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Sample records for h gamma aminobutyric

  1. Regional selectivity of a gamma-aminobutyric acid-induced (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release sensitive to inhibitors of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake

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    Bonanno, G.; Raiteri, M.

    1987-05-01

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine ((/sup 3/H)ACh) were studied in synaptosomes prepared from rat hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and striatum and prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)choline. When synaptosomes were exposed in superfusion to exogenous GABA (0.01-0.3 mM) the basal release of newly synthesized (/sup 3/H)ACh was increased in a concentration-dependent way in hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus nerve endings. In contrast, the release of (/sup 3/H)ACh was not significantly affected by GABA in striatal synaptosomes. The effect of GABA was not antagonized significantly by bicuculline or picrotoxin. Muscimol caused only a slight not significant increase of (/sup 3/H)ACh release when tested at 0.3 mM whereas, at this concentration, (-)-baclofen was totally inactive. The GABA-induced release of (/sup 3/H)ACh was counteracted by SKF 89976A, SKF 100561, and SKF 100330A, three strong and selective GABA uptake inhibitors. The data suggest that, in selective areas of the rat brain, GABA causes release of (/sup 3/H)ACh following penetration into cholinergic nerve terminals through a GABA transport system.

  2. The Synthesis of [gamma]-Aminobutyric Acid in Response to Treatments Reducing Cytosolic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L. A.; Bown, A. W.; Breitkreuz, K. E.; Guinel, F. C.

    1994-03-01

    [gamma]-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis (L-glutamic acid + H+ -> GABA + CO2) is rapidly stimulated by a variety of stress conditions including hypoxia. Recent literature suggests that GABA production and concomitant H+ consumption ameliorates the cytosolic acidification associated with hypoxia or other stresses. This proposal was investigated using isolated asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri Regel) mesophyll cells. Cell acidification was promoted using hypoxia, H+/L-glutamic acid symport, and addition of butyrate or other permeant weak acids. Sixty minutes of all three treatments stimulated the levels of both intracellular and extracellular GABA by values ranging from 100 to 1800%. At an external pH of 5.0, addition of 5 mM butyrate stimulated an increase in overall GABA level from 3.86 (0.56 [plus or minus] SE) to 20.4 (2.16 [plus or minus] SE) nmol of GABA/106 cell. Butyrate stimulated GABA levels by 200 to 300% within 15 s, and extracellular GABA was observed after 10 min. The acid load due to butyrate addition was assayed by measuring [14C]butyrate uptake. After 45 s of butyrate treatment, H+-consuming GABA production accounted for 45% of the imposed acid load. The cytosolic location of a fluorescent pH probe was confirmed using fluorescent microscopy. Spectrofluorimetry indicated that butyrate addition reduced cytosolic pH by 0.60 units with a half-time of approximately 2 s. The proposal that GABA synthesis ameliorates cytosolic acidification is supported by the data. The possible roles of H+ and Ca2+ in stimulating GABA synthesis are discussed.

  3. Inhibition of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid of depolarization-induced release of (/sup 14/C)cysteine sulfinate and (/sup 3/H)glutamate in rat hippocampal slices

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    Baba, A.; Okumura, S.; Mizuo, H.; Iwata, H.

    1983-01-01

    Effects of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid-related compounds on the release of (/sup 14/C)cysteine sulfinate and (/sup 3/H)glutamate from preloaded hippocampal slices of rat brain were examined by a superfusion method. Diazepam markedly inhibited the release of cysteine sulfinate and glutamate evoked either by high K/sup +/ or veratridine without affecting that of other neurotransmitter candidates, e.g., gamma-aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and dopamine; IC50 values for the release of cysteine sulfinate and glutamate were about 20 and 7 microM, respectively. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (1 to 10 microM) and muscimol (100 microM) significantly reduced high K+-stimulated release of glutamate. Bicuculline, which had no effect on the release at a concentration of 50 microM by itself, antagonized the inhibitor effects of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid on glutamate release. Similar results were obtained with the release of cysteine sulfinate except that a high concentration (100 microM) of gamma-aminobutyric acid was required for the inhibition. These results indicate the modulation by gamma-aminobutyric acid innervation of the release of excitatory amino acids in rat hippocampal formation, and also suggest that some of the pharmacological effects of diazepam may be a consequence of inhibition of excitatory amino acid transmission.

  4. Lactic acid bacterial cell factories for gamma-aminobutyric acid.

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    Li, Haixing; Cao, Yusheng

    2010-11-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid that is widely present in organisms. Several important physiological functions of gamma-aminobutyric acid have been characterized, such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic effects, and tranquilizer effects. Many microorganisms can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid including bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Among them, gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria have been a focus of research in recent years, because lactic acid bacteria possess special physiological activities and are generally regarded as safe. They have been extensively used in food industry. The production of lactic acid bacterial gamma-aminobutyric acid is safe and eco-friendly, and this provides the possibility of production of new naturally fermented health-oriented products enriched in gamma-aminobutyric acid. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing species of lactic acid bacteria and their isolation sources, the methods for screening of the strains and increasing their production, the enzymatic properties of glutamate decarboxylases and the relative fundamental research are reviewed in this article. And the potential applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria were also referred to.

  5. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 using fed-batch fermentation

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    Huang Guidong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gamma-aminobutyric acid is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brains, and has several well-known physiological functions. Lactic acid bacteria possess special physiological activities and are generally regarded as safe. Therefore, using lactic acid bacteria as cell factories for gamma-aminobutyric acid production is a fascinating project and opens up a vast range of prospects for making use of GABA and LAB. We previously screened a high GABA-producer Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 and optimized its fermentation medium composition. The results indicated that the strain showed potential in large-scale fermentation for the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid. To increase the yielding of GABA, further study on the fermentation process is needed before the industrial application in the future. In this article we investigated the impacts of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, pH, temperature and initial glutamate concentration on gamma-aminobutyric acid production by Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 in flask cultures. According to the data obtained in the above, a simple and effective fed-batch fermentation method was developed to highly efficiently convert glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. Results Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate did not affect the cell growth and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of Lb. brevis NCL912. Temperature, pH and initial glutamate concentration had significant effects on the cell growth and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of Lb. brevis NCL912. The optimal temperature, pH and initial glutamate concentration were 30-35°C, 5.0 and 250-500 mM. In the following fed-batch fermentations, temperature, pH and initial glutamate concentration were fixed as 32°C, 5.0 and 400 mM. 280.70 g (1.5 mol and 224.56 g (1.2 mol glutamate were supplemented into the bioreactor at 12 h and 24 h, respectively. Under the selected fermentation conditions, gamma-aminobutyric acid was rapidly produced at the first 36 h and almost not

  6. A Two-stage pH and Temperature Control with Substrate Feeding Strategy for Production of Gamma-aminobutyric Acid by Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC 1306

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    彭春龙; 黄俊; 胡升; 赵伟睿; 姚善泾; 梅乐和

    2013-01-01

    Methods to optimize the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC 1306 were investigated. Results indicated that cell growth was maximal at pH 5.0, while pH 4.5 was pref-erable to GABA formation. The optimal temperature for cell growth (35 °C) was lower than that for GABA forma-tion (40 °C). In a two-stage pH and temperature control fermentation, cultures were maintained at pH 5.0 and 35 °C for 32 h, then adjusted to pH 4.5 and 40 °C, GABA production increased remarkably and reached 474.79 mmol·L-1 at 72 h, while it was 398.63 mmol·L-1 with one stage pH and temperature control process, in which cultivation con-ditions were constantly controlled at pH 5.0 and 35 °C. In order to avoid the inhibition of cell growth at higher L-monosodium glutamate (L-MSG) concentrations, the two-stage control fermentation with substrate feeding strat-egy was applied to GABA production, with 106.87 mmol (20 g) L-MSG supplemented into the shaking-flask at 32 h and 56 h post-inoculation separately. The GABA concentration reached 526.33 mmol·L-1 at 72 h with the fer-mentation volume increased by 38%. These results will provide primary data to realize large-scale production of GABA by L. brevis CGMCC 1306.

  7. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

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    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Bencsura, Akos [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Heja, Laszlo [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Kardos, Julianna, E-mail: jkardos@chemres.hu [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  8. Photoaffinity Probe Candidates for Gamma-aminobutyric Acid (GABAA)-Gated Chloride Channel

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    Shang Zhong LIU; Qing Xiao LI

    2004-01-01

    New photoaffinity ligand candidates were synthesized based on 5-t-butyl-2-(4- (substituted-ethynyl)phenyl)-1, 3-dithiane for the noncompetitive blocker site on the gamma- aminobutyric acid -gated chloride channel. Their half-maximal inhibition concentrations ranged from 4 to 32 nmol/L as measured by 4'-ethynyl-4-n-[2,3-3H2]-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (3H EBOB) assay.

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid promotes human hepatocellular carcinoma growth through overexpressed gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor α3 subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and indicate the relationship among gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), gamrna-aminobutyric acid A receptor α3 subunit (GABRA3) and HCC.METHODS: HCC cell line Chang, HepG2, normal liver cell line L-02 and 8 samples of HCC tissues and paired non-cancerous tissues were analyzed with semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the expression of GABAA receptors. HepG2 cells were treated with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at serial concentrations (0, 1, 10, 20, 40 and 60 μmol/L), and their proliferating abilities were analyzed with the 3-(4, 5-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cell doubling time test, colon formation assay, cell cycle analysis and tumor planted in nude mice. Small interfering RNA was used for knocking down the endogenous GABRA3 in HepG2. oliferating abilities of these cells treated with or without GABA were analyzed.RESULTS: We identified the overexpression of GABRA3 in HCC cells. Knockdown of endogenous GABRA3 expression in HepG2 attenuated HCC cell growth, suggesting its role in HCC cell viability. We determined the in vitro and in vivo effect of GABA in the proliferation of GABRA3-positive cell lines, and found that GABA increased HCC growth in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the addition of GABA into the cell culture medium promoted the proliferation of GABRA3-expressing HepG2 cells, but not GABRA3-knockdown HepG2 cells. This means that GABA stimulates HepG2 cell growth through GABRA3. CONCLUSION: GABA and GABRA3 play important roles in HCC development and progression and can be a promising molecular target for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HCC.

  10. Separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid from fermented broth.

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    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Chen, Yan; Cao, Yusheng

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinaceous amino acid that is widely distributed in nature and acts as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. This study aimed to find a separation method for getting high-purity GABA from a fermented broth. Firstly, a fermented broth with a high content of GABA (reaching 997 ± 51 mM) was prepared by fermentation with Lactobacillus brevis NCL912. GABA purification was conducted by successive centrifugation, filtration, decoloration, desalination, ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), and crystallization. Inorganic salt (Na₂SO₄) was removed from the both by desalination with 70% ethanol solution. A ninhydrin test strip was designed for the real-time detection of GABA during IEC. The recovery rate for the whole purification process was about 50%. The purified product was characterized by thin-layer chromatography and HPLC, and its purity reached 98.66 ± 2.36%.

  11. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

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    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  12. Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in Tissue Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    Neurol. 234: 242-263. Peters, A. and Proskauer, c. C. (1980) Synaptic relationships between a multipolar stellate cell and a pyramidal neuron in rat...APR 1986 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in...AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER Title of Thesis: Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in Tissue Slices Name of Candidate

  13. Conformational basis for the Li(+)-induced leak current in the rat gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1

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    MacAulay, Nanna; Zeuthen, Thomas; Gether, Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    The rat gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1 (GAT-1) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and the substrate-independent Li(+)-induced leak current was examined using two-electrode voltage clamp. The leak current was not affected by the addition of GABA and was not due to H(+) permeation. The ...... of Na(+) restrains the transporter from moving into a leak conductance mode as well as allowing maintenance of GABA-elicited transport-associated current....

  14. DETERMINATION OF GAMMA - AMINOBUTYRIC ACID BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

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    D. Qujeq

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the main inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter in several areas of the brain. Measurement of gamma-aminobutyric acid in the brain will help elucidate its metabolic rote and diagnostic value. The liquid chromatography (LC system consisted of a delivery pump. Male rats (150-250g were used in this study. The brain was rapidly removed from decapitated animals. Trie chromatograms showed satisfactory resolution and symmetrical peak shapes, both with the standard and tissue extracts. the retention lime was 4.60 min. it was constant in repeated analyses and exactly the same for the standard and tissue samples.

  15. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

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    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  16. Neurochemical correlates of. gamma. -aminobutyrate (GABA) inhibition in cat visual cortex

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    Balcar, V.J.; Dreher, B. (Univ. of Sydney (Australia))

    1990-01-01

    High affinity binding of ({sup 3}H){gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to neuronal membranes from different parts of cat visual cortex was tested for sensitivity to GABA{sub A} agonists isoguvacine and THIP, GABA{sub A} antagonist SR95531 and GABA{sub B} agonist baclofen. Some of the GABA{sub A}-binding sites were found to have a very low affinity for THIP, suggesting the presence and, possibly, uneven distribution of non-synaptic GABA{sub A} receptors in cat visual cortex. There were no differences in K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of high affinity uptake of GABA and in the potency of K{sup +}-stimulated release of GABA, between primary and association cortices. Consequently, the present results indicate that despite the anatomical and physiological differences between the primary and association feline visual cortices the neurochemical characteristics of GABAergic inhibition are very similar in the two regions.

  17. Succinic semialdehyde as a substrate for the formation of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

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    van Bemmelen, F J; Schouten, M J; Fekkes, D; Bruinvels, J

    1985-11-01

    The conversion of succinic semialdehyde into gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by GABA-transaminase was measured in rat brain homogenate in the presence of different concentrations of the cosubstrate glutamate. The calculated kinetic parameters of succinic semialdehyde for GABA-transaminase were a limiting Km value of 168 microM and a limiting Vmax value of 38 mumol g-1 h-1. Combination with previously obtained data for the conversion of GABA into succinic semialdehyde revealed a kEq value of 0.04, indicating that equilibrium of GABA-transaminase is biased toward the formation of GABA. The increased formation of GABA in the presence of succinic semialdehyde was not due to an increased conversion of glutamate into GABA by glutamic acid decarboxylase. Therefore these results indicate that succinic semialdehyde can act as a precursor for GABA synthesis.

  18. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptogenesis and synaptic function

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    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Elster, L;

    1998-01-01

    The correct establishment and function of synapses depend on a variety of factors, such as guidance of pre- and postsynaptic neurons as well as receptor development and localization. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a pronounced effect on these events and elicits differentiation of neurons; tha...

  19. A validated method for gas chromatographic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tall fescue herbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in animals that is also found in plants and has been associated with plant responses to stress. A simple and relatively rapid method of GABA separation and quantification was developed from a commercially available kit for serum amino...

  20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

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    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  1. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2 under submerged fermentation.

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    Yang, S-Y; Lü, F-X; Lu, Z-X; Bie, X-M; Jiao, Y; Sun, L-J; Yu, B

    2008-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has several well-known physiological functions and has been applied to the production of many drugs and functional foods. The technology of GABA production via submerged fermentation by Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2 was investigated in this paper. It indicated that the GABA production was related to the biochemical characteristics of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) of S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2. After 24 h of fermentation at 37 degrees C, which is the suitable culture conditions for GAD-production, then the culture condition were adjusted to the optimal temperature (40 degrees C) and pH (4.5) for the GAD reaction activity in biotransformation of cells and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (0.02 mmol/l) were added to the broth at the 48 h, the GABA production was increased up to 1.76-fold, reaching 7984.75 +/- 293.33 mg/l. The strain shows great potential use as a starter for GABA-containing yoghurt, cheese and other functional fermented food productions.

  2. The multiple facets of gamma-aminobutyric acid dysfunction in epilepsy.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Holmes, Gregory,

    2005-01-01

    International audience; PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The polarity of action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) changes from inhibition to excitation in the developing brain and in epilepsies. This review deals with recent observations concerning the mechanisms and clinical implications of the shift in GABA's activity from inhibition to excitation. RECENT FINDINGS: GABAergic synapses provide most transmitter-gated inhibition and are the targets of numerous clinically active agents, notably antiepileptic ...

  3. Identification of gamma-aminobutyric acid and its binding sites in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Schaeffer, J.M.; Bergstrom, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase were identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The concentration of GABA in C. elegans is approximately 10-fold lower than the concentration of GABA in rat brain. Glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, the GABA anabolic and catabolic enzymes, are also present in C. elegans. Crude membrane fractions were prepared from C. elegans and used to study specific (/sup 3/H) GABA binding sites. GABA binds to C. elegans membranes with high affinity and low capacity. Muscimol is a competitive inhibitor of specific GABA binding with a K/sub I/ value of 120 nM. None of the other GABA agonists or antagonists inhibited greater than 40% of the specific GABA binding at concentrations up to 10/sup -4/M. Thirteen spider venoms were examined as possible GABA agonists or antagonists, the venom from Calilena agelenidae inhibits specific GABA binding with a K/sub I/ value of 6 nl/ml. These results suggest that GABA has a physiological role as a neurotransmitter in C. elegans.

  4. Characteristics of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors in the rat central nervous system.

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    Kuroda,Hiroo

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA were investigated in the rat central nervous system by radioreceptor assay (RRA. Scatchard analysis revealed that the rat brain had two distinct GABA binding sites with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 11.7 nM and 34.7 nM. The highest level of specific [3H]-GABA binding was found in the rat cerebellum. Imidazole acetic acid, a potent GABA agonist, was effective in displacing [3H]-GABA binding but beta-alanine was slightly effective in inhibiting [3H]-GABA binding. Muscimol, the most potent GABA agonist, has been used as a ligand to characterize the postsynaptic GABA receptors. However, the maximal binding capacity (Bmax of muscimol-RRA was about 3 times larger than that of GABA-RRA, suggesting that muscimol might label not only GABA receptors but other unknown receptors as well. An endogenous inhibitor of GABA receptor binding was purified from the P2 fraction of rat brain with 0.05% Triton X-100. The endogenous inhibitor was competitive with GABA on GABA binding sites. The inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor of GABA receptor binding was blocked by the allosteric effect of diazepam. In the presence of diazepam, [3H]-GABA binding with the endogenous inhibitor was larger than that with GABA, whereas there was no difference in the absence of diazepam. This indicated that the endogenous inhibitor was not GABA itself. The molecular weight of the endogenous inhibitor was estimate by gel filtration to be less than 3,000 daltons.

  5. Electrophoretic method for the determination of the proportion of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a mixture of labeled neurotransmitter and its catabolites

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    Cupello, A.; Rapallino, M.V.; Besio, G.; Mainardi, P.

    1987-01-01

    An electrophoretic method for the separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from its metabolites after GABA-transaminase attack is presented. The method is based on the fact that at neutral pH GABA has no net electrical charge, whereas its major metabolites, succinic acid and Krebs cycle intermediates, are negatively charged. The method appears to be especially suitable for evaluation of true-labeled neurotransmitter within the radioactivity which is found in synaptosomes after labeled GABA-uptake studies.

  6. The anticonvulsant gabapentin (neurontin) does not act through gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Mosbacher, Johannes; Elg, Susanne;

    2002-01-01

    The actions of the anticonvulsant gabapentin [1-(aminomethyl)cyclohexaneacetic acid, Neurontin] have been somewhat enigmatic until recently, when it was claimed to be a gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptor agonist acting exclusively at a heterodimeric complex containing the GABA(B(1a...... in vitro assays. In light of these results, we find it highly questionable that gabapentin is a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Hence, the anticonvulsive effects of the compound have to arise from GABA(B) receptor-independent mechanisms. This also implies that the first GABA(B) receptor splice variant...

  7. Pre-staining paper chromatography method for quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Cao, Yusheng; Yang, Jiyan; Huang, Zhibing

    2009-06-19

    The routine method of paper chromatography includes five steps: spotting, separating, drying, spraying/immersing and color development. In this paper, a pre-staining paper chromatography which only consisted of spotting, separating and color development was developed for quantitative analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid. Compared to the routine paper chromatography, the improved method is clean, rapid, inexpensive and reproducible. The effects of ninhydrin concentration, color temperature, color time and Cu(2+) concentration on the color yield in the ninhydrin reaction were optimized. And then the pre-staining paper chromatography coupled with vis spectrophotometry was applied to gamma-aminobutyric acid quantification. The results indicated that the limit of detection was 0.05 mg mL(-1) and the linear range was from 0.5 to 20.0 mg mL(-1). Furthermore, an excellent correlation coefficient was observed with an R(2)=0.998. The method is accurate (RSD<2.64%), and has good recoveries (102.7-103.9%). The validation of the modified technique was verified by a HPLC method.

  8. Characterization of bicuculline/baclofen-insensitive (rho-like) gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. II. Pharmacology of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R M; Polenzani, L; Miledi, R

    1993-04-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA from mammalian retina expresses bicuculline/baclofen-insensitive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in Xenopus oocytes with properties similar to those of homooligomeric GABA rho 1 receptors. The pharmacological profile of these rho-like receptors was extended by measuring sensitivities to various GABAA and GABAB receptor ligands. For direct comparison the same compounds were also assayed with GABAA receptors expressed by rat brain RNA. The potency sequence for heterocyclic GABA analogues at the GABA rho-like receptors was GABA (1.3) > muscimol (2.3) > isoguvacine (100) (approximate EC50 in parentheses; all EC50 and Kb values given in microM). Both muscimol and isoguvacine were partial agonists at the rho-like receptors. 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (Kb congruent to 32), piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (Kb congruent to 85), and isonipecotic acid (Kb congruent to 1000) acted primarily as competitive antagonists, showing little or no activity as agonists. The sulfonic acid GABA analogue 3-aminopropanesulfonic acid was also a competitive antagonist (Kb congruent to 20). Conformationally restricted GABA analogues trans- and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (TACA and CACA) were agonists at the rho-like receptors. TACA (EC50 congruent to 0.6) had twice the potency of GABA and was 125 times more potent than CACA (EC50 congruent to 75). Z-3-(Amidinothio)propenoic acid, an isothiouronium analogue of GABA, had little activity as an agonist but instead acted as a competitive antagonist (Kb congruent to 20). At concentrations of > 100 microM, bicuculline did have some weak competitive inhibitory effects on the GABA rho-like receptors (Kb congruent to 6000), but it was at least 5000 times more potent at GABAA receptors. Strychnine (Kb congruent to 70) and SR-95531 (Kb congruent to 35) also were competitive inhibitors of the rho-like receptors but were, respectively, 20 and 240 times more potent at GABAA receptors. The GABAB receptor ligands baclofen

  9. New insights into {gamma}-aminobutyric acid catabolism: Evidence for {gamma}-hydroxybutyric acid and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Benoît; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Lepoutre, Jean-Paul; Rossignol, Tristan; Blondin, Bruno; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2009-07-01

    The gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) shunt, an alternative route for the conversion of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate, involves the glutamate decarboxylase Gad1p, the GABA transaminase Uga1p and the succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase Uga2p. This pathway has been extensively described in plants and animals, but its function in yeast remains unclear. We show that the flux through Gad1p is insignificant during fermentation in rich sugar-containing medium, excluding a role for this pathway in redox homeostasis under anaerobic conditions or sugar stress. However, we found that up to 4 g of exogenous GABA/liter was efficiently consumed by yeast. We studied the fate of this consumed GABA. Most was converted into succinate, with a reaction yield of 0.7 mol/mol. We also showed that a large proportion of GABA was stored within cells, indicating a possible role for this molecule in stress tolerance mechanisms or nitrogen storage. Furthermore, based on enzymatic and metabolic evidence, we identified an alternative route for GABA catabolism, involving the reduction of succinate-semialdehyde into gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and the polymerization of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid to form poly-(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-4-hydroxybutyric acid). This study provides the first demonstration of a native route for the formation of this polymer in yeast. Our findings shed new light on the GABA pathway and open up new opportunities for industrial applications.

  10. Hippocampal and cortical expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in pentylenetetrazol-induced chronic epileptic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zeng; Zhong Yang; Xiaodong Long; Chao You

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter plays an important role in gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and is highly associated with epilepsy seizures.Pathologically, astrocytes release active substances that alter neuronal excitability, and it has been demonstrated that astrocytes play a role in epileptic seizures.OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of the temporal lobe in rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced chronic epilepsy.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Third Military University of Chinese PLA between January 2006 and December 2007.MATERIALS: Pentylenetetrazol was purchased from Sigma, USA; rabbit anti-rat gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were from Chemicon, USA.METHODS; A total of 40 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into model and control groups. Rat models of chronic epilepsy were created by pentylenetetrazol kindling, and were subdivided into 3-, 7-, and 14-day kindling subgroups.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, as well as the number of positive cells in the hippocampus and cortex of temporal lobe of rats, were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein -positive cells in the hippocampus and cortex of rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced epilepsy significantly increased, gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression increased after 3 days of kindling, reached a peak on day 7, and remained at elevated levels at day 14 (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Astrocytic activation and gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 overexpression may contribute to pentylenetetrazol

  11. Selective amino acid substitutions convert the creatine transporter to a gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna R; Christie, David L

    2007-05-25

    The creatine transporter (CRT) is a member of a large family of sodium-dependent neurotransmitter and amino acid transporters. The CRT is closely related to the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, GAT-1, yet GABA is not an effective substrate for the CRT. The high resolution structure of a prokaryotic homologue, LeuT has revealed precise details of the substrate binding site for leucine (Yamashita, A., Singh, S. K., Kawate, T., Jin, Y., and Gouaux, E. (2005) Nature 437, 215-223). We have now designed mutations based on sequence comparisons of the CRT with GABA transporters and the LeuT structural template in an attempt to alter the substrate specificity of the CRT. Combinations of two or three amino acid substitutions at four selected positions resulted in the loss of creatine transport activity and gain of a specific GABA transport function. GABA transport by the "gain of function" mutants was sensitive to nipecotic acid, a competitive inhibitor of GABA transporters. Our results show LeuT to be a good structural model to identify amino acid residues involved in the substrate and inhibitor selectivity of eukaryotic sodium-dependent neurotransmitter and amino acid transporters. However, modification of the binding site alone appears to be insufficient for efficient substrate translocation. Additional residues must mediate the conformational changes required for the diffusion of substrate from the binding site to the cytoplasm.

  12. Evolution of neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid,glutamate and their receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiheng GOU; Xiao WANG; Wen WANG

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate are two important amino acid neurotransmitters widely present in the nervous systems of ammals,insects,round worm,and platyhelminths,while their receptors are quite diversified across different animal phyla.However,the evolutionary mechanisms between the two conserved neurotransmitters and their diversified receptors remain elusive,and antagonistic interactions between GABA and glutamate signal transduction systems,in particular,have begun to attract significant attention.In this review,we summarize the extant results on the origin and evolution of GABA and glutamate,as well as their receptors,and analyze possible evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships of various GABAs and glutamate receptors.We further discuss the evolutionary history of Excitatory/Neutral Amino Acid Transporter (EAAT),a transport protein,which plays an important role in the GABA-glutamate "yin and yang" balanced regulation.Finally,based on current advances,we propose several potential directions of future research.

  13. Sodium glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid affect iron metabolism in the rat caudate putamen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Wang; Peng Guan; Fei Li; Yujian Fu; Xianglin Duan; Yanzhong Chang

    2010-01-01

    Glutamic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) influence iron content in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, although the mechanisms of action remain unclear. The present study measured iron content and changes in divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and hephaestin expression in the substantia nigra and caudate putamen, and explored the effects of GABA and glutamic acid on iron metabolism, Results demonstrated that iron content and DMT1 non iron response element [DMT1 (-IRE)] expression were significantly greater but hephaestin expression was significantly lower in the caudate putamen of the monosodium glutamate group compared with the control group. No significant difference in iron content was detected between the GABA and control groups. DMT1(-IRE) expression was significantly reduced, but hephaestin expression was significantly increased in the GABA group compared with the control group. In addition, there was no significant difference in tyrosine hydroxylase expression between monosodium glutamate and GABA groups and the control group. These results suggested that glutamate affected iron metabolism in the caudate putamen by increasing DMT1(-IRE) and decreasing hephaestin expression. In addition, GABA decreased DMT1(-IRE) expression in the caudate putamen.

  14. Excitatory action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on crustacean neurosecretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, U; Onetti, C; Valdiosera, R; Aréchiga, H

    1994-02-01

    1. Intracellular and voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from a selected population of neurosecretory (ns) cells in the X organ of the crayfish isolated eyestalk. Pulses of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) elicited depolarizing responses and bursts of action potentials in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by picrotoxin (50 microM) but not by bicuculline. Picrotoxin also suppressed spontaneous synaptic activity. 2. The responses to GABA were abolished by severing the neurite of X organ cells, at about 150 microns from the cell body. Responses were larger when the application was made at the neuropil level. 3. Topical application of Cd2+ (2 mM), while suppressing synaptic activity, was incapable of affecting the responses to GABA. 4. Under whole-cell voltage-clamp, GABA elicited an inward current with a reversal potential dependent on the chloride equilibrium potential. The GABA effect was accompanied by an input resistance reduction up to 33% at a -50 mV holding potential. No effect of GABA was detected on potassium, calcium, and sodium currents present in X organ cells. 5. The effect of GABA on steady-state currents was dependent on the intracellular calcium concentration. At 10(-6) M [Ca2+]i, GABA (50 microM) increased the membrane conductance more than threefold and shifted the zero-current potential from -25 to -10 mV. At 10(-9) M [Ca2+]i, GABA induced only a 1.3-fold increase in membrane conductance, without shifting the zero-current potential. 6. These results support the notion that in the population of X organ cells sampled in this study, GABA acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter, opening chloride channels.

  15. Postnatal changes in somatic gamma-aminobutyric acid signalling in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Minlebaev, Marat; Rheims, Sylvain; Ivanov, Anton; Jorquera, Isabelle; Holmes, Gregory L; Zilberter, Yuri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2008-05-01

    During postnatal development of the rat hippocampus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) switches its action on CA3 pyramidal cells from excitatory to inhibitory. To characterize the underlying changes in the GABA reversal potential, we used somatic cell-attached recordings of GABA(A) and N-methyl-D-aspartate channels to monitor the GABA driving force and resting membrane potential, respectively. We found that the GABA driving force is strongly depolarizing during the first postnatal week. The strength of this depolarization rapidly declines with age, although GABA remains slightly depolarizing, by a few millivolts, even in adult neurons. Reduction in the depolarizing GABA driving force was due to a progressive negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA currents. Similar postnatal changes in GABA signalling were also observed using the superfused hippocampus preparation in vivo, and in the hippocampal interneurons in vitro. We also found that in adult pyramidal cells, somatic GABA reversal potential is maintained at a slightly depolarizing level by bicarbonate conductance, chloride-extrusion and chloride-loading systems. Thus, the postnatal excitatory-to-inhibitory switch in somatic GABA signalling is associated with a negative shift of the GABA reversal potential but without a hyperpolarizing switch in the polarity of GABA responses. These results also suggest that in adult CA3 pyramidal cells, somatic GABAergic inhibition takes place essentially through shunting rather than hyperpolarization. Apparent hyperpolarizing GABA responses previously reported in the soma of CA3 pyramidal cells are probably due to cell depolarization during intracellular or whole-cell recordings.

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  17. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products.

  18. CHANGES IN SELECTIVITY OF GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID FORMATION EFFECTED BY FERMENTATION CONDITIONS AND MICROORGANISMS RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Kovalovská

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we observe the effect of fermentation conditions and resources of microorganisms for production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. The content of produced GABA depends on various conditions such as the amount of precursor, an addition of salt, enzyme and the effect of pH. The highest selectivity of GABA (74.0 % from the precursor (L-monosodium glutamate has been determinate in the follow conditions: in the presence of pre-cultured microorganisms from Encián cheese in amount 1.66 % (w/v the source of microorganisms/volume of the fermentation mixture, after the addition of 0.028 % (w/v of CaCl2/volume of the fermentation mixture, 100 μM of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P-5-P and the GABA precursor concentration in the fermentation mixture 2.6 mg ml-1 in an atmosphere of gas nitrogen. Pure cultures of lactic acid bacteria increased the selectivity of GABA by an average of 20 % compared with bacteria from the path of Encián.

  19. Determination of theanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea by high performance- liquid chromatography with precolumn derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yunfei; Yang, Xiufang; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin

    2012-02-01

    A method of precolumn derivatization-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the determination of theanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in tea was established. o-Phthalaldehyde (OPA) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) were chosen as the derivatization reagents. The effects of teapolyphenol (Tp), proline (Pro) and Vitamin C (Vc) on derivatization yields were investigated. The results indicated that Vc not only stabilized the stock solution of OPA, but also enhanced the yield of GABA derivative. However, the yield of theanine derivative was less affected. The HPLC separation system was also optimized. The resolution of the derivatives was improved by adjusting the pH value and phosphate-citric buffer concentration of the mobile phase. The limits of detection (LODs) for GABA and theanine were 3.01 x 10(-5) mmol/L and 7.98 x 10(-5) mmol/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 9.99 x 10(-5) mmol/L and 2.658 x 10(-4) mmol/L, respectively. The linear ranges of GABA and theanine were 0.01 - 0.4 mmol/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.996 and 0.05 - 0.8 mmol/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.995, respectively. The main recoveries for GABA and theanine in green tea, Oolong tea, and black tea, ranged from 99.29% to 119.60% and from 62.88% to 141.06% respectively. The method with simple procedure and efficient separation was proved to be suitable for the determination of GABA and theanine in tea.

  20. EFFECT OF FOOD-MICROORGANISMS ON GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID PRODUCTION BY FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Hudec

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are nice targets in order to study γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production that has been reported to be effective in order to reduce blood pressure in experimental animals and human beings. In this study, we aimed to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production in aerobical and anaerobical conditions, using different sources of microorganisms. The highest selectivity of GABA from precursor L-monosodium glutamate (82.22% has been reported using of microorganisms from banana, and with addition of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P-5-P. For augmentation of selectivity the application of the further stimulating factors of GABA biosynthesis is needed.

  1. EXTRACELLULAR GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA RETICULATA MEASURED BY MICRODIALYSIS IN AWAKE RATS - EFFECTS OF VARIOUS STIMULANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; WESTERINK, BHC

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) was challenged by local infusion of various receptor-specific agents to obtain additional information on the physiological significance of extracellular GABA levels as measured by microdialysis in awake rats. No

  2. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate con...

  3. The effect of antivitamin B6 administration on gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism in retina and electroretinogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, A; Kamada, Y; Kunita, M; Matsuda, M

    1980-01-01

    The effect of several antivitamin B6 on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism was studied in the rat retina. The rat electroretinogram (ERG) was also recorded after administration of these drugs. Aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) and hydrazine administration increased the GABA content and inhibited the GABA degrading enzyme, GABA transaminase in retina. In addition, there drugs elongated the peak latency of the oscillatory potential in the rat ERG. In contrast, 4-deoxypyridoxine (DOP) or isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) administration decreased the GABA content and inhibited the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase in retina, and administration of these drugs together with AOAA lessened the degrees of elevation of GABA content and of the elongation of the peak latency produced as compared with AOAA alone, though neither of the former drugs had a significant effect on ERG. The retinal GABA seems to play an important role in relation to the oscillatory potential of ERG.

  4. Gamma aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 gene knockout mice: a new model for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yang; Guoqiang Cai; Youqing Cai; Jian Fei; Guoxiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by hyperactivity,impaired sustained attention,impulsivity,and is usually accompanied by varying degrees of learning difficulties and lack of motor coordination.However,the pathophysiology and etiology of ADHD remain inconclusive so far.Our previous studies have demonstrated that the gamma aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) gene knockout (ko) mouse (gat1-/-)is hyperactive and exhibited impaired memory performance in the Morris water maze.In the current study,we found that the gat1-/-mice showed low levels of attentional focusing and increased impulsivity.In addition,the gat1-/-mice displayed ataxia characterized by defects in motor coordination and balance skills.The hyperactivity in the ko mice was reduced by both methylphenidate and amphetamine.Collectively,these results suggest that GAT1 ko mouse is a new animal model for ADHD studying and GAT1 may be a new target to treat ADHD.

  5. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and GABA_A receptors are involved in directional selectivity of pretectal neurons in pigeons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖泉; 付煜西; 胡婧; 高洪峰; 王书荣

    2000-01-01

    The present study describes the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its antagonists, bicuculline and 2-hydroxysaclofen, on visual responses of neurons in the pigeon nucleus lentiformis mesencephali (nLM). The results indicate that GABA significantly reduces both spontaneous activity and visual responsiveness, and GABAA antagonist bicuculline but not GABAB antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen enhances visual responses of nLM cells examined. Furthermore, inhibition produced by motion in the null-direction of pretectal neurons is diminished by bicuculline but not by 2-hydroxysaclofen. It is therefore concluded that the null-direction inhibition of directional cells in the pigeon nLM is predominantly mediated by GABA and GABAA receptors. This inhibition may at least in part underlie directional asymmetry of optokinetic responses.

  6. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  7. Presence of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (Gaba) in the Pedal Mucus of the Critically Endangered Species Patella ferruginea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ingraham, G A; Espinosa, F; Krock, B

    2015-05-01

    Patella ferruginea is a giant patellid limpet endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. It presently is in danger of extinction, and many have called for developing conservation measures including the mass production of spats for re-introduction projects. However, so far all attempts have been relatively unsuccessful. Previous work analyzing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the recruitment of patellid limpets has shown that larvae respond to the presence of this signaling molecule. This response could explain the gregarious distribution typical of this species. In the present study, we demonstrated that GABA is naturally secreted by P. ferruginea in the pedal mucus. GABA is preferentially secreted during the summer, coinciding with the reproductive resting period of the species. Further research should aim to analyze the effects of GABA on larval development and metamorphosis in order to assess its potential use to improve conservation efforts.

  8. Renewal and spontaneous recovery, but not latent inhibition, are mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid in appetitive conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Andrew R; Campese, Vincent; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2009-04-01

    Previous research has reported a role for the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the extinction and renewal of conditioned fear. Here, the authors examine whether GABA is involved in the acquisition, extinction, renewal, spontaneous recovery, and latent inhibition of appetitive conditioning. Using Long-Evans rats, systemic injection of the GABA A receptor inverse agonist FG 7142 was shown to eliminate ABA renewal (Experiment 1) and spontaneous recovery (Experiment 4) of appetitive responding by selectively reducing the recovery of extinguished magazine approach. Furthermore, treatment with FG 7142 had no effects on acquisition or single-session extinction (Experiment 3) or on the context-specific expression of latent inhibition (Experiment 2). These data suggest that ABA renewal and spontaneous recovery, but not latent inhibition or responding during acquisition and an initial extinction session, are mediated by GABAergic mechanisms in appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. They provide support for the view that renewal and spontaneous recovery share a common psychological mechanism.

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and GABAA receptors are involved in directional selectivity of pretectal neurons in pigeons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The present study describes the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and itsantagonists, bicuculline and 2-hydroxysaclofen, on visual responses of neurons in the pigeon nucleuslentiformis mesencephali (nLM). The results indicate that GABA significantly reduces bothspontaneous activity and visual responsiveness, and GABAA antagonist bicuculline but not GABABantagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen enhances visual responses of nLM cells examined. Furthermore,inhibition produced by motion in the null-direction of pretectal neurons is diminished by bicucullinebut not by 2-hydroxysaclofen. It is therefore concluded that the null-direction inhibition of directionalcells in the pigeon nLM is predominantly mediated by GABA and GABAA receptors. This inhibitionmay at least in part underlie directional asymmetry of optokinetic responses.

  10. Mu Opioid Receptors in Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Forebrain Neurons Moderate Motivation for Heroin and Palatable Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbogne, Pauline; Gardon, Olivier; Martín-García, Elena; Keyworth, Helen L; Matsui, Aya; Mechling, Anna E; Bienert, Thomas; Nasseef, Taufiq; Robé, Anne; Moquin, Luc; Darcq, Emmanuel; Ben Hamida, Sami; Robledo, Patricia; Matifas, Audrey; Befort, Katia; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Harsan, Laura-Adela; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hennig, Jurgen; Gratton, Alain; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Alvarez, Veronica A; Maldonado, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2017-05-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are central to pain control, drug reward, and addictive behaviors, but underlying circuit mechanisms have been poorly explored by genetic approaches. Here we investigate the contribution of MORs expressed in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons to major biological effects of opiates, and also challenge the canonical disinhibition model of opiate reward. We used Dlx5/6-mediated recombination to create conditional Oprm1 mice in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons. We characterized the genetic deletion by histology, electrophysiology, and microdialysis; probed neuronal activation by c-Fos immunohistochemistry and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging; and investigated main behavioral responses to opiates, including motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food. Mutant mice showed MOR transcript deletion mainly in the striatum. In the ventral tegmental area, local MOR activity was intact, and reduced activity was only observed at the level of striatonigral afferents. Heroin-induced neuronal activation was modified at both sites, and whole-brain functional networks were altered in live animals. Morphine analgesia was not altered, and neither was physical dependence to chronic morphine. In contrast, locomotor effects of heroin were abolished, and heroin-induced catalepsy was increased. Place preference to heroin was not modified, but remarkably, motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food was enhanced in operant self-administration procedures. Our study reveals dissociable MOR functions across mesocorticolimbic networks. Thus, beyond a well-established role in reward processing, operating at the level of local ventral tegmental area neurons, MORs also moderate motivation for appetitive stimuli within forebrain circuits that drive motivated behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid in Sri Lankan tea by means of ultra performance tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Elisabete; Punyasiri, P A Nimal; Somasiri, H P P Sudarshana; Abeysinghe, I Sarath B; Martens, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important bioactive component of tea, acts as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter and is considered to influence other physiological processes in human as well as in planta. In the hereby presented study, the content of this valuable metabolite was investigated in two novel types of Ceylon Tea, explicitly "Silver Tips" and "White Tea", originating from minimally processed buds of the unique cultivar, "TRI 2043". The samples were subjected to hot water infusion, equivalent to the traditional beverage preparation procedure, and analyzed by means of hydrophilic interaction ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC LC-MS/MS). The registered GABA levels were compared with those obtained for the classic "Black Tea" and "Green Tea" samples from Sri Lanka. A high variation of GABA content was observed among the different tea types, especially in the case of "Silver Tips" and "White Tea", indicating the crucial influence of the manufacturing procedure (processing extent) on the final abundance of the bioactive component of interest. Furthermore, "White Tea" samples boasted the highest GABA concentration reported for this type of tea so far, reaching up to 50% of that characteristic of the high-priced "GABA Tea". Therefore, "White Tea" and "Silver Tips" were proved to be high quality tea with amounts of gamma-aminobutyric acid comparable with those described for similar types before. To our knowledge, this is the first report on HILIC LC-MS/MS application for the quantification of GABA and for in-depth characterization of teas from Sri Lanka.

  12. Potentiation of gamma aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR by Ethanol: How are inhibitory receptors affected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eFörstera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A -aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR, a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs. However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR, another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools.

  13. Effects of Frequency Drift on the Quantification of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Using MEGA-PRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Fang, Chun-Hao; Wu, Thai-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ru

    2016-04-01

    The MEGA-PRESS method is the most common method used to measure γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain at 3T. It has been shown that the underestimation of the GABA signal due to B0 drift up to 1.22 Hz/min can be reduced by post-frequency alignment. In this study, we show that the underestimation of GABA can still occur even with post frequency alignment when the B0 drift is up to 3.93 Hz/min. The underestimation can be reduced by applying a frequency shift threshold. A total of 23 subjects were scanned twice to assess the short-term reproducibility, and 14 of them were scanned again after 2–8 weeks to evaluate the long-term reproducibility. A linear regression analysis of the quantified GABA versus the frequency shift showed a negative correlation (P  0.05). Therefore, a frequency shift threshold at 0.125 ppm (15.5 Hz) can be used to reduce underestimation during GABA quantification. For data with a B0 drift up to 3.93 Hz/min, the coefficients of variance of short-term and long-term reproducibility for the GABA quantification were less than 10% when the frequency threshold was applied.

  14. Dual actions of enflurane on postsynaptic currents abolished by the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor beta3(N265M) point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Berthold; Jurd, Rachel; Rudolph, Uwe; Antkowiak, Bernd

    2006-08-01

    At concentrations close to 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)-immobility, volatile anesthetics display blocking and prolonging effects on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents. It has been proposed that distinct molecular mechanisms underlie these dual actions. The authors investigated whether the blocking or the prolonging effect of enflurane is altered by a point mutation (N265M) in the beta3 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor. Furthermore, the role of the beta3 subunit in producing the depressant actions of enflurane on neocortical neurons was elucidated. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents were sampled from neocortical neurons in cultured slices derived from wild-type and beta3(N265M) mutant mice. The effects of 0.3 and 0.6 mm enflurane on decay kinetics, peak amplitude, and charge transfer were quantified. Furthermore, the impact of enflurane-induced changes in spontaneous action potential firing was evaluated by extracellular recordings in slices from wild-type and mutant mice. In slices derived from wild-type mice, enflurane prolonged inhibitory postsynaptic current decays and decreased peak amplitudes. Both effects were almost absent in slices from beta3(N265M) mutant mice. At clinically relevant concentrations between MAC-awake and MAC-immobility, the anesthetic was less effective in depressing spontaneous action potential firing in slices from beta3(N265M) mutant mice compared with wild-type mice. At concentrations between MAC-awake and MAC-immobility, beta3-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors contribute to the depressant actions of enflurane in the neocortex. The beta3(N265M) mutation affects both the prolonging and blocking effects of enflurane on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neocortical neurons.

  15. Serotonin Transporter (5-HTT) and gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Subunit beta3 (GABRB3) Gene Polymorphisms are not Associated with Autism in the IMGSA Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestrini, E.; Lai, C.; Marlow, A.;

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit beta3 (GABRB3) gene, or other genes in the 15q11-q13 region, are possibly involved in susceptibility to autism. To test this hypothesis we performed an association study...... and the GABRB3 genes are unlikely to play a major role in the aetiology of autism in our family data set....

  16. Propofol inhibits T-helper cell type-2 differentiation by inducing apoptosis via activating gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingxia; Xin, Xin; Liu, Zhen; Li, Hao; Huang, Bo; Huang, Yuguang; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Propofol has been shown to attenuate airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma patients. Our previous study showed that it may alleviate lung inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. Given the critical role of T-helper cell type-2 (Th2) differentiation in asthma pathology and the immunomodulatory role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor, we hypothesized that propofol could alleviate asthma inflammation by inhibiting Th2 cell differentiation via the GABA receptor. For in vivo testing, chicken ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged asthmatic mice were used to determine the effect of propofol on Th2-type asthma inflammation. For in vitro testing, Th2-type cytokines as well as the cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured to assess the effects of propofol on Th2 cell differentiation and determine the underlying mechanisms. We found that propofol significantly decreased inflammatory cell counts and interleukin-4 and inflammation score in vivo. Propofol, but not intralipid, significantly reduced the Th2-type cytokine interleukin-5 secretion and caused Th2 cell apoptosis without obvious inhibition of proliferation in vitro. A GABA receptor agonist simulated the effect of propofol, whereas pretreatment with an antagonist reversed this effect. This study demonstrates that the antiinflammatory effects of propofol on Th2-type asthma inflammation in mice are mediated by inducing apoptosis without compromising proliferation during Th2 cell differentiation via activation of the GABA receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate decarboxylase activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Guo; Hu, Qing Ping; Duan, Jiang Lian; Tian, Cheng Rui

    2010-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and provides beneficial effects for human and other animals health. To accumulate GABA, samples from two different naked oat cultivars, Baiyan II and Bayou I, were steeped and germinated in an incubator. The content of GABA and glutamic acid as well as the activity of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) in oats during steeping and germination were investigated with an amino acid automatic analyzer. Compared with raw groats, an increase in GABA content of oat groats during steeping and germination was continuously observed for two oat cultivars. The activity of GAD increased greatly at the end of steeping and the second stage of germination for Baiyan II and Bayou I, respectively. Glutamic acid content of treated oat groats was significantly lower than that in raw groats until the later period of germination. GABA was correlated (p<0.01) significantly and positively with the glutamic acid rather than GAD activity in the current study. The results indicates that steeping and germination process under highly controlled conditions can effectively accumulate the GABA in oat groats for Baiyan II and Bayou I, which would greatly facilitate production of nutraceuticals or food ingredients that enable consumers to gain greater access to the health benefits of oats. However, more assays need to be further performed with more oat cultivars.

  18. Subcellular localization and expression of multiple tomato gamma-aminobutyrate transaminases that utilize both pyruvate and glyoxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shawn M; Di Leo, Rosa; Van Cauwenberghe, Owen R; Mullen, Robert T; Shelp, Barry J

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) catalyses the breakdown of GABA to succinic semialdehyde. In this report, three GABA-T isoforms were identified in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plant. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three isoforms are highly similar over most of their coding regions with the exception of their N-terminal regions. Transient expression of the individual full-length GABA-T isoforms fused to the green fluorescent protein in tobacco suspension-cultured cells revealed their distinct subcellular localizations to the mitochondrion, plastid or cytosol, and that the specific targeting of the mitochondrion- and plastid-localized isoforms is mediated by their predicted N-terminal presequences. Removal of the N-terminal targeting presequences from the mitochondrion and plastid GABA-T isoforms yielded good recovery of the soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli when they were co-expressed with the GroES/EL molecular chaperone complex. Activity assays indicated that all three recombinant isoforms possess both pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T activities, although the mitochondrial enzyme has a specific activity that is significantly higher than that of its plastid and cytosolic counterparts. Finally, differential expression patterns of the three GABA-T isoforms in reproductive tissues, but not vegetative tissues, suggest unique roles for each enzyme in developmental processes. Overall, these findings, together with recent information about rice and pepper GABA-Ts, indicate that the subcellular distribution of GABA-T in the plant kingdom is highly variable.

  19. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  20. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glutamic acid (Glu, glycine (Gly in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  1. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  2. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain with Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase Activity Shows an Enhanced Genetic Transformation Ability in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Sha; Takayama, Mariko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has the unique ability to mediate inter-kingdom DNA transfer, and for this reason, it has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. To increase the transformation frequency in plant genetic engineering, we focused on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a negative factor in the Agrobacterium-plant interaction. Recent studies have shown contradictory results regarding the effects of GABA on vir gene expression, leading to the speculation that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. In this study, we examined the effect of GABA on T-DNA transfer using a tomato line with a low GABA content. Compared with the control, the T-DNA transfer frequency was increased in the low-GABA tomato line, indicating that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. Therefore, we bred a new A. tumefaciens strain with GABA transaminase activity and the ability to degrade GABA. The A. tumefaciens strain exhibited increased T-DNA transfer in two tomato cultivars and Erianthus arundinacues and an increased frequency of stable transformation in tomato. PMID:28220841

  3. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  4. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation modulates hypnosis, immobility, and breathing during isoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2008-12-01

    Many general anesthetics are thought to produce a loss of wakefulness, in part, by enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission. However, GABAergic neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation promotes wakefulness. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) relative to wakefulness, isoflurane decreases GABA levels in the pontine reticular formation; and (2) pontine reticular formation administration of drugs that increase or decrease GABA levels increases or decreases, respectively, isoflurane induction time. To test hypothesis 1, cats (n = 5) received a craniotomy and permanent electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram. Dialysis samples were collected from the pontine reticular formation during isoflurane anesthesia and wakefulness. GABA levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. For hypothesis 2, rats (n = 10) were implanted with a guide cannula aimed for the pontine reticular formation. Each rat received microinjections of Ringer's (vehicle control), the GABA uptake inhibitor nipecotic acid, and the GABA synthesis inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Rats were then anesthetized with isoflurane, and induction time was quantified as loss of righting reflex. Breathing rate was also measured. Relative to wakefulness, GABA levels were significantly decreased by isoflurane. Increased power in the electroencephalogram and decreased activity in the electromyogram caused by isoflurane covaried with pontine reticular formation GABA levels. Nipecotic acid and 3-mercaptopropionic acid significantly increased and decreased, respectively, isoflurane induction time. Nipecotic acid also increased breathing rate. Decreasing pontine reticular formation GABA levels comprises one mechanism by which isoflurane causes loss of consciousness, altered cortical excitability, muscular hypotonia, and decreased respiratory rate.

  5. Restless legs syndrome and central nervous system gamma-aminobutyric acid: preliminary associations with periodic limb movements in sleep and restless leg syndrome symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, John W; Schoerning, Laura; Platt, Sam; Jensen, J Eric

    2014-10-01

    Previous research has demonstrated abnormalities in glutamate and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) in the thalamus in individuals with restless legs syndrome (RLS) compared with healthy matched controls. However, levels of these transmitters in other RLS-related brain areas and levels of the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), have not been assessed. This study examined GABA, glutamate, and NAA levels in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), thalamus and cerebellum with the use of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 4 tesla (4 T) and Megapress difference-editing in 18 subjects with RLS and a matched control group without RLS. Actigraphy was performed on the nights before scans to assess periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS). Levels of GABA, glutamate, and NAA were no different between RLS and control subjects in any of the three voxels of interest. However, GABA levels were positively correlated with both PLM indices and RLS severity in the thalamus and negatively with both of these measures in the cerebellum in RLS subjects. In addition, NAA levels were higher in the ACC in RLS than in controls. Our preliminary data suggest that known cerebellar-thalamic interactions may modulate the intensity of RLS sensory and motor symptoms. In addition, anterior cingulate cortex may be associated with the affective components of the painful symptoms in this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of sourdough fermentation and pseudo-cereals and leguminous flours for the making of a functional bread enriched of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-02-28

    Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis PU1, previously selected for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), were used for sourdough fermentation of cereal, pseudo-cereal and leguminous flours. Chickpea, amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat were the flours most suitable to be enriched of GABA. The parameters of sourdough fermentation were optimized. Addition of 0.1mM pyridoxal phosphate, dough yield of 160, inoculum of 5 x 10(7)CFU/g of starter bacteria and fermentation for 24h at 30 degrees C were found to be the optimal conditions. A blend of buckwheat, amaranth, chickpea and quinoa flours (ratio 1:1:5.3:1) was selected and fermented with baker's yeast (non-conventional flour bread, NCB) or with Lb. plantarum C48 sourdough (non-conventional flour sourdough bread, NCSB) and compared to baker's yeast started wheat flour bread (WFB). NCSB had the highest concentration of free amino acids and GABA (ca. 4467 and 504 mg/kg, respectively). The concentration of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of NCSB bread was the highest, as well as the rate of in vitro starch hydrolysis was the lowest. Texture analysis showed that sourdough fermentation enhances several characteristics of NCSB with respect to NCB, thus approaching the features of WFB. Sensory analysis showed that sourdough fermentation allowed to get good palatability and overall taste appreciation.

  7. In vivo effects of ketamine on glutamate-glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carolyn I; Kegeles, Lawrence S; Levinson, Amanda; Ogden, R Todd; Mao, Xiangling; Milak, Matthew S; Vermes, Donna; Xie, Shan; Hunter, Liane; Flood, Pamela; Moore, Holly; Shungu, Dikoma C; Simpson, Helen B

    2015-08-30

    We previously reported the rapid and robust clinical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions in a proof-of-concept crossover trial in unmedicated adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the concurrent neurochemical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) during the clinical proof-of-concept crossover trial. Levels of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the excitatory neurochemicals glutamate+glutamine (Glx) were acquired in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), a region implicated in OCD pathology. Seventeen unmedicated OCD adults received two intravenous infusions at least 1 week apart, one of saline and one of ketamine, while lying supine in a 3.0 T GE MR scanner. The order of each infusion pair was randomized. Levels of GABA and Glx were measured in the MPFC before, during, and after each infusion and normalized to water (W). A mixed effects model found that MPFC GABA/W significantly increased over time in the ketamine compared with the saline infusion. In contrast, there were no significant differences in Glx/W between the ketamine and saline infusions. Together with earlier evidence of low cortical GABA in OCD, our findings suggest that models of OCD pathology should consider the role of GABAergic abnormalities in OCD symptomatology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel 4-(piperidin-4-yl)-1-hydroxypyrazoles as gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henriette A; Sander, Tommy; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard;

    2010-01-01

    A series of substituted 1-hydroxypyrazole analogues of the GABA(A) receptor partial agonist 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) have been synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. Several of the analogues displayed K(i) in the low nanomolar range at the native GABA(A) receptors and potent...... antagonism of the alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2) receptor. It appears that several regions situated in proximity to the core of the orthosteric binding site of the GABA(A) receptor are able to accommodate large hydrophobic substituents....

  9. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  10. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amajad Iqbal Kazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P < 0.05. Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%, hippocampus (17%, and cerebellum (33%. Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  12. Increased gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor function in the cerebral cortex of myoclonic calves with an hereditary deficit in glycine/strychnine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lummis, S C; Gundlach, A L; Johnston, G A; Harper, P A; Dodd, P R

    1990-08-01

    Inherited congenital myoclonus (ICM) of Poll Hereford cattle is a neurological disease in which there are severe alterations in spinal cord glycine-mediated neurotransmission. There is a specific and marked decrease, or defect, in glycine receptors and a significant increase in neuronal (synaptosomal) glycine uptake. Here we have examined the characteristics of the cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex, and demonstrate that the malfunction of the spinal cord inhibitory system is accompanied by a change in the major inhibitory system in the cerebral cortex. In synaptic membrane preparations from ICM calves, both high-and low-affinity binding sites for the GABA agonist [3H]muscimol were found (KD = 9.3 +/- 1.5 and 227 +/- 41 nM, respectively), whereas only the high-affinity site was detectable in controls (KD = 14.0 +/- 3.1 nM). The density and affinity of benzodiazepine agonist binding sites labelled by [3H]diazepam were unchanged, but there was an increase in GABA-stimulated benzodiazepine binding. The affinity for t-[3H]butylbicyclo-o-benzoate, a ligand that binds to the GABA-activated chloride channel, was significantly increased in ICM brain membranes (KD = 148 +/- 14 nM) compared with controls (KD = 245 +/- 33 nM). Muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake was 12% greater in microsacs prepared from ICM calf cerebral cortex, and the uptake was more sensitive to block by the GABA antagonist picrotoxin. The results show that the characteristics of the GABA receptor complex in ICM calf cortex differ from those in cortex from unaffected calves, a difference that is particularly apparent for the low-affinity, physiologically relevant GABA receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Selected Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Esters may Provide Analgesia for Some Central Pain Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Central pain is an enigmatic, intractable condition, related to destruction of thalamic areas, resulting in likely loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission mediated by GABA. It is proposed that treatment of central pain, a localized process, may be treated by GABA supplementation, like Parkinson’s disease and depression. At physiologic pH, GABA exists as a zwitterion that is poorly permeable to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Because the pH of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is acidic relative...

  14. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  15. Imidase catalyzing desymmetric imide hydrolysis forming optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Masutoshi; Hibi, Makoto; Shizawa, Hiroaki; Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Yasohara, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Ogawa, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The recent use of optically active 3-substituted gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs in human therapeutics has identified a need for an efficient, stereoselective method of their synthesis. Here, bacterial strains were screened for enzymes capable of stereospecific hydrolysis of 3-substituted glutarimides to generate (R)-3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides. The bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis NBRC13111 and Burkholderia phytofirmans DSM17436 were discovered to hydrolyze 3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutarimide (CGI) to (R)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutaric acid monoamide (CGM) with 98.1% enantiomeric excess (e.e.) and 97.5% e.e., respectively. B. phytofirmans DSM17436 could also hydrolyze 3-isobutyl glutarimide (IBI) to produce (R)-3-isobutyl glutaric acid monoamide (IBM) with 94.9% e.e. BpIH, an imidase, was purified from B. phytofirmans DSM17436 and found to generate (R)-CGM from CGI with specific activity of 0.95 U/mg. The amino acid sequence of BpIH had a 75% sequence identity to that of allantoinase from A. faecalis NBRC13111 (AfIH). The purified recombinant BpIH and AfIH catalyzed (R)-selective hydrolysis of CGI and IBI. In addition, a preliminary investigation of the enzymatic properties of BpIH and AfIH revealed that both enzymes were stable in the range of pH 6-10, with an optimal pH of 9.0, stable at temperatures below 40 °C, and were not metalloproteins. These results indicate that the use of this class of hydrolase to generate optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamide could simplify the production of specific chiral GABA analogs for drug therapeutics.

  16. Rosuvastatin attenuates mucus secretion in a murine model of chronic asthma by inhibiting the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Tao; ZHANG Wei; WANG Dao-xin; HUANG Ni-wen; BO Hong; DENG Wang; DENG Jia

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by reversible bronchial constriction,pulmonary inflammation and airway remodeling.Current standard therapies for asthma provide symptomatic control,but fail to target the underlying disease pathology.Furthermore,no therapeutic agent is effective in preventing airway remodeling.A substantial amount of evidence suggests that statins have anti-inflammatory properties and immunomodulatory activity.In this study,we investigated the effect of rosuvastatin on airway inflammation and its inhibitory mechanism in mucus hypersecretion in a murine model of chronic asthma.Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin to induce asthma.The recruitment of inflammatory cells into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lung tissues were measured by Diff-Quik staining and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining.ELISA was used for measuring the levels of IL-4,IL-5,IL-13 and TNF-α in BALF.Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining was used for mucus secretion.Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR)32 expression was measured by means of immunohistochemistry,reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting.Results Rosuvastatin reduced the number of total inflammatory cells,lymphocytes,macrophages,neutrophils,and eosinophils recruited into BALF,the levels of IL-4,IL-5,IL-13 and TNF-α in BALF,along with the histological mucus index (HMI) and GABAAR β2 expression.Changes occurred in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusions Based on its ability to reduce the inflammatory response and mucus hypersecretion by regulating GABAAR activity in a murine model of chronic asthma,rosuvastatin may be a useful therapeutic agent for treatment of asthma.

  17. Uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-glutamic acid by synaptosomes from postmortem human cerebral cortex: multiple sites, sodium dependence and effect of tissue preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, P R; Watson, W E; Morrison, M M; Johnston, G A; Bird, E D; Cowburn, R F; Hardy, J A

    1989-06-26

    The uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamic acid by synaptosomes prepared from frozen postmortem human brain was shown to be effected via distinct high and low affinity sites. At approximately 17 h postmortem delay, the kinetic parameters for GABA uptake were: high affinity site, Km 7.1 +/- 2.5 microM, Vmax 18.7 +/- 4.8 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein; low affinity site, Km 2 +/- 1 mM, Vmax 425 +/- 250 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein (means +/- S.E.M., n = 13). Kinetic parameters for L-glutamate uptake were: high affinity site, Km 7.5 +/- 1.0 microM, Vmax 85 +/- 8 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein; low affinity site, Km 1.8 +/- 1.2 mM. Vmax 780 +/- 175 nmol.min-1 per 100 mg protein (n = 11). A detailed kinetic analysis of high affinity GABA uptake was performed over a range of sodium ion concentrations. The results were consistent with a coupling ratio of one Na+ ion to one GABA molecule; a similar result was found with rat brain synaptosomes. However, rat and human synaptosomes differed in the degree to which the substrate affinity of the high affinity GABA uptake site varied with decreasing Na+ ion concentration. High affinity GABA uptake was markedly affected by the method used to freeze and divide the tissue, but did not vary greatly in different cortical regions. There was some decline of high affinity GABA uptake activity with postmortem delay, apparently due to a loss of sites rather than a change in site affinity.

  18. Searches for ttH and tH with H \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Cinca, Diane; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of the latest results concerning ttH with Higgs decaying to gamma gamma for 13 TeV data. Results are from both ATLAS and CMS. The talk is planned for Top2016, September 19-23, in Olomouc.

  19. The gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibits morphine sensitization by decreasing the dopamine level in rat nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhenyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated morphine exposure can induce behavioral sensitization. There are evidences have shown that central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA system is involved in morphine dependence. However, the effect of a GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats is unclear. Methods We used morphine-induced behavioral sensitization model in rat to investigate the effects of baclofen on behavioral sensitization. Moreover, dopamine release in the shell of the nucleus accumbens was evaluated using microdialysis assay in vivo. Results The present study demonstrated that morphine challenge (3 mg/kg, s.c. obviously enhanced the locomotor activity following 4-day consecutive morphine administration and 3-day withdrawal period, which indicated the expression of morphine sensitization. In addition, chronic treatment with baclofen (2.5, 5 mg/kg significantly inhibited the development of morphine sensitization. It was also found that morphine challenge 3 days after repeated morphine administration produced a significant increase of extracellular dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, chronic treatment with baclofen decreased the dopamine release induced by morphine challenge. Conclusions Our results indicated that gamma-aminobutyric acid system plays an important role in the morphine sensitization in rat and suggested that behavioral sensitization is a promising model to study the mechanism underlying drug abuse.

  20. Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors functional regulation during enhanced liver cell proliferation by GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, Joy; Pretty, Mary Abraham; Anitha, Malat; Paulose, Cheramadathikudyil Skaria

    2013-09-05

    Liver is one of the major organs in vertebrates and hepatocytes are damaged by many factors. The liver cell maintenance and multiplication after injury and treatment gained immense interest. The present study investigated the role of Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) coupled with chitosan nanoparticles in the functional regulation of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors mediated cell signaling mechanisms, extend of DNA methylation and superoxide dismutase activity during enhanced liver cell proliferation. Liver injury was achieved by partial hepatectomy of male Wistar rats and the GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatments were given intraperitoneally. The experimental groups were sham operated control (C), partially hepatectomised rats with no treatment (PHNT), partially hepatectomised rats with GABA chitosan nanoparticle (GCNP), 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (SCNP) and a combination of GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (GSCNP) treatments. In GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle treated group there was a significant decrease (Pchitosan nanoparticles induced liver cell proliferation which has therapeutic significance in liver disease management.

  1. Study on koji with high content of gamma-aminobutyric%富含γ-氧基丁酸清酒酒曲的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴岱熹; 吴非

    2012-01-01

    The varieties of rice and mold for making the koji with high content of gamma-aminobutyric(GABA)and high saccharifying enzyme activities were selected.Aspergillus oryzae 3.800 and rice from Shangzhi were selected as optimal combination,and the optimizing process conditions for koji to produce more GABA were studied.The results suggested that Aspergillus oryzae 3.800 was cultured for 6 days at 30℃ in PDA medium,and then put into steamed rice with 40mg/100g spore amount after rices were soaked in the water with ?.5mg/mL vitamin C and 2.0mg/mL sodium glutamate overnight,and more GABA was obtained after the koji was cultivated in the variable temperatures,just 30℃ for 20h,32℃ for 4h,35℃ for 14h,38℃ for 8h.6.936mg/g and 0.439mg/mL GABA were got in the koji and sake respectively in the above conditions.%以筛选出的霉菌和大米为原料制作富含γ-氨基丁酸同时具有较高糖化酶活力的清酒酒曲。通过筛选确定了米曲霉3.800和尚志长香米为最佳组合,并对其酒曲产γ-氨基丁酸条件进行了优化。最终结果为将大米浸泡在含有7.5mg/mL Vc和2.0mg/mL L-谷氨酸钠水溶液中一夜后蒸熟,然后将30%下培养6d的米曲霉3.800以40mg/100g蒸米的接种量接种到蒸米中制作酒曲,酒曲采用变温培养,即在30℃培养20h,32℃培养4h,35℃培养14h,38℃培养8h,以此得到的酒曲中γ-氨基丁酸含量为6.936mg/g酒曲,清酒中含量为0.439mg/mL。

  2. Chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer magnetic resonance imaging to map gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, myoinositol, glycine, and asparagine: Phantom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jang-Hoon; Kim, Hyug-Gi; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Jeong, Ha-Kyu; Lee, Soo Yeol; Jahng, Geon-Ho

    2017-03-01

    The physical and technical development of chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using clinical 3 T MRI was explored with the goal of mapping asparagine (Asn), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and myoinositol (MI), which exist in the brain. Phantoms with nine different conditions at concentrations of 10, 30, and 50 mM and pH values of 5.6, 6.2, and 7.4 were prepared for the five target molecules to evaluate the dependence of the CEST effect in the concentration, the pH, and the amplitude of the applied radiofrequency field B1. CEST images in the offset frequency range of ±6 parts per million (ppm) were acquired using a pulsed radio-frequency saturation scheme with a clinical 3 T MRI system. A voxel-based main magnetic field B0 inhomogeneity correction, where B0 is the center frequency offset at zero ppm, was performed by using the spline interpolation method to fit the full Z-spectrum to estimate the center frequency. A voxel-based CEST asymmetry map was calculated to evaluate amide (-NH), amine (-NH2), and hydroxyl (-OH) groups for the five target molecules. The CEST effect for Glu, GABA, and Gly clearly increased with increasing concentrations. The CEST effect for MI was minimal, with no noticeable differences at different concentrations. The CEST effect for Glu and Gly increased with increasing acidity. The highest CEST asymmetry for GABA was observed at pH 6.2. The CEST effect for Glu, GABA, and Gly increased with increasing B1 amplitude. For all target molecules, the CEST effect for the human 3 T MRI system increased with increasing concentration and B1 amplitude, but varied with pH, depending on the characteristics of the molecules. The CEST effect for MI may be not suitable with clinical MRI systems. These results show that CEST imaging in the brain with the amine protons by using 3 T MRI is possible for several neuronal diseases.

  3. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, or {beta}{sub 3} subunit of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culia, C.T.; Stubbs, L.J.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3} subunits of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telomere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors ({approximately} 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. The authors have previously suggested that deficiency of the {beta}{sub 3} subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report they describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the {gamma}{sub 3} transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the {gamma}{sub 3} nor {alpha}{sub 5} transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three ({gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3}) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A {gamma}-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  4. Successful combination immunotherapy of anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody-positive encephalitis with extensive multifocal brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Yuki; Okada, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Mari; Yamaguchi, Keiji

    2017-08-31

    A 78-year old woman who presented with akinetic mutism was admitted to our hospital. Brain MRI showed multifocal increased T2/FLAIR signal with extensive cortical-subcortical involvement. We suspected autoimmune encephalitis and the patient received methylprednisolone pulse. Her conscious level gradually recovered, but later relapsed again and presented with refractory status epilepticus. We treated her with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and pulsed cyclophosphamide, with satisfactory response. A brain biopsy showed perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates and reactive gliosis. Anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibodies test came back to be positive after her recovery, and the diagnosis of anti-GABAA receptor antibody-positive encephalitis was made. This is a very rare case where brain biopsies were performed in a patient with anti-GABAA receptor antibody-positive encephalitis.

  5. Production of yogurt with enhanced levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and valuable nutrients using lactic acid bacteria and germinated soybean extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Bum; Oh, Suk-Heung

    2007-05-01

    Yogurt with high levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), free amino acids and isoflavones was developed using lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and germinated soybean extract. Fermented soya milk (GABA soya yogurt) produced with starter and substrate had the GABA concentration of 424.67 microg/gDW, whereas fermented milk produced by a conventional method had GABA less than 1.5 microg/gDW. The GABA soya yogurt also contained significantly high levels of free amino acids and isoflavones compared with other conventional yogurts. The results suggested that the Lactobacillus brevis OPY-1 and germinated soybean possessed a prospect to be applied in dairy and other health products with high nutritive values and functional properties.

  6. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  7. [Influence of exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid contents in roots of melon seedling under hypoxia stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Li, Jing-Rui; Xia, Qing-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Hong-Bo

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigated the influence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid content under hypoxia stress by accurately controlling the level of dissolved oxygen in hydroponics, using the roots of melon 'Xiyu 1' seedlings as the test material. The results showed that compared with the control, the growth of roots was inhibited seriously under hypoxia stress. Meanwhile, the hypoxia-treated roots had significantly higher activities of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as well as the contents of GABA, pyruvic acid, alanine (Ala) and aspartic acid (Asp). But the contents of glutamic acid (Glu) and alpha-keto glutaric acid in roots under hypoxia stress was obviously lower than those of the control. Exogenous treatment with GABA alleviated the inhibition effect of hypoxia stress on root growth, which was accompanied by an increase in the contents of endogenous GABA, Glu, alpha-keto glutaric acid and Asp. Furthermore, under hypoxia stress, the activities of GAD, GDH, GOGAT, GS, ALT, AST as well as the contents of pyruvic acid and Ala significantly decreased in roots treated with GABA. However, adding GABA and viny-gamma-aminobutyric acid (VGB) reduced the alleviation effect of GABA on melon seedlings under hypoxia stress. The results suggested that absorption of GABA by roots could alleviate the injury of hypoxia stress to melon seedlings. This meant that GABA treatment allows the normal physiological metabolism under hypoxia by inhibiting the GAD activity through feedback and maintaining higher Glu content as well as the bal- ance of carbon and nitrogen.

  8. New Scalar Contributions to $h\\to Z\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Shu; Huang, Da; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the decay rate of $h\\to Z\\gamma$ by including the contributions from new scalars with arbitrary quantum numbers of the weak isospin ($T$) and hypercharge ($Y$) in the standard model. We find that our general formula for the decay rate of $h\\to Z\\gamma$ matches with that for $h\\to \\gamma\\gamma$ in the limit of $m_Z=0$, but it is different from those in the literature. To illustrate our result, by taking the current $2\\sigma$ excess of the $h\\to \\gamma\\gamma$rate measured by the LHC, we examine the corresponding shift for the $Z\\gamma$ decay channel due to the new scalar. We show that the enhancement or reduction of the $h\\to Z\\gamma$ rate only depends on the relative size of $T$ and the absolute value of $Y$. Explicitly, we predict $0.76gamma}\\equiv \\Gamma(h\\to Z\\gamma)/\\Gamma_{SM}(h\\to Z\\gamma)<2.05$ by imposing the observed range of $1.5gamma\\gamma}\\equiv \\Gamma(h\\to Z\\gamma\\gamma)/\\Gamma_{SM}(h\\to\\gamma\\gamma)<2$, which is independent of the number of multiplets and the c...

  9. 利用茶叶制备γ-氨基丁酸的工艺研究%Study on the Preparation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid from Tea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩玮; 杨芙莲; 董文宾; 冯丽琴

    2016-01-01

    采用邻苯二甲醛柱前衍生高效液相色谱法对富硒茶中γ-氨基丁酸的含量进行测定,利用Intertsil ODS-C18色谱柱,以15 mmol/L的乙酸钠,纯乙腈为流动相进行梯度洗脱。以γ-氨基丁酸质量浓度X(mg/mL)对峰面积Y(mAU·min)作回归曲线,得回归方程Y=3488.4X+23.525,相关系数为0.9965。选用真空处理和谷氨酸钠浸渍处理两种方法对茶叶中γ-氨基丁酸进行富集,并对比富集效果。研究表明,在真空处理条件下处理10 h,富硒茶中γ-氨基丁酸的富集效果最好,γ-氨基丁酸含量增至0.875 mg/mL,是对照品的9.5倍。富硒茶在1%谷氨酸钠溶液浸渍12 h后效果最好,γ-氨基丁酸含量为0.624 mg/mL,是对照品的6.8倍。%High performance liquid chromatography method with o-phthaldialdelhyde (OPA) pre-colomn derivatization was used to measureγ-aminobutyric acid content in Se tea. Separation of GABA was carried out on Intertsil ODS-C18 column with the gradient elution of 15 mmol/L sodium acetate and pure acetonitrile. Inγ-aminobutyric acid concentration X (mg/mL) on the peak area Y (mAU·min) draw a regression curve, the re-gression equation was Y=3 488.4X+23.525, with correlation coefficient of 0.996 5. Tea was processed with vacuum and impregnation with a solution of sodium glutamate to enrichγ-aminobutyric acid, and compared with two enrichment effects. Studies had shown that under vacuum conditions, when Se tea was deal with 10 h,γ-aminobutyric acid enrichment effect was the best,γ-aminobutyric acid content increased to 0.875 mg/mL, which was 9.5 times of the reference. After being impregnated with a solution of 1%sodium glutamate 12 h,γ-aminobutyric acid enrichment effect was the best, its content was 0.624 mg/mL, which was 6.8 times of the ref-erence.

  10. Silencing gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor alpha 1 subunit expression and outward potassium current in developing cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Bo; Jiang Li; Jian Li; Xingfang Li; Kaihui Xing

    2011-01-01

    We used RNA interference (RNAi) to disrupt synthesis of the cortical neuronal γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAAR) α1 in rats during development, and measured outward K+ currents during neuronal electrical activity using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Three pairs of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for GABAAR α1 subunit were designed using OligoEngine RNAi software. This siRNA was found to effectively inhibited GABAAR α1 mRNA expression in cortical neuronal culture in vitro, but did not significantly affect neuronal survival. Outward K+ currents were decreased, indicating that GABAAR α1 subunits in developing neurons participate in neuronal function by regulating outward K+ current.

  11. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  12. Progress in studies on the role of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor in convulsion: a short review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xing-fang; LIU Li-qun

    2012-01-01

    Convulsion is the medical condition where body muscles contract and relax rapidly and repeatedly,resulting in an uncontrolled shaking of the body.The impaired inhibition of electrical activity in the brain is one of leading causes of convulsion.y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS).GABA acts at inhibitory synapses in the brain by binding to specific transmembrane receptors in the plasma membrane of both pre- and post-synaptic neuronal processes.GABAA receptor (GABAAR) is the most important inhibitory receptor,and is the target receptor of anticonvulsant drugs in the clinic.In this review,we describe GABAergic signaling mediated by GABAAR,the mechanisms of GABAAR and their expression,and the progress being made on understanding the role of GABAAR in convulsion with emphasis on the association between GABAAR mutations or GABAAR subunit expression and convulsion.We also describe progress of anticonvulsant drugs based on the GABAAR.

  13. On fuzzy h-ideals in h-regular $\\Gamma$-hemiring and h-duo $\\Gamma$-hemiring

    CERN Document Server

    Sardar, S K

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, fuzzy h-bi-ideals, fuzzy h-quasi-ideals and fuzzy h-interior ideals of a $\\Gamma$-hemiring are studied and some related properties are investi- gated. The notions of h-intra-hemiregularity and h-quasi-hemiregularity of a $\\Gamma$-hemiring are introduced and studied along with h-hemiregularity and their characterizations in terms of fuzzy h-ideals are also obtained. The concept of fuzzy h-duo $\\Gamma$-hemiring is introduced and some of its characterizations are obtained.

  14. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective: The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR and GBR-derived gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design: Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD, HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4 were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results: Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions: These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  15. Co-localization of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate in Neurons of the Spider Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian-Fine, Ruth; Meisner, Shannon; Torkkeli, Päivi H; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2015-12-01

    Spider sensory neurons with cell bodies close to various sensory organs are innervated by putative efferent axons from the central nervous system (CNS). Light and electronmicroscopic imaging of immunolabeled neurons has demonstrated that neurotransmitters present at peripheral synapses include γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and octopamine. Moreover, electrophysiological studies show that these neurotransmitters modulate the sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons. Here, we undertook immunocytochemical investigations to characterize GABA and glutamate-immunoreactive neurons in three-dimensional reconstructions of the spider CNS. We document that both neurotransmitters are abundant in morphologically distinct neurons throughout the CNS. Labeling for the vesicular transporters, VGAT for GABA and VGLUT for glutamate, showed corresponding patterns, supporting the specificity of antibody binding. Whereas some neurons displayed strong immunolabeling, others were only weakly labeled. Double labeling showed that a subpopulation of weakly labeled neurons present in all ganglia expresses both GABA and glutamate. Double labeled, strongly and weakly labeled GABA and glutamate immunoreactive axons were also observed in the periphery along muscle fibers and peripheral sensory neurons. Electron microscopic investigations showed presynaptic profiles of various diameters with mixed vesicle populations innervating muscle tissue as well as sensory neurons. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) sensory neurons and muscle fibers are innervated by morphologically distinct, centrally located GABA- and glutamate immunoreactive neurons; (2) a subpopulation of these neurons may co-release both neurotransmitters; and (3) sensory neurons and muscles are innervated by all of these neurochemically and morphologically distinct types of neurons. The biochemical diversity of presynaptic innervation may contribute to how spiders filter natural stimuli and coordinate appropriate response

  16. A functional assay to measure postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidB responses in cultured spinal cord neurons: Heterologous regulation of the same K+ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamatchi, G.L.; Ticku, M.K. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The stimulation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors leads to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials due to the influx of K(+)-ions. This was studied biochemically, in vitro in mammalian cultured spinal cord neurons by using 86Rb as a substitute for K+. (-)-Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 86Rb-influx. This effect was stereospecific and blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists like CGP 35 348 (3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphonic acid) and phaclofen. Apart from the GABAB receptors, both adenosine via adenosine1 receptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) via 5-HT1 alpha agonists also increased the 86Rb-influx. These agonists failed to show any additivity between them when they were combined in their maximal concentration. In addition, their effect was antagonized specifically by their respective antagonists without influencing the others. These findings suggest the presence of GABAB, adenosine1 and 5-HT1 alpha receptors in the cultured spinal cord neurons, which exhibit a heterologous regulation of the same K(+)-channel. The effect of these agonists were antagonized by phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, an activator of protein kinase C, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. This suggests that these agonists by acting on their own receptors converge on the same K(+)-channel through the Gi/Go proteins. In summary, we have developed a biochemical functional assay for studying and characterizing GABAB synaptic pharmacology in vitro, using spinal cord neurons.

  17. Postnatal maturation of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and B-mediated inhibition in the CA3 hippocampal region of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiarsa, J L; McLean, H; Congar, P; Leinekugel, X; Khazipov, R; Tseeb, V; Ben-Ari, Y

    1995-03-01

    In the adult central nervous system, GABAergic synaptic inhibition is known to play a crucial role in preventing the spread of excitatory glutamatergic activity. This inhibition is achieved by a membrane hyperpolarization through the activation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) and GABAB receptors. In addition, GABA also depress transmitter release acting through presynaptic GABAB receptors. Despite the wealth of data regarding the role of GABA in regulating the degree of synchronous activity in the adult, little is known about GABA transmission during early stages of development. In the following we report that GABA mediates most of the excitatory drive at early stages of development in the hippocampal CA3 region. Activation of GABAA receptors induces a depolarization and excitation of immature CA3 pyramidal neurons and increases intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i)] during the first postnatal week of life. During the same developmental period, the postsynaptic GABAB-mediated inhibition is poorly developed. In contrast, the presynaptic GABAB-mediated inhibition is well developed at birth and plays a crucial role in modulating the postsynaptic activity by depressing transmitter release at early postnatal stages. We have also shown that GABA plays a trophic role in the neuritic outgrowth of cultured hippocampal neurons.

  18. Somatosensory regulation of serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala is mediated via corticotropin releasing factor and gamma-aminobutyric acid in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Ryota; Shimoju, Rie; Shibata, Hideshi; Kurosawa, Mieko

    2016-10-15

    Noxious cutaneous stimulation increases, whereas innocuous cutaneous stimulation decreases serotonin (5-HT) release in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in anesthetized rats. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to those responses. Release of 5-HT in the CeA was monitored by microdialysis before and after 10-min stimulation by pinching or stroking. Increased 5-HT release in the CeA in response to pinching was abolished by CRF2 receptor antagonism in the DRN. Decreased 5-HT release in the CeA in response to stroking was abolished by either CRF1 receptor antagonism or GABAA receptor antagonism in the DRN. These results suggest that opposite responses of 5-HT release in the CeA to noxious versus innocuous stimulation of the skin are due to separate contributions of CRF2, CRF1 and GABAA receptors in the DRN.

  19. Midazolam inhibits the formation of amyloid fibrils and GM1 ganglioside-rich microdomains in presynaptic membranes through the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Arima, Hajime; Sugiura, Takeshi; Hirate, Hiroyuki; Kusama, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Sobue, Kazuya

    2015-02-20

    Recent studies have suggested that a positive correlation exists between surgical interventions performed under general anesthesia and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the late postoperative period. It has been reported that amyloid β-protein (Αβ) fibrillogenesis, which is closely related to AD, is accelerated by exposure to anesthetics. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain uncertain. This study was designed to investigate whether the anesthetic midazolam affects Αβ fibrillogenesis, and if so, whether it acts through GM1 ganglioside (GM1) on the neuronal surface. Midazolam treatment decreased GM1 expression in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomains of neurons, and these effects were regulated by the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor. Midazolam inhibited Αβ fibril formation from soluble Αβ on the neuronal surface. In addition, midazolam suppressed GM1-induced fibril formation in a cell-free system. Moreover, midazolam inhibited the formation of Αβ assemblies in synaptosomes isolated from aged mouse brains. These finding suggested that midazolam has direct and indirect inhibitory effects on Αβ fibrillogenesis.

  20. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1, was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  1. Mass transfer characterization of gamma-aminobutyric acid production by Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003: encapsulation improves its survival under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divyashri, Gangaraju; Prapulla, Siddalingaiya Gurudatt

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by free and Ca-alginate encapsulated cells of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003 was investigated. Mass transfer rates characterizing the GABA production process using encapsulated cells were investigated. Experiments were performed to investigate external film and internal pore diffusion mass transfer rates. The Damkohler and Thiele analysis provides a good description of external film and internal pore diffusion resistances, respectively. The experiments revealed that the external film effects could be neglected but the process is affected to the greater extent by internal mass transfer effects and was found to be the principal rate-controlling step. Protective effect of encapsulation on cell survivability was tested under digestive environment, when challenged to salivary α-amylase, simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid. Viability of encapsulated cells was significantly higher under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions and could produce higher GABA than those observed with free cells. The results indicate that the Ca-alginate encapsulated probiotics could effectively be delivered to the colonic site for effective inhibitory action.

  2. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquifino, A.I. [Dept. de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular III, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A. [Lab. de Toxicologia, Universidad de Vigo, Orense (Spain)

    2001-05-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  3. Influence of cold stress on contents of soluble sugars, vitamin C and free amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Eun; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Pil Joo; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-01-15

    The contents of soluble sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose and raffinose), vitamin C and free amino acids (34 compounds, essential and non-essential) were quantified in open-field and greenhouse-grown spinaches in response to cold stress using liquid chromatography. In general, greenhouse cultivation produced nutritionally high value spinach in a shorter growing period, where the soluble sugars, vitamin C and total amino acids concentrations, including essential were in larger amounts compared to those grown in open-field scenarios. Further, low temperature exposure of spinach during a shorter growth period resulted in the production of spinach with high sucrose, ascorbate, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine content, and these constitute the most important energy/nutrient sources. In conclusion, cultivation of spinach in greenhouse at a low temperature (4-7°C) and exposure for a shorter period (7-21days) before harvest is recommended. This strategy will produce a high quality product that people can eat.

  4. Effects of Traumatic Stress Induced in the Juvenile Period on the Expression of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Type A Subunits in Adult Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Yan Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found that early traumatic experience significantly increases the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA deficits were proposed to be implicated in development of PTSD, but the alterations of GABA receptor A (GABAAR subunits induced by early traumatic stress have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, previous studies suggested that exercise could be more effective than medications in reducing severity of anxiety and depression but the mechanism is unclear. This study used inescapable foot-shock to induce PTSD in juvenile rats and examined their emotional changes using open-field test and elevated plus maze, memory changes using Morris water maze, and the expression of GABAAR subunits (γ2, α2, and α5 in subregions of the brain in the adulthood using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABAAR subunits changes induced by juvenile trauma in the pathogenesis of subsequent PTSD in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of exercise for 6 weeks and benzodiazepine (clonazepam for 2 weeks. This study found that juvenile traumatic stress induced chronic anxiety and spatial memory loss and reduced expression of GABAAR subunits in the adult rat brains. Furthermore, exercise led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment.

  5. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

  6. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  7. Efficient gamma-aminobutyric acid bioconversion by employing synthetic complex between glutamate decarboxylase and glutamate/GABA antiporter in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Ko, Ji-seun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a precursor of one of the most promising heat-resistant biopolymers, Nylon-4, and can be produced by the decarboxylation of monosodium glutamate (MSG). In this study, a synthetic protein complex was applied to improve the GABA conversion in engineered Escherichia coli. Complexes were constructed by assembling a single protein-protein interaction domain SH3 to the glutamate decarboxylase (GadA and GadB) and attaching a cognate peptide ligand to the glutamate/GABA antiporter (GadC) at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the 233rd amino acid residue. When GadA and GadC were co-overexpressed via the C-terminus complex, a GABA concentration of 5.65 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l MSG, which corresponds to a GABA yield of 93 %. A significant increase of the GABA productivity was also observed where the GABA productivity increased 2.5-fold in the early culture period due to the introduction of the synthetic protein complex. The GABA pathway efficiency and GABA productivity were enhanced by the introduction of the complex between Gad and glutamate/GABA antiporter.

  8. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway.

  9. Structure-activity relationships in a new series of insecticidally active dioxatricycloalkenes derived by structural comparison of the GABA (. gamma. -aminobutyric acid) antagonists bicycloorthocarboxylates and endosulfan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Mochida, Kazuo; Nakamura, Toshiie (Shimane Univ. (Japan)); Matsumura, Fumio (Univ. of California, Davis (USA))

    1990-05-01

    To study structural requirements for picrotoxinin-type GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) antagonists to interact with the receptor site, 5-substituted 4,6-dioxatricyclo(7.2.1.0{sup 2,8})dodec-10-enes and related compounds were prepared and examined for their insecticidal activity and potency in displacing ({sup 35}S)tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Compounds with high insecticidal activity possessed a phenyl group with an electron-withdrawing para substituent, a cycloalkyl group, or a C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} straight-chain alkyl group at the 5-position. The effect of the 5-substituents on insecticidal activity was very similar to that of the 1-substituents of the bicyloorthocarboxylate GABA antagonists. Representative dioxatricycloalkenes displaced the binding of the GABA antagonist ({sup 35}S)TBPS to housefly head membranes by 29-53% at 10 {mu}M. X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrated that this class of compounds had structures superimposable on those of 4-tert-butylbicycloorthocarboxylates. These findings indicate that the dioxatricycloalkenes and some other analogues occupy the picrotoxinin binding site in such a way that the fourth interacting subsite of the receptor site accommodates the 5-substituent.

  10. Dark Matter versus h into gamma gamma and h into gamma Z with supersymmetric triplets

    CERN Document Server

    Arina, Chiara; Nardini, Germano

    2014-01-01

    The Triplet extension of the MSSM (TMSSM) alleviates the little hierarchy problem and provides a significant enhancement of the loop-induced diphoton rate of the lightest CP-even Higgs h. In this paper we pursue the analysis of the TMSSM Higgs phenomenology by computing for the first time the h into Z + gamma decay. Interestingly we find that the rates of loop-induced decays are correlated and their signal strengths can rise up to 40% - 60% depending on the channel. We furthermore study the dark matter phenomenology of the TMSSM. The lightest neutralino is a good dark matter candidate in two regions. The first one is related to the Higgs and Z resonances and the LSP is mostly Bino. The second one is achieved for a mass larger than 90 GeV and the LSP behaves as the well-tempered neutralino. An advantage of the triplet contribution is that the well-tempered neutralino can be a Bino-Triplino mixture, relieving the problem of achieving M_2 ~ M_1 in unified scenarios. The dark matter constraints strongly affect th...

  11. Effect of brain-derived neurotropic factor released from hypoxic astrocytes on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function in normal hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes can release increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor during cerebral ischemia, but it is unclear whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor affects γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function in normal neurons. Results from this study demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid at 100 μmol/L concentration raised the intracellular calcium level in neurons treated with medium from cultured hypoxic astrocytes, and the rise in calcium level could be inhibited by γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor antagonist bicuculline or brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor antagonist k252a. Γ-aminobutyric acid type A-gated current induced by 100 μmol/L γ-aminobutyric acid was in an inward direction in physiological conditions, but shifted to the outward direction in neurons when treated with the medium from cultured hypoxic astrocytes, and this effect could be inhibited by k252a. The reverse potential was shifted leftward to -93 Mv, which could be inhibited by k252a and Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter inhibitor bumetanide. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was released from hypoxic astrocytes at a high level. It shifted the reverse potential of γ-aminobutyric acid type A-gated currents leftward in normal neurons by enhancing the function of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter, and caused γ-aminobutyric acid to exert an excitatory effect by activating γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor.

  12. alpha2-gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors are the molecular substrates mediating precipitation of narcosis but not of sedation by the combined use of diazepam and alcohol in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täuber, Marcus; Calame-Droz, Elisabeth; Prut, Laetitia; Rudolph, Uwe; Crestani, Florence

    2003-11-01

    Classical benzodiazepines such as diazepam are widely used tranquillisers and hypnotics in various neuropsychiatric diseases including alcohol-related disorders. One of the major drawbacks of benzodiazepine therapy, however, is an exacerbation of the sedative and hypnotic effects associated with alcohol intake, even at low doses. Even though the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor complex is a common target for the actions of both classes of drugs, the molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced pharmacological properties of the combined use of benzodiazepines and alcohol remain to be identified. The present experiments aimed at clarifying which of the GABAA receptor subtypes mediate the augmented hypnotic-like and sedative effects of combined diazepam and alcohol using the righting reflex and motor activity assays, respectively, in histidine-to-arginine point mutated mice that possess diazepam-insensitive alpha1-, alpha2-, alpha3- or alpha5-GABAA receptors. The combination of diazepam (2 or 3 mg/kg) and ethanol (3 g/kg) induced loss of righting reflex with a significantly dose-dependent increase of the latency to its full recovery in wild-type, alpha1(H101R), alpha3(H126R) and alpha5(H105R) but not in alpha2(H101R) mice. A combined treatment with diazepam (1 mg/kg) and ethanol (2.5 g/kg) precipitated motor inhibition similarly in wild-type and alpha2(H101R) mice. Responsiveness of the alpha2(H101R) mice to ethanol alone was similar to that of wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that induction of loss of righting reflex by combined diazepam and alcohol is closely dependent on the activation of the alpha2-GABAA receptors by the benzodiazepine whereas precipitation of sedation involves GABAA receptors other than the alpha2-GABAA receptors.

  13. In vivo simultaneous monitoring of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and L-aspartate using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection: Analytical developments and in vitro/in vivo validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvinet, Valérie; Parrot, Sandrine; Benturquia, Nadia; Bravo-Moratón, Eva; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2003-09-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and L-aspartate (L-Asp) are three major amino acid neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for the separation of these three neurotransmitters in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. Molecules were tagged on their primary amine function with the fluorogene agent naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA), and, after separation by micellar electrokinetic chromatography, were detected by laser-induced fluorescence using a 442 nm helium-cadmium laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of derivatized neurotransmitters in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical basis. The separation of GABA, Glu, and L-Asp takes less than 10 min by using a 75 mmol/L borate buffer, pH 9.2, containing 70 mmol/L SDS and 10 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and + 25 kV voltage. The detection limits were 3, 15 nmol/L and, 5 nmol/L for GABA, Glu, and L-Asp, respectively. Moreover, submicroliter samples can be analyzed. This method allows a simple, rapid and accurate measurement of the three amino acid neurotransmitters for the in vivo brain monitoring using microdialysis sampling.

  14. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres D. Ramirez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacologic properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam (0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally [PO] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.25 g/kg induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development.

  15. Kisspeptin increases gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic transmission directly to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in an estradiol-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2010-01-01

    GnRH neurons are the final central pathway controlling fertility. Kisspeptin potently activates GnRH release via G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54). GnRH neurons express GPR54, and kisspeptin can act directly; however, GPR54 is broadly expressed, suggesting indirect actions are possible. Transsynaptic mechanisms are involved in estradiol-induced potentiation of GnRH neuron response to kisspeptin. To investigate these mechanisms, separate whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were performed of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and glutamatergic transmission to GnRH neurons in brain slices before and during kisspeptin treatment. To determine whether estradiol alters the effect of kisspeptin on synaptic transmission, mice were ovariectomized and either left with no further treatment (OVX) or treated with estradiol implants (OVX+E). Cells were first studied in the morning when estradiol exerts negative feedback. Kisspeptin increased frequency and amplitude of GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) in GnRH neurons from OVX+E mice. Blocking action potentials eliminated the effect on frequency, indicating presynaptic actions. Amplitude changes were due to postsynaptic actions. Kisspeptin also increased frequency of glutamatergic excitatory PSCs in cells from OVX+E animals. Kisspeptin did not affect either GABAergic or glutamatergic transmission to GnRH neurons in cells from OVX mice, indicating effects on transmission are estradiol dependent. In contrast to stimulatory effects on GABAergic PSC frequency during negative feedback, kisspeptin had no effect during positive feedback. These data suggest estradiol enables kisspeptin-mediated increases in GABA and glutamate transmission to GnRH neurons. Furthermore, the occlusion of the response during positive feedback implies one consequence of estradiol positive feedback is an increase in transmission to GnRH neurons mediated by endogenous kisspeptin.

  16. A putrescine-inducible pathway comprising PuuE-YneI in which gamma-aminobutyrate is degraded into succinate in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Kato, Kenji; Asada, Kei; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) is metabolized to succinic semialdehyde by GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT), and the succinic semialdehyde is subsequently oxidized to succinate by succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). In Escherichia coli, there are duplicate GABA-ATs (GabT and PuuE) and duplicate SSADHs (GabD and YneI). While GabT and GabD have been well studied previously, the characterization and expression analysis of PuuE and YneI are yet to be investigated. By analyzing the amino acid profiles in cells of DeltapuuE and/or DeltagabT mutants, this study demonstrated that PuuE plays an important role in GABA metabolism in E. coli cells. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PuuE and GabT is 67.4%, and it was biochemically demonstrated that the catalytic center of GabT is conserved as an amino acid residue important for the enzymatic activity in PuuE as Lys-247. However, the regulation of expression of PuuE is significantly different from that of GabT. PuuE is induced by the addition of putrescine to the medium and is repressed by succinate and low aeration conditions; in contrast, GabT is almost constitutive. Similarly, YneI is induced by putrescine, while GabD is not. For E. coli, PuuE is important for utilization of putrescine as a sole nitrogen source and both PuuE and YneI are important for utilization of putrescine as a sole carbon source. The results demonstrate that the PuuE-YneI pathway was a putrescine-inducible GABA degradation pathway for utilizing putrescine as a nutrient source.

  17. Calretinin in the entorhinal cortex of the rat: distribution, morphology, ultrastructure of neurons, and co-localization with gamma-aminobutyric acid and parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouterlood, F G; van Denderen, J C; van Haeften, T; Witter, M P

    2000-09-18

    Calretinin is a marker that differentially labels neurons in the central nervous system. We used this marker to distinguish subtypes of neurons within the general population of neurons in the entorhinal cortex of the rat. The distribution, morphology, and ultrastructure of calretinin-immunopositive neurons in this cortical area were documented. We further analyzed the co-localization of the marker with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and studied whether calretinin-positive neurons project to the hippocampal formation. Methods used included single-label immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscopic level, retrograde tracing combined with immunocytochemistry, and double-label confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The entorhinal cortex contained calretinin-positive cells in a scattered fashion, in all layers except layer IV (lamina dissecans). Bipolar and multipolar dendritic configurations were present, displaying smooth dendrites. Bipolar cells had a uniform morphology whereas the multipolar calretinin cell population consisted of large neurons, cells with long ascending dendrites, horizontally oriented neurons, and small spherical cells. Retrograde tracing combined with immunocytochemistry showed that calretinin is not present in cells projecting to the hippocampus. Few synapic contacts between calretinin-positive axon terminals and immunopositive cell bodies and dendrites were seen. Most axon terminals of calretinin fibers formed asymmetrical synapses, and immunopositive axons were always unmyelinated. Results obtained in the CLSM indicate that calretinin co-exists in only 18-20% of the GABAergic cell population (mostly small spherical and bipolar cells). Thus, the entorhinal cortex contains two classes of calretinin interneurons: GABA positive and GABA negative. The first class is presumably a classical, GABAergic inhibitory interneuron. The finding of calretinin-immunoreactive axon terminals with asymmetrical synapses suggests that the second

  18. Development of "Pinceaux" formations and dendritic translocation of climbing fibers during the acquisition of the balance between glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic inputs in developing Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Constantino

    2008-01-10

    The acquisition of the dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition in developing Purkinje cells, necessary for their proper function, is analyzed. Newborn (P0) mouse cerebellum contains glutamatergic (VGLUT2-IR) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic (VIAAT-IR) axons. The former prevail and belong to climbing fibers, whereas the latter neither colabel with calbindin-expressing fibers nor belong to axons of the cortical GABAergic interneurons. During the first postnatal week, VIAAT-IR axons in the Purkinje cell neighborhood remains very low, and the first synapses with basket fibers are formed at P7, when climbing fibers have already established dense pericellular nets. The descending basket fibers reach the Purkinje cell axon initial segment by P9, immediately establishing axoaxonic synapses. The pinceaux appear as primitive vortex-like arrangements by P12, and by P20 interbasket fiber septate-like junctions, typical of fully mature pinceaux, are still missing. The climbing fiber's somatodendritic translocation occurs later than expected, after the regression of the multiple innervation, and follows the ascending collaterals of the basket axons, which are apparently the optimal substrate for the proper subcellular targeting of the climbing fibers. These results emphasize that chemical transmission in the axon initial segment precedes the electrical inhibition generated by field effects. In addition, GABAergic Purkinje cells, as opposed to glutamatergic projection neurons in other cortical structures, do not begin to receive their excitation to inhibition balance until the end of the first postnatal week, despite the early presence of potentially functional GABAergic axons that possess the required vesicular transport system.

  19. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2017-03-15

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate reflect genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by including healthy first-degree relatives. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was performed in 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia who were taking medication, 23 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and 24 healthy nonrelatives. Glutamate, glutamine, and GABA were measured cortically and subcortically in bilateral basal ganglia and occipital cortex. Patients with schizophrenia had reduced cortical GABA compared with healthy relatives and the combined sample of healthy relatives and healthy nonrelatives, suggesting that altered GABAergic systems in schizophrenia are associated with either disease state or medication effects. Reduced cortical glutamine relative to healthy control subjects was observed in patients with schizophrenia and the combined sample of healthy relatives and patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that altered glutamatergic metabolite levels are associated with illness liability. No group differences were found in the basal ganglia. Taken together, these findings are consistent with alterations in GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in patients with schizophrenia and provide novel insights into these systems in healthy relatives. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stoichiometry of expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors depends on the ratio of subunit cDNA transfected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Kelly R; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2010-05-07

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the target of many depressants, including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and alcohol. Although the highly prevalent alphabetagamma GABA(A)R subtype mediates the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain, receptors containing delta subunits also play a key role, mediating tonic inhibition and the actions of endogenous neurosteroids and alcohol. However, the fundamental properties of delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, such as subunit stoichiometry, are not well established. To determine subunit stoichiometry of expressed delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, we inserted the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site tag in the alpha(4), beta(2), and delta subunit N termini. An enhanced green fluorescent protein tag was also inserted into the beta(2) subunit to shift its molecular weight, allowing us to separate subunits using SDS-PAGE. Tagged alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs were expressed in HEK293T cells using various ratios of subunit cDNA, and receptor subunit stoichiometry was determined by quantitating fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin bound to each subunit on Western blots of surface immunopurified tagged GABA(A)Rs. The results demonstrate that the subunit stoichiometry of alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs is regulated by the ratio of subunit cDNAs transfected. Increasing the ratio of delta subunit cDNA transfected increased delta subunit incorporation into surface receptors with a concomitant decrease in beta(2) subunit incorporation. Because receptor subunit stoichiometry can directly influence GABA(A)R pharmacological and functional properties, considering how the transfection protocols used affect subunit stoichiometry is essential when studying heterologously expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs. Successful bungarotoxin binding site tagging of GABA(A)R subunits is a novel tool with which to accurately quantitate subunit stoichiometry and will be useful for monitoring GABA(A)R trafficking in live cells.

  1. Structural model for gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor noncompetitive antagonist binding: widely diverse structures fit the same site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ligong; Durkin, Kathleen A; Casida, John E

    2006-03-28

    Several major insecticides, including alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil, and the botanical picrotoxinin are noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs) for the GABA receptor. We showed earlier that human beta(3) homopentameric GABA(A) receptor recognizes all of the important GABAergic insecticides and reproduces the high insecticide sensitivity and structure-activity relationships of the native insect receptor. Despite large structural diversity, the NCAs are proposed to fit a single binding site in the chloride channel lumen lined by five transmembrane 2 segments. This hypothesis is examined with the beta(3) homopentamer by mutagenesis, pore structure studies, NCA binding, and molecular modeling. The 15 amino acids in the cytoplasmic half of the pore were mutated to cysteine, serine, or other residue for 22 mutants overall. Localization of A-1'C, A2'C, T6'C, and L9'C (index numbers for the transmembrane 2 region) in the channel lumen was established by disulfide cross-linking. Binding of two NCA radioligands [(3)H]1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-n-propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and [(3)H] 3,3-bis-trifluoromethyl-bicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2,2-dicarbonitrile was dramatically reduced with 8 of the 15 mutated positions, focusing attention on A2', T6', and L9' as proposed binding sites, consistent with earlier mutagenesis studies. The cytoplasmic half of the beta3 homopentamer pore was modeled as an alpha-helix. The six NCAs listed above plus t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate fit the 2' to 9' pore region forming hydrogen bonds with the T6' hydroxyl and hydrophobic interactions with A2', T6', and L9' alkyl substituents, thereby blocking the channel. Thus, widely diverse NCA structures fit the same GABA receptor beta subunit site with important implications for insecticide cross-resistance and selective toxicity between insects and mammals.

  2. NNLO Computational Techniques: the Cases H -> gamma gamma and H -> g g

    CERN Document Server

    Actis, S; Sturm, C; Uccirati, S

    2008-01-01

    A large set of techniques needed to compute decay rates at the two-loop level are derived and systematized. The main emphasis of the paper is on the two Standard Model decays H -> gamma gamma and H -> g g. The techniques, however, have a much wider range of application: they give practical examples of general rules for two-loop renormalization; they introduce simple recipes for handling internal unstable particles in two-loop processes; they illustrate simple procedures for the extraction of collinear logarithms from the amplitude. The latter is particularly relevant to show cancellations, e.g. cancellation of collinear divergencies. Furthermore, the paper deals with the proper treatment of non-enhanced two-loop QCD and electroweak contributions to different physical (pseudo-)observables, showing how they can be transformed in a way that allows for a stable numerical integration. Numerical results for the two-loop percentage corrections to H -> gamma gamma, g g are presented and discussed. When applied to the...

  3. Effects of progesterone on glutamate transporter 2 and gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 expression in the developing rat brain after recurrent seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingjuan Liu; Dingan Mao; Liqun Liu; Yu Huang; Tao Bo

    2012-01-01

    Seizures were induced by flurothyl inhalation. Rats were intramuscularly treated with progesterone after each seizure. Results demonstrated that glutamate transporter 2 and γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 expression levels were significantly increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the developing rat brain following recurrent seizures. After progesterone treatment, glutamate transporter 2 protein expression was upregulated, but γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 levels decreased. These results suggest that glutamate transporter 2 and γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 are involved in the pathological processes of epilepsy. Progesterone can help maintain a balance between excitatory and inhibitory systems by modulating the amino acid transporter system, and protect the developing brain after recurrent seizures.

  4. Contextual fear conditioning and baseline startle responses in the rat fear-potentiated startle test: a comparison of benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guscott, M R; Cook, G P; Bristow, L J

    2000-09-01

    In the rat, fear-potentiated startle (FPS) test animals are first trained to associate brief light presentations with a mild electric footshock and then tested for startle responses to acoustic stimuli, delivered either in darkness (i.e. baseline startle) or after the conditioning stimulus. Following light presentation the magnitude of the startle response is markedly increased, and the test is commonly used to distinguish anxiolytic drug effects (i.e. a reduction in FPS) from non-specific effects such as sedation/muscle relaxation. However, recent studies suggest that the environment in which the animal is trained may also contribute towards the acquisition of a conditioned fear response (i.e. contextual fear conditioning) and that this may elevate startle responses recorded in the dark. In the present study, therefore, we have compared the benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonist chlordiazepoxide with the partial agonists FG 8205 and bretazenil, which are known to have a reduced propensity to produce sedation/myorelaxation, using two different FPS procedures: (i) conditioning and testing in stabilimeter chambers, and (ii) conditioning and testing in different environments. The results show that FPS can be demonstrated in both procedures and that treatment with chlordiazepoxide, FG 8205 or bretazenil dose-dependently attenuates the response. However, animals conditioned and tested in stabilimeter chambers also showed a significant increase in dark-startle amplitudes compared with non-shocked rats, suggesting that this response was elevated by contextual fear conditioning. Furthermore, despite clear differences in side-effect liabilities, FG 8205 and bretazenil significantly reduced dark-startle responses, suggesting that this measure is also sensitive to the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines. In contrast, when animals were conditioned and tested in different environments, dark-startle responses were not significantly different from those

  5. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  6. Presumed case of "stiff-horse syndrome" caused by decreased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production in an American Paint mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Tawna Backman; Sellers, Ann Davidson; Goehring, Lutz S

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamic acid into the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Increased serum GAD (auto) antibody concentrations were found in a mare with increased postural musculature tone resulting in stiffness and recumbence. The mare was treated with dexamethasone which resulted in resolution of clinical signs and decreased GAD antibody concentrations.

  7. Presumed case of “stiff–horse syndrome” caused by decreased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production in an American Paint mare

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, Tawna Backman; Sellers, Ann Davidson; Goehring, Lutz S

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamic acid into the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Increased serum GAD (auto) antibody concentrations were found in a mare with increased postural musculature tone resulting in stiffness and recumbence. The mare was treated with dexamethasone which resulted in resolution of clinical signs and decreased GAD antibody concentrations.

  8. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and autism spectrum disorders%γ-氨基丁酸与孤独症谱系障碍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 单玲; 杜琳; 贾飞勇; 王伟

    2015-01-01

    孤独症谱系障碍是一组以社会交往、交流障碍和重复刻板性行为为主要特征的疾病,病因尚不明确。近年研究发现在孤独症谱系障碍动物模型中分娩时及生后早期Na+-K+-2Cl-共转运体1(NKCC1)与K+-2Cl-共转运体2(KCC2)的表达时相发生改变,造成海马神经元细胞内氯离子堆积,致使γ-氨基丁酸介导的神经兴奋性与抑制性的转换被破坏。应用 NKCC1抑制剂布美他尼对模型动物母体进行干预后纠正了它们的神经发育顺序,改善了其孤独症样行为,并且已有研究应用布美他尼改善了孤独症患者的症状。故而γ-氨基丁酸信号通路为孤独症谱系障碍发病机制的研究提供了新的方向,可能成为治疗孤独症谱系障碍新的靶点。本文对γ-氨基丁酸与孤独症谱系障碍关系的研究现状作一综述。%Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of diseases characterized by social interaction and communication defects and repeat stereotyped behaviors, and the etiology is not clear now. In recent years, the study found that in the ASD animal model of childbirth and early postnatal the time of expression of Na+-K+-2Cl-transporter 1 (NKCC1) and K+-2Cl- (KCC2) had changed, and the accumulation of chlorine ion neurons within the hippocampus, lead to the conversion of excitatory and inhibitory mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was damaged. Application of bumetanide, as a NKCC1 inhibitor, in animal models’ matrix may correct their neurological development order, improve autistic behaviors. And the existing research by applying bumetanide improved symptoms in patients with ASD. So GABA signaling pathway provides a new direction of the pathogenesis of ASD, may become a new target in the treatment of ASD. In this paper, the research was about the relationship of GABA and ASD.

  9. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid A-receptor antagonist on sleep-wakefulness cycles following lesion to the ventrolateral preoptic area in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Yina Sun; Peng Xie; Xuguang Yang; Yiping Hou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurons expressing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) play an important role in the regulation of wakefulness to sleep, as well as the maintenance of sleep. However, the role of GABAergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMn), with regard to the sleep-wakefulness cycle, is poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of GABAergic neurons in the TMn on the sleep-wakefulness cycle.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized controlled study, performed at the Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University from July 2007 to February 2008.MATERIALS: Fifteen healthy, adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups(n = 5): control, ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) lesion, and VLPO lesion plus GABAA receptor antagonist-treated. Ibotenic acid and bicuculline were provided by Sigma (St. Louis, USA). METHODS: Four electroencephalogram screw electrodes were implanted into the skull at a frontal region (two) and parietal bones (two) on each side. Three flexible electromyogram wire electrodes were placed into the nuchal muscles. On day 8, a fine glass micropipette (10-20 mm tip diameter) containing ibotenic acid solution (10 nmol/L) was injected into the VLPO in both hemispheres following bone wax removal under anesthesia. One week after the second surgery, sleep-wakefulness states were recorded in rats from the VLPO lesion group. On day 10 after VLPO lesion, bicuculline (10 nmol/L), a GABAA-receptor antagonist, was microinjected into the TMn and sleep-wakefulness states were recorded for 24 hours.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Duration of the sleep-wakefulness cycle in each group using a Data acquisition unit (Micro1 401 mk2) and Data collection software (Spike Ⅱ). RESULTS: VLPO lesion induced an increased duration of wakefulness (W, 13.17%) and light slow-wave sleep (SWS1, 28.9%), respectively. Deep slow-wave sleep (SWS2, 43.74%) and paradoxical sleep (PS

  10. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  11. Enhancement of $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ by seesaw-motivated exotic scalars

    CERN Document Server

    Picek, Ivica

    2012-01-01

    We examine the role of seesaw motivated exotic scalars in loop-mediated Higgs decays. We consider a simple TeV-scale seesaw model built upon the fermionic quintuplet mediator in conjunction with the scalar quadruplet, where we examine portions of the model parameter space for which the contributions of charged components of the scalar quadruplet significantly increase the $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decay rate. The most significant change in the diphoton width comes from a doubly charged scalar \\Phi^{--} which should be the lightest component in the scalar quadruplet. There is a mild suppression of the $h \\to Z \\gamma$ decay width by a factor 0.9 -- 0.7 in the part of the parameter space where the $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decay width is enhanced by a factor 1.25 -- 2.

  12. Insect γ-aminobutyric acid receptors and isoxazoline insecticides: toxicological profiles relative to the binding sites of [³H]fluralaner, [³H]-4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate, and [³H]avermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunqing; Casida, John E

    2014-02-05

    Isoxazoline insecticides, such as fluralaner (formerly A1443), are noncompetitive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA-R) antagonists with selective toxicity for insects versus mammals. The isoxazoline target in house fly ( Musca domestica ) brain has subnanomolar affinity for [³H]fluralaner and a unique pattern of sensitivity to isoxazolines and avermectin B(1a) (AVE) but not to fipronil and α-endosulfan. Inhibitor specificity profiles for 15 isoxazolines examined with Musca GABA-R and [³H]fluralaner, [³H]-4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([³H]EBOB), and [³H]AVE binding follow the same structure-activity trends although without high correlation. The 3 most potent of the 15 isoxazolines tested in Musca [³H]fluralaner, [³H]EBOB, and [³H]AVE binding assays and in honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain [³H]fluralaner assays are generally those most toxic to Musca and four agricultural pests. Fluralaner does not inhibit [³H]EBOB binding to the human GABA-R recombinant β₃ homopentamer, which is highly sensitive to all of the commercial GABAergic insecticides. The unique isoxazoline binding site may resurrect the GABA-R as a major insecticide target.

  13. Induction of c-fos mRNA expression in an in vitro hippocampal slice model of adult rats after kainate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid or bicuculline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massamiri, T; Khrestchatisky, M; Ben-Ari, Y

    1994-01-17

    Levels of gene expression following in vitro treatment of rat hippocampal slices with kainate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or bicuculline were measured by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method. Following a short-term exposure to kainate, c-fos gene expression was induced by 12-fold in the adult, but not the newborn, hippocampus. Under the same experimental conditions, zifl268 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression were unchanged. Our results also demonstrate a lack of induction of c-fos, zifl268 and BDNF after short-time treatment of either adult or newborn hippocampal slices with GABA or bicuculline. The relevance of the differential induction of gene expression in the adult and newborn in an in vitro hippocampal slice model as compared to previously described in vivo models is discussed.

  14. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in (1) H MRS volumes composed heterogeneously of grey and white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Brealy, Jennifer A; Linden, David E J; Evans, C John

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration using localised MRS suffers from partial volume effects related to differences in the intrinsic concentration of GABA in grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. These differences can be represented as a ratio between intrinsic GABA in GM and WM: rM . Individual differences in GM tissue volume can therefore potentially drive apparent concentration differences. Here, a quantification method that corrects for these effects is formulated and empirically validated. Quantification using tissue water as an internal concentration reference has been described previously. Partial volume effects attributed to rM can be accounted for by incorporating into this established method an additional multiplicative correction factor based on measured or literature values of rM weighted by the proportion of GM and WM within tissue-segmented MRS volumes. Simulations were performed to test the sensitivity of this correction using different assumptions of rM taken from previous studies. The tissue correction method was then validated by applying it to an independent dataset of in vivo GABA measurements using an empirically measured value of rM . It was shown that incorrect assumptions of rM can lead to overcorrection and inflation of GABA concentration measurements quantified in volumes composed predominantly of WM. For the independent dataset, GABA concentration was linearly related to GM tissue volume when only the water signal was corrected for partial volume effects. Performing a full correction that additionally accounts for partial volume effects ascribed to rM successfully removed this dependence. With an appropriate assumption of the ratio of intrinsic GABA concentration in GM and WM, GABA measurements can be corrected for partial volume effects, potentially leading to a reduction in between-participant variance, increased power in statistical tests and better discriminability of true effects.

  15. Observation of $h_{c}$ radiative decay $h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta'$ and evidence for $h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    A search for radiative decays of the $P$-wave spin singlet charmonium resonance $h_c$ is performed based on $4.48 \\times 10^{8}$ $\\psi'$ events collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring. Events of the reaction channels $h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta'$ and $\\gamma \\eta$ are observed with a statistical significance of $8.4 \\sigma$ and $4.0 \\sigma$, respectively, for the first time. The branching fractions of $h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta'$ and $h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta$ are measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta')=(1.52 \\pm 0.27 \\pm 0.29)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(h_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma \\eta)=(4.7 \\pm 1.5 \\pm 1.4)\\times10^{-4}$, respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic uncertainties.

  16. Neutron spectroscopy of gamma-MgH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander; Antonov, Vladimir; Efimchenko, Vadim; Granroth, Garrett; Klyamkin, S. N.; Levchenko, A. V.; Sakharov, Michael; Ren, Yang; Ramirez-Cuesta, Timmy

    2011-03-01

    Under ambient conditions, magnesium dihydride exists in two forms, alpha-MgH2 (the most stable modification) and gamma-MgH2 (a less stable modification). The alpha-phase partly transforms to gamma-MgH2 in the course of ball-milling and under high pressure and temperature. Due to the high hydrogen content of 7.6 wt.%, MgH2 has been intensively studied as a prospective material for hydrogen storage. By exposing of alpha-MgH2 to a pressure of 5 GPa and temperature 840 K, we prepared a sample, in which about 60% of the alpha-MgH2 was transformed to gamma-MgH2. We have measured inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of both the high pressure treated MgH2 and starting alpha-MgH2, and extracted the spectrum for gamma-MgH2. The differences between the INS spectra and their agreement with the first-principles calculations for these compounds will be discussed.

  17. $H\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ as a Triangle Anomaly: Possible Implications for the Hierarchy Problem

    CERN Document Server

    de Gouvea, Andre; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The Standard Model calculation of $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ has the curious feature of being finite but regulator-dependent. While dimensional regularization yields a result which respects the electromagnetic Ward identities, additional terms which violate gauge invariance arise if the calculation is done setting $d=4$. This discrepancy between the $d=4-\\epsilon$ and $d=4$ results is recognized as a true ambiguity which must be resolved using physics input; as dimensional regularization respects gauge invariance, the $d=4-\\epsilon$ calculation is accepted as the correct SM result. However, here we point out another possibility; working in analogy with the gauge chiral anomaly, we note that it is possible that the individual diagrams do violate the electromagnetic Ward identities, but that the gauge-invariance-violating terms cancel when all contributions to $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$, both from the SM and from new physics, are included. We thus examine the consequences of the hypothesis that the $d=4$ calcul...

  18. Vector Boson Fusion Production with rm $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinin, Mikhail; Ma, Yousi; Newman, Harvey B; Pieri, Marco

    2006-01-01

    A study of CMS discovery potential for an intermediate mass Higgs boson is presented in this note. Results have been obtained for the vector boson fusion (VBF) production mode, rm pp rightarrow rm q q H rightarrow rm q q gamma gamma where the final state includes two high-rapidity jets, during the first years of running at low luminosity. Full detector simulation is used both for the Higgs boson signal and all types of background.

  19. Renormalization of dimension-six operators relevant for the Higgs decays $h\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma,\\gamma Z$

    CERN Document Server

    Elias-Miró, J; Masso, E; Pomarol, A

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson has opened a new window to test the SM through the measurements of its couplings. Of particular interest is the measured Higgs coupling to photons which arises in the SM at the one-loop level, and can then be significantly affected by new physics. We calculate the one-loop renormalization of the dimension-six operators relevant for $h\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma, \\gamma Z$, which can be potentially important since it could, in principle, give log-enhanced contributions from operator mixing. We find however that there is no mixing from any current-current operator that could lead to this log-enhanced effect. We show how the right choice of operator basis can make this calculation simple. We then conclude that $h\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma, \\gamma Z$ can only be affected by RG mixing from operators whose Wilson coefficients are expected to be of one-loop size, among them fermion dipole-moment operators which we have also included.

  20. $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ in Type-II seesaw neutrino model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Shu; Huang, Da; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    We study the Higgs decay channel of $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ in the type-II seesaw neutrino model. In most of the allowed parameter space in the model, the new contribution to $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ is correlated with that to $h\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$. If the current $2\\sigma$ excess of the $h\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ rate measured by the LHC persists, the $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ rate should be also larger than the corresponding standard model prediction. We demonstrate that the anti-correlation between $h\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ and $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ only exists in some special region.

  1. γ-氨基丁酸在氯胺酮抗抑郁中的作用%Role of gamma-aminobutyric acid in the antidepressant effects of ketamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向六; 刘文学; 邱丽丽; 张广芬; 周志强

    2015-01-01

    action mechanisms are not yet fully understood .The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gamma-aminobutyric acid ( GABA) in the antidepressant effects of ketamine . Methods Thirty-two male Wistar rats were e-qually randomized into four groups: saline, ketamine, GABA, and GABA+ketamine.All the animals were implanted with a guide cannula into the lateral ventricle and on the eighth day after operation subjected to a 15 min forced swimming test (FST) for the estab-lishment of a depression model .At 24 h after modeling , the rats of the saline and ketamine groups were treated intracerebroventricularly with 2μL isotonic saline solution, and those of the GABA and GABA +ketamine groups with 50μg (2μL) GABA, followed by intrap-eritoneal administration of 1 mL saline in the former two groups and 10 mg/kg (1 mL) ketamine in the latter two groups 10 min later.At 30 min after treatment , the open field test ( OFT) was carried out for crossing and rearing scores and a 6-min FST was performed to re-cord the immobility time in the last 5 minutes.The content of GABA in the prefrontal cortex of the rats was measured following behav -ioral tests. Results The immobility time was significantly decreased in the ketamine group ([107.5 ±21.2]sec) as compared with the saline, GABA, and GABA+ketamine groups ([167.2 ±22.1], [159.8 ±17.5], and [143.8 ±22.1]sec) (P0.05).The level of GABA in the prefrontal cortex was remarkably lower in the ketamine group ([12.4 ±3.4]ng/mg prot) than in the saline, GABA, and GABA+ketamine groups ([23.3 ± 6.3], [27.3 ±5.7], and [18.0 ±5.4]ng/mg prot) (P0.05 ). Conclusion The antidepressant effects of ketamine are related to the decreased GABA level in the prefrontal cortex in rats receiving FST .

  2. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnett, D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and GABA metabolism of broilers.

  4. Template RR Lyrae H alpha, H beta, and H gamma Velocity Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Sesar, Branimir

    2012-01-01

    We present template radial velocity curves of $ab$-type RR Lyrae stars constructed from high-precision measurements of ${\\rm H\\alpha}$, ${\\rm H\\beta}$, and ${\\rm H\\gamma}$ lines. Amplitude correlations between the Balmer line velocity curves, Johnson $V$-band, and SDSS $g$- and $r$-band light curves are also derived. Compared to previous methods, these templates and derived correlations reduce the uncertainty in measured systemic (center-of-mass) velocities of RR Lyrae stars by up to 15 {\\kms}, and will be of particular interest to wide-area spectroscopic surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (LEGUE).

  5. TEMPLATE RR LYRAE H{alpha}, H{beta}, AND H{gamma} VELOCITY CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir, E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We present template radial velocity curves of ab-type RR Lyrae stars constructed from high-precision measurements of H{alpha}, H{beta}, and H{gamma} lines. Amplitude correlations between the Balmer line velocity curves, Johnson V band, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) g- and r-band light curves are also derived. Compared to previous methods, these templates and derived correlations reduce the uncertainty in measured systemic (center-of-mass) velocities of RR Lyrae stars by up to 15 km s{sup -1}, and will be of particular interest to wide-area spectroscopic surveys such as the SDSS and LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration.

  6. Effect of propofol on the reactivity of acetylcholinesterase, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors in the hippocampus of aged rats after chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Chen; Jiangbei Cao; Weidong Mi

    2011-01-01

    We induced ischemic brain injury in aging rats to examine the effects of varying doses of propofol on hippocampal activities of acetylcholinesterase, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors. Propofol exhibited no obvious impact on acetylcholinesterase activity, but directly activated the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor. The neuroprotective function of propofol on the hippocampus of aging rats following cerebral ischemic injury may be related to altered activities of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

  7. Analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor function in the in vitro and in vivo regulation of alpha-melanotropin-stimulating hormone secretion from melanotrope cells of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koning, H P; Jenks, B G; Roubos, E W

    1993-02-01

    The activity of many endocrine cells is regulated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The effects of GABA are mediated by GABAA and/or GABAB receptors. While GABAB receptors in the central nervous system have now been extensively characterized, little is known of the function and pharmacology of GABAB receptors on endocrine cells. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis, GABA inhibits the release of alpha MSH from the endocrine melanotrope cells through both GABAA and GABAB receptors. We have investigated the following aspects of the GABAB receptor of the melanotrope cells of X. laevis: 1) the pharmacology of this receptor, using antagonists previously established to demonstrate GABAB receptors in the mammalian central nervous system; 2) the relative contribution to the regulation of hormone secretion by the GABAA and GABAB receptors on melanotrope cells in vitro; and 3) the role of the GABAB receptor with respect to the physiological function of the melanotrope cell in vivo, i.e. regulation of pigment dispersion in skin melanophores in relation to background color. Our results demonstrate that phaclofen, 2-hydroxysaclofen, and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid dose-dependently blocked the inhibition of alpha MSH release by GABAB receptor activation, but not by GABAA receptor activation. The GABAB receptor antagonist delta-aminovaleric acid appeared to be a selective agonist on the GABAB receptor of melanotrope cells. The inhibitory secretory response to a low dose of GABA (10(-5) M) was not affected by bicuculline, but was significantly reduced by phaclofen, indicating that at a low GABA concentration, the GABAB receptor mechanism would dominate in inhibiting the melanotrope cells. Different thresholds of activation may form the basis for differential action of GABA through both GABA receptor types. The tonic inhibition of alpha MSH release in animals adapted to a white background was not affected by 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid, indicating that the GABAB receptor is not (solely

  8. Residues in the extracellular loop 4 are critical for maintaining the conformational equilibrium of the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, Nanna; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    . Oocytes expressing M345H showed a decrease in apparent GABA affinity, an increase in apparent affinity for Na+, a shift in the charge/voltage (Q/Vm) relationship to more positive membrane potentials, and an increased Li+-induced leak current. Oocytes expressing T349H showed an increase in apparent GABA...... affinity, a decrease in apparent Na+ affinity, a profound shift in the Q/Vm relationship to more negative potentials, and a decreased Li+-induced leak current. The data are consistent with a shift in the conformational equilibrium of the mutant transporters, with M345H stabilized in an outward...

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced alterations in the ultrastructure of cultured cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the ultrastructural composition of cultured cerebellar granule cells was investigated during development by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis). Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 h after...... 7 and 14 days, respectively, in culture. THIP treatment of 7-day-old cultures led to a statistically significant increase in the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and coated vesicles, whereas no significant increase in the cytoplasmic density...... of these organelles was observed in 14-day-old cultures exposed to THIP for 6 h. These findings show that the effect of THIP on the ultrastructural composition of cultured cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development....

  10. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Meier, E;

    1990-01-01

    differentiation and GABA receptor expression was investigated in cultured cerebellar granule cells. After 4 days in culture the neurons were exposed to the inhibitors for 6 h in the simultaneous presence of THIP. Subsequently, cultures were either fixed for electron microscopic examination or used for preparation...... of membranes for [3H]GABA binding assays. In some experiments the functional activity of the newly induced low-affinity GABA receptors was assessed by investigation of the ability of GABA to inhibit neurotransmitter release from the neurons. These experiments were performed to differentiate between...... an intracellular and a plasma membrane localization of the receptors. In all experiments cultures treated with THIP alone served as controls. The inhibitors of protein synthesis totally abolished the ability of THIP to induce low-affinity GABA receptors. In contrast, the inhibitors of intracellular transport...

  11. Ex vivo binding of t-( sup 35 S) butylbicyclophosphorothionate: A biochemical tool to study the pharmacology of ethanol at the gamma-aminobutyric acid-coupled chloride channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, E.; Concas, A.; Serra, M.; Santoro, G.; Biggio, G. (Univ. of Cagliari (Italy))

    1991-03-01

    The effects of acute administration of ethanol on t-(35S)Butylbiclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS) binding measured ex vivo in unwashed membrane preparations of rat cerebral cortex were investigated. Ethanol, given i.g., decreased in a dose-related (0.5-4 g/kg) and time-dependent manner the binding of 35S-TBPS. This effect was similar to that induced by the administration of diazepam (0.5-4 mg/kg i.p.). Scatchard plot analysis of this radioligand binding revealed that ethanol, differently from diazepam, decreased the apparent affinity of 35S-TBPS recognition sites whereas it failed to change the density of these binding sites. The effect of ethanol on 35S-TBPS binding could not be reversed by the previous administration to rats of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (1,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate). Vice versa, the benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, Ro 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (4,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) (8 mg/kg i.p.), prevented completely ethanol-induced decrease of 35S-TBPS binding. The ability of Ro 15-4513 to prevent the action of ethanol was shared by the anxiogenic and proconvulsant beta-carboline derivatives, FG 7142 (N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide) (12.5 mg/kg i.p.) and ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (0.6 mg/kg i.v.), which, per se, enhanced this parameter. Moreover, ethanol (0.5-4 g/kg) was able to reverse the increase of 35S-TBPS binding elicited by the s.c. injection of isoniazid (350 mg/kg) and to clearly attenuate the severity of tonic-clonic seizures produced by this inhibitor of the GABAergic transmission.

  12. Probing CP Violation in $h \\to Z\\gamma$ with Background Interference

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Marco; Robinson, Dean J

    2015-01-01

    We show that the parity of the $h Z\\gamma$ vertex can be probed by interference between the gluon fusion Higgs production, $gg \\to h \\to \\gamma Z \\to \\gamma \\ell^+\\ell^-$, and the background, $gg \\to \\gamma Z \\to \\gamma \\ell^+\\ell^-$, amplitudes. In the presence of a parity violating $hZ\\gamma$ vertex, this interference alters the kinematic distribution of the leptons and photon compared to Standard Model (SM) expectations. For a Higgs with SM-sized width and couplings, we find that the size of the effect enters at most at the $10^{-2}$ level. Such a small effect cannot be seen at the LHC, even with futuristic high luminosities. Should there exist other broader scalar particles with larger production cross-section times branching ratio to $Z\\gamma$, then the parity structure of their $Z\\gamma$ couplings can be probed with this technique.

  13. Precision calculations for {gamma}{gamma} {yields} 4 fermions and H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4 fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredenstein, A.

    2006-05-08

    In this work we provide precision calculations for the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} 4 fermions and H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4 fermions. At a {gamma}{gamma} collider precise theoretical predictions are needed for the {gamma}{gamma} {yields} WW {yields} 4f processes because of their large cross section. These processes allow a measurement of the gauge-boson couplings {gamma}WW and {gamma}{gamma}WW. Furthermore, the reaction {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4f arises through loops of virtual charged, massive particles. Thus, the coupling {gamma}{gamma}H can be measured and Higgs bosons with a relatively large mass could be produced. For masses M{sub H} >or(sim) 135 GeV the Higgs boson predominantly decays into W- or Z-boson pairs and subsequently into four leptons. The kinematical reconstruction of these decays is influenced by quantum corrections, especially real photon radiation. Since off-shell effects of the gauge bosons have to be taken into account below M{sub H} {approx} 2M{sub W/Z}, the inclusion of the decays of the gauge bosons is important. In addition, the spin and the CP properties of the Higgs boson can be determined by considering angular and energy distributions of the decay fermions. For a comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data Monte Carlo generators are useful tools. We construct such programs for the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} WW {yields} 4f and H {yields} WW/ZZ {yields} 4f. On the one hand, they provide the complete predictions at lowest order of perturbation theory. On the other hand, they contain quantum corrections, which ca be classified into real corrections, connected with photons bremsstrahlung, and virtual corrections. Whereas the virtual quantum corrections to {gamma}{gamma} {yields} WW {yields} 4f are calculated in the double-pole approximation, i.e. only doubly-resonant contributions are taken into account, we calculate the complete O({alpha}) corrections for the H {yields} WW

  14. Impact of a four-zero Yukawa texture on $h\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $\\gamma Z$ in the framework of the 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type III

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero-Cid, A; Honorato, C G; Moretti, S; Perez, M A; Rosado, A

    2013-01-01

    We study the substantial enhancement, with respect to the corresponding Standard Model rates, that can be obtained for the branching ratios of the decay channels $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $h\\to \\gamma Z$ within the framework of the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model Type III, assuming a four-zero Yukawa texture and a general Higgs potential. We show that these processes are very sensitive to the flavour pattern entering the Yukawa texture and to the triple coupling structure of the Higgs potential, both of which impact onto the aforementioned decays. We can accommodate the parameters of the model in such a way to obtain the $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ rates reported by the Large Hadron Collider and at the same time get a $h\\to \\gamma Z$ fraction much larger than in the Standard Model, indeed within experimental reach. We present some scenarios where this phenomenology is realised for spectrum configurations that are consistent with current constraints. We also discuss the possibility of obtaining a light charged Higgs boson com...

  15. Constitutive expression of gamma-H2AX has prognostic relevance in triple negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Kuijk, S.J. van; Sweep, F.C.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Martens, J.W.; Timmermans, M.A.Y.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Bussink, J.; Span, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Constitutive gamma-H2AX expression might indicate disruption of the DNA damage repair pathway, genomic instability, or shortened telomeric ends. Here, we quantified expression of endogenous gamma-H2AX and its downstream factor 53BP1 in a large number of breast cancer cell lin

  16. Fuzzy h-ideals of a $\\Gamma-$hemiring and its operator hemirings

    CERN Document Server

    Sardar, S K; Mandal, D

    2011-01-01

    Various correspondence between fuzzy h-ideals of a $\\Gamma$-hemiring and fuzzy h-ideals of its operator hemirings are established and some of their characterizations are given using lattice structure and cartesian product.

  17. Searching Heavier Higgs Boson via $H \\to hh \\to WW^*\\gamma\\gamma$ at LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Lan-Chun; Fang, Yaquan; He, Hong-Jian; Zhang, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    The LHC discovery of a light Higgs particle $h^0$ (125GeV) opens up new prospect for searching heavier Higgs boson(s) at the LHC Run-2, which will unambiguously point to new physics beyond the standard model (SM). We study the detection of a heavier neutral Higgs boson $H^0$ via di-Higgs production channel at the LHC (14TeV), $H^0 \\to h^0h^0 \\to WW^*\\gamma\\gamma$. This directly probes the $Hhh$ cubic Higgs interaction, which exists in most extensions of the SM Higgs sector. For the decay products of final states $WW^*$, we include both pure leptonic mode $WW^* \\to \\ell\\bar{\

  18. Search for Heavy Neutrino in K->mu nu_h(nu_h-> nu gamma) Decay at ISTRA+ Setup

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotov, V N; Lebedev, V A; Makarov, A I; Novikov, V P; Polyarush, A Yu; Akimenko, S A; Britvich, G I; Filin, A P; Inyakin, A V; Kholodenko, S A; Leontiev, V M; Obraztsov, V F; Polyakov, V A; Romanovsky, V I; Stenyakin, O V; Tchikilev, O G; Uvarov, V A; Yushchenko, O P

    2011-01-01

    Heavy neutrino nu_h with m_h mu nu_h (nu_h -> nu gamma) decay chain in the following parameter region: 40MeV < m_h < 80MeV; 10^{-11}sec < tau_h < 10^{-9}sec. The preliminary result is: |U_mu_ h|^2 < 6x10^{-5} at 95% C.L.

  19. The γ-aminobutyric acid-producing ability under low pH conditions of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented foods of Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, with a strong ability to produce ACE-inhibitory peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Barla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Many traditional fermented products are onsumed in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, such as kaburazushi, narezushi, konkazuke, and ishiru. Various kinds of lactic acid bacteria (LAB are associated with their fermentation, however, characterization of LAB has not yet been elucidated in detail. In this study, we evaluated 53 isolates of LAB from various traditional fermented foods by taxonomic classification at the species level by analyzing the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA sequences and carbohydrate assimilation abilities. We screened isolates that exhibited high angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activities in skim milk or soy protein media and produced high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA concentrations in culture supernatants when grown in de Man Rogosa Sharpe broth in the presence of 1% (w/v glutamic acid. The results revealed that 10 isolates, i.e., Lactobacillus buchneri (2 isolates, Lactobacillus brevis (6 isolates, and Weissella hellenica (2 isolates had a high GABA-producing ability of >500 mg/100 ml after 72 h of incubation at 35 °C. The ACE inhibitory activity of the whey cultured with milk protein by using L. brevis (3 isolates, L. buchneri (2 isolates, and W. hellenica (2 isolates was stronger than that of all whey cultured with soy protein media, and these IC50 were < 1 mg protein/ml. Three of 10 isolates had high GABA-producing activities at pH 3, suggesting that they could be powerful candidates for use in the fermentation of food materials having low pH.

  20. Diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Fukui, Y

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse $\\gamma$-ray emission is the most prominent observable signature of celestial cosmic-ray interactions at high energies. While already being investigated at GeV energies over several decades, assessments of diffuse $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies remain sparse. After completion of the systematic survey of the inner Galaxy, the H.E.S.S. experiment is in a prime position to observe large-scale diffuse emission at TeV energies. Data of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey are investigated in regions off known $\\gamma$-ray sources. Corresponding $\\gamma$-ray flux measurements were made over an extensive grid of celestial locations. Longitudinal and latitudinal profiles of the observed $\\gamma$-ray fluxes show characteristic excess emission not attributable to known $\\gamma$-ray sources. For the first time large-scale $\\gamma$-ray emission along the Galactic Plane using imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes has been observed. While the background subtraction technique limits the ability to recover mo...

  1. Q{sub {gamma}-H2AX}, an analysis method for partial-body radiation exposure using {gamma}-H2AX in non-human primate lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redon, Christophe E., E-mail: redonc@mail.nih.gov [NIH, NCI, CCR, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Nakamura, Asako J.; Gouliaeva, Ksenia [NIH, NCI, CCR, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Rahman, Arifur; Blakely, William F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Bonner, William M. [NIH, NCI, CCR, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We previously used the {gamma}-H2AX assay as a biodosimeter for total-body irradiation (TBI) exposure ({gamma}-rays) in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model. Utilizing peripheral blood lymphocytes and plucked hairs, we obtained statistically significant {gamma}-H2AX responses days after total-body exposure to 1-8.5 Gy ({sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays at 55 cGy min{sup -1}). Here, we introduce a partial-body exposure analysis method, Q{sub {gamma}-H2AX}, which is based on the number of {gamma}-H2AX foci per damaged cells as evident by having one or more {gamma}-H2AX foci per cell. Results from the rhesus monkey - TBI study were used to establish Q{sub {gamma}-H2AX} dose-response calibration curves to assess acute partial-body exposures. {gamma}-H2AX foci were detected in plucked hairs for several days after in vivo irradiation demonstrating this assay's utility for dose assessment in various body regions. The quantitation of {gamma}-H2AX may provide a robust biodosimeter for analyzing partial-body exposures to ionizing radiation in humans.

  2. Effect of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor on Brain Damage Induced by Recurrent Febrile Seizures%γ-氨基丁酸B受体在反复热性惊厥脑损伤中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖; 秦炯; 卜定方; 常杏芝; 杨志仙

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨γ-氨基丁酸B受体(γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor,GABABR)对反复热性惊厥(febrile seizures,FS)脑损伤的影响.方法SD大鼠随机分为对照组、FS组、FS+氯苯氨丁酸(baclofen)组、FS+法克罗芬(phaclofen)组.采用热水浴诱导大鼠FS,隔日诱导1次,共10次.记录大鼠惊厥潜伏期、持续时间及强度;用原位杂交和免疫组织化学方法分别观察c-fos基因和Fos蛋白表达情况.结果与FS组相比,FS+baclofen组大鼠惊厥潜伏期延长、惊厥持续时间缩短、惊厥强度减轻;而FS+phaclofen组大鼠惊厥潜伏期缩短、惊厥持续时间延长、惊厥强度加重.baclofen干预使c-fos基因和Fos蛋白表达降低,而phaclofen 干预使其表达增强.结论应用GABABR激动剂baclofen和抑制剂phaclofen干预研究表明,GABABR与热性惊厥脑损伤的发生、发展密切相关.

  3. Characteristics of {gamma}-H2AX foci at DNA double-strand breaks sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilch, D.R.; Sedelnikova, O.A.; Redon, C. [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Lab. of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Celeste, A.; Nussenzweig, A. [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Experimental Immunology Branch, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bonner, W.M. [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Lab. of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) is essential to the efficient recognition and (or) repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), and many molecules, often thousands, of H2AX become rapidly phosphorylated at the site of each nascent DSB. An antibody to {gamma}-H2AX reveals that this highly amplified process generates nuclear foci. The phosphorylation site is a serine four residues from the C-terminus which has been evolutionarily conserved in organisms from giardia intestinalis to humans. Mice and yeast lacking the conserved serine residue demonstrate a variety of defects in DNA DSB processing. H2AX{sup {delta}}{sup /{delta}} mice are smaller, sensitive to ionizing radiation, defective in class switch recombination and spermatogenesis while cells from the mice demonstrate substantially increased numbers of genomic defects. {gamma}-H2AX foci formation is a sensitive biological dosimeter and presents new and exciting opportunities to understand important biological processes, human diseases, and individual variations in radiation sensitivity. These potentialities demonstrate the importance of understanding the parameters and functions of {gamma}-H2AX formation. (author)

  4. Brain GABA levels across psychiatric disorders : A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of 1H-MRS studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schür, Remmelt R.; Draisma, Luc W R; Wijnen, Jannie P.; Boks, Marco P.; Koevoets, Martijn G J C; Joëls, Marian; Klomp, Dennis W.; Kahn, René S.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is involved in the etiology of most psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). It is therefore not surprising that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is increasi

  5. Observation of h_b(1P)->eta_b(1S)gamma

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    We report the first observation of the radiative transition h_b(1P)->eta_b(1S)gamma, where the h_b(1P) is produced in Upsilon(5S)->h_b(1P)pi+pi- dipion transitions. We measure the eta_b(1S) mass to be (9401.0+-1.9+1.4-2.4)MeV/c^2 with a width of (12.4+5.5-4.6+11.5-3.4)MeV and a decay branching fraction of BF[h_b(1P)->eta_b(1S)gamma]=(49.8+-6.8+10.9-5.2)%. The measured eta_b(1S) mass corresponds to a hyperfine splitting of (59.3+-1.9+2.4-1.4)MeV/c^2. This value deviates significantly from the current world average obtained from measurements of Upsilon(3S)->eta_b(1S)gamma and Upsilon(2S)->eta_b(1S)gamma reactions. We also report updated results for the h_b(1P) mass (9899.0+-0.4+-1.0)MeV/c^2 and its hyperfine splitting (0.8+-1.1)MeV/c^2. These measurements are performed using a 121.4fb^-1 data sample collected at the peak of the Upsilon(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  6. Decay $H^{+} \\to W^{+}\\gamma$ in a nonlinear $R_{\\xi}$ gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Sánchez, J; Tavares-Velasco, G; Toscano, J J; 10.1103/PhysRevD.69.095008

    2004-01-01

    A new evaluation of the charged Higgs boson decay H/sup +/ to W/sup + / gamma is presented in the context of the general two-Higgs doublet model. A nonlinear R/sub xi / gauge which considerably simplifies the calculation is introduced and simple expressions are obtained for the fermionic and bosonic contributions. The H/sup +/ to W/sup +/ gamma branching ratio is analyzed for several values of the parameters of the model. Although this decay can have a branching fraction as large as 10/sup -4/ in a certain region of the parameter space, it is found that such a region is disfavored by the most recent constraints on b to s gamma , g-2 of the muon, Z to bb, and the rho parameter, along with the exclusions from direct searches at the CERN e/sup -/e/sup +/ LEP collider. The possibility of detecting this decay at future colliders is discussed. (33 refs).

  7. Search for non-SM light Higgs Boson in the h $\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnitchouk, Alexander Stepanovych [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2004-05-01

    We present first results on the search for Higgs Boson with an enhanced branching fraction into photons in the h → γγ decay channel using recent Run II data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We discuss event selection, backgrounds, analysis optimization, and the limits on the Higgs boson mass obtained in this analysis.

  8. Search for top quark decays $t \\rightarrow qH$ with $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A search is performed for flavour-changing neutral currents in the decay of a top quark to an up-type ($c, u$) quark and a Higgs boson, where the Higgs boson decays to two photons. The proton-proton collision data set used corresponds to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Top quark pair events are searched for in which one top quark decays to $qH$ and the other decays to $bW$. Both the hadronic and the leptonic decay modes of the $W$ boson are used. No significant signal is observed and an upper limit is set on the $t\\rightarrow qH$ branching ratio of 0.79% at the 95% confidence level. The corresponding limit on the $tqH$ coupling combination $\\sqrt{\\lambda_{tcH}^{2} + \\lambda_{tuH}^{2}}$ is 0.17.

  9. Interference effects in the H($\\to \\gamma\\gamma$)+2 jets channel at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coradeschi, F. [Univ. di Firenze e INFN (Italia); Univ. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); de Florian, D. [Univ. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dixon, L. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States); Fidanza, N. [Univ. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Hoeche, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ita, H. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ. Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Li, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mazzitelli, J. [Univ. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-07-08

    We compute the interference between the resonant process pp → H(→γγ)+2 jets and the corresponding continuum background at leading order in QCD. For the Higgs signal, we include gluon fusion (GF) and vector boson fusion (VBF) production channels, while for the background we consider all tree-level contributions, including pure EW effects (O(α4QED)) and QCD contributions (O(α2QEDα2s)), plus the loop-induced gluon-initiated process. After convolution with the experimental mass resolution, the main effect of the interference is to shift the position of the mass peak, as in the inclusive GF case studied previously. The apparent mass shift is small in magnitude but strongly dependent on the Higgs width, potentially allowing for a measurement of, or bound on, the width itself. In the H(→γγ)+2 jets channel, the VBF and GF contributions generate shifts of opposite signs which largely cancel, depending on the sets of cuts used, to as little as 5 MeV (toward a lower Higgs mass). As a result, the small magnitude of the shift makes this channel a good reference mass for measuring the inclusive mass shift of around 60 MeV in the Standard Model.

  10. $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ search and direct photon pair production differential cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Xuebing [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China)

    2010-06-01

    At a hadron collider, diphoton (γγ) production allows detailed studies of the Standard Model (SM), as well as as searches for new phenomena, such as new heavy resonances, extra spatial dimensions or cascade decays of heavy new particles. Within the SM, continuum γγ+X production is characterized by a steeply-falling γγ mass spectrum, on top of which a heavy resonance decaying into γγ can potentially be observed. In particular, this is considered one of the most promising discovery channels for a SM Higgs boson at the LHC, despite the small branching ratio of BR (H → γγ) {approx} 0.2% for 110 < MHiggs < 140 GeV. At the Tevatron, the dominant SM Higgs boson production mechanism is gluon fusion, followed by associated production with a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion. While the SM Higgs production rate at the Tevatron is not sufficient to observe it in the γγ mode, the Hgg and Hγγ couplings, being loop-mediated, are particularly sensitive to new physics effects. Furthermore, in some models beyond the SM, for instance, fermiophobic Higgs, with no couplings to fermions, the BR (H → γγ) can be enhanced significantly relative to the SM prediction, while has the SM-like production cross sections except the gluon fusion is absent. In this thesis, we present a search for a light Higgs boson in the diphoton final state using 4.2 ± 0.3 fb-1 of the D0 Run II data, collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider from April 2002 to December 2008. Good agreement between the data and the SM background prediction is observed. Since there is no evidence for new physics, we set 95% C.L. limits on the production cross section times the branching ratio (σ x BR(H → γγ)) relative to the SM-like Higgs prediction for different assumed Higgs masses. The observed limits (σ(limit)/σ(SM)) range from 11.9 to 35.2 for Higgs masses from 100 to 150 GeV, while the expected limits range from 17.5 to 32.0. This search is also interpreted in the

  11. Poor prognosis of constitutive gamma-H2AX expressing triple-negative breast cancers is associated with telomere length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Kuijk, S.J. van; Martens, J.W.; Sweep, F.C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Bussink, J.; Span, P.N.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Here, we set out to establish whether endogenous gamma-H2AX is a biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer. METHODS: We explored the association of gamma-H2AX with mutation status and sensitivity to 139 different anticancer drugs in up to 41 breast cancer cell lines. Further, we correlated gam

  12. Meson exchange currents in the {sup 3}He({gamma},{pi}{sup +}){sup 3}H reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Tejedor, J.A.; Kamalov, S.S.; Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia--Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    1996-12-01

    We generate meson exchange currents mechanisms for the ({gamma},{pi}{sup +}) reaction in nuclei starting from the {gamma}{ital N}{r_arrow}{pi}{pi}{ital N} amplitude on one nucleon and allowing one of the pions to be produced off shell and be absorbed by a second nucleon. Detailed calculations are presented for the {gamma} {sup 3}He{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{sup 3}H reaction, where we show that the cross section at large momentum transfers is dominated by these mechanisms, helping improve the agreement with experimental data. It is also shown that the meson exchange currents produce important effects in the photon asymmetry in the {Delta}-resonance region. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Exploring Galactic TeV {gamma}-ray sources with H.E.S.S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eger, Peter A., E-mail: peter.eger@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), Physikalisches Institut, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-11-11

    The H.E.S.S. array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes continues to observe the southern sky with unprecedented sensitivity at very-high-energy (VHE, E>100GeV){gamma}-rays. This leads to a steady increase in the number of detected VHE {gamma}-ray sources as well as the discovery of sources with fluxes even below 1% of the flux of the Crab nebula. Up to now, well more than 100 VHE {gamma}-ray sources are known, which allow to study not only individual objects, but also whole populations of source classes, such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs). This paper focuses on Galactic sources, highlighting some aspects of the recent progress in this field. After discussing the general status and the future of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane survey, four individual sources related to recent discoveries are presented in detail in this contribution: (a) the PWNe HESS J1825-137 and HESS J1303-631 which show intriguing energy-dependent morphologies, (b) the formerly unidentified source HESS J1626-490 which is most likely associated to a molecular cloud illuminated with hadronic cosmic rays by a nearby SNR, and (c) Terzan 5 which is the first Galactic globular cluster that features a VHE {gamma}-ray source in direct vicinity.

  14. Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown in Methane: Diagnostic Using H-Gamma Line Broadening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements and analysis are reported of Stark-broadened profiles of the H-gamma line emitted from plasma formed by Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown (LIOB in a pulsed methane flow. Electron densities Ne are deduced for 18 instants of time in the range between 0.4 and 2.1 microseconds after LIOB and for 2 different gas pressures. The obtained values of Ne are in a good agreement with the corresponding values found previously from Stark-broadened profiles of the H-alpha and H-beta lines.

  15. Measurement of the Higgs boson mass in the $H\\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ and $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ channels with $\\sqrt{s}$=13TeV $pp$ collisions using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The mass of the Higgs boson is measured in the $H \\rightarrow ZZ^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ and in the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channels with 36 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data from the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2015 and 2016. The measured value in the $H \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow4\\ell$ channel is $124.88 \\pm 0.37$ GeV, while the measured value of $m_H$ in the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ channel is $125.11 \\pm 0.42$ GeV. The value of the Higgs boson mass obtained from a simultanous fit to the invariant mass distributions in the two channels is $124.98 \\pm 0.28$ GeV.

  16. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptor imaging for study of neuropsychiatric disorders%γ-氨基丁酸A型-苯二氮革受体显像剂在神经系统疾病中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍伟奇; 邱春; 管一晖

    2012-01-01

    γ-氨基丁酸A型-苯二氮革(GABAA-BZ)受体广泛分布于中枢神经系统,是嵌于神经细胞膜上的异质性多肽五聚体,不同的亚单位组合发挥不同的神经抑制性药理作用,如镇静催眠、抗惊厥、抗焦虑等.PET可用于活体内受体结合的研究.GABAA-BZ受体PET显像剂分为拮抗剂、激动剂、反向激动剂3类,其中以拮抗剂显像剂11C-氟马西尼最为成熟,在癫癎、焦虑症、抑郁症、植物状态、成瘾等神经精神疾病中广泛应用.%Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors are heterogeneous polypeptide pentamers widely spread in the central nervous system on the neuron membrane.Different subunit combinations educe various neuro-inhibitory pharmacological effects such as sedative,hypnosis,anticonvulsion and anxiolysis.PET can be utilized to study the binding of the receptors in vivo.PET radioligands of gammaaminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors can be classified into 3 types:antagonists,agonists and reverse agonists,of which antagonist radiotracer 11C-flumazenil is the most commonly applied in epilepsy,anxiety disorders,depression,vegetative state,addiction and other neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  17. First detection of VHE gamma-rays from SN 1006 by H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; de Almeida, U Barres; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Conrad, J; Chounet, L -M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzy'nski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Klu'zniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; Orford, E de Ona Wilhelmi K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, M Paz Arribas G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, 12 G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Ryde, F; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schönwald, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sushch, I; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2010-01-01

    Recent theoretical predictions of the lowest very high energy (VHE) luminosity of SN 1006 are only a factor 5 below the previously published H.E.S.S. upper limit, thus motivating further in-depth observations of this source. Deep observations at VHE energies (above 100 GeV) were carried out with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Cherenkov Telescopes from 2003 to 2008. More than 100 hours of data have been collected and subjected to an improved analysis procedure. Observations resulted in the detection of VHE gamma-rays from SN 1006. The measured gamma-ray spectrum is compatible with a power-law, the flux is of the order of 1% of that detected from the Crab Nebula, and is thus consistent with the previously established H.E.S.S. upper limit. The source exhibits a bipolar morphology, which is strongly correlated with non-thermal X-rays. Because the thickness of the VHE-shell is compatible with emission from a thin rim, particle acceleration in shock waves is likely to be the origin of the gamma-r...

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in black pepper and red pepper by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Jae; Sung, Hye-Jung; Kim, Sung-Youn; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-17

    This study evaluated the efficacy of gamma irradiation to inactivate foodborne pathogens in black pepper (Piper nigrum) and red pepper (dried Capsicum annuum). Black pepper and red pepper inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation in the range of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy, and color change was evaluated after treatment. Pathogen populations decreased with increasing treatment doses. A gamma irradiation dose of 5 kGy decreased E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium populations >4.4 to >5.2 log CFU/g in black pepper without causing color change. Similarly, 5 kGy of gamma irradiation yielded reduction of 3.8 to >5.2 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in red pepper. During gamma irradiation treatment, L*, a* and b* values of red pepper were not significantly changed except for 297 μm to 420 μm size red pepper treated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation. Based on the D-value of pathogens in black pepper and red pepper, S. Typhimurium showed more resistant to gamma irradiation than did E. coli O157:H7. These results show that gamma irradiation has potential as a non-thermal process for inactivating foodborne pathogens in spices with minimal color changes.

  19. Dose-response relationship of {gamma}-H2AX foci induction in human lymphocytes after X-rays exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandina, Tania [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Roch-Lefevre, Sandrine H.; Voisin, Pascale [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LDB, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Romero, Ivonne [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Garcia, Omar, E-mail: omar@cphr.edu.cu [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Voisin, Philippe; Roy, Laurence [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LDB, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-09-15

    Biological dosimeters are recommended for dose estimation in case of human overexposure to ionising radiation. Rapid measurement of {gamma}-H2AX foci as a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induction has been recently tested with this purpose. Here we reported a dose-response relationship after X-ray irradiation at different times post-exposure. Blood samples were obtained from several healthy donors and exposed to doses between 0 and 2 Gy. After irradiation, blood samples were incubated at 37 deg. C during 0.5 h, 5 h, and 8 h. Scoring of cells and {gamma}-H2AX foci was performed by software. The dose-response curves for different incubation times were as follows: Y{sub (0.5h)} = 11.66D + 0.15 (R{sup 2} = 0.99), Y{sub (5h)} = 2.44D + 0.15 (R{sup 2} = 0.99), Y{sub (8h)} = 1.57D + 0.22 (R{sup 2} = 0.99). At 0.5 h post-exposure, the dose-response relationship for X-irradiated lymphocytes was similar to the one obtained after gamma-irradiation using the same protocol. On the other hand, the results were not similar after 8 h due to different kinetics after gamma- and X-irradiation. Our results confirm the possibilities of using {gamma}-H2AX foci method for dose estimation in a period from 0.5 h up to 8 h post X-irradiation and support the hypothesis of differences in {gamma}-H2AX foci kinetics after gamma- and X-irradiation in vitro.

  20. Search for VHE Gamma-Ray Emission from Young SNe with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Lennarz, D

    2013-01-01

    Supernova (SN) remnants are a well motivated candidate for the acceleration sites of cosmic rays with energies up to the knee (10^15 eV). It has been suggested that also young SNe (~10 GeV) gamma-ray radiation. The H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array is an instrument sensitive to such radiation. In this contribution, the pointing directions of the H.E.S.S. telescopes are compared to a recently published, extragalactic SN catalogue to identify coincidental observations. The results of the data analysis are discussed.

  1. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with ASTRO-H and Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, M; Tashiro, M S; Ueno, H; Yonetoku, D; Sameshima, H; Takahashi, T; Seta, H; Mushotzky, R; Yamaoka, K

    2015-01-01

    ASTRO-H, the sixth Japanese X-ray observatory, which is scheduled to be launched by the end of Japanese fiscal year 2015 has a capability to observe the prompt emission from Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) utilizing BGO active shields for the soft gamma-ray detector (SGD). The effective area of the SGD shield detectors is very large and its data acquisition system is optimized for short transients such as short GRBs. Thus, we expect to perform more detailed time-resolved spectral analysis with a combination of ASTRO-H and Fermi LAT/GBM to investigate the gamma-ray emission mechanism of short GRBs. In addition, the environment of the GRB progenitor should be a remarkable objective from the point of view of the chemical evolution of high-z universe. If we can maneuver the spacecraft to the GRBs, we can perform a high-resolution spectroscopy of the X-ray afterglow of GRBs utilizing the onboard micro calorimeter and X-ray CCD camera.

  2. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Di Pierro, F; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Ramazani, V Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Munoz, A González; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nogués, L; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Perri, L; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; D'Ammando, F; Hovatta, T; Max-Moerbeck, W; Raiteri, C M; Readhead, A C S; Reinthal, R; Richards, J L; Verrecchia, F; Villata, M

    2016-01-01

    The MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes observed the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, $E > 100$ GeV) $\\gamma$-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9 $\\sigma$. The integral flux above 150 GeV is estimated to be $(2.0\\pm 0.5)$ per cent of the Crab Nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100 MeV $ < E < 100$ GeV) $\\gamma$-ray observations from Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be $z = 0.34 \\pm 0.15$. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and t...

  3. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of y-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxylase activity, culture of Lb. rhamnosus YS9 in medium supplemented with 200 mM of monosodium glutamate and 200 µM of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP, produced 187 mM of GABA.

  4. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of y-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxylase activity, culture of Lb. rhamnosus YS9 in medium supplemented with 200 mM of monosodium glutamate and 200 µM of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP, produced 187 mM of GABA.

  5. New gauge boson $B_{H}$ production associated with W boson pair via $\\gamma\\gamma$ collision in the littlest Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X; Liu, Y; Liu, S; Yang, H; Wang, Xuelei; Chen, Jihong; Liu, Yaobei; Liu, Suzhen; Yang, Hua

    2006-01-01

    The littlest Higgs model is the most economical little Higgs model. The observation of the new gauge bosons predicted by the littlest Higgs model could serve as a robust signature of the model. The ILC, with the high energy and luminosity, can open an ideal window to probe these new gauge bosons, specially, the lightest $B_H$. In the framework of the littlest Higgs model, we study a gauge boson $B_{H}$ production process $\\gamma\\gamma\\to W^{+}W^{-}B_H$. The study shows that the cross section of the process can vary in a wide range($10^{-1}-10^1$ fb) in most parameter spaces preferred by the electroweak precision data. The high c.m. energy(For example, $\\sqrt{s}=1500$ GeV) can obviously enhance the cross section to the level of tens fb. For the favorable parameter spaces, the sufficient typical events could be assumed at the ILC. Therefore, our study about the process $\\gamma\\gamma\\to W^{+}W^{-}B_H$ could provide a useful theoretical instruction for probing $B_H$ experimentally at ILC. Furthermore, such proces...

  6. Extending Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. limits on gamma-ray lines from dark matter annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2016-10-01

    Gamma-ray lines from dark matter annihilation (χχ → γX, where X = γ, h, Z) are always accompanied, at lower energies, by a continuum gamma-ray spectrum stemming both from radiative corrections (X = γ) and from the decay debris of the second particle possibly present in the final state (X = h, Z). This model-independent gamma-ray emission can be exploited to derive novel limits on gamma-ray lines that do not rely on the line feature. Although such limits are not expected to be as stringent as those based on the line feature, they can be used to probe the existence of gamma-ray lines for dark matter masses beyond the largest energies accessible to current telescopes. Here, we use continuous gamma-ray searches from Fermi-LAT observations of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies and from H.E.S.S. observations of the Galactic halo to extend the limits on the annihilation cross-sections into monochromatic photons to dark matter masses well beyond 500 GeV (Fermi-LAT) and 20 TeV (H.E.S.S.). In this large-mass regime, our results provide the first constraints on gamma-ray lines from dark matter annihilation.

  7. Exact formulae for Higgs production through $e\\gamma \\to eH$ in the non-linear $R_{\\xi}$-gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Cotti, U; Toscano, J J

    1997-01-01

    We study the production of the SM Higgs boson (H^0) at future e gamma colliders, through the reaction e gamma --> e H^0. The amplitude is evaluated using the non-linear R_\\xi gauge, which greatly simplifies the calculation. Complete analytical expressions for the amplitudes are presented, which include the contributions from 1-loop triangles "gamma gamma^* H^0" and "gamma Z^* H^0" as well as the W- and Z-boxes with their related $eeH^0$ triangle graphs. The resulting cross section for this mechanism indicates that it could be used to detect the Higgs signal and to test its properties.

  8. High-resolution profiling of gammaH2AX around DNA double strand breaks in the mammalian genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovoni, Jason S; Caron, Pierre; Lassadi, Imen; Nicolas, Estelle; Massip, Laurent; Trouche, Didier; Legube, Gaëlle

    2010-04-21

    Chromatin acts as a key regulator of DNA-related processes such as DNA damage repair. Although ChIP-chip is a powerful technique to provide high-resolution maps of protein-genome interactions, its use to study DNA double strand break (DSB) repair has been hindered by the limitations of the available damage induction methods. We have developed a human cell line that permits induction of multiple DSBs randomly distributed and unambiguously positioned within the genome. Using this system, we have generated the first genome-wide mapping of gammaH2AX around DSBs. We found that all DSBs trigger large gammaH2AX domains, which spread out from the DSB in a bidirectional, discontinuous and not necessarily symmetrical manner. The distribution of gammaH2AX within domains is influenced by gene transcription, as parallel mappings of RNA Polymerase II and strand-specific expression showed that gammaH2AX does not propagate on active genes. In addition, we showed that transcription is accurately maintained within gammaH2AX domains, indicating that mechanisms may exist to protect gene transcription from gammaH2AX spreading and from the chromatin rearrangements induced by DSBs.

  9. $H\\to Z\\gamma$ in the gauge-Higgs unification

    CERN Document Server

    Funatsu, Shuichiro; Hosotani, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The decay rate of the Higgs decay $H \\to Z \\gamma$ is evaluated at the one-loop level in the $SO(5)\\times U(1)$ gauge-Higgs unification. Although an infinite number of loops with Kaluza-Klein states contribute to the decay amplitude, there appears the cancellation among the loops, and the decay rate is found to be finite and non-zero. It is found that the decay rate is well approximated by the decay rate in the standard model multiplied by $\\cos^2\\theta_H$, where $\\theta_H$ is the Aharonov-Bohm phase induced by the vacuum expectation value of an extra-dimensional component of the gauge field.

  10. Muon Beam Studies in the H4 beam line and the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

    CERN Document Server

    Margraf, Rachel; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In this report, I summarize my work of detailed study and optimization of the muon beam configuration of H4 beam line in SPS North Area. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, I studied the properties and behavior of the muon beam in combination with the field of the large, spectrometer “ GOLIATH” magnet at -1.5, -1.0, 0, 1.0 and 1.5 Tesla, which is shown to affect the central x position of the muon beam that is delivered to the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). I also studied the muon beam for different configurations of the two XTDV beam dumps upstream of GIF++ in the H4 beam line. I will also discuss my role in mapping the magnetic field of the GOLIATH magnet in the H4 beam line.

  11. Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the ASTRO-H Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gilmore, Kirk; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kokubun, Motohide; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Madejski, Greg; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Shin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; 10.1117/12.857531

    2010-01-01

    ASTRO-H is the next generation JAXA X-ray satellite, intended to carry instruments with broad energy coverage and exquisite energy resolution. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of ASTRO-H instruments and will feature wide energy band (40-600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than the current instruments on orbit. SGD is complimentary to ASTRO-H's Hard X-ray Imager covering the energy range of 5-80 keV. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield where Compton kinematics is utilized to reject backgrounds. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) sensors. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors, and it results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Utilization of Compton kinematics also makes the SGD sensitive to the gamma-ray polarization, opening up a new window ...

  12. Theoretical study of the ${}^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,p)^3\\rm{H}$ and ${}^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,n)^3\\rm{He}$ reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Dinur, Nir Nevo; Barnea, Nir

    2013-01-01

    {\\it Ab initio} calculation of the total cross section for the reactions $^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,p)^3\\rm{H}$ and $^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,n)^3\\rm{He}$ is presented, using state-of-the-art nuclear forces. The Lorentz integral transform (LIT) method is applied, which allows exact treatment of the final state interaction (FSI). The dynamic equations are solved using the effective interaction hyperspherical harmonics (EIHH) method. In this calculation of the cross sections the three-nucleon force is fully taken into account, except in the source term of the LIT equation for the FSI transition matrix element.

  13. Long-term exposure to dieldrin reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function in primary cultures of mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babot, Zoila; Vilaró, M Teresa; Suñol, Cristina

    2007-12-01

    The organochlorine pesticide dieldrin is a persistent organic pollutant that accumulates in the fatty tissue of living organisms. In mammals, it antagonizes the GABA(A) receptor, producing convulsions after acute exposure. Although accumulation in human brain has been reported, little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dieldrin in the nervous system. Homeostatic control of the balance between excitation and inhibition has been reported when neuronal activity is chronically altered. We hypothesized that noncytotoxic concentrations of dieldrin could decrease glutamatergic neurotransmission as a consequence of a prolonged reduction in GABA(A) receptor function. Long-term exposure of primary cerebellar granule cell cultures to 3 microM dieldrin reduced the GABA(A) receptor function to 55% of control, as measured by the GABA-induced (36)Cl(-) uptake. This exposure produced a significant reduction (approximately 35%) of the NMDA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and of the [(3)H]MK-801 binding, which was not accompanied by a reduction in the NMDA receptor subunit NR1, as determined by Western blot. Consistent with the decreased NMDA receptor function, dieldrin-treated cultures were insensitive to an excitotoxic stimulus induced by exposure to high potassium. In summary, we report that the chronic reduction of GABA(A) receptor function induced by dieldrin decreases the number of functional NMDA receptors, which may be attributable to a mechanism of synaptic scaling. These effects could underlie neural mechanisms involved in cognitive impairment produced by low-level exposure to dieldrin. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate abuse and dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorden, M.S. van; Kamal, R.M.; Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Brunt, T.M.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a short-chain fatty acid that naturally occurs in the brain, where it acts as a neurotransmitter and as a neuromodulator. GHB is a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue that passes the blood–brain barrier. GHB exerts its actions by binding to the GHB receptor

  15. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate abuse and dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorden, M.S. van; Kamal, R.M.; Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Brunt, T.M.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a short-chain fatty acid that naturally occurs in the brain, where it acts as a neurotransmitter and as a neuromodulator. GHB is a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue that passes the blood–brain barrier. GHB exerts its actions by binding to the GHB receptor in the

  16. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate abuse and dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorden, M.S. van; Kamal, R.M.; Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Brunt, T.M.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a short-chain fatty acid that naturally occurs in the brain, where it acts as a neurotransmitter and as a neuromodulator. GHB is a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue that passes the blood–brain barrier. GHB exerts its actions by binding to the GHB receptor in the

  17. Search for $h_f\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ with the D0 detector at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; sman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Dliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gel, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gmez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kura, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Lévêque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, a S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy Garzn, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Snchez-Hernndez, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, aa L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strhomer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a search for a narrow resonance decaying into two photons in 1.1 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider during the period 2002-2006. We find no evidence for such a resonance and set a lower limit on the mass of a fermiophobic Higgs boson of $m_{h_f}>100$ GeV at the 95% C.L. This exclusion limit exceeds those obtained in previous searches at the Tevatron and covers a significant region of the parameter space $B(h_{f}\\to\\gamma\\gamma)$ vs. $m_{h_f}$ which was not accessible at the CERN LEP Collider.

  18. A portable microfluidic fluorescence spectrometer device for {gamma}-H2AX-based biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, I.A.; Barber, P.R. [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Horn, S.; Ainsbury, E. [Health Protection Agency Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom); Rothkamm, K., E-mail: kai.rothkamm@hpa.org.uk [Health Protection Agency Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom); Vojnovic, B. [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Following a radiological incident the rapid identification of those individuals exposed to critically high radiation doses is important for initial triage and medical treatment. It has been previously demonstrated that scoring of radiation-induced foci of the phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX, which form at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks, may be used to determine radiation exposure levels from blood samples. Although faster than the 'gold standard' dicentric assay, foci scoring is still impractical in a field situation where large numbers of people may need to be screened. To deal with such a situation, an inexpensive portable device with high throughput capacity is desirable. Here we describe a portable microfluidic fluorescence spectrometer device which passes a suspension of {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence-stained lymphocytes through a focused 488 nm laser beam in a microfluidic chamber and records emission spectra over the range 495-725 nm. The recorded emission spectra are spectrally unmixed into their constituent parts from which radiation exposure levels are determined. Proof of principle is demonstrated using cultured lymphoblastoid cells, exposed to X-ray doses between 0 and 8 Gy. With the current prototype setup it takes approximately 6 min to acquire and analyse 10,000 spectra. Further effort is required to fully develop this approach into a portable triage tool that could be used to help classify people into appropriate treatment categories based on radiation exposure levels.

  19. The soft gamma-ray detector (SGD) onboard ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Blandford, Roger; Enoto, Teruaki; Goldwurm, Andrea; Hagino, Kouichi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Ichinohe, Yuto; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kokubun, Motohide; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, François; Limousin, Olivier; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Kunishiro; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakano, Toshio; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumu; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of science instruments onboard ASTRO-H (Hitomi) and features a wide energy band of 60{600 keV with low backgrounds. SGD is an instrument with a novel concept of "Narrow field-of-view" Compton camera where Compton kinematics is utilized to reject backgrounds which are inconsistent with the field-of-view defined by the active shield. After several years of developments, the flight hardware was fabricated and subjected to subsystem tests and satellite system tests. After a successful ASTRO-H (Hitomi) launch on February 17, 2016 and a critical phase operation of satellite and SGD in-orbit commissioning, the SGD operation was moved to the nominal observation mode on March 24, 2016. The Compton cameras and BGO-APD shields of SGD worked properly as designed. On March 25, 2016, the Crab nebula observation was performed, and, the observation data was successfully obtained.

  20. 反复热性惊厥过程中γ-氨基丁酸B受体对硫化氢的调节作用%Gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor regulates the expression of hydrogen sulfide /cystathionine-β-synthase system in recurrent febrile seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖; 秦炯; 卜定方; 常杏芝; 杨志仙; 杜军保

    2006-01-01

    目的热性惊厥(febrile seizure,FS)是婴幼儿时期最常见的惊厥性疾患之一,阐明其发生机制一直是该领域的重要研究课题.该课题前期的研究证明,γ-氨基丁酸B受体(γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor,GABABR)亚基和气体信号分子硫化氢(H2S)均在反复热性惊厥中发挥了重要作用.该文使用GABABR激动剂ba-clofen,抑制剂Phaclofen,探讨GABABR对FS大鼠硫化氢/胱硫醚-β-合成酶(cystathionine-β-synthase,CBS)体系表达的影响.方法大鼠随机分为对照组,FS组,FS+baclofen组,FS+phaclofen组.采用热水浴诱导大鼠FS,隔日诱导1次,共10次.采用分光光度计法测定大鼠血浆中H2S含量;用原位杂交方法观察CBS mRNA表达情况;用免疫组化方法观察CBS蛋白表达情况.结果FS+baclofen组H2S含量较FS组升高427.45±15.91μmoL/L vs362.14±19.71 μmol/L,同时CBS表达也较FS组增强;而FS+phaclofen组H2S含量较FS组降低189.72±21.53μmol/L vs 362.14±19.71 μmol/L,同时CBS表达也较FS组减弱.结论反复热性惊厥过程中,GABABR的改变可影响H2S/CBS体系的表达.

  1. Ab initio study of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 4}He reactions and the tensor force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K.; Aoyama, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D. [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata, 940-8532 (Japan); Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan and RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, C.P.229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, CP165/82, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H, {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He, and {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reactions at low energies are studied with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in an ab initio approach. The obtained astrophysical S-factors are all in very good agreement with experiment. The most important channels for both transfer and radiative capture are all found to dominate thanks to the tensor force.

  2. Brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentraiton of the prefrontal lobe in unmedicated paitents with Obsessive-compulsive disorder:a research of magneitc resonance spectroscopy%未用药强迫症患者前额叶γ-氨基丁酸水平的磁共振波谱研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宗凤; 范青; 白艳乐; 王振; 张海音; 肖泽萍

    2016-01-01

    背景:近年来,大量的神经影像学研究发现强迫症(obsessive-compulsive disorder,OCD)在皮层-纹状体-丘脑-皮层(coritco-striato-thalamo-coritcal,CSTC)环路存在代谢方面的异常,前额叶是CSTC环路的重要脑区。  目的:本研究采用磁共振波谱技术研究OCD患者前额叶神经代谢的特点及其与临床特征之间的关系。  方法:研究入组未用药(8周及以上)的OCD患者78例以及76例健康对,性别、年龄及受教育年限无统计学差异。采用3.0 T西门子磁共振扫描仪分别收集眶额回(orbito frontal cortex,OFC)及前扣带回(anterior cingulate cortex,ACC)部位的磁共振波谱数据,采集序列为mega-press序列,基于LCmodel 6.3的分析方法得到OFC及ACC部位的γ-氨基丁酸(gamma-aminobutyric acid,GABA)、谷氨酸复合物(glutamine/glutamate,Glx)及N-乙酰天门冬氨酸(NAA)比水的相对浓度进行统计分析;采用两样本t 检验分析OCD组与健康对照组代谢物质浓度的差异,基于Pearson相关分析的方法,分析相关的代谢物质浓度与耶鲁-布朗强迫量表(Y-BOCS),汉密尔顿焦虑、抑郁量表(HAMA、HAMD)得分的相关性。  结果:与健康对照组相比,OCD患者OFC部位的GABA/W、NAA/W 显著减少(p=0.031,t=-2.193;p=0.002,t=-3.223);ACC部位的GABA/W有减少趋势(p=0.059,t=-1.921)。 OFC部位的GABA/W与耶鲁-布朗强迫思维、行为及强迫总分(Y-BOCS-O、Y-BOCS-C、Y-BOCS-T)负相关(p=0.037,r=-0.221;p=0.007, r=-0.283;p=0.014,r=-0.259)。  结论:OCD患者OFC部位的GABA相对水平存在显著减少,ACC存在减少趋势,且与临床症状相关,提示GABA与OCD精神病理相关。%Background: In recent years, a large number of neuroimaging studies found that the Cortico-Striato-Thalamo-Cortical circuit (CSTC), including the prefrontal lobe, a significant part of CSTC, has

  3. Specific gamma-hydroxybutyrate-binding sites but loss of pharmacological effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate in GABA-B1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2003-01-01

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate and its prodrug, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), recently received increased public attention as they emerged as popular drugs of abuse...

  4. Near threshold angular distributions of the $^2$H$(\\gamma,\\Lambda)$X reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Beckford, B; Chiba, A; Doi, D; Fujii, T; Fujii, Y; Futatsukawa, K; Gogami, T; Hashimoto, O; Honda, R; Hosomi, K; Kanda, H; Kaneta, M; Kaneko, Y; Kato, S; Kawama, D; Kimura, C; Kiyokawa, S; Koike, T; Maeda, K; Makabe, K; Matsubara, M; Miwa, K; Nagao, S; Nakamura, S N; Okuyama, A; Shirotori, K; Sugihara, K; Tamura, H; Tsukada, K; Yagi, K; Yamamoto, F; Yamamoto, T O; Han, Y C; Hirose, K; Ishikawa, T; Suzuki, K; Tamae, T; Yamazaki, H

    2013-01-01

    A study of the $^2$H$({\\gamma},{\\Lambda})$X reaction was performed using a tagged photon beam at the Research Center for Electron Photon Science (ELPH), Tohoku University. The photoproduced $\\Lambda$ was measured in the $p{\\pi^{-}}$ decay channel by the upgraded Neutral Kaon Spectrometer (NKS2+). The momentum integrated differential cross section was determined as a function of the scatting angle of ${\\Lambda}$ in the laboratory frame for five energy bins. Our results indicated a peak in the cross section at angles smaller than cos$\\theta^{LAB}_{\\Lambda}$ = 0.95. The experimentally obtained angular distributions were compared to isobar models, Kaon-Maid (KM) and Saclay-Lyon A (SLA), in addition to the composite Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model. Both SLA(r$K_{1}K_{\\gamma}$ = -1.4) and RPR describe the tendency of the data quite well in contrast to the KM model that substantially under predicted the cross section. With the anticipated forthcoming data on ${\\Lambda}$ integrated and momentum dependent differentia...

  5. Test of low-energy theorems for 1H(--> gamma, pi(0))(H)in the threshold hegion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A; Achenbach, P; Ahrens, J; Arends, H J; Beck, R; Bernstein, A M; Hejny, V; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Kuhr, V; Leukel, R; MacGregor, I J; McGeorge, J C; Metag, V; Olmos De León, V M; Rambo, F; Siodlaczek, U; Ströher, H; Walcher, T; Weiss, J; Wissmann, F; Wolf, M

    2001-12-03

    The photon asymmetry in the reaction 1H(--> gamma,pi(0))(1)H close to threshold has been measured for the first time with the photon spectrometer TAPS using linearly polarized photons from the tagged-photon facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. The total and differential cross sections were also measured simultaneously with the photon asymmetry. This allowed determination of the S-wave and all three P-wave amplitudes. The values obtained at threshold are E(0+) = [-1.33+/-0.08(stat)+/-0.03(syst)] x 10(-3)/m(pi(+)), P(1) = [9.47 +/- 0.08(stat) +/- 0.29(syst)] x 10(-3)q/m(2)(pi(+)), P(2) = [-9.46 +/- 0.1(stat) +/- 0.29(syst)] x 10(-3)q/m(2)(pi(+)), and P(3) = [11.48 +/- 0.06(stat) +/- 0.35(syst)] x 10(-3)q/m(2)(pi(+)).

  6. $H \\rightarrow \\tau^+ \\tau^- \\gamma$ as a Probe of the $\\tau$ Magnetic Dipole Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Galon, Iftah; Tait, Tim M P

    2016-01-01

    Low energy observables involving the Standard Model fermions which are chirality-violating, such as anomalous electromagnetic moments, necessarily involve an insertion of the Higgs in order to maintain $SU(2) \\times U(1)$ gauge invariance. As the result, the properties of the Higgs boson measured at the LHC impact our understanding of the associated low-energy quantities. We illustrate this feature with a discussion of the electromagnetic moments of the $\\tau$-lepton, as probed by the rare decay $H \\rightarrow \\tau^+ \\tau^- \\gamma$. We assess the feasibility of measuring this decay at the LHC, and show that the current bounds from lower energy measurements imply that $13~\\rm{TeV}$ running is very likely to improve our understanding of new physics contributing to the anomalous magnetic moment of the tau.

  7. Evaluation of soluble solids content and pH of ice cream treated with gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, V.D.; Nunes, T.C.F.; Fabbri, A.D.T.; Sagretti, J.M.; Sabato, S.F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The ice cream is considered an aerated suspension of fat and ice crystals in a concentrated sugar solution containing hydrocolloids, proteins and casein micelles. Only in Brazil, in the year 2010, it was produced 1120 million liter of ice cream and due to high demand by the consumers, this is considered the most important product of the dairy industry. The objective of this work is to evaluate the soluble solids content (SSC) and the hydrogenionic potential (pH) of vanilla ice cream conditioned in isothermal boxes irradiated with 3.0 and 5.0 kGy in the Multipurpose Irradiator of {sup 60}Co located at IPEN - CNEN/SP. It can be concluded that the treatment of ice cream with gamma radiation did not cause changes in the analyzed parameters. . (author)

  8. Evidence for the eta_b(2S) and observation of h_b(1P) -> eta_b(1S) gamma and h_b(2P) -> eta_b(1S) gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuk, R; Bondar, A; Pedlar, T K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Bay, A; Belous, K; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bischofberger, M; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, I -S; Cho, K; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fast, J E; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kawasaki, T; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koblitz, S; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Kouzes, R T; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, S -H; Li, J; Libby, J; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Louvot, R; Matvienko, D; McOnie, S; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Muramatsu, N; Mussa, R; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Ng, C; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Röhrken, M; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Schneider, O; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Smerkol, P; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Sumihama, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V

    2012-01-01

    We report the first evidence for the eta_b(2S) using the h_b(2P)->eta_b(2S)gamma transition and the first observation of the h_b(1P)->eta_b(1S)gamma and h_b(2P)->eta_b(1S)gamma transitions. The mass and width of the eta_b(1S) and eta_b(2S) are measured to be m_etab(1S)=(9402.4+-1.5+-1.8)MeV/c^2, m_etab(2S)=(9999.0+-3.5 +2.8-1.9)MeV/c^2 and Gamma_etab(1S)=(10.8 +4.0-3.7 +4.5-2.0)MeV. We also update the h_b(1P) and h_b(2P) mass measurements. We use a 133.4/fb data sample collected at energies near the Upsilon(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  9. Measurement of the Higgs boson mass from the $H\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H{\\rightarrow\\,}ZZ^{*}{\\rightarrow\\,}4\\ell$ channels with the ATLAS detector using 25 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abidi, Syed Haider; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    An improved measurement of the mass of the Higgs boson is derived from a combined fit to the invariant mass spectra of the decay channels $H\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H{\\rightarrow\\,}ZZ^{*}{\\rightarrow\\,}4\\ell$. The analysis uses the $pp$ collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8~TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 25 fb$^{-1}$. The measured value of the Higgs boson mass is $m_{H} = 125.36 \\pm 0.37 \\,\\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.18 \\,\\mathrm{(syst)}$ GeV. This result is based on improved energy-scale calibrations for photons, electrons, and muons as well as other analysis improvements, and supersedes the previous result from ATLAS. Upper limits on the total width of the Higgs boson are derived from fits to the invariant mass spectra of the $H\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H{\\rightarrow\\,}ZZ^{*}{\\rightarrow\\,}4\\ell$ decay channels.

  10. Optical and Gamma-Ray Variability of the vRL NLSy1 Galaxy, 1H 0323+342

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh R. Miller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 1H 0323+342 was one of the first vRLNLSy1 galaxies detected at gamma-rays with the Fermi-LAT and is one of the brightest of this class observed at optical wavelengths. We report the results of monitoring the optical flux, polarization and the gamma-ray flux of 1H 0323+342 during the past ~5 years. In some cases, the optical flux has been monitored on timescales as short as ~minutes simultaneously with two telescopes, demonstrating, for the first time, the reality of microvariability events with durations as short as ~15 min for this object.

  11. Double-bridge bonding of aluminium and hydrogen in the crystal structure of gamma-AlH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A; Denys, Roman V; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Frommen, Christoph; Fichtner, Maximilian; Bulychev, Boris M; Emerich, Hermann

    2007-02-19

    Aluminum trihydride (alane) is one of the most promising among the prospective solid hydrogen-storage materials, with a high gravimetric and volumetric density of hydrogen. In the present work, the alane, crystallizing in the gamma-AlH3 polymorphic modification, was synthesized and then structurally characterized by means of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. This study revealed that gamma-AlH3 crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell (space group Pnnm, a = 5.3806(1) A, b = 7.3555(2) A, c = 5.77509(5) A). The crystal structure of gamma-AlH3 contains two types of AlH6 octahedra as the building blocks. The Al-H bond distances in the structure vary in the range of 1.66-1.79 A. A prominent feature of the crystal structure is the formation of the bifurcated double-bridge bonds, Al-2H-Al, in addition to the normal bridge bonds, Al-H-Al. This former feature has not been previously reported for Al-containing hydrides so far. The geometry of the double-bridge bond shows formation of short Al-Al (2.606 A) and Al-H (1.68-1.70 A) bonds compared to the Al-Al distances in Al metal (2.86 A) and Al-H distances for Al atoms involved in the formation of normal bridge bonds (1.769-1.784 A). The crystal structure of gamma-AlH3 contains large cavities between the AlH6 octahedra. As a consequence, the density is 11% less than for alpha-AlH3.

  12. pH-sensitive wax emulsion copolymerization with acrylamide hydrogel using gamma irradiation for dye removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobashy, Mohamed Mohamady; Elhady, Mohamed., A.

    2017-05-01

    Emulsion polymerization is an efficient method for the production of new wax-hydrogel matrices of cetyl alcohol: stearic acid wax and acrylamide hydrogel using triethylamine (TEA) as an emulsifier. A cross-linking reaction occurred when a mixture of wax-hydrogel solution was irradiated with gamma rays at a dose of 20 kGy. The gelation percentage of the matrices (CtOH-StA/PAAm) was 86%, which indicates that a sufficiently high conversion occurred in these new wax-hydrogel matrices. The ability of PAAm and CtOH-StA/PAAm as an adsorbent for dye removal was investigated. The removal of three reactive dyes, namely Remazol Red (RR), Amido Black (AB), and Toluidine Blue (TB), from aqueous solutions depends on the pH of the dye solution. Removal efficiency was investigated by UV spectrophotometry, and the results showed the affinity of the wax hydrogel to adsorb TB was 98% after 320 min. Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance spectra confirmed the cross-linking process involved between the chains of wax and hydrogel; furthermore, scanning electron microscopy images showed that the wax and hydrogel were completely miscible to form a single matrix. Swelling measurements showed the high affinity of adsorbed dyes from aqueous solutions at different pH values to the wax-hydrogel network; the highest swelling values of 13.05 and 8.24 (g/g) were observed at pH 10 and 6, respectively

  13. Effect of gamma radiation on pH of commercial salad dressings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Susy F., E-mail: juliana.sagretti@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The demand for salad dressing has evolved significantly in recent years, and has been a frequent choice of meal. This can be attributed to the increasing consumption of healthier foods, low fat, convenience, availability and variety. Salad dressing is an oil-based emulsion in water (O/W) stabilized by proteins, phospholipids, and polysaccharides. It can be defined technically as a liquid medium used to add flavor, moisture, taste and adjust the appearance and texture of culinary preparations. Considering the positive effects of gamma irradiation in foods, such as improved security and stability of food products on shelves, pH is a key factor in addition to conservation as well. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation in the pH of 10 varieties of salad dressings, ready for consumption on the market in Sao Paulo, submitted to doses of 3.0 and 5.0 kGy in the irradiator Multipurpose IPEN / CNEN-SP. The irradiated samples were compared to control samples. The results showed no statistical difference by ANOVA and Tukey test at the 5% level of significance, which demonstrated that the application of radiation in addition to providing greater security to the product, do not interfere with their quality while maintaining a constant pH after irradiation. (author)

  14. Search for Gamma-ray Line Signatures with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Kieffer, Matthieu; Conrad, Jan; Farnier, Christian; Jacholkowska, A; Veh, Johannes; Viana, Aion

    2015-01-01

    Many results from astrophysical observations point to a 27% contribution of non-baryonic dark matter to the mass-energy budget of the universe. Although still elusive, strongly motivated candidates in form of weakly interacting massive particles could explain the nature of dark matter, and their annihilation or decay would give rise to detectable signatures in gamma-rays. In 2012, the H.E.S.S. collaboration started taking data with the largest imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope in the world which significantly lowered the energy threshold of the already operational four-telescope system. In particular, due to its location and improved performance at low energies, the H.E.S.S. experiment is now in a position to extend the search for dark matter line signals down to the 100 GeV mass range. The sensitivity to line searches with a new full likelihood approach will be discussed and preliminary results from observations with the second phase of H.E.S.S. will be presented.

  15. Interference in the $gg\\rightarrow h \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ On-Shell Rate and the Higgs Boson Total Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John [Fermilab; Carena, Marcela [Chicago U., KICP; Harnik, Roni [Fermilab; Liu, Zhen [Fermilab

    2017-04-26

    We consider interference between the Higgs signal and QCD background in $gg\\rightarrow h \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and its effect on the on-shell Higgs rate. The existence of sizable strong phases leads to destructive interference of about 2% of the on-shell cross section in the Standard Model. This effect can be enhanced by beyond the standard model physics. In particular, since it scales differently from the usual rates, the presence of interference allows indirect limits to be placed on the Higgs width in a novel way, using on-shell rate measurements. Our study motivates further QCD calculations to reduce uncertainties. We discuss potential width-sensitive observables, both using total and differential rates and find that the HL-LHC can potentially indirectly probe widths of order tens of MeV.

  16. Search for heavy neutrino in K{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub h}({nu}{sub h}{yields}{nu}{gamma}) decay at ISTRA+ setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duk, V.A., E-mail: Viacheslav.Duk@cern.ch [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.N.; Khudyakov, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Makarov, A.I.; Novikov, V.P.; Polyarush, A.Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Akimenko, S.A.; Britvich, G.I.; Filin, A.P.; Inyakin, A.V.; Kholodenko, S.A.; Leontiev, V.M.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Polyakov, V.A.; Romanovsky, V.I.; Stenyakin, O.V.; Tchikilev, O.G.; Uvarov, V.A.; Yushchenko, O.P. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-04

    Heavy neutrino {nu}{sub h} with m{sub h}{<=}300 MeV/c{sup 2} can be effectively searched for in kaon decays. We put upper limits on a mixing matrix element |U{sub {mu}h}|{sup 2} for radiatively decaying {nu}{sub h} from K{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub h}({nu}{sub h}{yields}{nu}{gamma}) decay chain in the following parameter region: 30 MeV/c{sup 2}{<=}m{sub h}{<=}80 MeV/c{sup 2}; 10{sup -11} s{<=}{tau}{sub h}{<=}10{sup -9} s. For the whole region |U{sub {mu}h}|{sup 2}{<=}5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -5} for Majorana type of {nu}{sub h} and |U{sub {mu}h}|{sup 2}{<=}8 Dot-Operator 10{sup -5} for the Dirac case.

  17. Limits on the TeV gamma-ray afterglow of fast radio bursts with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler, F.; Brun, F.; Pühlhofer, G.; Rowell, G.; Wagner, R.; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Keane, E.; Petroff, E.; SUPERB Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We here present the H.E.S.S. follow-up of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), millisecond-long, very strong radio pulses of yet unknown origin. The SUPERB (SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts) project at the Parkes radio observatory is able to detect these enigmatic events almost in real-time which allows triggering follow-up observations covering the full electromagnetic spectrum. The H.E.S.S. gamma-ray observatory is taking active part in this endeavor. Here we focus on data taken within hours of FRB 150418, which allow us to derive the first limits on gamma-ray afterglow emission of FRBs. Based on the identification of the potential host galaxy of this burst we are able to discuss absorption effects due to the extragalactic background light (EBL) and derive intrinsic, energy dependent limits on the gamma-ray afterglow.

  18. 交泰丸对睡眠剥夺大鼠下丘脑Orexin A及γ-氨基丁酸的影响%Effect of Jiaotai Pills on Hypothalamic Orexin A and Gamma-aminobutyric Acid in Sleep Deprivation Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    全世建; 焦蒙蒙; 黑赏艳; 钱莉莉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of Jiaotai Pills ( JP) on hypothalamic neurotransmitters of Orexin A and gamma-aminobutyric acid ( GABA) in rapid eye movement ( REM) sleep deprivation rats. Methods Rat model of REM-sleep deprivation was established by water small platform method. The rats were randomized into 6 groups, namely normal control group, model group, Diazepam group (3 mg/kg), and high-, medium-and low-dose JP groups ( JP in the dosage of 18.6, 9.3 and 4.6 g/kg respectively) . Enzyme-labeled instrument was used to detect the absorbance ratio of rat hypothalamic Orexin A content, and high performance liquid phase electrochemical detection method was adopted for the detection of hypothalamic GABA content. Results Compared with the normal control group, all of the rats in the model group suffered from insomnia, and the Orexin A content was increased ( P0.05) . Conclusion The sedative and hypnic mechanism of JP is probably related with the inhibition of hypothalamic Orexin A.%【目的】观察交泰丸对快速动眼(REM)睡眠剥夺大鼠下丘脑神经递质Orexin A及γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)的影响。【方法】采用水环境小平台法制备大鼠睡眠剥夺模型,将造模成功的大鼠随机分为6组,即交泰丸高、中、低剂量组(剂量分别为18.6、9.3、4.6 g/kg),地西泮组(剂量为3 mg/kg)、模型组及正常组,采用酶标仪吸光度法检测大鼠下丘脑促觉醒神经递质Orexin A,高效液相法库伦电化学检测大鼠下丘脑促睡眠神经递质GABA。【结果】与正常组比较,模型组大鼠完全处于失眠状态,其下丘脑Orexin A含量显著升高( P<0.05);与模型组比较,交泰丸高、中、低剂量组失眠状态有明显改善, Orexin A含量显著降低(P<0.05);与模型组比较,交泰丸高、中、低剂量组GABA含量无显著变化(P>0.05)。【结论】交泰丸的镇静催眠作用可能是通过抑制大鼠下

  19. VHE gamma-ray Emitting Pulsar Wind Nebulae Discovered by H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallant, Y.A.; /Montpellier U.; Carrigan, S.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Djannati-Atai, A.; /APC, Paris; Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Hinton, J.A.; /Leeds U.; Hoppe, S.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; de Jager, O.C.; /Potchefstroom U.; Khelifi, B.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Komin, Nu.; /Montpellier U.; Kosack, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Lemiere, A. /APC, Paris; Masterson, C.; /Dublin Inst.

    2008-06-05

    Recent advances in very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy have opened a new observational window on the physics of pulsars. The high sensitivity of current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, and in particular of the H.E.S.S. array, has already led to the discovery of about a dozen VHE-emitting pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and PWN candidates. These include the plerions in the composite supernova remnants MSH 15-52, G21.5-0.9, Kes 75, and Vela, two sources in the Kookaburra, and the nebula of PSR B1823-13. This VHE emission is generally interpreted as inverse Compton emission from the relativistic electrons and positrons accelerated by the pulsar and its wind; as such, it can yield a more direct spatial and spectral view of the accelerated particles than can be inferred from observations of their synchrotron emission. The VHE-emitting PWNe detected by the H.E.S.S. telescopes are reviewed and the implications for pulsar physics discussed.

  20. Probing charged matter through h → γγ, gamma ray lines, and EDMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, JiJi; Reece, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Numerous experiments currently underway offer the potential to indirectly probe new charged particles with masses at the weak scale. For example, the tentative excess in h → γγ decays and the tentative gamma-ray line in Fermi-LAT data have recently attracted attention as possible one-loop signatures of new charged particles. We explore the interplay between such signals, dark matter direct detection through Higgs exchange, and measurements of the electron EDM, by studying the size of these effects in several models. We compute one-loop effects to explore the relationship among couplings probed by different experiments. In particular, models in which dark matter and the Higgs both interact with charged particles at a detectable level typically induce, at loop level, couplings between dark matter and the Higgs that are around the level of current direct detection sensitivity. Intriguingly, one-loop h → γγ and DM DM → γγ, two-loop EDMs, and loop-induced direct detection rates are all coming within range of existing experiments for approximately the same range of charged particle masses, offering the prospect of an exciting coincidence of signals at collider, astrophysical, underground and atomic physics measurements.

  1. Search for Very-high-energy \\gamma-ray emission from Galactic globular clusters with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are established emitters of high-energy (HE, 100 MeV100 GeV) \\gamma-ray regime, judging from the recent detection of a signal from the direction of Terzan 5 with the H.E.S.S. telescope array. We searched for point-like and extended VHE \\gamma-ray emission from 15 GCs serendipitously covered by H.E.S.S observations and also performed a stacking analysis combining the data from all GCs to investigate the hypothesis of a population of faint emitters. Assuming IC emission as the origin of the VHE \\gamma-ray signal from the direction of Terzan 5, we calculated the expected \\gamma-ray flux from each of the 15 GCs, based on their number of millisecond pulsars, their optical brightness and the energy density of background photon fields. We did not detect significant VHE \\gamma-ray emission from any of the 15 GCs in either of the two analyses. Given the uncertainties related to the parameter determinations, the obtained flux upper limits allow to rule out the simple IC/msPSR scaling model for N...

  2. Unveiling the origin of gamma-ray emission towards the W41 region with H.E.S.S. data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méhault, Jérémie; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Fuessling, Matthias; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Behera, B.; Bernlühr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Borrel, V.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Conrad, J.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Domainko, A. Djannati-Ataü W.; Drury, L. O'c.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernan-Des, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fürster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füssling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Güring, D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jung, I.; Katarzynski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khálifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Klochkov, D.; Kluzniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Mau-Rin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; de Ona Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Orford, K. J.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schück, F. M.; Schünwald, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sushch, I.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Venter, L.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Vülk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    Both H.E.S.S. and MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes have observed very-high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from W41, a 105 years-old supernova remnant (SNR). The origin of this emission is still uncertain. Different scenarios, notably interaction with a molecular cloud or pulsar wind nebulae, have been proposed, in relation to 13 CO emission and X-ray pulsar candidates spatially coincident with the VHE excess. The improvement in event reconstruction and selection developed by the H.E.S.S. collaboration allows us to analyse this source with an unprecedented gamma-ray angular resolution. Furthermore, thanks to 5 time more H.E.S.S. data since the discovery paper, it is now possible to examine more precisely the spatial distribution of the VHE gamma-rays from W41 in com-parison with radio data. Informations provided by the 1-year Fermi-LAT catalogue will be included in the discussion of possible scenarios. The nearby SNR G22.7-0.2 (˜0.6° from W41, well within the H.E.S.S. field of view) appears to coincide with CO emission and is thus another potential VHE gamma-ray emitter.

  3. Study of the double Higgs production channel $H(\\rightarrow b\\bar{b})H(\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma)$ with the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This note presents the prospects for a measurement to observe di-Higgs production decaying to $b\\bar{b} \\gamma\\gamma$. This study is carried out in the context of the high luminosity LHC using an integrated luminosity of $3000$ fb$^{-1}$ and mean pileup rates $$ of 200. This analysis is based on generator-level information. The energy and momentum of the produced particles are smeared to simulate the response of the upgraded ATLAS detector and pile-up collisions. %on which the detector response is emulated using performance functions, which were derived from full simulation. An expected significance of $1.05\\sigma$ is found for this channel. Neglecting systematic uncertainties, the Higgs boson self-coupling would be constrained to $-0.8 < \\lambda/\\lambda_{SM} < 7.7$ at 95% confidence level.

  4. Cell size matters in gamma-H2AX assay for low-dose alpha particle effect assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ui seob; Kim, Eun Hee [Seoul National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gamma-H2AX assay is an immuno-fluorescence experiment that enables detecting the location and number of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in cells. Under uniform radiation beam intensity, cells would respond with similar numbers of gamma-H2AX if they are similar in cross section. If cells are not represented by a common size, however, a larger cell has a greater chance of radiation exposure and has a better chance of counting a greater number of foci. In other words, the cell size distribution would be reflected in the FPC distribution. In the conventional gamma-H2AX assay, the mean FPC value solely indicates the level of cellular damage under a certain radiation exposure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the FPC distribution in connection with the cell size distribution. The high-LET alpha beam was employed for radiation exposure so that a single track of radiation leaves a meaningful amount of energy in the cell. Gamma-H2AX is a powerful tool for investigating the cellular response at low-dose exposure. If the gamma-H2AX assay is performed with cells of the same size, 'the average number of foci per cell' may accord with the overall response of sample cells to radiation exposure. With cells of non-uniform size, however, one should be cautious in taking the value as an index of the severity in cellular effect of radiation exposure. According to our experiments, a portion of sample cells carried DSBs of more than 5 times greater number than the mean FPC value and might play a critical role in radio-response.

  5. Measurement of the $^{1}H$($\\vec{\\gamma}$, $\\vec{p}$)$\\pi^{0}$ reaction using a novel nucleon spin polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, D P; Aguar-Bartolomé\\, P; Akasoy, L K; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V S; Berghäuser, H; Braghieri, A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F B; Demissie, B T; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Freehart, B; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Jaegle, I; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A A; Kruglov, S P; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Maghrbi, Y; Manley, D M; Marinides, Z; Martinez, M; McGeorge, J C; McKinnon, B; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Micanovic, S; Middleton, D G; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Pheron, F; Polonski, A; Prakhov, S; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sober, D I; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Werthmüller, D; Workman, R L; Zamboni, I; Zehr, F

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large-acceptance measurement of polarization transfer from a polarized photon beam to a recoiling nucleon, pioneering a novel polarimetry technique with wide application to future nuclear and hadronic physics experiments. The commissioning measurement of polarization transfer in the $^{1}H$($\\vec{\\gamma}$,$\\vec{p}$)$\\pi^{0}$ reaction in the range $0.4gamma}<1.4$ GeV is highly selective regarding the basic parameterizations used in partial wave analyses to extract the nucleon excitation spectrum. The new data strongly favor the recently proposed Chew-Mandelstam formalism.

  6. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; D'Ammando, F.; Berdyugin, A.; Hovatta, T.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Raiteri, C. M.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reinthal, R.; Richards, J. L.; Verrecchia, F.; Villata, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes observed the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9σ. The integral flux above 150 GeV is estimated to be (2.0 ± 0.5) per cent of the Crab nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) γ-ray observations from Fermi-Large Area Telescope to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be z = 0.34 ± 0.15. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory telescope to study multifrequency characteristics of the source. We found no significant temporal variability of the flux in the HE and VHE bands. The flux in the optical and radio wavebands, on the other hand, did vary with different patterns. The spectral energy distribution of H1722+119 shows surprising behaviour in the ˜3 × 1014-1018 Hz frequency range. It can be modelled using an inhomogeneous helical jet synchrotron self-Compton model.

  7. Measurements of the Total and Differential Higgs Boson Production Cross Sections Combining the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ ^{*}\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ Decay Channels at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections of Higgs boson production are performed using 20.3~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are obtained from measured $H \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ ^{*}\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ event yields, which are combined accounting for detector efficiencies, fiducial acceptances and branching fractions. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of Higgs boson transverse momentum, Higgs boson rapidity, number of jets in the event, and transverse momentum of the leading jet. The total production cross section is determined to be $\\sigma_{pp \\to H} = 33.0 \\pm 5.3 \\, ({\\rm stat}) \\pm 1.6 \\, ({\\rm sys}) \\mathrm{pb}$. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art predictions.

  8. Lepton Polarization Asymmetries of $H\\to\\gamma\\tau^+\\tau^-$ Decays in Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar, Rabia; Aslam, M Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Recently, CMS and ATLAS collaborations at LHC announced a Higgs like particle with mass near $125$GeV. Regarding this, to explore its intrinsic properties, different observables are needed to be measured precisely at the LHC for various decay channels of the Higgs. In this context, we calculate the final state lepton polarization asymmetries, namely, single lepton polarization asymmetries ($P_i$) and double lepton polarization asymmetries ($P_{ij}$) in the SM for radiative semileptonic Higgs decay $H\\to\\gamma\\tau^+\\tau^-$. In the phenomenological analysis of these lepton polarization asymmetries both tree and loop level diagrams are considered and it is found that these diagrams give important contributions in the evaluation of said asymmetries. Interestingly, it is found that in $P_{ij}$ the tree level diagrams contribute separately, which however, are missing in the calculations of $P_i$ and the lepton forward-backward asymmetries ($A_{FB}$). Similar to the other observables such as the decay rate and the l...

  9. Study of $\\psi(3686)\\to\\pi^0 h_c, h_c\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$ via $\\eta_c$ exclusive decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    The process $\\psi(3686) \\to \\pi^0 h_c, h_c \\to \\gamma \\eta_c$ has been studied with a data sample of $106 \\pm 4$ million $\\psi(3686)$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. The mass and width of the $P$-wave charmonium spin-singlet state $h_c(^1P_1)$ are determined by simultaneously fitting distributions of the $\\pi^0$ recoil mass for 16 exclusive $\\eta_c$ decay modes. The results, $M(\\hc) = 3525.31 \\pm 0.11 {\\rm (stat.)} \\pm 0.14 {\\rm (syst.)}$\\,MeV/$c^2$ and $\\Gamma(\\hc) = 0.70 \\pm 0.28 \\pm 0.22$\\,MeV, are consistent with and more precise than previous measurements. We also determine the branching ratios for the 16 exclusive $\\eta_c$ decay modes, five of which have not been measured previously. New measurements of the $\\eta_c$ line-shape parameters in the $E1$ transition $h_c\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$ are made by selecting candidates in the $h_c$ signal sample and simultaneously fitting the hadronic mass spectra for the 16 $\\eta_c$ decay channels. The resulting $\\eta_c$ mass and width v...

  10. Efficacy of gamma radiation and aqueous chlorine on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in hydroponically grown lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nthenge, Agnes K; Weese, Jean S; Carter, Melvin; Wei, Cheng-I; Huang, Tung-Shi

    2007-03-01

    Interaction of Escherichia coli O157:H7/pGFP with hydroponically grown lettuce plants was evaluated in this study. Lettuce seedlings were planted in contaminated Hoagland's nutrient solution and thereafter subjected to gamma radiation at 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 kGy, and aqueous chlorine at 200 ppm. There was no trace of E. coli O157:H7/pGFP in lettuce leaves harvested from noncontaminated nutrient solution (control); however, for plants grown in contaminated nutrient solution, the pathogen was recovered from the leaves disinfected with 80% ethanol and 0.1% mercuric chloride. Most of the lettuce seedlings grown in contaminated nutrient solution tested negative for E. coli O157:H7/pGFP under controlled conditions. Gamma radiation at 0.25 and 0.5 kGy, and aqueous chlorine at 200 ppm failed to eliminate E. coli O157:H7/pGFP in lettuce tissue completely; however, the bacteria were not detected in 0.75-kGy treated plants. The presence of E. coli O157:H7/pGFP in lettuce leaves is an indication that the pathogen migrated from the contaminated hydroponic system through the roots to the internal locations of lettuce tissue. Due to inaccessibility and limited penetrating power, aqueous chlorine could not eliminate the bacteria localized in the internal tissue. Findings from this study suggest that gamma irradiation was more efficacious than was aqueous chlorine to control internal contamination in hydroponically grown lettuce. Gamma irradiation is a process that processors can use to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 and therefore, consumers benefit from a safer food product [corrected

  11. Very-high-energy gamma radiation from supernova remnants as seen with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Bochow, Anne; Gast, Henning; Marandon, Vincent; Renaud, Matthieu; Hofmann, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma radiation has already been detected from several supernova remnants (SNRs). These objects, which are well-studied in radio, optical and X-ray wavelengths, constitute one of the most intriguing source classes in VHE astronomy. H.E.S.S., an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in Namibia, has recorded an extensive dataset of VHE gamma-ray observations covering the central region of the Milky Way, both from pointed observations as well as from the Galactic Plane Survey conducted in the inner region of the Galaxy. From radio observations, several hundred SNRs are known in the Milky Way, but until now only few of them have been identified as VHE gamma-ray emitters. Using the H.E.S.S. dataset and a large ensemble of radio SNRs localized in the inner region of the Galaxy, the standard framework that links the origin of cosmic rays to the gamma-ray visibility of SNRs can now be tested. Here we present the ensemble of investigated SNRs and discuss constraints...

  12. Discovery of the two wings of the Kookaburra complex in VHE gamma -rays with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Kosack, K; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2006-01-01

    Aims. Search for Very High Energy gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex through observations with the H.E.S.S. array. Methods. Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov light emission of the gamma-ray showers in the atmosphere is used for the reconstruction and selection of the events to search for gamma-ray signals. Their spectrum is derived by a forward-folding maximum likelihood fit. Results. Two extended gamma-ray sources with an angular (68%) radius of 3.3-3.4' are discovered at high (>13sigma) statistical significance: HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609. They exhibit a flux above 1 TeV of (2.97+/-0.18stat +/-0.60sys)x10-12 and (2.17+/-0.17stat +/-0.43sys)x10-12 cm-2 s-1, respectively, and similar hard photon indices ~2.2. Multi-wavelength comparisons show spatial coincidence with the wings of the Kookaburra. Two pulsar wind nebulae candidates, K3/PSR J1420-6048 and the Rabbit, lie on the edge of the H.E.S.S. sources. Conclusions. The two new sources confirm the non-thermal nature of at least parts of the ...

  13. Prospects for measuring Higgs pair production in the channel $H(\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma)H(\\rightarrow b\\overline{b}) $ using the ATLAS detector at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Studies are presented on the prospects for the observation of Higgs pair production in the channel $H(\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma)H(\\rightarrow b\\overline{b})$ using an upgraded ATLAS detector, assuming a dataset comprising 3000~fb$^{-1}$ of 14~TeV proton-proton collisions at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Generator-level Monte Carlo events are used to perform this study, with parameterised efficiencies and resolution applied to approximate the expected performance of the upgraded ATLAS detector under HL-LHC conditions. After event selection, a signal yield of around $8$ events is obtained for the Standard Model scenario, corresponding to a signal significance of 1.3 $\\sigma$.

  14. Enhanced formation of quercetin by combined use of gamma ray and H2O2 from cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Cho, Jae-Young; Lee, In Chul; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    Cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside (cya-3-O-xylrut), a major pigment in Schizandra chinensis Baillon, was effectively removed by gamma irradiation of greater than 2 kGy, whereas quercetin, the most abundant of the flavonoids and has anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects, could be generated by degradation of cya-3-O-xylrut. In the present study, we investigated the effect of combination treatment of gamma irradiation and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the formation of quercetin through the degradation of cya-3-O-xylrut. Cya-3-O-xylrut was significantly degraded (˜93%) by gamma irradiation at 2 kGy and it was completely removed by a combination treatment (0.2% H2O2 and 2 kGy gamma ray). The formation of quercetin was significantly appeared at 2 kGy of gamma ray, together with disappearance of cya-3-O-xylrut. The quercetin formation by gamma ray is 3.2 μg/ml and combination treatment is 7.7 μg/ml. Therefore, the combination treatment of H2O2 and gamma ray is more effective to convert cya-3-O-xylrut into quercetin than gamma irradiation only. In conclusion, gamma ray combined with H2O2 would be a promising tool for bio-conversion of organic compounds.

  15. Leptoquark induced rare decay amplitudes $h \\to \\tau^\\mp \\mu^\\pm$ and $\\tau\\to \\mu\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Rare decay modes of the newly discovered standard-model-like Higgs boson $h$ may test the flavor changing couplings in the leptoquark sector through the process $h \\to \\tau^\\mp\\mu^\\pm$. Motived by the recently reported excess in LHC data from the CMS detector, we found that a predicted branching fraction Br($h \\to \\tau^\\mp\\mu^\\pm$) at the level of 1\\% is possible even though the coupling parameters are subjected to the stringent constraint from the null observation of $\\tau\\to\\mu\\gamma$, where the destructive cancellation among amplitudes is achievable by fine tuning.

  16. High energy gamma rays in the decay of 27h Ho166

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P.Gregers; Wilsky, K.; Horen, D.J.;

    1961-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of 27th Ho166 was re-investigated by means of a three-crystal pair-spectrometer and coincidence techniques. Two new gamma rays with energies of 1747 plusmn 5 and 1825 plusmn 5 keV establish a new level at 1826 keV in Er166. The log ft value for the beta-decay to this state...

  17. Baclofen and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a dangerous combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamal, R.M.; Qurishi, R.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Baclofen is a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-beta receptor agonist with a muscle relaxant effect. It increases GABA activity and reduces the production of glutamate and dopamine. The GABA precursor gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has gained popularity as a drug of abuse. For the first time, we report a

  18. Progress report for the enhancement of Radcalc: Isotope database, gamma absorption fractions, and G(H{sub 2}) values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1994-09-28

    Radcalc is a spreadsheet currently used to calculate the generation of hydrogen gas in low-level radioactive waste containers for purposes of transportation and packaging. Radcalc is being enlarged and expanded. It will be offered as a Windows compatible software and will include some of the following enhancements: extended radionuclide library, updated gamma absorption fractions for an increased number of packages, inclusion of a G(H{sub 2}) value data base, updated transportation information, thermal and pressure calculation update, testing and benchmarking. This report discusses the progress made on the new Radcalc program. It presents the new radionuclide library, the results of the gamma absorption fractions for the increased number of packages, and an extensive review of G(H{sub 2}) values.

  19. Production of t$\\gamma$, tZ and tH via Flavour Changing Neutral Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Amorim, Artur; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Santiago, Jose; Santos, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A UFO model describing general top quark Flavour Changing Neutral Currents is presented. We use it to study t$\\gamma$, tH and tZ production via FCNCs anomalous couplings at the Large Hadron Collider, in particular how the distributions of physical observables depend on the anomalous couplings. A sensitivity study of the Large Hadron Collider experiments to tZ production via FCNC in its second stage of operation is also performed.

  20. Mapping and identification of interferon gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins separated by immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, AC; Rossel Larsen, M; Roepstorff, P

    1999-01-01

    magnitude of IFN-gamma responsive genes has been reported previously. Our goal is to identify and map IFN-gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins to the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the immobilized pH gradient (IPG) two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) system...

  1. Determination of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ with $B^{0} \\rightarrow D(h^{+}h^{-})K*^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nardulli, Jacopo

    2008-01-01

    A study to measure the CKM unitarity-triangle angle $\\gamma$ with $B^0 \\to D K^{*0}$ decays is presented. The $D$ meson (either \\Dz or \\Dzb) is reconstructed in the two-body final states $\\Kpm\\pimp$, \\KpKm, and \\pipi, and the \\Kstarz in the self-tagging final state $\\Kp\\pim$. Detailed analysis of the signal and background are performed with the latest simulation of the LHCb experiment. The statistical uncertainty on $\\gamma$ is estimated to be in the range 15$^{\\circ}$ - 25$^{\\circ}$, for an integrated luminosity of 2~fb$^{-1}$, depending on the unknown value of the strong phase difference in \\Bz decays, \\dB, and other hadronic parameters, that can be evaluated from data.

  2. Detection of gamma rays from the supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622 with H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komin, N.R.

    2005-10-25

    This work reports on the observations of {gamma}-rays from the shell-type supernova remnant RXJ0852.0-4622 carried out with the High Energy Stereoscopic System in February 2004. H.E.S.S., a system of four imaging Cherenkov telescopes, is dedicated to the observation of {gamma}-rays of energies between 100 GeV and several tens of TeV. Emission of -rays from RXJ0852.0-4622 was detected with a significance of 12{sigma} within a live time of 3.2 h. The morphology of the emission region is clearly extended and correlated with the morphology of the X-ray emission. A differential energy spectrum of the photon flux between 0.5 and 10TeV was reconstructed. It is found to follow a power law dN/dE {proportional_to}E{sup -{gamma}} with a spectral index of {gamma}=2.1 {+-}0.1{sub stat} {+-}0.2{sub syst}. The integral photon flux above 1 TeV from the entire remnant is (1.9 {+-}0.3{sub stat} {+-}0.4{sub syst}) x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} which is at the level of the Crab flux at these energies, establishing RXJ0852.0-4622 as one of the brightest {gamma}-ray sources in the sky. RXJ0852.0-4622 is the second supernova remnant of which an extended {gamma}-ray morphology could be proved. The observed energy flux in {gamma}-rays between 0.5 and 10 TeV is calculated to be (9 {+-}1{sub stat} {+-}2{sub syst}) x 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Based on the energy flux in X-rays the expected energy flux due to inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on the cosmic microwave background is estimated. It is found to be several orders of magnitude lower than the observed flux, suggesting that another radiation component significantly contributes to the {gamma}-ray emission of RXJ0852.0-4622. In strong interactions of relativistic protons with the ambient interstellar material neutral pions are produced. The decay of these pions produce {gamma}-rays. The distance to RXJ0852.0-4622 and the density of the ambient interstellar material are open parameters in the

  3. Optimization of a mini-gamma camera based on a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu H8500 PSPMTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, Stan [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Wojcik, Randolph [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States): Ray Visions, Inc., 317 Blacksmith Arch, Yorktown, VA 23693 (United States)]. E-mail: wojcik@jlab.org; Weisenberger, Andrew [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2006-12-20

    We present the results of a comparative study between several scintillation sensors with the goal of optimizing the spatial resolution of a practical mini-gamma camera based on a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) with 64 anode pads per PSPMT. The readout of this 256 pad imager was achieved by a special in-house designed and optimized pad-decoupling strip readout reducing the number of readout channels to 32. Pixellated NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays, as well as thin continuous GSO, GSOZ, CsI(Na) and CsI(Tl) scintillator plates were coupled to this PSPMT array to form a compact mini-gamma camera. This round of tests, following extensive prior experience with this type of imager, was intended to investigate the possibility of achieving an intrinsic spatial resolution of under 1.0 mm FWHM across the whole surface of the mini-gamma camera. We confirmed the results of our previous studies that the best overall performance is achieved with pixellated NaI(Tl) arrays. The present resolution limit attainable with the H8500 PSPMT array is approaching 1.2 mm FWHM, which is equivalent to the smallest available pixel pitch of these arrays.

  4. Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2010-12-22

    To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

  5. Increased binding of [3H]GABA to striatal membranes following ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, A; Pulsinelli, W

    1983-05-01

    Sodium-independent binding of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) to membranes prepared from ischemic-damaged rat striatum was studied by kinetic and time-course analysis. Three days after 40 min of ischemia, [3H]GABA binding increased fourfold over control values. Scatchard analysis of the binding showed that ischemia significantly increased the affinity (KD) and the total number of binding sites (Bmax) for the high-affinity GABA receptor. These results support the conclusion that transient forebrain ischemia damages striatal GABAergic neurons.

  6. Relation between hippocampal gamma waves and behavioral disturbances induced by phencyclidine and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Leung, L S

    2000-06-15

    The relationship between hippocampal electrical activity and behavioral hyperactivity induced by either phencyclidine (PCP) or methamphetamine (MAP) was examined in freely behaving rats. The EEGs at the hippocampal CA1 region were simultaneously recorded with the animal's behavior for 2 h after administration of either PCP or MAP. PCP (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) significantly increased locomotor activity including rearing, walking, head-weaving and circling. Spectral analysis of the EEG showed that hippocampal gamma waves (30-70 Hz), but not other frequency bands, were significantly increased from 5 to 120 min after systemic injection of PCP. Inactivation of the medial septum with muscimol, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A agonist, 15 min prior to injection of PCP, suppressed both hippocampal gamma waves and locomotor activity. MAP (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased locomotor activity for longer than 2 h. During the behavioral hyperactivity induced by MAP, hippocampal EEG showed θ and gamma rhythms that were not significantly different from those during walking before MAP. However, MAP-induced behavioral activity was suppressed by pre-injection of muscimol in the medial septum, which also decreased hippocampal gamma activity. It is suggested that the medial septum plays a role in mediating behavioral disturbances induced by both PCP and MAP through control of the hippocampal electrical activity, and that hippocampal gamma waves may play a permissible role in the expression of behaviors.

  7. Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment of a nonylphenol ethoxylates: Degradation, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Munawar, E-mail: bosalvee@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar, Peshawar-25120 (Pakistan); Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad [Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040 (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Nonylphenol ethoxylates undergone gamma ray/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. • Treatment efficiency was evaluated on the basis of degradation and toxicity reduction. • A significant reductions in COD and TOC were achieved. • Radiolytic by-products were low carbon carboxylic acids. • AOP reduced the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity considerably. - Abstract: Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment of nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEO) was performed and treatment effect was evaluated on the basis of degradation, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC), and toxicity reduction efficiencies. The radiolytic by-products were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) techniques. Low mass carboxylic acids, aldehyde, ketone, and acetic acid were identified as the by-products of the NPEO degradation. NPEO sample irradiated to the absorbed dose of 15 kGy/4.58% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} showed more than 90% degradation. Allium cepa (A. cepa), brine shrimp, heamolytic tests were used for cytotoxicity study, while mutagenicity was evaluated through Ames test (TA98 and TA100 strains) of treated and un-treated NPEO. The reductions in COD and TOC were greater than 70% and 50%, respectively. Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment revealed a considerable reduction in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. A. cepa, heamolytic and shrimp assays showed cytotoxicity reduction up to 68.65%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. The mutagenicity reduced up to 62%, 74%, and 79% (TA98) and 68%, 78%, and 82% (TA100), respectively of NPEO-6, NPEO-9, and NPEO-30 irradiated to the absorbed dose of 15 kGy/4.58% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. NPEO-6 detoxified more efficiently versus NPEO-9 and NPEO-30 and results showed that Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment has the potential to mineralize and detoxify NPEO.

  8. Distribution of gamma-aminobutyric and nitrogen monoxide-coexisting neurons in cortical amygdaloid nucleus in rats and its modulation effect on pain transmission%大鼠杏仁皮质核内γ-氨基丁酸与一氧化氮共存神经元分布及对痛觉信息传递的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪晶晶; 凌树才; 朱晞

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quite a few deoxidized reduced form of nicotinamide-adenime dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH-d) -positive neurons distribute in amygdala complex (AMC) and gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)is an important inhibitory neurotransmitter that also widely distributes in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals. Whether there is coexistence of GABA and nitricoxide synthase (NOS) in AMC is unknown at present.OBJECTIVE: To observe whether there is GABA and NADPH-d-eoexist neuron in cortical nucleus of amygdala (Co) with the combination of NADPH-d hischemical and immunohistochemical double staining.DESIGN: A verifying controlled study based on the experimental animals.SETTING: Department of anatomy of two universities MATERIALS: The study was conducted in the department of Anatomy,Medical College of Zhejiang University between May 2004 and June 2004. Six SD rats in either gender with a body mass between 250 g and 300 g were selected.INTERVENTIONS: Coronary serial frozen slices of brain tissue were prepared. 4 sets of slices were selected for Nissl staining, NADPH-d histochemical staining, NADPH-d histochemical and GABA immunohistochemical double staining, and control experiment for the test of antibody specificity. GABA-labeled neurons, NADPH-d-positive neurons, and NADPH-d/GABA double-labeled neurons were counted in Co nucleus for the calculation of the percentage of double-labeled positive neurons to single-labeled positive neurons.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Distribution of NADPH-d/GABA double labeled neuron; distribution of NADPH-d or GABA single labeled neuron.RESULTS: Most of GABA-positive neurons distributed in posteromed cortical amygdaloid nucleus (PMCo), posterolateral cortical amygdaloid nucleus (PLCo), which were mainly small types but few middle types. Most of NADPH-d-positive neurons distributed in PMCo, PLCo and anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (Aco), which were mainly middle sized and small sized neurons. The ratio of NADPH-d/GABA double-labeled neurons

  9. Effect of pH on the Hydrolytic Kinetics of Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase from Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Balakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pH on the steady state kinetics of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT from Bacillus subtilis was examined using glutamyl-(3-carboxyl-4-nitroanilide as the chromogenic reporter substrate. The enzyme was active in the pH range 7.0–11.0 with the optimum activity at pH 11.0. We noticed a pH dependent transformation in the nature of substrate consumption kinetics. The substrate saturation curves were hyperbolic in the pH range 7.0–9.0 but changed into sigmoid form at pH 10.0 and 11.0. Hill’s coefficients were >1. We also analysed the effect of pH on the structure of the enzyme. The circular dichroism spectra of the enzyme sample at pH 9.0 and 11.0 were coincidental in both far and near UV regions indicating conservation of the secondary and tertiary structures, respectively. The molecular weight of the enzyme sample was the same in both pH 7.0 and 11.0 indicating conservation of the quaternary structure. These results show that the kinetic transformation does not involve significant conformational changes. Cooperative binding of multiple substrate molecules may not be the basis for the sigmoid kinetics as only one substrate binding site has been noticed in the reported crystal structures of B. subtilis GGT.

  10. Search for Extended {\\gamma}-ray Emission around AGN with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Malyshev, D

    2014-01-01

    Context: Very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) {\\gamma}-ray emission from blazars inevitably gives rise to electron-positron pair production through the interaction of these {\\gamma}-rays with the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). Depending on the magnetic fields in the proximity of the source, the cascade initiated from pair production can result in either an isotropic halo around an initially beamed source or a magnetically broadened cascade flux. Aims: Both extended pair halo (PH) and magnetically broadened cascade (MBC) emission from regions surrounding the blazars 1ES 1101-232, 1ES 0229+200 and PKS 2155-304 were searched for, using VHE {\\gamma}-ray data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), and high energy (HE; 100 MeV 10$^{-12}$G, this limits the production of pair halos developing from electromagnetic cascades. For weaker magnetic fields, in which electromagnetic cascades would result in magnetically broadened cascades, EGMF strengths in the range (0.3 - 3)$\\times 10^{-15}$G were e...

  11. Absolute hydrogen depth profiling using the resonant $^{1}$H($^{15}$N,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{12}$C nuclear reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Tobias P; Bemmerer, Daniel; Stöckel, Klaus; Wagner, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Resonant nuclear reactions are a powerful tool for the determination of the amount and profile of hydrogen in thin layers of material. Usually, this tool requires the use of a standard of well-known composition. The present work, by contrast, deals with standard-less hydrogen depth profiling. This approach requires precise nuclear data, e.g. on the widely used $^{1}$H($^{15}$N,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{12}$C reaction, resonant at 6.4\\,MeV $^{15}$N beam energy. Here, the strongly anisotropic angular distribution of the emitted $\\gamma$-rays from this resonance has been re-measured, resolving a previous discrepancy. Coefficients of (0.38$\\pm$0.04) and (0.80$\\pm$0.04) have been deduced for the second and fourth order Legendre polynomials, respectively. In addition, the resonance strength has been re-evaluated to (25.0$\\pm$1.5)\\,eV, 10\\% higher than previously reported. A simple working formula for the hydrogen concentration is given for cases with known $\\gamma$-ray detection efficiency. Finally, the absolute approach i...

  12. Production of gaba (γ - aminobutyric acid by microorganisms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  13. Characterization of pH-sensitive Poly (acrylic acid-co-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) Hydrogels Prepared by Gamma Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming-cheng; HE Su-qin; LIU Wen-tao; SONG Hong-yan; ZHU Cheng-shen

    2007-01-01

    The pH-sensitive copolymer hydrogels were prepared with the monomers of acrylic acid and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone based on gamma radiation technique. The morphology of the hydrogels was monitored by using scanning electron microscope. The influence of absorbed dose, monomer compasition and concentration on the swelling ratio (SR) of the hydrogels were investigated in detail. The effect of pH and temperature of the swelling medium on the swelling behavior of the hydrogels were also examined. The results show that the SR of the copolymer hydrogels decreases with the monomer concentration and absorbed dose increasing. The copolymer hydrogels show a better pH-sensitive behavior. In alkaline solution, the SR of the hydrogels is much higher than in acid solution.

  14. H.E.S.S. discovery of VHE gamma-rays from the quasar PKS 1510-089

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzynski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; 10.1051/0004-6361/201321135

    2013-01-01

    The quasar PKS 1510-089 (z=0.361) was observed with the H.E.S.S. array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes during high states in the optical and GeV bands, to search for very high energy (VHE, defined as E >= 0.1 TeV) emission. VHE \\gamma-rays were detected with a statistical significance of 9.2 standard deviations in 15.8 hours of H.E.S.S. data taken during March and April 2009. A VHE integral flux of I(0.15 TeV < E < 1.0 TeV) = (1.0 +- 0.2 (stat) +- 0.2 (sys) x 10^{-11} cm^{-2}s^{-1} is measured. The best-fit power law to the VHE data has a photon index of \\Gamma=5.4 +- 0.7 (stat) +- 0.3 (sys). The GeV and optical light curves show pronounced variability during the period of H.E.S.S. observations. However, there is insufficient evidence to claim statistically significant variability in the VHE data. Because of its relatively high redshift, the VHE flux from PKS 1510-089 should suffer considerable attenuation in the intergalactic space due to the extragalactic background light (EBL). Hence, the...

  15. INO80 and gamma-H2AX interaction links ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ashby J; Highland, Jessica; Krogan, Nevan J; Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Greenblatt, Jack F; Haber, James E; Shen, Xuetong

    2004-12-17

    While the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in transcription is well established, a link between chromatin remodeling and DNA repair has remained elusive. We have found that the evolutionarily conserved INO80 chromatin remodeling complex directly participates in the repair of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast. The INO80 complex is recruited to a HO endonuclease-induced DSB through a specific interaction with the DNA damage-induced phosphorylated histone H2A (gamma-H2AX). This interaction requires Nhp10, an HMG-like subunit of the INO80 complex. The loss of Nhp10 or gamma-H2AX results in reduced INO80 recruitment to the DSB. Finally, components of the INO80 complex show synthetic genetic interactions with the RAD52 DNA repair pathway, the main pathway for DSB repair in yeast. Our findings reveal a new role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in nuclear processes and suggest that an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex can read a DNA repair histone code.

  16. The polarization observables T, P, and H and their impact on $\\gamma p \\to p\\pi^0$ multipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, J; Anisovich, A V; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Becker, M; Beloglazov, Y; Berlin, A; Bichow, M; Böse, S; Brinkmann, K -Th; Crede, V; Dieterle, M; Eberhardt, H; Elsner, D; Fornet-Ponse, K; Friedrich, St; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Görtz, St; Gutz, E; Hammann, Ch; Hannappel, J; Hannen, V; Herick, J; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, Ph; Honisch, Ch; Jahn, O; Jude, T; Käser, A; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kalischewski, F; Klassen, P; Keshelashvili, I; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Koop, K; Krusche, B; Kube, M; Lang, M; Lopatin, I; Makonyi, K; Messi, F; Metag, V; Meyer, W; Müller, J; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Piontek, D; Reeve, S; Rosenbaum, Ch; Roth, B; Reicherz, G; Rostomyan, T; Runkel, St; Sarantsev, A; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schmitz, R; Seifen, T; Sokhoyan, V; Thämer, Ph; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; Urban, M; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch; Wiedner, U; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Witthauer, L

    2015-01-01

    Data on the polarization observables T, P, and H for the reaction $\\gamma p\\to p\\pi^0$ are reported. Compared to earlier data from other experiments, our data are more precise and extend the covered range in energy and angle substantially. The results were extracted from azimuthal asymmetries measured using a transversely polarized target and linearly polarized photons. The data were taken at the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA with the CBELSA/TAPS detector. Within the Bonn-Gatchina partial wave analysis, the new polarization data lead to a significant narrowing of the error band for the multipoles for neutral-pion photoproduction.

  17. Syntheses of {gamma}-aminobutyric-1-{sup 14}C and of {alpha}-aminoadipic-6-{sup 14}C acid from methoxy-3 chloropropyl-magnesium and marked carbon dioxide; Syntheses de l'acide {gamma}-aminobutyrique{sup 14}C-1 et de l'acide {alpha}-aminoadipique {sup 14}C-6 a partir de methoxy-3 chloropropylmagnesium et d'anhydride carbonique marque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung Nhu Liem [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Departement des radioelements, Service des molecules marquees

    1967-04-01

    Carbonation of {gamma}-methoxypropyl-magnesium chloride by CO{sub 2} gives {gamma}-methoxy-butyric carboxylic-{sup 14}C acid with a yield of about 95 per cent. When the latter is treated successively with anhydrous HBr and with diazomethane, methyl carboxylic {gamma}-bromobutyrate-{sup 14}C is formed. This in turn gives {gamma}-amino-butyric carboxylic-{sup 14}C acid with an overall yield of 66 per cent with respect to Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}, when it is condensed with potassium phthalimide and hydrolyzed by acid. By reacting methyl-{gamma}-bromobutyrate-{sup 14}C with the sodium derivative of ethyl cyanacetamido-acetate in ethanol, followed by an acid hydrolysis, {alpha}-aminoadipic-6-{sup 14}C acid is obtained with an overall yield of 46 per cent with respect to Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. (author) [French] La carbonatation du chlorure de {gamma}-methoxypropylmagnesium par {sup 14}CO{sub 2} donne l'acide {gamma}-methoxybutyrique carboxyle {sup 14}C avec un rendement d'environ 95 pour cent. Ce dernier traite successivement par HBr anhydre et par le diazomethane conduit au {gamma}-bromobutyrate de methyle carboxyle {sup 14}C. Celui-ci condense avec le phtalimide de potassium suivi d'une hydrolyse acide fournit l'acide {gamma}-aminobutyrique carboxyle {sup 14}C avec un rendement global de 66 pour cent par rapport a Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. L'action du {gamma}-bromobutyrate de methyle {sup 14}C sur le derive sode du cyanacetamidoacetate d'ethyle dans l'ethanol suivie d'hydrolyse acide donne l'acide {alpha}-aminoadipique {sup 14}C-6 avec un rendement global de 46 pour cent par rapport a Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. (auteur)

  18. Dicentric chromosomes and gamma-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of human blood samples exposed to a CT scanner: a direct comparison of dose response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfier, Sven; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Eckardt-Schupp, Friederike; Schmid, Ernst; Voth, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    Experiments using the induction of dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics) as well as the gamma-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of blood samples from a healthy donor were performed to directly evaluate the radiation sensitivity of both biological endpoints. For computed tomography scans at dose levels from 0.025 to 1 Gy, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentrics and a linear dose-response relationship for gamma-H2AX foci were obtained. The coefficients of the dose-response relationship for dicentrics are alpha = (3.76 +/- 0.29) x 10(-2) Gy(-1) and beta = (5.54 +/- 0.45) x 10(-2) Gy(-2), the linear coefficient for gamma-H2AX foci is (7.38 +/- 0.11) Gy(-1). The findings indicate that scoring of dicentrics as well as microscopic analysis of gamma-H2AX foci are sensitive methods to quantify a radiation-induced biological damage at low doses. However, since gamma-H2AX foci can be partially repaired within a few hours, biological damages present for days or even months, which constitute the clinically relevant endpoints, can only be quantified reliably by scoring of chromosome aberrations. Thus currently the quantification of dicentrics or reciprocal translocations remains the recommended method for estimating the effect of exposures to low dose levels of radiation ('biological dosimetry'). However, owing to the high radiation sensitivity of the gamma-H2AX foci assay observed in the present study, further investigations on the effectiveness of low-linear energy transfer radiation qualities in producing gamma-H2AX foci in lymphocytes from healthy donors should be performed.

  19. The synthesis and biodistribution of 3-(4'-[[sup 125]I]-iodophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid, a radioiodinated analogue of baclofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakita, Y.; Kojima, M. (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Div. of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry); Schwendner, S.W.; McConnell, D.; Counsell, R.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Medicine)

    1990-02-01

    Baclofen has been found to bind to receptors in the central nervous system that are specific for [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a well known inhibitory neurotransmitter. This paper describes the synthesis of a radioiodinated analog of baclofen as part of an effort to develop receptor probes useful in single photon emission computed tomography. Preliminary biodistribution studies showed the radioiodinationed analog to be essentially stable to in vivo deiodination and have a distribution profile similar to that of baclofen. (Author).

  20. Revision of the 15N(p,{\\gamma})16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    CERN Document Server

    Caciolli, A; Capogrosso, V; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Elekes, Z; Formicola, A; Fulop, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Palmerini, S; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A

    2011-01-01

    The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T {\\simeq} 30 {\\cdot} 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the RGB (red giant branch) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive AGB (asymptotic giant branch) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p,{\\gamma})16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. We present a new measurement of the 15N(p,{\\gamma})16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures...

  1. Biochemical Kinetics Model of DSB Repair and GammaH2AX FOCI by Non-homologous End Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis, A.; Pluth, Janice M.; Anderson, Jennifer A.; Harper, Jane V.; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We developed a biochemical kinetics approach to describe the repair of double strand breaks (DSB) produced by low LET radiation by modeling molecular events associated with the mechanisms of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). A system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations describes the induction of DSB and activation pathways for major NHEJ components including Ku(sub 70/80), DNA-PK(sub cs), and the Ligase IV-XRCC4 hetero-dimer. The autophosphorylation of DNA-PK(sub cs and subsequent induction of gamma-H2AX foci observed after ionizing radiation exposure were modeled. A two-step model of DNA-PK(sub cs) regulation of repair was developed with the initial step allowing access of other NHEJ components to breaks, and a second step limiting access to Ligase IV-XRCC4. Our model assumes that the transition from the first to second-step depends on DSB complexity, with a much slower-rate for complex DSB. The model faithfully reproduced several experimental data sets, including DSB rejoining as measured by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE), quantification of the induction of gamma-H2AX foci, and live cell imaging of the induction of Ku(sub 70/80). Predictions are made for the behaviors of NHEJ components at low doses and dose-rates, where a steady-state is found at dose-rates of 0.1 Gy/hr or lower.

  2. Gamma-ray spectra of hexane (C6H14) in positron-electron annihilation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Wang, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Iwata et al., 1997a) and liquid (Kerr et al., 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane contribute the same degree in the electron-positron annihilation of hexane. The electrons which dominate the positron-electron annihilation of molecules are called positrophilic electrons. The positrophilic electrons are predominately found to involve the electrons on the lowest occupied valence orbital (LOVO) of a free molecule in gas phase. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an "averaged" contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of valence electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

  3. Mapping and identification of interferon gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins separated by immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, AC; Rossel Larsen, M; Roepstorff, P

    1999-01-01

    magnitude of IFN-gamma responsive genes has been reported previously. Our goal is to identify and map IFN-gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins to the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the immobilized pH gradient (IPG) two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) system....... A semiconfluent layer of HeLa cells was grown on tissue culture plates, and changes in protein expression due to 100 U/mL IFN-gamma were investigated at different periods after treatment, using pulse labeling with [35S]methionine/cysteine in combination with 2-D PAGE (IPG). The identity of eight protein spots...

  4. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters act to terminate GABA neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Intriguingly four distinct GABA transporters have been cloned from rat and mouse, whereas only three functional homologs of these transporters have been cloned from human....... The aim of this study therefore was to search for this fourth missing human transporter. Using a bioinformatics approach, we successfully identified and cloned the full-length cDNA of a so far uncharacterized human GABA transporter (GAT). The predicted protein displays high sequence similarity to rat GAT......-2 and mouse GAT3, and in accordance with the nomenclature for rat GABA transporters, we therefore refer to the transporter as human GAT-2. We used electrophysiological and cell-based methods to demonstrate that this protein is a functional transporter of GABA. The transport was saturable...

  5. Screening of Lactic Acid Bacteria with High Yield of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid from Yellow Serofluid,the Wastewater from Tofu Production%黄浆水中高产γ-氨基丁酸乳酸菌的筛选及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳荣; 梁金钟

    2014-01-01

    经初筛、复筛,从黄浆水中筛得一株高产γ-氨基丁酸(γ-aminobutyric acid,GABA)的菌株,对其进行形态学及生理生化鉴定,并与GenBank上已提交的16S rDNA进行BLAST比对,结果表明,其归属于乳酸杆菌属(Lactobacillus).由MEGA 6.0软件构建的系统发育树结果表明,该菌株与Lactobacillus plantarum 16S rDNA序列同源性达99%,且与生理生化实验结果一致,因此,确定该菌株为植物乳杆菌(Lactobacillus plantarum),编号为LP-Dfa301,测得其发酵液中GABA产量为5.833 g/L.

  6. VHE observations of the gamma-ray binary system LS 5039 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Mariaud, C; Aharonian, F; Boettcher, M; Dubus, G; de Naurois, M; Romoli, C

    2015-01-01

    LS 5039 is a gamma-ray binary system observed in a broad energy range, from radio to TeV energies. The binary system exhibits both flux and spectral modulation as a function of its orbital period. The X-ray and very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray fluxes display a maximum/minimum at inferior/superior conjunction, with spectra becoming respectively harder/softer, a behaviour that is completely reversed in the high-energy domain (HE, 0.1 10 GeV that is compatible with the low-energy tail of the TeV emission. The low 10 - 100 GeV flux, however, makes the HE and VHE components difficult to reconcile with a scenario including emission from only a single particle population. We report on new observations of LS 5039 conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) telescopes from 2006 to 2015. This new data set enables for an unprecedentedly-deep phase-folded coverage of the source at TeV energies, as well as an extension of the VHE spectral range down to ~120 GeV, which makes LS 5039 the firs...

  7. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Shin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukuyama, Taro; Furui, Shunya; Genba, Kei; Hagino, Kouichi; Harayama, Astushi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohta, Masayuki; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Goro; Sato, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Togo, Atsushi; Tomizuka, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60--600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton camera has been finalized and the final prototype, which has the same configuration as the flight model, has been fabricated for performance evaluation. The Compton camera has overall dimensions of 12 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, consisting of 32 layers of Si pixel sensors and 8 layers of CdTe pixel sensors surrounded by 2 layers of CdTe pixel sensors. The detection efficiency of the Compton camera reaches about 15% and 3% for 100 keV and 511 keV gamma rays, respectively. The pixel pitch of the Si and CdTe sensors is 3.2 mm, and ...

  8. H.E.S.S. and CTA, present and perspectives in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, H.

    2016-12-01

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy emerged as a new branch of astronomy about ten years ago with the major discoveries achieved by the High Energy Stereocopic System (H.E.S.S.) operating in Namibia, quickly followed by the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes (MAGIC) in the Canary Islands and the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) in the USA. These experiments succeeded to start exploring the cosmos at TeV energies, with the present detection of 178 sources in this range, mostly pulsar wind nebulae, supernova remnants, binary systems, blazars, and a variety of other types of sources. Based on these promizing results, the scientific community soon defined a next generation global project with significantly improved performance, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), in order to implement an open observatory at extreme energies, allowing a deep analysis of the sky in the highest part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from 20 GeV to 300 TeV. The CTA preparation phase is now completed. Production of the first telescopes should start in 2017 for deployment in 2018, in the perspective of an array fully operational at the horizon 2022.

  9. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptors on hippocampus of rats with paclitaxol-induced neuropathic pain and the relationship with nuclear factor-κB pathway%γ-氨基丁酸B型受体对紫杉醇诱发神经痛大鼠海马核因子-κB通路的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昭; 赵爽; 王秀丽; 刘飞飞; 杨淑红; 石娜; 郭跃先

    2016-01-01

    .04;D3组:1.08±0.06;D4组:0.88±0.09)及TNF-α蛋白(D2组:0.98±0.07;D3组:1.00±0.04;D4组:0.71 ±0.08)表达下降(P<0.05).结论 紫杉醇可下调大鼠海马GABAB1受体、上调NF-κB及下游炎性因子IL-1β、TNF-α蛋白表达,诱发神经痛;激活GABAB受体可协同提高NF-κB通路抑制剂作用,改善大鼠疼痛状态.NF-κB在其中发挥关键作用.%Objective To evaluate the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors on hippocampus of rats with paclitaxol-induced neuropathic pain and the relationship with nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway by using GABAB receptor agonist (baclofen) and the NF-κB inhibitor (SN50).Methods Pathogen-free male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 160-180 g,were used in this study.All the 50 rats were randomly divided into two groups:normal control group (C group,n =10)and paclitaxol-induced neuropathic pain model group (n =40),which was given intraperitonealy saline or paclitaxol respectively.The rat paclitaxol-induced neuropathic pain model was establishing by intraperitoneal injection.Mechanical paw withdrawal threshold (MWT) was used to confirm the successful establishment of the models at 2nd week after the first administration of paclitaxol (T1).Forty paclitaxol-induced neuropathic pain model rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n =10 each):saline 10 μl + saline 10 μl were injected intrathecally in D1 group;saline 10 μl + baclofen 0.5 μg in D2 group;saline 10 μl + SN50 200 ng in D3 group;SN50 200 ng + baclofen 0.5 μg in D4 group;saline 10 μl + saline 10 μl were injected intrathecally in l0 normal rats (C group).There was an interval of 15 min between twice intrathecal injections in five groups.The MWT was measured before (T2) and 120 min (T3) after intrathecal in jection respectively.At the end of behavior test,the hippocampi of rats were removed for detection of GABAB1 receptor,NF-κB and inflammatory factors [interleukin (IL)-1β,tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)] expression using

  10. Relating MEG measured motor cortical oscillations to resting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetz, W; Edgar, J C; Wang, D J; Roberts, T P L

    2011-03-15

    The human motor cortex exhibits characteristic beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma oscillations (60-90 Hz), typically observed in the context of transient finger movement tasks. The functional significance of these oscillations, such as post-movement beta rebound (PMBR) and movement-related gamma synchrony (MRGS) remains unclear. Considerable animal and human non-invasive studies, however, suggest that the networks supporting these motor cortex oscillations depend critically on the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Despite such speculation, a direct relation between MEG measured motor cortex oscillatory power and frequency with resting GABA concentrations has not been demonstrated. In the present study, motor cortical responses were measured from 9 healthy adults while they performed a cued button-press task using their right index finger. In each participant, PMBR and MRGS measures were obtained from time-frequency plots obtained from primary motor (MI) sources, localized using beamformer differential source localization. For each participant, complimentary magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) GABA measures aligned to the motor hand knob of the left central sulcus were also obtained. GABA concentration was estimated as the ratio of the motor cortex GABA integral to a cortical reference NAA resonance at 2 ppm. A significant linear relation was observed between MI GABA concentration and MRGS frequency (R(2)=0.46, pGABA concentration and MRGS power. Conversely, a significant linear relation was observed between MI GABA concentration and PMBR power (R(2)=0.34, pGABA concentration and PMBR frequency. Finally, a significant negative linear relation between the participant's age and MI gamma frequency was observed, such that older participants had a lower gamma frequency (R(2)=0.40, pGABA in the generation and modulation of endogenous motor cortex rhythmic beta and gamma activity.

  11. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor on nitric oxide/nitric oxide synthase system during recurrent febrile seizures%反复热性惊厥过程中γ-氨基丁酸B受体对一氧化氮/一氧化氮合酶体系的调节作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖; 秦炯; 卜定方; 杨志仙; 常杏芝; 杜军保

    2006-01-01

    目的:探讨γ-氨基丁酸B受体(γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor,GABABR)对热性惊厥(febrile seizure,FS)大鼠一氧化氮(nitric oxide,NO)/一氧化氮合酶(nitric oxide synthase,NOS)体系表达的影响.方法:将21 d龄SD大鼠随机分为对照组、FS组、FS+巴氯芬(baclofen)组和FS+法克罗芬(phaclofen)组.采用热水浴诱导大鼠FS,隔日诱导1次,共10次.采用分光光度计法测定大鼠血浆中NO含量;用原位杂交方法观察神经元型一氧化氮合酶(neuronal nitric oxide synthase,nNOS)mRNA表达情况;用免疫组化方法观察nNOS蛋白表达情况.结果:FS+baclofen组NO含量低于FS组[(19.02±9.31)μmol/L比(40.03±9.12)μmol/L],同时nNOS蛋白和mRNA表达也较FS组减弱;而FS+phaclofen组NO含量高于FS组[(66.46±8.15)μmol/L比(40.03±9.12)μmol/L],同时nNOS蛋白和mRNA表达也较FS组增强.结论:反复热性惊厥过程中,GABABR的改变可影响NO/NOS体系的表达.

  12. A simple strategy for {sup 13}C,{sup 1}H labeling at the Ile-{gamma}2 methyl position in highly deuterated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschak, Amy M.; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.c [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    A straightforward approach for the production of highly deuterated proteins labeled with {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H at Ile-{gamma}2 methyl positions is described. The utility of the methodology is illustrated with an application involving the half proteasome (360 kDa). High quality 2D Ile {sup 13}C{sup {gamma}2},{sup 1}H{sup {gamma}2} HMQC data sets, exploiting the methyl-TROSY principle, are recorded with excellent sensitivity and resolution, that compare favorably with Ile {sup 13}C{sup {delta}1},{sup 1}H{sup {delta}1} spectra. This labeling scheme adds to a growing list of different approaches that are significantly impacting the utility of solution NMR spectroscopy in studies of supra-molecular systems.

  13. Connection between orbital modulation of H-alpha and gamma-rays in the Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R; Stoyanov, K; Borissova, A; Tomov, N A

    2013-01-01

    We studied the average orbital modulation of various parameters (gamma-ray flux, H-alpha emission line, optical V band brightness) of the radio- and gamma-ray emitting Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303. Using the Spearman rank correlation test, we found highly significant correlations between the orbital variability of the equivalent width of the blue hump of the H-alpha and Fermi-LAT flux with a Spearman p-value 2e-5, and the equivalent widths ratio EW_B/EW_R and Fermi-LAT flux with p-value 9e-5. We also found a significant anti-correlation between Fermi-LAT flux and V band magnitude with p-value 7.10^{-4}. All these correlations refer to the average orbital variability, and we conclude that the H-alpha and gamma-ray emission processes in LSI+61303 are connected. The possible physical scenario is briefly discussed.

  14. Effects of temperature and pH on adsorption of basic brown 1 by the bacterial biopolymer poly(gamma-glutamic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbaraj, B Stephen; Chiu, C P; Ho, G H; Yang, J; Chen, B H

    2008-03-01

    Poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA), an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) synthesized by Bacillus species, was explored to study its interaction with the basic brown 1 dye by conducting a systematic batch adsorption study as affected by two critical parameters, temperature and pH. Adsorption isotherms were closely predicted by Temkin equation among the eight isotherm models tested. The rate of adsorption was very rapid attaining equilibrium within 60 min and the kinetics were well described by both modified second-order and pseudo second-order models. Boyd's ion exchange model, which assumes exchanges of ions to be a chemical phenomenon, also fitted the kinetic data precisely. The adsorption rate increased with increasing solution temperature, however, a reversed trend was observed for the adsorption capacity. Changes in enthalpy, entropy and free energy values revealed dye adsorption by gamma-PGA to be an exothermic and spontaneous process involving no structural modification in gamma-PGA, whereas the activation energy of 37.21 kJ/mol indicated dye adsorption to be reaction-controlled. Following a rise in solution pH, the dye adsorption increased and reached a plateau at pH 5, while the maximum release of dye from spent gamma-PGA occurred at pH 1.5, suggesting a possible ion exchange mechanism. Ion exchange adsorption of basic dyes by gamma-PGA was further proved by the presence of two new IR bands at approximately 1600 and 1405.72 cm(-1), representing asymmetric and symmetric stretching vibration of carboxylate anion, for dye-treated gamma-PGA.

  15. Thermochemical study of the reactions of acid-base interaction in an aqueous solution of α-aminobutyric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The heat effects of the interaction between a solution of α-aminobutyric acid and solutions of HNO3 and KOH are measured by means of calorimetry in different ranges of pH at 298.15 K and values of ionic strength of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 (KNO3). The heat effects of the stepwise dissociation of the amino acid are determined. Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H 0, Δr G 0, and Δr S 0) of the reactions of acid-base interaction in aqueous solutions of α-aminobutyric acid are calculated. The connection between the thermodynamic characteristics of the dissociation of the amino acid and the structure of this compound is considered.

  16. Japanese VLBI Network Observations of a Gamma-Ray Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0323+342

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiyoaki Wajima; Kenta Fujisawa; Masaaki Hayashida; Naoki Isobe

    2014-09-01

    We made simultaneous single-dish and VLBI observations of a gamma-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy 1H 0323+342. We found significant flux variation at 8 GHz on a time scale of one month. The total flux density varied by 5.5% in 32 days, corresponding to a variability brightness temperature of 7.0 × 1011 K. We also obtained brightness temperatures of greater than 5.2 × 1010 K from the VLBI images. These high brightness temperatures suggest that the source has nonthermal processes in the central engine. The source structure could be modelled by two elliptical Gaussian components on the parsec scales. The flux of the central component decreases in the same way as the total flux density, showing that the short-term variability is mainly associated with this component.

  17. Binding interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant gamma-butyrolactones and gamma-thiobutyrolactones with the picrotoxin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, K.D.; McKeon, A.C.; Covey, D.F.; Ferrendelli, J.A. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Alkyl-substituted gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) and gamma-thiobutyrolactones (TBLs) are neuroactive chemicals. beta-Substituted compounds are convulsant, whereas alpha-alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs are anticonvulsant. The structural similarities between beta-alkyl GBLs and the convulsant picrotoxinin suggested that alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs act at the picrotoxin receptor. To test this hypothesis we examined the interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs with the picrotoxin, benzodiazepine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding sites of the GABA receptor complex. All of these convulsants and anticonvulsants studied competitively displaced 35S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS), a ligand that binds to the picrotoxin receptor. This inhibition of 35S-TBPS binding was not blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline methobromide. The convulsant GBLs and TBLs also partially inhibited (3H)muscimol binding to the GABA site and (3H)flunitrazepam binding to the benzodiazepine site, but they did so at concentrations substantially greater than those that inhibited 35S-TBPS binding. The anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs had no effect on either (3H)muscimol or (3H)flunitrazepam binding. In contrast to the GBLs and TBLs, pentobarbital inhibited TBPS binding in a manner that was blocked by bicuculline methobromide, and it enhanced both (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)muscimol binding. Both ethosuximide and tetramethylsuccinimide, neuroactive compounds structurally similar to GBLs, competitively displaced 35S-TBPS from the picrotoxin receptor and both compounds were weak inhibitors of (3H) muscimol binding. In addition, ethosuximide also partially diminished (3H)flunitrazepam binding. These data demonstrate that the site of action of alkyl-substituted GBLs and TBLs is different from that of GABA, barbiturates and benzodiazepines.

  18. [Topography of the metabolic cycle of 4-aminobutyrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Ruiz, A

    1982-01-01

    This work describes, with some detail the intervention of 4-aminobutyrate as protagonist of a derivation of tricarboxylic cycle. Its vicarial mission is emphasized in connection with its existence in microorganisms (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens), plants (Helianthus tuberosus. Lupinus albus and Agave americana), neoplasic cells (ascitic tumor of Ehrlich and HeLa cells) and animal tissues (adrenal medulla and brain.

  19. GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid production, antioxidant activity in some germinated dietary seeds and the effect of cooking on their GABA content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasarin TIANSAWANG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germinated grains have been known as sources of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA that provide beneficial effects for human health. This study was aimed to investigate GABA production, dietary fiber, antioxidant activity, and the effect of cooking on GABA loss in germinated legumes and sesame. The highest GABA content was found in germinated mung bean, (0.8068 g kg-1, 24 h incubation followed by germinated soybean, germinated black bean and soaked sesame. Beside GABA, dietary fiber content also increased in all grains during germination where the insoluble dietary fiber fractions were always found in higher proportions to soluble dietary fiber fractions. Our results also confirmed that germinated mung bean is a rich source of GABA and dietary fibers. Microwave cooking resulted in the smallest loss of GABA in mung bean and sesame, while steaming led to the least GABA content loss in soybean and black bean. Therefore microwave cooking and steaming are the most recommended cooking processes to preserve GABA in germinated legumes and sesame.

  20. [Evaluation of crossing calibration of (123)I-MIBG H/M ration, with the IDW scatter correction method, on different gamma camera systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittaka, Daisuke; Takase, Tadashi; Akiyama, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Yasuo; Shinozuka, Akira; Shirai, Muneaki

    2011-01-01

    (123)I-MIBG Heart-to-Mediastinum activity ratio (H/M) is commonly used as an indicator of relative myocardial (123)I-MIBG uptake. H/M ratios reflect myocardial sympathetic nerve function, therefore it is a useful parameter to assess regional myocardial sympathetic denervation in various cardiac diseases. However, H/M ratio values differ by site, gamma camera system, position and size of region of interest (ROI), and collimator. In addition to these factors, 529 keV scatter component may also affect (123)I-MIBG H/M ratio. In this study, we examined whether the H/M ratio shows correlation between two different gamma camera systems and that sought for H/M ratio calculation formula. Moreover, we assessed the feasibility of (123)I Dual Window (IDW) method, which is a scatter correction method, and compared H/M ratios with and without IDW method. H/M ratio displayed a good correlation between two gamma camera systems. Additionally, we were able to create a new H/M calculation formula. These results indicated that the IDW method is a useful scatter correction method for calculating (123)I-MIBG H/M ratios.

  1. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst. H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Superb Collaboration; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Petroff, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 h of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 h of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99% C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of Φγ(E > 350 GeV) energy were derived and used to constrain the intrinsic high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constrain the gamma-ray luminosity at 1 TeV to L < 5.1 × 1047 erg/s at 99% C.L.

  2. Effect of prolonging radiation delivery time on retention of gammaH2AX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duzenli Cheryl

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Compared to conventional external beam radiotherapy, IMRT requires significantly more time to deliver the dose. Prolonging dose delivery potentially increases DNA repair which would reduce the biological effect. We questioned whether retention of γH2AX, a measure of lack of repair of DNA damage, would decrease when dose delivery was protracted. Materials and methods Exponentially growing SiHa cervical carinoma cells were irradiated with 6 MV photons in a water tank using a VarianEX linear accelerator. Cells held at 37°C received 2 Gy in 0.5 min and 4 Gy in 1 min. To evaluate effect of dose delivery prolongation, 2 and 4 Gy were delivered in 30 and 60 min. After 24 h recovery, cells were analyzed for clonogenic survival and for residual γH2AX as measured using flow cytometry. Results Increasing the dose delivery time from 0.5 or 1 min to 30 or 60 min produced a signficant increase in cell survival from 0.45 to 0.48 after 2 Gy, and from 0.17 to 0.20 after 4 Gy. Expression of residual γH2AX decreased from 1.27 to 1.22 relative to background after 2 Gy and 1.46 to 1.39 relative to background after 4 Gy, but differences were not statistically significant. The relative differences in the slopes of residual γH2AX versus dose for acute versus prolonged irradiation bordered on significant (p = 0.055, and the magnitude of the change was consistent with the observed increase in surviving fraction. Conclusion These results support the concept that DNA repair underlies the increase in survival observed when dose delivery is prolonged. They also help to establish the limits of sensitivity of residual γH2AX, as measured using flow cytometry, for detecting differences in response to irradiation.

  3. Human keratinocytes produce the complement inhibitor factor H: synthesis is regulated by interferon-gamma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timar, K.K.; Pasch, M.C.; Bosch, N.H. van den; Jarva, H.; Junnikkala, S.; Meri, S.; Bos, J.D.; Asghar, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Locally synthesized complement is believed to play an important role in host defense and inflammation at organ level. In the epidermis, keratinocytes have so far been shown to synthesize two complement components, C3 and factor B. Here, we studied the synthesis of factor H by human keratinocytes. We

  4. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective Lagrangian using differential cross sections measured in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello

    2016-02-10

    The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated within an effective field theory framework, which allows new CP-even and CP-odd interactions that can lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra. The parameters of the effective field theory are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ candidate events in the proton-proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model are observed and limits on the effective field theory parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model int...

  5. THE 2H(alpha, gamma6LI REACTION AT LUNA AND BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHETIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Gustavino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2H(α, γ6Li reaction is the leading process for the production of 6Li in standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Recent observations of lithium abundance in metal-poor halo stars suggest that there might be a 6Li plateau, similar to the well-known Spite plateau of 7Li. This calls for a re-investigation of the standard production channel for 6Li. As the 2H(α, γ6Li cross section drops steeply at low energy, it has never before been studied directly at Big Bang energies. For the first time the reaction has been studied directly at Big Bang energies at the LUNA accelerator. The preliminary data and their implications for Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the purported 6Li problem will be shown.

  6. $H^0 \\rightarrow Z^0 \\gamma$ channel in ATLAS. \\\\ A study of the Standard Model and \\\\ Minimal Supersymmetric SM case

    CERN Document Server

    Kiourkos, S

    1999-01-01

    One of the potentially accessible decay modes of the Higgs boson in the mass region $100 < m_H < 180$ GeV is the $H^0 \\rightarrow Z^0 \\gamma$ channel. The work presented in this note examines the Standard Model and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model predictions for the observability of this channel using particle level simulation as well as the ATLAS fast simulation (ATLFAST). It compares present estimates for the signal observability with previously reported ones in \\cite{unal} specifying the changes arising from the assumed energy of the colliding protons and the improvements in the treatment of theoretical predictions. With the present estimates, the expected significance for the SM Higgs does not exceed, in terms of $\\frac{S}{\\sqrt{B}}$, 1.5 $\\sigma$ (including $Z^0 \\rightarrow e^+ e^-$ and $Z^0 \\rightarrow {\\mu}^+ {\\mu}^-$) for an integrated luminosity of $10^5$ pb$^{-1}$ therefore not favouring this channel for SM Higgs searches. Comparable discovery potential is expected at most for the MSSM $...

  7. The host galaxy of the gamma-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León Tavares, J.; Chavushyan, V.; Puerari, I.; Patiño-Alvarez, V.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Guichard, J.; Olguín-Iglesias, A.; Valdes, J. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Kotilainen, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Añorve, C. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Espacio (FACITE) de la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Blvd. de la Americas y Av. Universitarios S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 80010, Culiacán Sinaloa (Mexico); Cruz-González, I. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-264, 04510 DF (Mexico); Antón, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía-CSIC, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Karhunen, K.; Sanghvi, J., E-mail: leon.tavares@inaoep.mx [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20100 Turku (Finland)

    2014-11-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) imaging data of the radio-loud, narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342, which shows intense and variable gamma-ray activity discovered by the Fermi satellite with the Large Area Telescope. Near-infrared and optical images are used to investigate the structural properties of the host galaxy of 1H 0323+342; this together with optical spectroscopy allows us to examine its black hole mass. Based on two-dimensional (2D) multiwavelength surface-brightness modeling, we find that statistically, the best model fit is a combination of a nuclear component and a Sérsic profile (n ∼ 2.8). However, the presence of a disk component (with a small bulge n ∼ 1.2) also remains a possibility and cannot be ruled out with the present data. Although at first glance a spiral-arm-like structure is revealed in our images, a 2D Fourier analysis of the imagery suggests that this structure corresponds to an asymmetric ring, likely associated with a recent violent dynamical interaction. We discuss our results in the context of relativistic jet production and galaxy evolution.

  8. Validation of Tikhonov adaptively regularized gamma variate fitting with 24-h plasma clearance in cirrhotic patients with ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, Carl Adam [Memorial University of Newfoundland, Radiology, St. John' s, NL (Canada); General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada); Ling, Lin [Memorial University of Newfoundland, Radiology, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Xirouchakis, Elias; Giamalis, Ioannis G.; Burroughs, Andrew K. [Royal Free Hospital, The Royal Free Sheila Sherlock Liver Centre, London (United Kingdom); Burniston, Maria T. [Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics, London (United Kingdom); Puetter, Richard C. [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States); Babyn, Paul S. [University of Saskatchewan, Radiology, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    The aim was to compare late-time extrapolation of plasma clearance (CL) from Tikhonov adaptively regularized gamma variate fitting (Tk-GV) and from mono-exponential (E1) fitting. Ten {sup 51}Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid bolus IV studies in adults - 8 with ascites - assessed for liver transplantation, with 12-16 plasma samples drawn from 5-min to 24-h, were fit with Tk-GV and E1 models and CL results were compared using Passing-Bablok fitting. The 24-h CL(Tk-GV) values ranged from 11.4 to 79.7 ml/min. Linear regression of 4- versus 24-h CL(Tk-GV) yielded no significant departure from a slope of 1, whereas the 4- versus 24-h CL(E1) slope, 1.56, was significantly increased. For CL(Tk-GV-24-h) versus CL(E1-24-h), there was a biased slope and intercept (0.85, 5.97 ml/min). Moreover, the quality of fitting of 24-h data was significantly better for Tk-GV than for E1, as follows. For 10 logarithm of concentration curves, higher r values were obtained for each Tk-GV fit (median 0.998) than for its corresponding E1 fit (median 0.965), with p < 0.0001 (paired t-test of z-statistics from Fisher r-z transformations). The E1 fit quality degraded with increasing V/W [volume of distribution (l) per kg body weight, p=0.003]. However, Tk-GV fit quality versus V/W was uncorrelated (p=0.8). CL(E1) values were dependent on sample time and the quality of fit was poor and degraded with increasing ascites, consistent with current opinion that CL(E1) is contraindicated in ascitic patients. CL(Tk-GV) was relatively more accurate and the good quality of fit was unaffected by ascites. CL(Tk-GV) was the preferred method for the accurate calculation of CL and was useful despite liver failure and ascites. (orig.)

  9. A compact sup 3 H(p,gamma) sup 4 He 19.8 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Poon, A W P; Waltham, C E; Browne, M C; Robertson, R G H; Kherani, N P; Mak, H B

    2000-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a new 1000-t D sub 2 O Cherenkov solar neutrino detector. A high-energy gamma-ray source is needed to calibrate SNO beyond the sup 8 B solar neutrino endpoint of 15 MeV. This paper describes the design and construction of a source that generates 19.8 MeV gamma rays using the sup 3 H(p,gamma) sup 4 He reaction (''pT''), and demonstrates that the source meets all the physical, operational and lifetime requirements for calibrating SNO. An ion source was built into this unit to generate and to accelerate protons up to 30 keV, and a high-purity scandium tritide target with a scandium-tritium atomic ratio of 1 : 2.0+-0.2 was included. This pT source is the first self-contained, compact, and portable high-energy gamma-ray source (E subgamma>10 MeV). (authors)

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-bake cookie dough by gamma and electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seul-Gi; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of gamma and electron beam irradiation to inactivate foodborne pathogens in ready-to-bake cookie dough and to determine the effect on quality by measuring color and texture changes. Cookie dough inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, or Listeria monocytogenes was subjected to gamma and electron beam irradiation, with doses ranging from 0 to 3 kGy. As the radiation dose increased, the inactivation effect increased among all tested pathogens. After 3.0 kGy of gamma and electron beam irradiation, numbers of inoculated pathogens were reduced to below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g). The D10-values of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes in cookie dough treated with gamma rays were 0.53, 0.51, and 0.71 kGy, respectively, which were similar to those treated by electron beam with the same dose. Based on the D10-value of pathogens in cookie dough, L. monocytogenes showed more resistance to both treatments than did E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium. Color values and textural characteristics of irradiated cookie dough were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from the control. These results suggest that irradiation can be applied to control pathogens in ready-to-bake cookie dough products without affecting quality.

  11. Discovery of extended VHE gamma-ray emission from the asymmetric pulsar wind nebula in MSH 15-52 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Atai, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    The Supernova Remnant MSH 15-52 has been observed in very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays using the H.E.S.S. 4-telescope array located in Namibia. A gamma-ray signal is detected at the 25 sigma level during an exposure of 22.1 hours live time. The image reveals an elliptically shaped emission region around the pulsar PSR B1509-58, with semi-major axis 6' in the NW-SE direction and semi-minor axis 2' approximately. This morphology coincides with the diffuse pulsar wind nebula as observed at X-ray energies by ROSAT. The overall energy spectrum from 280 GeV up to 40 TeV can be fitted by a power law with photon index Gamma = 2.27 +/- 0.03(stat.) +/- 0.20(syst.). The detected emission can be plausibly explained by inverse Compton scattering of accelerated relativistic electrons with soft photons.

  12. Gamma Sensitivity of A 4H-SiC Detector in Current Mode%4H-SiC电流型探测器对60Co源γ射线的响应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭子瑜; 李明富; 李莉; 金长江; 吴健

    2014-01-01

    为研究4H-SiC电流型探测器对γ射线的探测性能,采用4H-SiC制成肖特基二极管,并利用60 Co源形成的强γ辐射场研究其对γ射线的响应特性及其影响因素。实验结果表明,当外加反向电压为195 V时,4H-SiC探测器漏电流仅为11.4 pA/cm2,远低于Si基探测器漏电流。当4H-SiC探测器置于强γ辐射场时,由γ射线导致的信号电流为249 nA,比本底信号电流大5个量级。同时4H-SiC探测器在零偏压时也能对γ射线产生明显的信号,均值电流为85 nA。随工作电压增大,4H-SiC探测器的γ响应随之增大。结合4H-SiC探测器体积小、响应快、耐高温和耐辐照等特点,可将4H-SiC探测器用于强钴源点注量在线监测等方面。%A Schottky barrier diode was made using 4H-SiC wide band gap material, which is both radiation resistance and temperature resistance, excellent due to its intrinsic properties.The gamma sensitivity of the 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode was investigated by irradiating the diode with gamma rays from 60 Co source.The leakage current of the detector is 11.4 pA/cm2 , when a reverse bias of 195V is applied.The gamma induced current is 249 nA when the 4H-SiC detector is irradiated by 60 Co gamma rays.The detector is able to detect gamma rays at zero bias, with a induced current of 85nA.The gamma sensitivity of the 4H-SiC detector in-creases with reversed bias.

  13. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  14. Effect of the cation and the anion of an electrolyte on the solubility of DL-aminobutyric acid in aqueous solutions: measurement and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, A; Arce, A; K Khoshkbarchi, M; Vera, J H

    1998-07-13

    The solubilities at 298.2 K of dl-aminobutyric acid in aqueous solutions of NaCl, KCl, NaNO(3) and KNO(3) were measured. The solubility of DL-aminobutyric acid was found to be influenced by the concentration and by the nature of both the cation and the anion of the electrolyte. Comparison of the results obtained in this study and those for other amino acids reported in the literature, indicates that the structure of the hydrocarbon backbone of an amino acid plays an important role in the interactions of an amino acid with an electrolyte. A thermodynamic model has been used to correlate the solubilities of DL-aminobutyric acid in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The activity coefficients of the amino acid in the electrolyte solutions, were represented by a model proposed by Khoshkbarchi and Vera [M.K. Khoshkbarchi, J.H. Vera, AIChE J. 42 (1996) 2354; M.K. Khoshkbarchi, J.H. Vera, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 35 (1996) 4755]. This model, which considers a combination of both long- and short-range interactions, contains only two adjustable parameters. All other parameters are available in the literature. The model can accurately correlate the solubility of dl-aminobutyric acid in aqueous solutions of electrolytes.

  15. Search for ttH and tH production with $H \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nitsche, Isabel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of the Yukawa coupling of the top quark is one important goal of particle physics after the discovery of the Higgs boson. There are two processes that offer the possibility to directly measure the Yukawa coupling of the top quark. These include the production of a top-antitop-quark pair in association with a Higgs boson via the strong interaction (ttH) and the electroweak production of a single top quark and a Higgs boson (tH). In the Standard Model, the cross section for tH production is much smaller than the cross section for ttH production as there is a destructive interference between diagrams where the Higgs boson is radiated from a top quark and diagrams where is it radiated from a W boson. But in contrast to ttH, this interference provides additional sensitivity to the sign of the Yukawa coupling. The considered Higgs boson decay into photons is promising due to the good energy resolution of the photons and the relatively small backgrounds. But it is also challenging due to the small br...

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D10 values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased ( Pbacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D10 values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Oral Microbiology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeollabuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon, E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.k [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D{sub 10} values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased (P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences (P>=0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D{sub 10} values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  18. Elastic and proton dissociative J/{psi} photoproduction at low W{sub {gamma}p} with the H1 detector at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Florian

    2013-02-15

    Elastic and proton dissociative photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons is measured with the H1 detector at the HERA electron proton collider in the photon virtuality phase space of Q{sup 2}gamma}p}<110 GeV. The integrated luminosity for both data sets are 130 pb{sup -1} and 10.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively, corresponding to more than two times the statistics used in previous H1 analyses. Due to an online selection purely based on tracks both leptonic decay channels J/{psi}{yields}ee and J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{mu} are available for the analysis. Elastic ({gamma}p{yields} J/{psi}p) and proton dissociative ({gamma}p{yields} J/{psi}Y) differential {gamma}p cross sections are determined in a simultaneous measurement as function of the squared momentum transfer at the proton vertex t and as function of W{sub {gamma}p} by means of an unfolding procedure, taking not only all bin correlations into account, but also the correlation between the elastic and proton dissociative process. The obtained elastic and proton dissociative differential cross sections are analysed in a simultaneous fit, taking the full statistical covariance matrices and systematic uncertainty sources into account.

  19. A detailed spectral and morphological study of the gamma-ray supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Khelifi, B; Klages, S; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J

    2006-01-01

    We present results from deep observations of the Galactic shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 (also known as G347.3-0.5) conducted with the complete H.E.S.S. array in 2004. Detailed morphological and spatially resolved spectral studies reveal the very-high-energy (VHE -- Energies E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray aspects of this object with unprecedented precision. Since this is the first in-depth analysis of an extended VHE gamma-ray source, we present a thorough discussion of our methodology and investigations of possible sources of systematic errors. Gamma rays are detected throughout the whole SNR. The emission is found to resemble a shell structure with increased fluxes from the western and northwestern parts. The differential gamma-ray spectrum of the whole SNR is measured over more than two orders of magnitude, from 190 GeV to 40 TeV, and is rather hard with indications for a deviation from a pure power law at high energies. Spectra have also been determined for spatially separated regions of RX J1...

  20. Increased quercetin formation by combination treatment of gamma ray and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Chung, Byung Yeoup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sang Ho [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Young [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Chul [Youngdong University, Youngdong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside (cya-3-O-xylrut) is one of the most abundant anthocyanin, which is responsible for the red, purple, and blue colors of most fruits and vegetable, in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis Baillon and raspberries. Especially the cya-3- O-xylrut is a major anthocyanin accounting for about 94% in the fruits of S. chinensis, which is a unique source of highly pure cya-3-O-xylrut, and exhibits high antioxidant activity. Previously, we reported that the red color of the S. chinensis fruit extract dramatically disappeared in a dose-dependent manner of gamma irradiation. The color of S. chinensis was effectively removed at 2 kGy of gamma irradiation, even at 1 kGy resulted in a 50% reduction. Interestingly, the destruction of cya-3-O-xylrut by gamma irradiation led to generate flavonoids such as quercetin and unknown compounds. Quercetin, a typical flavonoltype flavonoid, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables. Quercetin exhibits various biological activities such as anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, vasodilating, and anti-cancer effects. In the present study our purpose is to develop a promising tool for bio-conversion of organic compounds by combination treatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and gamma ray

  1. Discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR B1259-63 in Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays around Periastron with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Johnston, S; Khelifi, B; Kirk, J G; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Martineau-Huynh, O; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Skjraasen, O; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission of the binary system PSR B1259-63/SS 2883 of a radio pulsar orbiting a massive, luminous Be star in a highly eccentric orbit. The observations around the 2004 periastron passage of the pulsar were performed with the four 13 m Cherenkov telescopes of the H.E.S.S. experiment, recently installed in Namibia and in full operation since December 2003. Between February and June 2004, a gamma-ray signal from the binary system was detected with a total significance above 13 sigma. The flux was found to vary significantly on timescales of days which makes PSR B1259-63 the first variable galactic source of VHE gamma-rays observed so far. Strong emission signals were observed in pre- and post-periastron phases with a flux minimum around periastron, followed by a gradual flux decrease in the months after. The measured time-averaged energy spectrum above a mean threshold energy of 380 GeV can be fitted by a simple power law F_0(E/1 TeV)^-Gamma with a phot...

  2. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst: H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Andersson, T; Angüner, E O; Arakawa, M; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Büchele, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Coffaro, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Decock, J; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Devin, J; deWilt, P; Dirson, L; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fern, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M -H; Hahn, J; Haupt, M; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Iwasaki, H; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katsuragawa, M; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J -P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leser, E; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Liu, R; López-Coto, R; Lypova, I; Mar, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Mohrmann, L; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Nakashima, S; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Odaka, H; Öttl, S; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perennes, C; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Piel, Q; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Richter, S; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Saito, S; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Seglar-Arroyo, M; Settimo, M; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Takahashi, T; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tibaldo, L; Tiziani, D; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tsuji, N; Tuffs, R; Uchiyama, Y; van der Walt, D J; van Eldik, C; van Rensburg, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zanin, R; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N; :,; Jankowski, F; Keane, E F; Petroff, E

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 hours of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 hours of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99 % C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of (E>350 GeV) < 1.33 x 10^-8 m^-2s^-1. Differential flux upper limits as function of the photon energy were derived and used to constrain the intrinsic high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constr...

  3. 异丙酚预先给药对抑郁大鼠电休克后海马Glu和GABA水平的影响%Effects of propofol pretreatment on the levels of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid in hippocampus of mentally depressed rats after electro-convulsive therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永峰; 闵苏; 董军; 魏珂; 曹俊; 黎平

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of propofol pretreatment on the levels of glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobytyric acid (GABA) in hippocampus of mentally depressed rats after electro-convulsive therapy.Methods Thirty male 2-3 month old SD rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly divided into 5 groups ( n = 6each) : group Ⅰ control (C) ; group Ⅱ mental depression (D) ; group Ⅲ propofol (P) ; group Ⅳ electric shock (E) and groupV propofol + electric shock (PE). Mental depression was induced by subjecting the animals to different kinds of stresses every day for 21 consecutive days in group Ⅱ - Ⅴ. After mental depression had been induced, the animals received intraperitoneal (IP) propofol 100 mg/kg in group P, electric shock in group E and propefol 100 mg/kg + electric shock in group PE respectively once every 2 days × 6 times. The anxiety-related behavior was assessed by open-field test and scored (the higher the score the better) on the day before induction of mental depression was started (To ,baseline), on the 1st day after mental depression had been induced (T1) and on the 2nd day after treatment (T2). The learning ability and memory were evaluated by Morris water maze at T1 and T2. The animals were killed after the last test and their brains were removed and bilateral hippocampi were isolated for determination of glutamate and GABA contents by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).Results The behavior scores and learning ability and memory were significandy decreased in group Ⅱ-Ⅴ as compared with the control group (P0.05);与E组比较,PE组学习记忆功能增强,Glu含量升高,GABA含量降低,Glu/GABA比值升高(P<0.05).结论 异丙酚预先给药改善电休克治疗后学习记忆功能的机制可能与异丙酚调节Glu和GABA功能状态的平衡有关.

  4. Abnormal γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in a Kcnq2 model of early onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Taku; Lossin, Christoph; Ihara, Yukiko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Koyama, Susumu; Hirose, Shinichi

    2017-08-01

    Mutations of the KCNQ2 gene, which encodes the Kv 7.2 subunit of voltage-gated M-type potassium channels, have been associated with epilepsy in the neonatal period. This developmental stage is unique in that the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is inhibitory in adults, triggers excitatory action due to a reversed chloride gradient. To examine whether KCNQ2-related neuronal hyperexcitability involves neonatally excitatory GABA, we examined 1-week-old knockin mice expressing the Kv 7.2 variant p.Tyr284Cys (Y284C). Brain slice electrophysiology revealed elevated CA1 hippocampal GABAergic interneuron activity with respect to presynaptic firing and postsynaptic current frequency. Blockade with the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline decreased ictal-like bursting in brain slices with lowered divalent ion concentration, which is consistent with GABA mediating an excitatory function that contributes to the hyperexcitability observed in mutant animals. We conclude that excitatory GABA contributes to the phenotype in these animals, which raises the question of whether this special type of neurotransmission has broader importance in neonatal epilepsy than is currently recognized. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid treatment on plasma substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in children with asthma%γ-氨基丁酸治疗对哮喘患儿血浆P物质和降钙素基因相关肽含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐传伟; 郭山春; 郑振文; 王庆元

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)治疗前后哮喘患儿血浆P物质(SP)和降钙素基因相关肽(CGRP)含量的变化.方法 75例哮喘患儿随机分为GABA治疗组(36例)和对照组(39例),两组患儿均给予哮喘常规治疗.治疗组在常规治疗的基础上给予GABA口服(每日25 ~ 30 mg/kg).采用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)测定患儿治疗前、缓解后血浆SP、CGRP的含量.结果 两组患儿治疗前血浆SP、CGRP含量差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);哮喘缓解后治疗组血浆SP、CGRP含量分别为57±15 pg/mL、23±10 pg/mL,显著低于对照组(分别为127±12 pg/mL、42 ±8 pg/mL),差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).两组哮喘缓解后血浆SP、CGRP含量均较治疗前明显下降,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).哮喘患儿血浆SP与CGRP含量呈显著正相关(r=0.792,P<0.01).结论 GABA可抑制小儿哮喘急性发作期血浆SP、CGRP的释放.%Objective To study the changes in plasma substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels in children with acute asthma before and after gamma-aminobutyricacid (GABA) treatment. Methods Seventy-five children with asthma were randomly assigned to GABA treatment ( n = 36 ) and control groups ( n = 39 ) . Both groups were given conventional treatment for asthma. Besides the conventional treatment, the treatment group was administered with oral GABA (25 - 30 mg/kg·d). Plasma content of SP and CGRP was measured using ELISA before treatment and after remission. Results There were no significant differences in plasma content of SP and CGRP between the GABA treatment and control groups (P > 0.05) before treatment. Plasma content of SP and CGRP in the GABA treatment group was significantly lower than the control group (SP: 57 ± 15 pg/mL vs 127 ± 12 pg/mL; CGRP: 23 ± 10 pg/mL vs 42 ± 8 pg/mL) after remission (P<0. 01). Plasma content of SP and CGRP after remission was significantly lower than before treatment (P <0.01) in both groups. There was a

  6. Combined measurements of Higgs boson production and decay in the $H\\rightarrow ZZ^∗\\rightarrow4\\ell$ and $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ channels using $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV pp collision data collected with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Combined measurements of Higgs boson production cross sections and branching fractions are presented using the $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\rightarrow ZZ^∗\\rightarrow4\\ell$ decay channels, based on 36.1 fb$^{−1}$ of proton–proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV. Results are presented for the individual production processes of gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, WH, ZH, and t$\\bar{\\rm{t}}$H , and for kinematic subdivisions of these processes. The total cross section for $pp \\rightarrow H + X$ is determined to be $57.0^{+6.0}_{−5.9}$ (stat.) $^{+4.0}_{−3.3}$ (syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction of $55.6^{+2.4}_{−3.4}$ pb. The results are translated into constraints on coefficients of Standard Model couplings. No significant deviations from the expectations are observed.

  7. Proton/gamma relative thermoluminescence efficiencies of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE prepared at ININ and TLD-100H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, O.; Gonzalez, P.; Murillo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    Properties of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE dosemeters developed at ININ have been investigated in order to evaluate their performance compared to those of equivalent commercial dosemeters. In this work both LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE and TLD-100H pellets were exposed to low fluence 3 MeV protons and to low dose gamma radiation to evaluate experimental proton/gamma efficiencies. Gamma irradiation was performed using the Vic krad irradiator at ININ at varying doses between 25 and 500 mGy. For proton irradiation the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at ININ was used. Dosemeters were placed on a holder inside a scattering chamber where protons impinge on a gold target and scatter in all directions. The holder allows for several angular positions so that dosemeters receive proton fluence between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 1}0 p/cm{sup 2}. Experimental efficiency values found for LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE and TLD-100H were 0.18 +- 03 and 0.23 +- 0.03, respectively. These results allow to confirm the reliability of the dosemeters developed at ININ. (Author)

  8. Detection of VHE gamma-ray emission from the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232 with H.E.S.S. and broadband characterisation

    CERN Document Server

    Akhperjanian, A G; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Atai, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fussling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Olive, J P; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2007-01-01

    The blazar 1ES 1101-232 was observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACT) in 2004 and 2005, for a live time of 43 hours. VHE (E > 10^11 eV) gamma-rays were detected for the first time from this object. VHE observations of blazars are used to investigate the inner parts of the blazar jets, and also to study the extragalactic background light (EBL) in the near-infrared band. Observations in 2005 were conducted in a multiwavelength campaign, together with the RXTE satellite and optical observations. In 2004, simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton were obtained. 1ES 1101-232 was detected with H.E.S.S. with an excess of 722 photons, at a significance of 12 sigma. The measured VHE gamma-ray flux amounts to dN/dE = (5.63 +- 0.89) x 10^-13 (E/TeV)^-(2.94 +- 0.20) cm^-2 s^-1 TeV^-1, above a spectral energy threshold of 225 GeV. No significant variation of the VHE gamma-ray flux on any time scale was found. 1ES 1101-232 exhibits a very hard spectrum, and at a ...

  9. H-alpha observations of the gamma-ray-emitting Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303: orbital modulation, disk truncation, and long-term variability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R; Marti, J; Tomov, N A; Belcheva, G; Luque-Escamilla, P L; Latev, G

    2013-01-01

    We report 138 spectral observations of the H-alpha emission line of the radio- and gamma-ray-emitting Be/X-ray binary LSI+61303 obtained during the period of September 1998 -- January 2013. From measuring various H-alpha parameters, we found that the orbital modulation of the H-alpha is best visible in the equivalent width ratio EW(B)/EW(R), the equivalent width of the blue hump, and in the radial velocity of the central dip. The periodogram analysis confirmed that the H-alpha emission is modulated with the orbital and superorbital periods. For the past 20 years the radius of the circumstellar disk is similar to the Roche lobe size at the periastron. It is probably truncated by a 6:1 resonance. The orbital maximum of the equivalent width of H-alpha emission peaks after the periastron and coincides on average with the X-ray and gamma-ray maxima. All the spectra are available upon request from the authors and through the CDS.

  10. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid affects {gamma}H2AX expression in osteosarcoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor and normal tissue cell lines after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, C.; Oertel, S.; Thiemann, M.; Weber, K.J.; Schmezer, P.; Zelezny, O.; Lopez Perez, R.; Kulozik, A.E.; Debus, J.; Ehemann, V. [Univ. Children' s Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology, Immunology and Pulmology

    2012-02-15

    Osteosarcoma and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors are tumor entities with varying response to common standard therapy protocols. Histone acetylation affects chromatin structure and gene expression which are considered to influence radiation sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and irradiation on atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and osteosarcoma compared to normal tissue cell lines. Clonogenic assay was used to determine cell survival. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) were examined by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE) as well as by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining involving flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and immunoblot analysis. SAHA lead to an increased radiosensitivity in tumor but not in normal tissue cell lines. {gamma}H2AX expression as an indicator for DSB was significantly increased when SAHA was applied 24 h before irradiation to the sarcoma cell cultures. In contrast, {gamma}H2AX expression in the normal tissue cell lines was significantly reduced when irradiation was combined with SAHA. Analysis of initial DNA fragmentation and fragment rejoining by PFGE, however, did not reveal differences in response to the SAHA pretreatment for either cell type. SAHA increases radiosensitivity in tumor but not normal tissue cell lines. The increased H2AX phosphorylation status of the SAHA-treated tumor cells post irradiation likely reflects its delayed dephosphorylation within the DNA damage signal decay rather than chromatin acetylation-dependent differences in the overall efficacy of DSB induction and rejoining. The results support the hypothesis that combining SAHA with irradiation may provide a promising strategy in the treatment of solid tumors. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of fiducial, differential and production cross sections in the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel with 13.3 fb$^{-1}$ of 13 TeV proton-proton collision data with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents preliminary measurements of the Higgs boson properties measured in the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel using 13.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data taken at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Fiducial and differential cross section measurements are presented in a variety of phase space regions and as a function of several kinematic variables. The fiducial cross section is measured to be $ \\sigma_{\\rm fid} = 43.2 \\pm 14.9\\, ({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 4.9 \\, ({\\rm syst.})\\,\\mathrm{fb}$ for a Higgs boson of mass 125.09 GeV decaying to two isolated photons that have transverse momentum greater than 35% and 25% of the diphoton invariant mass and each with absolute pseudorapidity $|\\eta|<2.37$, excluding the region $1.37 < |\\eta|<1.52$. The Standard Model prediction for the same fiducial region is $62.8 \\, ^{+3.4}_{-4.4}\\,$fb. Finally, production cross section measurements for a Higgs boson rapidity $|y_H|<$ 2.5 and in the full phase space are presented for gluon f...

  12. The gamma-ray and neutrino sky: a consistent picture of Fermi-LAT, H.E.S.S., Milagro, and IceCube results

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Marinelli, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we propose a novel interpretation of the anomalous TeV gamma-ray diffuse emission observed by Milagro in the inner Galactic plane consistent with the signal reported by H.E.S.S. in the Galactic ridge; remarkably, our picture also accounts for a relevant portion of the neutrino flux measured by IceCube. Our scenario is based on a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially-dependent cosmic-ray (CR) transport properties. Designed to reproduce both Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data and local CR observables, this model offers for the first time a self-consistent picture of both the GeV and the TeV sky.

  13. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P T; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tam, P H T; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2014-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the $0.3\\textrm{--}10$ keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, $>100$ GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of $z\\sim0.5$, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time ($<700 \\rm{s}$ after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above $\\sim$380 GeV of $4.2\\times10^{-12} \\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ (95 % confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been ...

  14. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil.

  15. 生物基尼龙聚丁内酰胺单体γ-氨基丁酸的纯化工艺研究%Study on the Separation and Extraction Technology of Gamma-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) for PA4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵鹤飞; 夏泉鸣; 邱勇隽; 王耀松; 蒋丽华; 赵黎明

    2014-01-01

    为掌握从谷氨酸发酵液提取生物基尼龙聚丁内酰胺单体γ-氨基丁酸( GABA)的技术,本文研究了膜过滤联合离子交换吸附和洗脱的工艺,并且使用活性炭进行脱色。膜过滤过程中初始大跨膜压差为0.85 bar,过滤温度控制在38℃;离子交换过程采用QY-021-a强酸型阳离子交换树脂,常温下吸附-洗脱的操作方法;经旋转蒸发浓缩后,添加15%(碳对固形物含量之比)活性炭,温度为65℃,搅拌40 min脱色。结果表明:平均膜通量为128 L/m2·h,浓缩倍数为33.3倍。经取样检测膜透过液样品,浓缩液样品计算GABA收率为97.7%,微滤膜以及膜表面污染物上无GABA截留和吸附截留;离子交换经5 BV洗脱后计算收率,吸附-洗脱过程的收率为92.8%;使用活性碳B的脱色率为94.2%,GABA收率为99.2%。该工艺的总收率为85%,该工艺具有工业化应用前景,并且可以通过优化离子交换工艺和设备进一步提高收率。%In order to explore the extraction technology of GABA from fermentation broth with glutamic acid as substrate, membrane filtration associated with ion-exchange adsorption and desorption process were studied in this paper, and followed with decolorization by using active carbon. The initial trans-membrane pressure is 0. 85 bar during the filtration process, and the temperature was controlled at 38℃. With QY-021-a strong acid cation exchange resin as packing in ion-exchange column, adsorption-desorption process was exerted at room temperature. After concentrated by rotary evaporation, decolorization was performed using 15% ( carbon/solids in the solution ) activate carbon, with temperature fixed at 65℃, stirring for 40 min. Results showed that the average flux was 128 L/m2·h, and concentration ratio was 33.3. Samplings to detect membrane permeate showed that the yield of GABA was 97.7%, which indicated that there was no GABA

  16. Long-term monitoring of PKS 2155$-$304 with ATOM and H.E.S.S.: investigation of optical/$\\gamma$-ray correlations in different spectral states

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadsch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report on the analysis of all the available optical and very high-energy $\\gamma$-ray ($>$200 GeV) data for the BL Lac object PKS 2155$-$304, collected simultaneously with the ATOM and H.E.S.S. telescopes from 2007 until 2009. This study also includes X-ray (RXTE, Swift) and high-energy $\\gamma$-ray (Fermi-LAT) data. During the period analysed, the source was transitioning from its flaring to quiescent optical states,and was characterized by only moderate flux changes at different wavelengths on the timescales of days and months. A flattening of the optical continuum with an increasing optical flux can be noted in the collected dataset, but only occasionally and only at higher flux levels. We did not find any universal relation between the very high-energy $\\gamma$-ray and optical flux changes on the timescales from days and weeks up to several years. On the other hand, we noted that at higher flux levels the source can follow two distinct tracks in the optical flux-colour diagrams, which see...

  17. Variable optical polarization during high state in gamma-ray loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Uemura, Makoto; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Doi, Akihiro; Arai, Akira; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hayashi, Masahiko; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Kawabata, Koji S; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kuroda, Daisuke; Miyaji, Takeshi; Miyanoshita, Ryo; Moritani, Yuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murata, Katsuhiro L; Nagayama, Takahiro; Oasa, Yumiko; Ohshima, Tomohito; Ohsugi, Takashi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sasada, Mahito; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yuhei; Takahashi, Jun; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ui, Takahiro; Watanabe, Makoto; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We present results of optical polarimetric and multi-band photometric observations for gamma-ray loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342. This object has been monitored by 1.5 m Kanata telescope since 2012 September but following a gamma-ray flux enhancement detected by Fermi-LAT on MJD 56483 (2013 July 10) dense follow-up was performed by ten 0.5-2.0 m telescopes in Japan over one week. The 2-year R_C-band light curve showed clear brightening corresponding to the gamma-ray flux increase and then decayed gradually. The high state as a whole lasted for ~20 days, during which we clearly detected optical polarization from this object. The polarization degree (PD) of the source increased from 0-1% in quiescence to ~3% at maximum and then declined to the quiescent level, with the duration of the enhancement of less than 10 days. The moderate PD around the peak allowed us to precisely measure the daily polarization angle (PA). As a result, we found that the daily PAs were almost constant and aligned to the je...

  18. Probing the gamma-ray emission from HESS J1834-087 using H.E.S.S. and Fermi LAT observations

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Acero, F; Casandjian, J M; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Giordano, F; Guillemot, L; Lande, J; Pletsch, H; Uchiyama, Y

    2014-01-01

    Previous observations with HESS have revealed the existence of an extended very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray source, HESS J1834-087, coincident with the SNR W41. The origin of the gamma-ray emission has been further investigated with HESS and the Fermi-LAT. The gamma-ray data provided by 61h (HESS) and 4 yrs (Fermi LAT) of observations cover over 5 decades in energy (1.8GeV - 30TeV). The morphology and spectrum of the TeV and GeV sources have been studied and multi-wavelength data have been used to investigate the origin of the observed emission. The TeV source can be modeled with a sum of two components: one point-like and one significantly extended (sig_TeV = 0.17{\\deg}), both centered on SNR W41 and exhibiting spectra described by a power law of index 2.6. The GeV source detected with Fermi is extended (sig_GeV =0.15{\\deg}) and morphologically matches the VHE emission. Its spectrum can be described by a power-law with index 2.15 and joins smoothly the one of the whole TeV source. A break appears ...

  19. Optimization of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from Honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Tajabadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM. The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM.

  20. Optimization of γ-aminobutyric acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajabadi, Naser; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Baradaran, Ali; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abdul; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-04-15

    Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM) in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM.

  1. A specific inhibitor of protein kinase CK2 delays gamma-H2Ax foci removal and reduces clonogenic survival of irradiated mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Peter E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein kinase CK2 sustains multiple pro-survival functions in cellular DNA damage response and its level is tightly regulated in normal cells but elevated in cancers. Because CK2 is thus considered as potential therapeutic target, DNA double-strand break (DSB formation and rejoining, apoptosis induction and clonogenic survival was assessed in irradiated mammalian cells upon chemical inhibition of CK2. Methods MRC5 human fibroblasts and WIDR human colon carcinoma cells were incubated with highly specific CK2 inhibitor 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB, or mock-treated, 2 hours prior to irradiation. DSB was measured by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE as well as gamma-H2AX foci formation and removal. Apoptosis induction was tested by DAPI staining and sub-G1 flow cytometry, survival was quantified by clonogenic assay. Results TBB treatment did not affect initial DNA fragmention (PFGE; up to 80 Gy or foci formation (1 Gy. While DNA fragment rejoining (PFGE was not inhibited by the drug, TBB clearly delayed gamma-H2AX foci disappearence during postirradiation incubation. No apoptosis induction could be detected for up to 38 hours for both cell lines and exposure conditions (monotherapies or combination, but TBB treatment at this moderately toxic concentration of 20 μM (about 40% survival enhanced radiation-induced cell killing in the clonogenic assay. Conclusions The data imply a role of CK2 in gamma-H2AX dephosporylation, most likely through its known ability to stimulate PP2A phosphatase, rather than DSB rejoining. The slight but definite clonogenic radiosensitization by TBB does apparently not result from interference with an apoptosis suppression function of CK2 in these cells but could reflect inhibitor-induced uncoupling of DNA damage response decay from break ligation.

  2. Corrections of order O(G$_{F}\\alpha_{s}$m$_{t}^{2}$) to the Higgs decay rate $\\Gamma$(H --> b$\\overline{b}$)

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiatkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    QCD corrections to the electroweak one-loop result for the partial width \\Gamma(H\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}) are studied. For the decay channel into bottom quarks the rate is affected by a virtual top quark through electroweak interactions. The calculation of QCD corrections to this quantity is performed for an intermediate range Higgs mass in the heavy top mass limit. The leading correction of order {\\cal O}(G_F\\alpha_s m_t^2) is estimated. Numerically the contribution is of the same size as the electroweak correction.

  3. Subcellular Compartmentation of the 4-Aminobutyrate Shunt in Protoplasts from Developing Soybean Cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreuz, K. E.; Shelp, B. J.

    1995-05-01

    The subcellular localization of enzymes involved in the 4-ami-nobutyrate shunt was investigated in protoplasts prepared from developing soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv Maple Arrow] cotyledons. Protoplast lysate was fractionated by differential and continuous Percoll-gradient centrifugation to separate organelle fractions. Glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was found exclusively in the cytosol, whereas 4-aminobutyrate:pyruvate transami-nase (EC 2.6.1.19) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.16) were associated exclusively with the mitochondrial fractions. Mitochondrial fractions also catabolized [U-14C]4-aminobu-tyrate to labeled succinate.

  4. The inhibitory role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immunomodulation of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meijia; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Zhaoqun; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter to suppress the immune-mediated pro-inflammatory reactions, and it has been used in the treatment of many inflammation-related diseases in vertebrates, while its immunomodulatory role in invertebrates has never been reported. In the present study, GABA was found to exist in the hemolymph of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and its concentration decreased slightly from 8.00 ± 0.37 μmol L(-1) at normal condition to 7.73 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1) at 6 h after LPS stimulation, and then increased to 9.34 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1), 8.86 ± 0.68 μmol L(-1) at 12 h and 48 h, respectively. After LPS stimulation, the mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (CgIL-17 and CgTNF) and immune effectors (CgSOD and CgBPI), and the protein expression of NOS increased significantly, and these increased trends were remarkably inhibited by GABA stimulation. At the same time, the phagocytosis rate and apoptosis rate of immunocytes also increased obviously after LPS stimulation, whereas the increase was repressed with the addition of GABA. The results collectively demonstrated that GABA was an indispensable inhibitory agent for both humoral and cellular immune response, which mainly functioned at the late phase of immune response to avoid the excess immune reactions and maintain the immune homeostasis.

  5. Does gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA influence the development of chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridges S Louis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated a role for spinal p38 MAP kinase (MAPK in the development of chronic inflammation and peripheral arthritis and a role for GABA in the inhibition of p38 MAPK mediated effects. Integrating these data suggests that GABA may play a role in downregulating mechanisms that lead to the production of proinflammatory agents such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 – agents implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic studies have also associated RA with members of the p38 MAPK pathway. Hypothesis We propose a hypothesis for an inefficient GABA signaling system that results in unchecked proinflammatory cytokine production via the p38 MAPK pathway. This model also supports the need for increasing research in the integration of immunology and neuroscience.

  6. Investigation of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA A receptors genes and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccodicola Alfredo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of severe headache, affecting around 12% of Caucasian populations. It is well known that migraine has a strong genetic component, although the number and type of genes involved is still unclear. Prior linkage studies have reported mapping of a migraine gene to chromosome Xq 24–28, a region containing a cluster of genes for GABA A receptors (GABRE, GABRA3, GABRQ, which are potential candidate genes for migraine. The GABA neurotransmitter has been implicated in migraine pathophysiology previously; however its exact role has not yet been established, although GABA receptors agonists have been the target of therapeutic developments. The aim of the present research is to investigate the role of the potential candidate genes reported on chromosome Xq 24–28 region in migraine susceptibility. In this study, we have focused on the subunit GABA A receptors type ε (GABRE and type θ (GABRQ genes and their involvement in migraine. Methods We have performed an association analysis in a large population of case-controls (275 unrelated Caucasian migraineurs versus 275 controls examining a set of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region (exons 3, 5 and 9 of the GABRE gene and also the I478F coding variant of the GABRQ gene. Results Our study did not show any association between the examined SNPs in our test population (P > 0.05. Conclusion Although these particular GABA receptor genes did not show positive association, further studies are necessary to consider the role of other GABA receptor genes in migraine susceptibility.

  7. Comparison of Nootropic and Neuroprotective Features of Aryl-Substituted Analogs of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurenkov, I N; Borodkina, L E; Bagmetova, V V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2016-02-01

    GABA analogs containing phenyl (phenibut) or para-chlorophenyl (baclofen) substituents demonstrated nootropic activity in a dose of 20 mg/kg: they improved passive avoidance conditioning, decelerated its natural extinction, and exerted antiamnestic effect on the models of amnesia provoked by scopolamine or electroshock. Tolyl-containing GABA analog (tolibut, 20 mg/kg) exhibited antiamnestic activity only on the model of electroshock-induced amnesia. Baclofen and, to a lesser extent, tolibut alleviated seizures provoked by electroshock, i.e. both agents exerted anticonvulsant effect. All examined GABA aryl derivatives demonstrated neuroprotective properties on the maximum electroshock model: they shortened the duration of coma and shortened the period of spontaneous motor activity recovery. In addition, these agents decreased the severity of passive avoidance amnesia and behavioral deficit in the open field test in rats exposed to electroshock. The greatest neuroprotective properties were exhibited by phenyl-containing GABA analog phenibut.

  8. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptogenesis and synaptic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Elster, L;

    1998-01-01

    , but the intracellular link between GABA receptor activation and DNA transcription is largely unknown. GABA also controls the induction and development of functionally and pharmacologically different GABAA receptor subtypes. The induced receptors are likely to be inserted only into the synaptic membrane domain. However...

  9. Synthesis of nylon 4 from gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) produced by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si Jae; Kim, Eun Young; Noh, Won; Oh, Young Hoon; Kim, Hye Young; Song, Bong Keun; Cho, Kwang Myung; Hong, Soon Ho; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jegal, Jonggeon

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we developed recombinant Escherichia coli strains expressing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Il1403 glutamate decarboxylase (GadB) for the production of GABA from glutamate monosodium salt (MSG). Syntheses of GABA from MSG were examined by employing recombinant E. coli XL1-Blue as a whole cell biocatalyst in buffer solution. By increasing the concentration of E. coli XL1-Blue expressing GadB from the OD₆₀₀ of 2-10, the concentration and conversion yield of GABA produced from 10 g/L of MSG could be increased from 4.3 to 4.8 g/L and from 70 to 78 %, respectively. Furthermore, E. coli XL1-Blue expressing GadB highly concentrated to the OD₆₀₀ of 100 produced 76.2 g/L of GABA from 200 g/L of MSG with 62.4 % of GABA yield. Finally, nylon 4 could be synthesized by the bulk polymerization using 2-pyrrolidone that was prepared from microbially synthesized GABA by the reaction with Al₂O₃ as catalyst in toluene with the yield of 96 %.

  10. Basal Ganglia Dopamine-gamma-Aminobutyric Acid-Acetylcholine Interaction in Organophosphate-Induced Neurotoxicity. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    of chollnestcrasc upon body weight, food intake, and water Intake In the rat. J. Coap . Physiol. Psychol. 1966;61:295-299. Clow PH, Rose S...Chollnesterase levels and operant extinction. J. Coap . Physiol. .-sychol. 1966;61:165-172. Glow PH, Rose S, Richardson A. The effect of acute and chronic

  11. A gene duplication led to specialized gamma-aminobutyrate and beta-alanine aminotransferase in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Andersen, Birgit; Dobritzsch, D.

    2007-01-01

    and related yeasts have two different genes/enzymes to apparently 'distinguish' between the two reactions in a single cell. It is likely that upon duplication similar to 200 million years ago, a specialized Uga1p evolved into a 'novel' transaminase enzyme with broader substrate specificity....

  12. Efficacy of integrated treatment of UV light and low-dose gamma irradiation on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Ukuku, D; Fan, X; Juneja, V K

    2013-07-01

    The study evaluated the efficacy of integrated ultraviolet-C light (UVC) and low-dose gamma irradiation treatments to inactivate mixed strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on inoculated whole grape tomatoes. A mixed bacterial cocktail composed of a 3 strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, E02128, and F00475) and a 3 serotype mixture of S. enterica (S. Montevideo G4639, S. Newport H1275, and S. Stanley H0558) was used based on their association with produce-related outbreaks. Spot inoculation (50 to 100 μmL) on tomato surfaces was performed to achieve a population of appropriately 10(7-8) CFU/tomato. Inoculated tomatoes were subjected to UVC (253.7 nm) dose of 0.6 kJ/m(2) followed by 4 different low doses of gamma irradiations (0.1 kGy, 0.25 kGy, 0.5 kGy, 0.75 kGy). The fate of background microflora (mesophilic aerobic) including mold and yeast counts were also determined during storage at 5 °C over 21 d. Integrated treatment significantly (P E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica, respectively, per tomato with UVC (0.6 kJ/m(2) ) and 0.25 kGy irradiation. More than a 4 log and higher reduction (>5 log) per fruit was accomplished by combined UVC treatment with 0.5 kGy and 0.75 kGy irradiation, respectively, for all tested pathogens. Furthermore, the combined treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the native microflora compared to the control during storage. The data suggest efficacious treatment strategy for produce indicating 5 or higher log reduction which is consistent with the recommendations of the Natl. Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods.

  13. Isolation of novel human cDNA (hGMF-gamma) homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, K; Fujita, K; Yamamoto, M; Hotta, T; Morikawa, M; Kokubo, M; Moriyama, A; Kato, T

    1998-03-13

    A novel full-length human cDNA homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta (GMF-beta) gene was isolated. Sequence analysis of the entire cDNA revealed an open reading frame of 426 nucleotides with a deduced protein sequence of 142 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of its putative product is highly homologous to human GMF-beta (82% identity) and named for GMF-gamma. Northern blot analysis indicated that a message of 0.9 kb long, but not 4.1 kb of GMF-beta, is predominantly expressed in human lung, heart, and placenta.

  14. Detection of TeV gamma-ray Emission from the Shell-Type Supernova Remnant RX J0852.0-4622 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Wagner, S J; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection of TeV gamma-rays from the shell-type supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622 with data of 3.2 h of live time recorded with H.E.S.S. in February 2004. An excess of (700 +/- 60) events from the whole remnant with a significance of 12 sigma was found. The observed emission region is clearly extended with a radius of the order of 1 degree and the spatial distribution of the signal correlates with X-ray observations. The spectrum in the energy range between 500 GeV and 15 TeV is well described by a power law with a photon index of 2.1 +/- 0.1(stat) +/- 0.2(syst) and a differential flux at 1 TeV of (2.1 +/- 0.2(stat) +/- 0.6(syst)) 10^{-11} cm^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1}. The integral flux above 1 TeV was measured to be (1.9 +/- 0.3(stat) +/- 0.6(syst)) 10^{-11} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which is at the level of the flux of the Crab nebula at these energies. More data are needed to draw firm conclusions on the magnetic field in the remnant and the type of the particle population creating the TeV gamma-rays.

  15. High-energy break-up of 6Li as a tool to study the Big-Bang nucleosynthesis reaction 2H(alpha,gamma)6Li

    CERN Document Server

    Hammache, F; Typel, S; Galaviz, D; Sümmerer, K; Coc, A; Uhlig, F; Attallah, F; Caamano, M; Cortina, D; Geissel, H; Hellström, M; Iwasa, N; Kiener, J; Koczon, P; Kohlmeyer, B; Mohr, P; Schwab, E; Schwarz, K; Schümann, F; Senger, P; Sorlin, O; Tatischeff, V; Thibaud, J P; Vangioni, E; Wagner, A; Walus, W

    2010-01-01

    The recently claimed observations of non-negligible amounts of 6Li in old halo stars have renewed interest in the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) of 6Li. One important ingredient in the predicted BBN abundance of 6Li is the low-energy 2H(alpha,gamma)6Li cross section. Up to now, the only available experimental result for this cross section showed an almost constant astrophysical S-factor below 400 keV, contrary to theoretical expectations. We report on a new measurement of the 2H(alpha,gamma)6Li reaction using the break-up of 6Li at 150 A MeV. Even though we cannot separate experimentally the Coulomb contribution from the nuclear one, we find clear evidence for Coulomb-nuclear interference by analyzing the scattering-angular distributions. This is in-line with our theoretical description which indicates a drop of the S_24-factor at low energies as predicted also by most other models. Consequently, we find even lower upper limits for the calculated primordial 6Li abundance than before.

  16. Interaction between γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor genes: new evidence in migraine susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Quintas

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common neurological episodic disorder with a female-to-male prevalence 3- to 4-fold higher, suggesting a possible X-linked genetic component. Our aims were to assess the role of common variants of gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAAR genes, located in the X-chromosome, in migraine susceptibility and the possible interaction between them. An association study with 188 unrelated cases and 286 migraine-free controls age- and ethnic matched was performed. Twenty-three tagging SNPs were selected in three genes (GABRE, GABRA3 and GABRQ. Allelic, genotypic and haplotypic frequencies were compared between cases and controls. We also focused on gene-gene interactions. The AT genotype of rs3810651 of GABRQ gene was associated with an increased risk for migraine (OR: 4.07; 95% CI: 1.71-9.73, p=0.002, while the CT genotype of rs3902802 (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.21-0.78, p=0.006 and GA genotype of rs2131190 of GABRA3 gene (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88, p=0.013 seem to be protective factors. All associations were found in the female group and maintained significance after Bonferroni correction. We also found three nominal associations in the allelic analyses although there were no significant results in the haplotypic analyses. Strikingly, we found strong interactions between six SNPs encoding for different subunits of GABAAR, all significant after permutation correction. To our knowledge, we show for the first time, the putative involvement of polymorphisms in GABAAR genes in migraine susceptibility and more importantly we unraveled a role for novel gene-gene interactions opening new perspectives for the development of more effective treatments.

  17. Stereo-scopy of {gamma}-ray air showers with the H.E.S.S. telescopes: first images of the supernova remnants at TeV; Stereoscopie de gerbes de {gamma} avec les telescopes H.E.S.S.: premieres images de vestiges de supernovae au TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne [Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    The H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System) experiment in gamma-ray Astronomy consists of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes devoted to the observation of the gamma-ray sky in the energy domain above 100 GeV and extending up to several tens of TeV. This thesis presents a new reconstruction method of gamma-ray induced air showers which takes full advantage of the stereo-scopy and of the fine-grain imaging of the H.E.S.S. cameras. This new method provides an angular resolution better than 0.1 angle, an energy resolution of about 15% at zenith and a very efficient hadronic rejection based on a cut on the lateral spread of the electromagnetic shower which does not depend on simulations. A new background subtraction method, well adapted to the study of extended sources, was also developed. No assumption, either on the distribution of gamma-rays in the field of view, or on the distribution of hadrons are necessary. It provides two sky maps obtained from a maximum likelihood fit: one for {gamma}-rays and the other for hadrons. These two analysis methods were applied to the study of the shell-type supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and RX J0852.0-4622 (Vela Junior), allowing for the first time to resolve their morphology in the gamma-ray domain. The study of these sources should answer the question: 'can shell-type supernova remnants accelerate cosmic-rays up to the knee (5 x 10{sup 15} eV)?'. A morphological and spectral study of these sources combined with a comparison of a simple model of emission processes (from electrons and protons accelerated in supernova remnants) provides some constraints on the parameters of the leptonic process. Nevertheless, this scenario cannot be excluded. The different results obtained are discussed and compared with a third shell-type supernova remnant observed by H.E.S.S. but not detected: SN 1006. (author)

  18. Effects of Aeration Treatment on γ-Aminobutyric Acid Accumulation in Germinated Tartary Buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the optimum condition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA accumulation in germinated tartary buckwheat, effects of some factors including aeration treatment, physiological indexes, air flow rate, culture temperature, and pH value of cultivating solution under hypoxia on GABA in germinated tartary buckwheat were investigated. The results showed that the dark cultures with distilled water at 30°C, 2 days, and aeration stress with 1.0 L/min air flow rate at 30°C were optimal for GABA accumulation. Under these conditions, the predicted content of GABA was up to 371.98 μg/g DW. The analysis of correlation indicated that there was a significant correlation (P<0.01 between GABA accumulation and physiological indexes. Box-Behnken experimental analysis revealed that optimal conditions with aeration treatment for GABA accumulation in germinated tartary buckwheat were air flow rate of 1.04 L/min, culture temperature of 31.25°C, and a pH value of 4.21. Under these conditions, the GABA content was predicted as high as 386.20 μg/g DW, which was close to the measured value (379.00±9.30 μg/g DW. The variance analysis and validation test suggested that this established regression model could predict GABA accumulation in tartary buckwheat during germination.

  19. Transgenic mice overexpressing γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype I develop obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing murine γaminobutyric acid transporter subtype I were created. Unexpectedly, these mice markedly exhibited heritable obesity,which features significantly increased body weight and fat deposition. Behavioral examination revealed that transgenic mice have slightly reduced spontaneous locomotive capacity and altered feeding pattern. This preliminary finding indicates that the inappropriate level of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters may be directly or indirectly involved in the pathogenic mechanism underlying certain types of obesity.

  20. EPR study of gamma irradiated N-methyl taurine (C 3H 9NO 3S) and sodium hydrogen sulphate monohydrate (NaHSO 3·H 2O) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, İlkay; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2011-03-01

    EPR study of gamma irradiated C 3H 9NO 3S and NaHSO 3.H 2O single crystals have been carried out at room temperature. There is one site for the radicals in C 3H 9NO 3S and two magnetically distinct sites for the radicals in NaHSO 3. The observed lines in the EPR spectra have been attributed to the species of SO3- and RH radicals for N-methyl taurine, and to the SO3- and OH radicals for sodium hydrogen sulfate monohydrate single crystals. The principal values of the g for SO3-, the hyperfine values of RH and OH proton splitting have been calculated and discussed.

  1. Investigating chromosome damage and gammaH2AX response in human lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets as potential biomarkers of radiation sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Lindsay A.

    This thesis examines in vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients exhibiting late normal tissue damage after receiving radiotherapy, for lymphocyte response. Chromosomal aberrations, translocations and proliferation rate are measured, as well as gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets. The goal of this thesis is to determine whether the lymphocyte response to in vitro radiation could be used as a marker for radiosensitivity. Patients were selected from a randomized clinical trial evaluating the optimal timing of Dose Escalated Radiation and short course Androgen Deprivation Therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% developed Grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood was drawn from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated and were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes, excess fragments and proliferation rates (at 6 Gy), translocations, stable and unstable damage (at 4 Gy), and dose response (up to 10 Gy), along with time response after 2 Gy (0 -- 24 h). Chromosome aberrations, excess fragments per cell, translocations per cell and proliferation rates were analyzed by brightfield and fluorescent microscopy, while the gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets was analyzed by flow cytometry. Both groups were statistically similar for all endpoints at 0 Gy. At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell, the mean number of excess fragments per cell and the proportion of cells in second metaphase. At 4 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the two cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of translocations per cell, the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell and the mean number of deletions per cell. There were no significant differences between the gammaH2AX

  2. Local environments and lithium adsorption on the iron oxyhydroxides lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and goethite (alpha-FeOOH): A 2H-2 and 7Li solid-state MAS NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Grey, Clare P.; Paik, Jonkim

    2008-01-01

    2H and 7LiMAS NMR spectroscopy techniques were applied to study the local surface and bulk environments of iron oxyhydroxide lepiclocrocite (gamma-FeOOH). 2H variable-temperature (VT) MAS NMR experiments were performed, showing the presence of short-range, strong antiferromagnetic correlations, e...

  3. Combined measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates in $H\\to ZZ^*\\to 4\\ell$ and $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ final states using $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents combined measurements based on Higgs boson production cross sections and branching ratios using more than 13.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV. The combination is based on the analyses of the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\to ZZ^*\\to 4\\ell$ decay channels. Results are derived for these two decay modes and five sets of production processes for a Higgs boson rapidity $|y_H| < 2.5$ and for a Higgs boson mass of $125.09 \\pm 0.21{\\rm (stat)} \\pm 0.11{\\rm (syst)}$ GeV. The global signal strength, defined as the ratio in the full phase space (including $|y_H| \\geq 2.5$) between the observed total signal yield and the Standard Model expectation, is measured to be $\\mu = 1.13\\,^{+0.18}_{-0.17}$. The cross section of $pp \\to H + X$ in the full phase space is determined from fiducial cross section measurements to be $59.0^{+9.7}_{-9.2} ~(\\mathrm{stat.})~ ^{+4.4}_{-3.5} (\\mathrm{syst.})$ pb, to be compared with the Standard Model...

  4. $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ Coupling Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, Jared Gregory; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Higgs boson, measurements of the decay rates and couplings have become paramount to an understanding of the new boson and its role in electroweak symmetry breaking and the mechanism of fermion mass generation. Despite the small branching ratio, the diphoton decay channel is a particularly attractive method to study these properties thanks to the clean signal peak and novel analysis strategy. This poster will present the latest 13 TeV measurements on the signal strengths (and their ratios) from various Higgs production modes in the diphoton decay channel. The measurements are further extended to include cross-section measurements in theory motivated kinematic regions as defined by the Simplified Template Cross-Section framework.

  5. Solubilization of {alpha}-FeO(OH), ThO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and {gamma}-UO{sub 3} by hydroxamate and carboxylate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, Joanna C.; Livens, Francis R.; Collison, David; Robson, Geoffrey D.; Trinci, Anthony P.J. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, Robin J. [BNFL, Research and Technology, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-01

    The ability of five different ligands to solubilize {alpha}-FeO(OH) (goethite), ThO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and {gamma}-UO{sub 3} was investigated at pH 3, 5 and 7: the hydroxamates acetohydroxamate (AHA), glutarodihydroxamate (GDA), rhodotorulate (RA), desferrioxamine B (DFO) and the dicarboxylate iminodiacetate (IDA). Solubilization in the absence of ligand and solubilization by DFO (pH 5) as a function of time was also investigated. RA was the most effective at solubilizing {alpha}-FeO(OH) at all three pH values and ThO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O at pH 5 and 7. IDA solubilized most ThO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O at pH 3. GDA was the least effective ligand for {alpha}-FeO(OH) and ThO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. Most {gamma}-UO{sub 3} was solubilized by DFO (pH 3 and 5) and GDA (pH 7). AHA was the least effective. For dissolution over time, solubilization of {alpha}-FeO(OH) appears to be a diffusion-controlled process, whilst for ThO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and {gamma}-UO{sub 3} it is controlled by first-order chemical kinetics. (author)

  6. Microwaves from UMTS/GSM mobile phones induce long-lasting inhibition of 53BP1/gamma-H2AX DNA repair foci in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Igor Y; Markovà, Eva; Hillert, Lena; Malmgren, Lars O G; Persson, Bertil R R

    2009-02-01

    We have recently described frequency-dependent effects of mobile phone microwaves (MWs) of global system for mobile communication (GSM) on human lymphocytes from persons reporting hypersensitivity to electromagnetic fields and healthy persons. Contrary to GSM, universal global telecommunications system (UMTS) mobile phones emit wide-band MW signals. Hypothetically, UMTS MWs may result in higher biological effects compared to GSM signal because of eventual "effective" frequencies within the wideband. Here, we report for the first time that UMTS MWs affect chromatin and inhibit formation of DNA double-strand breaks co-localizing 53BP1/gamma-H2AX DNA repair foci in human lymphocytes from hypersensitive and healthy persons and confirm that effects of GSM MWs depend on carrier frequency. Remarkably, the effects of MWs on 53BP1/gamma-H2AX foci persisted up to 72 h following exposure of cells, even longer than the stress response following heat shock. The data are in line with the hypothesis that the type of signal, UMTS MWs, may have higher biological efficiency and possibly larger health risk effects compared to GSM radiation emissions. No significant differences in effects between groups of healthy and hypersensitive subjects were observed, except for the effects of UMTS MWs and GSM-915 MHz MWs on the formation of the DNA repair foci, which were different for hypersensitive (P 0.05). The non-parametric statistics used here did not indicate specificity of the differences revealed between the effects of GSM and UMTS MWs on cells from hypersensitive subjects and more data are needed to study the nature of these differences.

  7. Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB), gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) reduce the volume of cerebral infarction in rodent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, Shankar; Maher, Timothy J; Quang, Lawrence S

    2006-08-01

    gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), an endogenous organic acid catabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), has been shown to have tissue-protective effects in various organs, including the brain. We examined the potential neuroprotective effect of GHB and its chemical precursors, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD), in the rodent ischemic stroke model by intraluminal filament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent transient left-sided MCAO and received intraperitoneal treatment with 300 mg/kg of GHB, GBL, 1,4-BD, or control vehicle given at 30 min before, as well as 180 and 360 min after the onset of ischemia. Infarct volumes were determined 24 h after MCAO. In transient MCAO, the mean volume of infarction for control rats was 464.4 +/- 17.9 cu.mm versus 273.6 +/- 53.1, 233.3 +/- 44.7, and 275.4 +/- 39.9 cu.mm for rats treated with 1,4-BD (P GBL (P GBL, and 1,4-BD protect against rat focal cerebral ischemia from transient MCAO.

  8. Discovery of very high energy gamma-ray emission from the BL Lac object PKS 0301-243 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Ait, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füssling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzìnska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    The active galactic nucleus PKS 0301-243 (z=0.266) is a high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lac object that is detected at high energies (HE, 100 MeV 100 GeV) by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) from observations between September 2009 and December 2011 for a total live time of 34.9 hours. Gamma rays above 200 GeV are detected at a significance of 9.4{\\sigma}. A hint of variability at the 2.5{\\sigma} level is found. An integral flux I(E > 200 GeV) = (3.3 +/- 1.1_stat +/- 0.7_syst)e-12 ph cm^-2s^-1 and a photon index {\\Gamma} = 4.6 +/- 0.7_stat +/- 0.2_syst are measured. Multi-wavelength light curves in HE, X-ray and optical bands show strong variability, and a minimal variability timescale of eight days is estimated from the optical light curve. A single-zone leptonic synchrotron self-Compton scenario satisfactorily reproduces the multi-wavelength data. In this model, the emitting region is out of equipartition and the jet is particle dominated. Because of its high redshift compared to other sources obse...

  9. On the black hole mass of the gamma-ray emitting narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    CERN Document Server

    Landt, H; Balokovic, M; Kynoch, D; Storchi-Bergmann, T; Boisson, C; Done, C; Schimoia, J; Stern, D

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies have been identified by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope as a rare class of gamma-ray emitting active galactic nuclei (AGN). The lowest-redshift candidate among them is the source 1H 0323+342. Here we present quasi-simultaneous Gemini near-infrared and Keck optical spectroscopy for it, from which we derive a black hole mass based on both the broad Balmer and Paschen emission lines. We supplement these observations with a NuSTAR X-ray spectrum taken about two years earlier, from which we constrain the black hole mass based on the short timescale spectral variability. Our multiwavelength observations suggest a black hole mass of ~2x10^7 solar masses, which agrees well with previous estimates. We build the spectral energy distribution and show that it is dominated by the thermal and reprocessed emission from the accretion disc rather than the non-thermal jet component. A detailed spectral fitting with the energy-conserving accretion disc model of Done et al. constrains the Eddin...

  10. Experiment search of the electroweak symmetry breaking in the H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} channel and of a solution of the hierarchy problem in the Atlas experiment: participation to the tests of the electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter; Recherche experimentale de la brisure spontanee de symetrie electrofaible dans le canal H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} et d'une solution au probleme de hierarchie dans ATLAS. Participation a la preparation de l'electronique du calorimetre electromagnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalier, M

    2005-04-15

    This thesis deals with the understanding of the spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism in the ATLAS experiment at LHC collider, by studying two complementary topics: the search for the Higgs boson in the H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} channel, and a search for extra dimensions in the gluon sector. Tests of the electronic of the electromagnetic calorimeter allowed us to validate various cards that were under the responsibility of the LPNHE. Using full simulation data of the detector allowed us to precisely compute mass resolution of the di-photon system. Due to recent theoretical improvements, signal and background have been studied at the next order of the perturbative development, which increases cross-sections. With regards to the jet background, a study has been done using discriminating variables in order to obtain, for a 80 % photons efficiency, a rejection factor of 7000. The discovery potential benefits from this change of cross-sections and increases by 50 % in comparison with the same analysis done at the leading order. In addition to this, a new analysis using a maximum likelihood method allowed us to increase by 40 % the discovery potential in comparison with our classical analysis. In conclusion, the Higgs boson of 120 GeV/c{sup 2} can be now discovered in this channel with an integrated luminosity of 10 fb{sup -1}. Furthermore, the consistency of the problem of the Higgs boson mass can be solved by introducing extra dimensions in which gluons can propagate. We have shown that it was possible to discover extra-dimensions up to a compactification scale of 15 TeV. (author)

  11. Discovery of gamma-ray emission from the extragalactic pulsar wind nebula N 157B with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Atäı, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; G´rard, L.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; K´ski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; K´lifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; K´niak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; M´hault, J.; Menzler, U.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Lstrok; .; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2012-09-01

    We present the significant detection of the first extragalactic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) detected in gamma rays, N 157B, located in the large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Pulsars with high spin-down luminosity are found to power energised nebulae that emit gamma rays up to energies of several tens of TeV. N 157B is associated with PSR J0537-6910, which is the pulsar with the highest known spin-down luminosity. The High Energy Stereoscopic System telescope array observed this nebula on a yearly basis from 2004 to 2009 with a dead-time corrected exposure of 46 h. The gamma-ray spectrum between 600 GeV and 12 TeV is well-described by a pure power-law with a photon index of 2.8 ± 0.2stat ± 0.3syst and a normalisation at 1 TeV of (8.2 ± 0.8stat ± 2.5syst) × 10-13 cm-2 s-1 TeV-1. A leptonic multi-wavelength model shows that an energy of about 4 × 1049 erg is stored in electrons and positrons. The apparent efficiency, which is the ratio of the TeV gamma-ray luminosity to the pulsar's spin-down luminosity, 0.08% ± 0.01%, is comparable to those of PWNe found in the Milky Way. The detection of a PWN at such a large distance is possible due to the pulsar's favourable spin-down luminosity and a bright infrared photon-field serving as an inverse-Compton-scattering target for accelerated leptons. By applying a calorimetric technique to these observations, the pulsar's birth period is estimated to be shorter than 10 ms. Data set is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/545/L2

  12. Gastric acid induces mucosal H2S release in rats by upregulating mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Veisi, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects the gastric mucosa against gastric acid and other noxious stimulants by several mechanisms but until now the effect of gastric acid on H2S production has not been evaluated. This study was performed to determine the effect of basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion on mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), and on mucosal release of H2S in rats. Seventy-two male rats were randomly assigned into 9 groups (8 in each)-control, distention, and pentagastrin-induced gastric acid secretion groups. The effects of 15% alcohol solution, propargylglycine (PAG), L-NAME, and pantoprazole were also investigated. Under anesthesia, animals underwent tracheostomy and midline laparotomy. A catheter was inserted into the stomach through the duodenum for gastric washout. At the end of the experiments, the animals were killed and the gastric mucosa was collected to measure H2S concentration and to quantify mRNA expression of CSE and CBS by quantitative real-time PCR, and expression of their proteins by western blot. Basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion increased mucosal levels of H2S, and mRNA and protein expression of CSE. Pantoprazole and L-NAME reversed H2S release and restored protein expression of CSE to the control level. Pantoprazole, but not propargylglycine, pretreatment inhibited the elevated level of protein expression of eNOS in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion. Our findings indicated that NO mediated the stimulatory effect of gastric acid on H2S release and protein expression of CSE.

  13. Rheological properties of gamma irradiated [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn2Cl5]- and [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn3Cl7]- ionic liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李倩妹; 罗迎社; 吴国忠; 陈仕谋

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to verify the rheological behavior of irradiated [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn2Cl5]-and [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn3Cl7]-ionic liquids in comparison to the unirradiated ones,the viscosities were measured by a strain-control experiment under different irradiation doses’ samples(0,10,20,50,100 kGy) at different shear rates and temperatures.The curves of shear stress against shear rate present that the viscosity of ionic liquid is insensitive to shear rate;the viscosity of ionic liquids decreases with increasing temperature,and can be fitted by Arrhenius equation very well.Gamma radiation causes a decrease of viscosity of [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn3Cl7]-by greater than 10%,but it does not impair the viscosity of [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn2Cl5]-(within the experimental error) except 20 kGy irradiated sample.The results show that the radiation stability of [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn2Cl5]-is higher than that of [Me3NC2H4OH]+[Zn3Cl7]-.

  14. Production of furfural from xylose, xylan and corncob in gamma-valerolactone using FeCl3·6H2O as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luxin; Yu, Hongbing; Wang, Pan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and simple one-pot monophasic reaction system with small carbon footprint for converting xylose, xylan and corncob into furfural was developed in gamma-valerolactone (GVL, an ideal sustainable solvent derived from lignocelluloses) by using FeCl3·6H2O as catalyst. Good yields of furfural from xylose were obtained, and the system was shown to work for xylan and corncob as well. A surprisingly high furfural yield of 79.6% from untreated corncob was achieved at 458 K for 100 min. Contrary to what was generally believed, the addition of water, reduced the rate of the reactions, but showed positive effect on preventing the furfural from degradation in GVL. Besides, the C6 sugars (glucose and cellulose) afforded 11.4-24.5% furfural yields when employing this catalytic approach. The reaction system proposed in this manuscript showed great potential for optimizing the catalytic process in furfural production.

  15. Conformational preferences of γ-aminobutyric acid in the gas phase and in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Il Keun; Kang, Young Kee

    2012-09-01

    The conformational study of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been carried out at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the gas phase and the SMD M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in water. In the gas phase, the folded conformation gG1 with gauche- and gauche+ conformations for the Cβsbnd Cα and Cγsbnd Cβ bonds, respectively, is found to be lowest in energy and enthalpy, which can be ascribed to the favored hyperconjugative n → π* interaction between the lone electron pair of the amine nitrogen atom and the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic group and the favored antiparallel dipole-dipole interaction between the Nsbnd H bond and the Cdbnd O bond. In addition, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group and the amine Nsbnd H group have contributed to stabilize some low-energy conformers. However, the most preferred conformation is found to be tG1 and more stable by 0.4 kcal/mol in ΔG than the conformer gG1, in which the favored entropic term due to the conformational flexibility and the other favored n → σ*, σ → σ*, and π → σ* interactions seem to play a role. The conformational preferences of the neutral GABA calculated by ΔG's are reasonably consistent with the populations deduced from FT microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets combined with laser ablation. In water, the two folded conformers Gg and gG of the zwitterionic GABA are dominantly populated, each of which has the population of 47%, and the hydrogen bond between the ammonium Nsbnd H group and the lone electron pair of the Csbnd O- group seems to be crucial in stabilizing these conformers. Our calculated result that the folded conformers preferentially exist in water is consistent with the 1H NMR experiments in D2O.

  16. Use of Lactococcus lactis to enrich sourdough bread with γ-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanwar, Seema; Bamnia, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Moushumi; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2013-02-01

    Fried sourdough bread (bhatura) with an elevated amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was produced using lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The LAB starter was screened and isolated from pickled yam showing highest GABA content and was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The maximum GABA production in de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) media supplemented with monosodium glutamate (MSG) was 110 mg/100 ml at pH 5, and 1-3% NaCl did not change the production of GABA significantly (p>0.05). When MSG was replaced with Vigna mungo in sourdough, the amount of GABA for bhatura was 226.22 mg/100 g representing about 10-fold increase. A sensory evaluation resulted as the overall general acceptability of bhatura to be 4.91 ± 0.03 on a five-point hedonic scale. Thus, the results indicated the potential of L. lactis as a LAB starter for the production of GABA-enriched bhatura. Although other physiological effects can be expected in the product, animal and clinical studies are mandatory prior to application of this food.

  17. Massive stars formed in atomic hydrogen reservoirs: H i observations of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.

    2015-01-01

    , implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (HI), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought. In this case, it is possible that star formation is directly fuelled by atomic gas (or that the H1-to-H2 conversion is very efficient, which rapidly...... exhaust molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low-metallicity gas near the onset of star formation because cooling of gas (necessary for star formation) is faster than the H1-to-H2 conversion. Indeed, large atomic gas reservoirs, together with low molecular gas...... masses, stellar, and dust masses are consistent with GRB hosts being preferentially galaxies which have very recently started a star formation episode after accreting metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. This provides a natural route for forming GRBs in low-metallicity environments. The gas...

  18. Search for top quark decays $t \\rightarrow qH$, with $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$, in $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV $pp$ collisions using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Afik, Yoav; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahmani, Marzieh; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Bandyopadhyay, Anjishnu; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barkeloo, Jason Tyler Colt; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Beck, Helge Christoph; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Beyer, Julien-christopher; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a search for flavour-changing neutral currents in the decay of a top quark into an up-type ($q = c, u$) quark and a Higgs boson, where the Higgs boson decays into two photons. The proton--proton collision data set analysed amounts to 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Top quark pair events are searched for, where one top quark decays into $qH$ and the other decays into $bW$. Both the hadronic and leptonic decay modes of the $W$ boson are used. No significant excess is observed and an upper limit is set on the $t \\rightarrow cH$ branching ratio of $2.2\\times 10^{-3}$ at the 95% confidence level, while the expected limit in the absence of signal is $1.6 \\times 10^{-3}$. The corresponding limit on the $tcH$ coupling is 0.090 at the 95% confidence level. The observed upper limit on the $t \\rightarrow uH$ branching ratio is $2.4 \\times 10^{-3}$.

  19. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Gamma Knife Gamma Knife® is a radiation therapy that uses computerized treatment planning software to help ... sparing surrounding tissue. If you're scheduled for radiation therapy using Gamma Knife®, a treatment team consisting of a radiation ...

  20. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Gamma Knife Gamma Knife® is a radiation therapy that uses computerized treatment ... If you're scheduled for radiation therapy using Gamma Knife®, a treatment team consisting of a radiation oncologist, ...

  1. The Pattern of Distribution of Peroxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in Hypocotyls of Pumpkin irradiated with Gamma Ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wi, Seung Gon; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Hong; Lee, Ju Woon; Baek, Myung Hwa; Chae, Hyo Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Gamma radiation, one of ionizing radiations, has been reported to affect the morphological, anatomical, biochemical and physiological changes of plants at different dose levels. These effects at high level include inhibition in plant growth. Peroxidases (PODs) are mainly participations the process of lignification on the cell wall and protect the cell organelles in cytosol against the oxidative stresses by ROS (reactive oxygen species). Hydrogen peroxide (ROS) is normal metabolite in aerobic cells and the physiological steady concentrations (between 10{sup -7} and 10{sup -9}) are not particularly cytotoxic. When these concentrations are increased by ionizing radiation, they lead to cell lethality. Thus radiation-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may appear as an important agent causing cell damage. In this study, a polyclonal antibody against peroxidase and cerium chloride as a trapping agent for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were used to obtain for better information on the occurrence and distribution of POD and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the cytoplasm and walls of vascular bundle in hypocotyls of pumpkin.

  2. The Effect of Human Recombinant Interferon Gamma (hrIFN-γ) on hCG Secretion of Trophoblast and Protein Synthesis of Decidual Tissue in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹咏清; 陈幼珍

    1996-01-01

    In this study the effect of human recombinant interferon gamma (hrIFN-γ) on hCG secretion of human first trimester trophoblast and protein synthesis of decidual tissue was investigated in vitro. The results indicated that hrIFN-γ at the doses of 250 U/ml medium and 2500 U/ml medium decreased hCG secretion of trophoblast obviously (P < 0. 0,5, P<0. 01 ) in a dose dependent manner. The effect of hrIFN-γ on protein synthesis at the doses of 10 U to 1,000 U/ml medium inhibited the3 H leucine incorporation obviously. The cpm values between control and experimental groups were significantly different (P <0. 05 ) in a dosedependent manner. Furthermore its inhibitory effect is in a dose-dependent manner and was neutralized by IFN-γ antiserum. The IFN-α at the doses used did not find any effect on protein synthesis in decidual tissue.

  3. Direct quantification of gamma H2AX by cell-based high throughput screening for evaluation of genotoxicity of pesticides in a human thyroid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Jerome M; France, Bryan; Hon, Kevin; Damoiseaux, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Genotoxicity is thought to be the cause of many cancers. Genotoxicity due to environmental toxins may be partly responsible for the dramatic increase in the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer over the past two decades. Here, we present a fully automatable assay platform that directly quantifies the phosphorylation of nuclear histone gamma H2AX (γH2AX), a specific cellular marker for DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) via immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. It multiplexes γH2AX with total cell number measured as propidium iodide and calculates the percentage of cells with DSBs. Validation of this assay using NTHY-ori-3-1 human thyroid cells and etoposide showed that it was an excellent choice for high throughput applications. We used the assay to test the genotoxic effects of the EPA Toxcast Phase 1 pesticide library of 309 compounds. Compounds were evaluated in dose response and the DSB was quantified. We found that 19 pesticides induce DSB in vitro, highlighting a need to further assess these pesticides for their long-term oncogenic effects on the thyroid gland. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:522-528, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Gamma-H2AX upregulation caused by Wip1 deficiency increases depression-related cellular senescence in hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Wen-Yue; Hu, Wei-Yan; Yang, Lu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Shu; Liu, Si-Cheng; Zhang, Feng-Lan; Mei, Rong; Xing, Da; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The PP2C family member Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) critically regulates DNA damage response (DDR) under stressful situations. In the present study, we investigated whether Wip1 expression was involved in the regulation of DDR-induced and depression-related cellular senescence in mouse hippocampus. We found that Wip1 gene knockout (KO) mice showed aberrant elevation of hippocampal cellular senescence and of γ-H2AX activity, which is known as a biomarker of DDR and cellular senescence, indicating that the lack of Wip1-mediated γ-H2AX dephosphorylation facilitates cellular senescence in hippocampus. Administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine had no significant effects on the increased depression-like behaviors, enriched cellular senescence, and aberrantly upregulated hippocampal γ-H2AX activity in Wip1 KO mice. After wildtype C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the procedure of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), cellular senescence and γ-H2AX activity in hippocampus were also elevated, accompanied by the suppression of Wip1 expression in hippocampus when compared to the control group without CUMS experience. These CUMS-induced symptoms were effectively prevented following fluoxetine administration in wildtype C57BL/6 mice, with the normalization of depression-like behaviors. Our data demonstrate that Wip1-mediated γ-H2AX dephosphorylation may play an important role in the occurrence of depression-related cellular senescence. PMID:27686532

  5. Specific loss of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation and HP1gamma/cohesin binding at D4Z4 repeats is associated with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zeng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy in which no mutation of pathogenic gene(s has been identified. Instead, the disease is, in most cases, genetically linked to a contraction in the number of 3.3 kb D4Z4 repeats on chromosome 4q. How contraction of the 4qter D4Z4 repeats causes muscular dystrophy is not understood. In addition, a smaller group of FSHD cases are not associated with D4Z4 repeat contraction (termed "phenotypic" FSHD, and their etiology remains undefined. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis using D4Z4-specific PCR primers to examine the D4Z4 chromatin structure in normal and patient cells as well as in small interfering RNA (siRNA-treated cells. We found that SUV39H1-mediated H3K9 trimethylation at D4Z4 seen in normal cells is lost in FSHD. Furthermore, the loss of this histone modification occurs not only at the contracted 4q D4Z4 allele, but also at the genetically intact D4Z4 alleles on both chromosomes 4q and 10q, providing the first evidence that the genetic change (contraction of one 4qD4Z4 allele spreads its effect to other genomic regions. Importantly, this epigenetic change was also observed in the phenotypic FSHD cases with no D4Z4 contraction, but not in other types of muscular dystrophies tested. We found that HP1gamma and cohesin are co-recruited to D4Z4 in an H3K9me3-dependent and cell type-specific manner, which is disrupted in FSHD. The results indicate that cohesin plays an active role in HP1 recruitment and is involved in cell type-specific D4Z4 chromatin regulation. Taken together, we identified the loss of both histone H3K9 trimethylation and HP1gamma/cohesin binding at D4Z4 to be a faithful marker for the FSHD phenotype. Based on these results, we propose a new model in which the epigenetic change initiated at 4q D4Z4 spreads its effect to other genomic regions, which compromises muscle-specific gene regulation leading to FSHD pathogenesis.

  6. The gamma dose assessment and pH correlation for various soil types at Batu Pahat and Kluang districts, Johor, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johar, Saffuwan Mohamed, E-mail: saffuwan@uthm.edu.my [Department of Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia); Embong, Zaidi [Department of Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia); Research Center for Soft Soil (RECESS), Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia); Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad [Research Center for Soft Soil (RECESS), Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    An assessment of absorbed dose and radiation hazard index as well as its relationship with soil pH was performed in this study. The area was chosen due to its variety of soil types from the Alluvial and the Sedentary group. The radioactivity concentration levels and the soil acidity were measured using the Canberra GC3518 high pure germanium with a relative efficiency of 35% at 1.3 MeV and the Takemura Soil pH and Moisture Tester (DM15), respectively. Overall results show the Holyrood-Lunas soil of Alluvial group recorded the highest external terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of 286.4±37.9 nGy h{sup −1} and radioactivity concentrations of 78.1±8.9 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 226}Ra), 410.5±55.4 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 232}Th) and 56.4±8.8 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 40}K), respectively, while the Peat soil of Alluvial group recorded the lowest TGRD of 4.4±2.7 nGy h{sup −1} and radioactivity concentrations of 4.8±1.7 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 226}Ra), 3.1±1.1 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 232}Th) and 6.1±2.0 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 40}K), respectively. The estimated mean outdoor annual effective dose, the mean radium equivalent activity (R{sub eq}) and the mean external (H{sub ext}) and internal hazard index (H{sub int}) associated with the alluvial and sedentary soil group were evaluated at 0.15 and 0.20 mSv, 280 and 364 Bq kg{sup −1}, H{sub ext} = 0.78 and 1.01, and H{sub int} = 0.93 and 1.26, respectively. Correlation analysis between 238U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K with soil pH level for alluvial group was r = +0.68, +0.48 and 0, respectively, while for sedentary soil, the Pearson’s, r = −0.30, −0.90 and +0.14, respectively.

  7. Discovery of VHE gamma-rays from the radio galaxy PKS 0625-354 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Dyrda, Michal; Hervet, Olivier; Moderski, Rafal; Janiak, Mateusz; Ostrowski, Michał; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    Most of the extragalactic objects detected so far in the very high energy (VHE) regime are blazars, but the discovered nearby radio galaxies: M87, Cen A and NGC 1275 of type FRI seem to constitute a new class of VHE emitters. The radio galaxy PKS 0625-354 was observed and detected ($\\sim$6$\\sigma$) with the H.E.S.S. phase I telescopes in 2012, above an energy threshold of 250 GeV. The time-averaged VHE energy spectrum is well characterized by a power law model. The broad-band light curve, including the available multiwavelength data, as well as the VHE data gathered with H.E.S.S. will be presented.

  8. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Crab during its March 2013 GeV Gamma-Ray Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Context. On March 4, 2013, the Fermi-LAT and AGILE reported a flare from the direction of the Crab Nebula in which the high-energy (HE; E > 100 MeV) flux was six times above its quiescent level. Simultaneous observations in other energy bands give us hints about the emission processes during the flare episode and the physics of pulsar wind nebulae in general. Aims. We search for variability of the emission of the Crab Nebula at very-high energies (VHE; E > 100 GeV), using contemporaneous data taken with the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes. Methods. Observational data taken with the H.E.S.S. instrument on five consecutive days during the flare were analysed concerning the flux and spectral shape of the emission from the Crab Nebula. Night-wise light curves are presented with energy thresholds of 1 TeV and 5 TeV. Results. The observations conducted with H.E.S.S. on 2013 March 6 to March 10 show no significant changes in the flux. They limit the variation on the integral flux above 1 TeV to less than 63% ...

  9. Inner jet kinematics and the viewing angle towards the {\\gamma}-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    CERN Document Server

    Fuhrmann, L; Komossa, S; Angelakis, E; Krichbaum, T P; Schulz, R; Kreikenbohm, A; Kadler, M; Myserlis, I; Ros, E; Nestoras, I; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    Near-Eddington accretion rates onto low-mass black holes are thought to be a prime driver of the multi-wavelength properties of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) population of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Orientation effects have repeatedly been considered as another important factor involved, but detailed studies have been hampered by the lack of measured viewing angles towards this type of AGN. Here we present multi-epoch, 15 GHz VLBA images (MOJAVE program) of the radio-loud and Fermi/LAT-detected NLS1 galaxy 1H 323+342. These are combined with single-dish, multi-frequency radio monitoring of the source's variability, obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m and IRAM 30-m telescopes, in the course of the F-GAMMA program. The VLBA images reveal 6 components with apparent peeds of ~1 to ~7 c, and one quasi-stationary feature. Combining the obtained apparent jet speed ($\\beta_{app}$) and variability Doppler factor ($D_{var}$) estimates together with other methods, we constrain the viewing angle towards 1H 0323+342 ...

  10. A highly sulfur resistant Pt-Sn/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-NO-O{sub 2} reaction under lean conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corro, Grisel; Montiel, Ramon [Instituto de Ciencias, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur 6301, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Castillo, Salvador; Moran, Marina [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Av. Eje Central No. 152, Mexico 0700, D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-11-10

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with C{sub 3}H{sub 8} was studied over 1% Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 1% Pt-2% Sn/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The SO{sub 2} effect on the catalysts activity was examined using pre-sulfated samples of the above catalysts and SO{sub 2}-containing feeds. A high SO{sub 2} tolerance of 1% Pt-2% Sn/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pre-sulfated catalyst for C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-NO-O{sub 2} reaction was found. Above 200C, NO was converted mainly into N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O. Surface analysis of both unsulfated and pre-sulfated catalysts by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that Sn addition to 1% Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} prevents Pt particles from sintering during high temperature sulfation process. This fact suggests that a Pt-Sn/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst can resist high temperature reactions during automotive exhaust control without losing Pt active area.

  11. Biological in-vivo measurement of dose distribution in patients' lymphocytes by gamma-H2AX immunofluorescence staining: 3D conformal- vs. step-and-shoot IMRT of the prostate gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Peter E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different radiation-techniques in treating local staged prostate cancer differ in their dose- distribution. Physical phantom measurements indicate that for 3D, less healthy tissue is exposed to a relatively higher dose compared to SSIMRT. The purpose is to substantiate a dose distribution in lymphocytes in-vivo and to discuss the possibility of comparing it to the physical model of total body dose distribution. Methods For each technique (3D and SSIMRT, blood was taken from 20 patients before and 10 min after their first fraction of radiotherapy. The isolated leukocytes were fixed 2 hours after radiation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB in lymphocytes' nuclei were stained immunocytochemically using the gamma-H2AX protein. Gamma-H2AX foci inside each nucleus were counted in 300 irradiated as well as 50 non-irradiated lymphocytes per patient. In addition, lymphocytes of 5 volunteer subjects were irradiated externally at different doses and processed under same conditions as the patients' lymphocytes in order to generate a calibration-line. This calibration-line assigns dose-value to mean number of gamma-H2AX foci/ nucleus. So the dose distributions in patients' lymphocytes were determined regarding to the gamma-H2AX foci distribution. With this information a cumulative dose-lymphocyte-histogram (DLH was generated. Visualized distribution of gamma-H2AX foci, correspondingly dose per nucleus, was compared to the technical dose-volume-histogram (DVH, related to the whole body-volume. Results Measured in-vivo (DLH and according to the physical treatment-planning (DVH, more lymphocytes resulted with low-dose exposure ( 80% was equal in both radiation techniques. The mean number of gamma-H2AX foci per lymphocyte was 0.49 (3D and 0.47 (SSIMRT without significant difference. Conclusions In-vivo measurement of the dose distribution within patients' lymphocytes can be performed by detecting gamma-H2AX foci. In case of 3D and SSIMRT, the

  12. Standard enthalpies of formation of γ-aminobutyric acid and the products of its dissociation in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    Heat effects of the dissolution of crystalline γ-aminobutyric acid in water and potassium hydroxide solutions are determined by direct colorimetry at 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies of formation of γ-aminobutyric acid and the products of its dissociation in aqueous solution are calculated.

  13. A $SU(3)_{c} x SU(2)_{L} x U(1)_{\\gamma} x U(1)_{H}$ gauge model of flavor

    CERN Document Server

    Mira, J M; Restrepo, D A; Mira, Jesus M.; Nardi, Enrico; Restrepo, Diego A.

    2000-01-01

    A non anomalous horizontal $U(1)_H$ gauge symmetry can be responsible for the fermion mass hierarchies of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Imposing the consistency conditions for the absence of gauge anomalies, gauge invariance and supersymmetry solve in an elegant way some serious phenomenological problems: 1) unification of leptons and down-type quarks Yukawa couplings is allowed at most for two generations. 2) The $\\mu$ term is necessarily somewhat below the supersymmetry breaking scale. 3) The determinant of the quark mass matrix vanishes, solving in a simple way the strong CP problem. 4) The superpotential has accidental B and L symmetries, and R-parity is automatically conserved. 5) A suitable horizontal charge assignment explains the observed pattern of fermion masses and mixing angles. The prediction $m_{up}=0$ provides the possibility of an unambiguous test of the model at low energy.

  14. Determination of gamma radiation dose to the destruction of Escherichia coli O157: H7 in hamburger;Determinacao da dose de radiacao gama para a destruicao de Escherichia coli O157:H7 em hamburguer bovino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orejuela Chirinos, Rodolfo Raul

    1999-07-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been incriminated in several foodborne outbreaks due to the consumption of different kinds of foods. Among these, hamburgers are the most common. Irradiation process is an effective method for food preservation because it causes no significant change in organoleptic and nutritional food characteristics and destroys pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. Hamburgers and nutrient broth inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 were submitted to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0,0 to 0,7 kGy in order to calculate the D{sub 10} for this bacteria in these substrate. The D{sub 10} for the pathogen nutrient broth ranged from 0.08 kGy to 0.10 kGy and in hamburger from 0.11 kGy to 0.21 kGy. Considering the highest D{sub 10} value in hamburger, a dose of 0,8 kGy would not change the sensorial characteristics of the product, and would reduce the population of E. coli O157:H7 in 4 cycles logarithmic. (author)

  15. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  16. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response.

  17. H.E.S.S and Fermi-LAT discovery of gamma rays from the blazar 1ES 1312-423

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; de OñaWilhelmi, E; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spieß, F; Stawarz, {Ł }; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Perkins, J S; Ojha, R; Stevens, J; Edwards, P G; Kadler, M

    2013-01-01

    A deep observation campaign carried out by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) on Centaurus A enabled the discovery of gamma rays from the blazar 1ES 1312-423, two degrees away from the radio galaxy. With a differential flux at 1 TeV of (1.9 +/-0.6(stat) +/-0.4(sys)) x 10^{-13} /cm^2 /s /TeV corresponding to 0.5% of the Crab nebula differential flux and a spectral index of 2.9 +/- 0.5 (stat) +/- 0.2 (sys), 1ES 1312-423 is one of the faintest sources ever detected in the very high energy (E>100 GeV) extragalactic sky. A careful analysis using three and a half years of Fermi-LAT data allows the discovery at high energies (E>100 MeV) of a hard spectrum (index of 1.4 +/- 0.4 (stat) +/- 0.2 (sys)) source coincident with 1ES 1312-423. Radio, optical, UV and X-ray observations complete the spectral energy distribution of this blazar, now covering 16 decades in energy. The emission is successfully fitted with a synchrotron self Compton model for the non-thermal component, combined with a black-body spectru...

  18. Characterizing the gamma-ray long-term variability of PKS 2155-304 with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, H; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Andersson, A G Akhperjanian T; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernhard, D Berge S; Bernlöhr, K; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Casanova, J Carr S; Cerruti, M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Decock, J; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Devin, J; deWilt, P; Dirson, L; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gajdus, S Gabici M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M -H; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Haupt, M; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J -P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leser, E; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Liu, R; López-Coto, R; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Mohrmann, L; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; deNaurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Odaka, H; Öttl, S; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perennes, C; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, Q Piel S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; delosReyes, R; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Settimo, M; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tibaldo, L; Tiziani, D; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; Uchiyama, Y; van der Walt, D J; vanEldik, C; vanRensburg, C; vanSoelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; White, R M Wagner R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-01-01

    Studying the temporal variability of BL Lac objects at the highest energies provides unique insights into the extreme physical processes occurring in relativistic jets and in the vicinity of super-massive black holes. To this end, the long-term variability of the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 is analyzed in the high (HE, 100 MeV 200 GeV) gamma-ray domain. Over the course of ~9 yr of H.E.S.S observations the VHE light curve in the quiescent state is consistent with a log-normal behavior. The VHE variability in this state is well described by flicker noise (power-spectral-density index {\\ss}_VHE = 1.10 +0.10 -0.13) on time scales larger than one day. An analysis of 5.5 yr of HE Fermi LAT data gives consistent results ({\\ss}_HE = 1.20 +0.21 -0.23, on time scales larger than 10 days) compatible with the VHE findings. The HE and VHE power spectral densities show a scale invariance across the probed time ranges. A direct linear correlation between the VHE and HE fluxes could neither be excluded nor firmly established...

  19. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  20. Procognitive properties of drugs with single and multitargeting H3 receptor antagonist activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Katarina; Filipic, Slavica; Agbaba, Danica; Stark, Holger

    2014-07-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3 R) is an important modulator of numerous central control mechanisms. Novel lead optimizations for H3 R antagonists/inverse agonists involved studies of structure-activity relationships, cross-affinities, and pharmacokinetic properties of promising ligands. Blockade of inhibitory histamine H3 autoreceptors reinforces histaminergic transmission, while antagonism of H3 heteroreceptors accelerates the corticolimbic liberation of acetylcholine, norepinephrine, glutamate, dopamine, serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The H3 R positioned at numerous neurotransmission crossroads indicates therapeutic applications of small-molecule H3 R modulators in a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases with various clinical candidates available. Dual target drugs displaying H3 R antagonism/inverse agonism with inhibition of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT), or serotonin transporter (SERT) are novel class of procognitive agents. Main chemical diversities, pharmacophores, and pharmacological profiles of procognitive agents acting as H3 R antagonists/inverse agonists and dual H3 R antagonists/inverse agonists with inhibiting activity on AChE, HMT, or SERT are highlighted here.

  1. Plant perception of β-aminobutyric acid is mediated by an aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luna, Estrella; van Hulten, Marieke; Zhang, Yuhua; Berkowitz, Oliver; López, Ana; Pétriacq, Pierre; Sellwood, Matthew A; Chen, Beining; Burrell, Mike; van de Meene, Allison; Pieterse, Corné M J; Flors, Victor; Ton, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    Specific chemicals can prime the plant immune system for augmented defense. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) is a priming agent that provides broad-spectrum disease protection. However, BABA also suppresses plant growth when applied in high doses, which has hampered its application as a crop defense activ

  2. Model-independent determination of the strong-phase difference between D^0 and D^0-bar-> K^0_S,L h^+ h^- (h=pi,K) and its impact on the measurement of the CKM angle gamma/phi_3

    CERN Document Server

    ~Libby, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Tarbert, C M; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Xavier, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Brisbane, S; Malde, S; Martin, L; Powell, A; Spradlin, P; Wilkinson, G; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; ~Ricciardi, S; Thomas, C; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Horwitz, N; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Gershon, T; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Zhu, J; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Randrianarivony, K; ~Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Cassel, J P Alexander D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Hartill, S W Gray D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Peterson, V E Kuznetsov J R Patterson D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Shi, A J Sadoff X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J

    2010-01-01

    We report the first determination of the relative strong-phase difference between D^0 -> K^0_S,L K^+ K^- and D^0-bar -> K^0_S,L K^+ K^-. In addition, we present updated measurements of the relative strong-phase difference between D^0 -> K^0_S,L pi^+ pi^- and D^0-bar -> K^0_S,L pi^+ pi^-. Both measurements exploit the quantum coherence between a pair of D^0 and D^0-bar mesons produced from psi(3770) decays. The strong-phase differences measured are important for determining the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma/phi_3 in B^- -> K^- D^0-tilde decays, where D^0-tilde is a D^0 or D^0-bar meson decaying to K^0_S h^+ h^- (h=pi,K), in a manner independent of the model assumed to describe the D^0 -> K^0_S h^+ h^- decay. Using our results, the uncertainty in gamma/phi_3 due to the error on the strong-phase difference is expected to be between 1.7 and 3.9 degrees for an analysis using B^- K^- D^0-tilde D^0-tilde -> K^0_S pi^+ pi^- decays, and between 3.2 and 3.9 degrees for an analysis based on B^- -> K^- D^0-tilde,...

  3. Gamma-ray blazar spectra with H.E.S.S. II mono analysis: The case of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Donaggio, B.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Razzano, M.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spinelli, P.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The addition of a 28 m Cherenkov telescope (CT5) to the H.E.S.S. array extended the experiment's sensitivityto lower energies. The lowest energy threshold is obtained using monoscopic analysis of data taken with CT5, providing access to gamma-ray energies below 100 GeV for small zenith angle observations. Such an extension of the instrument's energy range is particularly beneficial for studies of active galactic nuclei with soft spectra, as expected for those at a redshift ≥0.5. The high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects PKS 2155-304 (z = 0.116) and PG 1553+113 (0.43 100 GeV interpreted as being due to interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Aims: The aims of this work are twofold: to demonstrate the monoscopic analysis of CT5 data with a low energy threshold, and to obtain accurate measurements of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 near their SED peaks at energies ≈100 GeV. Methods: Multiple observational campaigns of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were conducted during 2013 and 2014 using the full H.E.S.S. II instrument (CT1-5). A monoscopic analysis of the data taken with the new CT5 telescope was developed along with an investigation into the systematic uncertainties on the spectral parameters which are derived from this analysis. Results: Using the data from CT5, the energy spectra of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were reconstructed down to conservative threshold energies of 80 GeV for PKS 2155-304, which transits near zenith, and 110 GeV for the more northern PG 1553+113. The measured spectra, well fitted in both cases by a log-parabola spectral model (with a 5.0σ statistical preference for non-zero curvature for PKS 2155-304 and 4.5σ for PG 1553+113), were found consistent with spectra derived from contemporaneous Fermi-LAT data, indicating a sharp break in the observed spectra of both sources at E ≈ 100 GeV. When corrected for EBL absorption, the intrinsic H.E.S.S. II mono and Fermi

  4. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of GABA-T by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Barghouthi, Samira

    2003-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T, EC 2.6.1.19) is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of gamma-aminobutyric acid. The kinetics of this reaction are studied in vitro, both in the absence, and in the presence of two inhibitors: gamma-vinyl GABA (4-aminohex-5-enoic acid), and a natural product, taurine (ethylamine-2-sulfonic acid). A kinetic model that describes the transamination process is proposed. GABA-T from Pseudomonas fluorescens is inhibited by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine at concentrations of 51.0 and 78.5 mM. Both inhibitors show competitive inhibition behavior when GABA is the substrate and the inhibition constant (Ki) values for gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine were found to be 26 +/- 3 mM and 68 +/- 7 mM respectively. The transamination process of alpha-ketoglutarate was not affected by the presence of gamma-vinyl GABA, whereas, taurine was a noncompetitive inhibitor of GABA-T when alpha-ketoglutarate was the substrate. The inhibition dissociation constant (Kii) for this system was found to be 96 +/- 10 mM. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) in the absence of inhibition, was found to be 0.79 +/- 0.11 mM, and 0.47 +/- 0.10 mM for GABA and alpha-ketoglutarate respectively.

  5. 不同干燥方式对发芽豇豆γ-氨基丁酸含量影响%Study on different drying technology on the content ofγ-aminobutyric acid in germination cowpea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱青霞; 郭祯祥; 赵艳丽

    2012-01-01

      研究热风干燥、真空干燥及微波热风组合干燥法对发芽豇豆γ–氨基丁酸含量影响;经干燥温度45℃、干燥时间8 h热风干燥,γ–氨基丁酸保留量为120.78 mg/100g;经干燥温度45℃、干燥时间6 h真空干燥,γ–氨基丁酸保留量为128.72 mg/100g;经微波350 W、干燥6 min后,45℃、热风干燥3 h微波热风组合干燥,γ–氨基丁酸保留量为131.73 mg/100g.经比较,以选择微波热风干燥组合为宜.%  Effect of hot air,vacuum drying technology and the combination of microwave and hot–air dring method on the content ofγ–aminobutyric acid in germination cowpea were studied. The result showed that the best conditions of hot air drying was drying temperature 45℃,time 8 h,the content ofγ–aminobutyric acid were 119.96 mg/100g;vacuum drying were drying temperature 45℃,time 6 h,the content ofγ–aminobutyric acid were 129.38 mg/100g. then the condition of the combination of microwave drying and hot–air dring method were microwave 350 W,6min and 45℃,hot air drying 3 h, the content ofγ–aminobutyric acid were 131.73 mg/100g.

  6. The influence of x-ray contrast agents in computed tomography on the induction of dicentrics and {gamma}-H2AX foci in lymphocytes of human blood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, G; Golfier, S; Pietsch, H; Lengsfeld, P; Voth, M [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schmid, T E [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany); Eckardt-Schupp, F [Institute of Radiation Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schmid, E [Institute for Cell Biology, Center for Integrated Protein Science, University of Munich, 80336 Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: Ernst.Schmid@lrz.uni-muenchen.de

    2009-10-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify two biomarkers for radiation exposure (dicentrics and {gamma}-H2AX foci) in human lymphocytes after CT scans in the presence of an iodinated contrast agent. Blood samples from a healthy donor were exposed to CT scans in the absence or presence of iotrolan 300 at iodine concentrations of 5 or 50 mg ml{sup -1} blood. The samples were exposed to 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 Gy in a tissue equivalent body phantom. Chromosome aberration scoring and automated microscopic analysis of {gamma}-H2AX foci were performed in parts of the same samples. The theoretical physical dose enhancement factor (DEF) was calculated on the basis of the mass energy-absorption coefficients of iodine and blood and the photon energy spectrum of the CT tube. No significant differences in the yields of dicentrics and {gamma}-H2AX foci were observed in the absence or presence of 5 mg iodine ml{sup -1} blood up to 0.1 Gy, whereas at 1 Gy the yields were elevated for both biomarkers. At an iodine concentration of 50 mg ml{sup -1} serving as a positive control, a biological DEF of 9.5 {+-} 1.4 and 2.3 {+-} 0.5 was determined for dicentrics and {gamma}-H2AX foci, respectively. A physical DEF of 1.56 and 6.30 was calculated for 5 and 50 mg iodine ml{sup -1}, respectively. Thus, it can be concluded that in the diagnostic dose range (radiation and contrast dose), no relevant biological dose-enhancing effect could be detected, whereas a clear biological dose-enhancing effect could be found for a contrast dose well outside the diagnostic CT range for the complete radiation dose range with both methods.

  7. H

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Heredad : héritage (12.9) ; terre (13.6). « que son suyas de heredad », qui leur appartiennent par héritage (1.2). Heredamiento : héritage, bien héréditaire (1.2 ; 15.4) ; donation (15.5). « por eredamiento », par héritage (15.5).« dar eredamientos », faire des donations (15.5). Heredar : hériter (14.1) « heredar los reinos », hériter des royaumes (14.1). Hermandad : fraternité (16.3). Honra (ou honrra) : honneur (13.6, 16.2). « fazerles mucho bien e honrra », leur faire grand bien et gra...

  8. H

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Heredad : héritage (12.9) ; terre (13.6). « que son suyas de heredad », qui leur appartiennent par héritage (1.2). Heredamiento : héritage, bien héréditaire (1.2 ; 15.4) ; donation (15.5). « por eredamiento », par héritage (15.5).« dar eredamientos », faire des donations (15.5). Heredar : hériter (14.1) « heredar los reinos », hériter des royaumes (14.1). Hermandad : fraternité (16.3). Honra (ou honrra) : honneur (13.6, 16.2). « fazerles mucho bien e honrra », leur faire grand bien et gra...

  9. DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

  10. H.E.S.S. observations of RX J1713.7-3946 with improved angular and spectral resolution; evidence for gamma-ray emission extending beyond the X-ray emitting shell

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, H; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Andersson, T; Angüner, E O; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Büchele, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Coffaro, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Decock, J; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Devin, J; deWilt, P; Dirson, L; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fern, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M -H; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Haupt, M; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J -P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leser, E; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Liu, R; López-Coto, R; Lypova, I; Mar, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Mohrmann, L; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Odaka, H; Öttl, S; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perennes, C; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Piel, Q; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Seglar-Arroyo, L; Settimo, M; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tibaldo, L; Tiziani, D; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; Uchiyama, Y; van der Walt, D J; van Eldik, C; van Rensburg, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zanin, R; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants exhibit shock fronts (shells) that can accelerate charged particles up to very high energies. In the past decade, measurements of a handful of shell-type supernova remnants in very-high-energy gamma rays have provided unique insights into the acceleration process. Among those objects, RX$~$J1713.7-3946 (also known as G347.3-0.5) has the largest surface brightness, allowing us in the past to perform the most comprehensive study of morphology and spatially resolved spectra of any such very-high-energy gamma-ray source. Here we present extensive new H.E.S.S. measurements of RX$~$J1713.7-3946, almost doubling the observation time compared to our previous publication. Combined with new improved analysis tools, the previous sensitivity is more than doubled. The H.E.S.S. angular resolution of $0.048^\\circ$ ($0.036^\\circ$ above 2 TeV) is unprecedented in gamma-ray astronomy and probes physical scales of 0.8 (0.6) parsec at the remnant's location. The new H.E.S.S. image of RX$~$J1713.7-3946 allows u...

  11. Calibration of the cameras of the H.E.S.S. {gamma}-ray astronomy experiment and observations of the Galactic Centre above 100 GeV; Etalonnage des cameras de l'experience d'astronomie {gamma} H.E.S.S. et observations du centre galactique au-dela de 100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, L

    2005-05-15

    The H.E.S.S. experiment (High Energy Stereoscopic System) consists of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to study the southern astrophysical sources above 100 GeV. This thesis presents the detector as well as the analysis chain. The calibration methods are described in details and the systematic errors on the image amplitude are derived. Then, an analysis based on a semi-analytical model of the electromagnetic shower development in the atmosphere is presented. Tools to reconstruct the energy spectrum and the morphology of the very high energy {gamma}-ray sources are presented and applied to the Crab Nebula. Systematic errors associated to the spectrum analysis are estimated. All these techniques were applied to study the Galactic Centre emission above 100 GeV. The nature of the source detected in 2003 and 2004 observations is still unknown and its spectrum, variability and morphology are studied. Various candidates are proposed, among them the supermassive black hole Sgr A* located at the dynamical centre of the Milky Way, the supernova remnant Sgr A Est or interactions of accelerated particles with the dense medium of this region. In this thesis, the signal was interpreted in terms of dark matter annihilation (neutralinos or Kaluza-Klein bosons) in a dense halo located at the Galactic Centre. This analysis showed that, in the framework of these models, dark matter annihilation alone can not explain the H.E.S.S. signal. The main component would thus come from astrophysical sources. (author)

  12. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  13. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  14. Characterization of soybean fermented by aflatoxin non-producing Aspergillus oryzae and γ-aminobutyric acid producing Lactobacillus brevis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Nam Yeun; Ji, Geun Eog

    2014-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize fermented soybean products with enhanced safety and bioactive compound using aflatoxin non-producing Aspergillus oryzae FMB S46471 and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA...

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  16. Resistance to Citrus Canker in Key/Mexican Lime Induced by β-Aminobutyric Acid and Green Tea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B. Beheshti; G. R. Sharifi-Sirchi; M. Mansouri; A. Hosseinipour; N. L. Schlaich

    2011-01-01

    .... To improve control of this disease, lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants inoculated with Xcc were treated with β-Aminobutyric Acid (BABA), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), thiamin (vitamin B1), green tea (Camellia sinensis...

  17. A model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm$ with $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} h^+h^-$ ($h=\\pi, K$) decays and constraints on the CKM angle $\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    A binned Dalitz plot analysis of $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm$ decays, with $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} K^+ K^-$, is performed to measure the $CP$-violating observables $x_{\\pm}$ and $y_{\\pm}$ which are sensitive to the CKM angle $\\gamma$. The analysis exploits 1.0~$\\rm fb^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment. The study makes no model-based assumption on the variation of the strong phase of the $D$ decay amplitude over the Dalitz plot, but uses measurements of this quantity from CLEO-c as input. The values of the parameters are found to be $x_- = (0.0 \\pm 4.3 \\pm 1.5 \\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-2}$, $y_- = (2.7 \\pm 5.2 \\pm 0.8 \\pm 2.3) \\times 10^{-2}$, $x_+ = ( -10.3 \\pm 4.5 \\pm 1.8 \\pm 1.4 )\\times 10^{-2}$ and $y_+ = (-0.9 \\pm 3.7 \\pm 0.8 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-2}$. The first, second, and third uncertainties are the statistical, the experimental systematic, and the error associated with the precision of the strong-phase parameters measured at CLEO-c, respectively. These results correspond to ...

  18. Comparison between spontaneous and kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the mouse hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Patel, Nisha; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Neuronal synchronization at gamma frequency, implicated in cognition, can be evoked in hippocampal slices by pharmacological activation. We characterized spontaneous small-amplitude gamma oscillations (SgammaO) recorded in area CA3 of mouse hippocampal slices and compared it with kainate-induced gamma oscillations (KgammaO). SgammaO had a lower peak frequency, a more sinusoidal waveform and was spatially less coherent than KgammaO, irrespective of oscillation amplitude. CA3a had the smallest oscillation power, phase-led CA3c by approximately 4 ms and had the highest SgammaO frequency in isolated subslices. During SgammaO CA3c neurons fired at the rebound of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) that were associated with a current source in stratum lucidum, whereas CA3a neurons often fired from spikelets, 3-4 ms earlier in the cycle, and had smaller IPSPs. Kainate induced faster/larger IPSPs that were associated with an earlier current source in stratum pyramidale. SgammaO and KgammaO power were dependent on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, gap junctions and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. SgammaO was suppressed by elevating extracellular KCl, blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors or muscarinic receptors, or activating GluR5-containing kainate receptors. SgammaO was not affected by blocking metabotropic glutamate receptors or hyperpolarization-activated currents. The adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethoxyxanthine (8-CPT) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) increased SgammaO power, indicating that endogenous adenosine and/or endocannabinoids suppress or prevent SgammaO in vitro. SgammaO emerges from a similar basic network as KgammaO, but differs in involvement of somatically projecting interneurons and pharmacological modulation profile. These observations advocate

  19. The four human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Christiansen, Bolette; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    , we perform the first elaborate pharmacological characterization of all four human GAT subtypes. We conduct the experiments in parallel in a [3H]GABA uptake assay using 14 standard GAT substrates and inhibitors. This setup enables direct comparison of the absolute values of inhibitory activities......, no subtype selective ligands have been reported for the three remaining GATs. Given the potential therapeutic relevance of the individual GAT subtypes, a search for novel structures displaying selectivities for specific GAT subtypes is important. In this study, we validate our [3H]GABA uptake assay for use...... at the four human GATs....

  20. Morphine modulates the effects of histamine H1 and H3 receptors on seizure susceptibility in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Hassanipour, Mahsa; Shirzadian, Armin; Gooshe, Maziar; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Histamine regulates release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and also is involved in several functions in central nervous system (CNS). It has been shown that histamine participates in disorders like seizure. It has been well documented that morphine dose-dependently induces anti or proconvulsant effects. In the current study, we firstly showed that morphine (1mg/kg) exerts anticonvulsant effects which significantly reversed by naltrexone administration. Secondly, we determined seizure threshold for H1 and H3 receptors agonists and antagonists in mouse model of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced clonic seizures. Our results showed that activation of H1 receptors by 2-(2-Pyridyl)-ethylamine exerts anticonvulsant properties while inhibition of H1 receptors by pyrilamine maleate induced proconvulsant effects. Furthermore, we showed that immepip dihydrobromide, a H3 receptor agonist, increased seizure susceptibility to PTZ whereas thioperamide, a H3 receptor antagonist increased seizure threshold. We also revealed that pretreatment with morphine potently reversed the effects of histaminergic system on seizure threshold suggesting the involvement of opioid system in alteration of seizure threshold by histaminergic drugs.

  1. Gamma watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implem