix and Neuraminidase Gene Segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J.A. Schrauwen (Eefje); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); S. Herfst (Sander)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses have devastated the poultry industry in many countries of the eastern hemisphere. Occasionally H5N1 viruses cross the species barrier and infect humans, sometimes with a severe clinical outcome. When this happens, there is a chance of

  10. Pathogenesis of influenza A/H5N1 virus infection in ferrets differs between intranasal and intratracheal routes of inoculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bodewes (Rogier); J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); G. van Amerongen (Geert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMost patients infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza A/H5N1 virus develop severe pneumonia resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, with extrarespiratory disease as an uncommon complication. Intranasal inoculation of ferrets with influenza A/H5N1 virus causes lesions in

  11. Protective measures and H5N1-seroprevalence among personnel tasked with bird collection during an outbreak of avian influenza A/H5N1 in wild birds, Ruegen, Germany, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littmann Martina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, the first outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza A/H5N1 occurred among wild birds on the island of Ruegen between February and April 2006. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of recommended protective measures and to measure H5N1-seroprevalence among personnel tasked with bird collection. Methods Inclusion criteria of our study were participation in collecting wild birds on Ruegen between February and March 2006. Study participants were asked to complete a questionnaire, and to provide blood samples. For evaluation of the use of protective measures, we developed a personal protective equipment (PPE-score ranging between 0 and 9, where 9 corresponds to a consistent and complete use of PPE. Sera were tested by plaque neutralization (PN and microneutralization (MN assays. Reactive sera were reanalysed in the World Health Organization-Collaborating Centre (WHO-CC using MN assay. Results Of the eligible personnel, consisting of firemen, government workers and veterinarians, 61% (97/154 participated in the study. Of those, 13% reported having always worn all PPE-devices during bird collection (PPE-score: 9. Adherence differed between firemen (mean PPE-score: 6.6 and government workers (mean PPE-score: 4.5; p = 0.006. The proportion of personnel always adherent to wearing PPE was lowest for masks (19%. Of the participants, 18% had received seasonal influenza vaccination prior to the outbreak. There were no reports of influenza-like illness. Five sera initially H5-reactive by PN assay were negative by WHO-CC confirmatory testing. Conclusion Gaps and variability in adherence demonstrate the risk of exposure to avian influenza under conditions of wild bird collection, and justify serological testing and regular training of task personnel.

  12. Specific mutations in the PB2 protein of influenza A virus compensate for the lack of efficient IFN antagonism of the NS1 protein of bat influenza A-like viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; Pavlisin, Amzie; Martinez-Romero, Carles; Tripathi, Shashank; Mena, Ignacio; Moreira-Soto, Andrés; Vicente-Santos, Amanda; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Schwemmle, Martin; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2018-01-10

    Recently, two new influenza A-like viruses have been discovered in bats, HL17NL10 and HL18NL11. The hemagglutinin-like (HL) and neuraminidase like (NL) proteins of these viruses lack hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities despite their sequence and structural homologies with the HA and NA proteins of conventional influenza A virus. We now have investigated whether the NS1 proteins of HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 viruses can functionally substitute the NS1 protein of a conventional influenza A virus. For this purpose we generated recombinant influenza A/PR8/34 (PR8) H1N1 viruses containing the NS1 protein of PR8 WT, HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 viruses. These viruses (r/NS1PR8, r/NS1HL17, r/NS1HL18) were tested for replication in bat and non-bat mammalian cells and in mice. Our results demonstrate that r/NS1HL17 and r/NS1HL18 viruses are attenuated in vitro and in vivo However, bat NS1 recombinant viruses showed similar phenotypes as r/NS1PR8 virus in STAT1-/- human A549 cells and mice, unable to respond to IFN. Interestingly, multiple mouse passages of r/NS1HL17 and r/NS1HL18 viruses resulted in selection of mutant viruses containing single amino acid mutations in the viral PB2 protein. In contrast to the parental viruses, the selected PB2 mutants restored virulence and IFN antagonism. Our results indicate that the NS1 protein of bat influenza A-like viruses is less efficient than its conventional influenza A virus NS1 counterpart in antagonizing the IFN response, and that this deficiency can be overcome by the influenza virus PB2 protein.ImportanceSignificant gaps are still uncovered in our understanding of the basic features of the recently discovered bat influenza A-like viruses, HL17NL10 and HL18NL11. These unique viruses display both similarities and differences in basic biology compared to conventional influenza A viruses. In here, we show that recombinant influenza A viruses containing the NS1 protein from HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 are attenuated. This attenuation was

  13. H5N1 whole-virus vaccine induces neutralizing antibodies in humans which are protective in a mouse passive transfer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Howard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H5N1 vaccines have been extensively tested in clinical trials and consistently demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic; however, clinical efficacy is difficult to evaluate in the absence of wide-spread human disease. A lethal mouse model has been utilized which allows investigation of the protective efficacy of active vaccination or passive transfer of vaccine induced sera following lethal H5N1 challenge. METHODS: We used passive transfer of immune sera to investigate antibody-mediated protection elicited by a Vero cell-derived, non-adjuvanted inactivated whole-virus H5N1 vaccine. Mice were injected intravenously with H5N1 vaccine-induced rodent or human immune sera and subsequently challenged with a lethal dose of wild-type H5N1 virus. RESULTS: Passive transfer of H5N1 vaccine-induced mouse, guinea pig and human immune sera provided dose-dependent protection of recipient mice against lethal challenge with wild-type H5N1 virus. Protective dose fifty values for serum H5N1 neutralizing antibody titers were calculated to be ≤1∶11 for all immune sera, independently of source species. CONCLUSIONS: These data underpin the confidence that the Vero cell culture-derived, whole-virus H5N1 vaccine will be effective in a pandemic situation and support the use of neutralizing serum antibody titers as a correlate of protection for H5N1 vaccines.

  14. Cellular transcriptional profiling in influenza A virus-infected lung epithelial cells: The role of the nonstructural NS1 protein in the evasion of the host innate defense and its potential contribution to pandemic influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Gary K.; Salvatore, Mirella; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Carter, Victoria S.; Wang, Xiuyan; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Palese, Peter; Katze, Michael G.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-08-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus contributes to viral pathogenesis, primarily by enabling the virus to disarm the host cell type IFN defense system. We examined the downstream effects of NS1 protein expression during influenza A virus infection on global cellular mRNA levels by measuring expression of over 13,000 cellular genes in response to infection with wild-type and mutant viruses in human lung epithelial cells. Influenza A/PR/8/34 virus infection resulted in a significant induction of genes involved in the IFN pathway. Deletion of the viral NS1 gene increased the number and magnitude of expression of cellular genes implicated in the IFN, NF-B, and other antiviral pathways. Interestingly, different IFN-induced genes showed different sensitivities to NS1-mediated inhibition of their expression. A recombinant virus with a C-terminal deletion in its NS1 gene induced an intermediate cellular mRNA expression pattern between wild-type and NS1 knockout viruses. Most significantly, a virus containing the 1918 pandemic NS1 gene was more efficient at blocking the expression of IFN-regulated genes than its parental influenza A/WSN/33 virus. Taken together, our results suggest that the cellular response to influenza A virus infection in human lung cells is significantly influenced by the sequence of the NS1 gene, demonstrating the importance of the NS1 protein in regulating the host cell response triggered by virus infection.

  15. In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Blixt, Klas Ola; Stevens, James

    2012-01-01

    substitutions in the hemagglutinin (S227N, D187G, E190G, and Q196R) that revealed modestly increased a2-6 and minimally decreased a2-3 binding by glycan array analysis. However, a mutant virus combining Q196R with mutations from previous pandemic viruses (Q226L and G228S) revealed predominantly a2-6 binding......Acquisition of a2-6 sialoside receptor specificity by a2-3 specific highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) is thought to be a prerequisite for efficient transmission in humans. By in vitro selection for binding a2-6 sialosides, we identified four variant viruses with amino acid...

  16. Selection of therapeutic H5N1 monoclonal antibodies following IgVH repertoire analysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sean A; Moore, Margaret; VandenEkart, Emily J; Roque, Richard P; Bowen, Richard A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Wiley, Steven R; Clegg, Christopher H

    2016-07-01

    The rapid rate of influenza virus mutation drives the emergence of new strains that inflict serious seasonal epidemics and less frequent, but more deadly, pandemics. While vaccination provides the best protection against influenza, its utility is often diminished by the unpredictability of new pathogenic strains. Consequently, efforts are underway to identify new antiviral drugs and monoclonal antibodies that can be used to treat recently infected individuals and prevent disease in vulnerable populations. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and the analysis of antibody gene repertoires is a valuable tool for Ab discovery. Here, we describe a technology platform for isolating therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by analyzing the IgVH repertoires of mice immunized with recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin (rH5). As an initial proof of concept, 35 IgVH genes were selected using a CDRH3 search algorithm and co-expressed in a murine IgG2a expression vector with a panel of germline murine kappa genes. Culture supernatants were then screened for antigen binding. Seventeen of the 35 IgVH MAbs (49%) bound rH5VN1203 in preliminary screens and 8 of 9 purified MAbs inhibited 3 heterosubtypic strains of H5N1 virus when assayed by HI. Two of these MAbs demonstrated prophylactic and therapeutic activity in virus-challenged mice. This is the first example in which an NGS discovery platform has been used to isolate anti-influenza MAbs with relevant therapeutic activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Monovalent H5 vaccine based on epitope-chimeric HA provides broad cross-clade protection against variant H5N1 viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; Prabakaran, Mookkan; Rajesh Kumar, Subaschandrabose; Tan, Yunrui; Kwang, Jimmy

    2014-05-01

    H5N1 HPAI virus continues to be a severe threat for public health, as well as for the poultry industry, due to its high mortality and antigenic drift rate. There is no monovalent vaccine available which provides broad protection against those major circulating strains. In the present study, a monovalent H5 vaccine strain was developed with antigenic sequence analysis and epitope mutations. H5 from Indonesia strain (A/Indonesia/CDC669/2006) was used as backbone sequence. Three amino acids were mutated to express immunogenic epitopes from other circulating H5N1s in the backbone. RG influenza virus expressing the epitope-chimeric H5 can react in HI with multiple H5 monoclonal antibodies which fail to neutralize wild type CDC669. High titers in HI and virus neutralization against different clades H5N1s (clade 1, 2, 4 and 7) were detected using sera from mice immunized with the epitope-chimeric H5N1. The monovalent vaccine with RG-epitope-chimeric H5N1 protected mice from lethal challenge with H5N1s of different clades, including clade 1.0, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3. This study indicates that the broad immune response elicited by this single H5N1 virus allows it to be a promising candidate for a monovalent H5 universal vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Perbandingan Sekuens Konsensus Gen Hemaglutinin Virus Avian Influenza Subtipe H5N1 Asal Unggas di Indonesia dengan Subtipe H5N2 dan H5N9

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    I Gusti Ngurah Kade Mahardika

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Consensus sequence of hemagglutinin (HA gene of avian influenza viruses of H5N1 subtype isolatedfrom fowl in Indonesia – hereafter named as H5N1_Indonesia – is compared with that of H5N2 and H5N9viruses. Sequence information were downloaded from the public database GeneBank. The genetic distancesand nucleotide as well as its deduced amino-acid sequence alignment were analysed. At nucleotide level,genetic distances of HA between H5N1_Indonesia to H5N2 and H5N9 are 16.2% and 9.6%, respectively.At amino-acid level, the distances are 9.7% and 6.8%. The genetic distances of HA1 fragments are 19.0%(H5N1_Indonesia – H5N2 and 10.9% (H5N1_Indonesia – H5N9. At amino-acid, level the genetic distancesof HA1 are 13.1% (H5N1_Indonesia-H5N2 and 8.8% (H5N1_Indonesia – H5N9. All three subtypes havedifferent glycosilation motive and variation of amino-acid sequence of four antigenic sites. The consequenceof those facts is discussed.

  19. Environmental Factors Influencing the Spread of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus in wild birds in Europe

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    Yali Si

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A large number of occurrences of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus in wild birds were reported in Europe. The relationship between the occurrence pattern and environmental factors has, however, not yet been explored. This research uses logistic regression to quantify the relationships between anthropogenic or physical environmental factors and HPAI H5N1 occurrences. Our results indicate that HPAI H5N1 occurrences are highly correlated with the following: the increased normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI in December; intermediate NDVI in March; lower elevations; increased minimum temperatures in January; and reduced precipitation in January. A predictive risk map of HPAI H5N1 occurrences in wild birds in Europe was generated on the basis of five key environmental factors. Independent validation of the risk map showed the predictive model to be of high accuracy (79%. The analysis suggests that HPAI H5N1 occurrences in wild birds are strongly influenced by the availability of food resources and are facilitated by increased temperatures and reduced precipitation. We therefore deduced that HPAI H5N1 occurrences in wild birds in Europe are probably caused by contact with other wild birds and not by contact with domestic poultry. These findings are important considerations for the global surveillance of HPAI H5N1 occurrences in wild birds.

  20. An Optimized Real-Time PCR to Avoid Species-/Tissue-Associated Inhibition for H5N1 Detection in Ferret and Monkey Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    LingJun Zhan; LinLin Bao; FengDi Li; Qi Lv; LiLi Xu; Chuan Qin

    2012-01-01

    The real-time PCR diagnostics for avian influenza virus H5N1 in tissue specimens are often suboptimal, since naturally occurring PCR inhibitors present in samples, or unanticipated match of primer to unsequenced species’ genome. With the principal aim of optimizing the SYBR Green real-time PCR method for detecting H5N1 in ferret and monkey (Chinese rhesus macaque) tissue specimens, we screened various H5N1 gene-specific primer pairs and tested their ability to sensitively and specifically det...

  1. Role of domestic ducks in the propagation and biological evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse-Post, D J; Sturm-Ramirez, K M; Humberd, J; Seiler, P; Govorkova, E A; Krauss, S; Scholtissek, C; Puthavathana, P; Buranathai, C; Nguyen, T D; Long, H T; Naipospos, T S P; Chen, H; Ellis, T M; Guan, Y; Peiris, J S M; Webster, R G

    2005-07-26

    Wild waterfowl, including ducks, are natural hosts of influenza A viruses. These viruses rarely caused disease in ducks until 2002, when some H5N1 strains became highly pathogenic. Here we show that these H5N1 viruses are reverting to nonpathogenicity in ducks. Ducks experimentally infected with viruses isolated between 2003 and 2004 shed virus for an extended time (up to 17 days), during which variant viruses with low pathogenicity were selected. These results suggest that the duck has become the "Trojan horse" of Asian H5N1 influenza viruses. The ducks that are unaffected by infection with these viruses continue to circulate these viruses, presenting a pandemic threat.

  2. Human H5N1 influenza infections in Cambodia 2005-2011: case series and cost-of-illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries-Waa, Karen; Drake, Tom; Huszar, Anthony; Liverani, Marco; Borin, Khieu; Touch, Sok; Srey, Teng; Coker, Richard

    2013-06-06

    Southeast Asia has been identified as a potential epicentre of emerging diseases with pandemic capacity, including highly pathogenic influenza. Cambodia in particular has the potential for high rates of avoidable deaths from pandemic influenza due to large gaps in health system resources. This study seeks to better understand the course and cost-of-illness for cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Cambodia. We studied the 18 laboratory-confirmed cases of avian influenza subtype H5N1 identified in Cambodia between January 2005 and August 2011. Medical records for all patients were reviewed to extract information on patient characteristics, travel to hospital, time to admission, diagnostic testing, treatment and disease outcomes. Further data related to costs was collected through interviews with key informants at district and provincial hospitals, the Ministry of Health and non-governmental organisations. An ingredient-based approach was used to estimate the total economic cost for each study patient. Costing was conducted from a societal perspective and included both financial and opportunity costs to the patient or carer. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to evaluate potential change or variation in the cost-of-illness. Of the 18 patients studied, 11 (61%) were under the age of 18 years. The majority of patients (16, 89%) died, eight (44%) within 24 hours of hospital admission. There was an average delay of seven days between symptom onset and hospitalisation with patients travelling an average of 148 kilometres (8-476 km) to the admitting hospital. Five patients were treated with oseltamivir of whom two received the recommended dose. For the 16 patients who received all their treatment in Cambodia the average per patient cost of H5N1 influenza illness was US$300 of which 85.0% comprised direct medical provider costs, including diagnostic testing (41.2%), pharmaceuticals (28.4%), hospitalisation (10.4%), oxygen (4.4%) and outpatient consultations (0

  3. Human H5N1 influenza infections in Cambodia 2005–2011: case series and cost-of-illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Southeast Asia has been identified as a potential epicentre of emerging diseases with pandemic capacity, including highly pathogenic influenza. Cambodia in particular has the potential for high rates of avoidable deaths from pandemic influenza due to large gaps in health system resources. This study seeks to better understand the course and cost-of-illness for cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Cambodia. Methods We studied the 18 laboratory-confirmed cases of avian influenza subtype H5N1 identified in Cambodia between January 2005 and August 2011. Medical records for all patients were reviewed to extract information on patient characteristics, travel to hospital, time to admission, diagnostic testing, treatment and disease outcomes. Further data related to costs was collected through interviews with key informants at district and provincial hospitals, the Ministry of Health and non-governmental organisations. An ingredient-based approach was used to estimate the total economic cost for each study patient. Costing was conducted from a societal perspective and included both financial and opportunity costs to the patient or carer. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to evaluate potential change or variation in the cost-of-illness. Results Of the 18 patients studied, 11 (61%) were under the age of 18 years. The majority of patients (16, 89%) died, eight (44%) within 24 hours of hospital admission. There was an average delay of seven days between symptom onset and hospitalisation with patients travelling an average of 148 kilometres (8-476 km) to the admitting hospital. Five patients were treated with oseltamivir of whom two received the recommended dose. For the 16 patients who received all their treatment in Cambodia the average per patient cost of H5N1 influenza illness was US$300 of which 85.0% comprised direct medical provider costs, including diagnostic testing (41.2%), pharmaceuticals (28.4%), hospitalisation (10.4%), oxygen (4.4%) and

  4. Production of inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccines from MDCK cells in serum-free medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Yung-Chih Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly pathogenic influenza viruses pose a constant threat which could lead to a global pandemic. Vaccination remains the principal measure to reduce morbidity and mortality from such pandemics. The availability and surging demand for pandemic vaccines needs to be addressed in the preparedness plans. This study presents an improved high-yield manufacturing process for the inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccines using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells grown in a serum-free (SF medium microcarrier cell culture system. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The current study has evaluated the performance of cell adaptation switched from serum-containing (SC medium to several commercial SF media. The selected SF medium was further evaluated in various bioreactor culture systems for process scale-up evaluation. No significant difference was found in the cell growth in different sizes of bioreactors studied. In the 7.5 L bioreactor runs, the cell concentration reached to 2.3 × 10(6 cells/mL after 5 days. The maximum virus titers of 1024 Hemagglutinin (HA units/50 µL and 7.1 ± 0.3 × 10(8 pfu/mL were obtained after 3 days infection. The concentration of HA antigen as determined by SRID was found to be 14.1 µg/mL which was higher than those obtained from the SC medium. A mouse immunogenicity study showed that the formalin-inactivated purified SF vaccine candidate formulated with alum adjuvant could induce protective level of virus neutralization titers similar to those obtained from the SC medium. In addition, the H5N1 viruses produced from either SC or SF media showed the same antigenic reactivity with the NIBRG14 standard antisera. CONCLUSIONS: The advantages of this SF cell-based manufacturing process could reduce the animal serum contamination, the cost and lot-to-lot variation of SC medium production. This study provides useful information to manufacturers that are planning to use SF medium for cell-based influenza vaccine production.

  5. Prediction and identification of T cell epitopes in the H5N1 influenza virus nucleoprotein in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Hou

    Full Text Available T cell epitopes can be used for the accurate monitoring of avian influenza virus (AIV immune responses and the rational design of vaccines. No T cell epitopes have been previously identified in the H5N1 AIV virus nucleoprotein (NP in chickens. For the first time, this study used homology modelling techniques to construct three-dimensional structures of the peptide-binding domains of chicken MHC class Ι molecules for four commonly encountered unique haplotypes, i.e., B4, B12, B15, and B19. H5N1 AIV NP was computationally parsed into octapeptides or nonapeptides according to the peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I molecules of the B4, B12, B15 and B19 haplotypes. Seventy-five peptide sequences were modelled and their MHC class I molecule-binding abilities were analysed by molecular docking. Twenty-five peptides (Ten for B4, six for B12, two for B15, and seven for B19 were predicted to be potential T cell epitopes in chicken. Nine of these peptides and one unrelated peptide were manually synthesized and their T cell responses were tested in vitro. Spleen lymphocytes were collected from SPF chickens that had been immunised with a NP-expression plasmid, pCAGGS-NP, and they were stimulated using the synthesized peptides. The secretion of chicken IFN-γ and the proliferation of CD8(+ T cells were tested using an ELISA kit and flow cytometry, respectively. The significant secretion of chicken IFN-γ and proliferation of CD8(+ T lymphocytes increased by 13.7% and 11.9% were monitored in cells stimulated with peptides NP(89-97 and NP(198-206, respectively. The results indicate that peptides NP(89-97 (PKKTGGPIY and NP(198-206 (KRGINDRNF are NP T cell epitopes in chicken of certain haplotypes. The method used in this investigation is applicable to predicting T cell epitopes for other antigens in chicken, while this study also extends our understanding of the mechanisms of the immune response to AIV in chicken.

  6. Pathogenesis of H5N1 influenza virus infections in mice and ferret models differ between respiratory and digestive system exposure

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    Background. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data suggests H5N1 influenza viruses are transmitted through and predominantly affect the respiratory system of mammals. Some data suggests digestive system involvement. However, direct evidence of alimentary transmission and infection in mammal...

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of an AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in Korean adults: a phase IV, randomized, open-label, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izurieta, Patricia; Kim, Woo Joo; Wie, Seong-Heon; Lee, Jacob; Lee, Jin-Soo; Dramé, Mamadou; Vaughn, David W; Schuind, Anne

    2015-06-04

    AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccines have been assessed in an extensive clinical development program conducted in North America, Europe, and Asia including children from 6 months of age, adults, and elderly adults. We evaluated AS03-H5N1 in Korean adults 18 through 60 years of age. This Phase IV, randomized, study was conducted to assess the immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and safety of two doses (3.75μg of hemagglutinin antigen) of A/Indonesia/5/2005 (H5N1) adjuvanted with AS03 given 21 days apart in Korean adults. Antibody responses were assessed using hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays against the vaccine strain and a vaccine-heterologous strain (A/Vietnam/1194/2004) 21 days after the second dose. A control group (safety) received a licensed seasonal inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). Reactogenicity was assessed for 7 days after each vaccination, and unsolicited adverse events were assessed for 182 days following vaccination in both study groups (NCT01730378). AS03-H5N1 was immunogenic and elicited robust HI antibody responses with seroconversion rates of 100% for the vaccine strain and 69.1% for the heterologous strain (N=81). HI antibody responses fulfilled the European licensure criteria for immunogenicity (primary endpoint). The incidence of local and systemic solicited adverse events (reactogenicity) was higher with AS03-H5N1 than TIV. There was no apparent difference in the rate of unsolicited adverse events in the AS03-H5N1 and TIV groups. The results indicate that AS03-H5N1 vaccine is immunogenic with reactogenicity and safety findings that are consistent with the established profile of AS03-H5N1 vaccine. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses with H9N2-PB1 Gene in Poultry, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamage, Mat; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Claes, Filip; Ahmed, Garba; Giasuddin, Mohammed; Salviato, Annalisa; Ormelli, Silvia; Bonfante, Francesco; Schivo, Alessia; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has reported a high number of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) (H5N1) in poultry. We identified a natural reassortant HPAI (H5N1) virus containing a H9N2-PB1 gene in poultry in Bangladesh. Our findings highlight the risks for prolonged co-circulation of avian influenza viruses and the need to monitor their evolution. PMID:24047513

  9. Influenza A H5N1 clade 2.3.4 virus with a different antiviral susceptibility profile replaced clade 1 virus in humans in northern Vietnam.

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    Mai T Q Le

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 2007, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry and humans in Vietnam were consistently reported to be clade 1 viruses, susceptible to oseltamivir but resistant to amantadine. Here we describe the re-emergence of human HPAI H5N1 virus infections in Vietnam in 2007 and the characteristics of the isolated viruses.Respiratory specimens from patients suspected to be infected with avian influenza in 2007 were screened by influenza and H5 subtype specific polymerase chain reaction. Isolated H5N1 strains were further characterized by genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing. Eleven poultry outbreak isolates from 2007 were included in the sequence analysis. Eight patients, all of them from northern Vietnam, were diagnosed with H5N1 in 2007 and five of them died. Phylogenetic analysis of H5N1 viruses isolated from humans and poultry in 2007 showed that clade 2.3.4 H5N1 viruses replaced clade 1 viruses in northern Vietnam. Four human H5N1 strains had eight-fold reduced in-vitro susceptibility to oseltamivir as compared to clade 1 viruses. In two poultry isolates the I117V mutation was found in the neuraminidase gene, which is associated with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. No mutations in the M2 gene conferring amantadine resistance were found.In 2007, H5N1 clade 2.3.4 viruses replaced clade 1 viruses in northern Vietnam and were susceptible to amantadine but showed reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. Combination antiviral therapy with oseltamivir and amantadine for human cases in Vietnam is recommended.

  10. NS1 Protein Amino Acid Changes D189N and V194I Affect Interferon Responses, Thermosensitivity, and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

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    Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus NS1 protein is a nonstructural, multifunctional protein that counteracts host innate immune responses, modulating virus pathogenesis. NS1 protein variability in subjects infected with H3N2 influenza A viruses (IAVs) during the 2010/2011 season was analyzed, and amino acid changes in residues 86, 189, and 194 were found. The consequences of these mutations for the NS1-mediated inhibition of IFN responses and the pathogenesis of the virus were evaluated, showing that NS1 mutations D189N and V194I impaired the ability of the NS1 protein to inhibit general gene expression, most probably because these mutations decreased the binding of NS1 to the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30). A recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-D189N protein was slightly attenuated, whereas the virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-V194I protein was further attenuated in mice. The higher attenuation of this virus could not be explained by differences in the ability of the two NS1 proteins to counteract host innate immune responses, indicating that another factor must be responsible. In fact, we showed that the virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-V194I protein demonstrated a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype, providing a most likely explanation for the stronger attenuation observed. As far as we know, this is the first description of a mutation in NS1 residue 194 conferring a ts phenotype. These studies are relevant in order to identify new residues important for NS1 functions and in human influenza virus surveillance to assess mutations affecting the pathogenicity of circulating viruses. IMPORTANCE Influenza viral infections represent a serious public health problem, with influenza virus causing a contagious respiratory disease that is most effectively prevented through vaccination. The multifunctional nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is the main viral factor counteracting the host antiviral response. Therefore, influenza virus

  11. Influenza A virus NS1 gene mutations F103L and M106I increase replication and virulence

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    Ping Jihui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the evolutionary steps required for a virus to become virulent in a new host, a human influenza A virus (IAV, A/Hong Kong/1/68(H3N2 (HK-wt, was adapted to increased virulence in the mouse. Among eleven mutations selected in the NS1 gene, two mutations F103L and M106I had been previously detected in the highly virulent human H5N1 isolate, A/HK/156/97, suggesting a role for these mutations in virulence in mice and humans. Results To determine the selective advantage of these mutations, reverse genetics was used to rescue viruses containing each of the NS1 mouse adapted mutations into viruses possessing the HK-wt NS1 gene on the A/PR/8/34 genetic backbone. Both F103L and M106I NS1 mutations significantly enhanced growth in vitro (mouse and canine cells and in vivo (BALB/c mouse lungs as well as enhanced virulence in the mouse. Only the M106I NS1 mutation enhanced growth in human cells. Furthermore, these NS1 mutations enhanced early viral protein synthesis in MDCK cells and showed an increased ability to replicate in mouse interferon β (IFN-β pre-treated mouse cells relative to rPR8-HK-NS-wt NS1. The double mutant, rPR8-HK-NS-F103L + M106I, demonstrated growth attenuation late in infection due to increased IFN-β induction in mouse cells. We then generated a rPR8 virus possessing the A/HK/156/97 NS gene that possesses 103L + 106I, and then rescued the L103F + I106M mutant. The 103L + 106I mutations increased virulence by >10 fold in BALB/c mice. We also inserted the avian A/Ck/Beijing/1/95 NS1 gene (the source lineage of the A/HK/156/97 NS1 gene that possesses 103L + 106I, onto the A/WSN/33 backbone and then generated the L103F + I106M mutant. None of the H5N1 and H9N2 NS containing viruses resulted in increased IFN-β induction. The rWSN-A/Ck/Beijing/1/95-NS1 gene possessing 103L and 106I demonstrated 100 fold enhanced growth and >10 fold enhanced virulence that was associated with increased tropism for lung

  12. Three-dimensional printed magnetophoretic system for the continuous flow separation of avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhe; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Ronghui; Wang, Maohua; Lin, Jianhan

    2017-04-01

    As a result of the low concentration of avian influenza viruses in samples for routine screening, the separation and concentration of these viruses are vital for their sensitive detection. We present a novel three-dimensional printed magnetophoretic system for the continuous flow separation of the viruses using aptamer-modified magnetic nanoparticles, a magnetophoretic chip, a magnetic field, and a fluidic controller. The magnetic field was designed based on finite element magnetic simulation and developed using neodymium magnets with a maximum intensity of 0.65 T and a gradient of 32 T/m for dragging the nanoparticle-virus complexes. The magnetophoretic chip was designed by SOLIDWORKS and fabricated by a three-dimensional printer with a magnetophoretic channel for the continuous flow separation of the viruses using phosphate-buffered saline as carrier flow. The fluidic controller was developed using a microcontroller and peristaltic pumps to inject the carrier flow and the viruses. The trajectory of the virus-nanoparticle complexes was simulated using COMSOL for optimization of the carrier flow and the magnetic field, respectively. The results showed that the H5N1 viruses could be captured, separated, and concentrated using the proposed magnetophoretic system with the separation efficiency up to 88% in a continuous flow separation time of 2 min for a sample volume of 200 μL. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The threat of avian influenza H5N1: 'do we have the tools for the job'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, John; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Mann, Alex

    2007-01-01

    For the first time in human history virologists have the knowledge about the avian origin of pandemic influenza A viruses. Furthermore, in the last two decades a new class of anti influenza drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs), has been developed from an academic discovery to a series of antiviral drugs to be used in the clinic. At present vaccinologists are producing influenza A (H5N1) vaccines to be stockpiled alongside the NIs to combat the first wave of an anticipated influenza pandemic. Studies from the 1918 infection calamity, the Spanish influenza, and the succeeding pandemics of 1957 and 1968, all caused by avian influenza A viruses, have shown how quickly such a virus can mutate to become less virulent (starting with 50% case fatality) and more infectious. Such a mutation cluster could lead to a rapid increase in world deaths, currently 170, to many millions. However there are optimistic analyses: judicious and swift application of NIs, vaccine and hygiene to an outbreak epicentre, most likely in South-East Asia, could break the chain of transmission.

  14. Mucosal Administration of Cycle-Di-Nucleotide-Adjuvanted Virosomes Efficiently Induces Protection against Influenza H5N1 in Mice

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    Thomas Ebensen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for more effective influenza vaccines is highlighted by the emergence of novel influenza strains, which can lead to new pandemics. There is a growing population of susceptible subjects at risk for severe complications of influenza, such as the elderly who are only in part protected by current licensed seasonal vaccines. One strategy for improving seasonal and pandemic vaccines takes advantage of adjuvants to boost and modulate evoked immune responses. In this study, we examined the capacity of the recently described adjuvant cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP to serve as an adjuvant for improved mucosal influenza vaccines, and induce effective protection against influenza H5N1. In detail, c-di-AMP promoted (i effective local and systemic humoral immune responses, including protective hemagglutination inhibition titers, (ii effective cellular responses, including multifunctional T cell activity, (iii induction of long-lasting immunity, and (iv protection against viral challenge. Furthermore, we demonstrated the dose-sparing capacity of the adjuvant as well as the ability to evoke cross-clade protective immune responses. Overall, our results suggest that c-di-AMP contributes to the generation of a protective cell-mediated immune response required for efficacious vaccination against influenza, which supports the further development of c-di-AMP as an adjuvant for seasonal and pandemic influenza mucosal vaccines.

  15. Quantitative assessment of a spatial multicriteria model for highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in Thailand, and application in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde C.; Goutard, Flavie L.; Roulleau, Floriane; Holl, Davun; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Roger, François L.; Tran, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 (HPAI) virus is now considered endemic in several Asian countries. In Cambodia, the virus has been circulating in the poultry population since 2004, with a dramatic effect on farmers’ livelihoods and public health. In Thailand, surveillance and control are still important to prevent any new H5N1 incursion. Risk mapping can contribute effectively to disease surveillance and control systems, but is a very challenging task in the absence of reliable disease data. In this work, we used spatial multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) to produce risk maps for HPAI H5N1 in poultry. We aimed to i) evaluate the performance of the MCDA approach to predict areas suitable for H5N1 based on a dataset from Thailand, comparing the predictive capacities of two sources of a priori knowledge (literature and experts), and ii) apply the best method to produce a risk map for H5N1 in poultry in Cambodia. Our results showed that the expert-based model had a very high predictive capacity in Thailand (AUC = 0.97). Applied in Cambodia, MCDA mapping made it possible to identify hotspots suitable for HPAI H5N1 in the Tonlé Sap watershed, around the cities of Battambang and Kampong Cham, and along the Vietnamese border. PMID:27489997

  16. An optimized real-time PCR to avoid species-/tissue-associated inhibition for H5N1 detection in ferret and monkey tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, LingJun; Bao, LinLin; Li, FengDi; Lv, Qi; Xu, LiLi; Qin, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    The real-time PCR diagnostics for avian influenza virus H5N1 in tissue specimens are often suboptimal, since naturally occurring PCR inhibitors present in samples, or unanticipated match of primer to unsequenced species' genome. With the principal aim of optimizing the SYBR Green real-time PCR method for detecting H5N1 in ferret and monkey (Chinese rhesus macaque) tissue specimens, we screened various H5N1 gene-specific primer pairs and tested their ability to sensitively and specifically detect H5N1 transcripts in the infected animal tissues, then we assessed RNA yield and quality by comparing Ct values obtained from the standard Trizol method, and four commonly used RNA isolation kits with small modifications, including Roche High Pure, Ambion RNAqueous, BioMIGA EZgene, and Qiagen RNeasy. The results indicated that a single primer pair exhibited high specificity and sensitivity for H5N1 transcripts in ferret and monkey tissues. Each of the four kits and Trizol reagent produced high-quality RNA and removed all or nearly all PCR inhibitors. No statistically significant differences were found between the Ct values from the isolation methods. So the optimized SYBR Green real-time PCR could avoid species- or tissue-associated PCR inhibition in detecting H5N1 in ferret and monkey tissues, including lung and small intestine.

  17. An Optimized Real-Time PCR to Avoid Species-/Tissue-Associated Inhibition for H5N1 Detection in Ferret and Monkey Tissues

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    LingJun Zhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The real-time PCR diagnostics for avian influenza virus H5N1 in tissue specimens are often suboptimal, since naturally occurring PCR inhibitors present in samples, or unanticipated match of primer to unsequenced species’ genome. With the principal aim of optimizing the SYBR Green real-time PCR method for detecting H5N1 in ferret and monkey (Chinese rhesus macaque tissue specimens, we screened various H5N1 gene-specific primer pairs and tested their ability to sensitively and specifically detect H5N1 transcripts in the infected animal tissues, then we assessed RNA yield and quality by comparing Ct values obtained from the standard Trizol method, and four commonly used RNA isolation kits with small modifications, including Roche High Pure, Ambion RNAqueous, BioMIGA EZgene, and Qiagen RNeasy. The results indicated that a single primer pair exhibited high specificity and sensitivity for H5N1 transcripts in ferret and monkey tissues. Each of the four kits and Trizol reagent produced high-quality RNA and removed all or nearly all PCR inhibitors. No statistically significant differences were found between the Ct values from the isolation methods. So the optimized SYBR Green real-time PCR could avoid species- or tissue-associated PCR inhibition in detecting H5N1 in ferret and monkey tissues, including lung and small intestine.

  18. Phylogenetic study-based hemagglutinin (HA) gene of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) detected from backyard chickens in Iran, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Syed Ali; Langeroudi, Arash Ghalyanchi; Maghsoudloo, Hossein; Tehrani, Farshad; Khaltabadifarahani, Reza; Abdollahi, Hamed; Fallah, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-02-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 subtype have been diversified into multiple phylogenetic clades over the past decade and are highly genetically variable. In June 2015, one outbreak of HPAI H5N1 in backyard chickens was reported in the Nogardan village of the Mazandaran Province. Tracheal tissues were taken from the dead domestic chickens (n = 10) and processed for RT-PCR. The positive samples (n = 10) were characterized as HPAI H5N1 by sequencing analysis for the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the samples revealed that the viruses belonged to clade 2.3.2.1c, and cluster with the HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from different avian species in Bulgaria, Romania, and Nigeria in 2015. They were not closely related to other H5N1 isolates detected in previous years in Iran. Our study provides new insights into the evolution and genesis of H5N1 influenza in Iran and has important implications for targeting surveillance efforts to rapidly identify the spread of the virus into and within Iran.

  19. Modelling influenza A H5N1 vaccination strategy scenarios in the household poultry sector in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Masry, Ihab; Rijks, Jolianne; Peyre, Marisa; Taylor, Nick; Lubroth, Juan; Jobre, Yilma

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) due to H5N1 virus was first reported in Egypt in February 2006; since then, the government has allowed avian influenza vaccination in poultry. The present study evaluated the impact of AI vaccination in terms of cumulative annual flock immunity (CAFI): the percentage of bird × weeks protected by immunity. This evaluation took account of the combined effects of vaccination coverage, vaccine efficacy (VE), and different characteristics of household poultry production on the effectiveness of the adopted vaccination strategy (VS), and provided alternative options for improvement. The evaluation used a population and vaccination model that calculates the CAFI. Participatory approaches were employed in 21 villages to develop the vaccination and flock parameters required for the model. The adopted VS were compared in the model with three alternative VS scenarios in terms of the CAFI. Vaccination coverage varied among villages but was generally low (between 1 and 48 %; median 14 %). Under the adopted VS, the CAFI predicted for the villages ranged from 2 to 31 %. It was concluded that despite the enormous effort put into rural household poultry AI vaccination by the Egyptian government, village CAFI is unlikely to be maintained at the levels required to significantly reduce the virus load and restrict transmission. In HPAI-endemic countries that consider AI vaccination as one of the disease control options, the high cost of mass AI vaccination campaigns and their achievable benefits must be compared with other available control measures, which may include targeted vaccination. Achievable vaccination coverage, VE and the different characteristics of commercial and household (village) poultry production are key parameters determining the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of different AI vaccination strategies.

  20. The controversy over H5N1 transmissibility research: an opportunity to define a practical response to a global threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedson, David S; Opal, Steven M

    2013-05-01

    Since December 2011, influenza virologists and biosecurity experts have been engaged in a controversial debate over research on the transmissibility of H5N1 influenza viruses. Influenza virologists disagreed with the NSABB's recommendation not to publish experimental details of their findings, whereas biosecurity experts wanted the details to be withheld and future research restricted. The virologists initially declared a voluntary moratorium on their work, but later the NSABB allowed their articles to be published, and soon transmissibility research will resume. Throughout the debate, both sides have had understandable views, but both have overlooked the more important question of whether anything could be done if one of these experimentally derived viruses or a naturally occurring and highly virulent influenza virus should emerge and cause a global pandemic. This is a crucial question, because during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, more than 90% of the world's people had no access to timely supplies of affordable vaccines and antiviral agents. Observational studies suggest that inpatient statin treatment reduces mortality in patients with laboratory-confirmed seasonal influenza. Other immunomodulatory agents (glitazones, fibrates and AMPK agonists) improve survival in mice infected with influenza viruses. These agents are produced as inexpensive generics in developing countries. If they were shown to be effective, they could be used immediately to treat patients in any country with a basic health care system. For this reason alone, influenza virologists and biosecurity experts need to join with public health officials to develop an agenda for laboratory and clinical research on these agents. This is the only approach that could yield practical measures for a global response to the next influenza pandemic.

  1. Penerapan Metode Diagnosis Cepat Virus Avian Influenza H5N1 dengan Metode Single Step Multiplex RT-PCR

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    Aris Haryanto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI virus is a segmented single stranded (ss RNA virus with negative polarity andbelong to the Orthomyxoviridae family. Diagnose of AI virus can be performed using conventional methodsbut it has low sensitivity and specificity. The objective of the research was to apply rapid, precise, andaccurate diagnostic method for AI virus and also to determine its type and subtype based on the SingleStep Multiplex Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction targeting M, H5, and N1 genes. In thismethod M, H5 and NI genes were simultaneously amplified in one PCR tube. The steps of this researchconsist of collecting viral RNAs from 10 different AI samples originated from Maros Disease InvestigationCenter during 2007. DNA Amplification was conducted by Simplex RT-PCR using M primer set. Then, bysingle step multiplex RT-PCR were conducted simultaneously using M, H5 and N1 primers set. The RTPCRproducts were then separated on 1.5% agarose gel, stained by ethidum bromide and visualized underUV transilluminator. Results showed that 8 of 10 RNA virus samples could be amplified by Simplex RTPCRfor M gene which generating a DNA fragment of 276 bp. Amplification using multiplex RT-PCRmethod showed two of 10 samples were AI positive using multiplex RT-PCR, three DNA fragments weregenerated consisting of 276 bp for M gene, 189 bp for H5 gene, and 131 bp for N1. In this study, rapid andeffective diagnosis method for AI virus can be conducted by using simultaneous Single Step Multiplex RTPCR.By this technique type and subtype of AI virus, can also be determined, especially H5N1.

  2. PEMBUATAN DAN STANDARISASI ANTIGEN AI H5N1 KOMERSIAL UNTUK MONITORING TITER ANTIBODI HASIL VAKSINASI AI DI INDUSTRI PETERNAKAN AYAM

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    Retno D. Soejoedono

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is one of the chosen strategy for controling AI H5N1 in Indonesia. Vaccination able to induce protective antibodies against AI but unable to inhibit viral infection. Determination of antibody titers in the serum from bird vaccinated with AI-H5N1 vaccine consisting of 2 or 3 different AI virus isolates difficult to be meassured if the antigen for HI test is uncalibrated yet. Furthermore, the determination of a minimum protective antibody titer against the challenge of AI virus circulating in the field at this time needs to be done. This study aims to determine the H5N1 AI virus antigen for standart HI test and the minimum titre of antibodies that able neutralize virus infection. As much as 55 chickens were divided into 11 groups, 10 groups vaccinated with commercial AI vaccine and AI H5N1 field isolat antigen. Four types of commercial vaccines were veccinated to one group and seven other groups vaccinated with the antigen AI Legok 2004, Nagrak Ag 2009, Ag Lawang 2010, as well as polyvalent Ag combination of these three types of antigen. After third vaccinations, the presence of antibodieswere meassured by HI test. Serum with a titer test 26-28 were tested for the capability of virus neutralizationin using virus neutralization test against three different H5N1 AI virus field isolates. The test results showed that the H5N1 subtype AI virus antigen representative as standart antigen for HI test is antigen Legok 2004 and the minimum titer which able neutralize H5N1 AI virus field isolates 28

  3. A single residue substitution in the receptor-binding domain of H5N1 hemagglutinin is critical for packaging into pseudotyped lentiviral particles.

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    Dong-Jiang Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serological studies for influenza infection and vaccine response often involve microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays to evaluate neutralizing antibodies against human and avian influenza viruses, including H5N1. We have previously characterized lentiviral particles pseudotyped with H5-HA (H5pp and validated an H5pp-based assay as a safe alternative for high-throughput serological studies in BSL-2 facilities. Here we show that H5-HAs from different clades do not always give rise to efficient production of H5pp and the underlying mechanisms are addressed. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We have carried out mutational analysis to delineate the molecular determinants responsible for efficient packaging of HA from A/Cambodia/40808/2005 (H5Cam and A/Anhui/1/2005 (H5Anh into H5pp. Our results demonstrate that a single A134V mutation in the 130-loop of the receptor binding domain is sufficient to render H5Anh the ability to generate H5Anh-pp efficiently, whereas the reverse V134A mutation greatly hampers production of H5Cam-pp. Although protein expression in total cell lysates is similar for H5Anh and H5Cam, cell surface expression of H5Cam is detected at a significantly higher level than that of H5Anh. We further demonstrate by several independent lines of evidence that the behaviour of H5Anh can be explained by a stronger binding to sialic acid receptors implicating residue 134. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a single A134V mutation as the molecular determinant in H5-HA for efficient incorporation into H5pp envelope and delineated the underlying mechanism. The reduced binding to sialic acid receptors as a result of the A134V mutation not only exerts a critical influence in pseudotyping efficiency of H5-HA, but has also an impact at the whole virus level. Because A134V substitution has been reported as a naturally occurring mutation in human host, our results may have implications for the understanding of human host adaptation

  4. Impact of educational intervention concerning awareness and behaviors relating to avian influenza (H5N1 in a high-risk population in Vietnam.

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    Toshie Manabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early initiation of treatment is essential for treatment of avian influenza A/H5N1 viral infection in humans, as the disease can lead to rapid development of severe pneumonia which can result in death. Contact with infected poultry is known to be a significant risk factor for contraction of H5N1 infection. However, handling and encountering poultry are a part of most peoples' daily lives, especially in rural communities in Vietnam where epidemic outbreaks among poultry have been continuously reported. Enhancing proper knowledge relating to H5N1 and to the importance of early initiation of treatment are crucial. The aim of this study was to develop an effective educational program to enhance awareness of H5N1 and motivate people to access to health care earlier when H5N1 infection is suspected or likely. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A study was conducted in two agricultural communities (intervention and control groups in the Ninh Binh province in Vietnam, where epidemic outbreaks of avian influenza have recently occurred in birds. A unique educational intervention was developed and provided to the intervention group, and no intervention was provided to the control group. A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP survey was conducted in both groups with a face-to-face interview by trained local healthcare workers at time points before and after the educational intervention. KAP scores were compared between the different time points and between the groups. How educational intervention influenced awareness relating to H5N1 and accessibility of healthcare in the population was analyzed. The study indicated an increased awareness of H5N1 and increased reliance on local health care workers. CONCLUSIONS: The novel educational program which was developed for this study impacted awareness of H5N1, and resulted in more people seeking early access to healthcare, and also resulted in earlier medical intervention for patients with H5N1 avian

  5. Cross-reactive neuraminidase antibodies afford partial protection against H5N1 in mice and are present in unexposed humans.

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    Matthew R Sandbulte

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A pandemic H5N1 influenza outbreak would be facilitated by an absence of immunity to the avian-derived virus in the human population. Although this condition is likely in regard to hemagglutinin-mediated immunity, the neuraminidase (NA of H5N1 viruses (avN1 and of endemic human H1N1 viruses (huN1 are classified in the same serotype. We hypothesized that an immune response to huN1 could mediate cross-protection against H5N1 influenza virus infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice were immunized against the NA of a contemporary human H1N1 strain by DNA vaccination. They were challenged with recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 viruses bearing huN1 (PR8-huN1 or avN1 (PR8-avN1 or with H5N1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/04. Additional naïve mice were injected with sera from vaccinated mice prior to H5N1 challenge. Also, serum specimens from humans were analyzed for reactivity with avN1. Immunization elicited a serum IgG response to huN1 and robust protection against the homologous challenge virus. Immunized mice were partially protected from lethal challenge with H5N1 virus or recombinant PR8-avN1. Sera transferred from immunized mice to naïve animals conferred similar protection against H5N1 mortality. Analysis of human sera showed that antibodies able to inhibit the sialidase activity of avN1 exist in some individuals. CONCLUSIONS: These data reveal that humoral immunity elicited by huN1 can partially protect against H5N1 infection in a mammalian host. Our results suggest that a portion of the human population could have some degree of resistance to H5N1 influenza, with the possibility that this could be induced or enhanced through immunization with seasonal influenza vaccines.

  6. Viral replication rate regulates clinical outcome and CD8 T cell responses during highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Hatta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the first recorded infection of humans with H5N1 viruses of avian origin in 1997, sporadic human infections continue to occur with a staggering mortality rate of >60%. Although sustained human-to-human transmission has not occurred yet, there is a growing concern that these H5N1 viruses might acquire this trait and raise the specter of a pandemic. Despite progress in deciphering viral determinants of pathogenicity, we still lack crucial information on virus/immune system interactions pertaining to severe disease and high mortality associated with human H5N1 influenza virus infections. Using two human isolates of H5N1 viruses that differ in their pathogenicity in mice, we have defined mechanistic links among the rate of viral replication, mortality, CD8 T cell responses, and immunopathology. The extreme pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses was directly linked to the ability of the virus to replicate rapidly, and swiftly attain high steady-state titers in the lungs within 48 hours after infection. The remarkably high replication rate of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus did not prevent the induction of IFN-β or activation of CD8 T cells, but the CD8 T cell response was ineffective in controlling viral replication in the lungs and CD8 T cell deficiency did not affect viral titers or mortality. Additionally, BIM deficiency ameliorated lung pathology and inhibited T cell apoptosis without affecting survival of mice. Therefore, rapidly replicating, highly lethal H5N1 viruses could simply outpace and overwhelm the adaptive immune responses, and kill the host by direct cytopathic effects. However, therapeutic suppression of early viral replication and the associated enhancement of CD8 T cell responses improved the survival of mice following a lethal H5N1 infection. These findings suggest that suppression of early H5N1 virus replication is key to the programming of an effective host response, which has implications in treatment of this infection in humans.

  7. Retention of a recombinant GFP protein expressed by the yellow fever 17D virus in the E/NS1 intergenic region in the endoplasmic reticulum

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    Gisela Freitas Trindade

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The flaviviral envelope proteins, E protein and precursor membrane protein, are mainly associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER through two transmembrane (TM domains that are exposed to the luminal face of this compartment. Their retention is associated with the viral assembly process. ER-retrieval motifs were mapped at the carboxy terminus of these envelope proteins. A recombinant yellow fever (YF 17D virus expressing the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP with the stem-anchor (SA region of E protein fused to its carboxy terminus was subjected to distinct genetic mutations in the SA sequence to investigate their effect on ER retention. Initially, we introduced progressive deletions of the stem elements (H1, CS and H2. In a second set of mutants, the effect of a length increase for the first TM anchor region was evaluated either by replacing it with the longer TM of human LAMP-1 or by the insertion of the VALLLVA sequence into its carboxy terminus. We did not detect any effect on the GFP localisation in the cell, which remained associated with the ER. Further studies should be undertaken to elucidate the causes of the ER retention of recombinant proteins expressed at the intergenic E/NS1 region of the YF 17D virus polyprotein.

  8. Experimental infection of a North American raptor, American Kestrel (Falco sparverius, with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1.

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    Jeffrey S Hall

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Several species of wild raptors have been found in Eurasia infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV subtype H5N1. Should HPAIV (H5N1 reach North America in migratory birds, species of raptors are at risk not only from environmental exposure, but also from consuming infected birds and carcasses. In this study we used American kestrels as a representative species of a North American raptor to examine the effects of HPAIV (H5N1 infection in terms of dose response, viral shedding, pathology, and survival. Our data showed that kestrels are highly susceptible to HPAIV (H5N1. All birds typically died or were euthanized due to severe neurologic disease within 4-5 days of inoculation and shed significant amounts of virus both orally and cloacally, regardless of dose administered. The most consistent microscopic lesions were necrosis in the brain and pancreas. This is the first experimental study of HPAIV infection in a North American raptor and highlights the potential risks to birds of prey if HPAIV (H5N1 is introduced into North America.

  9. Protective efficacy of passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies in animal models of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Itoh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses of the H5N1 subtype often cause severe pneumonia and multiple organ failure in humans, with reported case fatality rates of more than 60%. To develop a clinical antibody therapy, we generated a human-mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb ch61 that showed strong neutralizing activity against H5N1 HPAI viruses isolated from humans and evaluated its protective potential in mouse and nonhuman primate models of H5N1 HPAI virus infections. Passive immunization with MAb ch61 one day before or after challenge with a lethal dose of the virus completely protected mice, and partial protection was achieved when mice were treated 3 days after the challenge. In a cynomolgus macaque model, reduced viral loads and partial protection against lethal infection were observed in macaques treated with MAb ch61 intravenously one and three days after challenge. Protective effects were also noted in macaques under immunosuppression. Though mutant viruses escaping from neutralization by MAb ch61 were recovered from macaques treated with this MAb alone, combined treatment with MAb ch61 and peramivir reduced the emergence of escape mutants. Our results indicate that antibody therapy might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and delaying disease progression during H5N1 HPAI virus infection in clinical cases and combined treatment with other antiviral compounds should improve the protective effects of antibody therapy against H5N1 HPAI virus infection.

  10. Experimental infection of a North American raptor, American kestrel (Falco sparverius), with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J.S.; Ip, H.S.; Franson, J.C.; Meteyer, C.; Nashold, S.; Teslaa, J.L.; French, J.; Redig, P.; Brand, C.

    2009-01-01

    Several species of wild raptors have been found in Eurasia infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N1. Should HPAIV (H5N1) reach North America in migratory birds, species of raptors are at risk not only from environmental exposure, but also from consuming infected birds and carcasses. In this study we used American kestrels as a representative species of a North American raptor to examine the effects of HPAIV (H5N1) infection in terms of dose response, viral shedding, pathology, and survival. Our data showed that kestrels are highly susceptible to HPAIV (H5N1). All birds typically died or were euthanized due to severe neurologic disease within 4-5 days of inoculation and shed significant amounts of virus both orally and cloacally, regardless of dose administered. The most consistent microscopic lesions were necrosis in the brain and pancreas. This is the first experimental study of HPAIV infection in a North American raptor and highlights the potential risks to birds of prey if HPAIV (H5N1) is introduced into North America.

  11. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Padmanava; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Murugkar, Harshad V; Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Prakash, Anil; Gothalwal, Ragini; Dubey, Shiv Chandra; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Tosh, Chakradhar

    2015-06-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a threat to animal and public health worldwide. Till date, the H5N1 virus has claimed 402 human lives, with a mortality rate of 58 percent and has caused the death or culling of millions of poultry since 2003. In this study, we have designed three siRNAs (PB2-2235, PB2-479 and NP-865) targeting PB2 and NP genes of avian influenza virus and evaluated their potential, measured by hemagglutination (HA), plaque reduction and Real time RT-PCR assay, in inhibiting H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Navapur/7972/2006) replication in MDCK cells. The siRNAs caused 8- to 16-fold reduction in virus HA titers at 24 h after challenged with 100TCID50 of virus. Among these siRNAs, PB2-2235 offered the highest inhibition of virus replication with 16-fold reduction in virus HA titer, 80 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and 94 percent inhibition in expression of specific RNA at 24 h. The other two siRNAs had 68-73 percent and 87-88 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and RNA copy number, respectively. The effect of siRNA on H5N1 virus replication continued till 48h (maximum observation period). These findings suggest that PB2-2235 could efficiently inhibit HPAI H5N1 virus replication.

  12. Infectious and lethal doses of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus for house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and rock pigeons (Columbia livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E; Berghaus, Roy D; Swayne, David E

    2009-07-01

    Terrestrial wild birds commonly associated with poultry farms have the potential to contribute to the spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus within or between poultry facilities or between domesticated and wild bird populations. This potential, however, varies between species and is dependent on several virus and host factors, including habitat utilization, susceptibility, and viral shedding patterns. To provide data on susceptibility and shedding patterns of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and rock pigeons (Columba livia), 20 birds from each species were inoculated with decreasing concentrations of A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 (H5N1) HPAI virus, and the birds were evaluated for morbidity, mortality, viral shedding, and seroconversion over a 14-day trial. The house sparrows were highly susceptible to the H5N1 HPAI virus as evidenced by low infectious and lethal viral doses. In addition, house sparrows excreted virus via the oropharynx and cloaca for several days prior to the onset of clinical signs. Based on these results, house sparrows could play a role in the dissemination of H5N1 HPAI virus in poultry. In contrast, pigeons were resistant to the HPAI virus, requiring a high concentration of virus to produce infection or death. When infection did occur, the duration of viral shedding was brief, and viral titers were low. The data suggests that pigeons would contribute little to the transmission and spread of H5N1 HPAI virus in poultry.

  13. The influenza fingerprints: NS1 and M1 proteins contribute to specific host cell ultrastructure signatures upon infection by different influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrier, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Carron, Coralie; Cartet, Gaeelle [Equipe VirCell, Laboratoire de Virologie et Pathologie Humaine, VirPath EMR 4610, Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Faculte de medecine RTH Laennec, rue Guillaume Paradin, F-69008 Lyon (France); Frobert, Emilie [Laboratoire de Virologie, Centre de Biologie et de Pathologie Est, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 59 boulevard Pinel, F-69677 Bron Cedex, Lyon (France); Yver, Matthieu; Traversier, Aurelien [Equipe VirCell, Laboratoire de Virologie et Pathologie Humaine, VirPath EMR 4610, Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Faculte de medecine RTH Laennec, rue Guillaume Paradin, F-69008 Lyon (France); Wolff, Thorsten [Division of Influenza/Respiratory Viruses, Robert Koch Institute, Nordufer 20, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Riteau, Beatrice [Laboratoire de Virologie et Pathologie Humaine, VirPath EMR 4610, Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Faculte de medecine RTH Laennec, rue Guillaume Paradin, F-69008 Lyon (France); Naffakh, Nadia [Institut Pasteur, Unite de Genetique Moleculaire des Virus Respiratoires, URA CNRS 3015, EA302 Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); and others

    2012-10-10

    Influenza A are nuclear replicating viruses which hijack host machineries in order to achieve optimal infection. Numerous functional virus-host interactions have now been characterized, but little information has been gathered concerning their link to the virally induced remodeling of the host cellular architecture. In this study, we infected cells with several human and avian influenza viruses and we have analyzed their ultrastructural modifications by using electron and confocal microscopy. We discovered that infections lead to a major and systematic disruption of nucleoli and the formation of a large number of diverse viral structures showing specificity that depended on the subtype origin and genomic composition of viruses. We identified NS1 and M1 proteins as the main actors in the remodeling of the host ultra-structure and our results suggest that each influenza A virus strain could be associated with a specific cellular fingerprint, possibly correlated to the functional properties of their viral components.

  14. [Study on the histopathology of cats inoculated with H5N1 subtype high pathogenic avian influenza virus originated from tigers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuang; Ding, Zhuang; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Yu-Wei; Zou, Xiao-Huan; Wang, Tie-Cheng; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2007-11-01

    In this study, the HPAIV A/Tiger/Harbin/01/2002 (H5N1) used was originated from tigers and propagated in SPF embryonated hen eggs. TCID5, of the virus was 10(-7.36)/0. 05mL on MDCK cell. The cats were inoculated through bronchus route and then, the cats of dead and control were collected for histopathological and immunohistochemistry examination. Meanwhile, the emulsion supernatant fluid of organs and the pharyngeal swab samples of the dead cats were collected for RT-PCR, survived cats and the control cats were tested for the presence of HI antibody by standard method. The results indicated that the damage of lungs from the dead cats were most obvious, the wide range of red consolidation focus emerged on the lobus pulmonis, the fused focus of infection caused injury of lungs. Histology under the microscope revealed diffuse alveolar damage, confluence phlegmasia pathology, infiltration of lymphomonocytes, sackful of infiltration of macrophages and manipulus protein-like effusion in the alveolar. By immunohistochemistry, the positively stained virus particles were found on the epithelial cells of bronchus and alveolus, and also in the endochylema of lymphomonocytes. The specific electophoretic band of 464bp amplified by RT-PCR from samples of pharyngeal swabs, lungs, kidneys, hearts and brains was as same as the theory value. HI antibody titers of the survived cat were 1:32.

  15. The matrix gene of influenza A H5N1 in Egypt, 2006-2016: molecular insights and distribution of amantadine-resistant variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Mahmoud M; Hagag, Naglaa; El-Sanousi, Ahmed A; Hussein, Hussein Ali; Arafa, Abdel-Satar

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale sequence analysis of Matrix (M) gene and its coding proteins M1 and M2 was performed for 274 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses H5N1 circulated in Egypt from 2006 to 2016. The aim is to study the amantadine-resistant markers distribution and to estimate the evolutionary rate. 246 viruses were obtained from the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data base, and 28 additional viruses were sequenced. Maximum clade credibility (MCC) phylogenetic tree revealed that the M gene has evolved into two different lineages. Estimated Evolutionary analysis showed that the M2 protein possessed higher evolutionary rates (3.45 × 10 -3 ) than the M1 protein (2.73 × 10 -3 ). M gene encoding proteins revealed significant markers described to be associated with host tropism and increase in virulence: V15I, N30D, and T121A in M1 and L55F in M2 protein. Site analysis focusing attention on the temporal and host distribution of the amantadine-resistant markers was carried out and showed that vast majority of the M2 amantadine-resistant variants of clade 2.2.1.1 (n = 90) is N31 marker, in addition to G27 (n = 7), A27 (n = 5), I27 (n = 1), and S30 (n = 1). In 2010-2011, amantadine resistant frequency increased considerably resembling more than half of the resistant variants. Notably, all viruses of clade 2.2.1.1 possessed amantadine-resistant marker. However, almost all current circulating viruses in Egypt of clade 2.2.1.2 from 2014 to 2016 did not carry any amantadine-resistant markers.

  16. Immunomorphologic Manifestations in Mice Liver Infected with Influenza A/H5N1, A/Goose/Krasnoozerskoye/627/05 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana V. Potapova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 (HPAI H5N1 viruses can infect mammals, including humans, causing severe systemic disease with the inhibition of the immune system and a high mortality rate. In conditions of lymphoid tissue depletion, the liver plays an important role in host defence against viruses. The changes in mice liver infected with HPAI H5N1 virus A/goose/Krasnoozerskoye/627/05 have been studied. It has been shown that the virus persistence in the liver leads to the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and intracellular proteases (lysozyme, cathepsin D, and myeloperoxidase by Kupffer cells. Defective antiviral response exacerbates destructive processes in the liver accelerating the development of liver failure.

  17. Susceptibility of Muscovy (Cairina Moschata) and mallard ducks (Anas Platyrhynchos) to experimental infections by different genotypes of H5N1 avian influenza viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, Do Quy; Dung, Nguyen Tien; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2011-01-01

    It is a fact that in Viet Nam, Muscovy ducks are raised in large populations (approximately 8 million), usually kept in small flocks together with mallards and chickens. As a result, it is a great concern for epidemiologists to elucidate possible differences in relation to these species being...... exposed to infection with H5N1. To do this, an experimental study on infections with different genotypes of H5N1 in mallards and Muscovy ducks have been conducted, where it was found that the mortality of the inoculated Muscovy ducks was at least 80%, regardless of the virus strain employed. In contrast......, the mortality of the mallards ranged from nil to 100%, which suggests that Muscovy ducks are more susceptible to HPAIV H5N1 infection in terms of disease development and mortality. It was also found that higher virus titers developed in vital organs of Muscovy ducks compared to mallards, particularly...

  18. Eco-virological approach for assessing the role of wild birds in the spread of avian influenza H5N1 along the central Asian flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Scott H.; Hill, Nichola J.; Spragens, Kyle A.; Janies, Daniel; Voronkin, Igor O.; Prosser, Diann J.; Yan, Baoping; Lei, Fumin; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Natsagdorj, Tseveenmyadag; Bishop, Charles M.; Butler, Patrick J.; Wikelski, Martin; Balachandran, Sivananinthaperumal; Mundkur, Taej; Douglas, David C.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2012-01-01

    A unique pattern of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks has emerged along the Central Asia Flyway, where infection of wild birds has been reported with steady frequency since 2005. We assessed the potential for two hosts of HPAI H5N1, the bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) and ruddy shelduck (Tadorna tadorna), to act as agents for virus dispersal along this ‘thoroughfare’. We used an eco-virological approach to compare the migration of 141 birds marked with GPS satellite transmitters during 2005–2010 with: 1) the spatio-temporal patterns of poultry and wild bird outbreaks of HPAI H5N1, and 2) the trajectory of the virus in the outbreak region based on phylogeographic mapping. We found that biweekly utilization distributions (UDs) for 19.2% of bar-headed geese and 46.2% of ruddy shelduck were significantly associated with outbreaks. Ruddy shelduck showed highest correlation with poultry outbreaks owing to their wintering distribution in South Asia, where there is considerable opportunity for HPAI H5N1 spillover from poultry. Both species showed correlation with wild bird outbreaks during the spring migration, suggesting they may be involved in the northward movement of the virus. However, phylogeographic mapping of HPAI H5N1 clades 2.2 and 2.3 did not support dissemination of the virus in a northern direction along the migration corridor. In particular, two subclades (2.2.1 and 2.3.2) moved in a strictly southern direction in contrast to our spatio-temporal analysis of bird migration. Our attempt to reconcile the disciplines of wild bird ecology and HPAI H5N1 virology highlights prospects offered by both approaches as well as their limitations.

  19. Hemagglutinin-targeting Artificial MicroRNAs Expressed by Adenovirus Protect Mice From Different Clades of H5N1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinying Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus (IV is a continuously evolving virus that widely spreads in humans and contributes to substantial morbidity and mortality. Re-emergence of human infection with avian influenza virus H5N1 poses extra challenge to IV control. Artificial microRNA (amiRNA-mediated RNA interference has become a powerful antiviral approach due to its high specificity and rapid effect. Here, we designed several amiRNAs targeting the hemagglutinin gene of H5N1, a major determinant of pathogenicity. Expression and delivery efficiency were enhanced by presenting functional amiRNA with chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 68 (AdC68. One amiRNA, HA-1405, significantly limited H5N1 replication in vitro and inhibited 96.7% of clade 2.3.2 replication. AdC68-conjugated HA-1405 treatment remarkably decreased different clades of H5N1 plaque formation in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. Moreover, prophylactic administration with rAd(HA-1405 markedly alleviated clinical symptoms and reduced ≃3- to 40-folds of lung viral RNA copies against four clades of H5N1 in Institute of Cancer Research (ICR mice. Our results further showed that rAd(HA-1405 conferred 70 and 40% immediate protection against lethal clade 2.3.2 and clade 2.3.4 H5N1 challenge, respectively. In conclusion, these data provided information that HA-targeting amiRNA delivered by AdC68 could be pursued as a potential agent for highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses prevention.

  20. Experimentally infected domestic ducks show efficient transmission of Indonesian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, but lack persistent viral shedding.

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    Hendra Wibawa

    Full Text Available Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n = 15, which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2-8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1-15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1-24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40. Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks. However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n = 10 and contact ducks (n = 9 when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5 than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15. We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection.

  1. Eco-virological approach for assessing the role of wild birds in the spread of avian influenza H5N1 along the Central Asian Flyway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott H Newman

    Full Text Available A unique pattern of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 outbreaks has emerged along the Central Asia Flyway, where infection of wild birds has been reported with steady frequency since 2005. We assessed the potential for two hosts of HPAI H5N1, the bar-headed goose (Anser indicus and ruddy shelduck (Tadorna tadorna, to act as agents for virus dispersal along this 'thoroughfare'. We used an eco-virological approach to compare the migration of 141 birds marked with GPS satellite transmitters during 2005-2010 with: 1 the spatio-temporal patterns of poultry and wild bird outbreaks of HPAI H5N1, and 2 the trajectory of the virus in the outbreak region based on phylogeographic mapping. We found that biweekly utilization distributions (UDs for 19.2% of bar-headed geese and 46.2% of ruddy shelduck were significantly associated with outbreaks. Ruddy shelduck showed highest correlation with poultry outbreaks owing to their wintering distribution in South Asia, where there is considerable opportunity for HPAI H5N1 spillover from poultry. Both species showed correlation with wild bird outbreaks during the spring migration, suggesting they may be involved in the northward movement of the virus. However, phylogeographic mapping of HPAI H5N1 clades 2.2 and 2.3 did not support dissemination of the virus in a northern direction along the migration corridor. In particular, two subclades (2.2.1 and 2.3.2 moved in a strictly southern direction in contrast to our spatio-temporal analysis of bird migration. Our attempt to reconcile the disciplines of wild bird ecology and HPAI H5N1 virology highlights prospects offered by both approaches as well as their limitations.

  2. Molecular basis for broad neuraminidase immunity: conserved epitopes in seasonal and pandemic H1N1 as well as H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongquan; Gao, Jin; Xu, Kemin; Chen, Hongjun; Couzens, Laura K; Rivers, Katie H; Easterbrook, Judy D; Yang, Kevin; Zhong, Lei; Rajabi, Mohsen; Ye, Jianqiang; Sultana, Ishrat; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiufan; Perez, Daniel R; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Eichelberger, Maryna C

    2013-08-01

    Influenza A viruses, including H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes, pose a serious threat to public health. Neuraminidase (NA)-related immunity contributes to protection against influenza virus infection. Antibodies to the N1 subtype provide protection against homologous and heterologous H1N1 as well as H5N1 virus challenge. Since neither the strain-specific nor conserved epitopes of N1 have been identified, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that exhibit different reactivity spectra with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and used these MAbs to map N1 antigenic domains. We identified 12 amino acids essential for MAb binding to the NA of a recent seasonal H1N1 virus, A/Brisbane/59/2007. Of these, residues 248, 249, 250, 341, and 343 are recognized by strain-specific group A MAbs, while residues 273, 338, and 339 are within conserved epitope(s), which allows cross-reactive group B MAbs to bind the NAs of seasonal H1N1 and the 1918 and 2009 pandemic (09pdm) H1N1 as well as H5N1 viruses. A single dose of group B MAbs administered prophylactically fully protected mice against lethal challenge with seasonal and 09pdm H1N1 viruses and resulted in significant protection against the highly pathogenic wild-type H5N1 virus. Another three N1 residues (at positions 396, 397, and 456) are essential for binding of cross-reactive group E MAbs, which differ from group B MAbs in that they do not bind 09pdm H1N1 viruses. The identification of conserved N1 epitopes reveals the molecular basis for NA-mediated immunity between H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and demonstrates the potential for developing broadly protective NA-specific antibody treatments for influenza.

  3. The Survey of H5N1 Flu Virus in Wild Birds in 14 Provinces of China from 2004 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zuohua; Guo, Shan; Wang, Mingli; Gao, Xuebin; Li, Peng; Tang, Lijun; Jiang, Ping; Luo, Ze; Xin, Zhi; Ding, Changqing; He, Yubang; Ren, Zuyi; Cui, Peng; Zhao, Hongfeng; Zhang, Zhong; Tang, Shuang; Yan, Baoping; Lei, Fumin; Li, Tianxian

    2009-01-01

    Background The highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza emerged in the year 1996 in Asia, and has spread to Europe and Africa recently. At present, effective monitoring and data analysis of H5N1 are not sufficient in Chinese mainland. Methodology/Principal Findings During the period from April of 2004 to August of 2007, we collected 14,472 wild bird samples covering 56 species of 10 orders in 14 provinces of China and monitored the prevalence of flu virus based on RT-PCR specific for H5N1 subtype. The 149 positive samples involved six orders. Anseriformes had the highest prevalence while Passeriformes had the lowest prevalence (2.70% versus 0.36%). Among the 24 positive species, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) had the highest prevalence (4.37%). A difference of prevalence was found among 14 provinces. Qinghai had a higher prevalence than the other 13 provinces combined (3.88% versus 0.43%). The prevalence in three species in Qinghai province (Pintail (Anas acuta), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)) were obviously higher than those in other 13 provinces. The results of sequence analysis indicated that the 17 strains isolated from wild birds were distributed in five clades (2.3.1, 2.2, 2.5, 6, and 7), which suggested that genetic diversity existed among H5N1 viruses isolated from wild birds. The five isolates from Qinghai came from one clade (2.2) and had a short evolutionary distance with the isolates obtained from Qinghai in the year 2005. Conclusions/Significance We have measured the prevalence of H5N1 virus in 56 species of wild birds in 14 provinces of China. Continuous monitoring in the field should be carried out to know whether H5N1 virus can be maintained by wild birds. PMID:19742325

  4. The survey of H5N1 flu virus in wild birds in 14 Provinces of China from 2004 to 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Kou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza emerged in the year 1996 in Asia, and has spread to Europe and Africa recently. At present, effective monitoring and data analysis of H5N1 are not sufficient in Chinese mainland. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the period from April of 2004 to August of 2007, we collected 14,472 wild bird samples covering 56 species of 10 orders in 14 provinces of China and monitored the prevalence of flu virus based on RT-PCR specific for H5N1 subtype. The 149 positive samples involved six orders. Anseriformes had the highest prevalence while Passeriformes had the lowest prevalence (2.70% versus 0.36%. Among the 24 positive species, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos had the highest prevalence (4.37%. A difference of prevalence was found among 14 provinces. Qinghai had a higher prevalence than the other 13 provinces combined (3.88% versus 0.43%. The prevalence in three species in Qinghai province (Pintail (Anas acuta, Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos and Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula were obviously higher than those in other 13 provinces. The results of sequence analysis indicated that the 17 strains isolated from wild birds were distributed in five clades (2.3.1, 2.2, 2.5, 6, and 7, which suggested that genetic diversity existed among H5N1 viruses isolated from wild birds. The five isolates from Qinghai came from one clade (2.2 and had a short evolutionary distance with the isolates obtained from Qinghai in the year 2005. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have measured the prevalence of H5N1 virus in 56 species of wild birds in 14 provinces of China. Continuous monitoring in the field should be carried out to know whether H5N1 virus can be maintained by wild birds.

  5. High-Yield Expression of M2e Peptide of Avian Influenza Virus H5N1 in Transgenic Duckweed Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, Aleksey; Tarasenko, Irina; Mitiouchkina, Tatiana; Ismailova, Natalya; Shaloiko, Lyubov; Vainstein, Alexander; Dolgov, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Avian influenza is a major viral disease in poultry. Antigenic variation of this virus hinders vaccine development. However, the extracellular domain of the virus-encoded M2 protein (peptide M2e) is nearly invariant in all influenza A strains, enabling the development of a broad-range vaccine against them. Antigen expression in transgenic plants is becoming a popular alternative to classical expression methods. Here we expressed M2e from avian influenza virus A/chicken/Kurgan/5/2005(H5N1) in nuclear-transformed duckweed plants for further development of avian influenza vaccine. The N-terminal fragment of M2, including M2e, was selected for expression. The M2e DNA sequence fused in-frame to the 5' end of β-glucuronidase was cloned into pBI121 under the control of CaMV 35S promoter. The resulting plasmid was successfully used for duckweed transformation, and western analysis with anti-β-glucuronidase and anti-M2e antibodies confirmed accumulation of the target protein (M130) in 17 independent transgenic lines. Quantitative ELISA of crude protein extracts from these lines showed M130-β-glucuronidase accumulation ranging from 0.09-0.97 mg/g FW (0.12-1.96 % of total soluble protein), equivalent to yields of up to 40 μg M2e/g plant FW. This relatively high yield holds promise for the development of a duckweed-based expression system to produce an edible vaccine against avian influenza.

  6. A Meta-Analysis of the Prevalence of Influenza A H5N1 and H7N9 Infection in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, C; Rahman, B; Heywood, A E; MacIntyre, C R

    2017-06-01

    Despite a much higher rate of human influenza A (H7N9) infection compared to influenza A (H5N1), and the assumption that birds are the source of human infection, detection rates of H7N9 in birds are lower than those of H5N1. This raises a question about the role of birds in the spread and transmission of H7N9 to humans. We conducted a meta-analysis of overall prevalence of H5N1 and H7N9 in different bird populations (domestic poultry, wild birds) and different environments (live bird markets, commercial poultry farms, wild habitats). The electronic database, Scopus, was searched for published papers, and Google was searched for country surveillance reports. A random effect meta-analysis model was used to produce pooled estimates of the prevalence of H5N1 and H7N9 for various subcategories. A random effects logistic regression model was used to compare prevalence rates between H5N1 and H7N9. Both viruses have low prevalence across all bird populations. Significant differences in prevalence rates were observed in domestic birds, farm settings, for pathogen and antibody testing, and during routine surveillance. Random effects logistic regression analyses show that among domestic birds, the prevalence of H5N1 is 47.48 (95% CI: 17.15-133.13, P bird outbreaks), the prevalence of H5N1 is still higher than H7N9 with an OR of 43.02 (95% CI: 16.60-111.53, P birds are postulated to be the source. Much lower rates of H7N9 in birds compared to H5N1 raise doubts about birds as the sole source of high rates of human H7N9 infection. Other sources of transmission of H7N9 need to be considered and explored. © 2016 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Combination therapy using chimeric monoclonal antibodies protects mice from lethal H5N1 infection and prevents formation of escape mutants.

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    Mookkan Prabakaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that there is a possibility of a human H5N1 pandemic and the fact that the recent H5N1 viruses are resistant to the anti-viral drugs, newer strategies for effective therapy are warranted. Previous studies show that single mAbs in immune prophylaxis can be protective against H5N1 infection. But a single mAb may not be effective in neutralization of a broad range of different strains of H5N1 and control of potential neutralization escape mutants. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected two mAbs which recognized different epitopes on the hemagglutinin molecule. These two mAbs could each neutralize in vitro escape mutants to the other and in combination could effectively neutralize viruses from clades 0, 1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4, 7 and 8 of influenza A H5N1 viruses. This combination of chimeric mAbs when administered passively, pre or post challenge with 10 MLD50 (50% mouse lethal dose HPAI H5N1 influenza A viruses could protect 100% of the mice from two different clades of viruses (clades 1 and 2.1. We also tested the efficacy of a single dose of the combination of mAbs versus two doses. Two doses of the combination therapy not only affected early clearance of the virus from the lung but could completely prevent lung pathology of the H5N1 infected mice. No escape variants were detected after therapy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies provide proof of concept that the synergistic action of two or more mAbs in combination is required for preventing the generation of escape mutants and also to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of passive therapy against H5N1 infection. Combination therapy may allow for a lower dose of antibody to be administered for passive therapy of influenza infection and hence can be made available at reduced economic costs during an outbreak.

  8. Host-range restriction of vaccinia virus E3L deletion mutant can be overcome in vitro, but not in vivo, by expression of the influenza virus NS1 protein.

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    Susana Guerra

    Full Text Available During the last decades, research focused on vaccinia virus (VACV pathogenesis has been intensified prompted by its potential beneficial application as a vector for vaccine development and anti-cancer therapies, but also due to the fear of its potential use as a bio-terrorism threat. Recombinant viruses lacking a type I interferon (IFN antagonist are attenuated and hence good vaccine candidates. However, vaccine virus growth requires production in IFN-deficient systems, and thus viral IFN antagonists that are active in vitro, yet not in vivo, are of great value. The VACV E3 and influenza virus NS1 proteins are distinct double-stranded RNA-binding proteins that play an important role in pathogenesis by inhibiting the mammalian IFN-regulated innate antiviral response. Based on the functional similarities between E3 and NS1, we investigated the ability of NS1 to replace the biological functions of E3 of VACV in both in vitro and in vivo systems. For this, we generated a VACV recombinant virus lacking the E3L gene, yet expressing NS1 (VVΔE3L/NS1. Our study revealed that NS1 can functionally replace E3 in cultured cells, rescuing the protein synthesis blockade, and preventing apoptosis and RNA breakdown. In contrast, in vivo the VVΔE3L/NS1 virus was highly attenuated after intranasal inoculation, as it was unable to spread to the lungs and other organs. These results indicate that there are commonalities but also functional differences in the roles of NS1 and E3 as inhibitors of the innate antiviral response, which could potentially be utilized for vaccine production purposes in the future.

  9. The emergence of influenza A H7N9 in human beings 16 years after influenza A H5N1: a tale of two cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Chen, Honglin; Li, Lanjuan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-09-01

    Infection with either influenza A H5N1 virus in 1997 or avian influenza A H7N9 virus in 2013 caused severe pneumonia that did not respond to typical or atypical antimicrobial treatment, and resulted in high mortality. Both viruses are reassortants with internal genes derived from avian influenza A H9N2 viruses that circulate in Asian poultry. Both viruses have genetic markers of mammalian adaptation in their haemagglutinin and polymerase PB2 subunits, which enhanced binding to human-type receptors and improved replication in mammals, respectively. Hong Kong (affected by H5N1 in 1997) and Shanghai (affected by H7N9 in 2013) are two rapidly flourishing cosmopolitan megacities that were increasing in human population and poultry consumption before the outbreaks. Both cities are located along the avian migratory route at the Pearl River delta and Yangtze River delta. Whether the widespread use of the H5N1 vaccine in east Asia-with suboptimum biosecurity measures in live poultry markets and farms-predisposed to the emergence of H7N9 or other virus subtypes needs further investigation. Why H7N9 seems to be more readily transmitted from poultry to people than H5N1 is still unclear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus could partly be evacuated by pregnant BALB/c mouse during abortion or preterm delivery

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    Deng Wei

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus is one of candidates for future pandemic. Since H5N1 viruses had previously been isolated only from avian species, the outbreak raised questions about the ability of these viruses to cause severe disease and death in humans. Pregnant women are at increased risk for influenza-associated illness and death. However, little is known about whether influenza viruses could transmit to the fetus through the placenta, and the effects of abortion and preterm delivery to maternal influenza infection are not well understood. We found that the H5N1 viruses could vertical transmit to the fetus through the placenta in the BALB/c mouse model, and the viruses could partly be evacuated by the pregnant mice during abortion or preterm delivery. This study may further our understanding about the transmission of this highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, supply optimized clinical treatment method for pregnant women, and shed some light on better preventing and controlling for future potential outbreak of H5N1 influenza pandemic.

  11. Influenza A virus (H5N1) infection in cats causes systemic disease with potential novel routes of virus spread within and between hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); M.M.J.W. Baars (Marianne); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); G. van Amerongen (Geert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe ongoing outbreak of avian influenza A virus (subtype H5N1) infection in Asia is of great concern because of the high human case fatality rate and the threat of a new influenza pandemic. Case reports in humans and felids suggest that this virus may have a different tissue tropism from

  12. Antigenic variation of clade 2.1 H5N1 virus is determined by a few amino acid substitutions immediately adjacent to the receptor binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.F. Koel (Björn); S. van der Vliet (Stefan); D.F. Burke (David); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); E.E. Bharoto (Eny); I.W.W. Yasa (I. Wayan); I. Herliana (Inna); B.M. Laksono (Brigitta); K. Xu (Kemin); E. Skepner (Eugene); C.A. Russell (Colin); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); D.R. Perez (Daniel); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D.J. Smith (Derek James); T.Y. Prajitno (Teguh); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 subtype are genetically highly variable and have diversified into multiple phylogenetic clades over the past decade. Antigenic drift is a well-studied phenomenon for seasonal human influenza viruses, but much less is known

  13. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on specific pathogen free (SPF) birds immunized with 0.2 ...

  14. Seroevidence for a High Prevalence of Subclinical Infection With Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Among Workers in a Live-Poultry Market in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazufumi; Wulandari, Laksmi; Poetranto, Emmanuel D; Setyoningrum, Retno A; Yudhawati, Resti; Sholikhah, Amelia; Nastri, Aldise M; Poetranto, Anna L; Candra, Adithya Y R; Puruhito, Edith F; Takahara, Yusuke; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Yamaoka, Masaoki; Hotta, Hak; Ustumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria I; Soetjipto; Shimizu, Yohko K; Soegiarto, Gatot; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-12-15

     In Indonesia, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus has become endemic in poultry and has caused sporadic deadly infections in human. Since 2012, we have conducted fixed-point surveillance of avian influenza viruses at a live-poultry market in East Java, Indonesia. In this study, we examined the seroprevalence of avian influenza A(H5N1) virus infection among market workers.  Sera were collected from 101 workers in early 2014 and examined for antibody activity against avian A(H5N1) Eurasian lineage virus by a hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay.  By the HI assay, 84% of the sera tested positive for antibody activity against the avian virus. Further analysis revealed that the average HI titer in 2014 was 2.9-fold higher than in 2012 and that seroconversion occurred in 44% of paired sera (11 of 25) between 2012 and 2014. A medical history survey was performed in 2016; responses to questionnaires indicated that none of workers had had severe acute respiratory illness during 2013.  This study provides evidence of a high prevalence of avian A(H5N1) virus infection in 2013 among workers at a live-poultry market. However, because no instances of hospitalizations were reported, we can conclude the virus did not manifest any clinical symptoms in workers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in a long-distance migrant shorebird under migratory and non-migratory states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Bildt, Marco W.G. van de; Amerongen, Geert van; Buehler, Deborah; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Jenni-Eiermann, Susi; Piersma, Theunis; Kuiken, Thijs

    2011-01-01

    Corticosterone regulates physiological changes preparing wild birds for migration. It also modulates the immune system and may lead to increased susceptibility to infection, with implications for the spread of pathogens, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1. The red knot

  16. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in a long-distance migrant shorebird under migratory and non-migratory states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); D.M. Buehler (Debbie); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); S. Jenni-Eiermann (Susi); T. Piersma (Theunis); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCorticosterone regulates physiological changes preparing wild birds for migration. It also modulates the immune system and may lead to increased susceptibility to infection, with implications for the spread of pathogens, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1. The

  17. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraedts, Felix; Goutagny, Nadege; Hornung, Veit; Severa, Martina; de Haan, Aalzen; Pool, Judith; Wilschut, Jan; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Huckriede, Anke

    In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed

  18. Prior infection of chickens with H1N1 or H1N2 avian influenza elicits partial heterologous protection against highly pathogenic H5N1.

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    Charles Nfon

    Full Text Available There is a critical need to have vaccines that can protect against emerging pandemic influenza viruses. Commonly used influenza vaccines are killed whole virus that protect against homologous and not heterologous virus. Using chickens we have explored the possibility of using live low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI A/goose/AB/223/2005 H1N1 or A/WBS/MB/325/2006 H1N2 to induce immunity against heterologous highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI A/chicken/Vietnam/14/2005 H5N1. H1N1 and H1N2 replicated in chickens but did not cause clinical disease. Following infection, chickens developed nucleoprotein and H1 specific antibodies, and reduced H5N1 plaque size in vitro in the absence of H5 neutralizing antibodies at 21 days post infection (DPI. In addition, heterologous cell mediated immunity (CMI was demonstrated by antigen-specific proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in PBMCs re-stimulated with H5N1 antigen. Following H5N1 challenge of both pre-infected and naïve controls chickens housed together, all naïve chickens developed acute disease and died while H1N1 or H1N2 pre-infected chickens had reduced clinical disease and 70-80% survived. H1N1 or H1N2 pre-infected chickens were also challenged with H5N1 and naïve chickens placed in the same room one day later. All pre-infected birds were protected from H5N1 challenge but shed infectious virus to naïve contact chickens. However, disease onset, severity and mortality was reduced and delayed in the naïve contacts compared to directly inoculated naïve controls. These results indicate that prior infection with LPAI virus can generate heterologous protection against HPAI H5N1 in the absence of specific H5 antibody.

  19. Role of domestic ducks in the emergence of a new genotype of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Subrata; Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Hasan, M Kamrul; Akhtar, Sharmin; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Turner, Jasmine Cm; Franks, John; Walker, David; Seiler, Jon; Friedman, Kimberly; Kercher, Lisa; Jeevan, Trushar; Darnell, Daniel; Kayali, Ghazi; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Feeroz, Mohammed M

    2017-08-09

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses were first isolated in Bangladesh in February 2007. Subsequently, clades 2.2.2, 2.3.4.2 and 2.3.2.1a were identified in Bangladesh, and our previous surveillance data revealed that by the end of 2014, the circulating viruses exclusively comprised clade 2.3.2.1a. We recently determined the status of circulating avian influenza viruses in Bangladesh by conducting surveillance of live poultry markets and waterfowl in wetland areas from February 2015 through February 2016. Until April 2015, clade 2.3.2.1a persisted without any change in genotype. However, in June 2015, we identified a new genotype of H5N1 viruses, clade 2.3.2.1a, which quickly became predominant. These newly emerged H5N1 viruses contained the hemagglutinin, neuraminidase and matrix genes of circulating 2.3.2.1a Bangladeshi H5N1 viruses and five other genes of low pathogenic Eurasian-lineage avian influenza A viruses. Some of these internal genes were closely related to those of low pathogenic viruses isolated from ducks in free-range farms and wild birds in a wetland region of northeastern Bangladesh, where commercially raised domestic ducks have frequent contact with migratory birds. These findings indicate that migratory birds of the Central Asian flyway and domestic ducks in the free-range farms in Tanguar haor-like wetlands played an important role in the emergence of this novel genotype of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses.

  20. Satellite tracking on the flyways of brown-headed gulls and their potential role in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanakorn, Parntep; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Eiamampai, Krairat; Farmer, Adrian H; Webster, Robert G; Chaichoune, Kridsada; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Pothieng, Duangrat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2012-01-01

    Brown-headed gulls (Larus brunnicephalus), winter visitors of Thailand, were tracked by satellite telemetry during 2008-2011 for investigating their roles in the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus spread. Eight gulls negative for influenza virus infection were marked with solar-powered satellite platform transmitters at Bang Poo study site in Samut Prakarn province, Thailand; their movements were monitored by the Argos satellite tracking system, and locations were mapped. Five gulls completed their migratory cycles, which spanned 7 countries (China, Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam) affected by the HPAI H5N1 virus. Gulls migrated from their breeding grounds in China to stay overwinter in Thailand and Cambodia; while Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Vietnam were the places of stopovers during migration. Gulls traveled an average distance of about 2400 km between Thailand and China and spent 1-2 weeks on migration. Although AI surveillance among gulls was conducted at the study site, no AI virus was isolated and no H5N1 viral genome or specific antibody was detected in the 75 gulls tested, but 6.6% of blood samples were positive for pan-influenza A antibody. No AI outbreaks were reported in areas along flyways of gulls in Thailand during the study period. Distance and duration of migration, tolerability of the captive gulls to survive the HPAI H5N1 virus challenge and days at viral shedding after the virus challenging suggested that the Brown-headed gull could be a potential species for AI spread, especially among Southeast Asian countries, the epicenter of H5N1 AI outbreak.

  1. Satellite tracking on the flyways of brown-headed gulls and their potential role in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parntep Ratanakorn

    Full Text Available Brown-headed gulls (Larus brunnicephalus, winter visitors of Thailand, were tracked by satellite telemetry during 2008-2011 for investigating their roles in the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus spread. Eight gulls negative for influenza virus infection were marked with solar-powered satellite platform transmitters at Bang Poo study site in Samut Prakarn province, Thailand; their movements were monitored by the Argos satellite tracking system, and locations were mapped. Five gulls completed their migratory cycles, which spanned 7 countries (China, Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam affected by the HPAI H5N1 virus. Gulls migrated from their breeding grounds in China to stay overwinter in Thailand and Cambodia; while Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Vietnam were the places of stopovers during migration. Gulls traveled an average distance of about 2400 km between Thailand and China and spent 1-2 weeks on migration. Although AI surveillance among gulls was conducted at the study site, no AI virus was isolated and no H5N1 viral genome or specific antibody was detected in the 75 gulls tested, but 6.6% of blood samples were positive for pan-influenza A antibody. No AI outbreaks were reported in areas along flyways of gulls in Thailand during the study period. Distance and duration of migration, tolerability of the captive gulls to survive the HPAI H5N1 virus challenge and days at viral shedding after the virus challenging suggested that the Brown-headed gull could be a potential species for AI spread, especially among Southeast Asian countries, the epicenter of H5N1 AI outbreak.

  2. Cell-Based Systems Biology Analysis of Human AS03-Adjuvanted H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Responses: A Phase I Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Leigh M; Hoek, Kristen L; Goll, Johannes B; Samir, Parimal; Galassie, Allison; Allos, Tara M; Niu, Xinnan; Gordy, Laura E; Creech, C Buddy; Prasad, Nripesh; Jensen, Travis L; Hill, Heather; Levy, Shawn E; Joyce, Sebastian; Link, Andrew J; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine development for influenza A/H5N1 is an important public health priority, but H5N1 vaccines are less immunogenic than seasonal influenza vaccines. Adjuvant System 03 (AS03) markedly enhances immune responses to H5N1 vaccine antigens, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. We compared the safety (primary endpoint), immunogenicity (secondary), gene expression (tertiary) and cytokine responses (exploratory) between AS03-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted inactivated split-virus H5N1 influenza vaccines. In a double-blinded clinical trial, we randomized twenty adults aged 18-49 to receive two doses of either AS03-adjuvanted (n = 10) or unadjuvanted (n = 10) H5N1 vaccine 28 days apart. We used a systems biology approach to characterize and correlate changes in serum cytokines, antibody titers, and gene expression levels in six immune cell types at 1, 3, 7, and 28 days after the first vaccination. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Nine of 10 subjects in the adjuvanted group and 0/10 in the unadjuvanted group exhibited seroprotection (hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer > 1:40) at day 56. Within 24 hours of AS03-adjuvanted vaccination, increased serum levels of IL-6 and IP-10 were noted. Interferon signaling and antigen processing and presentation-related gene responses were induced in dendritic cells, monocytes, and neutrophils. Upregulation of MHC class II antigen presentation-related genes was seen in neutrophils. Three days after AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle and division was detected in NK cells and correlated with serum levels of IP-10. Early upregulation of interferon signaling-related genes was also found to predict seroprotection 56 days after first vaccination. Using this cell-based systems approach, novel mechanisms of action for AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccination were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01573312.

  3. Detection of antibody responses by using haemagglutination inhibiton test and the protection titer of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Indriani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on the detection of antibody responses using haemagglutination inhibition (HI test and the protection titer to Avian influenza (AI virus H5N1 subtype local isolate has been conducted at the Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS. A total number of 50 village chicken (10 chicken served as un-injected controls and 30 quail were injected intramuscularly with inactivated virus of AI H5N1 subtype local isolate. Serum samples were collected 3 weeks after injection and were tested using haemagglutination inhibition tests. The correlation between antibody titer and its protection to AI virus H5N1 local isolate were measured by challenging the birds with AI virus H5N1 local isolate The HI test was then used to determine field serum samples. A total number of 48 village chicken from three (3 Districts (Bekasi, Tangerang and Bogor and 96 quails from two (2 farms in District of Sukabumi which were all vaccinated with commercial AI adjuvant vaccine were sampled. The study revealed that village chicken and quails showed antibody responses after 3 weeks vaccination and that titer of ≥ 3 log 2 was able to protect chicken and quails when they were challenged with local isolate virus. Based on this result, village chicken field samples from Districts of Tangerang, Bekasi and Bogor showed antibody titer which will protect 50, 100 and 85% of the flocks respectively. While quail field samples from Farm I and Farm II in District of Sukabumi showed antibody titer which will protect 60-100% and 0-80% of the flocks respectively. It is concluded that the study has successfully measured antibody titer to AI virus H5N1 subtype which protect village chicken and quails from local isolate virus challenge so that the results will be used to analyze field serum samples after vaccination program to eradicate AI from Indonesia.

  4. Replication and transcription activities of ribonucleoprotein complexes reconstituted from avian H5N1, H1N1pdm09 and H3N2 influenza A viruses.

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    Karry L K Ngai

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses pose a serious pandemic threat to humans. Better knowledge on cross-species adaptation is important. This study examined the replication and transcription efficiency of ribonucleoprotein complexes reconstituted by plasmid co-transfection between H5N1, H1N1pdm09 and H3N2 influenza A viruses, and to identify mutations in the RNA polymerase subunit that affect human adaptation. Viral RNA polymerase subunits PB1, PB2, PA and NP derived from influenza viruses were co-expressed with pPolI-vNP-Luc in human cells, and with its function evaluated by luciferase reporter assay. A quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure vRNA, cRNA, and mRNA levels for assessing the replication and transcription efficiency. Mutations in polymerase subunit were created to identify signature of increased human adaptability. H5N1 ribonucleoprotein complexes incorporated with PB2 derived from H1N1pdm09 and H3N2 viruses increased the polymerase activity in human cells. Furthermore, single amino acid substitutions at PB2 of H5N1 could affect polymerase activity in a temperature-dependent manner. By using a highly sensitive quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, an obvious enhancement in replication and transcription activities of ribonucleoproteins was observed by the introduction of lysine at residue 627 in the H5N1 PB2 subunit. Although less strongly in polymerase activity, E158G mutation appeared to alter the accumulation of H5N1 RNA levels in a temperature-dependent manner, suggesting a temperature-dependent mechanism in regulating transcription and replication exists. H5N1 viruses can adapt to humans either by acquisition of PB2 from circulating human-adapted viruses through reassortment, or by mutations at critical sites in PB2. This information may help to predict the pandemic potential of newly emerged influenza strains, and provide a scientific basis for stepping up surveillance measures and vaccine production.

  5. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Swayne, David E; Thomas, Colleen; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Naffakh, Nadia; Warnes, Christine; Altholtz, Melanie; Donis, Ruben; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-05-01

    Following circulation of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites, and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 to 2007, H5N1 viruses with a short NA stalk have become widespread in several avian species. Compared to viruses with a long-stalk NA, viruses with a short-stalk NA showed a decreased capacity to elute from red blood cells and an increased virulence in mice, but not in chickens. The presence of additional HA glycosylation sites had less of an effect on virulence than did NA stalk length. The short-stalk NA of H5N1 viruses circulating in Asia may contribute to virulence in humans.

  6. Experimental challenge and pathology of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in dunlin (Calidris alpina), an intercontinental migrant shorebird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Franson, J. Christian; Gill, Robert E.; Meteyer, Carol U.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Dusek, Robert J.; Ip, Hon S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Shorebirds (Charadriiformes) are considered one of the primary reservoirs of avian influenza. Because these species are highly migratory, there is concern that infected shorebirds may be a mechanism by which highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 could be introduced into North America from Asia. Large numbers of dunlin (Calidris alpina) migrate from wintering areas in central and eastern Asia, where HPAIV H5N1 is endemic, across the Bering Sea to breeding areas in Alaska. Low pathogenic avian influenza virus has been previously detected in dunlin, and thus, dunlin represent a potential risk to transport HPAIV to North America. To date no experimental challenge studies have been performed in shorebirds.

  7. Novel H5 Clade 2.3.4.4 Reassortant (H5N1) Virus from a Green-Winged Teal in Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchetti, Mia Kim; Killian, Mary Lea; Dusek, Robert J; Pedersen, Janice C; Hines, Nichole; Bodenstein, Barbara; White, C LeAnn; Ip, Hon S

    2015-04-02

    Eurasian (EA)-origin H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 avian influenza viruses were first detected in North America during December 2014. Subsequent reassortment with North American (AM) low-pathogenic wild-bird-origin avian influenza has generated at least two reassortants, including an EA/AM H5N1 from an apparently healthy wild green-winged teal, suggesting continued ongoing reassortment. Copyright © 2015 Torchetti et al.

  8. Eco-Virological Approach for Assessing the Role of Wild Birds in the Spread of Avian Influenza H5N1 along the Central Asian Flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    migratory birds occurred during a sudden cold spell in Europe during 2005–2006. This event was driven by a climate anomaly [22]. The recurring spatio-temporal...in comparison to populated urban centers where poultry outbreaks typically occur. More complete surveillance of HPAI H5N1 through rural East Asia is...Assessment of grassland degradation near Lake Qinghai, West China, using Landsat TM and in situ reflectance spectra data. Int J Remote Sens 24: 4177–4189. 36

  9. Rivers and flooded areas identified by medium-resolution remote sensing improve risk prediction of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerapong Thanapongtharm

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Thailand experienced several epidemic waves of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 between 2004 and 2005. This study investigated the role of water in the landscape, which has not been previously assessed because of a lack of high-resolution information on the distribution of flooded land at the time of the epidemic. Nine Landsat 7- Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus scenes covering 174,610 km2 were processed using k-means unsupervised classification to map the distribution of flooded areas as well as permanent lakes and reservoirs at the time of the main epidemic HPAI H5N1 wave of October 2004. These variables, together with other factors previously identified as significantly associated with risk, were entered into an autologistic regression model in order to quantify the gain in risk explanation over previously published models. We found that, in addition to other factors previously identified as associated with risk, the proportion of land covered by flooding along with expansion of rivers and streams, derived from an existing, sub-district level (administrative level no. 3 geographical information system database, was a highly significant risk factor in this 2004 HPAI epidemic. These results suggest that water-borne transmission could have partly contributed to the spread of HPAI H5N1 during the epidemic. Future work stemming from these results should involve studies where the actual distribution of small canals, rivers, ponds, rice paddy fields and farms are mapped and tested against farm-level data with respect to HPAI H5N1.

  10. Insight into live bird markets of Bangladesh: an overview of the dynamics of transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jasmine C M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Hasan, M Kamrul; Akhtar, Sharmin; Walker, David; Seiler, Patrick; Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Kayali, Ghazi; Webster, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 viruses have been recognized as threats to public health in Bangladesh since 2007. Although live bird markets (LBMs) have been implicated in the transmission, dissemination, and circulation of these viruses, an in-depth analysis of the dynamics of avian transmission of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses at the human-animal interface has been lacking. Here we present and evaluate epidemiological findings from active surveillance conducted among poultry in various production sectors in Bangladesh from 2008 to 2016. Overall, the prevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in collected samples was 24%. Our data show that AIVs are more prevalent in domestic birds within LBMs (30.4%) than in farms (9.6%). Quail, chickens and ducks showed a high prevalence of AIVs (>20%). The vast majority of AIVs detected (99.7%) have come from apparently healthy birds and poultry drinking water served as a reservoir of AIVs with a prevalence of 32.5% in collected samples. HPAI H5N1 was more frequently detected in ducks while H9N2 was more common in chickens and quail. LBMs, particularly wholesale markets, have become a potential reservoir for various types of AIVs, including HPAI H5N1 and LPAI H9N2. The persistence of AIVs in LBMs is of great concern to public health, and this study highlights the importance of regularly reviewing and implementing infection control procedures as a means of reducing the exposure of the general public to AIVs.Emerging Microbes & Infections (2017) 6, e12; doi:10.1038/emi.2016.142; published online 8 March 2017.

  11. Single-dose vaccination of a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 expressing NP from H5N1 virus provides broad immunity against influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Gabbard, Jon D; Mooney, Alaina; Gao, Xiudan; Chen, Zhenhai; Place, Ryan J; Tompkins, S Mark; He, Biao

    2013-05-01

    Influenza viruses often evade host immunity via antigenic drift and shift despite previous influenza virus infection and/or vaccination. Vaccines that match circulating virus strains are needed for optimal protection. Development of a universal influenza virus vaccine providing broadly cross-protective immunity will be of great importance. The nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A virus is highly conserved among all strains of influenza A viruses and has been explored as an antigen for developing a universal influenza virus vaccine. In this work, we generated a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) containing NP from H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/2004), a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, between HN and L (PIV5-NP-HN/L) and tested its efficacy. PIV5-NP-HN/L induced humoral and T cell responses in mice. A single inoculation of PIV5-NP-HN/L provided complete protection against lethal heterosubtypic H1N1 challenge and 50% protection against lethal H5N1 HPAI virus challenge. To improve efficacy, NP was inserted into different locations within the PIV5 genome. Recombinant PIV5 containing NP between F and SH (PIV5-NP-F/SH) or between SH and HN (PIV5-NP-SH/HN) provided better protection against H5N1 HPAI virus challenge than did PIV5-NP-HN/L. These results suggest that PIV5 expressing NP from H5N1 has the potential to be utilized as a universal influenza virus vaccine.

  12. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling.

    OpenAIRE

    Felix Geeraedts; Nadege Goutagny; Veit Hornung; Martina Severa; Aalzen de Haan; Judith Pool; Jan Wilschut; Katherine A Fitzgerald; Anke Huckriede

    2008-01-01

    In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed individuals, inactivated whole virus (WIV) vaccines are more immunogenic and induce protective antibody responses at a lower antigen dose than other formulations like split virus (SV) or subunit (...

  13. MF59-adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine induces immunologic memory and heterotypic antibody responses in non-elderly and elderly adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Banzhoff

    Full Text Available Pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1 has the potential to cause a major global pandemic in humans. Safe and effective vaccines that induce immunologic memory and broad heterotypic response are needed.Healthy adults aged 18-60 and > 60 years (n = 313 and n = 173, respectively were randomized (1:1 to receive two primary and one booster injection of 7.5 microg or 15 microg doses of a subunit MF59-adjuvanted H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1 vaccine. Safety was monitored until 6 months after booster. Immunogenicity was assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI, single radial hemolysis (SRH and microneutralization assays (MN. Mild injection-site pain was the most common adverse reaction. No serious adverse events relating to the vaccine were reported. The humoral immune responses to 7.5 microg and 15 microg doses were comparable. The rates for seroprotection (HI>40; SRH>25 mm(2; MN > or = 40 after the primary vaccination ranged 72-87%. Six months after primary vaccination with the 7.5 microg dose, 18% and 21% of non-elderly and elderly adults were seroprotected; rates increased to 90% and 84%, respectively, after the booster vaccination. In the 15 microg group, seroprotection rates among non-elderly and elderly adults increased from 25% and 62% after primary vaccination to 92% and 88% after booster vaccination, respectively. A heterologous immune response to the H5N1/turkey/Turkey/05 strain was elicited after second and booster vaccinations.Both formulations of MF59-adjuvanted influenza H5N1 vaccine were well tolerated. The European Union requirement for licensure for pre-pandemic vaccines was met by the lower dose tested. The presence of cross-reactive antibodies to a clade 2 heterologous strain demonstrates that this vaccine may be appropriate for pre-pandemic programs.(ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00311480.

  14. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses at the Animal-Human Interface in Vietnam, 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanga, Adrian; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Cuong, Vuong Duc; Nguyen, Ha T; Phuong, Hoang Vu Mai; Thanh, Le Thi; Thach, Nguyen Co; Hien, Pham Thi; Tung, Nguyen; Jang, Yunho; Balish, Amanda; Dang, Nguyen Hoang; Duong, Mai Thuy; Huong, Ngo Thu; Hoa, Do Ngoc; Tho, Nguyen Dang; Klimov, Alexander; Kapella, Bryan K; Gubareva, Larisa; Kile, James C; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Mai, Le Quynh; Davis, C Todd

    2017-09-15

    Mutation and reassortment of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses at the animal-human interface remain a major concern for emergence of viruses with pandemic potential. To understand the relationship of H5N1 viruses circulating in poultry and those isolated from humans, comprehensive phylogenetic and molecular analyses of viruses collected from both hosts in Vietnam between 2003 and 2010 were performed. We examined the temporal and spatial distribution of human cases relative to H5N1 poultry outbreaks and characterized the genetic lineages and amino acid substitutions in each gene segment identified in humans relative to closely related viruses from avian hosts. Six hemagglutinin clades and 8 genotypes were identified in humans, all of which were initially identified in poultry. Several amino acid mutations throughout the genomes of viruses isolated from humans were identified, indicating the potential for poultry viruses infecting humans to rapidly acquire molecular markers associated with mammalian adaptation and antiviral resistance. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Cell culture (Vero) derived whole virus (H5N1) vaccine based on wild-type virus strain induces cross-protective immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Howard, M Keith; Spruth, Martin; Wodal, Walter; Brühl, Peter; Gerencer, Marijan; Crowe, Brian A; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Livey, Ian; Reiter, Manfred; Mayerhofer, Ines; Tauer, Christa; Grillberger, Leopold; Mundt, Wolfgang; Falkner, Falko G; Barrett, P Noel

    2007-08-10

    The rapid spread and the transmission to humans of avian influenza virus (H5N1) have induced world-wide fears of a new pandemic and raised concerns over the ability of standard influenza vaccine production methods to rapidly supply sufficient amounts of an effective vaccine. We report here on a robust and flexible strategy which uses wild-type virus grown in a continuous cell culture (Vero) system to produce an inactivated whole virus vaccine. Candidate vaccines based on clade 1 and clade 2 influenza H5N1 strains were developed and demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in animal models. The vaccines induce cross-neutralising antibodies, highly cross-reactive T-cell responses and are protective in a mouse challenge model not only against the homologous virus but also against other H5N1 strains, including those from another clade. These data indicate that cell culture-grown whole virus vaccines, based on the wild-type virus, allow the rapid high yield production of a candidate pandemic vaccine.

  16. Mild Respiratory Illness Among Young Children Caused by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infection in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Apurba; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hossain, M Jahangir; Khan, Salah Uddin; Haider, M Sabbir; Sultana, Rebeca; Ali Rimi, Nadia; Islam, M Saiful; Haider, Najmul; Islam, Ausraful; Sultana Shanta, Ireen; Sultana, Tahmina; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Homaira, Nusrat; Goswami, Doli; Nahar, Kamrun; Alamgir, A S M; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mahbuba Jamil, Khondokar; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Simpson, Natosha; Shu, Bo; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gerloff, Nancy; Davis, C Todd; Katz, Jaqueline M; Mikolon, Andrea; Uyeki, Timothy M; Luby, Stephen P; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine

    2017-09-15

    In March 2011, a multidisciplinary team investigated 2 human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus infection, detected through population-based active surveillance for influenza in Bangladesh, to assess transmission and contain further spread. We collected clinical and exposure history of the case patients and monitored persons coming within 1 m of a case patient during their infectious period. Nasopharyngeal wash specimens from case patients and contacts were tested with real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and virus culture and isolates were characterized. Serum samples were tested with microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays. We tested poultry, wild bird, and environmental samples from case patient households and surrounding areas for influenza viruses. Two previously healthy case patients, aged 13 and 31 months, had influenzalike illness and fully recovered. They had contact with poultry 7 and 10 days before illness onset, respectively. None of their 57 contacts were subsequently ill. Clade 2.2.2.1 highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses were isolated from the case patients and from chicken fecal samples collected at the live bird markets near the patients' dwellings. Identification of H5N1 cases through population-based surveillance suggests possible additional undetected cases throughout Bangladesh and highlights the importance of surveillance for mild respiratory illness among populations frequently exposed to infected poultry.

  17. VARIATION OF NON-CODING REGION AND CODING REGION OF 5’-TERMINAL CRNA OF POLYMERASE BASIC 1 OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS SUBTYPE H5N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The sequence of the Non-Coding Region (NCR and Coding Region (CR of 5’-terminal cRNA of thepolymerase basic 1 (PB1 gene as a major factor for the species adaptation of avian influenza virussubtype H5N1 (AIV H5N1 has been analysed. The information could be a virological signal for theemergence of a new strain with pandemic potential. Total RNA from twenty six (26 avian influenzasubtype H5N1 isolates were amplified using reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCRwith a universal forward primer for influenza virus and specifically designed backward primers. Fifteen(15 PB1 gene fragments could be amplified. RT-PCR products were sequenced and analyzed using Mega4software. The length of NCR of PB1 gene was found to be 24 bases and mostly shows conserved sequence,with an exception of Dk/Badung/2006 isolate which has C-7T substitution. A/T composition of PB1 NCRwas 54,2%, while the Dk/Badung/2006 isolate was 58,3%. Species and geographical specificity could not befound in the genetic distance, the amino acid polymorphism, as well as the phylogenetic analysis of t

  18. Differential activation of NK cells by influenza A pseudotype H5N1 and 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Zhou, Jianfang; Lin, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yonghui; Yang, Xiaoxing; Wang, Yue; Shu, Yuelong

    2010-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the effectors of innate immunity and are recruited into the lung 48 h after influenza virus infection. Functional NK cell activation can be triggered by the interaction between viral hemagglutinin (HA) and natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp46 and NKp44 on the cell surface. Recently, novel subtypes of influenza viruses, such as H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1, transmitted directly to the human population, with unusual mortality and morbidity rates. Here, the human NK cell responses to these viruses were studied. Differential activation of heterogeneous NK cells (upregulation of CD69 and CD107a and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma] production as well as downregulation of NKp46) was observed following interactions with H5N1, 1918 H1N1, and 2009 H1N1 pseudotyped particles (pps), respectively, and the responses of the CD56(dim) subset predominated. Much stronger NK activation was triggered by H5N1 and 1918 H1N1 pps than by 2009 H1N1 pps. The interaction of pps with NK cells and subsequent internalization were mediated by NKp46 partially. The NK cell activation by pps showed a dosage-dependent manner, while an increasing viral HA titer attenuated NK activation phenotypes, cytotoxicity, and IFN-gamma production. The various host innate immune responses to different influenza virus subtypes or HA titers may be associated with disease severity.

  19. Differential Activation of NK Cells by Influenza A Pseudotype H5N1 and 1918 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses▿ ‡ ‖

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Zhou, Jianfang; Lin, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yonghui; Yang, Xiaoxing; Wang, Yue; Shu, Yuelong

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the effectors of innate immunity and are recruited into the lung 48 h after influenza virus infection. Functional NK cell activation can be triggered by the interaction between viral hemagglutinin (HA) and natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp46 and NKp44 on the cell surface. Recently, novel subtypes of influenza viruses, such as H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1, transmitted directly to the human population, with unusual mortality and morbidity rates. Here, the human NK cell responses to these viruses were studied. Differential activation of heterogeneous NK cells (upregulation of CD69 and CD107a and gamma interferon [IFN-γ] production as well as downregulation of NKp46) was observed following interactions with H5N1, 1918 H1N1, and 2009 H1N1 pseudotyped particles (pps), respectively, and the responses of the CD56dim subset predominated. Much stronger NK activation was triggered by H5N1 and 1918 H1N1 pps than by 2009 H1N1 pps. The interaction of pps with NK cells and subsequent internalization were mediated by NKp46 partially. The NK cell activation by pps showed a dosage-dependent manner, while an increasing viral HA titer attenuated NK activation phenotypes, cytotoxicity, and IFN-γ production. The various host innate immune responses to different influenza virus subtypes or HA titers may be associated with disease severity. PMID:20484512

  20. Physician's knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infections of humans in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, A Danielle; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Storms, Aaron D; Samaan, Gina; Ariawan, Iwan; Soeharno, Nugroho; Kreslake, Jennifer M; Storey, J Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    Indonesia has reported highest number of fatal human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N1) virus infection worldwide since 2005. There are limited data available on seasonal and pandemic influenza in Indonesia. During 2012, we conducted a survey of clinicians in two districts in western Java, Indonesia, to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of clinical diagnosis, testing, and treatment of patients with seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, or HPAI H5N1 virus infections. Overall, a very low percentage of physician participants reported ever diagnosing hospitalized patients with seasonal, pandemic, or HPAI H5N1 influenza. Use of influenza testing was low in outpatients and hospitalized patients, and use of antiviral treatment was very low for clinically diagnosed influenza patients. Further research is needed to explore health system barriers for influenza diagnostic testing and availability of antivirals for treatment of influenza in Indonesia. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens using adenovirus vector and virus-like particles induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2013-11-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to trigger severe diseases in poultry and humans, prompting efforts to develop an effective vaccine. Toward that goal, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding influenza hemagglutin (rAd-HA) and a flagellin-containing virus-like particle (FliC-VLP). Using a murine model, we investigated a heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimen combining these two vectors. Our results indicate that priming with the rAd-HA vector followed by a FliC-VLP booster induced the highest HA-specific total IgG, IgG1and IgG2a. Maximum neutralizing antibody titers against homologous and heterologous clades of H5N1 virus strains and hemagglutination inhibition resulted from the heterologous vaccination strategy. Our results are likely to contribute to the development of more effective H5N1 vaccines. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Narcissus tazetta lectin shows strong inhibitory effects against respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Linda S M; Ho, Wing-Shan; Ngai, Karry L K; Tian, Li; Chan, Paul K S; Sun, Samuel S M; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2010-03-01

    A mannose-binding lectin (Narcissus tazetta lectin [NTL]) with potent antiviral activity was isolated and purified from the bulbs of the Chinese daffodil Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis, using ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on mannose-agarose and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-gel filtration on Superose 12. The purified lectin was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa by gel filtration and 13 kDa by SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is probably a dimer with two identical subunits. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of NTL as determined by molecular cloning also reveals that NTL protein contains a mature polypeptide consisting of 105 amino acids and a C-terminal peptide extension. Three-dimensional modelling study demonstrated that the NTL primary polypeptide contains three subdomains, each with a conserved mannose-binding site. It shows a high homology of about 60%-80% similarity with the existing monocot mannose-binding lectins. NTL could significantly inhibit plaque formation by the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with an IC50 of 2.30 microg/ml and exhibit strong antiviral properties against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and influenza B viruses with IC50 values ranging from 0.20 microg/ml to 1.33 microg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. It is worth noting that the modes of antiviral action of NTL against RSV and influenza A virus are significantly different. NTL is effective in the inhibition of RSV during the whole viral infection cycle, but the antiviral activity of NTL is mainly expressed at the early stage of the viral cycle of influenza A (H1N1) virus. NTL with a high selective index (SI=CC50/IC50 > or = 141) resulting from its potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity demonstrates a potential for biotechnological development as an antiviral agent.

  3. Spatial and temporal association of outbreaks of H5N1 influenza virus infection in wild birds with the 0 degrees C isotherm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie A Reperant

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Wild bird movements and aggregations following spells of cold weather may have resulted in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1 in Europe during the winter of 2005-2006. Waterbirds are constrained in winter to areas where bodies of water remain unfrozen in order to feed. On the one hand, waterbirds may choose to winter as close as possible to their breeding grounds in order to conserve energy for subsequent reproduction, and may be displaced by cold fronts. On the other hand, waterbirds may choose to winter in regions where adverse weather conditions are rare, and may be slowed by cold fronts upon their journey back to the breeding grounds, which typically starts before the end of winter. Waterbirds will thus tend to aggregate along cold fronts close to the 0 degrees C isotherm during winter, creating conditions that favour HPAIV H5N1 transmission and spread. We determined that the occurrence of outbreaks of HPAIV H5N1 infection in waterbirds in Europe during the winter of 2005-2006 was associated with temperatures close to 0 degrees C. The analysis suggests a significant spatial and temporal association of outbreaks caused by HPAIV H5N1 in wild birds with maximum surface air temperatures of 0 degrees C-2 degrees C on the day of the outbreaks and the two preceding days. At locations where waterbird census data have been collected since 1990, maximum mallard counts occurred when average and maximum surface air temperatures were 0 degrees C and 3 degrees C, respectively. Overall, the abundance of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos and common pochards (Aythya ferina was highest when surface air temperatures were lower than the mean temperatures of the region investigated. The analysis implies that waterbird movements associated with cold weather, and congregation of waterbirds along the 0 degrees C isotherm likely contributed to the spread and geographical distribution of outbreaks of HPAIV H5N1 infection in wild birds in

  4. Spatial modeling of wild bird risk factors to investigate highly pathogenic A(H5N1) avian influenza virus transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Diann J.; Hungerford, Laura L.; Erwin, R. Michael; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Takekawa, John Y.; Newman, Scott H.; Xiao, Xianming; Ellis, Erie C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the longest-persisting avian influenza viruses in history, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A(H5N1), continues to evolve after 18 years, advancing the threat of a global pandemic. Wild waterfowl (family Anatidae), are reported as secondary transmitters of HPAIV, and primary reservoirs for low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses, yet spatial inputs for disease risk modeling for this group have been lacking. Using GIS and Monte Carlo simulations, we developed geospatial indices of waterfowl abundance at 1 and 30 km resolutions and for the breeding and wintering seasons for China, the epicenter of H5N1. Two spatial layers were developed: cumulative waterfowl abundance (WAB), a measure of predicted abundance across species, and cumulative abundance weighted by H5N1 prevalence (WPR), whereby abundance for each species was adjusted based on prevalence values then totaled across species. Spatial patterns of the model output differed between seasons, with higher WAB and WPR in the northern and western regions of China for the breeding season and in the southeast for the wintering season. Uncertainty measures indicated highest error in southeastern China for both WAB and WPR. We also explored the effect of resampling waterfowl layers from 1 km to 30 km resolution for multi-scale risk modeling. Results indicated low average difference (less than 0.16 and 0.01 standard deviations for WAB and WPR, respectively), with greatest differences in the north for the breeding season and southeast for the wintering season. This work provides the first geospatial models of waterfowl abundance available for China. The indices provide important inputs for modeling disease transmission risk at the interface of poultry and wild birds. These models are easily adaptable, have broad utility to both disease and conservation needs, and will be available to the scientific community for advanced modeling applications.

  5. Evaluating interest in an influenza A(H5N1) vaccine among laboratory workers who work with highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kate E; Bresee, J S; Katz, J M; Olsen, S J

    2018-01-04

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) viruses found in poultry and wild birds occasionally infect humans and can cause serious disease. In 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviewed data from one licensed ASO3-adjuvanted influenza A(H5N1) vaccine for consideration of use during inter-pandemic periods among persons with occupational exposure. To guide vaccine policy decisions, we conducted a survey of laboratory workers to assess demand for HPAI vaccination. We designed an anonymous web survey (EpiInfo 7.0) to collect information on demographics, type of work and time spent with HPAI viruses, and interest in HPAI vaccination. Eligible participants were identified from 42 entities registered with United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Select Agent program in 2016 and emailed electronic surveys. Personnel with Biosafety Level 3 enhanced (BSL-3E) laboratory access were surveyed. Descriptive analysis was performed. Overall, 131 responses were received from 33 principal investigators, 26 research scientists, 24 technicians, 15 postdoctoral fellows, 6 students, and 27 others. The estimated response rate was 15% among the laboratory personnel of responding principal investigators. One hundred respondents reported working in a BSL-3E area where HPAI experiments occurred with a mean time of 5.1-11.7 h per week. Overall, 49% were interested in receiving an A(H5N1) vaccine. By role, interest was highest among students (80%) and among those who spent >50% of their time in a BSL-3E area (64%). Most (61%) of those who said they might be or were not interested in vaccine believed it would not provide additional protection to current safety practices. Half of responding laboratory workers was interested in receiving an influenza A(H5N1) vaccine. HPAI vaccination of laboratory workers at risk of occupational exposure could be used along with existing safety practices to protect this population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Assessment of immune responses to H5N1 inactivated influenza vaccine among individuals previously primed with H5N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Larisa; Naykhin, Anatoly; Donina, Svetlana; Korenkov, Daniil; Petukhova, Galina; Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Losev, Igor; Stukova, Marina; Erofeeva, Mariana; Nikiforova, Alexandra; Power, Maureen; Flores, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, a number of H5 subtype influenza vaccines have been developed and tested in clinical trials, but most of them induced poor serum antibody responses prompting the evaluation of novel vaccination approaches. One of the most promising ones is a "prime-boost" strategy, which could result in the induction of prompt and robust immune responses to a booster influenza vaccine following priming with homologous or heterologous vaccine strains. In our study we evaluated immunogenicity of an adjuvanted A(H5N1) inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in healthy adult subjects who received A(H5N2) live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) 1.5 years earlier and compared this with a group of naïve subjects. We found that priming with A(H5N2) LAIV induced a long-lasting B-cell immunological memory against influenza A(H5N1) virus, which was brought on by more prompt and vigorous antibody production to a single dose of A(H5N1) IIV in the primed group, compared to the naïve controls. Thus, by day 28 after the first booster dose, the hemagglutination inhibition and neutralizing (MN) antibody titer rises were 17.2 and 30.8 in the primed group, compared to 2.3 and 8.0 in the control group, respectively. The majority (79%) of the primed individuals achieved seroprotective MN antibody titers at 7 days after the first dose of the IIV. All LAIV-primed volunteers had MN titers ≥ 1:40 by Day 28 after one dose of IIV, whereas only 58% subjects from the naïve control group developed similar immune responses at this time point. The second A(H5N1) IIV dose did not increase the immune response in the LAIV-primed group, whereas 2 doses of IIV were required for naïve volunteers to develop significant immune responses. These findings were of special significance since Russian-based LAIV technology has been licensed to WHO, through whom the vaccine has been provided to vaccine manufacturers in India, China and Thailand - countries particularly vulnerable to a pandemic influenza

  7. The first case of H5N1 avian influenza infection in a human with complications of adult respiratory distress syndrome and Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, A S; Chan, L T

    1999-04-01

    Avian influenza virus was not known to cause systemic infection in humans before. We report a 3-year-old boy with good past health who developed pneumonia caused by H5N1 avian influenza A virus (A/Hong Kong/156/97). The virus was isolated from a tracheal aspirate. There were complications of Reye's syndrome, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and multiple organ system failure. He had a history of receiving aspirin. His adult respiratory distress syndrome did not respond to endotracheal surfactant replacement therapy. He died 6 days after admission. Clinicians should be alert to the importance of a new human influenza strain.

  8. Highly (H5N1 and low (H7N2 pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in falcons via nasochoanal route and ingestion of experimentally infected prey.

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    Kateri Bertran

    Full Text Available An experimental infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI viruses was carried out on falcons in order to examine the effects of these viruses in terms of pathogenesis, viral distribution in tissues and viral shedding. The distribution pattern of influenza virus receptors was also assessed. Captive-reared gyr-saker (Falco rusticolus x Falco cherrug hybrid falcons were challenged with a HPAI H5N1 virus (A/Great crested grebe/Basque Country/06.03249/2006 or a LPAI H7N2 virus (A/Anas plathyrhynchos/Spain/1877/2009, both via the nasochoanal route and by ingestion of previously infected specific pathogen free chicks. Infected falcons exhibited similar infection dynamics despite the different routes of exposure, demonstrating the effectiveness of in vivo feeding route. H5N1 infected falcons died, or were euthanized, between 5-7 days post-infection (dpi after showing acute severe neurological signs. Presence of viral antigen in several tissues was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and real time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR, which were generally associated with significant microscopical lesions, mostly in the brain. Neither clinical signs, nor histopathological findings were observed in any of the H7N2 LPAI infected falcons, although all of them had seroconverted by 11 dpi. Avian receptors were strongly present in the upper respiratory tract of the falcons, in accordance with the consistent oral viral shedding detected by RRT-PCR in both H5N1 HPAI and H7N2 LPAI infected falcons. The present study demonstrates that gyr-saker hybrid falcons are highly susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus infection, as previously observed, and that they may play a major role in the spreading of both HPAI and LPAI viruses. For the first time in raptors, natural infection by feeding on infected prey was successfully reproduced. The use of avian prey species in falconry husbandry and wildlife rehabilitation facilities could put valuable birds

  9. Characterization of a novel mutation in NS1 protein of influenza A virus induced by a chemical substance for the attenuation of pathogenicity.

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    Kohei Sasaki

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV has the potential for use as a vaccination against flu. In this study, we demonstrated the nature of an influenza A virus (IAV mutant induced by treating the IAV with a stable furan derivative, (1R,2R-1-(5'-methylfur-3'-ylpropane-1,2,3-triol (MFPT, which had been isolated from Streptomyces sp. strain FV60 with the objective of it being an LAIV candidate. The resulting MFPT-resistant (MFPTr IAVs possessed attenuated pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo when compared with that of the parent virus (H1N1 subtype, NWS strain. Sequencing analysis revealed that a novel mutation, C490U in ns gene (P164S in NS1, was detected in all MFPTr virus clones tested. Therefore, NS1 might be a main target of MFPT, and it was suggested that the P164S mutation contributed to the attenuated pathogenicity of the mutants. Although the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is one of the targets of NS1, the MFPTr virus suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt when compared with the wild-type (WT virus. It was suggested that this might lead to the subsequent inhibition of the cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3, which is important for the progression of apoptosis. At the same time, nucleoprotein (NP was found to be retained in the nuclei in MFPTr virus-infected cells while nuclear export of NP was detected in WT virus-infected cells. In addition, the expression levels of interferon-β transcripts were significantly decreased in MFPTr virus-infected cells. From these results it can be shown that the mutation, NS1P164S, might be one of the key residues to control NS1 function concerning the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, MFPT induced favorable mutation in the ns gene for the attenuation of IAV, and therefore might provide the novel methodology for preparing LAIVs.

  10. Dual-use nanoresearch of concern: recognizing threat and safeguarding the power of nanobiomedical research advances in the wake of the H5N1 controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleson, Kathleen

    2013-04-01

    The issue of dual-use leapt to the attention of the broader research community in 2012, when papers detailing the changes that allow H5N1 (avian) influenza virus to be transmitted between mammals were published after months of controversy. Although there is little overlap between nanomedical research and the organisms, toxins, and aims recognized by governing bodies as "of concern," dual-use potential is increasing along with the rapid pace of advances in nanotechnology and other converging technologies (biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science) that introduce novel capabilities to the global community. The capacity for harmful misuse of research enabled by converging technology progress is evident in molecular manipulation of virulence factors and directed traversal of the blood-brain barrier by nanoparticles. Increased awareness on the part of nanobiomedical scientists about dual-use potential will serve the interest of public health and safety as well as the integrity of the research enterprise. The recent controversy about publishing vs. withholding a paper about the successful manipulation of H5N1 (avian) flu to be transmitted between mammals triggered this thought provoking "Perspective" article. Given the possibility of misusing medical research results for the purposes of bioterrorism, the ideas, moral and ethical dilemmas presented in this paper should be considered by every practicing clinician-scientist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling habitat suitability for occurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in domestic poultry in Asia: a spatial multicriteria decision analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kim B; Gilbert, Marius; Pfeiffer, Dirk U

    2013-03-01

    Risk maps are one of several sources used to inform risk-based disease surveillance and control systems, but their production can be hampered by lack of access to suitable disease data. In such situations, knowledge-driven spatial modeling methods are an alternative to data-driven approaches. This study used multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify areas in Asia suitable for the occurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 in domestic poultry. Areas most suitable for H5N1 occurrence included Bangladesh, the southern tip and eastern coast of Vietnam, parts of north-central Thailand and large parts of eastern China. The predictive accuracy of the final model, as determined by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC), was 0.670 (95% CI 0.667-0.673) suggesting that, in data-scarce environments, MCDA provides a reasonable alternative to the data-driven approaches usually used to inform risk-based disease surveillance and control strategies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. LABEL: fast and accurate lineage assignment with assessment of H5N1 and H9N2 influenza A hemagglutinins.

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    Samuel S Shepard

    Full Text Available The evolutionary classification of influenza genes into lineages is a first step in understanding their molecular epidemiology and can inform the subsequent implementation of control measures. We introduce a novel approach called Lineage Assignment By Extended Learning (LABEL to rapidly determine cladistic information for any number of genes without the need for time-consuming sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, or manual annotation. Instead, LABEL relies on hidden Markov model profiles and support vector machine training to hierarchically classify gene sequences by their similarity to pre-defined lineages. We assessed LABEL by analyzing the annotated hemagglutinin genes of highly pathogenic (H5N1 and low pathogenicity (H9N2 avian influenza A viruses. Using the WHO/FAO/OIE H5N1 evolution working group nomenclature, the LABEL pipeline quickly and accurately identified the H5 lineages of uncharacterized sequences. Moreover, we developed an updated clade nomenclature for the H9 hemagglutinin gene and show a similarly fast and reliable phylogenetic assessment with LABEL. While this study was focused on hemagglutinin sequences, LABEL could be applied to the analysis of any gene and shows great potential to guide molecular epidemiology activities, accelerate database annotation, and provide a data sorting tool for other large-scale bioinformatic studies.

  13. Antibody titer has positive predictive value for vaccine protection against challenge with natural antigenic-drift variants of H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Swayne (David); D.L. Suarez (David L.); E. Spackman (Erica); S. Jadhao (Samadhan); G. Dauphin (Gwenaelle); M. Kim-Torchetti (Mia); J. McGrane (James); J. Weaver (John); P. Daniels (Peter); F. Wong (Frank); P. Selleck (Paul); A. Wiyono (Agus); R. Indriani (Risa); Y. Yupiana (Yuni); E.S. Siregar (Elly Sawitri); T.Y. Prajitno (Teguh); D.J. Smith (Derek James); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractVaccines are used in integrated control strategies to protect poultry against H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI). H5N1 HPAI was first reported in Indonesia in 2003, and vaccination was initiated in 2004, but reports of vaccine failures began to emerge in mid-2005. This study

  14. Reassortant H9N2 influenza viruses containing H5N1-like PB1 genes isolated from black-billed magpies in Southern China.

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    Guoying Dong

    Full Text Available H9N2 influenza A viruses have become endemic in different types of terrestrial poultry and wild birds in Asia, and are occasionally transmitted to humans and pigs. To evaluate the role of black-billed magpies (Pica pica in the evolution of influenza A virus, we conducted two epidemic surveys on avian influenza viruses in wild black-billed magpies in Guangxi, China in 2005 and characterized three isolated black-billed magpie H9N2 viruses (BbM viruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three BbM viruses were almost identical with 99.7 to 100% nucleotide homology in their whole genomes, and were reassortants containing BJ94-like (Ck/BJ/1/94 HA, NA, M, and NS genes, SH/F/98-like (Ck/SH/F/98 PB2, PA, and NP genes, and H5N1-like (Ck/YN/1252/03, clade 1 PB1 genes. Genetic analysis showed that BbM viruses were most likely the result of multiple reassortments between co-circulating H9N2-like and H5N1-like viruses, and were genetically different from other H9N2 viruses because of the existence of H5N1-like PB1 genes. Genotypical analysis revealed that BbM viruses evolved from diverse sources and belonged to a novel genotype (B46 discovered in our recent study. Molecular analysis suggested that BbM viruses were likely low pathogenic reassortants. However, results of our pathogenicity study demonstrated that BbM viruses replicated efficiently in chickens and a mammalian mouse model but were not lethal for infected chickens and mice. Antigenic analysis showed that BbM viruses were antigenic heterologous with the H9N2 vaccine strain. Our study is probably the first report to document and characterize H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from black-billed magpies in southern China. Our results suggest that black-billed magpies were susceptible to H9N2 influenza viruses, which raise concerns over possible transmissions of reassortant H9N2 viruses among poultry and wild birds.

  15. Reassortant H9N2 Influenza Viruses Containing H5N1-Like PB1 Genes Isolated from Black-Billed Magpies in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengmin; Wu, Bin; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Nolte, Dale Louis; Deliberto, Thomas Jude; Duan, Mingxing; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2011-01-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses have become endemic in different types of terrestrial poultry and wild birds in Asia, and are occasionally transmitted to humans and pigs. To evaluate the role of black-billed magpies (Pica pica) in the evolution of influenza A virus, we conducted two epidemic surveys on avian influenza viruses in wild black-billed magpies in Guangxi, China in 2005 and characterized three isolated black-billed magpie H9N2 viruses (BbM viruses). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three BbM viruses were almost identical with 99.7 to 100% nucleotide homology in their whole genomes, and were reassortants containing BJ94-like (Ck/BJ/1/94) HA, NA, M, and NS genes, SH/F/98-like (Ck/SH/F/98) PB2, PA, and NP genes, and H5N1-like (Ck/YN/1252/03, clade 1) PB1 genes. Genetic analysis showed that BbM viruses were most likely the result of multiple reassortments between co-circulating H9N2-like and H5N1-like viruses, and were genetically different from other H9N2 viruses because of the existence of H5N1-like PB1 genes. Genotypical analysis revealed that BbM viruses evolved from diverse sources and belonged to a novel genotype (B46) discovered in our recent study. Molecular analysis suggested that BbM viruses were likely low pathogenic reassortants. However, results of our pathogenicity study demonstrated that BbM viruses replicated efficiently in chickens and a mammalian mouse model but were not lethal for infected chickens and mice. Antigenic analysis showed that BbM viruses were antigenic heterologous with the H9N2 vaccine strain. Our study is probably the first report to document and characterize H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from black-billed magpies in southern China. Our results suggest that black-billed magpies were susceptible to H9N2 influenza viruses, which raise concerns over possible transmissions of reassortant H9N2 viruses among poultry and wild birds. PMID:21980538

  16. Use of a tetanus toxoid marker to allow differentiation of infected from vaccinated poultry without affecting the efficacy of a H5N1 avian influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Berry, C M; Middleton, D; Mansfield, J P; Fenwick, S G; Ellis, T M

    2010-10-30

    Tetanus toxoid (TT) was assessed as a positive marker for avian influenza (AI) virus vaccination in chickens, in a vaccination and challenge study. Chickens were vaccinated twice with inactivated AI H5N2 virus vaccine, and then challenged three weeks later with highly pathogenic AI H5N1 virus. Vaccinated chickens were compared with other groups that were either sham-vaccinated or vaccinated with virus with the TT marker. All sham-vaccinated chickens died by 36 hours postinfection, whereas all vaccinated chickens, with or without the TT marker, were protected from morbidity and mortality following exposure to the challenge virus. Serological testing for H5-specific antibodies identified anamnestic responses to H5 in some of the vaccinated birds, indicating active virus infection.

  17. Potency of whole virus particle and split virion vaccines using dissolving microneedle against challenges of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Akihiro; Kuruma, Koji; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Hiono, Takahiro; Suzuki, Mizuho; Matsuno, Keita; Kida, Hiroshi; Oyamada, Takayoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-15

    Transdermal vaccination using a microneedle (MN) confers enhanced immunity compared with subcutaneous (SC) vaccination. Here we developed a novel dissolving MN patch for the influenza vaccine. The potencies of split virion and whole virus particle (WVP) vaccines prepared from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) and A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (H5N1), respectively, were evaluated. MN vaccination induced higher neutralizing antibody responses than SC vaccination in mice. Moreover, MN vaccination with a lower dose of antigens conferred protective immunity against lethal challenges of influenza viruses than SC vaccination in mice. These results suggest that the WVP vaccines administered using MN are an effective combination for influenza vaccine to be further validated in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identifikasi Secara Serologi Galur Virus Flu Burung Subtipe H5N1 Clade 2.1.3 dan Clade 2.3.2 pada Ayam Petelur (SEROLOGICAL IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN INFLUENZA STRAIN VIRUS SUBTYPE H5N1 CLADE 2.1.3 AND CLADE 2.3.2 FROM LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilia Kusumastuti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to know avian influenza (AI infection in field by using serology test in threemarketing area of AI vaccines. Haemagglutination inhibition methode was used in this test. There werefour antigen strains of AI subtype H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (AIstrainA/Chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006, AIstrain A/Chicken/Garut/BBVW-223/2007, AI strain A/Chicken/West Java-Nagrak/30/2007, and AI strainA/Chicken/Pekalongan/BBVW-208/2007 and 2 antigen strains of AI subtype H5N1 clade 2.3.2 (AI strainA/duck/Sukoharjo/BBVW-1428-9/2012 and AI strain A/duck/Sleman/BBVW-1463-10/2012 was used inthis study for HI test. The result presents that 93,33% chicken farms in three marketing area of PT. SanbioLaboratories have positive antibody titre to AI subtype H5N1 clade 2.1.3. This titre may be obtained fromAI clade 2.1.3 vaccination. From 15 samples, 92,86% are positive to AI subtype H5N1 clade 2.3.2A/duck/Sukoharjo/BBVW-1428-9/2012 and 92,31% are positive to A/duck/Sleman/BBVW-1463-10/2012 evenwithout AI clade 2.3.2 vaccination. This antibody titre may be obtained from AI clade 2.1.3 vaccine crossprotection or field infection.

  19. Evaluation of epidemic intelligence systems integrated in the early alerting and reporting project for the detection of A/H5N1 influenza events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Philippe; Vaillant, Laetitia; Mawudeku, Abla; Nelson, Noele P; Hartley, David M; Madoff, Lawrence C; Linge, Jens P; Collier, Nigel; Brownstein, John S; Yangarber, Roman; Astagneau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The objective of Web-based expert epidemic intelligence systems is to detect health threats. The Global Health Security Initiative (GHSI) Early Alerting and Reporting (EAR) project was launched to assess the feasibility and opportunity for pooling epidemic intelligence data from seven expert systems. EAR participants completed a qualitative survey to document epidemic intelligence strategies and to assess perceptions regarding the systems performance. Timeliness and sensitivity were rated highly illustrating the value of the systems for epidemic intelligence. Weaknesses identified included representativeness, completeness and flexibility. These findings were corroborated by the quantitative analysis performed on signals potentially related to influenza A/H5N1 events occurring in March 2010. For the six systems for which this information was available, the detection rate ranged from 31% to 38%, and increased to 72% when considering the virtual combined system. The effective positive predictive values ranged from 3% to 24% and F1-scores ranged from 6% to 27%. System sensitivity ranged from 38% to 72%. An average difference of 23% was observed between the sensitivities calculated for human cases and epizootics, underlining the difficulties in developing an efficient algorithm for a single pathology. However, the sensitivity increased to 93% when the virtual combined system was considered, clearly illustrating complementarities between individual systems. The average delay between the detection of A/H5N1 events by the systems and their official reporting by WHO or OIE was 10.2 days (95% CI: 6.7-13.8). This work illustrates the diversity in implemented epidemic intelligence activities, differences in system's designs, and the potential added values and opportunities for synergy between systems, between users and between systems and users.

  20. Evaluation of epidemic intelligence systems integrated in the early alerting and reporting project for the detection of A/H5N1 influenza events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Barboza

    Full Text Available The objective of Web-based expert epidemic intelligence systems is to detect health threats. The Global Health Security Initiative (GHSI Early Alerting and Reporting (EAR project was launched to assess the feasibility and opportunity for pooling epidemic intelligence data from seven expert systems. EAR participants completed a qualitative survey to document epidemic intelligence strategies and to assess perceptions regarding the systems performance. Timeliness and sensitivity were rated highly illustrating the value of the systems for epidemic intelligence. Weaknesses identified included representativeness, completeness and flexibility. These findings were corroborated by the quantitative analysis performed on signals potentially related to influenza A/H5N1 events occurring in March 2010. For the six systems for which this information was available, the detection rate ranged from 31% to 38%, and increased to 72% when considering the virtual combined system. The effective positive predictive values ranged from 3% to 24% and F1-scores ranged from 6% to 27%. System sensitivity ranged from 38% to 72%. An average difference of 23% was observed between the sensitivities calculated for human cases and epizootics, underlining the difficulties in developing an efficient algorithm for a single pathology. However, the sensitivity increased to 93% when the virtual combined system was considered, clearly illustrating complementarities between individual systems. The average delay between the detection of A/H5N1 events by the systems and their official reporting by WHO or OIE was 10.2 days (95% CI: 6.7-13.8. This work illustrates the diversity in implemented epidemic intelligence activities, differences in system's designs, and the potential added values and opportunities for synergy between systems, between users and between systems and users.

  1. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling.

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    Felix Geeraedts

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed individuals, inactivated whole virus (WIV vaccines are more immunogenic and induce protective antibody responses at a lower antigen dose than other formulations like split virus (SV or subunit (SU vaccines. The reason for this discrepancy in immunogenicity is a long-standing enigma. Here, we show that stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs of the innate immune system, in particular stimulation of TLR7, by H5N1 WIV vaccine is the prime determinant of the greater magnitude and Th1 polarization of the WIV-induced immune response, as compared to SV- or SU-induced responses. This TLR dependency largely explains the relative loss of immunogenicity in SV and SU vaccines. The natural pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP recognized by TLR7 is viral genomic ssRNA. Processing of whole virus particles into SV or SU vaccines destroys the integrity of the viral particle and leaves the viral RNA prone to degradation or involves its active removal. Our results show for a classic vaccine that the acquired immune response evoked by vaccination can be enhanced and steered by the innate immune system, which is triggered by interaction of an intrinsic vaccine component with a pattern recognition receptor (PRR. The insights presented here may be used to further improve the immune-stimulatory and dose-sparing properties of classic influenza vaccine formulations such as WIV, and will facilitate the development of new, even more powerful vaccines to face the next influenza pandemic.

  2. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraedts, Felix; Goutagny, Nadege; Hornung, Veit; Severa, Martina; de Haan, Aalzen; Pool, Judith; Wilschut, Jan; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Huckriede, Anke

    2008-08-29

    In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed individuals, inactivated whole virus (WIV) vaccines are more immunogenic and induce protective antibody responses at a lower antigen dose than other formulations like split virus (SV) or subunit (SU) vaccines. The reason for this discrepancy in immunogenicity is a long-standing enigma. Here, we show that stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system, in particular stimulation of TLR7, by H5N1 WIV vaccine is the prime determinant of the greater magnitude and Th1 polarization of the WIV-induced immune response, as compared to SV- or SU-induced responses. This TLR dependency largely explains the relative loss of immunogenicity in SV and SU vaccines. The natural pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognized by TLR7 is viral genomic ssRNA. Processing of whole virus particles into SV or SU vaccines destroys the integrity of the viral particle and leaves the viral RNA prone to degradation or involves its active removal. Our results show for a classic vaccine that the acquired immune response evoked by vaccination can be enhanced and steered by the innate immune system, which is triggered by interaction of an intrinsic vaccine component with a pattern recognition receptor (PRR). The insights presented here may be used to further improve the immune-stimulatory and dose-sparing properties of classic influenza vaccine formulations such as WIV, and will facilitate the development of new, even more powerful vaccines to face the next influenza pandemic.

  3. Role of position 627 of PB2 and the multibasic cleavage site of the hemagglutinin in the virulence of H5N1 avian influenza virus in chickens and ducks.

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    Karel A Schat

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have caused major disease outbreaks in domestic and free-living birds with transmission to humans resulting in 59% mortality amongst 564 cases. The mutation of the amino acid at position 627 of the viral polymerase basic-2 protein (PB2 from glutamic acid (E in avian isolates to lysine (K in human isolates is frequently found, but it is not known if this change affects the fitness and pathogenicity of the virus in birds. We show here that horizontal transmission of A/Vietnam/1203/2004 H5N1 (VN/1203 virus in chickens and ducks was not affected by the change of K to E at PB2-627. All chickens died between 21 to 48 hours post infection (pi, while 70% of the ducks survived infection. Virus replication was detected in chickens within 12 hours pi and reached peak titers in spleen, lung and brain between 18 to 24 hours for both viruses. Viral antigen in chickens was predominantly in the endothelium, while in ducks it was present in multiple cell types, including neurons, myocardium, skeletal muscle and connective tissues. Virus replicated to a high titer in chicken thrombocytes and caused upregulation of TLR3 and several cell adhesion molecules, which may explain the rapid virus dissemination and location of viral antigen in endothelium. Virus replication in ducks reached peak values between 2 and 4 days pi in spleen, lung and brain tissues and in contrast to infection in chickens, thrombocytes were not involved. In addition, infection of chickens with low pathogenic VN/1203 caused neuropathology, with E at position PB2-627 causing significantly higher infection rates than K, indicating that it enhances virulence in chickens.

  4. Influenza NS1 directly modulates Hedgehog signaling during infection.

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    Margery G Smelkinson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional NS1 protein of influenza A viruses suppresses host cellular defense mechanisms and subverts other cellular functions. We report here on a new role for NS1 in modifying cell-cell signaling via the Hedgehog (Hh pathway. Genetic epistasis experiments and FRET-FLIM assays in Drosophila suggest that NS1 interacts directly with the transcriptional mediator, Ci/Gli1. We further confirmed that Hh target genes are activated cell-autonomously in transfected human lung epithelial cells expressing NS1, and in infected mouse lungs. We identified a point mutation in NS1, A122V, that modulates this activity in a context-dependent fashion. When the A122V mutation was incorporated into a mouse-adapted influenza A virus, it cell-autonomously enhanced expression of some Hh targets in the mouse lung, including IL6, and hastened lethality. These results indicate that, in addition to its multiple intracellular functions, NS1 also modifies a highly conserved signaling pathway, at least in part via cell autonomous activities. We discuss how this new Hh modulating function of NS1 may influence host lethality, possibly through controlling cytokine production, and how these new insights provide potential strategies for combating infection.

  5. Increase in viral yield in eggs and MDCK cells of reassortant H5N1 vaccine candidate viruses caused by insertion of 38 amino acids into the NA stalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Xue, Tao; Wu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Pinghu; Zhao, Guo; Peng, Daxing; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiufan

    2011-10-19

    The H5N1 subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses has spread to over 63 countries in Asia, Europe, and Africa and has become endemic in poultry. Since 2004, vaccination against H5N1 influenza has become common in domestic poultry operations in China. Most influenza vaccines have been produced in embryonated chicken eggs. High yield is the essential feature of a good vaccine candidate virus. Therefore, the large-scale manufacture of such a vaccine requires that the viral yield of H5N1 reassortant vaccine viruses in eggs and MDCK cells be increased. We generated two sets of reassortant H5N1 viruses based on backbone viruses A/Chicken/F/98 (H9N2) and A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) using reverse genetics. The HAs and NAs of the reassortants were derived from the three epidemic H5N1 strains found in China. We compared the replication properties of these recombinant H5N1 viruses in embryonated chicken eggs and MDCK cells after inserting either 20 or 38 amino acids into their NA stalks. In this study, we demonstrated that inserting 38 amino acids into the NA stalks can significantly increase the viral yield of H5N1 reassortant viruses in both embryonated chicken eggs and MDCK cells, while inserting only 20 amino acids into the same NA stalks does not. Hemagglutinin inhibition testing and protection assays indicated that recombinant H5N1 viruses with 38 aa inserted into their NA stalks had the same antigenicity as the viruses with wt-NA. These results suggest that the generation of an H5N1 recombinant vaccine seed by the insertion of 38 aa into the NA stalk may be a suitable and more economical strategy for the increase in viral yield in both eggs and MDCK cells for the purposes of vaccine production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MicroRNA expression in mice infected with seasonal H1N1, swine H1N1 or highly pathogenic H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Eric M; Kasoji, Manjula D; Wendling, Morgan Q; Price, Jennifer A; Knostman, Katherine A B; Bresler, Herbert S; Long, James P

    2014-09-01

    Influenza virus infections in humans remain a healthcare concern, and the need for vaccines, therapeutics and prophylactics remains a high priority. Understanding the molecular events associated with influenza-virus-induced pathology may lead to the identification of clinical disease biomarkers and novel antiviral targets. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are well-conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs known to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression as well as play a major role in many biological processes and pathways. Animal studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in viral disease and controlling inflammation. In this study, we examined the differences in the miRNA expression profiles associated with the lung in mice infected with influenza viruses that varied in virulence and pathogenicity. A statistical model was employed that utilized changes in miRNA expression to identify the virus that was used to infect the mice. This study identified a unique fingerprint of viral pathogenicity associated with seasonal H1N1, swine H1N1 and highly pathogenic H5N1 in the mouse model, and may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic and prophylactic targets. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Improving adjuvanticity of quaternized chitosan-based microgels for H5N1 split vaccine by tailoring the particle properties to achieve antigen dose sparing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Qi; Fan, Qing-Ze; Liu, Yan; Yue, Hua; Ma, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2016-12-30

    In this study, we developed the quaternized chitosan microgels without chemical crosslinking as an adjuvant of H5N1 split vaccine. The microgels with pH-sensitivity, positive surface charge and good biocompatibility, have been demonstrated in favor of enhancing both humoral and cellular immune response. However, the detailed mechanism of the chitosan-based microgels to enhance antigen specific immune responses remains unclear. Therefore, we prepared the quaternized chitosan microgels with well defined quaternization degrees (QDs, 20-80%) and particle sizes (800nm-5μm) by the premix membrane emulsification technique, and investigated the effect of quaternization degree (QD) and size on the adjuvanticity of microgels. Results suggested that microgels with relatively smaller size (807nm) and moderate quaternization degree (QD 41% and 60%) were favorable for a maximum immune response. The mechanism was studied and explained by examining the characteristics of microgels and investigating the stimulation of bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Moreover, they induced significantly stronger immune responses at lower antigen doses (known as antigen sparing effect) compared to aluminum adjuvant. These data indicated that a maximum immune response can be achieved by controlling properties of chitosan microgels, which also could serve as a significant guidance for rational design of chitosan-based particle adjuvant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tropism and Infectivity of Influenza Virus, Including Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Virus, in Ferret Tracheal Differentiated Primary Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Maines, Taronna R.; Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Pekosz, Andrew; Zaki, Sherif R.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropism and adaptation of influenza viruses to new hosts is partly dependent on the distribution of the sialic acid (SA) receptors to which the viral hemagglutinin (HA) binds. Ferrets have been established as a valuable in vivo model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission because of similarities to humans in the distribution of HA receptors and in clinical signs of infection. In this study, we developed a ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture model that consisted of a layered epithelium structure with ciliated and nonciliated cells on its apical surface. We found that human-like (α2,6-linked) receptors predominated on ciliated cells, whereas avian-like (α2,3-linked) receptors, which were less abundant, were presented on nonciliated cells. When we compared the tropism and infectivity of three human (H1 and H3) and two avian (H1 and H5) influenza viruses, we observed that the human influenza viruses primarily infected ciliated cells and replicated efficiently, whereas a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) replicated efficiently within nonciliated cells despite a low initial infection rate. Furthermore, compared to other influenza viruses tested, VN/1203 virus replicated more efficiently in cells isolated from the lower trachea and at a higher temperature (37°C) compared to a lower temperature (33°C). VN/1203 virus infection also induced higher levels of immune mediator genes and cell death, and virus was recovered from the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. This ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture system provides a valuable in vitro model for studying cellular tropism, infectivity, and the pathogenesis of influenza viruses. PMID:23255802

  9. Risk factors of poultry outbreaks and human cases of H5N1 avian influenza virus infection in West Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yupiana, Yuni; de Vlas, Sake J; Adnan, Nana M; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association of potential risk factors to the spread and maintenance of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus in poultry and humans at the district level in West Java Province, Indonesia. The association of demography and environmental risk factors including poultry density, human density, road density, percentage of paddy field, and percentage of swamp, dyke and pond with both HPAI human cases and HPAI outbreaks in poultry were assessed using a descriptive epidemiological design. We also assessed the association of HPAI outbreaks in poultry with HPAI human cases. Poisson regression (generalized linear modeling and generalized estimating equations) was used to analyze the data corrected for over-dispersion. There were 794 HPAI outbreaks in poultry covering 24 of the 25 districts in our study during 2003-2008 and 34 HPAI human cases involving 12 districts during 2005-2008. We found that two risk factors--poultry density and road density--had a statistically significant correlation with the number of HPAI outbreaks in poultry. The number of poultry outbreaks had a negative association with poultry density (29% effect) and a positive association with road density (67% effect). The number of human cases was significantly associated with the number of poultry outbreaks (34% effect), but with none of the other risk factors considered. We conclude that the most effective way to prevent human HPAI cases is to intervene directly in the poultry sector. Our study further suggests that implementing preventive measures in backyard chicken farming and limiting transport of live poultry and their products are promising options to this end. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Single electrode genosensor for simultaneous determination of sequences encoding hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of avian influenza virus type H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Iwona; Malecka, Kamila; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2013-11-05

    The duo-genosensor consisting of two different oligonucleotide probes immobilized covalently on the surface of one gold electrode via Au-S bond formation was used for simultaneous determination of two different oligonucleotide targets. One of the probes, decorated on its 5'-end with ferrocene (SH-ssDNA-Fc), is complementary to the cDNA representing a sequence encoding part of H5 hemagglutinin from H5N1 virus. The second probe, decorated on its 5'-end with methylene blue (SH-ssDNA-MB), is complementary to cDNA representing the fragment of N1 neuraminidase from the same virus. The presence of both probes on the surface of gold electrodes was confirmed with Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The changes in redox activity of both redox active complexes before and after the hybridization process were used as analytical signal. The peak at +400 ± 2 mV was observed in the presence of 40 nM ssDNA used as a target for SH-ssDNA-Fc probe. This peak increased with the increase of concentration of target ssDNA. It indicates the "signal on" mode of analytical signal generation. The peak at -250 ± 4 mV, characteristic for SH-ssDNA-MB probe, was decreasing with the increase of the concentration of the complementary ssDNA target starting from 8 to 100 nM. This indicates the generation of electrochemical signal according to the "signal off" mode. The proposed duo-genosensor is capable of simultaneous, specific, and good sensitivity probing for the sequences derived from genes encoding two main markers of the influenza virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase.

  11. Effects of Double Combinations of Amantadine, Oseltamivir, and Ribavirin on Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infections in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Donald F.; Hurst, Brett L.; Wong, Min-Hui; Bailey, Kevin W.; Morrey, John D.

    2009-01-01

    An amantadine-resistant influenza A/Duck/MN/1525/81 (H5N1) virus was developed from the low-pathogenic North American wild-type (amantadine-sensitive) virus for studying treatment of infections in cell culture and in mice. Double combinations of amantadine, oseltamivir (or the cell culture-active form, oseltamivir carboxylate), and ribavirin were used. Amantadine-oseltamivir carboxylate and amantadine-ribavirin combinations showed synergistic interactions over a range of doses against wild-type virus in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture, but oseltamivir carboxylate-ribavirin combinations did not. Primarily additive interactions were seen with oseltamivir carboxylate-ribavirin combinations against amantadine-resistant virus. The presence of amantadine in drug combinations against the resistant virus did not improve activity. The wild-type and amantadine-resistant viruses were lethal to mice by intranasal instillation. The resistant virus infection could not be treated with amantadine up to 100 mg/kg body weight/day, whereas the wild-type virus infection was treatable with oral doses of 10 (weakly effective) to 100 mg/kg/day administered twice a day for 5 days starting 4 h prior to virus exposure. Drug combination studies showed that treatment of the amantadine-resistant virus infection with amantadine-oseltamivir or amantadine-ribavirin combinations was not significantly better than using oseltamivir or ribavirin alone. In contrast, the oseltamivir-ribavirin (25- and 75-mg/kg/day combination) treatments produced significant reductions in mortality. The wild-type virus infection was markedly reduced in severity by all three combinations (amantadine, 10 mg/kg/day combined with the other compounds at 20 or 40 mg/kg/day) compared to monotherapy with the three compounds. Results indicate a lack of benefit of amantadine in combinations against amantadine-resistant virus, but positive benefits in combinations against amantadine-sensitive virus. PMID:19273672

  12. In Silico Identification of Highly Conserved Epitopes of Influenza A H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, and H5N1 with Diagnostic and Vaccination Potential

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    José Esteban Muñoz-Medina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unpredictable, evolutionary nature of the influenza A virus (IAV is the primary problem when generating a vaccine and when designing diagnostic strategies; thus, it is necessary to determine the constant regions in viral proteins. In this study, we completed an in silico analysis of the reported epitopes of the 4 IAV proteins that are antigenically most significant (HA, NA, NP, and M2 in the 3 strains with the greatest world circulation in the last century (H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 and in one of the main aviary subtypes responsible for zoonosis (H5N1. For this purpose, the HMMER program was used to align 3,016 epitopes reported in the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB and distributed in 34,294 stored sequences in the Pfam database. Eighteen epitopes were identified: 8 in HA, 5 in NA, 3 in NP, and 2 in M2. These epitopes have remained constant since they were first identified (~91 years and are present in strains that have circulated on 5 continents. These sites could be targets for vaccination design strategies based on epitopes and/or as markers in the implementation of diagnostic techniques.

  13. Combined prime-boost vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE using a recombinant vaccinia virus and a bacterial plasmid both expressing TBE virus non-structural NS1 protein

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    Zakharova LG

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterologous prime-boost immunization protocols using different gene expression systems have proven to be successful tools in protecting against various diseases in experimental animal models. The main reason for using this approach is to exploit the ability of expression cassettes to prime or boost the immune system in different ways during vaccination procedures. The purpose of the project was to study the ability of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV and bacterial plasmid, both carrying the NS1 gene from tick-borne encephalitis (TBE virus under the control of different promoters, to protect mice against lethal challenge using a heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol. Results The heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol, using a VV recombinant and bacterial plasmid, both containing the NS1 TBE virus protein gene under the control of different promoters, achieved a high level of protection in mice against lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic TBE virus strain. No signs of pronounced TBE infection were detected in the surviving animals. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocols using recombinant VV and bacterial plasmids could be used for the development of flavivirus vaccines.

  14. Spatio-Temporal Occurrence Modeling of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Subtype H5N1: A Case Study in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

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    Chinh C. Tran

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI subtype H5N1 poses severe threats to both animals and humans. Investigating where, when and why the disease occurs is important to help animal health authorities develop effective control policies. This study takes into account spatial and temporal occurrence of HPAI H5N1 in the Red River Delta of Vietnam. A two-stage procedure was used: (1 logistic regression modeling to identify and quantify factors influencing the occurrence of HPAI H5N1; and (2 a geostatistical approach to develop monthly predictive maps. The results demonstrated that higher average monthly temperatures and poultry density in combination with lower average monthly precipitation, humidity in low elevation areas, roughly from November to January and April to June, contribute to the higher occurrence of HPAI H5N1. Provinces near the Gulf of Tonkin, including Hai Phong, Hai Duong, Thai Binh, Nam Dinh and Ninh Binh are areas with higher probability of occurrence of HPAI H5N1.

  15. Detection of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype in organs of chicken affected by higly pathogenic avian infuenza in East and West Java by using immunohistochemical technique

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    R Damayanti

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to detect antigen H5N1 of highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI virus in various farms in East and West Java. The immunohistochemical technique was applied due to Hematoxilin-eosin (H&E staining was impossible to visualize the antigen in tissue. Immunohistochemical staining was applied for some visceral organs collected from the areas where the outbreaks occurred in September-October 2003. The specimens were processed as histopathological paraffin blocks using standard method. The blocks that were suspected to have antigen H5N1 were cut and rabbit antisera to H5N1 produced from the local isolate was applied as the primary antibody. Biotinylated secondary antibody and avidin biotin peroxidase from a commercial kit were administered. The antigen present in the tissues were visualized by adding a substrate called Amino Ethyl Carbazole (AEC resulting in reddish brown colour. This immunostaining proved to be accurate and reliably quick method to detect H5N1 antigen present in the avian tissues. In conclusion, the outbreak of bird flu was caused by H5N1 strain and the antigen could be found in wattles, combs, brain, trachea, lungs, heart, proventriculus, liver, spleen, kidney and ovary.

  16. Investigating a crow die-off in January-February 2011 during the introduction of a new clade of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 into Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Berman, Lashondra; Haider, Najmul; Gerloff, Nancy; Rahman, Md Z; Shu, Bo; Rahman, Mustafizur; Dey, Tapan Kumar; Davis, Todd C; Das, Bidhan Chandra; Balish, Amanda; Islam, Ausraful; Teifke, Jens P; Zeidner, Nord; Lindstrom, Steven; Klimov, Alexander; Donis, Ruben O; Luby, Stephen P; Shivaprasad, H L; Mikolon, Andrea B

    2014-03-01

    We investigated unusual crow mortality in Bangladesh during January-February 2011 at two sites. Crows of two species, Corvus splendens and C. macrorhynchos, were found sick and dead during the outbreaks. In selected crow roosts, morbidity was ~1 % and mortality was ~4 % during the investigation. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1 was isolated from dead crows. All isolates were closely related to A/duck/India/02CA10/2011 (H5N1) with 99.8 % and A/crow/Bangladesh/11rs1984-15/2011 (H5N1) virus with 99 % nucleotide sequence identity in their HA genes. The phylogenetic cluster of Bangladesh viruses suggested a common ancestor with viruses found in poultry from India, Myanmar and Nepal. Histopathological changes and immunohistochemistry staining in brain, pancreas, liver, heart, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, rectum, and cloaca were consistent with influenza virus infection. Through our limited investigation in domesticated birds near the crow roosts, we did not identify any samples that tested positive for influenza virus A/H5N1. However, environmental samples collected from live-bird markets near an outbreak site during the month of the outbreaks tested very weakly positive for influenza virus A/H5N1 in clade 2.3.2.1-specific rRT-PCR. Continuation of surveillance in wild and domestic birds may identify evolution of new avian influenza virus and associated public-health risks.

  17. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein as a Diagnostic Marker: Commercially Available ELISA and Comparison to qRT-PCR and Serological Diagnostic Assays Currently Used by the State of Florida

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    Jason H. Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The proper management of patients infected with dengue virus requires early detection. Here, real-time molecular assays have proven useful but have limitations, whereas ELISAs that detect antibodies are still favored but results are obtained too late to be of clinical value. The production of DENV NS1 peaks early during infection and its detection can combine the advantages of both diagnostic approaches. Methods. This study compared assays currently used for detecting DENV infection at the Florida Department of Health including anti-DENV IgM and IgG ELISAs as well as qRT-PCR, against a commercially available DENV NS1 ELISA. These comparisons were made among a group of 21 human sera. Results. Nine of 14 (64.3% DENV qRT-PCR+ samples were also DENV NS1+. Interestingly, the 5 NS1− samples that were qRT-PCR+ were additionally IgM− and IgG+ suggesting a nonprimary infection. Compared to qRT-PCR, the NS1 assay had a sensitivity of 64.3%, specificity 100%, PPV of 100%, and NPV of 58.3%. Conclusions. The NS1 ELISA performed as expected in known DENV qRT-PCR+ samples; however negative NS1 results for qRT-PCR+ and IgG+ sera seemingly reduced the usefulness of the NS1 ELISA for nonprimary cases. We therefore conclude that diagnosis obtained via DENV NS1 ELISA deserves further investigation.

  18. INDUCTION OF LONG-TERM T AND B CELL MEMORY IMMUNITY TO INFLUENZA A VIRUS (H5N1 IN PERSONS VACCINATED WITH LIVE INFLUENZA A VACCINE (H5N2

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    I. V. Losev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over last years, a novel strategy for vaccination of people against potentially pandemic influenza A viruses is actively developed worldwide, i.e., a combined (prime-boost vaccination. It provides  amplification (boosting of immune response  for a vaccine  be means  of pre-vaccination (priming with another vaccine.  We have first studied an issue of immunological consequences for people after priming  by live attenuated influenza H5N2 vaccine (LAIV, followed by a boost with inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccine (IIV 1.5 years later. Unlike non-primed volunteers, the primed persons developed more rapid and high production of serum antibodies (of HAI-, MN-, ELISA-types after a single vaccination with H5N1 IIV. That concerned induction of antibodies to the H5N1 vaccinal strain A, and other heterologous strains containing H5 haemagglutinin. In primed persons, the antibodies showed  higher  avidity as compared to non-primed individuals. Before inoculation with H5N1 IIV, the  IgG-antibody titers  to A virus (H5N1, and  the  levels of specific  CD4+  and  CD8+   memory T-cells proved  to be higher  in primed subjects  than  in non-primed persons.  The  boosting  effect  of H5N1 IIV did not correlate with HAI-and MN-based data on immunogenicity of priming  H5N2 live attenuated vaccine.  In general, the results obtained justify a new direction in applications of LAIVs for protection against potentially pandemic influenza virus A.

  19. HETEROSUBTYPIC IMMUNE RESPONSE AND CROSS-PROTECTION AGAINST A HIGHLY PATHOGENIC A (H5N1 INFLUENZA VIRUS IN MICE IMMUNIZED WITH COLD-ADAPTED A/LENINGRAD/134/17/57 (H2N2 INFLUENZA VIRUS

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    A. R. Rekstin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available While investigating the efficacy of an H5N2 ca reassortant vaccine candidate in protecting against a lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic (HP H5N1 virus in the mouse model, we observed a degree of cross-protection provided by the ca Len/17 (H2N2 virus itself. 80% of mice administered a high dose of attenuated Len/17 vaccine intranasally (i.n. survived after a lethal challenge with A/Hong Kong/483/97 H5N1 virus. Therefore, we investigated the basis of the cross- reactive immunity between H2N2 and H5N1 viruses that may have contributed to recovery from lethal HK/ 483 virus infection. Sera from mice immunized i.n. with Len/17 did not cross-react with HK/483 virus in neutralization or hemagglutination-inhibition assays, however IgG and IgA antibodies that cross-reacted with the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 1997 viruses were detected. Spleen cells from mice immunized i.n. with Len/17 vaccine showed enhanced production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IFNγ following in vitro stimulation with inactivated H5N1 virus. Our findings indicate that both cross-reactive humoral and cellular immunity induced by Len/17 H2N2 vaccine may plays a role in recovery from lethal H5N1 virus infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms of heterosubtypic immunity will improve vaccine design against HP avian influenza viruses.

  20. A single substitution in amino acid 184 of the NP protein alters the replication and pathogenicity of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously we found that exchanging the NP genes of recombinant avian influenza viruses (AIVs) affected viral replication and altered host gene expression and mean death times in chickens infected with these viruses. Five amino acids at positions 22, 184, 400, 406, and 423 were different between th...

  1. The European Union faces up to the threat of a pandemic: meeting at the DGV on the influenza A (H5N1) of the ad hoc group on communicable diseases Luxembourg 14 January 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desenclos, J-C.; Manigat, R

    1998-03-01

    The transmission of an avian influenza H5N1 virus to a child in Hong Kong in May 1997 followed by the occurrence of 17 other human cases with a high case fatality rate (6/18, 33%) suggested that an influenza pandemic could be imminent and led many Europea

  2. Reduced experimental infectivity and transmissibility of intercontinental H5 (H5N8 and H5N2) compared to Eurasian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses for chickens, turkeys, and Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus (HPAIV) emerged in 1996 in Guangdong China and has since spread to infect and cause deaths in wild birds, poultry and humans in over 63 countries in Asia, Europe and Africa; and more recently a reassortant H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 HPAI virus has spread ...

  3. A systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-reactivity of antibodies induced by oil-in-water emulsion adjuvanted influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chada, Kinnera E; Forshee, Richard; Golding, Hana; Anderson, Steven; Yang, Hong

    2017-05-31

    Cross-clade immunogenic stockpiled H5N1 vaccines may decrease the morbidity and transmission of infection during the initial phase of influenza pandemic. Meta-analysis of cross-reactive antibodies induced by oil-in-water emulsion adjuvanted (OWEA) influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccines with circulating heterologous H5N1 virus strains, isolated from human infections was performed. Literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, The Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry was conducted up through December 1, 2015. Methodologically qualified studies were included for (1) use of two doses of licensed OWEA (AS03 or MF59) egg-derived, inactivated influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccine, (2) participant age between 18 and 64years, and (3) evaluation of immunogenicity outcome for one or more subclade. Meta-analysis assessed the cross-reactivity of antibodies elicited by clade 1 adjuvanted vaccine strain against clade 2.1 virus strain (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 vs. A/Indonesia/05/2005); and separately against clade 2.2 virus strain (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 vs. A/turkey/Turkey/1/05); and clade 2.1 adjuvanted vaccine strain against clade 1 virus strain (A/Indonesia/05/2005 vs. A/Vietnam/1194/2004). Quantitative publication bias and influence analysis was conducted to evaluate potential impact of unpublished or new studies on the robustness of meta-analysis. Of 960 articles, 53 qualified for quality assessment and 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. All assessed clade pairs elicited cross-reactive antibodies (clade 1 against clade 2.1 and 2.2; clade 2.1 against clade 1, 2.2, and 2.3). Heterologous strains of same sub-clade are likely to elicit higher cross-reactive antibodies. OWEA influenza H5N1 virus monovalent vaccines exhibit broad cross-clade immunogenicity, a desired feature for vaccine stockpiling not yet demonstrated by unadjuvanted vaccines. In case of an impending H5N1 virus pandemic, stockpiled

  4. Intracellular degradation and localization of NS1 of TBEV affects its protective properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Yulia; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Shevtsova, Anastasia; Chernokhaeva, Lubov; Latanova, Anastasia; Preobrazhenskaia, Olga; Timofeev, Andrey; Karganova, Galina; Karpov, Vadim

    2016-12-30

    Currently many DNA vaccines against infectious diseases are in clinical trials however their efficacy is needed to be improved. Potency of DNA immunogen can be optimized by targeting technologies. In a current study to increase the efficacy of NS1encoded by plasmid the proteasome targeting was applied. NS1 variants with or without translocation sequence and with signal of proteasomal degradation of ornithine decarboxylase were tested for expression, localization, protein turnover, proteasomal degradation and protection properties. Deletion of translocation signal abrogated presentation of NS1 on the cell surface and increased proteasomal processing of NS1. Fusion with ODC signal led to increase of protein turnover and proteasome degradation rate of NS1. Immunization with NS1 variants with increased proteasome processing protected mice from viral challenge only partially, however, the survival time of infected mice was prolonged in these groups. This data can give a presupposition for formulation of specific immune therapy for infected individuals.

  5. Testing of human specimens for the presence of highly pathogenic zoonotic avian influenza virus A(H5N1) in Poland in 2006-2008 - justified or unnecessary steps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowska, Magdalena; Nowak, Iwona; Brydak, Lidia; Wojtyla, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Since 1997, human infections with highly pathogenic zoonotic avian influenza viruses have shown that the risk of influenza pandemic is significant. In Europe, infections caused by the highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N7) virus were confirmed in the human population in 2003 in the Netherlands. Moreover, outbreaks of A(H5N1) infections were observed in wild and farm birds in different European regions, including Poland in 2006-2008. This study presents 16 patients in Poland from whom clinical specimens were collected and tested for A(H5N1) highly pathogenic avian influenza. This article shows the results of laboratory tests and discusses the legitimacy of the collection and testing of the specimens. All patients were negative for A(H5N1) infection. Nevertheless, only two patients met clinical and epidemiological criteria from the avian influenza case definition. The conclusion is that there is still a strong necessity for increasing the awareness of medical and laboratory staff, as well as the awareness of some occupational groups about human infections with avian influenza viruses, including the importance of seasonal influenza vaccination. It should also be emphasized that in the case of patients suspected of being infected with avian influenza, the information about clinical symptoms is insufficient and must be accompanied by a wide epidemiological investigation.

  6. Development and implementation of the quality control panel of RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR for avian influenza A (H5N1 surveillance network in mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR and real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR have been indispensable methods for influenza surveillance, especially for determination of avian influenza. The movement of testing beyond reference lab introduced the need of quality control, including the implementation of an evaluation system for validating personal training and sample proficiency testing. Methods We developed a panel with lysates of seasonal influenza virus (H1N1, H3N2 and B, serials of diluted H5N1 virus lysates, and in-vitro transcribed H5 hemaglutinin (HA and an artificial gene RNAs for RT-PCR and rRT-PCR quality control assessment. The validations of stability and reproducibility were performed on the panel. Additionally, the panel was implemented to assess the detection capability of Chinese human avian influenza networks. Results The panel has relatively high stability and good reproducibility demonstrated by kappa's tests. In the implementation of panel on Chinese human avian influenza networks, the results suggested that there were a relatively low number of discrepancies for both concise and reproducibility in Chinese avian influenza virus net works. Conclusions A quality control panel of RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR for avian influenza A (H5N1 surveillance network was developed. An availably statistical data, which are used to assess the detection capability of networks on avian influenza virus (H5N1, can be obtained relatively easily through implementation of the panel on networks.

  7. Addition of N-glycosylation sites on the globular head of the H5 hemagglutinin induces the escape of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses from vaccine-induced immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Lorin, Valérie; Jouvion, Grégory; Da Costa, Bruno; Escriou, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses remain endemic in poultry in several countries and still constitute a pandemic threat. Since the early 20th century, we experienced four influenza A pandemics. H3N2 and H1N1pdm09 viruses that respectively emerged during 1968 and 2009 pandemics are still responsible for seasonal epidemics. These viruses evolve regularly by substitutions in antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin (HA), which prevent neutralization by antibodies directed against previous strains (antigenic drift). For seasonal H3N2 viruses, an addition of N-glycosylation sites (glycosites) on H3 contributed to this drift. Here, we questioned whether additional glycosites on H5 could induce an escape of H5N1 virus from neutralization, as it was observed for seasonal H3N2 viruses. Seven H5N1 mutants were produced by adding glycosites on H5. The most glycosylated virus escaped from neutralizing antibodies, in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a single additional glycosite was responsible for this escape. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Infection with 2009 H1N1 influenza virus primes for immunological memory in human nose-associated lymphoid tissue, offering cross-reactive immunity to H1N1 and avian H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahallawi, Waleed H; Kasbekar, Anand V; McCormick, Maxwell S; Hoschler, Katja; Temperton, Nigel; Leong, Samuel C; Beer, Helen; Ferrara, Francesca; McNamara, Paul S; Zhang, Qibo

    2013-05-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious mucosal infection in the respiratory tract. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus infection resulted in substantial morbidity and mortality in humans. Little is known on whether immunological memory develops following pH1N1 infection and whether it provides protection against other virus subtypes. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay was used to analyze hemagglutinin (HA)-specific memory B cell responses after virus antigen stimulation in nose-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) from children and adults. Individuals with serological evidence of previous exposure to pH1N1 showed significant cross-reactive HA-specific memory B cell responses to pH1N1, seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1), and avian H5N1 (aH5N1) viruses upon pH1N1 virus stimulation. pH1N1 virus antigen elicited stronger cross-reactive memory B cell responses than sH1N1 virus. Intriguingly, aH5N1 virus also activated cross-reactive memory responses to sH1N1 and pH1N1 HAs in those who had previous pH1N1 exposure, and that correlated well with the memory response stimulated by pH1N1 virus antigen. These memory B cell responses resulted in cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against sH1N1, 1918 H1N1, and aH5N1 viruses. The 2009 pH1N1 infection appeared to have primed human host with B cell memory in NALT that offers cross-protective mucosal immunity to not only H1N1 but also aH5N1 viruses. These findings may have important implications for future vaccination strategies against influenza. It will be important to induce and/or enhance such cross-protective mucosal memory B cells.

  9. Experimental evidence and molecular modeling of the interaction between hRSV-NS1 and quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Deriane Elias; Caruso, Ícaro Putinhon; de Araujo, Gabriela Campos; de Lourenço, Isabella Otenio; de Melo, Fernando Alves; Cornélio, Marinônio Lopes; Fossey, Marcelo Andrés; de Souza, Fátima Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus is one of the major causes of acute respiratory infections in children, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Non-Structural Protein 1 (NS1) is involved in immune system evasion, a process that contributes to the success of hRSV replication. This protein can act by inhibiting or neutralizing several steps of interferon pathway, as well as by silencing the hRSV ribonucleoproteic complex. There is evidence that quercetin can reduce the infection and/or replication of several viruses, including RSV. The aims of this study include the expression and purification of the NS1 protein besides experimental and computational assays of the NS1-quercetin interaction. CD analysis showed that NS1 secondary structure composition is 30% alpha-helix, 21% beta-sheet, 23% turn and 26% random coils. The melting temperature obtained through DSC analysis was around 56°C. FRET analysis showed a distance of approximately 19Å between the NS1 and quercetin. Fluorescence titration results showed that the dissociation constant of the NS1-quercetin interaction was around 10(-6)M. In thermodynamic analysis, the enthalpy and entropy balanced forces indicated that the NS1-quercetin interaction presented both hydrophobic and electrostatic contributions. The computational results from the molecular modeling for NS1 structure and molecular docking regarding its interaction with quercetin corroborate the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains.

  11. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing Haemagglutinin from a Polish Avian H5N1 Isolate and Its Immunological Effect in Preliminary Animal Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka K. Szczepankowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram-positive, nonpathogenic microorganisms that are gaining much interest as antigen producers for development of live vaccine vectors. Heterologous proteins of different origin have been successfully expressed in various LAB species, including Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant L. lactis strains have been shown to induce specific local and systemic immune responses against various antigens. Our study aimed at constructing a L. lactis strain expressing haemagglutinin of a Polish avian H5H1 influenza isolate and examining its effect on animals. Expression of the cloned H5 gene was achieved using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. Detection of the intracellular H5 antigen produced in L. lactis was performed by Western blot analysis and confirmed using mass spectrometry. The potential of L. lactis recombinant cells to induce an immune response was examined by setting up preliminary immunization trials on chickens and mice. Obtained sera were tested for specific antibodies by ELISA assays. The results of these studies are a promising step toward developing a vaccine against the bird flu using Lactococcus lactis cells as bioreactors for efficient antigen production and delivery to the mucosal surface.

  12. Randomized, double-blind, multi-center, phase III clinical trial to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of MG1109 (egg-based pre-pandemic influenza A/H5N1 vaccine) in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joon Young; Choi, Min Joo; Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Cheong, Hee Jin; Wie, Seong-Heon; Lee, Jin-Soo; Woo, Gyu-Jin; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Woo Joo

    2017-05-04

    Considering the pandemic potential of avian influenza A/H5N1, development of an effective and well-tolerated vaccine is an essential part of pandemic preparedness plans. This phase III, randomized, double-blind study was conducted to assess the immunogenicity and safety profile of an alum-adjuvanted, whole virion, pre-pandemic influenza A/H5N1 vaccine (MG1109). Healthy individuals were randomly assigned, in a 3:1 ratio, to receive two doses of either MG1109 or placebo containing alum gel. Immunogenicity was determined by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events were assessed after vaccination. Among 420 enrolled subjects, 418 were available for safety analysis, and 298 MG1109 recipients were available for per-protocol immunogenicity analyses. According to the HI assays, after two vaccine doses, all three of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) criteria were met against the vaccine strain for all age groups: seroprotection rate = 74.8% (95% CI: 69.9 - 79.8), seroconversion rate = 67.8% (95% CI: 62.5-73.1), and geometric mean titer ratio (GMTR) = 5.9 (95% CI: 5.4 - 6.4). According to the MN assays, the GMTR was 2.4 (95% CI: 2.1 - 2.7) and 7.0 (95% CI: 6.3 - 7.9) three weeks after the first and second vaccine doses, respectively. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were mostly mild to moderate and were not significantly different between MG1109 and placebo recipients. In conclusion, two-dose administration of alum-adjuvanted H5N1 pre-pandemic influenza vaccine (MG1109) was highly immunogenic and tolerable in adults.

  13. Improvement of influenza vaccine strain A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1) growth with the neuraminidase packaging sequence from A/Puerto Rico/8/34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weiqi; Dong, Zhenyuan; Meng, Weixu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ting; Li, Chufang; Zhang, Beiwu; Chen, Ling

    2012-02-01

    H5N1 influenza candidate vaccine viruses were developed using the "6+2" approach. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes were derived from the popular H5N1 virus and the remaining six internal segments were derived from the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 strain (H1N1, PR8). However, some of these candidate strains have been reported to produce relatively low yields in vaccine manufacture. In this study, we found that the NA vRNA of the A/Vietnam/1194/2004 strain (H5N1, VN1194) was poorly packaged into recombinant viruses with a backbone of PR8 genes, which resulted in the formation of defective virions that did not include the NA vRNA in the genome. Using recombinant DNA techniques, we constructed a chimeric NA gene with the coding region of VN1194 NA flanked by the packaging signal sequence of the PR8 NA gene (41 bp form the 3' end of the vRNA and 67 bp from the 5' end). The packaging of the NA vRNA was restored to normal levels in the recombinant viruses containing the chimeric NA gene. Recombinant viruses containing the chimeric NA replicated much better in chicken embryonated eggs than viruses with the wild-type NA from VN1194. These findings suggest a novel strategy to improve in ovo growth of vaccine strains and to increase the number of vaccine doses available to save people if a pandemic were to occur.

  14. Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Alteration of Receptor-Binding Specificity in a Novel Genotype of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses Detected in Cambodia in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith, Sareth; Davis, C. Todd; Duong, Veasna; Sar, Borann; Horm, Srey Viseth; Chin, Savuth; Ly, Sovann; Laurent, Denis; Richner, Beat; Oboho, Ikwo; Jang, Yunho; Davis, William; Thor, Sharmi; Balish, Amanda; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Sorn, San; Holl, Davun; Sok, Touch; Seng, Heng; Tarantola, Arnaud; Tsuyuoka, Reiko; Parry, Amy; Chea, Nora; Allal, Lotfi; Kitsutani, Paul; Warren, Dora; Prouty, Michael; Horwood, Paul; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Lindstrom, Stephen; Villanueva, Julie; Donis, Ruben; Cox, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Human infections with influenza A(H5N1) virus in Cambodia increased sharply during 2013. Molecular characterization of viruses detected in clinical specimens from human cases revealed the presence of mutations associated with the alteration of receptor-binding specificity (K189R, Q222L) and respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets (N220K with Q222L). Discovery of quasispecies at position 222 (Q/L), in addition to the absence of the mutations in poultry/environmental samples, suggested that the mutations occurred during human infection and did not transmit further. PMID:25210193

  15. Experimental challenge of chicken vaccinated with commercially available H5 vaccines reveals loss of protection