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Sample records for gypsum cement

  1. Tunisian gypsums: Characteristics and use in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Salah; Bennour, Ali; Chalwati, Youssef; Souidi, Khouloud; Thabet, Manel; Srasra, Ezzedine; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-09-01

    Gypsum materials of hundred meters thickness and interbedded with marine claystones and limestones from different paleogeographic sectors in the Tunisian territory are studied to assess their suitability for cement production. For this reason, thirty representative samples are analysed by chemical, physical and geotechnical tests. The obtained results for the studied gypsum materials are compared to Tunisian and European norms and with the local cements, currently marketed and which obey international norms. Indeed, for all samples hydraulic modulus HM, silica modulus SM and alumina modulus AM vary from (2.37-2.44), (2.48-2.68) and (1.45-2.5), respectively; whereas the required values for these modulus are (1.5-2.5), (2-3) and (1.5-2.5). The same behavior is observed for mineralogical analyses of C3S, C2S, C3A and C4AF and compressive strength at different ages. Briefly, Tunisia contains important reserves of gypsum scattered and spread over the Tunisian territory and can be used for cement production.

  2. Petroleum Sludge as gypsum replacement in cement plants: Its Impact on Cement Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlamoudi, Ali; Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Khodja, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Due to high cost of cement manufacturing and the huge amount of resources exhaustion, companies are trying to incorporate alternative raw materials or by-products into cement production so as to produce alternative sustainable cement. Petroleum sludge is a dangerous waste that poses serious imparts on soil and groundwater. Given that this sludge contains a high percentage of anhydrite (CaSO4), which is the main component of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), it may play the same gypsum role in strength development. In this research, a total replacement of gypsum (100%) has been substituted by petroleum sludge in cement production and has led to an increase of 28.8% in UCS values after 28 curing days. Nevertheless, the burning of this waste has emitted a considerable amount of carbon monoxide (CO) gas that needs to be carefully considered prior to use petroleum sludge within cement plants.

  3. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  4. The solidification of low level radioactive organic fluids with Envirostone Gypsum Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstiel, T.L.; Lange, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The primary method for the management of low level radioactive waste (LLW) has been and continues to be the isolation of the waste in a solid mass. Of the four typical LLW streams, organic fluids pose the most significant waste isolation problem. The organic fluids comprised of lubrication oils, hydraulic fluids, sludges, scintillation fluids, etc., result from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power generating stations, research activities, tooling operations, and diagnostic analyses. The United States Gypsum Company developed the patented Envirostone Gypsum Cement system for the solidification of all types of low level radioactive wastes to facilitate handling and transportation to regulated LLW disposal sites. For the solidification of organic fluids, Envirostone Gypsum Cement is used in conjunction with Envirostone Emulsifier, selected for its ability to emulsify a broad range of organic fluids in aqueous solutions. In the solidification process it is theorized that as the crystalline matrix of the gypsum forms, the micelles of the emulsifier behave as a chemical bridge which draws the organic fluid into the crystalline structure via the hydration water. Initial testing of physical properties of solidified waste forms, including leachability, per the requirements and the procedures specified for 10 CFR Part 61 as outlined in the Branch Technical Position Report from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission were in progress as of the writing of this paper. Upon completion of this testing a Topical Report will be submitted to the USNRC for review and approval. The presentation reviews field experience in the use of Envirostone Gypsum Cement for the solidification of low level radioactive organic fluids from nuclear power generating stations and makes an economic comparison between Envirostone Gypsum Cement and portland cement systems

  5. Elementary characterization of samples of Portland cement, natural gypsum and phosphogypsum mortars from Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi; Torres, Catarina Alzira Peddis; Mazer, Wellington; Macioski, Gustavo [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), PR (Brazil); Lara, Alessandro [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Casali, Juliana Machado, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: alellara@hotmail.com, E-mail: jucasali@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Portland cement, the basic ingredient of concrete and is manufactured by crushing, milling and proportioning limestone, sand, clay, iron ore and secondary materials such as shells, chalk or marl combined with shale slate or blast furnace slag, fly ash, gypsum, phosphogypsum, and some others. Evaluating the physical and mineralogical characteristics of the cement and its chemical composition is essential to establish the quality of the product. Therefore, the objective of this work was to characterize and quantify the most common chemical elements in the samples of Brazilian Portland cement, natural gypsum, and phosphogypsum mortars by means of X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDXRF), as well as to evaluate the strength of these mortars. For analysis of the compressive strength, initially prepared samples were submitted to a destructive mechanical test. Subsequently samples were milled and compacted to form thin tablets, which were submitted to the EDXRF analysis. The qualitative and quantitative analyzes showed that for phosphogypsum mortar the largest mass fractions were found of 49.8±2.5% (Si), 24.66±0.96% (S) and 22.10±0.42% (Ca). For gypsum mortar those values were found of 43.41±0.45% (Ca), 33.8 ± 0.8% (S) and 18.9±1.2% (Si), respectively; and for Portland cement mortar, the predominant elements in those samples have the mass fractions of 64.20±0.52% (Ca) and 27.3±1.5% (Si). The results showed that obtained values of mass fraction of the elements Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Fe are in rather good agreement with quantities indicated for manufacture. Besides, gypsum and phosphogypsum presented almost the same composition and compressive strength. (author)

  6. Elementary characterization of samples of Portland cement, natural gypsum and phosphogypsum mortars from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi; Torres, Catarina Alzira Peddis; Mazer, Wellington; Macioski, Gustavo; Lara, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Portland cement, the basic ingredient of concrete and is manufactured by crushing, milling and proportioning limestone, sand, clay, iron ore and secondary materials such as shells, chalk or marl combined with shale slate or blast furnace slag, fly ash, gypsum, phosphogypsum, and some others. Evaluating the physical and mineralogical characteristics of the cement and its chemical composition is essential to establish the quality of the product. Therefore, the objective of this work was to characterize and quantify the most common chemical elements in the samples of Brazilian Portland cement, natural gypsum, and phosphogypsum mortars by means of X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDXRF), as well as to evaluate the strength of these mortars. For analysis of the compressive strength, initially prepared samples were submitted to a destructive mechanical test. Subsequently samples were milled and compacted to form thin tablets, which were submitted to the EDXRF analysis. The qualitative and quantitative analyzes showed that for phosphogypsum mortar the largest mass fractions were found of 49.8±2.5% (Si), 24.66±0.96% (S) and 22.10±0.42% (Ca). For gypsum mortar those values were found of 43.41±0.45% (Ca), 33.8 ± 0.8% (S) and 18.9±1.2% (Si), respectively; and for Portland cement mortar, the predominant elements in those samples have the mass fractions of 64.20±0.52% (Ca) and 27.3±1.5% (Si). The results showed that obtained values of mass fraction of the elements Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Fe are in rather good agreement with quantities indicated for manufacture. Besides, gypsum and phosphogypsum presented almost the same composition and compressive strength. (author)

  7. Influence of Curing Humidity on the Compressive Strength of Gypsum-Cemented Similar Materials

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    Weiming Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analogous simulation experiment is widely used in geotechnical and mining engineering. However, systematic errors derived from unified standard curing procedure have been underestimated to some extent. In this study, 140 gypsum-cemented similar material specimens were chosen to study their curing procedure with different relative humidity, which is 10%–15%, 40%, 60%, and 80%, respectively. SEM microstructures and XRD spectra were adopted to detect the correlation between microstructures and macroscopic mechanical strength during curing. Our results indicated that the needle-like phases of similar materials began to develop in the early stage of the hydration process through intersecting with each other and eventually transformed into mat-like phases. Increase of humidity may inhibit the development of needle-like phases; thus the compressive strength changes more smoothly, and the time required for the material strength to reach the peak value will be prolonged. The peak strength decreases along with the increase of humidity while the humidity is higher than 40%; however, the reverse tendency was observed if the humidity was lower than 40%. Finally, we noticed that the material strength usually reaches the peak value when the water content continuously reduces and tends towards stability. Based on the above observation, a curing method determination model and experimental strength predication method for gypsum-cemented similar materials were proposed.

  8. Use of the “red gypsum” industrial waste as substitute of natural gypsum for commercial cements manufacturing

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    Gázquez, M. J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research has been the valorisation of a waste from the TiO2 production process (sulphate method, called red gypsum, in the production of cements. This waste is mainly formed by di-hydrate calcium sulphate and iron hydroxides. To cover this objective it has been necessary to perform the physico-chemical characterisation of the red gypsum as well as the main components in the production of cements and of the new cements generated. Moreover, for the red gypsum, has been analyzed its radioactive content because it is generated in a NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials industry. Finally, the most important properties of the obtained cements with different proportions of red gypsum in their composition have been studied by comparing them with the standard ones obtained in a Portland cement. Lastly, we have demonstrated that the new cements fulfil all the quality tests imposed by the European legislation.

    El objetivo de esta investigación ha sido analizar la valorización de un residuo generado en el proceso de producción de dióxido de titanio (vía sulfato, denominado yeso rojo, en la producción de cementos. Dicho residuo está compuesto fundamentalmente por sulfato de calcio di-hidratado e hidróxidos de hierro. Para ello, ha sido necesaria la caracterización físico-química del yeso rojo, así como la de los otros componentes fundamentales en la fabricación de cementos y de los cementos generados con el mencionado residuo. Además, en el caso del yeso rojo, se ha analizado su contenido radiactivo al generarse éste en una industria NORM (Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials. Posteriormente, se han estudiado las propiedades más importantes de los cementos producidos con diferentes porcentajes de yeso rojo añadido, comparando estas mezclas con las propiedades de un cemento Portland comercial, comprobándose que se cumplen todas las normas Europeas de calidad exigibles.

  9. Influence of the gypsum dehydration temperature and alkali additives on the properties of anhydrite cement

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    Leskeviciene V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While dehydrating gypsum with additives at the temperatures of 800°C and 900°C the influence of alkali additives on both the crystalline structure of anhydrite and properties of anhydrite binder was investigated. The industrial and household wastes including other lowcost materials were used as additives. Having heated them with gypsum the anhydrite with alkali activation properties was obtained. The properties of such substances were evaluated using the methods of chemical, diffractive X-ray scanning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses. Some additives, e.g. 5 % ground glass waste, were found to increase crystal agglomerate formation of anhydrite binder, accelerate the hydration process of anhydrite and double the compressive strength of hydrated samples compared to samples without additives.

  10. Manufacturing of mortars and concretes non-traditionals, by Portland cement, metakaoline and gypsum (15.05%

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    Talero, R.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In a thorough previous research (1, it appeared that creation, evolution and development of the values of compressive mechanical strength (CS and flexural strength (FS, measured in specimens 1x1x6cm of mortar type ASTM C 452-68 (2, manufactured by ordinary Portland cement P-1 (14.11% C3A or PY-6 (0.00% C3A, metakaolin and gypsum (CaSO4∙2H2O -or ternary cements, CT-, were similar to the ones commonly developed in mortars and concretes of OPC. This paper sets up the experimental results obtained from non-traditional mortars and concretes prepared with such ternary cements -TC-, being the portland cement/metakaolin mass ratio, as follows: 80/20, 70/30 and 60/40. Finally, the behaviour of these cements against gypsum attack, has been also determined, using the following parameters: increase in length (ΔL%, compressive, CS, and flexural, FS, strengths, and ultrasound energy, UE. Experimental results obtained from these non-traditional mortars and concretes, show an increase in length (ΔL, in CS and FS, and in UE values, when there is addition of metakaolin.

    En una exhaustiva investigación anterior (1, se pudo comprobar que la creación, evolución y desarrollo de los valores de resistencias mecánicas a compresión, RMC, y flexotracción, RMF, proporcionados por probetas de 1x1x6 cm, de mortero 1:2,75, selenitoso tipo ASTM C 452-68 (2 -que habían sido preparadas con arena de Ottawa, cemento portland, P-1 (14,11% C3A o PY- 6 (0,00% C3A, metacaolín y yeso (CaSO4∙2H2O-, fue semejante a la que, comúnmente, desarrollan los morteros y hormigones tradicionales de cemento portland. En el presente trabajo se exponen los resultados experimentales obtenidos de morteros y hormigones no tradicionales, preparados con dichos cementos ternarios, CT, siendo las proporciones porcentuales en masa ensayadas, cemento portland/metacaolín, las siguientes: 80/20, 70

  11. MARKETING OF BYPRODUCT GYPSUM FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the 1985 marketing potential of byproduct gypsum from utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD), for the area east of the Rocky Mountains, using the calculated gypsum production rates of 14 selected power plants. The 114 cement plants and...

  12. The Gypsum: White gold of Rajasthan, introduction, uses and future prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gayatri

    2013-06-01

    Rajasthan is mineral based state and Bikaner and its surrounding district have been gifted with Gypsum. Mt of Gypsum is available in these districts. Gypsum has multiple uses including basic raw material for POP industry, addition in cement and a natural fertilizer. This mineral has changes the economic scenario in the remote areas of Bikaner, Nagaur, Hanumangarh, Sanchore, Shriganganagar etc. Gypsum and selenite are mined about 3.0 million tons per year. There is huge demand from cement industry as Gypsum is added for improving setting time of cement. Gypsum is a natural fertilizer for alkaline land and it role is vital in state like India where alkaline land is major role. Its high use as fertilizer has potential to change millions of poor farmer families and improving in crop production. Cement Industry has started importing Gypsum from Thailand, Bankong, Pakistan, Iran etc. The mining of gypsum of purity of 70% CaSO4.2H2O is cooperative effort between the land owners and Rajasthan State Mines and Minerals Limited. Gypsum fulfills the demand of POP and Cement industry in Rajasthan and powder gypsum used in agriculture for recon dining of alkaline soil. This paper deals with multiple uses, availability, and future prospective of Gypsum, a white gold of Rajasthan.

  13. Co-treatment of flotation waste, neutralization sludge, and arsenic-containing gypsum sludge from copper smelting: solidification/stabilization of arsenic and heavy metals with minimal cement clinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De-Gang; Min, Xiao-Bo; Ke, Yong; Chai, Li-Yuan; Liang, Yan-Jie; Li, Yuan-Cheng; Yao, Li-Wei; Wang, Zhong-Bing

    2018-03-01

    Flotation waste of copper slag (FWCS), neutralization sludge (NS), and arsenic-containing gypsum sludge (GS), both of which are difficult to dispose of, are major solid wastes produced by the copper smelting. This study focused on the co-treatment of FWCS, NS, and GS for solidification/stabilization of arsenic and heavy metals with minimal cement clinker. Firstly, the preparation parameters of binder composed of FWCS, NS, and cement clinker were optimized to be FWCS dosage of 40%, NS dosage of 10%, cement clinker dosage of 50%, mill time of 1.5 h, and water-to-binder ratio of 0.25. On these conditions, the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of the binder reached 43.24 MPa after hydration of 28 days. Then, the binder was used to solidify/stabilize the As-containing GS. When the mass ratio of binder-to-GS was 5:5, the UCS of matrix can reach 11.06 MPa after hydration of 28 days, meeting the required UCS level of MU10 brick in China. Moreover, arsenic and other heavy metals in FWCS, NS, and GS were effectively solidified or stabilized. The heavy metal concentrations in leachate were much lower than those in the limits of China standard leaching test (CSLT). Therefore, the matrices were potential to be used as bricks in some constructions. XRD analysis shows that the main hydration products of the matrix were portlandite and calcium silicate hydrate. These hydration products may play a significant role in the stabilization/solidification of arsenic and heavy metals.

  14. Hydrogeology of Gypsum formations

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    Klimchouk A.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed explanation of hydrogeological characteristics of gypsum aquifers is given in various situations: deep-seated karst-confined conditions, subjacent, entrenched and denuded karst types-semi-confined, phreatic and vadose conditions. The hydrogeological evolution of barren exposed gypsum karst and flow velocities in gypsum karst aquifers is also discussed.

  15. MODIFIED GYPSUM BINDER

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    KONDRATEVA N. V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Statement of the problem. A disadvantage of the gypsum binder is the limited water resistance of products that historically led to the use of gypsum products mostly for internal construction and finishing works. To regulate the process of hydration and structure formation of the use of chemical additives that are introduced with the mixing water or in the production of the binder. As a rule, substances that increase the solubility of the gypsum binder referred to as the hardening accelerator, and substances which retard the solubility of the inhibitors of hardening of the mixture. Most accelerators and retarders hardening affect adversely on the final strength of the mixture. More effective impact on gypsum binder additives have plasticizers. The purpose of the article. Getting gypsum binder modified with the aim of improving its water resistance and improvement of some technological factors (the time of hardening, water gypsum ratio, etc. would reduce its shortcomings and expand the scope of application of the binder. Conclusion. The result of the research reviewed changes in the basic properties of the gypsum binder with the introduction of additives, plasticizers, and selected the most effective supplements to significantly reduce water gypsum ratio, to improve strength properties and to obtain gypsum binder more dense structure.

  16. GYPSUM DEPOSITS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

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    Anto Gabrić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurences and deposits of gypsum can be found in big karst poljes (Sinjsko, Vrličko, Petrovo, Kosovo and Kninsko as well as in tectonnically predestined river valleys of Zrmanja, Butišnica and Una. There also appear spatially localized occurences on the island of Vis and in the vicinity of Samobor. Evaporites (gypsum and anhydrite with adjoining overlying clastic rocks (red sandstones, siltites and pelites, carbonate rocks (dolomites and limestones and porous carbonate breccias (Rauhwackes were deposited during the period of Upper Permian. The recent position of the Upper Permian beds is a result of complex tectonic, particularly neotectonic, movements and diapiric displacements. Evaporites were deposited in marginal areas of the epicontinental marine basin, in a period of favourable conditions for the sabkha and playa sedimentation due to the continuous shoreline progradation. The Upper Permian age of these sediments in Dalmatio is proved by the characteristic mineral paragenesis and palinological determinations in elastics rocks, as well as by isotope analyses of sulphure in gypsum. Gypsum is a significant ore mineral resource in building, cement production, as well as in a number of tehnological processes used in chemical industry and elsewhere. According to the recent investigations gypsum is predestined to serve as an ore mineral resource of significant perspectives (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Preparing hydraulic cement from oil-shale residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-08-28

    A process for preparation of hydraulic cement from oil-shale residue is characterized in that, as flux is used, rich-in-lime poor-in-sulfur portland-cement clinker, by which the usual gypsum addition, is avoided.

  18. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lei; Zhao Qinglin; Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-01-01

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV–VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C 3 A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration. Highlights: ► Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C 3 A and ettringite have been studied. ► C 3 A–gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. ► Welan gum retards the process of C 3 A–gypsum hydration. ► The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  19. Hydration of fly ash cement and microstructure of fly ash cement pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiyuan, H.

    1981-01-01

    The strength development and hydration of fly ash cement and the influence of addition of gypsum on those were studied at normal and elevated temperatures. It was found that an addition of a proper amount of gypsum to fly ash cement could accelerate the pozzolanic reaction between CH and fly ash, and as a result, increase the strength of fly ash cement pastes after 28 days.

  20. Compaction of FGD-gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, B.T.J.; Larbi, J.A.; Heijnen, W.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to produce compacted gypsum with a low porosity and a high strength on a laboratory scale by uniaxial compaction of flue gas desulphurization (FGD-) gypsum powder. Compacted FGD-gypsum cylinders were produced at a compaction pres-sure between 50 and 500 MPa yielding

  1. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  2. Gypsum karst in Great Britain

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    Cooper A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In Great Britain the most spectacular gypsum karst development is in the Zechstein gypsum (late Permian mainly in north-eastern England. The Midlands of England also has some karst developed in the Triassic gypsum in the vicinity of Nottingham. Along the north-east coast, south of Sunderland, well-developed palaeokarst, with magnificent breccia pipes, was produced by dissolution of Permian gypsum. In north-west England a small gypsum cave system of phreatic origin has been surveyed and recorded. A large actively evolving phreatic gypsum cave system has been postulated beneath the Ripon area on the basis of studies of subsidence and boreholes. The rate of gypsum dissolution here, and the associated collapse lead to difficult civil engineering and construction conditions, which can also be aggravated by water abstraction.

  3. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

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    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  4. Mineral of the month: gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founie, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The earliest known use of gypsum as a building material was in Anatolia (in what is now Turkey) around 6000 B.C. It has been found on the interiors of the great pyramids in Egypt, which were erected in about 3700 B.C. Now an average new American home contains more than 7 metric tons of gypsum in the form of more than 6,000 square feet of wallboard.

  5. Possibilities of using aluminate cements in high-rise construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddo, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The article describes preferable ways of usage of alternative binders for high-rise construction based on aluminate cements. Possible areas of rational use of aluminate cements with the purpose of increasing the service life of materials and the adequacy of the durability of materials with the required durability of the building are analyzed. The results of the structure, shrinkage and physical and mechanical properties of concrete obtained from dry mixes on the base of aluminate cements for self-leveling floors are presented. To study the shrinkage mechanism of curing binders and to evaluate the role of evaporation of water in the development of shrinkage was undertaken experiment with simple unfilled systems: gypsum binder, portland cement and «corrosion resistant high alumina cement + gypsum». Principle possibility of binder with compensated shrinkage based on aluminate cement, gypsum and modern superplasticizers was defined, as well as cracking resistance and corrosion resistance provide durability of the composition.

  6. Economics of Gypsum Production in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the economics of gypsum production in Iran. The trend in production cost, selling price and profit are used to investigate economics of gypsum production. In addition, the multivariate time series method is used to determine factors affecting gypsum price in domestic market. The results indicated that due to increase in production and inflation, profitability of gypsum production has decreased during recent years. It is concluded that tariff and non-tariff barriers on mines machinery are among reasons for increasing production cost in Iranian gypsum mines. Decreasing such barriers could increase profitability of gypsum production in Iran.

  7. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  8. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. ► The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. ► The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. ► The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C–S–H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563–938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO 4 2- from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO 4 2- releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO 4 2- from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m −2 , which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum.

  10. Hydrate Phase Assemblages in Blends of Ye'elimite and Gypsum with Alite and Belite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Calcium sulpho-aluminate (CSA) cements all contain ye’elimite, either as the main phase or in intermediate amounts, while they differ in their content of accessory phases. Belite is the main phase in most CSA cements, however, alite - CSA cements have been produced. The hydrate phases formed during...... and hydration kinetics. The improved understanding of the hydrate phase assemblages as well as the hydration kinetics for the model systems will form the fundamental basis for further optimizations of blended systems including ye’elimite with the aim of maximizing the reaction degree of the main clinker phases...... hydration of CSA cements depend on the type of CSA cement and the amount of gypsum added. The hydration reactions of the main phases are by themselves well documented, whereas the simultaneous hydration of CSA cement components is not fully understood in terms of hydration products and kinetics. To further...

  11. Growth of indoor fungi on gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Frank J J; van Laarhoven, Karel A; Wosten, Han; Dijksterhuis, Jan

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To have a better understanding of fungal growth on gypsum building materials to prevent indoor fungal growth. METHODS AND RESULTS: Gypsum is acquired by mining or as a by-product of flue-gas desulfurization or treatment of phosphate ore for the production of fertilizer. Natural gypsum,

  12. A practical method for estimating maximum shear modulus of cemented sands using unconfined compressive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyunwook; Nam, Hongyeop; Lee, Woojin

    2017-12-01

    The composition of naturally cemented deposits is very complicated; thus, estimating the maximum shear modulus (Gmax, or shear modulus at very small strains) of cemented sands using the previous empirical formulas is very difficult. The purpose of this experimental investigation is to evaluate the effects of particle size and cement type on the Gmax and unconfined compressive strength (qucs) of cemented sands, with the ultimate goal of estimating Gmax of cemented sands using qucs. Two sands were artificially cemented using Portland cement or gypsum under varying cement contents (2%-9%) and relative densities (30%-80%). Unconfined compression tests and bender element tests were performed, and the results from previous studies of two cemented sands were incorporated in this study. The results of this study demonstrate that the effect of particle size on the qucs and Gmax of four cemented sands is insignificant, and the variation of qucs and Gmax can be captured by the ratio between volume of void and volume of cement. qucs and Gmax of sand cemented with Portland cement are greater than those of sand cemented with gypsum. However, the relationship between qucs and Gmax of the cemented sand is not affected by the void ratio, cement type and cement content, revealing that Gmax of the complex naturally cemented soils with unknown in-situ void ratio, cement type and cement content can be estimated using qucs.

  13. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varas, M.J.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-01-01

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements

  14. Properties of expansive cements, made with Portland cement, gypsum and high alumina cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monfore, G. E.

    1966-03-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLos cementos expansivos se han desarrollado durante las tres décadas pasadas, principalmente por las investigaciones llevadas a cabo en Francia, URSS y Estados Unidos. Los cementos expansivos que fueron utilizados en los estudios de los cuales se da cuenta en el presente trabajo se obtuvieron mediante la mezcla de cemento Portland, cemento aluminoso y yeso. En las investigaciones se utilizaron morteros con los cuales se pudo determinar los efectos de la composición, tiempo y temperatura de curado sobre las resistencias, dilatación libre, retracción y desarrollo de resistencias en probetas pretensadas. Se hace una revisión sobre los estudios hechos con cementos expansivos y desarrollados en la Universidad de California. Las propiedades de taIes hormigones son, en términos generales, comparables a aquellos obtenidos con mezclas de cementos portland, cemento aluminoso y yeso. Es necesaria más información sobre pérdidas de tensión en los aceros y durabilidad de los hormigones autopretensados.

  15. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing

  16. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr_3Al_2O_6 and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  17. The influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongxu, L.; Xuequan, W.; Jinlin, S.; Yujiang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the activation theory of alkali and sulfate, the influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement was studied by testing the strength, pore structure, hydrates, and microstructure, Test results show that compound admixtures can obviously improve the properties of high-content slag cement. The emphasis of the present research is two-fold: substituting gypsum with anhydrite and calcining gypsum. These both can improve early and later performance.

  18. Growth of indoor fungi on gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, F J J; van Laarhoven, K A; Wösten, H A B; Dijksterhuis, J

    2017-08-01

    To have a better understanding of fungal growth on gypsum building materials to prevent indoor fungal growth. Gypsum is acquired by mining or as a by-product of flue-gas desulphurization or treatment of phosphate ore for the production of fertilizer. Natural gypsum, flue-gas gypsum and phosphogypsum therefore have different mineral compositions. Here, growth of fungi on these types of gypsum was assessed. Conidia of the indoor fungi Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium halotolerans and Penicillium rubens were inoculated and observed using microscopic techniques including low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Elemental analysis of gypsum was done using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and segmented flow analysis. Moisture content of the gypsum was determined using a dynamic vapour sorption apparatus. Aspergillus niger, C. halotolerans and P. rubens hardly germinated on natural gypsum and flue-gas gypsum. The latter two fungi did show germination, outgrowth, and conidiation on phosphogypsum, while A. niger hardly germinated on this substrate. Other experiments show that C. halotolerans and P. rubens can develop in pure water, but A. niger does not. The observations show that the lack of germination of three indoor fungi is explained by the low amount of phosphor in natural, flue-gas and laboratory-grade gypsum. Additionally, C. halotolerans and P. rubens can develop in pure water, while conidia of A. niger do not show any germination, which is explained by the need for organic molecules of this species to induce germination. Indoor fungal growth is a potential threat to human health and causes damage to building materials. This study possibly helps in the application of the right type of gypsum in buildings. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. The hydrophobic modification of gypsum binder by peat products: physico-chemical and technological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Misnikov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum binder is a quick-setting and fast-hardening material that is used widely in the construction industry for plastering and as an ingredient of concrete, other binding materials, etc. The issue addressed here is its short shelf life (around three months which arises because it is hygroscopic, i.e. it readily absorbs moisture and begins to set during transport and storage. The main methods that are currently available for protecting gypsum binder against unwanted exposure to moisture and water vapour are considered, and hydrophobic modification with the bitumen released during peat thermolysis (a method previously considered for cement is proposed as a promising alternative. Because there is overlap in the temperature ranges used in the manufacture of gypsum binder and those required for the initial stages of thermal decomposition of the organic matter in peat, it is expected that hydrophobisation could be achieved during the established manufacturing process without any changes to plant or procedures. The optimum concentration of organic (peat additive for gypsum rock mined from the Shushokskoye deposit in Russia is derived experimentally. With 0.5–1 % of peat additive, the strength grading of the gypsum plaster is preserved and its storage time without caking and hydration increases, even under adverse conditions (100 % relative humidity. The proposed method is compatible with current gypsum production technology, it does not require any changes in equipment, and the prices of mineral raw materials and semi-finished peat products are approximately the same. Thus, the incorporation of hydrophobic modification using peat into the manufacturing process for gypsum binder is unlikely to increase the cost of the product.

  20. Attenuation characteristics of gypsum wallboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Ralph C.; Sayeg, Joseph

    1978-01-01

    Increased cost of lead is promoting enhanced usage of common building materials for shielding in diagnostic medical and dental facilities where only a few half value layers (HVLs) are needed. We have measured attenuation of x-rays in gypsum wallboard as a function of kVp, filtration, and wallboard thickness. Our findings, obtained using a Victoreen 555 with an 0.1 DAS probe in poor geometry, are in agreement with the sparse data in the literature (Gross and McCullough (1977), Radiology 122: 825. Moos et al. (1961), Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology 14: 569) but extend to thicker wall configurations and different kVp and filtration parameters. We conclude that gypsum wallboard as sole shielding material should be used with great caution. These findings are of value in maximizing the benefit/cost ratio for diagnostic shielding, and strengthen the conviction that, where used for shielding purposes, common building materials must be installed carefully and HVL-depth dependence considered thoroughly. (author)

  1. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account......For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...

  2. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. Currently a large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO2 from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance c...

  3. Cermet cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  4. Gypsum ground: a new occurrence of gypsum sediment in playas of central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang Yang Chen; Bowler, James M.; Magee, John W.

    1991-06-01

    There are many playas (dry salt lakes) in arid central Australia (regional rainfall about 250 mm/y and pan evaporation around 3000 mm/y). Highly soluble salts, such as halite, only appear as a thin (several centimetres thick), white, ephemeral efflorescent crust on the dry surface. Gypsum is the major evaporite precipitating both at present and preserved in sediment sequences. One type of gypsum deposit forms a distinctive surface feature, which is here termed "gypsum ground". It consists of a thick (up to 80 cm) gypsum zone which rises from the surrounding smooth white playa surface and is overlain by a heaved brown crust. The gypsum zone, with an average gypsum content above 60%, consists of pure gypsum sublayers and interlayered clastic bands of sandy clay. The gypsum crystals are highly corroded, especially in the direction parallel to the c-axis and on the upper sides where illuviated clay has accumulated in corrosion hollows. Overgrowth parallel to the a- and b-axes is very common, forming highly discoidal habits. These secondary changes (corrosion and overgrowth) are well-developed in the vadose zone and absent from crystals below the long-term watertable (depth around 40 cm). These crystal characteristics indicate a rainwater leaching process. At Lake Amadeus, one of the largest playas (800 km 2) of central Australia, such gypsum ground occupies 16% of the total area. The gypsum ground is interpreted as an alteration of a pre-existing gypsum deposit which probably extended across the whole playa before breaking down, leaving a playa marginal terrace and several terrace islands within the gypsum ground. This pre-existing gypsum deposit, preserved in the residual islands, consists of pure, pale, sand-sized lenticular crystals. It is believed to have been deposited during an episode of high regional watertable, causing active groundwater seepage and more frequent surface brine in the playa. A later fall in watertable, probably resulting from climatic change

  5. Mechanical properties of simulated Mars materials: gypsum-rich sandstones and lapilli tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Carolyn; Lockner, David; Okubo, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity, and other recent studies on diagenesis in the extensive equatorial layered deposits on Mars, suggest that the likely lithologies of these deposits are gypsum-rich sandstones and tuffaceous sediments (for example, Murchie and others, 2009; Squyres and others, 2012; Zimbelman and Scheidt, 2012). Of particular interest is how the diagenesis history of these sediments (degree of cementation and composition) influences the strength and brittle behavior of the material. For instance, fractures are more common in lower porosity materials under strain, whereas deformation bands, characterized by distributed strain throughout a broader discontinuity in a material, are common in higher porosity sedimentary materials. Such discontinuities can either enhance or restrict fluid flow; hence, failure mode plays an important role in determining the mechanics of fluid migration through sediments (Antonellini and Aydin, 1994; 1995; Taylor and Pollard, 2000; Ogilvie and Glover, 2001). As part of a larger study to characterize processes of fault-controlled fluid flow in volcaniclastic and gypsum-rich sediments on Mars, we have completed a series of laboratory experiments to focus on how gypsum clast content and degree of authigenic cementation affects the strength behavior of simulated Mars rocks. Both axial deformation and hydrostatic pressure tests were done at room temperature under dry conditions.

  6. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Sobolev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA cement helps to improve its ecological compatibility. HVMA cement technology is based on the intergrinding of portland cement clinker, gypsum, mineral additives, and a special complex admixture. This new method increases the compressive strength of ordinary cement, improves durability of the cement-based materials, and - at the same time - uses inexpensive natural mineral additives or industrial by-products. This improvement leads to a reduction of energy consumption per unit of the cement produced. Higher strength, better durability, reduction of pollution at the clinker production stage, and decrease of landfill area occupied by industrial by-products, all provide ecological advantages for HVMA cement.

  7. Gypsum crystals observed in experimental and natural sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilfus, N.-X.; Galley, R. J.; Cooper, M.; Halden, N.; Hare, A.; Wang, F.; Søgaard, D. H.; Rysgaard, S.

    2013-12-01

    gypsum has been predicted to precipitate in sea ice, it has never been observed. Here we provide the first report on gypsum precipitation in both experimental and natural sea ice. Crystals were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. Based on their apparent distinguishing characteristics, the gypsum crystals were identified as being authigenic. The FREeZing CHEMistry (FREZCHEM) model results support our observations of both gypsum and ikaite precipitation at typical in situ sea ice temperatures and confirms the "Gitterman pathway" where gypsum is predicted to precipitate. The occurrence of authigenic gypsum in sea ice during its formation represents a new observation of precipitate formation and potential marine deposition in polar seas.

  8. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  9. Gypsum karst in Italy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jo; Chiarini, Veronica; Columbu, Andrea; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Madonia, Giuliana; Parise, Mario; Piccini, Leonardo; Vattano, Marco; Vigna, Bartolomeo; Zini, Luca; Forti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Although outcropping only rarely in Italy, gypsum karst has been described in detail since the early XXth century (Marinelli, 1917). Gypsum caves are now known from almost all Italian regions (Madonia & Forti, 2003), but are mainly localised along the northern border of the Apennine chain (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions), Calabria, and Sicily, where the major outcrops occur. Recently, important caves have also been discovered in the underground gypsum quarries in Piedmont (Vigna et al., 2010). During the late 80s and 90s several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in many gypsum areas. All this work converged into a comprehensive overview in 2003 (Madonia & Forti, 2003). Further detailed studies focused on the gypsum areas of Emilia Romagna (Chiesi et al., 2010; Forti & Lucci, 2010; Demaria et al., 2012; De Waele & Pasini, 2013; Ercolani et al., 2013; Columbu et al., 2015; Lucci & Piastra, 2015; Tedeschi et al., 2015) and of Sicily (Madonia & Vattano, 2011). Sinkholes related to Permo-Triassic gypsum have been studied in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Zini et al., 2015). This presentation will review the state of the art regarding different aspects of evaporite karst in Italy focusing on the main new results. References Chiesi M., et al. (2010) - Origin and evolution of a salty gypsum/anhydrite karst spring: the case of Poiano (Northern Apennines, Italy). Hydrogeology Journal, 18, pp. 1111-1124. Columbu A. et al. (2015) - Gypsum caves as indicators of climate-driven river incision and aggradation in a rapidly uplifting region. Geology, 43(6), 539-542. Demaria D. et al. (Eds.) (2012), Le Grotte Bolognesi, GSB-USB, 431 p. De Waele J., Pasini G. (2013) - Intra-messinian gypsum palaeokarst in the northern Apennines and its palaeogeographic implications. Terra Nova 25, pp. 199-205. Ercolani M., et al. (Eds.) (2013), I Gessi e la Cave i Monte Tondo. Studio multidisciplinare di un'area carsica nella Vena del Gesso Romagnola. Memorie Ist. It. Spel. II(26), 559 p

  10. Mechanical properties of gypsum board at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.M. Cramer; O.M. Friday; R.H. White; G. Sriprutkiat

    2003-01-01

    Gypsum board is a common fire barrier used in house and general building construction. Recently, evaluation of the collapses of the World Trade Center Towers highlighted the potential role and failure of gypsum board in containing the fires and resisting damage. The use of gypsum board as primary fire protection of light-flame wood or steel construction is ubiquitous....

  11. Gypsum crystals observed in experimental and natural sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Galley, Ryan; Cooper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    , the gypsum crystals were identified as being authigenic. The FREeZing CHEMistry (FREZCHEM) model results support our observations of both gypsum and ikaite precipitation at typical in situ sea ice temperatures and confirms the “Gitterman pathway” where gypsum is predicted to precipitate. The occurrence...

  12. Comparison of the surface roughness of gypsum models constructed using various impression materials and gypsum products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Chang

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The surface roughness of stone models was mainly determined by the type of alginate impression material, and was less affected by the type of silicone rubber impression material or gypsum product, or the storage time before repouring.

  13. Clay stabilization by using gypsum and paddy husk ash with reference to UCT and CBR value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesyanto; Iskandar, R.; Hastuty, I. P.; Dianty, W. O.

    2018-02-01

    Clays that have low shear strength need to be stabilized in order to meet the technical requirements to serve as a subgrade material. One of the usual soil stabilization methods is by adding chemicals such as Portland cement, lime, and bitumen. The clay stabilization research was done by adding gypsum and paddy husk ash. The research goals were to find out the value of engineering properties of clay due to the addition of 2% gypsum and 2% - 15% paddy husk ash. The soil was classified as Clay - Low Plasticity (CL) based on USCS and was classified as A-7-6 (10) based on AASHTO classification system. The UCT value of original soil was 1.41 kg/cm2. While the CBR soaked and unsoaked values of original soil were 4.41% and 6.23% respectively. The research results showed the addition of paddy husk ash decreased the value of unconfined compressive strength as well as CBR. The stabilized soil by 2% gypsum and 0% paddy husk ash gave maximum UCT value of 1.67 kg/cm2, while the maximum value of CBR were found 6.71% for CBR soaked and 8.00% for CBR unsoaked. The addition of paddy husk ash did not alter the soil classification according to AASHTO or USCS, even degrade the engineering properties of original soil.

  14. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  15. A study of the effectiveness of the use of gypsum and volcanic ash against the stability of clay soil in terms of UCT and CBR values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesyanto; Iskandar, R.; Hastuty, IP; Lubis, AIU

    2018-02-01

    Soil stabilization is an effort to improve engineering properties of soil. The conventional soil stabilization is by adding additives to the soil such as Portland cement, lime, and bitumen. The clay stabilization research was done by adding gypsum and volcanic ash. The research purposes were to find out the value of engineering properties of clay due to the addition of 2% gypsum and 2% - 15% volcanic ash. The soil was classified as Clay - Low Plasticity (CL) based on USCS and was classified as A-7-6 (10) based on AASHTO classification system. The UCT values of original soil and original soil plus 2% gypsum were 1.40 kg/cm2 and 1.66 kg/cm2 respectively. The CBR soaked and unsoaked values of original soil were 4.44% and 6.28% correspondingly. Meanwhile, CBR soaked and CBR unsoaked values of original soil plus 2% gypsum were 6.74% and 8.02% respectively. The research results showed that the additives materials of gypsum and volcanic ash improved the engineering properties of clay. The UCT result from the stabilized soil by 2% gypsum and 10% volcanic ash gave value of 2.79 kg/cm2 (increased 99.28% from original soil). For CBR test, the most effective mixture were in variation of 2% gypsum and 9% volcanic ash which gave value of 9.07% (104.27% increase from original soil) for CBR soaked and 10.29% (63.85% increase from original soil) for CBR unsoaked. The stabilized soil with 2% gypsum and 9% volcanic ash was classified as CL based on USCS and was classified as A-6 (4) based on AASHTO classification system.

  16. Simulating the structure of gypsum composites using pulverized basalt waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buryanov Аleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the possibility of simulating the structure of gypsum composite modified with basalt dust waste to make materials and products based on it. Structural simulating of the topological space in gypsum modified composite by optimizing its grain-size composition highly improves its physical and mechanical properties. Strength and density tests have confirmed the results of the simulation. The properties of modified gypsum materials are improved by obtaining of denser particle packing in the presence of hemihydrate of finely dispersed basalt and plasticizer particles in the system, and by engaging basalt waste in the structuring process of modified gypsum stone.

  17. Efficiency of sulfuric acid, mined gypsum, and two gypsum by-products in soil crusting prevention and sodic soil reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amezketa, E.; Aragues, R.; Gazol, R. [Gobierno Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Agricultural Resources Evaluation Center

    2005-06-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of four amendments (sulfuric acid, mined-gypsum, and the by-products coal-gypsum and lacto-gypsum) in crusting prevention of two calcareous nonsodic and sodic soils and in sodic soil reclamation. Treatments for crust prevention consisted of surface-applied amendments at equivalent rates of 5 Mg pure-gypsum ha{sup -1}. Treatments for sodic soil reclamation consisted of surface-applied acid and soil-incorporated gypsums at rates of 1 pure-gypsum requirement. The efficiency of these amendments was evaluated by comparing the final infiltration rates (FIR) of the amended vs. the nonamended soils measured in disturbed-soil columns pounded with low-salinity irrigation water. Electrical conductivity (EC) and Na in the leachates of the sodic soil were measured. In the crusting prevention experiment, FIRs (mm h{sup -1) of the nonsodic soil were 21 (nonamended), 33 to 35 (gypsum materials), and 53 (sulfuric acid), whereas those for the sodic soil were 0 (nonamended), 9 (lacto-gypsum), 15 to 17 (coal- and mined-gypsum), and 21 (sulfuric acid). In the sodic-soil reclamation experiment, FIRs were 0 (nonamended), 8 to 9 (gypsum-materials), and 17 (sulfuric acid) mm h{sup -1}. All amendments were effective in crusting prevention and soil reclamation, but sulfuric acid was the most efficient due to the fastest EC and Na reductions in the leachates. The three gypsum-materials were equally effective in the reclamation process and in the nonsodic soil crusting-prevention, whereas lacto-gypsum was less efficient in the sodic-soil crusting-prevention.

  18. The influence of calcium lignosulphonate - sodium bicarbonate on the status of ettringite crystallization in fly ash cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, K.; Zhang, C.; Liu, Z. [Hebei Institute of Technology, Tang Shan (China)

    2002-01-01

    Calcium lignosulphonate (CL) - sodium bicarbonate (SB) (a total of 0.7% by weight of cement and CL to SB ratio of 1:1.8) will cause the fluidity of fly ash cement paste to decrease rapidly. It is the variation of the status of ettringite crystallization that causes this phenomenon. Experimental results show that CL-SB affects the liquid-phase composition of fly ash cement paste remarkably. As a result, ettringite crystallizes out in the shape of needles from the solution. These needle-like crystal particles are distributed in the solution at a certain distance from the surface of clinker particles. At the initial hydration stage, the crystallization of ettringite is stronger in fly ash cement with calcined gypsum than in fly ash cement with gypsum. 5 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority's newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective

  20. Soil management and application of agricultural gypsum in a Planosol for soybean cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesan, Enio; Tonetto, Felipe; Teló, Gustavo Mack; Coelho, Lucas Lopes; Aramburu, Bruno Behenck; Trivisiol, Vinicius Severo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effects of soil management systems, tillage, and application of gypsum agricultural to soil, on soybean development in lowland areas. The experiment was carried out on an Alfisol in a randomized complete block design in a factorial arrangement. The two soil tillage practices were without deep tillage and with deep tillage. Gypsum treatments were no gypsum application, 500kg of gypsum ha-1, 1000kg of gypsum ha-1, and 1500kg of gypsum ha-1. Deep tillage res...

  1. Leaching behavior of harmful components from cement solidities of fluidized-bed coal ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, T.; Fukuoka, H.; Shigemoto, N. [Fuji Clean Co., Kagawa (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    Solidifies of fluidized-bed fly ash with slag cement were prepared by hydrothermal treatment after adding gypsum, Na3PO{sub 4}, or Al2(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. XRD analysis of the solidifies was performed and leaching behavior of Pb and F from the solidities was investigated. The fly ash-cement and fly ash-cement-gypsum solidifies showed rather high leaching concentration of F and Pb. The F leaching was explained by solubility products of a Ca(OH){sub 2} CaF2 system. The Pb leaching concentrations roughly agreed with the theoretical curve for hydroxo complexes of Pb, showing a strong dependence on pH. Addition of Na3PO{sub 4} and Al2(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, to cement solidities gave katoite and aluminium phosphate, and ettringite, respectively, and these solidities showed lower leaching concentrations of F and Pb than the fly ash-cement and fly ash-cement-gypsum solidifies. Capture of F and Pb in crystalline components such as ettringite probably accounts for such leaching suppression.

  2. Mechanical, Hygric and Thermal Properties of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tesárek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference measurements of basic mechanical, thermal and hygric parameters of hardened flue gas desulfurization gypsum are carried out. Moisture diffusivity, water vapor diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined with the primary aim of comparison with data obtained for various types of modified gypsum in the future. 

  3. Occurrence and geochemistry of Nafada Gypsum, north-eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gypsum deposits occur in numerous locations within the Senonian Fika Shale at Nafada, northeastern Nigeria. Geologic investigations at Baro Winde and Wuro Dabo mines indicate the occurrence of three varieties of gypsum namely, Balatino laminated, Alabaster and Satin Spar. These are interlayered within shale and ...

  4. Gypsum as a bedding source for broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three trials examined the feasibility of flue gas desulfurization gypsum as a bedding material for raising broilers. Gypsum was used alone, under or on top of pine shavings and pine bark. Test materials were placed as bedding in pens to simulate commercial broiler production through three growout cy...

  5. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  6. Gypsum-anhydrites in 2 Ga Vempalle Formation, Cuddapah basin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    69

    In fact high solubility in water leads to removal of gypsum in suficial environment. ... with presence of evaporite gypsum in the upper as well as lower part of the ..... created with shallow inlet or a slightly permeable seal with main water body.

  7. Corrosion behaviour of metallic and non-metallic materials in various media in the Anhydrite and Gypsum Mine Felsenau/AG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laske, D.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1983-10-01

    The final underground disposal of radioactive wastes necessitates container materials with a good long-term resistance against corrosion from both external agents and the solidification matrix inside. For low- and medium-level active waste, repositories in anhydrite sites, among others, are under consideration. Sheet and plate samples from 14 metallic and 8 non-metallic materials have been tested for 5 years in a tunnel in the Anhydrite and Gypsum Mine Felsenau/AG for their corrosion resistance in the tunnel atmosphere, anhydrite powder, gypsum powder, gypsum, and cement. From the metallic materials tested, only chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant to all the media present. Zinc plated and tin plated iron sheet as well as aluminium and aluminium alloys are corrosion resistant only in the atmosphere of the tunnel, and lead plated iron sheet is resistant also in cement. Aluminium is dissolved in cement. Uncovered iron sheet undergoes severe corrosion. The non-metallic coatings tested (lacquer, stove lacquer, or synthetic resins) partially flake off already after one year's testing and are therefore not appropriate for iron sheet corrosion protection. No influence of the different media has been observed after 5 years on the 8 plastic materials tested (6 without, and 2 with glass fiber reinforcement). (author)

  8. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  9. Thermal analysis of borogypsum and its effects on the physical properties of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Derun, Emek Moeroeydor; Guelen, Jale; Piskin, Sabriye

    2003-01-01

    Borogypsum, which consists mainly of gypsum crystals, B 2 O 3 and some impurities, is formed during the production of boric acid from colemanite, which is an important borate ore. In this study, the effect of borogypsum and calcined borogypsum on the physical properties of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) has been investigated. The calcination temperature and transformations in the structures of borogypsum and natural gypsum were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Thermal experiments were carried out between ambient temperature and 500 deg. C in an air atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min -1 . After calculation of enthalpy and determination of conversion temperatures, borogypsum (5% and 7%), hemihydrate borogypsum (5%) and natural gypsum (5%) were added separately to Portland cement clinker and cements were ground in the laboratory. The final products were tested for chemical analysis, compressive strength, setting time, Le Chatelier expansion and fineness properties according to the European Standard (EN 196). The results show that increasing the borogypsum level in Portland cement from 5% to 7% caused an increase in setting time and a decrease in soundness expansion and compressive strength. The cement prepared with borogypsum (5%) was found to have similar strength properties to those obtained with natural gypsum, whereas a mixture containing 5% of hemihydrate borogypsum was found to develop 25% higher compressive strength than the OPC control mixtures at 28 days. For this reason, utilization of calcined borogypsum in cement applications is expected to give better results than untreated borogypsum. It is concluded that hemihydrate borogypsum could be used as a retarder for Portland cement as an industrial side. This would play an important role in reducing environmental pollution

  10. Permeability of gypsum samples dehydrated in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike; Blöcher, Guido

    2011-09-01

    We report on changes in rock permeability induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air (dry) for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the reaction kinetics, so induced changes in porosity, and the concurrent evolution of sample permeability were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate and complete dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity showed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% to 30%, whilst the initial bulk volume remained unchanged. Within these limits permeability significantly increased with porosity by almost three orders of magnitude from approximately 7 × 10-19 m2 to 3 × 10-16 m2. We show that - when mechanical and hydraulic feedbacks can be excluded - permeability, reaction progress, and porosity are related unequivocally.

  11. The effect of cure conditions on the stability of cement waste forms after immersion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.; Adams, J.W.; Clinton, J.H.; Piciulo, P.L.; McDaniel, K.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effects of curing conditions on the stability of cement-solidified ion-exchange resins after immersion in water. The test specimens consisted of partially depleted mixed-bed bead resins solidified in one of three vendor-supplied Portland I cement formulations, in a reference cement formulation, or in a gypsum-based binder formulation. We cured samples prepared using each formulation in sealed containers for periods of 7, 14, or 28 days as well as in air or with an accelerated heat cure prior to 90-day immersion in water. Two cement formulations exhibited apparent Portland-cement-like behavior, i.e., compressive strength increased or stabilized with increasing cure time. Two cement formulations exhibited behavior apparently unlike that of Portland cement, i.e., compressive strength decreased with increasing cure time. Such non-Portland-cement-like behavior is correlated with higher waste loadings. The gypsum-based formulation exhibited approximately constant compressive strength with cure time. Accelerated heat cures may not give compressive strengths representative of real-time cures. Some physical deterioration (cracking, spalling) of the waste form occurs during immersion

  12. The effect of cure conditions on the stability of cement waste forms after immersion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.; Adams, J.W.; Clinton, J.H.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of curing conditions on the stability of cement-solidified ion-exchange resins after immersion in water. The test specimens consisted of partially depleted mixed-bed bead resins solidified in one of three vendor-supplied Portland I cement formulations, in a reference cement formulation, or in a gypsum-based binder formulation. They cured samples prepared using each formulation in sealed containers for periods of 7, 14, or 28 days as well as in air or with an accelerated heat cure prior to 90-day immersion in water. Two cement formulations exhibited apparent Portland-cement-like behavior, i.e., compressive strength increased or stabilized with increasing cure time. Two cement formulations exhibited behavior apparently unlike that of Portland cement, i.e. compressive strength decreased with increasing cure time. Such non-Portland-cement-like behavior is correlated with higher waste loadings. The gypsum-based formulation exhibited approximately constant compressive strength with cure time. Accelerated heat cures may not give compressive strengths representative of real-time cures. Some physical deterioration (cracking, spalling) of the waste form occurs during immersion

  13. Measuring the gypsum content of C&D debris fines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musson, Stephen E; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G

    2008-11-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) debris recycling facilities often produce a screened material intended for use as alternative daily cover (ADC) at active landfills or for shaping and grading at closed landfills. This product contains soil and small pieces of wood, concrete, gypsum drywall, shingles and other components of C&D debris. Concerns have been raised over the contribution of gypsum drywall in C&D debris fines to odor problems at landfills where the product is used. To address such concerns, limitations may be placed on the percentage of gypsum (or sulfate) that can occur, and standardized testing procedures are required to permit valid compliance testing. A test procedure was developed for measuring the gypsum content in C&D debris fines. The concentration of sulfate leached in an aqueous solution was used to estimate the initial gypsum content of the sample. The impact of sample size and leaching time were evaluated. Precision and accuracy increased with increasing gypsum content. Results from replicate samples had an average relative standard deviation of 9%. The gypsum content of fines obtained from different facilities in the US varied widely from 1% to over 25%. These variations not only occurred between differing facilities, but within batches produced within a single facility.

  14. Interaction of gypsum with lead in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astilleros, J.M.; Godelitsas, A.; Rodriguez-Blanco, J.D.; Fernandez-Diaz, L.; Prieto, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Harissopulos, S.

    2010-01-01

    Sorption processes on mineral surfaces are a critical factor in controlling the distribution and accumulation of potentially harmful metals in the environment. This work investigates the effectiveness of gypsum (CaSO 4 .2H 2 O) to sequester Pb. The interaction of gypsum fragments with Pb-bearing solutions (10, 100 and 1000 mg/L) was monitored by performing macroscopic batch-type experiments conducted at room temperature. The aqueous phase composition was periodically determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Regardless of the [Pb aq ] initial , a [Pb aq ] final aq ] initial ≥ 100 mg/L and significantly slower (t > 1 week) for [Pb aq ] initial = 10 mg/L. Speciation calculations revealed that after a long time of interaction (1 month), all the solutions reached equilibrium with respect to both gypsum and anglesite. For [Pb aq ] initial ≥ 100 mg/L, sorption takes place mainly via the rapid dissolution of gypsum and the simultaneous formation of anglesite both on the gypsum surface and in the bulk solution. In the case of [Pb aq ] initial = 10 mg/L, no anglesite precipitation was observed, but surface spectroscopy (proton Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, p-RBS) confirmed the formation of Pb-bearing surface layers on the (0 1 0) gypsum surface in this case also. This study shows that the surface of gypsum can play an important role in the attenuation of Pb in contaminated waters.

  15. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal; Caracterizacao de cimentos experimentais com finalidade endodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia, E-mail: alana.mxd@hotmail [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba (UEPB), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  16. Sustainable Uses of FGD Gypsum in Agricultural Systems: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dexter B; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil and water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural producing regions within the last two decades has attributed to this interest. Currently, published data on the long-term sustainability of FGD gypsum use in agricultural systems is limited. This has led to organization of the American Society of Agronomy's Community "By-product Gypsum Uses in Agriculture" and a special collection of nine technical research articles on various issues related to FGD gypsum uses in agricultural systems. A brief review of FGD gypsum, rationale for the special collection, overviews of articles, knowledge gaps, and future research directions are presented in this introductory paper. The nine articles are focused in three general areas: (i) mercury and other trace element impacts, (ii) water quality impacts, and (iii) agronomic responses and soil physical changes. While this is not an exhaustive review of the topic, results indicate that FGD gypsum use in sustainable agricultural production systems is promising. The environmental impacts of FGD gypsum are mostly positive, with only a few negative results observed, even when applied at rates representing cumulative 80-year applications. Thus, FGD gypsum, if properly managed, seems to represent an important potential input into agricultural systems. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  18. Process for reducing radioactive contamination in waste product gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, P.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the radioactive contamination in waste product gypsum in which waste product gypsum is reacted with a dilute sulfuric acid containing barium sulfate to form an acid slurry at an elevated temperature, the slurry is preferably cooled, the acid component is separated from the solid, and the resulting solid is separated into a fine fraction and a coarse fraction. The fine fraction predominates in barium sulfate and radioactive contamination. The coarse fraction predominates in a purified gypsum product of reduced radioactive contamination

  19. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  20. Characterisation of Cements From Dominantly Volcanic Raw Materials of the Carpathian Bend Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halmagy Timea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations regarding the production of cements from local raw materials, such as limestone from Varghis, gypsum from Nucsoara, basaltic scoria from Racosul de Jos, volcanic tuff from Racosul de Sus, diatomite from Filia, and red mud from Oradea. The raw mixtures, based on modified Bogue calculations, contain limestone, gypsum, and one or two of the above-mentioned materials. The cements resulted from clinker grinding in a laboratory gas furnace at 1260-1300 °C, with one hour at the peak temperatures, and were characterised for Blaine specific surface area, specific density, and mineral phases. Physico-mechanical properties, such as water content for normal consistency, setting time, soundness, and compressive strength were also determined. Results show that these cements contain belite, ferrite, calcium sulphoaluminate, anhydrite, and some minor compounds.

  1. Assessment of Natural Exposure From Some kinds of Egyptian Gypsum Using Low Background Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sroor, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactivity of natural gypsum and gypsum derived products are examined investigated due to their importance as element of building materials and agricultural gypsum. the natural gypsum and its product may constitute an additional source of radiation exposure to workers and members of public from radiation produced by radioactive decaying. thirty natural gypsum samples from different quarries and 32 fabricated gypsum samples from commercial companies were analyzed using low background HPGe detector. the natural concentration of Ra-226, 232 Th and 40 K activities in all samples were determined in Bq/Kg dry weight. it was found that radioactivity of natural gypsum is less than the fabricated gypsum, so it can be used as agricultural gypsum. fabricated gypsum is suitable for use as an element of building material in egypt

  2. Radium uptake by recrystallized gypsum: an incorporation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestini, Leslie; Beaucaire, Catherine; Vercouter, Thomas; Descostes, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Batch experiments of 226 Ra uptake by recrystallized gypsum CaSO 4 .2H 2 O(s), monitored over 200 days, have shown that the published value for the distribution coefficient of 226 Ra between gypsum and an aqueous phase, 0.03 (Gnanapragasam and Lewis, 1995), is an upper limit. This suggests that this value needs to be confirmed. A solid solution between gypsum and radium sulfate (Ca,Ra)SO 4 .2H 2 O(s) cannot be considered per se, which is not surprising considering gypsum's high solubility product (lg Ks = -4.58) and the ionic radius of VIII Ra (1.48 A), when compared to that of VIII Ca (1.12 A). (authors)

  3. Uranium-series dating of gypsum speleothems: methodology and examples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Laura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The analytical problems of dating gypsum speleothems with the U-series technique are reviewed. Gypsum speleothems are, in general, very low in U content, challenging the limits of detection methods. Various approaches to dissolving gypsum and isolation of actinides from the matrix include ion-pairing dissolution with magnesium salts and using nitric acid. The most precise dating technique is Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS, combined with Fe(OH3 scavenging and anionic exchange chromatography. Less satisfactory, but much quicker, is direct retention of actinides from HNO3 by means of TRU resin and MC-ICP-MS detection. We have tested these methods on gypsum speleothems from the Sorbas karst in Spain and from the Naica caves in Mexico.

  4. Gypsum crystals in the inner shelf sediments off Maharashtra, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Ambre, N.V.

    Gypsum crystals have been found in the inner shelf silty clay/clayey silt off the Maharashtra Coast between Vengurla and Bombay. Generally these occur as euhedral single or twinned crystals of selenite. Very often shells are found embedded within...

  5. Preliminary Estimate of Gypsum Deposit Based on Wenner

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogara M. D. and Aloa J. O.

    estimating the quantity of some possible deposits of gypsum. Just ... exploitation is an everyday activity that is currently going on, but, on a 'wild cat' ... important source of wealth for a nation, but before they are harnessed ..... REFERENCES.

  6. Direct and indirect dating of gypsum occurrences in deserts using luminescence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, Y.C.; Juyal, N.; Singhyi, A.K.; Kocurek, G.; Wadhawan, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study we have made an attempt to directly date gypsum or provide indirect age estimate for gypsum formation through dating the associated sediments (quartz) using the luminescence dating technique. In the direct dating of gypsum, we explored the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and Thermally Stimulated Luminescence (TL) behaviour of gypsum. The associated sediments (indirect dating) were dated using the traces of quartz extract from gypsum (concentration 0.1% ) and the underlying and overlying quartz sand in playa

  7. Origin and diagenetic evolution of gypsum and microbialitic carbonates in the Late Sag of the Namibe Basin (SW Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Gindre-Chanu; Edoardo, Perri; Ian, Sharp R.; Peacock, D. C. P.; Roger, Swart; Ragnar, Poulsen; Hercinda, Ferreira; Vladimir, Machado

    2016-08-01

    analyses reveal successive dissolution, recrystallisation and cementation phases that occurred during burial, uplift and exhumation, implying a complex diagenetic evolution of both gypsum and carbonates, influenced by pore fluids of diverse composition which distinctly varied from meso- to telogenetic domains.

  8. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  9. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy Study of Cubic and Orthorhombic C3A and Their Hydration Products in the Presence of Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rheinheimer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the microstructural differences and phase characterization of pure phases and hydrated products of the cubic and orthorhombic (Na-doped polymorphs of tricalcium aluminate (C3A, which are commonly found in traditional Portland cements. Pure, anhydrous samples were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and X-ray diffraction (XRD and demonstrated differences in the chemical and mineralogical composition as well as the morphology on a micro/nano-scale. C3A/gypsum blends with mass ratios of 0.2 and 1.9 were hydrated using a water/C3A ratio of 1.2, and the products obtained after three days were assessed using STXM. The hydration process and subsequent formation of calcium sulfate in the C3A/gypsum systems were identified through the changes in the LIII edge fine structure for Calcium. The results also show greater Ca LII binding energies between hydrated samples with different gypsum contents. Conversely, the hydrated samples from the cubic and orthorhombic C3A at the same amount of gypsum exhibited strong morphological differences but similar chemical environments.

  10. Interaction of gypsum with lead in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astilleros, J.M., E-mail: jmastill@geo.ucm.es [Dpto. Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Jose Antonio Novais, 2, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Godelitsas, A. [Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, University of Athens, Panepistimioupoli Zographou, 15784 Athens (Greece); Rodriguez-Blanco, J.D. [School of Earth and Environments, Faculty of Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fernandez-Diaz, L. [Dpto. Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Jose Antonio Novais, 2, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Prieto, M. [Dpto. de Geologia, Universidad de Oviedo, E-30005 Oviedo (Spain); Lagoyannis, A.; Harissopulos, S. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , GR-15310 Attiki (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    Sorption processes on mineral surfaces are a critical factor in controlling the distribution and accumulation of potentially harmful metals in the environment. This work investigates the effectiveness of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) to sequester Pb. The interaction of gypsum fragments with Pb-bearing solutions (10, 100 and 1000 mg/L) was monitored by performing macroscopic batch-type experiments conducted at room temperature. The aqueous phase composition was periodically determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Regardless of the [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial}, a [Pb{sub aq}]{sub final} < 4 mg/L was always reached. The uptake process was fast (t < 1 h) for [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} {>=} 100 mg/L and significantly slower (t > 1 week) for [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} = 10 mg/L. Speciation calculations revealed that after a long time of interaction (1 month), all the solutions reached equilibrium with respect to both gypsum and anglesite. For [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} {>=} 100 mg/L, sorption takes place mainly via the rapid dissolution of gypsum and the simultaneous formation of anglesite both on the gypsum surface and in the bulk solution. In the case of [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} = 10 mg/L, no anglesite precipitation was observed, but surface spectroscopy (proton Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, p-RBS) confirmed the formation of Pb-bearing surface layers on the (0 1 0) gypsum surface in this case also. This study shows that the surface of gypsum can play an important role in the attenuation of Pb in contaminated waters.

  11. Unravelling the mechanisms for plant survival on gypsum soils: an analysis of the chemical composition of gypsum plants from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolukbasi, A; Kurt, L; Palacio, S

    2016-03-01

    Depending on their specificity to gypsum, plants can be classified as gypsophiles (gypsum exclusive) and gypsovags (non-exclusive). The former may further be segregated into wide and narrow gypsophiles, depending on the breadth of their distribution area. Narrow gypsum endemics have a putative similar chemical composition to plants non-exclusive to gypsum (i.e. gypsovags), which may indicate their similar ecological strategy as stress-tolerant plant refugees on gypsum. However, this hypothesis awaits testing in different regions of the world. We compared the chemical composition of four narrow gypsum endemics, one widely distributed gypsophile and six gypsovags from Turkey. Further, we explored the plasticity in chemical composition of Turkish gypsovags growing on high- and low-gypsum content soils. Differences were explored with multivariate analyses (RDA) and mixed models (REML). Narrow gypsum endemics segregated from gypsovags in their chemical composition according to RDAs (mainly due to higher K and ash content in the former). Nevertheless, differences were small and disappeared when different nutrients were analysed individually. All the gypsovags studied accumulated more S and ash when growing on high-gypsum than on low-gypsum soils. Similar to narrow gypsum endemics from other regions of the world, most local gypsum endemics from Turkey show a similar chemical composition to gypsovags. This may indicate a shared ecological strategy as stress-tolerant plants not specifically adapted to gypsum. Nevertheless, the narrow gypsum endemic Gypsophila parva showed a chemical composition typical of gypsum specialists, indicating that various strategies are feasible within narrowly distributed gypsophiles. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Study of belite calcium sulfo-aluminate cement potential for zinc conditioning: From hydration to durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, St.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium silicate cements are widely used for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste conditioning. However, wastes produced by nuclear activities are very diverse and some of their components may chemically react with cement phases. For instance, ashes resulting from the incineration of technological wastes including neoprene and polyvinylchloride may contain substantial amounts of soluble zinc chloride. This compound is known to strongly delay or inhibit Portland cement setting. One approach to limit adverse cement-waste interactions is to select a binder showing a better compatibility with the waste while keeping cement matrix advantages (low cost, simple process, hydration with water provided by the waste...). This work thus investigates the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement for zinc Zn(II) immobilization. Four aspects were considered: hydration (kinetics and products formed), properties of hydrated binders, mechanisms of zinc retention and durability of the cement pastes (based on leaching experiments and modelling). The influence of three main parameters was assessed: the gypsum content of the cement, the concentration of ZnCl 2 and the thermal evolution at early age. It follows that materials based on a calcium sulfo-aluminate cement containing 20% gypsum are interesting candidates for zinc Zn(II) stabilization/solidification: there is no delay in hydration, mineralogy of the hydrated phases is slightly dependent on thermal history, mechanical strength is high, dimensional changes are limited and zinc Zn(II) is well immobilized, even if the cement paste is leached by pure water during a long period (90 d). (author)

  13. Synthesis on research results of FGD gypsum briquetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosturkiewicz Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available FGD gypsum products can be characterized by significant solubility in water and dusting in dry state. These characteristics can cause a considerable pollution of air, water and soil. Among many approaches of preparing utilization of this waste, the process of compaction using briquetting has proved to be very effective. Using FGD gypsum products a new material of fertilizers characteristics has been acquired and this material is resistant to the conditions of transportation. This paper presents results of experimental briquetting of flue gas desulphurisation products in a roll press. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory roll presses LPW 450 and LPW 1100 equipped with two interchangeable forming rings that form material into saddle-shaped briquettes with volume 6,5 cm3 and 85 cm3. The experiments were conducted with various percentage amounts of FGD gypsum moisture. The results provided information regarding influence of moisture and roll press configuration on quality of briquettes. On the basis of obtained results, technological process and a general outline of technological line for FGD gypsum were developed. Two roll presses of own construction with different outputs were identified as appropriate for this purpose. A range of necessary works related to their adaptation for the FGD gypsum briquetting were pointed out.

  14. Converting SDAP into gypsum in a wet limestone scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, F [Faelleskemikerne, Elsamprojekt A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The ELSAM power pool has an installed electrical capacity of approx. 5 GW{sub e}, mainly firing import coal. The major base load units are equipped with desulphurization units and three different desulphurization technologies are used: the wet limestone gypsum process, the spray dry absorption process and a sulphuric acid process. Gypsum and sulphuric acid are commercialized, whereas it has been difficult to utilize the spray dry absorption product (SDAP). The main constituents of SDAP are calcium sulphide, calcium chloride, hydrated lime and impurities mainly originating from fly ash. Sulphide can be oxidized into sulphate in acidic solution - the reaction is utilized in the wet limestone gypsum process - and the possibility of using any spare capacity in the wet limestone gypsum units to oxidize the sulphide content of SDAP into sulphate and produce usable gypsum has been investigated in the laboratory and in a 400 MW{sub e} equivalent wet limestone unit. The limestone inhibition effect of the addition of SDAP is currently being studied in the laboratory in order to determine the effect of different SDAP types (plant/coal sources) on limestone reactivity before further long-term full-scale tests are performed and permanent use of the process planned. (EG)

  15. [The effect of disinfectant soaking on dental gypsum model size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cao-yun; Xu, Yun-wen; Xu, Kan

    2012-12-01

    To study the influence of disinfectant soaking on the dimensional stability of three kinds of dental gypsum model. Three commonly used gypsums ( type III,IV,Vtype) in clinic were used to make 24 specimens for 50 mm×15 mm×10 mm in size. One hour after release, the specimens were placed for 24 h. A digital caliper was used to measure the size of the gypsum model. Distilled water immersion was as used control, glutaraldehyde disinfectant and Metrix CaviCide disinfectant soaking were used for the experimental group. After soaking for 0.5h, the gypsum models were removed and placed for 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 24 h. The size of the models was measured again using the same method. The data was analyzed with SPSS10.0 software package. The initial gypsum model length was (50.07±0.017) mm, (50.048±0.015) mm and (50.027±0.015) mm. After soaking for different times, the size of the model changed little, and the dimensions changed less than 0.01%. The results show that disinfectant soaking has no significant effect on dental model dimensions.

  16. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  17. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  18. Chemical properties of an Oxisol after gypsum application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Roncaratti de Moraes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum utilization is a critical practice in agriculture because of the high solubility and consequent relative neutralization of subsurface toxic aluminum. However, it has been observed that in most cases, gypsum is being randomly utilized without scientifically established parameters or even the need to use it as a soil amendment at all. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and electrical conductivity of an Oxisol’s saturation extract under different gypsum doses (0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 Mg ha-1. This experiment was conducted in a greenhouse environment. Soil columns (V = 1.57 dm3 were filled with sifted (2 mm soil collected from the upper layer (0-20 cm. The experimental design adopted was completely randomized with five repetitions. The treatments consisted of a 5 × 2 factorial through five gypsum doses (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 Mg ha-1 of gypsum consisting of 224.1 g kg-1 S, 314.8 g kg-1 CaO, and 7 g kg-1 P2O5 and two depth evaluations (0-10 and 10-20 cm. After the treatments, soil from both 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm layers was removed from the columns, sifted once (2 mm, and subjected to vacuum extraction to assess the saturation extract. The data acquired was processed and submitted to variance analysis (when due and adjusted to regression equations when statistically relevant. Significant increases were observed for Ca, Mg, K, P, and S, although Al, Si, and pH presented no statistically significant difference. The electrical conductivity value of this soil in particular is directly related to the gypsum dose.

  19. Extension of the possibilities for disposal of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum by the development of a process for the production of FGD gypsum. Final report. Erweiterung der Entsorgungsmoeglichkeiten von REA-Gips durch Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur Herstellung von REA-Anhydrit aus REA-Gips. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limmer, B.; Hueller, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the course of this research project a completly new transformation of FGD-gypsum into FGD-anhydrite has been studied. The reaction is catalysed by small quantities of sulphuric acid resulting in a FGD-anhydrite without combined water and with an orthorhombic crystal lattice. The course of reaction was thoroughly investigated by laboratory test and hypothesis have been put forward. The process engineering has been developed from laboratory to pilot plant scale. The FGD-anhydrite is technologically a novel product. The idea was to create it for cement industry as well as to put it on the filler market as a raw product. In principle, FGD-anhdrite will be suitable for the use in the cement industry due to its characteristics. However, it is not interesting for this market in this moment. With respect to the filler industry, this application will enable a further-reaching usability of the FGD-gypsum than the traditional scope of the gypsum industry. First experiments show that the specific properties of processed FGD-anhydrite may qualify it as a high-grade filler. (orig.) With 18 refs., 21 tabs., 41 figs.

  20. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  1. Characterization of quality recycled gypsum and plasterboard with maximized recycled content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-Rivero, J.; García-Navarro, J.

    2017-01-01

    The quality of secondary materials is imperative to promote a circular economy. In order to improve the way in which the quality of recycled gypsum is assessed, European guidelines on recycled gypsum (RG) quality criteria have been outlined in the framework of the Life+ Gypsum to Gypsum (GtoG) project. Such GtoG guidelines, along with the European Standard on gypsum plasterboard EN 520, provided the basis for this study. During the GtoG project, gypsum recycling and plasterboard manufacturing processes were monitored by testing the gypsum feedstock and the plasterboard produced. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results obtained on relevant parameters that characterize gypsum as a secondary raw material, as well as the resulting product. The minimum requirements were fulfilled by 56% of the RG samples and 86% of the plasterboard with increased RG. [es

  2. Investigation on the potential of waste cooking oil as a grinding aid in Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Jianfeng; Huang, Yuyan; Jiang, Zhengwu; Yang, Xiaojie; Yang, Zhenghong; Chen, Qing

    2016-12-15

    Although there are several methods for managing waste cooking oil (WCO), a significant result has not been achieved in China. A new method is required for safe WCO management that minimizes the environmental threat. In this context, this work was developed in which cement clinker and gypsum were interground with various WCOs, and their properties, such as grindability, water-cement ratio required to achieve a normal consistency, setting times, compressive strength, contents of calcium hydroxide and ettringite in the hardened paste, microstructure and economic and environmental considerations, were addressed in detail. The results show that, overall, WCO favorably improves cement grinding. WCO prolonged the cement setting times and resulted in longer setting times. Additionally, more remarkable effects were found in cements in which WCO contained more unsaturated fatty acid. WCOs increased the cement strength. However, this enhancement was rated with respect to the WCO contents and components. WCOs decreased the CH and AFt contents in the cement hardened paste. Even the AFt content at later ages was reduced when WCO was used. WCO also densify microstructure of the hardened cement paste. It is economically and environmentally feasible to use WCOs as grinding aids in the cement grinding process. These results contribute to the application of WCOs as grinding aids and to the safe management of WCO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Producing cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  4. Contribution to the study of wastes stabilization by sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, S.

    2005-02-01

    Calcium sulfo-aluminate cement is mainly composed of yeelimite known to be a precursor of ettringite formation. Ettringite is able to incorporate several heavy metals by isomorphous substitutions without altering its crystalline structure. The design of a binder required for immobilizing heavy metals was undertaken. The hydration study of clinker, and cement containing 4 amounts of gypsum has been carried out by means of XRD, DTA and IR spectrometry. It was pointed out that the addition of gypsum enhances hydration. Two binders were selected: 80/20 and 70/30. The immobilisation of 7 pollutants was very successful. Nevertheless, damages appeared with the binder 70/30 containing sodium chromate and dichromate: sodium caused activation of yeelimite reactivity and important dissolution of gypsum leading to important ettringite production. With a great amount of gypsum (30 %), dissolution led to secondary ettringite formation which damaged the hardened paste. Adding polyol enhances the retention of sodium chromate. On the other hand, the immobilisation of two types of weakly radioactive wastes supplied by CEA has been made. Results obtained in terms of setting time, compressive strength and leaching were excellent. (author)

  5. Contribution to the determination of gypsum and hemihydrates content in Portland cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Arús, Fernando

    1975-09-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLa mayoría de los técnicos de cemento, aceptan, que las anormalidades del fraguado, conocidas como "falso fraguado" en el cemento portland, se deben primordialmente a la presencia de yeso parcialmente deshidratado (S04Ca1/2H20. Si el clínker que se muele está enriquecido en cal libre, o la temperatura del molino es elevada (superior a los 110 °C o hay escasa ventilación de éste, se llega a originar una parcial deshidratación del yeso, que se mantiene durante el proceso de ensilado y que origina las anormalidades del fraguado al que anteriormente nos hemos referido. Por esta razón creemos muy importante poder conocer el grado de deshidratación en que se encuentra el yeso en un cemento.

  6. Developing Low-Clinker Ternary Blends for Indian Cement Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Aritra

    2018-05-01

    In today's scenario cement-concrete has become the backbone of infrastructure development. The use of concrete is increasing day by day and so does cement. One of the major concerns is that the cement manufacturing contributes 7% of total man-made CO2 emission in the environment. At the same time India being a developing country secured the second position in cement production. On the other hand solid waste management is one of the growing problems in India. As we are one of the major contributors in this situation so, the time has come to think about the sustainable alternatives. From various researches it has been observed that the low clinker cement can be suitable option. In the present paper we have tried to develop a low clinker ternary blend for Indian cement industry using the concept of synergetic behavior of fly ash-limestone reaction and formation of more stable monocarboaluminate hydrate and hemicarboaluminate hydrate. 30% fly ash and 15% limestone and 5% gypsum have been used as supplementary cementing material for replacing 50% clinker. The mechanical properties like, compressive strength, have been studied for the fly ash limestone ternary blends cements and the results have been compared with the other controlled blends and ternary blends. The effect of intergrinding of constituent materials has shown a comparable properties which can be used for various structural application. The effect of dolomitic limestone has also been studied in fly ash limestone ternary blends and the result shows the relation between compressive strength and dolomite content is inversely proportional.

  7. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  8. Composite Gypsum Binders with Silica-containing Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, N. V.; Lesovik, V. S.; Drebezgova, M. Yu; Shatalova, S. V.; Alaskhanov, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    New types of fine mineral additives are proposed for designing water-resistant Composite Gypsum Binders (CGB); these additives significantly differ from traditional quartz feed: wastes from wet magnetic separation of Banded Iron Formation (BIF WMS waste), nanodispersed silica powder (NSP), chalk. Possibility of their combined use has been studied as well.

  9. Preparation of gypsum/polymer composites using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aji, Z.

    2007-05-01

    Gypsum composites have been prepared with different monomers using Gamma radiation: acrylamide, butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, and methyl acrylate. The conversion of polymerization was determined as a function of absorbed dose. The data show that conversion of polymerization increases by increasing the dose.(author)

  10. Influence of gypsum on efflorescence in ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, C.M.O.L.; Nascimento, R.M.; Martinelli, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The red ceramic industry is recognized as of major importance in Piaui State. The State capital, Teresina, is the greatest producer of this material, which is used mainly for masonry sealing blocks. One of the most frequent problems in this kind of products is the efflorescence.This paper has the main objective of studying the influence of gypsum on tiles, using the local industry production standards. The raw materials were characterized by FRX, DRX, thermal analysis and sulfates. Extruded test specimens were made with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of gypsum in the ceramic paste, burned at 850 deg C, 950 deg C and 1050 deg C and submitted to further technological and analysis for MEV. The reference ceramic paste did not show tendency to efflorescence formation after burning for samples with 1% gypsum added to the paste. The reference ceramic paste showed tendency to efflorescence formation after drying and consolidated efflorescence after burning for samples with 5% gypsum added to the paste. (author)

  11. Evaluation of gypsum rates on greenhouse crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was to determine the potential of an added value distribution channel for gypsum waste by evaluating various greenhouse crops with captious pH and calcium needs. Three studies consisting of: Zonal geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum) and petunia (Petunia x hybrida); tomato (Solanum lycoper...

  12. Gypsum Formation during the Messinian Salinity Crisis: an Alternative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, A.; Krijgsman, W.; Sangiorgi, F.; Vasiliev, I.; Baak, C. V.; Wolthers, M.; Stoica, M.; Reichart, G. J.; Davies, G.

    2016-12-01

    During the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC; 5.97 - 5.33 Myr ago), thick packages of evaporites (gypsum and halite) were deposited in the Mediterranean Basin. Traditionally, the occurrence of these evaporites is explained by the so-called "desiccation-model", in which evaporites are considered to result from a (partly) desiccated basin. In the last decade, it was thought that changes in the Mediterranean-Atlantic connectivity could explain the formation of gypsum. Stable isotope studies, however, show that the gypsum formed under influence of large freshwater input. Here we present new strontium isotope data from two well-dated Messinian sections in the Black and Caspian Seas. Our Sr isotope records suggest a persistent Mediterranean-Black Sea connection throughout the salinity crisis, which implies a large additional freshwater source to the Mediterranean. We claim that low saline waters from the Black Sea region are a prerequisite for gypsum formation in the Mediterranean and speculate about the mechanisms explaining this apparent paradox.

  13. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  14. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  15. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  16. The behavior of biogenic silica-rich rocks and volcanic tuffs as pozzolanic additives in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulis, Dimitris; Stamatakis, Michael; Anastasatou, Marianthi

    2015-04-01

    Cements currently produced, include a variety of pozzolanic materials, aiming for lower clinker addition and utilization of vast deposits of certain raw materials and/or mining wastes and byproducts. The major naturally occurring pozzolanic materials include glassy tuffs, zeolitic tuffs, diatomites and volcanic lavas rich in glassy phase, such as perlites. Therefore, based on the available raw materials in different locations, the cement composition might vary according to the accessibility of efficient pozzolanic materials. In the present investigation, the behavior of pozzolanic cements produced with representative samples of the aforementioned materials was studied, following the characterization of the implemented pozzolanas with respect to their chemical and mineralogical characteristics. Laboratory cements were produced by co-grinding 75% clinker, 5% gypsum and 20% pozzolana, for the same period of time (45 min). Regarding pozzolanic materials, four different types of pozzolanas were utilized namely, diatomite, perlite, zeolite tuff and glassy tuff. More specifically, two diatomite samples originated from Australia and Greece, with high and low reactive silica content respectively, two perlite samples originated from Turkey and from Milos Island, Greece, with different reactive silica contents, a zeolite tuff sample originated from Turkey and a glassy tuff sample originated from Milos Island, Greece. The above pozzolana samples, which were ground in the laboratory ball mill for cement production performed differently during grinding and that was reflected upon the specific surface area (cm2/gr) values. The perlites and the glassy tuff were the hardest to grind, whereas, the zeolite tuff and the Australian diatomite were the easiest ones. However, the exceedingly high specific surface area of the Australian diatomite renders cement difficult to transport and tricky to use for concrete manufacturing, due to the high water demand of the cement mixture. Regarding

  17. Mercury enrichment and its effects on atmospheric emissions in cement plants of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai; Wu, Qingru; Hao, Jiming

    2014-08-01

    The cement industry is one of the most significant anthropogenic sources of atmospheric mercury emissions worldwide. In this study of three typical Chinese cement plants, mercury in kiln flue gas was sampled using the Ontario Hydro Method (OHM), and solid samples were analyzed. Particulate matter recycling, preheating of raw materials, and the use of coal and flue gas desulfurization derived gypsum contributed to emissions of Hg in the air and to accumulation in cement. Over 90% of the mercury input was emitted into the atmosphere. Mercury emission factors were 0.044-0.072 g/t clinker for the test plants. The major species emitted into the atmosphere from cement plants is oxidized mercury, accounting for 61%-91% of the total mercury in flue gas. The results of this study help improve the accuracy of the mercury emission inventory in China and provide useful information for developing mercury controls.

  18. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  19. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  20. A study on super-sulfated cement using Dinh Vu phosphogypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nguyen Ngoc

    2018-04-01

    Super-sulfated cement (SSC) is a newly developed unburnt cementitious material. It is a kind of environmental-friendly cementitious material due to its energy-saving, carbon emission reducing, and waste-utilization. It mainly composes of phosphogysum (PG) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GFS), with a small amount of cement. In Vietnam, the Diammonium Phosphate DAP – Dinh Vu fertilizer plant in Dinh Vu industrial zone in the northern port city of Hai Phong – has discharged millions of tons of solid waste containing gypsum after 9 years of operation. The waste has changed the color of the water, eroded metal and destroyed fauna and floral systems in the surrounding area. Notably, according to the environmental impact assessment, the gypsum landfill area is supposed to be 13 hectares and the storage time reaches up to five years. This paper presents the experimental results on SSC using a high amount of Dinh Vu phosphogypsum and GFS in comparison with those of ordinary Portland cement (PC). The results show that the setting time of SSC is much longer than that of Portland cement but the compressive strength of SSC can be obtained 45-50 MPa at the age of 28 days, similar to that of the control sample using 100% PC40, and 69MPa at the age of 90 days. This value even exceeds the compressive strength of the PC40 cement.

  1. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate super plasticisers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.; Kurdowski, W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cement superplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1), while the other had a 9% C 3 A content (C2). These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m 2 /kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaOx3Al 2 O 3 xCaSO 4 ) (1, 2). Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation. (Author) 15 refs.

  2. Physicochemical Properties and Cellular Responses of Strontium-Doped Gypsum Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Pouria, Amir; Bandegani, Hadis; Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Hesaraki, Saeed; Alizadeh, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes some physical, structural, and biological properties of gypsum bioceramics doped with various amounts of strontium ions (0.19–2.23 wt%) and compares these properties with those of a pure gypsum as control. Strontium-doped gypsum (gypsum:Sr) was obtained by mixing calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and solutions of strontium nitrate followed by washing the specimens with distilled water to remove residual salts. Gypsum was the only phase found in the composition of both pu...

  3. Gypsum and hydrohalite dynamics in sea ice brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Benjamin M.; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Day, Sarah J.; Kennedy, Hilary

    2017-09-01

    Mineral authigenesis from their dissolved sea salt matrix is an emergent feature of sea ice brines, fuelled by dramatic equilibrium solubility changes in the large sub-zero temperature range of this cryospheric system on the surface of high latitude oceans. The multi-electrolyte composition of seawater results in the potential for several minerals to precipitate in sea ice, each affecting the in-situ geochemical properties of the sea ice brine system, the habitat of sympagic biota. The solubility of two of these minerals, gypsum (CaSO4 ·2H2O) and hydrohalite (NaCl · 2H2O), was investigated in high ionic strength multi-electrolyte solutions at below-zero temperatures to examine their dissolution-precipitation dynamics in the sea ice brine system. The gypsum dynamics in sea ice were found to be highly dependent on the solubilities of mirabilite and hydrohalite between 0.2 and - 25.0 ° C. The hydrohalite solubility between - 14.3 and - 25.0 ° C exhibits a sharp change between undersaturated and supersaturated conditions, and, thus, distinct temperature fields of precipitation and dissolution in sea ice, with saturation occurring at - 22.9 ° C. The sharp changes in hydrohalite solubility at temperatures ⩽-22.9 °C result from the formation of an ice-hydrohalite aggregate, which alters the structural properties of brine inclusions in cold sea ice. Favourable conditions for gypsum precipitation in sea ice were determined to occur in the region of hydrohalite precipitation below - 22.9 ° C and in conditions of metastable mirabilite supersaturation above - 22.9 ° C (investigated at - 7.1 and - 8.2 ° C here) but gypsum is unlikely to persist once mirabilite forms at these warmer (>-22.9 °C) temperatures. The dynamics of hydrohalite in sea ice brines based on its experimental solubility were consistent with that derived from thermodynamic modelling (FREZCHEM code) but the gypsum dynamics derived from the code were inconsistent with that indicated by its

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  6. Stabilization of ZnCl2-Containing Waste Using Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Berger, S.; Le Bescop, P.; Damidot, D.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement was investigated to solidify and stabilize radwastes containing large amounts of soluble zinc chloride (a strong inhibitor of Portland cement hydration). Hydration of pastes and mortars prepared with a 0.5 mol/L ZnCl 2 mixing solution was characterized over one year as a function of the gypsum content of the binder and the thermal history of the material. Blending the CSA clinker with 20% gypsum enabled rapid hydration, with only very small delay compared with a reference prepared with pure water. It also improved the compressive strength of the hardened material and significantly reduced its expansion under wet curing. Moreover, the hydrate assemblage was less affected by a thermal treatment at early age simulating the temperature rise and fall occurring in a large-volume drum of cemented waste. Fully hydrated materials contained ettringite, amorphous aluminum hydroxide, straetlingite, together with AFm phases (Kuzel's salt associated with monosulfoaluminate or Friedel's salt depending on the gypsum content of the binder), and possibly C-(A)-S-H. Zinc was readily insolubilized and could not be detected in the pore solution extracted from cement pastes, or in their leachates after 3 months of leaching by pure water at pH 7. The good retention of zinc by the cement matrix was mainly attributed to the precipitation of a hydrated and well crystallized phase with platelet morphology (which may belong to the layered double hydroxides family) at early age ≤ 1 day), and to chemisorption onto aluminum hydroxide at later age. (author)

  7. Basic Properties of Flue-Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Ferenc

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Several hundred thousand of FGD gypsum is produced annually at the Matra Power Plant (Hungary as a byproduct of generating electricity and protecting the environment. Chemical and mechanical characteristics of this material were studied of the Department of Mining and Geotechnical Engineering, University of Miskolc (Hungary. The material in question was found dead gypsum which can be calcined easily to obtain a relatively high-strength (15-25 MPa and clean binding material. Furthermore, grain composites were made of it by adding fly ash, which the power plant can provide the expected producers with, thus decreasing the energy consumption of calcining and utilizing a small part of coal combustion wastes.

  8. Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell Using Gypsum Based Electrolyte And Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Nagai, Masayuki; Katagiri, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    The proton conductive electrolyte membrane and the electrodes for intermediate temperature fuel cell were made from the phosphoric acid treated gypsum as a proton conductor. The membrane and the electrodes were built into single cell and tested at intermediate temperature region. The power density of the fuel cell was 0.56 mW/cm -2 at 150 deg. C without any humidification and 1.38 mW/cm -2 at 150 deg. C, 5% relative humidity. The open circuit voltage of the cell was increased higher than 0.7 V when the electrodes were annealed at 150 deg. C, 5%R.H., however the reasons for this are still to be further investigated. The results show that the potential of the phosphoric acid treated gypsum for the intermediate temperature proton conductor.

  9. Biological sulfate removal from gypsum contaminated construction and demolition debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-12-15

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) contains high levels of sulfate that can cause detrimental environmental impacts when disposed without adequate treatment. In landfills, sulfate can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under anaerobic conditions. CDD can thus cause health impacts or odor problems to landfill employees and surrounding residents. Reduction of the sulfate content of CDD is an option to overcome these problems. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate removal system to reduce the sulfate content of gypsum contaminated CDD in order to decrease the amount of solid waste, to improve the quality of CDD waste for recycling purposes and to recover sulfur from CDD. The treatment leached out the gypsum contained in CDD by water in a leaching column. The sulfate loaded leachate was then treated in a biological sulfate reducing Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor to convert the sulfate to sulfide. The UASB reactor was operated at 23 ± 3 °C with a hydraulic retention time and upflow velocity of 15.5 h and 0.1 m h(-1), respectively while ethanol was added as electron donor at a final organic loading rate of 3.46 g COD L(-1) reactor d(-1). The CDD leachate had a pH of 8-9 and sulfate dissolution rates of 526.4 and 609.8 mg L(-1) d(-1) were achieved in CDD gypsum and CDD sand, respectively. Besides, it was observed that the gypsum dissolution was the rate limiting step for the biological treatment of CDD. The sulfate removal efficiency of the system stabilized at around 85%, enabling the reuse of the UASB effluent for the leaching step, proving the versatility of the bioreactor for practical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lime and gypsum application on the wheat crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caires Eduardo Fávero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Root growth and crop yield can be affected by chemical modifications of the soil profile owing to lime and gypsum applications. A field trial was carried out on a dystrophic Clayey Rhodic Hapludox at Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil, aiming to evaluate lime (without or with incorporation into the soil and gypsum effects on root growth, mineral nutrition and grain yield of wheat (cv. OR 1. A randomized complete block design was used, with three replications, in a split-plot experiment. Treatments with dolomitic limestone (without lime and 4.5 t ha-1 of lime applied on the surface, in total rate and 1/3 of the requirement per year during 3 years, or incorporated into the soil were applied in July 1998 (main plots and the rates of gypsum (0, 3, 6 and 9 t ha-1 in October 1998 (subplots. Wheat was evaluated in the 2000 winter season. In conditions of water deficit absence, there was no limitation in root growth in depth, for exchangeable Ca of 6 mmol c dm-3. Lime incorporation of lime increased the Mg concentration in the leaves, but wheat yield was not influenced by the correction of soil acidity through liming treatments. Gypsum increased the concentrations of Ca and S in wheat leaves, with significant effects on grain yield. The critical level of S-SO4(2- in the 0-20 cm soil layer, extracted by ammonium acetate 0.5 mol L-1 in acetic acid 0.25 mol L-1, was 25.8 mg dm-3.

  11. occurrence and geochemistry of nafada gypsum, north-eastern nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-03-18

    Mar 18, 2010 ... The container was placed in a. “HERZOG” palletizing machine for 10 seconds after which a pellet was produced. The procedure was repeated for each gypsum sample. Each pellet was analyzed for SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, K2O, Na2O,. MgCO3, combine water and purity, using X-ray spectrometer.

  12. Comparison of Energy Dissipation, Stiffness, and Damage of Structural Oriented Strand Board (OSB, Conventional Gypsum, and Viscoelastic Gypsum Shearwalls Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Blasetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A key element in the seismic load resisting system of a wood framed structure is the shear wall which is typically sheathed on one side with plywood or oriented strand board (OSB and gypsum on the other. The shear capacity of gypsum sheathed shear walls is typically neglected in high seismic areas due to the susceptibility of conventional drywall screw connections to damage caused by earthquakes. The earthquake resistance of an innovative viscoelastic (VE gypsum shearwall is evaluated and compared to conventional structural and non-structural walls. Ten 8 ft × 8 ft wood framed wall specimens of three configurations [nailed-OSB, screw-gypsum, and VE polymer-gypsum] were subjected to a cyclic test protocol. The energy dissipation, stiffness, and damage characteristics of all shearwalls are reported herein. Testing results indicate the VE-gypsum walls can dissipate more energy than the OSB structural panels and 500% more energy that the conventional gypsum sheathed walls and contains a constant source of energy dissipation not seen in the structural and non-structural walls. The wall stiffness of the OSB wall degrades at a far greater rate that the VE gypsum wall and at continued cycling degrades below the VE wall stiffness. Unlike both of the conventional wall types, the VE wall showed no visible or audible signs of damage when subjected to shear displacements up to 1.

  13. Manufacturing of calcium phosphate scaffolds by pseudomorphic transformation of gypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Batista, H. de.; Batista Cardoso, M.; Sales Vasconcelos, A.; Vinicius Lia Fook, M.; Rodriguez Barbero, M. A.; Garcia Carrodeguas, R.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAp) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) have been employed for decades as constituents of scaffolds for bone regeneration because they chemically resemble bone mineral. In this study, the feasibility to manufacture CHAp/β-TCP scaffolds by pseudomorphic transformation of casted blocks of gypsum was investigated. The transformation was carried out by immersing the precursor gypsum block in 1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}/1.33 M NH{sub 4}OH solution with liquid/solid ratio of 10 mL/g and autoclaving at 120 degree centigrade and 203 kPa (2 atm) for 3 h at least. Neither shape nor dimensions significantly changed during transformation. The composition of scaffolds treated for 3 h was 70 wt.% CHAp and 30 wt.% β-TCP, and their compressive and diametral compressive strengths were 6.5 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ±0.7 MPa, respectively. By increasing the time of treatment to 6 h, the composition of the scaffold enriched in β-TCP (60 wt.% CHAp and 40 wt.% β-TCP) but its compressive and diametral compressive strengths were not significantly affected (6.7 ± 0.9 and 5.4 ± 0.6 MPa, respectively). On the basis of the results obtained, it was concluded that this route is a good approach to the manufacturing of biphasic (CHAp/β-TCP) scaffolds from previously shaped pieces of gypsum. (Author)

  14. Sails: a new gypsum speleothem from Naica, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forti Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The caves of Naica (Chihuahua, Mexico are perhaps the most famous mine caves of the world due to the presence of giganticgypsum crystals. Nevertheless, very little research has been carried out on this karst area until now. A multidisciplinary investigationstarted in 2006 with the aim not only to define the genesis and the age of the Naica gypsum crystals, but also on other scientificaspects of these caves.This paper describes a completely new type of gypsum speleothem: the “sails”, observed only inside the Cueva de las Velas, one ofthe caves of the Naica system. This speleothem consists of extremely thin, elongated skeleton crystals that have grown epitaxiallyonly on the tips of the gypsum crystals pointing upward. The genesis of sails is strictly related to the environmental conditions setup inside the cave just after the artificial lowering of the groundwater by mine dewatering (less than 20 yr ago. In a few years sail speleothems will disappear entirely and therefore this study is fundamental to preserve at least the memory of them.

  15. Crack Coalescence in Molded Gypsum and Carrara Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, N.; Einstein, H. H.

    2007-12-01

    This research investigates the fracturing and coalescence behavior in prismatic laboratory-molded gypsum and Carrara marble specimens, which consist of either one or two pre-existing open flaws, under uniaxial compression. The tests are monitored by a high speed video system with a frame rate up to 24,000 frames/second. It allows one to precisely observe the cracking mechanisms, in particular if shear or tensile fracturing takes place. Seven crack types and nine crack coalescence categories are identified. The flaw inclination angle, the ligament length and the bridging angle between two flaws have different extents of influence on the coalescence patterns. For coplanar flaws, as the flaw inclination angle increases, there is a general trend of variation from shear coalescence to tensile coalescence. For stepped flaws, as the bridging angle changes from negative to small positive, and further up to large positive values, the coalescence generally progresses from categories of no coalescence, indirect coalescence to direct coalescence. For direct coalescence, it generally progresses from shear, mixed shear-tensile to tensile as the bridging angle increases. Some differences in fracturing and coalescence processes are observed in gypsum and marble, particularly the crack initiation in marble is preceded by the development of macroscopic white patches, but not in gypsum. Scanning Electron Microprobe (SEM) study reveals that the white patches consist of zones of microcracks (process zones).

  16. Natural gamma-emitting radionuclides in egyptian cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Arabi, A.M.; Abbady, A.; El Kamel, A.H.; Nosier, A.; Moustafa, A.

    2005-01-01

    Samples of cement manufactured in Egypt and the various raw materials, which compose the product, have been analyzed using gamma-spectroscopy, in order to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides and associated radiological hazard. The mean of specific activity due to all the three radionuclides (226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K ) were found to be 20±4 , 11± 2, 320 ± 18 (gypsum), 41 ±8, 27± 5, 410± 27 (clay), 58 ± 11, 18 3, 321± 20 (Iron ore) and 37.6 ± 6, 11.8 ± 3, 178.6 ± 15 Bq.kg-1 (Portland cement), respectively. 40 K concentration could not be detected in Slag; limestone; Sulphate resistant cement; Clinker and White cement, while the mean activity concentrations of 226 R a and 232 T h are 239 ± 16, 48.7 ± 7; 31.5 ±5, 10 ± 2; 47 ± 7, 20 ± 4; 23 ± 5, 10.4 ± 3 and 23 ± 5, 11 ±3 Bq.kg-1, respectively. The measured activity concentrations of these natural radionuclides were compared with data of some countries. The present values are in the same range and sometimes less than those in other countries

  17. Natural gamma-emitting radionuclides in egyptian cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arabi, A.M.; Abbady, A.; El-Kamel, A.H.; Nosier, A.; Moustafa, A.

    2005-01-01

    Samples of cement manufactured in Egypt and the various raw materials, which compose the product, have been analyzed using gamma-spectroscopy, in order to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides and associated radiological hazard. The mean of specific activity due to all the three radionuclides (226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K ) were found to be 20 ± 4 , 11 ± 2, 320 ± 18 (gypsum), 41 ± 8, 27 ± 5, 410 ± 27 (clay), 58 ± 11, 18 3, 321 ± 20 (Iron ore) and 37.6 ± 6, 11.8 ± 3, 178.6 ± 15 Bq.kg-1 (Portland cement), respectively. 40 K concentration could not be detected in Slag; limestone; Sulphate resistant cement; Clinker and White cement, while the mean activity concentrations of 226 R a and 232 T h are 239 ± 16, 48.7 ± 7; 31.5 ± 5, 10 ± 2; 47 3 ± 7, 20 ± 4; 23 ± 5, 10.4 ± 3 and 23 ± 5, 11 ± 3 Bq.kg-1, respectively. The measured activity concentrations of these natural radionuclides were compared with data of some countries. The present values are in the same range and sometimes less than those in other countries

  18. Characterization mixtures of thick gypsum with addition of treated waste from laminated plasterboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Orejón, A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available nvironmental protection involves the reuse of construction and demolition waste. In order to improve recycling, waste from laminated plasterboards is used in the cement and laminated gypsum boards manufacture.This article analyzes the use of ground and burnt laminated plasterboard (BLG waste mixed with thick gypsum (TG. Physical-mechanical characterization of superficial hardness and mechanical strength has been performed on different batches of plaster powder materials with different BLG waste particle sizes to determine its suitability. Coarse particle sizes were preferred in order to reduce the waste treatment. From all the mixtures studied, the one with the best results was TG + 5% BLG1.25 which forms a material of higher superficial hardness and strength. The results obtained in the study have proved suitable products for building use (both as renders and as prefabricated elements enabling for a reduction in the consumption of natural resources.La protección del medio ambiente implica la reutilización de los residuos de construcción y demolición. Los residuos de placas de yeso laminado se utilizan en la fabricación de cemento y de placas de yeso laminado. En este artículo se ha estudiado la utilización deresiduos de placa de yeso laminado cocido (YLC mezclado con yeso grueso (YG, realizándose la caracterización físico-mecánica de dureza superficial y resistencias mecánicas, para determinar su idoneidad formando materiales de yeso en polvo con distintas granulometrías de residuos de (YLC, teniendo preferencia por granulometrías gruesas, que reducen el tratamiento del residuo. De las mezclas estudiadas la que mejores resultados ha ofrecido es YG + 5%YLC1,25 formando un material de mayor dureza superficial y resistencia. De los resultados obtenidos en el estudio se puede afirmar que se han conseguido productos aptos para su utilización en edificación posibilitando una reducción del consumo de recursos naturales.

  19. Setting time and flowability of accelerated Portland cement mixed with polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkornchaowalit, Norachai; Lertchirakarn, Veera

    2011-03-01

    Important limitations of mineral trioxide aggregate for use in clinical procedures are extended setting time and difficult handling characteristics. The removal of gypsum at the end stage of the Portland cement manufacturing process and polycarboxylate superplasticizer admixture may solve these limitations. Different concentrations of polycarboxylate superplasticizer (0%, 1.2%, 1.8%, and 2.4% by volume) and liquid-to-powder ratios (0.27, 0.30, and 0.33 by weight) were mixed with white Portland cement without gypsum (AWPC-experimental material). Type 1 ordinary white Portland cement mixed with distilled water at the same ratios as the experimental material was used as controls. All samples were tested for setting time and flowability according to the International Organization for Standardization 6876:2001 guideline. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance. Then, one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparison tests were used to analyze the significance among groups. The data are presented in mean ± standard deviation values. In all experimental groups, the setting times were in the range of 4.2 ± 0.4 to 11.3 ± 0.2 minutes, which were significantly (p setting time and increased flowability of cement, which would be beneficial for clinical use. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Suitability of Gypsum for the Production of Gypsum Plaster an Example from the Abu-Ruweis Evaporites (Upper Triassic), as Subayhi Area, Northwest Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saqqa, W.; Arikat, M.

    2003-01-01

    The gypsum of Abu Ruweis Formation (Upper Triassic) of the northwestern Jordan was chemically, physically and mechanically assessed for likely industrial uses. Chemical results indicate that the investigated gypsum (calcium sulfate dihydrate) is highly pure. This is confirmed by the high ratios of CaO (32-33%) andSO 3 (41-43%) and the very low content of other elements such as Mg, Al and Si. Trace elements are also negligible. The CaSO 4 % (86-88%), purity ratio (CaO/SO 3 ) (0.85) , and combined water (≅5%) for β-hemihydrate gypsum agree well with the jordanian standards for gypsum plaster. Thermal analyses indicate that the temperature required to obtain hemihydrate gypsum falls between 175deg-200deg. A significant mass variation or maximum loss on weight (-20%) was achieved after initial dehydration by heating to 200deg. Heating to 225deg is far enough to evolve all combined water molecules. The results of fineness, consistency, setting time, compressive strength and flexural strength for β-hemilhydrate agree, in most of the case, with the local and international standards intended for gypsum building components. The study showed that the absorption and consistency ratios for final gypsum product are proportional to porosity, whilst the consistency itself decreases with the increase of applied stresses. (author)

  1. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih 31109, México (Mexico); Fuentes-Montero, M. E. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Campus Universitario#2, Circuito Universitario, C.P.31125, Chihuahua, Chih. México (Mexico); Reyes-Cortes, M. [Facultad de Ingeniería. Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Campus Universitario#2, Circuito Universitario, C.P.31125, Chihuahua, Chih. México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), β-MnO{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO and/or MnCO{sub 3}, PbS, PbCO{sub 3} and/or PbSO4, ZnO{sub 4}, ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO{sub 3}), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases.

  2. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Fuentes-Montero, M. E.; Reyes-Cortes, M.

    2015-01-01

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ), β-MnO 2 , Mn 2 O 3 , MnO and/or MnCO 3 , PbS, PbCO 3 and/or PbSO4, ZnO 4 , ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO 3 ), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases

  3. Production of a calcium silicate cement material from alginate impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizawa, Norimasa; Narusawa, Hideaki; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize biomaterials from daily dental waste. Since alginate impression material contains silica and calcium salts, we aimed to synthesize calcium silicate cement from alginate impression material. Gypsum-based investment material was also investigated as control. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that although firing the set gypsum-based and modified investment materials at 1,200°C produced calcium silicates, firing the set alginate impression material did not. However, we succeeded when firing the set blend of pre-fired set alginate impression material and gypsum at 1,200°C. SEM observations of the powder revealed that the featured porous structures of diatomite as an alginate impression material component appeared useful for synthesizing calcium silicates. Experimentally fabricated calcium silicate powder was successfully mixed with phosphoric acid solution and set by depositing the brushite. Therefore, we conclude that the production of calcium silicate cement material is possible from waste alginate impression material.

  4. Microstructure of amorphous aluminum hydroxide in belite-calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Fei; Yu, Zhenglei; Yang, Fengling; Lu, Yinong, E-mail: yinonglu@njtech.edu.cn; Liu, Yunfei, E-mail: yfliu@njtech.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Belite-calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement is a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cement. Herein, aluminum hydroxide (AH{sub 3}), the main amorphous hydration product of BCSA cement, was investigated in detail. The microstructure of AH{sub 3} with various quantities of gypsum was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The AH{sub 3} with various morphologies were observed and confirmed in the resulting pastes. Particular attention was paid to the fact that AH{sub 3} always contained a small amount of Ca according to the results of EDS analysis. The AH{sub 3} was then characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results of HRTEM indicated that Ca arose from nanosized tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate which existed in the AH{sub 3}.

  5. Nucleation and growth of the Naica giant gypsum crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Fermín; García-Ruiz, JuanMa

    2014-04-07

    The Cave of Giant Crystals in the Naica mine (Mexico) is one of the most amazing displays of mineral beauty ever created in nature. In addition to the colossal crystals of gypsum, which in some cases exceed eleven meters in length and one meter in thickness, the scenery fashioned by the crystalline beams that thrust through the darkness of the cave from floor to ceiling with a luster like moonlight is a unique example of harmony based on crystal symmetry. We review the crystallogenesis of this remarkable and challenging phenomenon of mineralization near equilibrium that can be used to teach the basics of nucleation and crystal growth.

  6. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  7. Preparation of hydraulic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-08-28

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cement by the use of oil-shale residues is characterized in that the oil-shale refuse is mixed with granular basic blast-furnace slag and a small amount of portland cement and ground together.

  8. Low force cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P R

    1996-07-01

    The marginal adaptation of full coverage restorations is adversely affected by the introduction of luting agents of various minimum film thicknesses during the cementation process. The increase in the marginal opening may have long-term detrimental effects on the health of both pulpal and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying seating forces (2.5, 12.5, 25 N), venting, and cement types on post-cementation marginal elevation in cast crowns. A standardized cement space of 40 microns was provided between a machined gold crown and a stainless steel die. An occlusal vent was placed that could be opened or closed. The post-cementation crown elevation was measured, following the use of two commercially available capsulated dental cements (Phosphacap, and Ketac-cem Applicap). The results indicate that only the combination of Ketac-Cem Applicap and crown venting produced post-cementation crown elevation of less than 20 microns when 12.5 N seating force was used. Higher forces (25 N) and venting were required for comparable seating when using Phosphacap (19 microns). The amount of force required to allow maximum seating of cast crowns appears to be cement specific, and is reduced by effective venting procedures.

  9. Cementation process study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Ahn, S.J.; Choi, K.S.; Lee, M.W.; Ryu, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the cementation process study, in 1984, design of the waste treatment simulator was finished for the first step. We can experience not only the operation of solidification system but the design and construction of comming large scale plant through the design of cementation process. (Author)

  10. Waste-form development for conversion to portland cement at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veazey, G.W.; Schake, A.R.; Shalek, P.D.; Romero, D.A.; Smith, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    The process used at TA-55 to cement transuranic (TRU) waste has experienced several problems with the gypsum-based cement currently being used. Specifically, the waste form could not reliably pass the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) prohibition for free liquid and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) standard for chromium. This report describes the project to develop a portland cement-based waste form that ensures compliance to these standards, as well as other performance standards consisting of homogeneous mixing, moderate hydration temperature, timely initial set, and structural durability. Testing was conducted using the two most common waste streams requiring cementation as of February 1994, lean residue (LR)- and oxalate filtrate (OX)-based evaporator bottoms (EV). A formulation with a pH of 10.3 to 12.1 and a minimum cement-to-liquid (C/L) ratio of 0.80 kg/l for OX-based EV and 0.94 kg/L for LR-based EV was found to pass the performance standards chosen for this project. The implementation of the portland process should result in a yearly cost savings for raw materials of approximately $27,000 over the gypsum process

  11. Investigation and dating of gypsum crystals from Sivrihisar region in Eskisehir by ESR and TL techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Gypsum crystals taken from Sivrihisar-Eskisehir district were investigated and dated by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The natural ESR spectra of gypsum samples had also the signals of Mn 2 + in addition to the signal at g=2.009. It was observed that the intensity of ESR signal at g=2.009 increased with gamma irradiation dose. This ESR signal (g=2.009) was used as a dating signal in dating of gypsum samples. The only one TL peak at about 278 degree Celsius was observed in TL glow curves of nonirradiated gypsum sample. In the case of irradiated sample, TL peak at 157 degree Celsius was observed in addition of TL peak at 278 degree Celsius. Gypsum samples were irradiated with a 6 0Co gamma source. The ESR spectra and TL glow curve of gypsum samples were recorded by X-band ESR spectrometer and Risφ TL/OSL reader, respectively. For samples, ESR/TL dose-response curves was constructed. Dose-response curves were fitted with an exponential saturation function. Based on this model, accumulated dose (AD) values for dating are determined. 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K analysis was carried out for gypsum crystals and dolomite which enveloped these gypsum crystals. The internal dose rate was calculated from 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K analysis results of gypsum sample. The external dose rate was calculated by using 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K analysis results of dolomite and cosmic dose rate. Internal and external gamma dose-rate was used for dating calculations. Because of successive recrystallization of gypsum sample after formation, calculated age values of gypsum is smaller than expected formation age.

  12. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per

  13. Effects of Blended-Cement Paste Chemical Composition Changes on Some Strength Gains of Blended-Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement. PMID:24587737

  14. Effects of Blended-Cement Paste Chemical Composition Changes on Some Strength Gains of Blended-Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Serkan Kirgiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min. Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS and flexural strengths (FS of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2, sodium oxide (Na2O, and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2 at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM in comparison with reference mortars (RM at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement.

  15. Reaction mechanism of reductive decomposition of FGD gypsum with anthracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Da; Lu, Hailin; Sun, Xiuyun; Liu, Xiaodong; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction mechanism was different if the molar ratio of C/CaSO 4 was different. • The yield of CaO rises with an increase in temperature. • The optimal ratio of C/CaSO 4 = 1.2:1. • The decomposition process is mainly apparent solid–solid reaction with liquid-phase involved. - Abstract: The process of decomposition reaction between flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum and anthracite is complex, which depends on the reaction conditions and atmosphere. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the experiment in a tubular reactor were used to characterize the decomposition reaction in a nitrogen atmosphere under different conditions. The reaction mechanism analysis showed that the decomposition reaction process and mechanism were different when the molar proportion of C/CaSO 4 was changed. The experiment results showed that appropriate increase in the C/CaSO 4 proportion and higher temperatures were suitable for the formation of the main production of CaO, which can help us to understand the solid state reaction mechanism better. Via kinetic analysis of the reaction between anthracite and FGD gypsum under the optimal molar ratio of C/CaSO 4 , the mechanism model of the reaction was confirmed and the decomposition process was a two-step reaction which was in accordance with apparent solid–solid reaction

  16. Radiological properties of a wax-gypsum compensator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plessis, F.C.P. du; Willemse, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the radiological properties of a compensator material consisting of wax and gypsum is presented. Effective attenuation coefficients (EACs) have been determined from transmission measurements with an ion chamber in a Perspex phantom. Measurements were made at 80 and 100 cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) for beam energies of 6, 8, and 15 MV, for field sizes ranging from narrow beam geometries up to 40x40 cm 2 , and at measurement depths of maximum dose build-up, 5 and 10 cm. A parametrization equation could be constructed to predict the EAC values within 4% uncertainty as a function of field size and depth of measurement. The EAC dependence on off-axis position was also quantified at each beam energy and SSD. It was found that the compensator material reduced the required thickness for compensation by 26% at 8 MV when compared to pure paraffin wax for a 10x10 cm 2 field. Relative surface ionization (RSI) measurements have been made to quantify the effect of scattered electrons from the wax-gypsum compensator. Results indicated that for 80 cm SSD the RSI would exceed 50% for fields larger than 15x15 cm 2 . At 100 cm SSD the RSI values were below 50% for all field sizes used

  17. Incorporation of arsenic into gypsum: Relevant to arsenic removal and immobilization process in hydrometallurgical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Danni; Yuan, Zidan [Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Shaofeng, E-mail: wangshaofeng@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Jia, Yongfeng, E-mail: yongfeng.jia@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Demopoulos, George P. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Quantitatively studied the incorporation of arsenic into the structure of gypsum. • Arsenic content in the solid increased with pH and initial arsenic concentration. • Calcium arsenate phase precipitated in addition to gypsum at higher pH values. • The structure of gypsum and its morphology was altered by the incorporated arsenate. • The incorporated arsenate formed sainfeldite-like local structure in gypsum. - Abstract: Gypsum precipitates as a major secondary mineral during the iron-arsenate coprecipitation process for the removal of arsenic from hydrometallurgical effluents. However, its role in the fixation of arsenic is still unknown. This work investigated the incorporation of arsenic into gypsum quantitatively during the crystallization process at various pHs and the initial arsenic concentrations. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the coprecipitated solids. The results showed that arsenate was measurably removed from solution during gypsum crystallization and the removal increased with increasing pH. At lower pH where the system was undersaturated with respect to calcium arsenate, arsenate ions were incorporated into gypsum structure, whereas at higher pH, calcium arsenate was formed and constituted the major arsenate bearing species in the precipitated solids. The findings may have important implications for arsenic speciation and stability of the hydrometallurgical solid wastes.

  18. Authigenic gypsum in a deep sea core from Southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.

    Authigenic gypsum has been encountered in a deep sea core RC9-157 from the southeastern Arabian Sea at a depth of 4111 m which is a zone of lysocline. The formation of gypsum in the deep sea region is attributed to the prevailing sulphate rich...

  19. Hydrology of marginal evaporitic basins during the Messinian Salinity Crisis: isotopic investigation of gypsum deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kilany, Aida; Caruso, Antonio; Dela Pierre, Francesco; Natalicchio, Marcello; Rouchy, Jean-Marie; Pierre, Catherine; Balter, Vincent; Aloisi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of gypsum in Messinian Mediterranean marginal basins is controlled by basin restriction and the local hydrological cycle (evaporation/precipitation rates and relative importance of continental vs marine water inputs). We are using the stable isotopic composition of gypsum as a proxy of the hydrological cycle that dominated at the moment of gypsum precipitation. We studied the Messinian Caltanissetta (Sicily) and Tertiary Piedmont (north western Italy) basins where we carried out a high-resolution isotopic study of gypsum layers composing gypsum-marl cycles. These cycles are thought to be the sedimentary expression of astronomical precession cycles, lasting approximately 20 kyr, during which the marginal basins experienced a succession of arid and a wet conditions. We determined the isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water (18O and D), of the sulphate ion (34S, 18O) and of Strontium (87/86Sr), all of which are potentially affected by the hydrological cycle. In our samples, the mother water from which gypsum precipitated is considerably lighter (-4.0 micro-scale. This is an essential step in interpreting the isotopic signals of gypsum because we can expect the 18O and D composition of Messinian continental input to be not too dissimilar from that of modern meteoric waters involved in diagenetic processes.

  20. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM observations of the growth of gypsum {010} surfaces in the presence of Cr(VI and (ii gypsum precipitation experiments by mixing aqueous solutions containing variable amounts of Cr(VI. Gypsum precipitation is progressively delayed when occurring from solutions bearing increasing Cr(VI concentrations. Chemical analyses of gypsum precipitates show that gypsum incorporates small Cr(VI amounts that correlate with the content of this ion in the aqueous solution. Gypsum cell parameters variation reflects this incorporation. At the molecular scale, Cr(VI induces a slowdown of step advance rates on gypsum {010} surfaces accompanied by the roughening of nanostep edges and the so-called “template effect”. This effect involves the reproduction of the original nanotopography after the completion of individual advancing monolayers and appears as a general nanoscale phenomenon occurring during growth of solid solutions from aqueous solutions even in the case of compositionally-restricted solid solutions.

  1. Pre-contamination of new gypsum wallboard with potentially harmful fungal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Dosen, Ina; Lewinska, Anna Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Gypsum wallboard is a popular building material, but is also very frequently overgrown by Stachybotrys chartarum after severe and/or undetected water damage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Stachybotrys and other fungi frequently isolated from wet gypsum wallboard are already...

  2. Thermal conductivity of gypsum plasterboards : at ambient temperature and exposed to fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Wald, F.; Kallerova, P.; Chlouba, J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the more complicated thermal properties to calculate for gypsum plasterboard is the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity is important because it plays an important role in the fire behaviour of gypsum plasterboards. Plasterboard often protects steel structures of buildings, because

  3. Use of FGD gypsum on a bermudagrass pasture in the Appalachian Plateau Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of industrial by-products from coal fired power plants (FGD gypsum and FGD gypsum + fly ash) are thought to increase plant production. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of industrial by-products as a soil amendment on bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) yield. The study was...

  4. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  5. Radioactive waste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  6. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  7. ESR Studies and Dating of Egyptian Gypsum at Ras Mala'ab, Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Monem, A. A.; Abdei-Razek, Y. A.; Rasheed, N. M.; Hassan, G.M.; Eissa, H.M.; El-Morsy, M.

    2007-01-01

    A gypsum sample from the famous gypsum-anhydrite evaporitic deposit composing the Ras Mala'ab Formation, Upper Miocene, occurring at Ras Mala'ab, on the east coast of the Gulf of Suez, was subjected to (ESR) dosimetric studies. Also, (ESR) was used to date the formation or most recent recrystallization of that gypsum. The gypsum derivative (ESR) spectrum is characterized by the large broad Fe 2+ signal (g=2.50) and HF-sixtet Mn 2+ signals. Only the characteristic gypsum signal (G l, g=2.0040) was detected between the third and fourth lines of the HF-Mn 2+ which is attributed to the electron-center SO 3 - . This signal was sensitive to artificial γ-irradiation and showed significant enhancement using a γ-dose of 550 Gy. Also, the signal was very stable up to 400 o C. The gypsum sample with a total dose (TD) of 1500 Gy, determined graphically by extrapolating the linear relationship between defect concentration and the artificial γ-doses for (G l, g=2.0040) and an annual dose (D) due to cosmic rays (0.3 mGy), yielded an age of 5.00 Ma. This could mean the age of formation or latest recrystallization of this gypsum deposit. The geologic age assignment of the Ras Mala'ab Group including the evaporitic gypsum unit, is Middle to Late Miocene. It is directly overlain by the Pliocene elastics at the locality of Ras Mala'ab. This might suggest that these evaporitic gypsum facies represent the top of the Miocene in the Gulf of Suez area, since the Miocene-Pliocene boundary is now put at 5.00-5.50 Ma ago. Therefore, the ESR age of the Ras Mala'ab gypsum is consistent with the geologic age assignment

  8. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  9. Radioactivity in polluted cement and its raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.; Aslam, M.; Orfi, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Samples of portland cement manufactured in the North West frontier Province (NWFP) of Pakistan and its different raw materials have been investigated applying gamma-spectrometric techniques for natural gamma-emitting radionuclides. A high purity germanium detector (HPGE) was used for data acquisition. Average values of the total specific activity (in Bq.kg/sup -1/ ) due to all the three radionuclides (/sub 40/K, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 232/Th) were found to be 327.7+ - 168.2 for portland cement; 104.4 + - 21.1 for limestone; 193.2+ - 50.4 for gypsum; 890.4 + - 86.5 for state and 545.6+ - 56.6 for latrite. The average specific activities due to /sup 40/K in Portland cement and all the raw materials were found to be higher as compared to /sub 226/Ra and /sup 232/Th in the respective materials. It is concluded that such materials do not pose any health problem and are not a major source of radiation hazards. However, The data can be utilized in determining radioactivity associated with other building materials. (author)

  10. PPF-reinforced, ESP-lightened gypsum plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Santos, A.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new construction material has been obtained by adding aggregate to gypsum plaster which, without reducing the bending strength of plain gypsum plaster without aggregates, lowers its density, and consequently the weight of the construction elements made from the agglomerated material, by half.The aggregates used were expanded polystyrene beads and short polypropylene fibre.The new material addresses one of the issues of cardinal interest in construction materials and construction element research, namely the need to lighten materials so as to ease the burden on buildings’ bearing structures while facilitating assembly of construction units, by a single worker wherever possible.With a water / binder ratio of 0.7 and 2% (by weight of plaster of expanded polystyrene and 2% of polypropylene fibre aggregates, the decline in density achieved was 50,88% over plain gypsum plaster and 32.88% over plasterboard.Se ha obtenido un nuevo material de construcción aditivando el yeso o la escayola, mediante la incorporación de agregados, de modo que sin reducir la resistencia a flexotracción de una escayola sin ningún tipo de adición, reduce su densidad a la mitad, y por tanto, el peso de los elementos constructivos que puedan realizarse basándose en él.El material está compuesto por una adición de gránulos de poliestireno expandido y fibras cortadas de polipropileno.El nuevo material incide sobre aquellos aspectos de más interés en el campo de la investigación en construcción, en donde se intenta reducir el peso de los materiales, de modo que se grave lo menos posible la estructura resistente de las edificaciones, a la par que se facilitan los procedimientos de montaje de las unidades constructivas, al poder ser manejadas por un solo operario.La escayola, con relación de agua/conglomerante de 0,7, y con adiciones del 2% en peso (sobre la cantidad de escayola, tanto de poliestireno expandido como de fibras de polipropileno, permite reducir la

  11. Effect of Limestone Powder on Acid Attack Characteristics of Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The acid resistance of cement pastes containing limestone powder with two different water-binder (w/b ratios exposed to acetic (pH = 4 and sulfuric acid (pH = 2 solutions respectively were investigated in this paper. Limestone powder, fly ash and silica fume were also added to the cement paste mixture at different proportions. Static and flowing aqueous environments were set in this experiment. Strength and microstructure of the pastes after acid attack were investigated by using strength test, X-ray diffractometer (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The experimental results show that the erosion degree depends not only on pH value of the solution and w/b ratio of the pastes, but also on the content of limestone powder. Acetic acid reacts with calcium hydroxide and carbonate thus dissolving the pastes, while sulfuric acid consumed calcium hydroxide, and generated gypsum and ettringite. The consumption of calcium hydroxide in the flowing solution group is higher than that in the static solution because the flowing sulfuric acid solution has negative effect upon the gypsum crystallization. Fly ash and silica fume are beneficial to limestone cement paste because of the less calcium hydroxide formation, which is among the hydrates vulnerable to acid erosion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6231

  12. the Danish cement industry

    OpenAIRE

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Møllgård, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We test econometrically whether the sole Danish producer of cement holds a dominant position in the Danish market for (grey) cement. In import penetration tests, we find that its pricing and quantity decisions are independent of import price and quantity, implying that it can act to a considerable extent independently of its competitors. We also test whether it can act independently of its customers and find that its demand is inelastic with respect to its price. It thus holds a dominant posi...

  13. Constructive applications of composite gypsum reinforced with Typha Latifolia fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Santos, A.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research analyses the possibility to reinforce gypsum using enea fibres (Typha Latifolia creating a compound material in wich the fibres contribute to increase mechanical resistance, producing as well a reduction of the weight and a possible regulation of the set time.

    La investigación presente analiza la posibilidad de reforzar los morteros de escayola mediante la utilización dé fibras de Typha Latifolia, creando un material compuesto en el que las fibras contribuyen al aumento de resistencia mecánica, a la vez que se produce una reducción del peso y una regulación de los tiempos de fraguado. Las propiedades de estos materiales hacen que, en determinadas aplicaciones, su utilización resulte ventajosa con respecto a materiales tradicionales.

  14. Corrosion of bare and galvanized steel in gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez, Mercedes

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum is a relatively low-cost building material much abounding in our country. When it is put in contact with steel, it may produce high corrosion rates due to its pH value (close to 7. This work reports the results obtained in studying the corrosion rates of bare and galvanized steel in contact with gypsum and plaster, as well as the influence curing thermal treatment applied to gypsum, enviromental relative humidity and addition of compounds with different natures and purposes may have in such process. In-situ observations, as well as the measurement of the Polarization Resistance and the weight loss have been used as measurement technics. From the results obtained it has been possible to deduce that galvanized steel has better behaviour in dry enviroments than bare steel in the same conditions and moist atmosphere induces proportionally more corrosion in galvanized steel than in bare one. Additions to gypsum do not modified these conclusions, though it may be pointed out that addition of nitrites or lime improves the behaviour of bare steel, while galvanized behaviour is not modified. The addition of lime is not recommended because phenomena of dilated along time expansion may take place.

    El yeso es un material de construcción de relativo bajo coste y que, además, es muy abundante en nuestro país. Debido a su pH cercano a la neutralidad, cuando entra en contacto con el acero, este puede corroerse a elevadas velocidades. En esta comunicación se presentan los resultados de un estudio sobre la velocidad de corrosión del acero desnudo y galvanizado en contacto con yeso y escayola y la influencia que tienen: el tratamiento térmico del curado del yeso, la humedad relativa ambiental y la adición de aditivos de diversa naturaleza y finalidad. Como técnicas de medida se han utilizado la medida de la Resistencia de Polarización y de la pérdida de peso, así como observaciones visuales. De los resultados se puede deducir que en

  15. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J. W.; Burdette, K. E.; Inrig, E. L.; Dewitt, R.; Mistry, R.; Rink, W. J.; Boreham, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d. (authors)

  16. Influence of gypsum amendment on methane emission from paddy rice soil affected by saline irrigation water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Ei eTheint

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of gypsum application on methane (CH4 emission from paddy rice soil affected by saline irrigation water, two pot experiments with the rice cultivation were conducted. In pot experiment (I, salinity levels 30 mMNaCl (S30 and 90 mMNaCl (S90, that showed maximum and minimum CH4 production in an incubation experiment, respectively, were selected and studied without and with application of 1 Mg gypsum ha-1(G1. In pot experiment (II, CH4 emission was investigated under different rates of gypsum application: 1 (G1, 2.5 (G2.5 and 5 (G5 Mg gypsum ha-1 under a non-saline and saline condition of 25 mMNaCl (S25. In experiment (I, the smallest CH4 emission was observed in S90. Methane emission in S30 was not significantly different with the non-saline control. The addition of gypsum showed significant lower CH4 emission in saline and non-saline treatments compared with non-saline control. In experiment (II, the CH4 emissions in the saline treatments were not significantly different to the non-saline treatments except S25-G5. However, our work has shown that gypsum can lower CH4 emissions under saline and non-saline conditions. Thus, gypsum can be used as a CH4 mitigation option in non-saline as well as in saline conditions.

  17. Use of gypsum residues as a corrective for saline-sodic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Medeiros dos Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the hugest problems faced by the civil construction sector is the final destination of residues, especially gypsum, which presents recycling restrictions. However, these residues present a high amount of calcium in their composition, and can be alternatively used for replacing mined gypsum as a saline-sodic soil corrective. This study aimed at evaluating the efficiency of gypsum residues from the civil construction, when compared to mined gypsum, for correcting a saline-sodic soil. A randomized blocks design was used, in a factorial arrangement consisting of two kinds of corrective (gypsum residue and mined gypsum and five leaching depths (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 times the soil pores volume, with three replications. Electric conductivity, soluble cations and sodium adsorption ratio were evaluated in the soil saturation extract. The use of gypsum residue proved to be effective in leaching salts and soluble sodium in saline-sodic soil, and can be recommended as a calcium source for recovering from sodicity.

  18. Initiation and growth of gypsum piercement structures in the Zechstein Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Stroud, S. C.; Paul, J.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of tectonic processes in initiating halite diapirs has become much better understood in recent years. Less well understood is the development of diapiric structures involving rocks composed predominantly of gypsum. Below about 1000 m, gypsum dehydrates to anhydrite, which often obscures primary sedimentary textures. If the strain associated with diapiric rise in the rock induces the transition to anhydrite, obliteration of primary features in the gypsum can be expected. In our study, we infer that the diapiric movement in the Werra Anhydrite member of cycle 1 of the Zechstein Formation of Europe occurred before the initial transition of gypsum to anhydrite based on the presence of pseudomorphs of bedded primary gypsum crystals, the overburden lithologies and depositional environment, and the mechanical properties of gypsum, anhydrite and carbonate rocks. Faulting and differential loading of a shallow overburden were the key components in initiating the gypsum diapirism. The transition to anhydrite occurred after burial and after cessation of diapirism. In comparison, the diapirism of calcium sulfate of the Leine Anhydrite into the Leine Halite members of cycle 3 of the Zechstein Formation probably occurred much later after burial and appears to have been triggered by halite diapirism, which in turn triggered the dehydration reaction, causing the calcium sulfate to become the incompetent phase relative to the halite. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. UTILIZATION OF MINERAL FIBER WASTE IN THE PRODUCTION OF GYPSUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solov'ev Vitaliy Nikolaevich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject: the effectiveness of using compositions with the use of basalt fibers is proven, but the composition must be selected depending on the binder and additives chosen. Research objectives: we examine the possibility of waste recycling of basalt fiber production during manufacturing of modified gypsum composite material with improved characteristics. Materials and methods: as a raw material, a gypsum binder of Samara production was used. As a reinforcement additive, a disperse waste of basalt fiber production of Tver region was used. Studying characteristics of the gypsum binder and modified mixture, and also comparative analysis of these characteristics by average density, total porosity, strength in compression and flexure of the gypsum composite were carried out using standard techniques. Results: dependence of physical and mechanical properties of the modified gypsum material on the content of the basalt fiber additive is established. It was found that an increase in concentration of the additive requires an increased water content or additional use of plasticizer. Conclusions: modification of gypsum stone with a mineral basalt additive will increase the strength, density and durability of thin-walled gypsum products, and, consequently, the demand for products due to ensuring their high quality in transportation and installation.

  20. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  1. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-06-01

    Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline-alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation.

  2. Influence of shelf life on the setting time of type IV gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari, M. L.; Irawan, B.; Damiyanti, M.

    2017-08-01

    Although expired materials can exhibit a deterioration in their properties, expired type IV gypsum can still be found on the market. In order to evaluate the influence of the shelf life on its setting time, two groups of type IV gypsum (GC Fuji rock EP) with different expiration dates were used in this research. The setting time tests were done in a mold using a Vicat Needle apparatus. The results of the statistical analysis showed a significant difference (pshelf life did influence the setting time of the type IV gypsum.

  3. Investigation of the gypsum quality at three full-scale wet flue gas desulphurisation plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun; Kiil, Søren; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2011-01-01

    In the present study the gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) quality at three full-scale wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) plants and a pilot plant were examined and compared. Gypsum quality can be expressed in terms of moisture content (particle size and morphology dependent) and the concentration of residual......, low moisture content and low impurity content). An episode concerning a sudden deterioration in the gypsum dewatering properties was furthermore investigated, and a change in crystal morphology, as well as an increased impurity content (aluminium, iron and fluoride), was detected....

  4. Determination of Radium 226 in mexican phosphate fertilizers and gypsum by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinez A, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    The 226 Ra isotope was determined in 17, 20 and 46% m/m phosphate fertilizers and gypsum. The samples of the fertilizers were dissolved in 10% v/v nitric acid solutions. The barium sulphate method was used for the precipitation of 226 Ra. On the other hand, alkaline fusion method was used to separate the 226 Ra from gypsum. The results indicated that 226 Ra was present in the phosphate fertilizers and gypsum. The 226 Ra concentrations present in these materials were between 10 -4 - 10 -5 μg g -1 . (Author)

  5. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  6. Analyses of heavy metals in mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Matthew; Peplow, George; Camilleri, Josette

    2010-07-01

    Portland cement is used in the construction industry as a binder in concrete. It is manufactured from chalk, limestone, and clay, which are clinkered at very high temperatures and ground with gypsum to form Portland cement. The raw materials and the manufacturing process can result in the inclusion of heavy metals in Portland cement. Portland cement with a four to one addition of bismuth oxide is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), which is used mainly as a dental material. Heavy metal inclusion can be of concern because MTA is in contact with hard and soft tissues. Measurements of arsenic, lead, and chromium in hydrated gray and white Portland cement, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Angelus were conducted with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry after acid digestion on the hydrated material. The leaching of the metal ions from the solid material in water and simulated body fluid (SBF) was also determined. All cement types showed high relative values of leached chromium compared with arsenic and lead in both the total metal content and leached species. The gray Portland cement showed the highest total amount of metal. The white Portland and both MTAs had lower values for all the leached metal ions. Both MTAs released more arsenic than the amount specified in ISO 9917-1 (2007). Portland cements and MTAs showed evidence of heavy metals in the acid-soluble form as well as leaching in deionized water and SBF. MTA contained levels of arsenic higher than the safe limit specified by the ISO 9917-1 (2007). Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering and sustainability aspect of palm oil shell powder in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohammad Razaul; Hossain, Md. Moktar; Yusoff, Sumiani Binti

    2017-06-01

    Palm oil shell (POS) is a waste material which significantly produced in palm oil mills. In current practice, this waste is dumped in open land or landfill sites or is used as fuel to run a steam turbine of a boiler, which leads to environmental pollutions. The characterization, engineering and sustainability aspect of this waste for using in cement-based applications lead to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide and cost, save natural resources for cement production and also sustainable usage of waste material. The characterization was carried out using particle size analyzer, XRF, SEM and total organic carbon analyzer. ASTM standard methods were used to observe the setting time and water for normal consistency. The compressive strength of palm oil shell powder (POSP) blended cement was explored with the water to cement and cement to sand ratio of 0.40 and 0.50, respectively up to 40% replacement levels of OPC. Result found that the setting time and water demand were increased, but compressive strength was decreased to replacement levels. However, the incorporation of POSP in cement was reduced 9.6% of CO2 emission, 25 % of the cost and save natural resource, i.e. limestone, clay, iron ore, silica shale and gypsum of 35.1%, 4.95%, 0.9%, 4.05 % and 1.2 %, respectively at 30% replacement level of OPC. The results of this extensive study on POSP characterization, effect on basic cement properties and sustainability aspect provide the guidance for using the POSP at industrial scale for cement production.

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  9. The composition of cement hydrating at 60 deg C from synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auld, J.; Turner, K.; Thorogood, G.J.; Ball, C.J.; Aldridge, L.P.; Taylor, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Cement consists of 5 phases C3S, C2S, C3A, C4AF (where C denotes CaO, S denotes SiO 2 , A denotes AI 2 O 3 and F denotes Fe 2 O 3 ) and gypsum. When cement hydrates it forms an amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) as well as the crystalline ettringite and calcium hydroxide. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the hydrated cement is difficult to interpret because of its complexity. In addition, the overlapping lines from the remaining cement compounds make it difficult to quantify the amount of the crystalline components present. Using Rietveld analysis we have been able to interpret the patterns obtained from synchrotron x-ray diffraction patterns obtained at the Photon Factory at the Australian National Beamline Facility using BIGDIF. The changes in the composition of the hydrated cement paste were determined as a function of time during hydration at 60 deg C. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  10. Characterization of cement-based ancient building materials in support of repository seal materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    Ancient mortars and plasters collected from Greek and Cypriot structures dating to about 5500 BC have been investigated because of their remarkable durability. The characteristics and performance of these and other ancient cementitious materials have been considered in the light of providing information on longevity of concrete materials for sealing nuclear waste geological repositories. The matrices of these composite materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) gypsum cements; (2) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated-lime cements; (3) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated-lime cements (+- siliceous components); and (4) pozzolana/hydrated-lime cements. Most of the materials investigated, including linings of ore-washing basins and cisterns used to hold water, are in categories (2) and (3). The aggregates used included carbonates, sandstones, shales, schists, volcanic and pyroclastic rocks, and ore minerals, many of which represent host rock types of stratigraphic components of a salt repository. Numerous methods were used to characterize the materials chemically, mineralogically, and microstructurally and to elucidate aspects of both the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical (mineralogical) and microstructural factors. Durability was found to be affected by matrix mineralogy, particle size and porosity, and aggregate type, grading, and proportioning, as well as method of placement and exposure conditions. Similar factors govern the potential for durability of modern portland cement-containing materials, which are candidates for repository sealing. 29 references, 29 figures, 6 tables

  11. Recycle of fired phosphogypsum waste product as a cement replacement and its role on the hydration and strength development of pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantawi, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Partially up to fully substituted of treated phosphogypsum x(PG) for natural gypsum on the physico- mechanical as well as kinetic of hydration of ordinary Portland cement has been discussed . The results show that by increasing PG % the water to cement ratio decreased while the initial and final setting times increased So PG acts as a retarder and water reducer . The retardation effect may be attributed to formation of ettringite layer which formed on the surface of C3A of cement pastes . The chemically combined water, free lime content and bulk density increased with curing time and with PG content for all cement pastes up to 90 days due to increasing of the rate of hydration. The compressive strength increased by increasing of PG % due to formation of anhydrite , changes in major oxides content and reduction of impurities . X-Ray Diffraction, SEM and DTA of some samples have been studied

  12. Gypsum-induced decay in granite monuments in Northwestern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common forms of decay in granite monuments is the detachment of the superficial layer of the stone (plaques, plaquettes and scales. Previous studies of granite monuments in the northwest Iberian Peninsula revealed a direct relation between this type of weathering and the presence of calcium sulphate, and a mechanism whereby the salt causes this type of decay was suggested. In the present study, various hypotheses as regards the origin of the gypsum found in granite monuments are proposed. The study involved analysis of the contents of ions soluble in water, the results of X-ray diffraction analyses and the ratios of CaO/SO3 in samples of stone, mortar and deposits collected from different monuments. It was concluded that in most cases the gypsum originated from old paintworks or/and from the joint mortars, although inputs from other sources cannot be discounted, as discussed

    Una de las formas de deterioro más frecuente en los monumentos graníticos es la separación de la capa superficial de la piedra (placas, plaquetas y escamas. En trabajos anteriores centrados en monumentos del noroeste de la Península Ibérica, se constató la relación directa entre esta forma de alteración y la presencia de sulfato de calcio y se propuso el mecanismo a través del cual esta sal provoca este tipo de deterioro. En este trabajo se plantean varias hipótesis acerca del origen del yeso encontrado en monumentos graníticos. Para ello se comparan los contenidos de iones solubilizados en agua, los resultados de difracción de rayos X y las relaciones OCa/SO3 de muestras de piedra, morteros y depósitos recogidas en diferentes monumentos. Se llega a la conclusión de que en la mayor parte de los casos el yeso procede de antiguas pinturas o de revestimientos superficiales y de los morteros de juntas entre sillares, pero no se puede descartar la contribución de otros aportes, los cuales se discuten también en este artículo.

  13. Primary Evaporites for the Messinian Salinity Crisis: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Krijgsman, Wout

    2014-05-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, and resulted in the deposition of 0.3-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable and long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation. During the CIESM Almeria Workshop a consensus was reached on several aspects. In addition, remaining issues to be solved were identified, such as for the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal settings, while dolomite containing rocks have been reported from deeper settings. A range of potential explanations have been reported, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are poorly understood and commonly neglected. These may, however, explain that different deposits formed in shallow versus deep environments without needing exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. We present here a unifying mechanism in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is mostly limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes in the deep basin result in the formation of dolomite. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always largely oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is thought to be inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus the conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for the formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process that links the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, oxygen is rapidly depleted through OM degradation, then sulphate becomes the main oxidant for OM

  14. Coal Combustion Residual Beneficial Use Evaluation: Fly Ash Concrete and FGD Gypsum Wallboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains documents related to the evaluation of coal combustion residual beneficial use of fly ash concrete and FGD gypsum wallboard including the evaluation itself and the accompanying appendices

  15. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate super plasticisers; Influencia de la naturaleza del cemento en la compatibilidad con aditivos superplastificantes basados en carboxilatos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.; Kurdowski, W.

    2011-07-01

    An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cement superplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1), while the other had a 9% C{sub 3}A content (C2). These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m{sup 2}/kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaO{center_dot}3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaSO{sub 4}) (1, 2). Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation. (Author) 15 refs.

  16. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  17. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  18. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  19. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  20. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  1. Design of Cold-Formed Steel Screw Connections with Gypsum Sheathing at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Load-bearing cold-formed steel (CFS walls sheathed with double layers of gypsum plasterboard on both sides have demonstrated good fire resistance and attracted increasing interest for use in mid-rise CFS structures. As the main connection method, screw connections between CFS and gypsum sheathing play an important role in both the structural design and fire resistance of this wall system. However, studies on the mechanical behavior of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing are still limited. In this study, 200 monotonic tests of screw connections with single- or double-layer gypsum sheathing at both ambient and elevated temperatures were conducted. The failure of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing in shear was different from that of single-layer gypsum sheathing connections at ambient temperature, and it could be described as the breaking of the loaded sheathing edge combined with significant screw tilting and the loaded sheathing edge flexing fracture. However, the screw tilting and flexing fracture of the loaded sheathing edge gradually disappear at elevated temperatures. In addition, the influence of the loaded edge distance, double-layer sheathing and elevated temperatures is discussed in detail with clear conclusions. A unified design formula for the shear strength of screw connections with gypsum sheathing is proposed for ambient and elevated temperatures with adequate accuracy. A simplified load–displacement model with the post-peak branch is developed to evaluate the load–displacement response of screw connections with gypsum sheathing at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  2. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  3. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  4. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  5. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  6. NOx photocatalytic degradation on gypsum plates modified by TiO2-N,C photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In presented studies the photocatalytic decomposition of NOx on gypsum plates modified by TiO2-N,Cphotocatalysts were presented. The gypsum plates were obtained by addition of 10 or 20 wt.% of different types of titanium dioxide, such as: pure TiO2 and carbon and nitrogen co-modified TiO2 (TiO2-N,C to gypsum. TiO2-N,C photocatalysts were obtained by heating up the starting TiO2 (Grupa Azoty Zakłady Chemiczne Police S.A in the atmosphere of ammonia and carbon at the temperature: 100, 300 i 600ºC. Photocatalyst were characterized by FTIR/DRS, UVVis/DR, BET and XRD methods. Moreover the compressive strength tests of modified gypsum were also done. Photocatalytic activity of gypsum plates was done during NOx decomposition. The highest photocatalytic activity has gypsum with 20 wt.% addition of TiO2-N,C obtained at 300ºC.

  7. Field studies with radioactive sulphur-labelled gypsum fertiliser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, K.M.; Gregg, P.E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of the sizes of different sulphur (S) cycling pools in the soil-pasture system have been determined in soils belonging to the recent and yellow-brown earth soil groups. Several field trials were conducted, involving applications of 35 S-labelled gypsum fertiliser. An equilibrium was attained in the specific activity of the pasture herbage at about 240 days after fertiliser application. This was used to estimate pool sizes. At all sites, the amount of S involved in cycling ranged from 105 to 292 kg S/ha, which was sufficiently large to sustain active plant growth if cycled rapidly. However, most of the S was in the inert fraction (80-90% of total soil S) which appeared not to enter the active S cycling pool. At 3 of the sites studied, the major contributor to the cycling S pool was the residues pool of plant residues and soil organisms. No relationship was found between the size of the cycling S pool and topdressing responses of pastures. The significance of the results obtained is discussed in relation to the availability of S to pasture plants. (auth)

  8. Conditioning highly concentrated borate solutions with calcium sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champenois, J.B.; Cau dit Coumes, C.; Poulesquen, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Damidot, D.

    2012-01-01

    The early age hydration by borate solution of 3 calcium sulfo-aluminate cements (CSA), containing respectively 0%, 10% and 20% of gypsum by weight of cement was studied using isothermal calorimetry and dynamic mode rheo-metry. XRD and TGA analysis were carried out on pastes with increasing hydration degrees (up to 90 days) to specify the mineralogy and to figure out the mechanisms of borate immobilisation. It has been shown that the retarding effect of borate anions is due to the precipitation of the amorphous calcium borate C 2 B 3 H 8 ; borate anions were then incorporated in Aft-type phases. The macroscopic properties of hydrated binders (compressive strength, length change) were also followed during 180 days. It appears that the mechanical strength continuously increases with the hydration degree. Length changes under wet-curing and sealed bag remain moderate and seem to be stabilized after 180 days

  9. The mechanical properties and hydration characteristics of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongxu Li; Xuyan Song [Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2008-04-15

    The mechanical properties of several kinds of coal gangue calcined with limestone were researched so as to find the optimum way of calcinations with limestone. The microstructure and property of hydration process of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the method of mercury in trusion poremeasurement. When the proper amounst of gypsum and fluorite were taken as mineralizers in the course of calcinations of added-calcium coal gangue, the activity of coal gangue can be effectively improved. The results of mechanical property and structural characteristics such as hydration, hydration products and microstructure etc. of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue are consistent.

  10. Gypsum amendment to soil can reduce selenium uptake by alfalfa grown in the presence of coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, M.A.; Rubin, G.; Woodbury, P.B.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments in the field and greenhouse were conducted in the presence of coal fly ash to determine whether gypsum can reduce Se concentration in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). In the field experiment, conducted at a coal fly ash landfill, 11.2 t ha -1 gypsum was applied to soil as a top dressing to test the effect of gypsum in reducing selenium (Se) concentration in aboveground plant tissue. There were four treatment combinations of gypsum over a two year period, 1990, and 1991: (0, 0), (0, 11.2) (11.2, 0) and (11.2, 11.2). In 1991, the Se concentration was lower in alfalfa grown with gypsum, regardless of whether the gypsum was applied in both years or in only one year, indicating that the effect of gypsum application in the first year persisted into the second year. Since there was no increase in aboveground biomass with added gypsum, differences in Se concentration reflect a competitive interaction between S and Se. In the greenhouse experiment, 12 soil treatments were tested: three levels of fly ash (0, 10 and 20%) in combination with each of four levels of gypsum (0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5%). The Se concentration in alfalfa grown in 10% fly ash declined linearly with increasing gypsum dose, resulting in a reduction in Se concentration of 0.04 ± 0.02 μg g -1 for each 1% gypsum added for the first harvest and 0.06 ± 0.03 μg g -1 for each 1% gypsum added in the second harvest. Based on these results, gypsum may prove useful as a management tool to reduce the uptake of Se by plants growing on coal fly ash landfills

  11. CHEMICAL SOIL ATTRIBUTES AS AFFECTED BY LIME AND GYPSUM SURFACE APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mantovani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gypsum is a soil condition end it has to function contribute to the elimination or reduction of aluminum in the soil in depth. Still, it can contribute to the distribution of nutrients in the soil profile more uniformly and thus increasing the productivity of crops. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of gypsum application, with and without lime, on soil chemical properties and soybean yield, in a no-till system. The experiment was carried in Campos Novos, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, with a randomized block design and split plot design with four replications, the main portion was distributed gypsum doses (1000, 2000, 4000 and 6000 kg ha-1 without incorporation, and the split plot (with and without lime and the liming was 2,000 kg ha-1. We evaluated the performance of components and productivity of soybeans. It was also analyzed the soil pH and Ca, Mg, S and Al at 0-20 and 20-40 cm. The application of gypsum at the rates tested surface with and without lime did not affect the yield components and soybean productivity. At 0-20 cm soil depth lime application increased soil pH by 0.3 units on the average rates of gypsum, but in the 20-40 cm layer was not found effect of lime and gypsum in pH ground due to the short time between application and evaluation. In areas with and without lime contents of Ca and S in the two layers evaluated increased with increasing rates of gypsum, since Mg has difference with the lime application on a 0-20 cm to dose 4000 kg ha-1 and the lime in the gypsum rates and Al decreased with increasing dose gypsum average in the 20-40 cm layer depth. The application of gypsum and limestone softened the negative effects of soil acidity and the increase mainly of calcium and sulfur at 0-20 cm, with less efficient effects in the 20-40 cm layer due to the soil is clayey and the period between the implementation and evaluation be 120 days.

  12. Recycling Jorf Lasfar fly ash as an additive to cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadi A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recycling fly ash is a good example of valorization of waste. It gives a solution the environmental problem by avoiding land filling, and reducing CO2 emission in the atmosphere. In this work we studied the physical-chemical characteristics of Jorf Lasfar fly ash. The parameters investigated were particle size, density, specific surface Blaine, chemical and mineralogical compositions. The techniques used are scanning electronic microscope (SEM, transmission electronic microscope (TEM, X-rays fluorescence (XRF, X-rays diffraction (XRD and atomic spectrometry emission coupled with inductive plasma ICP. We also conducted a study on the mechanical behavior of type CPJ45 cements produced from a combined grinding of clinker, limestone and gypsum. The substitution of a portion of the clinker by different percentages of fly ash was conducted. We noticed that the compression and bending resistances for these mixtures went through a maximum at 28 days with the addition of 7% (by mass of ash. This result showed that the mineral and chemical compositions of this ash conferred a Pozzoulanic power to the cement studied.

  13. Constraining the origin of the Messinian gypsum deposits using coupled measurement of δ^{18}O$/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Gázquez, Fernando; McKenzie, Judith A.; Chapman, Hazel J.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    We used oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water (GHW) coupled with salinity deduced from ice melting temperatures of primary fluid inclusions in the same samples (in tandem with 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S and other isotopic measurements) to determine the composition of the mother fluids that formed the gypsum deposits of the Messinian Salinity Crisis from shallow and intermediate-depth basins. Using this method, we constrain the origin of the Messinian Primary Lower Gypsum (PLG) of the Sorbas basin (Betic foreland) and both the Upper Gypsum (UG) and the Lower Gypsum of the Sicilian basin. We then compare these results to measurements made on UG recovered from the deep Ionian and Balearic basins drilled during DSDP Leg 42A. The evolution of GHW δ18O/δD vs. salinity is controlled by mixing processes between fresh and seawater, coupled with the degree of evaporation. Evaporation and subsequent precipitation of gypsum from fluids dominated by freshwater will result in a depressed 87Sr/86Sr values and different trajectory in δ18O/δD vs. salinity space compared to fluids dominated by seawater. The slopes of these regression equations help to define the end-members from which the fluid originated. For example, salinity estimates from PLG cycle 6 in the Sorbas basin range from 18 to 51ppt, and after correction for fractionation factors, estimated δ18O and δD values of the mother water are low (-2.6 meteoric water during gypsum deposition, while 87Sr/86Sr (0.708942 fall below those expected from the evaporation of seawater alone, the slope of the regression equation is similar to that of seawater evaporation. This implies that there is a change up-section from a dominantly marine environment in cycle 2 to a greater influence of meteoric water in cycle 6. The UG from the Sicilian basin display greater δ18O/δD values (2.9 meteoric water that subsequently underwent intense evaporation. This observation concurs with the low values of 87Sr/86Sr from the same UG

  14. Experienced materials in wet limestone-gypsum FGD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Hiroshima (Japan). Hiroshima Research and Development Center; Iwashita, K.; Ochi, E.; Higuchi, T. [Mitsubishi heavy Industry, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    This study was made on the corrosion resistivity evaluation method used for material selection in the Wet Limestone-Gypsum FGD system with examples of various process configuration, their corrosion environment, and the materials used in them. The wet limestone-gypsum process FGD plant is broadly divided into two types-ash-separated (dual-loop) process, and ash-mixed (single-loop) process-depending on whether the flue gas is separated from ash before being led into the absorber or led as it is into the absorber mixed with ash. Presently, the single-loop process has become the mainstream process however. The dual -loop process comprises a dedusting tower (quencher) and an absorption tower (absorber). In the quencher ash is removed with sprayed water where most of the HCl, HF etc., and a part of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} contained in the flue gas are also removed with absorption. On the contrary, in the single-loop process which is configured of only the absorber, the flue gas is introduced into it as it is contained with ash, SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, HCl, HF etc. The corrosion environment in these plants largely differs depending on the process type and condition. The absorber recirculated liquid has various ion inclusions among which Cl{sup {minus}} promotes pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion while SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} inhibits these corrosions. Both Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} cover an extremely large range between 25 to 100,000 ppm and 564 to 73,600 ppm respectively, and their influence on the corrosion is related to their activity which is decided by Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, H{sup +} and liquid temperature. The balance of these ions is decided by the gas composition, limestone composition, make-up water and wastewater mass balance etc., of individual plants. Accordingly, materials of FGD plant are selected on the basis of evaluated results of corrosion resistivity test made under such simulated process conditions of

  15. Evaluating portland cement concrete degradation by sulphate exposure through artificial neural networks modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Douglas Nunes de; Bourguignon, Lucas Gabriel Garcia; Tolentino, Evandro, E-mail: tolentino@timoteo.cefetmg.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Costa, Rodrigo Moyses, E-mail: rodrigo@moyses.com.br [Universidade de Itauna, Itauna, MG (Brazil); Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A concrete is durable if it has accomplished the desired service life in the environment in which it is exposed. The durability of concrete materials can be limited as a result of adverse performance of its cement-paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either chemical or physical attack. Among other aggressive chemical exposures, the sulphate attack is an important concern. Water, soils and gases, which contain sulphate, represent a potential threat to the durability of concrete structures. Sulphate attack in concrete leads to the conversion of the hydration products of cement to ettringite, gypsum, and other phases, and also it leads to the destabilization of the primary strength generating calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. The formation of ettringite and gypsum is common in cementitious systems exposed to most types of sulphate solutions. The present work presents the application of the neural networks for estimating deterioration of various concrete mixtures due to exposure to sulphate solutions. A neural networks model was constructed, trained and tested using the available database. In general, artificial neural networks could be successfully used in function approximation problems in order to approach the data generation function. Once data generation function is known, artificial neural network structure is tested using data not presented to the network during training. This paper is intent to provide the technical requirements related to the production of a durable concrete to be used in the structures of the Brazilian near-surface repository of radioactive wastes. (author)

  16. Immobilization of Hg(II) by Coprecipitation in Sulfate-Cement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Uptake and molecular speciation of dissolved Hg during formation of Al- or Fe-ettringite-type and high-pH phases were investigated in coprecipitation and sorption experiments of sulfate-cement treatments used for soil and sediment remediation. Ettringite and minor gypsum were identified by XRD as primary phases in Al systems, whereas gypsum and ferrihydrite were the main products in Hg–Fe precipitates. Characterization of Hg–Al solids by bulk Hg EXAFS, electron microprobe, and microfocused-XRF mapping indicated coordination of Hg by Cl ligands, multiple Hg and Cl backscattering atoms, and concentration of Hg as small particles. Thermodynamic predictions agreed with experimental observations for bulk phases, but Hg speciation indicated lack of equilibration with the final solution. Results suggest physical encapsulation of Hg as a polynuclear chloromercury(II) salt in ettringite as the primary immobilization mechanism. In Hg–Fe solids, structural characterization indicated Hg coordination by O atoms only and Fe backscattering atoms that is consistent with inner-sphere complexation of Hg(OH)20 coprecipitated with ferrihydrite. Precipitation of ferrihydrite removed Hg from solution, but the resulting solid was sufficiently hydrated to allow equilibration of sorbed Hg species with the aqueous solution. Electron microprobe XRF characterization of sorption samples with low Hg concentration reacted with cement and FeSO4 amendment indicated correlation of Hg and Fe, supporting the interpretation of Hg removal by precipitation of an Fe(III) oxide phase. PMID:22594782

  17. Evaluating portland cement concrete degradation by sulphate exposure through artificial neural networks modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Douglas Nunes de; Bourguignon, Lucas Gabriel Garcia; Tolentino, Evandro; Costa, Rodrigo Moyses; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    A concrete is durable if it has accomplished the desired service life in the environment in which it is exposed. The durability of concrete materials can be limited as a result of adverse performance of its cement-paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either chemical or physical attack. Among other aggressive chemical exposures, the sulphate attack is an important concern. Water, soils and gases, which contain sulphate, represent a potential threat to the durability of concrete structures. Sulphate attack in concrete leads to the conversion of the hydration products of cement to ettringite, gypsum, and other phases, and also it leads to the destabilization of the primary strength generating calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. The formation of ettringite and gypsum is common in cementitious systems exposed to most types of sulphate solutions. The present work presents the application of the neural networks for estimating deterioration of various concrete mixtures due to exposure to sulphate solutions. A neural networks model was constructed, trained and tested using the available database. In general, artificial neural networks could be successfully used in function approximation problems in order to approach the data generation function. Once data generation function is known, artificial neural network structure is tested using data not presented to the network during training. This paper is intent to provide the technical requirements related to the production of a durable concrete to be used in the structures of the Brazilian near-surface repository of radioactive wastes. (author)

  18. Soil composition and nutritional status of apple as affected by long-term application of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Nava

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum does not affect the soil negative charges and maintains sulfate in the soil solution, making it one of the cheapest products to increase Ca activity in soil solution, especially in the deeper soil layers. Higher Ca levels in the soil solution can increase the uptake of this nutrient by apple trees, reducing the risk of physiological disorders caused by Ca deficiency. This study assessed the effect of long-term gypsum application on some soil properties and on the chemical composition of leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to fruit disorders associated with low Ca. The experiment was conducted in São Joaquim, in the South of Brazil, from 2001 to 2009. Gypsum rates of 0, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 t ha-1 were annually broadcast over the soil surface, without incorporation, in an apple orchard with cultivar ´Catarina´, planted in 1997. Gypsum application over eight consecutive years had no effect on soil exchangeable K and Al to a depth of 80 cm, but increased exchangeable Ca in the sampled layers (0-10, 10-20, 40-60 and 60-80 cm, while exchangeable Mg decreased only in the surface layer (0-20 cm. Gypsum did not affect the concentration of any nutrient in the fruits, including Ca. The same was verified in the leaves, except for Mg which decreased with increased gypsum rate. Despite increasing the availability of Ca in the soil profile to a depth of 80 cm, gypsum was not effective to increase the Ca content in leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to Ca deficiency grown in an appropriately limed soil.

  19. Surface Coating of Gypsum-Based Molds for Maxillofacial Prosthetic Silicone Elastomeric Material: The Surface Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Salah; Ariffin, Zaihan; Husein, Adam; Reza, Fazal

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the surface roughness of maxillofacial silicone elastomers fabricated in noncoated and coated gypsum materials. This study was also conducted to characterize the silicone elastomer specimens after surfaces were modified. A gypsum mold was coated with clear acrylic spray. The coated mold was then used to produce modified silicone experimental specimens (n = 35). The surface roughness of the modified silicone elastomers was compared with that of the control specimens, which were prepared by conventional flasking methods (n = 35). An atomic force microscope (AFM) was used for surface roughness measurement of silicone elastomer (unmodified and modified), and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the topographic conditions of coated and noncoated gypsum and silicone elastomer specimens (unmodified and modified) groups. After the gypsum molds were characterized, the fabricated silicone elastomers molded on noncoated and coated gypsum materials were evaluated further. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis of gypsum materials (noncoated and coated) and silicone elastomer specimens (unmodified and modified) was performed to evaluate the elemental changes after coating was conducted. Independent t test was used to analyze the differences in the surface roughness of unmodified and modified silicone at a significance level of p SEM analysis results showed evident differences in surface smoothness. EDX data further revealed the presence of the desired chemical components on the surface layer of unmodified and modified silicone elastomers. Silicone elastomers with lower surface roughness of maxillofacial prostheses can be obtained simply by coating a gypsum mold. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Urea Hydrolysis and Calcium Carbonate Precipitation in Gypsum-Amended Broiler Litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Christopher D; Cabrera, Miguel L; Rothrock, Michael J; Kissel, D E

    2018-01-01

    Broiler () litter is subject to ammonia (NH) volatilization losses. Previous work has shown that the addition of gypsum to broiler litter can increase nitrogen mineralization and decrease NH losses due to a decrease in pH, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects are not well understood. Therefore, three laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of gypsum addition to broiler litter on (i) urease activity at three water contents, (ii) calcium carbonate precipitation, and (iii) pH. The addition of gypsum to broiler litter increased ammonium concentrations ( litter pH by 0.43 to 0.49 pH units after 5 d ( litter only increased on Day 0 for broiler litter with low (0.29 g HO g) and high (0.69 g HO g) water contents, and on Day 3 for litter with medium (0.40 g HO g) water content ( litter with gypsum also caused an immediate decrease in litter pH (0.22 pH units) due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO) from gypsum-derived calcium and litter bicarbonate. Furthermore, as urea was hydrolyzed, more urea-derived carbon precipitated as CaCO in gypsum-treated litter than in untreated litter ( litter with gypsum favors the precipitation of CaCO, which buffers against increases in litter pH that are known to facilitate NH volatilization. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  2. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  3. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Chemical environment in cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  5. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanum dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry; Caracterizacion fisico-quimica y radiactiva de los sub-productos provenientes de la industria de dioxido de titanio para su valorizacion en la industria del cemento: implicaciones radiologicas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-07-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanum dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields sucha as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  6. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry; Caracterizacion fisico-quimica y radiactiva de los sub-productos provenientes de la industria de dioxido de titanio para su valorizacion en la industria del cemento: implicaciones radiologicas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-07-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  7. Messinian Salinity Crisis' Primary Evaporites: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, G. J.; Krijgsman, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, resulting in deposition of 1-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable, long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation, including the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions at a precessional rhythm. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal- and dolomite formation at deeper settings. A range of potential explanations was given, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are commonly neglected but may explain that different deposits formed in shallow vs deep environments without exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. A unifying mechanism is presented in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing deep-basin anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes result in dolomite formation. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process linking the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, ongoing OM-degradation may result in reducing the sulphate and enhancing the dissolved carbonate content. Such low-sulphate / high carbonate conditions in MSC deepwater are. unfavorable for gypsum preservation and favorable for dolomite formation, and always coincide with anoxic, i.e. oxygen-free conditions. Including dynamic biogeochemical processes in the thusfar static

  8. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  9. Effects of gypsum and bulk density on neutron probe calibration curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Awadis; Razzouk, A.K.

    1993-10-01

    The effects of gypsum and bulk density on the neutron probe calibration curve were studied in the laboratory and in the field. The effect of bulk density was negligible for the soil studied in the laboratory, while it was significant for the field calibration. An increase in the slope of moisture content on a volume basis vs. count ratio with increasing gypsum content at the soil was observed in the laboratory calibration. A simple method for correction of the calibration curve for gypsum content was adopted to obtain a specific curve for each layer. The adapted method requires the gypsum fraction to be estimated for each layer and then incorporated in the calibration curve to improve the coefficient of determination. A field calibration showed an improvement of the determination coefficient by introducing bulk density and gypsum fraction, in addition to count ratio using moisture content on a volume basis as a dependent variable in multi linear regression analysis. The same procedure was successful with variable gravel fractions. (author). 18 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Effect of alginate chemical disinfection on bacterial count over gypsum cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Dowah, Omir S; Gana, Naif S; Al-Hytham, Abdullah

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) and iodophor disinfectants on alginate impressions along with their effect on the survived bacterium count on the gypsum cast. Four alginate impression on each dentate patients were made, of which Group I were not washed or disinfected, Group II impressions were merely washed with water, Group III were disinfected by spraying with sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10), Group IV were disinfected with iodophor (1 : 213). Gypsum cast (type III) were made from all the impression. Impressions and gypsum cast were swabbed in mid palatal region for bacterial culture. Bacterial colony counting done after 3 days of incubation at 37℃ in blood agar media. The data obtained was analyzed by one way ANOVA test at a significant difference level of 0.05. Group I and Group II showed significantly more bacteria compared to Group III and Group IV. Bacterial colonies on the alginate impression and gypsum cast in group disinfected with Sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) were 0.18, 0.82 respectively compared to group treated with iodophor (1 : 213). There was an increase in bacterial count on dental cast compared to source alginate impressions. Sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) was found to be better disinfectant for alginate impression. There was an indication of increase in number of bacteria from alginate impression to making of dental cast. Additional gypsum cast disinfectant procedures need to be encouraged to completely eliminate cross infection to dental laboratory.

  11. Gypsum-permineralized microfossils and their relevance to the search for life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J William; Farmer, Jack D; Foster, Ian S; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Gallardo, Victor A; Espinoza, Carola

    2012-07-01

    Orbital and in situ analyses establish that aerially extensive deposits of evaporitic sulfates, including gypsum, are present on the surface of Mars. Although comparable gypsiferous sediments on Earth have been largely ignored by paleontologists, we here report the finding of diverse fossil microscopic organisms permineralized in bottom-nucleated gypsums of seven deposits: two from the Permian (∼260 Ma) of New Mexico, USA; one from the Miocene (∼6 Ma) of Italy; and four from Recent lacustrine and saltern deposits of Australia, Mexico, and Peru. In addition to presenting the first report of the widespread occurrence of microscopic fossils in bottom-nucleated primary gypsum, we show the striking morphological similarity of the majority of the benthic filamentous fossils of these units to the microorganisms of a modern sulfuretum biocoenose. Based on such similarity, in morphology as well as habitat, these findings suggest that anaerobic sulfur-metabolizing microbial assemblages have changed relatively little over hundreds of millions of years. Their discovery as fossilized components of the seven gypsiferous units reported suggests that primary bottom-nucleated gypsum represents a promising target in the search for evidence of past life on Mars. Key Words: Confocal laser scanning microscopy-Gypsum fossils-Mars sample return missions-Raman spectroscopy-Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument-Sulfuretum.

  12. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  13. Stability of reinforced cemented backfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.J.; Stone, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mining with backfill has been the subject of several international meetings in recent years and a considerable research effort is being applied to improve both mining economics and ore recovery by using backfill for ground support. Classified mill tailings sands are the most commonly used backfill material but these fine sands must be stabilized before full ore pillar recovery can be achieved. Normal portland cement is generally used for stabilization but the high cost of cement prohibits high cement usage. This paper considers the use of reinforcements in cemented fill to reduce the cement usage. It is concluded that strong cemented layers at typical spacings of about 3 meters in a low cement content bulk fill can reinforce the fill and reduce the overall cement usage. Fibre reinforcements introduced into strong layers or into bulk fills are also known to be effective in reducing cement usage. Some development work is needed to produce the ideal type of anchored fibre in order to realize economic gains from fibre-reinforced fills

  14. A DOC coagulant, gypsum treatment can simultaneously reduce As, Cd and Pb uptake by medicinal plants grown in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuck Soo; Seo, Byoung-Hwan; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Yang, Jae-E; Owens, Gary; Kim, Kwon-Rae

    2018-02-01

    The efficiency of gypsum, as a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) coagulator, for the simultaneous immobilization of two heavy metals (Cd and Pb) and one metalloid (As) in agricultural soils near an abandoned mining site was examined. The agricultural soil was defined as long-term contaminated as As (1540mgkg -1 ), Cd (55mgkg -1 ) and Pb (1283mgkg -1 ) concentrations exceeded the Korean guideline values for As (25mgkg -1 ), Cd (4mgkg -1 ), and Pb (200mgkg -1 ). Gypsum was incorporated into the contaminated soil at 3% (w/w). In comparison two commonly using immobilizing agents (lime and compost), together with a mixture (lime+gypsum) were also included in the pot trial for the cultivation of two medical plants (A. gigas and A. macrocephala) and to evaluate the effectiveness of gypsum on As, Cd and Pb immobilization. The results showed that even though pH change-induced immobilizing agents such as lime were more effective than gypsum at immobilizing Cd and Pb, addition of gypsum also effectively reduced heavy metal phytoavailability as indicated by decreases in the concentration of Cd and Pb in medicinal plants. Furthermore, gypsum and gypsum+ lime were also most effective in reducing As concentrations in both plants studied. This was mainly attributed to significant decreases in soil DOC (48-64%) when gypsum and gypsum+lime were applied to the soil. Consequently, it was concluded that enhanced DOC coagulation with gypsum, could be considered as a promising technique for the immobilization of both metals (Cd and Pb) and metalloids (As) in agricultural soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of EDTA and gypsum on self diffusion coefficient of zinc in alkali soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.N.; Deb, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of EDTA and gypsum application on the rate of zinc diffusion was studied in an alkali soil. Gypsum application at the rate of half gypsum requirement (GR) increased the apparent self diffusion coefficient of zinc (DaZn) and decreased the capacity factor (B) of soil. The higher rates (full GR and double GR) depressed the rate of zinc diffusion and increased the B value. Application of EDTA at the rate of 0.77 μeg -1 of soil produced 1600 and 24 fold increase in DaZn and DpZn values respectively and 100 times drop in B value. Addition of 55 ppm Zn to the soil significantly increased the DaZn and DpZn values. (author)

  16. Dimensional accuracy and surface property of titanium casting using gypsum-bonded alumina investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Nishimura, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy and surface property of titanium casting obtained using a gypsum-bonded alumina investment. The experimental gypsum-bonded alumina investment with 20 mass% gypsum content mixed with 2 mass% potassium sulfate was used for five cp titanium castings and three Cu-Zn alloy castings. The accuracy, surface roughness (Ra), and reaction layer thickness of these castings were investigated. The accuracy of the castings obtained from the experimental investment ranged from -0.04 to 0.23%, while surface roughness (Ra) ranged from 7.6 to 10.3microm. A reaction layer of about 150 microm thickness under the titanium casting surface was observed. These results suggested that the titanium casting obtained using the experimental investment was acceptable. Although the reaction layer was thin, surface roughness should be improved.

  17. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL BASED ON GYPSUM BINDER AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUMAK Anastasia Gennadievna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to carry out a number of studies in the area of nanomodi­fication of gypsum binder matrix and to investigate the influence of multilayer carbon nanotubes on the structure, physical and mechanical properties of obtained compos­ites. The study of the gypsum binders structure formation mechanisms with the use of nanoadditives makes it possible to control the production processes of gypsum materi­als and articles with the given set of properties. The main tasks of the binder nanomodification are: even distribution of carbon nanostructures over the whole volume of material and provision of stability for the nanodimensional modifier during production process of the construction composite.

  18. Effect of shelf life on compressive strength of type iv gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, K. S.; Irawan, B.; Damiyanti, M.

    2017-08-01

    Type IV gypsum, as a dental material for an indirect restoration’s working model, should have strength and abrasive-resistant properties. These properties depend on the product’s shelf life and its proper storage, which sometimes are easily missed by sellers. The aim of this research was to observe the effect of shelf life on the compressive strength of type IV gypsum with different production dates. Twenty cylindrical specimens were separated into two groups with different production dates and tested with a universal testing with the crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute and a load of 2,500 kgf. The data were analyzed with independent t-tests. There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in the compressive strength between the two groups with an increase in compressive strength seen in the gypsum that was stored longer.

  19. Application of gypsum as shielding against low-energy X-radiation in the radiodiagnosis area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.A.G.; Lima, F.R.A.; Santos, M.A.P. dos; Oliveira, D.N.S. de; Silva, V.H.F.F. da

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, materials such as lead, concrete and iron have been studied for use as shielding for ionizing radiations of different energies in radiative installations. In the radiodiagnosis area, lead and barite are the most used materials as shielding. However, for beams of low energy X-radiation, such as in mammography and dentistry, the gypsum material may be used. This study aims to verify the feasibility of the use of gypsum as shielding for low-energy X-ray using standardized dental X-ray beams in a metrology laboratory. The project will allow a better understanding in the study of gypsum used as shielding, certifying its use as a good attenuator for low-energy X-ray

  20. Analysis of cubic and orthorhombic C3A hydration in presence of gypsum and lime

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchheim, A. P.

    2009-02-26

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to study the microstructural changes and phase development that take place during the hydration of cubic (pure) and orthorhombic (Na-doped) tricalcium aluminate (C3A) and gypsum in the absence and presence of lime. The results demonstrate that important differences occur in the hydration of each C3A polymorph and gypsum when no lime is added; orthorhombic C3A reacts faster with gypsum than the cubic phase, forming longer ettringite needles; however, the presence of lime slows down the formation of ettringite in the orthorhombic sample. Additional rheometric tests showed the possible effects on the setting time in these cementitious mixes.

  1. Analysis of cubic and orthorhombic C3A hydration in presence of gypsum and lime

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchheim, A. P.; Fernà ndez-Altable, V.; Monteiro, P. J. M.; Dal Molin, D. C. C.; Casanova, I.

    2009-01-01

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to study the microstructural changes and phase development that take place during the hydration of cubic (pure) and orthorhombic (Na-doped) tricalcium aluminate (C3A) and gypsum in the absence and presence of lime. The results demonstrate that important differences occur in the hydration of each C3A polymorph and gypsum when no lime is added; orthorhombic C3A reacts faster with gypsum than the cubic phase, forming longer ettringite needles; however, the presence of lime slows down the formation of ettringite in the orthorhombic sample. Additional rheometric tests showed the possible effects on the setting time in these cementitious mixes.

  2. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on development of technology to recycle disintegrated waste gypsum boards; 1999 nendo kaitai haisekko board no saishigenka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Investigations and researches have been made on disintegrated waste gypsum boards generated in building demolishing sites, with a target of recycling them as a raw material for boards. In the investigations, the actual status of discarding the disintegrated gypsum boards was identified, whereas the harmful substance contents such as of heavy metals were verified to be below the environmental criteria. As a method to remove impurities and foreign materials from the disintegrated waste gypsum boards, the hydration crushing method was established, in which volumetric change when hemihydrate gypsum returns to gypsum dehydrate is utilized, and bond of gypsum particles with each other and with impurities is destructed to separate them into simple substances. Furthermore, discussions were given on the reforming conditions to reform in an energy saving manner the disintegrated waste gypsum boards into high-quality large-size hemihydrate gypsum by using the wet-type process that utilizes the reversible reaction between hemihydrate gypsum and gypsum dehydrate in the disintegrated waste gypsum boards. A manufacturing process to put the recycled gypsum into practical use was also discussed. Prototype board fabrication and tests were performed by using the reformed gypsum board materials, wherein good results were obtained from all of the practical, chemical, and physical tests. (NEDO)

  4. Testing CO2 Sequestration in an Alkaline Soil Treated with Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying effective and economical methods for increasing carbon storage in soils is of interest for reducing soil CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere in order to partially offset anthropogenic CO2 contributions to climate change This study investigates an alternative strategy for increasing carbon retention in soils by accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. The addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8, often found in arid and semi-arid regions, may accelerate the slow process of calcite precipitation. Increased ionic strength from addition of a soluble Ca source also suppresses microbial activity which oxidizes SOC to gaseous CO2. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to identify conditions in which inorganic and organic C sequestration is practical in semi-arid and arid soils by gypsum treatment. As an inexpensive calcium source, we proposed to use flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG), a byproduct of fossil fuel burning electric power plants. To test the hypothesis, laboratory column experiments have been conducted in calcite-buffered soil with addition of gypsum and FGDG. The results of several months of column monitoring are demonstrating that gypsum-treated soil have lowered amounts of soil organic carbon loss and increased inorganic carbon (calcite) production. The excess generation of FGDG relative to industrial and agricultural needs, FGDG, is currently regarded as waste. Thus application of FGDG application in some soils may be an effective and economical means for fixing CO2 in soil organic and inorganic carbon forms.Soil carbon cycle, with proposed increased C retention by calcite precipitation and by SOC binding onto soil mineral surfaces, with both processes driven by calcium released from gypsum dissolution.

  5. Using dehydrated cement paste as new type of cement additive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.; Dong, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study, including evaluation and modification, on using dehydrated cement paste (DCP) as a new type of cement additive. After a series of processes, normal DCP (N-DCP) was produced as before and a modified form of DCP (M-DCP) was produced as well. The cementitious

  6. Competition between reaction-induced expansion and creep compaction during gypsum formation: Experimental and numerical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Savage, H. M.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Kelemen, P. B.; Yancopoulos, D.

    2017-12-01

    Deformation and cracking caused by reaction-driven volume increase is an important process in many geological settings, however the conditions controlling these processes are poorly understood. The interaction of rocks with reactive fluids can change permeability and reactive surface area, leading to a large variety of feedbacks. Gypsum is an ideal material to study these processes. It forms rapidly at room temperature via bassanite hydration, and is commonly used as an analogue for rocks in high-temperature, high-pressure conditions. We conducted uniaxial strain experiments to study the effects of applied axial load on deformation and fluid flow during the formation of gypsum from bassanite. While hydration of bassanite to gypsum involves a solid volume increase, gypsum exhibits significant creep compaction when in contact with water. These two volume changing processes occur simultaneously during fluid flow through bassanite. We cold-pressed bassanite powder to form cylinders 2.5 cm in height and 1.2 cm in diameter. Samples were compressed with a static axial load of 0.01 to 4 MPa. Water infiltrated initially unsaturated samples through the bottom face and the height of the samples was recorded as a measure of the total volume change. We also performed experiments on pure gypsum samples to constrain the amount of creep observed in tests on bassanite hydration. At axial loads 1 MPa, creep in the gypsum dominates and samples exhibit monotonic compaction. At intermediate loads, samples exhibit alternating phases of compaction and expansion due to the interplay of the two volume changing processes. We observed a change from net compaction to net expansion at an axial load of 0.250 MPa. We explain this behavior with a simple model that predicts the strain evolution, but does not take fluid flow into account. We also implement a 1D poro-visco-elastic model of the imbibition process that includes the reaction and gypsum creep. We use the results of these models, with

  7. Experimental Shock Transformation of Gypsum to Anhydrite: A New Low Pressure Regime Shock Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The shock behavior of gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Paleogene event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets (e.g., Mars Exploration Rover Spirit detected sulfate at Gusev crater, [1]). Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of SO2 to better understand its role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [2,3]. Kondo and Ahrens [4] measured induced radiation emitted from single crystal gypsum shocked to 30 and 40 GPa. They observed greybody emission spectra corresponding to temperatures in the range of 3,000 to 4,000 K that are a factor of 2 to 10 times greater than calculated pressure-density energy equation of state temperatures (Hugoniot) and are high enough to melt gypsum. Chen et al. [5] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of these phases with silica. Their observations indicated little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, Badjukov et al. [6] observed only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa but have not experimentally shocked gypsum in a step-wise manner to constrain possible incipient transformation effects. Schmitt and Hornemann [7] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa and report the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggested that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid-state transformation. They concluded that significant decomposition of anhydrite requires shock pressures higher than 60 GPa. Gupta et al. [8

  8. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  9. Process for fabrication of dry flue gas gypsum. Verfahren zur Herstellung von trockenem Rauchgasgips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirsching, F.; Hueller, R.; Limmer, B.

    1984-06-20

    According to the invention gypsum from flue gas wet desulfurization is dried without loss of crystallization water by a 1-4% sidestream of the flue gas in a suspended bed dryer and is subsequently separated in a cyclone. The sidestream is removed after the electrostatic precipitator, where the gas temperature is 100-130 degrees, and returned to the main gas stream prior to desulfurization, thus preventing the dehydration of the gypsum and eliminating the energy costs of reheating the gas stream to prevent acid condensation.

  10. GE`s worldwide experience with IFO based gypsum producing flue gas desulfurization systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, A. [GE Environmental Systems, Lebanon, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The In-Situ Forced Oxidation (IFO) process to produce gypsum in a commercial scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system was first demonstrated by GE Environmental Systems in 1980 at the Monticello Generating Station of Texas Utilities. Since then, the IFO technology developed and demonstrated by GE has become the industry standard and is used extensively on a world-wide basis to produce both commercial and disposable-grade gypsum. The paper gives an overview of the development, demonstration, commercial design and current status of the IFO technology.

  11. Evaluation of Synthetic Gypsum Recovered via Wet Flue-Gas Desulfurization from Electric Power Plants for Use in Foundries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Biernacki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates possible use of waste gypsum (synthetic, recovered via flue-gas desulfurization from coal-fired electric powerplants, in foundries. Energy sector, which in Eastern Europe is mostly composed from coal-fired electric power plants, is one of the largestproducers of sulfur dioxide (SO2.In order to protect the environment and reduce the amount of pollution flue-gas desulfurization (FGD is used to remove SO2 fromexhaust flue gases of fossil-fuel power plants. As a result of this process gypsum waste is produced that can be used in practicalapplications.Strength and permeability tests have been made and also in-depth analysis of energy consumption of production process to investigateways of preparing the synthetic gypsum for casting moulds application. This paper also assesses the chemical composition, strength andpermeability of moulds made with synthetic gypsum, in comparison with moulds made with traditional GoldStar XL gypsum and withceramic molds. Moreover examination of structure of synthetic gypsum, the investigations on derivatograph and calculations of energyconsumption during production process of synthetic gypsum in wet flue-gas desulfurization were made.After analysis of gathered data it’s possible to conclude that synthetic gypsum can be used as a material for casting mould. There is nosignificant decrease in key properties, and on the other hand there is many additional benefits including low energy consumption,decreased cost, and decreased environmental impact.

  12. Gypsum and organic matter distribution in a mixed construction and demolition waste sorting process and their possible removal from outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, A; Tojo, Y; Matsuo, T; Matsuto, T; Yamada, M; Asakura, H; Ono, Y

    2010-03-15

    With insufficient source separation, construction and demolition (C&D) waste becomes a mixed material that is difficult to recycle. Treatment of mixed C&D waste generates residue that contains gypsum and organic matter and poses a risk of H(2)S formation in landfills. Therefore, removing gypsum and organic matter from the residue is vital. This study investigated the distribution of gypsum and organic matter in a sorting process. Heavy liquid separation was used to determine the density ranges in which gypsum and organic matter were most concentrated. The fine residue that was separated before shredding accounted for 27.9% of the waste mass and contained the greatest quantity of gypsum; therefore, most of the gypsum (52.4%) was distributed in this fraction. When this fine fraction was subjected to heavy liquid separation, 93% of the gypsum was concentrated in the density range of 1.59-2.28, which contained 24% of the total waste mass. Therefore, removing this density range after segregating fine particles should reduce the amount of gypsum sent to landfills. Organic matter tends to float as density increases; nevertheless, separation at 1.0 density could be more efficient. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomass for green cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, R. [Lafarge Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Lafarge examined the use of waste biomass products in its building materials and provided background information on its operations. Cement kiln infrastructure was described in terms of providing access to shipping, rail and highways; conveying and off-loading equipment; having large storage facilities; and, offering continuous monitoring and stack testing. The presentation identified the advantages and disadvantages of a few different biomass cases such as coal; scrap tires; non-recyclable household waste; and processed biomass. A chart representing landfill diversion rates was presented and the presentation concluded with a discussion of energy recovery and recycling. 1 tab., figs.

  14. Physical and microstructural aspects of sulfate attack on ordinary and limestone blended Portland cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Lothenbach, Barbara; Romer, Michael; Neuenschwander, Juerg; Scrivener, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of external sulfate attack were investigated by traditional test methods, i.e. length and mass change, as well as by a newly developed, surface sensitive ultrasonic method, using Leaky Rayleigh waves (1 MHz). The macroscopic changes are discussed and compared with thermodynamic calculations and microstructural findings (SEM/EDS). The results show that the main impact of limestone additions on resistance to sulfate degradation are physical - i.e. addition of a few percent in Portland cement reduces the porosity and increases the resistance of Portland cement systems to sulfate; but higher addition of 25% increase porosity and lower resistance to sulfate. The kinetics of degradation were dramatically affected by the solution concentration (4 or 44 g Na 2 SO 4 /l) and the higher concentration also resulted in the formation of gypsum, which did not occur at the low concentration. However the pattern of cracking was similar in both cases and it appears that gypsum precipitates opportunistically in pre-formed cracks so it is not considered as making a significant contribution to the degradation. At 8 deg. C limited formation of thaumasite occurred in the surface region of the samples made from cement with limestone additions. This thaumasite formation led to loss of cohesion of the paste and loss of material from the surface of the samples. However thaumasite formation was always preceded by expansion and cracking of the samples due to ettringite formation and given the very slow kinetics of thaumasite formation it was probably facilitated by the opening up of the structure due to ettringite induced cracking. The expansion of the samples showed a steady stage, followed by a rapidly accelerating stage, with destruction of the samples. The onset of the rapidly accelerating stage occurred when the thickness of the cracked surface layer reached about 1-1.5 mm-10-15% of the total specimen thickness (10 mm).

  15. Process of preparing hydraulic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1919-12-11

    A process of preparing hydraulic cement from oil shale or shale coke is characterized in that the oil shale or shale coke after the distillation is burned long and hot to liberate the usual amount of carbonic acid and then is fine ground to obtain a slow hardening hydraulic cement.

  16. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  17. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  18. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  19. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  20. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  1. Investigation of Parameters Affecting Gypsum Dewatering Properties in a Wet Flue Gas Desulphurization Pilot Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun; Kiil, Søren

    2012-01-01

    of impurities (0.002 M Al2F6; 50 g quartz/L; 0.02 M Al3+, and 0.040 M Mg2+) were investigated. In addition, slurry from a full-scale wet FGD plant, experiencing formation of flat shaped crystals and poor gypsum dewatering properties, was transferred to the pilot plant to test if the plant would now start...... to time. In this work, the particle size distribution, morphology, and filtration rate of wet FGD gypsum formed in a pilot-scale experimental setup, operated in forced oxidation mode, have been studied. The influence of holding tank residence time (10–408 h), solids content (30–169 g/L), and the presence...... to produce low quality gypsum. The crystals formed in the pilot plant, on the basis of the full-scale slurry did, however, show acceptable filtration rates and crystal morphologies closer to the prismatic crystals from after pilot plant experiments with demineralized water. The gypsum slurry filtration rates...

  2. Development of a self-compacting gypsum-based lightweight composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Q.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses experiments and theories of a self-compacting gypsum-based lightweight composite (SGLC). A ß-hemihydrate is used as binder and lightweight aggregate (LWA, 0–2 mm in different size ranges) is used as aggregate into this composite. The mix of the new composite is designed based

  3. Composition of gypsum from the Koběřice quarry (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Pavel; Plevová, Eva; Vaculíková, Lenka; Kožušníková, Alena; Peterková, J.; Hundáková, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2011), s. 145-156 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : gypsum * Kobeřice quarry * spectroscopy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/abstracts/AGG/02_11/5_Konecny.pdf

  4. Morphology and stability of aggregates of an Oxisol according to tillage system and gypsum application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Régis de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characterization and aggregate stability is an important factor in evaluating management systems. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the stability and morphology of the aggregates of a dystrophic Oxisol managed with no-tillage and conventional tillage with and without the residual action of gypsum. The experimental design was randomized blocks arranged in split-split plot, where the treatments were two soil management systems (plots with 0 and 2000 kg ha-1 of gypsum (subplots and five depths (0-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.15, 0.15-0.20 and 0.20-0.30 m as the subsubplots, with four replications. The aggregate morphology was determined through images and later evaluated by the Quantporo software. Stability was determined by the wet method. The results showed that the no-tillage system, with or without gypsum residual effect, provided the aggregates with the largest geometric diameters. The combination of no-tillage system and the gypsum residual effect provided rougher aggregates.

  5. Two distinctive new species of Commicarpus (Nyctaginaceae) from gypsum outcrops in eastern Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Gilbert, Michael G.; Weber, Odile

    2016-01-01

    During field trips in 2013 and 2014, two distinctive plants belonging to the genus Commicarpus were collected in the Lele Hills, Bale Zone, eastern Ethiopia, on outcrops of sedimentary rock belonging to the Gorrahei Formation with high contents of gypsum. The plants are here described as two new...

  6. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  7. Palaeoclimatic significance of gypsum pseudomorphs in the inner shelf sediments off Machalipatnam bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Pseudo-gypsum crystals have been found in the coarse fraction of the sediments from the inner continental shelf off Machilipatnam Bay. They range in size from 3 to 7 mm are elongate and lenticular in shape. Bassanite and calcite are pseudomorphs...

  8. Results using flue gas desulfurization gypsum in soilless substrates for greenhouse crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent availability of Flue Gas Desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has led to interested in its possible use in horticulture greenhouse production. Three studies were conducted to determine the effects of increasing rates of FGDG on six greenhouse crops. In the first study, substrates (6:1 pine bark:san...

  9. Seepage Analysis of Upper Gotvand Dam Concerning Gypsum Karstification (2D and 3D Approaches)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrekarimi, Jamshid; Kiyani, Majid; Fakhri, Behnam

    2011-01-01

    Upper Gotvand Dam is constructed on the Karun River at the south west of Iran. In this paper, 2D and 3D models of the dam together with the foundation and abutments were established, and several seepage analyses were carried out. Then, the gypsum veins that are scattered throughout the foundation...

  10. Gypsum plasterboards enhanced with phase change materials: A fire safety assessment using experimental and computational techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolaitis Dionysios I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials (PCM can be used for thermal energy storage, aiming to enhance building energy efficiency. Recently, gypsum plasterboards with incorporated paraffin-based PCM blends have become commercially available. In the high temperature environment developed during a fire, the paraffins, which exhibit relatively low boiling points, may evaporate and, escaping through the gypsum plasterboard's porous structure, emerge to the fire region, where they may ignite, thus adversely affecting the fire resistance characteristics of the building. Aiming to assess the fire safety behaviour of such building materials, an extensive experimental and computational analysis is performed. The fire behaviour and the main thermo-physical physical properties of PCM-enhanced gypsum plasterboards are investigated, using a variety of standard tests and devices (Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, Cone Calorimeter. The obtained results are used to develop a dedicated numerical model, which is implemented in a CFD code. CFD simulations are validated using measurements obtained in a cone calorimeter. In addition, the CFD code is used to simulate an ISO 9705 room exposed to fire conditions, demonstrating that PCM addition may indeed adversely affect the fire safety of a gypsum plasterboard clad building.

  11. Assessment of Mercury in Soils, Crops, Earthworms, and Water when Soil is Treated with Gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum from fossil fuel combustion has many potential uses in agriculture, but there is concern about the potential environmental effects of its elevated mercury (Hg) concentration. The wet limestone scrubbing process that removes sulfur from flue gas (and produces gyp...

  12. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relative to fresh broiler litter, little is known about the dynamics of composted litter derived-nutrient in the ecosystem. In this study, the potential leaching losses of nutrients from compost relative to fresh broiler litter along with flue gas desulfurization (FGD gypsum), as a nutrient immobil...

  13. Characterization of gypsum crystals exposed to a high CO2 concentration fog using x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreño-Márquez, I. J. A.; Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    In Chihuahua State, a little town called Naica has the largest gypsum single crystals in the world. The growth of these structures has been described as a long and stable process developed over thousands of years. Due to the change in the environmental conditions, these crystals could suffer alterations on their surface. In this project we study the cause of possible deterioration of the giant crystals and intend to suggest measures for their preservation. For this sake, our first experiment consists on several gypsum crystals that have been subjected in a climate chamber to a fog at high CO 2 concentration and 51 °C for a period of time of six months, extracting two crystals every 15 days. Then the crystals have been characterized through Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction using a diffractometer PanAlytical X’PertPro with two different detectors; Xe-filled proportional detector and a Pixel 3D detector. The results were compared to determine which technique is the most suitable to study the degradation of gypsum single crystals. In the two cases, we have identified only the gypsum phase, but with different crystal plane orientations

  14. Inflammatory potential of low doses of airborne fungi from fungal infested damp and dry gypsum boards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Sofie Marie; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2017-01-01

    chrysogenum. Bacillus infantis and Paenibacillus sp. were found on the gypsum boards, but not recovered in the aerosols. A significant correlation was found between the TIP of diluted and undiluted samples of fungal aerosols. However, diluted samples had a higher TIP than undiluted samples, and no significant...

  15. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum: Its effectiveness as an alternative bedding material for broiler production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) may be a viable low-cost alternative bedding material for broiler production. In order to evaluate FGD gypsum’s viability, three consecutive trials were conducted to determine its influence on live performance (body weight, feed consumption, feed efficiency, an...

  16. Investigation on the Permeability Evolution of Gypsum Interlayer Under High Temperature and Triaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meng; Yechao, You; Jie, Chen; Yaoqing, Hu

    2017-08-01

    The permeability of the surrounding rock is a critical parameter for the designing and assessment of radioactive waste disposal repositories in the rock salt. Generally, in the locations that are chosen for radioactive waste storage, the bedded rock salt is a sedimentary rock that contains NaCl and Na2SO4. Most likely, there are also layers of gypsum ( {CaSO}_{ 4} \\cdot 2 {H}_{ 2} {O)} present in the salt deposit. Radioactive wastes emit a large amount of heat and hydrogen during the process of disposal, which may result in thermal damage of the surrounding rocks and cause a great change in their permeability and tightness. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the permeability evolution of the gypsum interlayer under high temperature and high pressure in order to evaluate the tightness and security of the nuclear waste repositories in bedded rock salt. In this study, a self-designed rock triaxial testing system by which high temperature and pressure can be applied is used; the μCT225kVFCB micro-CT system is also employed to investigate the permeability and microstructure of gypsum specimens under a constant hydrostatic pressure of 25 MPa, an increasing temperature (ranging from 20 to 650 °C), and a variable inlet gas pressure (1, 2, 4, 6 MPa). The experimental results show: (a) the maximum permeability measured during the whole experiment is less than 10-17 m2, which indicates that the gypsum interlayer has low permeability under high temperature and pressure that meet the requirements for radioactive waste repository. (b) Under the same temperature, the permeability of the gypsum specimen decreases at the beginning and then increases as the pore pressure elevates. When the inlet gas pressure is between 0 and 2 MPa, the Klinkenberg effect is very pronounced. Then, as the pore pressure increases, the movement behavior of gas molecules gradually changes from free motion to forced directional motion. So the role of free movement of gas molecules gradually

  17. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  18. Effect of temperature and concentration principle on gypsum scaling in desalination units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ahmed, Samia; Tlili, Mohamed; Ben Amor, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Tunisia (North Africa) is currently confronted to the crucial problem of the public, agricultural and industrial feed water supply, in particular in the center and south areas. Production of fresh water by seawater and brackish water desalination has proved to be an alternative for these regions. However, all the desalination processes are based on the concentration principle of waters already presented higher salinity. So, scale problem can occurs by the accumulation of minerals such as CaCO 3 and CaSO 4 . These salts form hard and strongly adhering deposits on the surfaces and their formation is favoured by the decrease of their solubility with increasing temperature. The main object of this investigation is the study and the control of calcium sulphate deposition causes and conditions in the thermal desalination plant. For this purpose, the effect of different water temperatures (30-90 degree) and saturation states (3-10), on homogeneous nucleation and growth of gypsum, variety usually met, was examined. Gypsum was precipitated by mixing aqueous CaCl 2 and Na 2 SO 4 solutions. It was found that, with increasing temperature or supersaturation, the induction time decreases and the growth rate increases. At the same saturation state, the effect of temperature on reducing induction time is more significant for T<50 degree whereas the growth rate of gypsum crystals is more influenced when the temperature exceeds 50 degree. This value can be considered as a critical temperature; once reached the gypsum scaling threat becomes serious. By using classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension and the nucleation rate values were estimated. It was shown that the interfacial tension is, as well, temperature dependent. The calculation of nucleation rate showed that: i) by increasing temperature, the number of formed nuclei does not change. The effect of this parameter is limited at the kinetic of formation and growth of these nuclei, ii) the water concentration

  19. IMPACT OF NANOMODIFIERS ON MECHANICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF GYPSUM BINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEREVIANKO V. N.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Problem statement. In the next 10 years, more than 90% of materials will be replaced with new materials – nanocomposites [1]. The nanocomponents application will allow manufacture of high-strength materials with reduced production cost and will ensure demand for products [2]. Researches aimed to determination of carbon nanotube type nanomodifier concentration impact on the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum binders are important today and must result in creation of competitive strong nano-materials. Purpose. Research of carbon nanotube (CNT type nanomodifier concentration impact on the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum binders. Conclusion. Sample microstructure analysis revealed that the non-modified gypsum sample structure is dominated by prismatic and lamellar crystals randomly distributed throughout the matrix volume. In this case, loose structure with increased porosity is formed, which results in sample mechanical strength reduction. In the CNT-modified gypsum matrix, well-ordered and homogeneous structure is formed with larger needle-shaped crystals, which results in the phase-contacting area increase, porosity reduction and thus the physical and mechanical characteristics improvement. It is experimentally proved that at the identical nano-modifier content in the gypsum matrix (0.035 %, maximum compression strength gain is achieved with the use of CNT and makes 28- 30%. At the use of initial carbon nanotubes, increase in strength at the same nano-modifier content makes 13-15%. The Ca2+ ions interaction with the graphene-like carbon surface was investigated by the DFT method. Capability is demonstrated of the covalent calcium bonding with the hexagonal carbon surface cell as a result of overlap of Ca2+ valence 3p orbitals and carbon 2р orbitals.

  20. A cement based syntactic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Muthyala, Venkata D.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cement based syntactic foam core was proposed and experimentally investigated for composite sandwich structures. This was a multi-phase composite material with microballoon dispersed in a rubber latex toughened cement paste matrix. A trace amount of microfiber was also incorporated to increase the number of mechanisms for energy absorption and a small amount of nanoclay was added to improve the crystal structure of the hydrates. Three groups of cement based syntactic foams with varying cement content were investigated. A fourth group of specimens containing pure cement paste were also prepared as control. Each group contained 24 beam specimens. The total number of beam specimens was 96. The dimension of each beam was 30.5 cm x 5.1 cm x 1.5 cm. Twelve foam specimens from each group were wrapped with plain woven 7715 style glass fabric reinforced epoxy to prepare sandwich beams. Twelve cubic foam specimens, three from each group, with a side length of 5.1 cm, were also prepared. Three types of testing, low velocity impact test and four-point bending test on the beam specimens and compression test on the cubic specimens, were conducted to evaluate the impact energy dissipation, stress-strain behavior, and residual strength. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also used to examine the energy dissipation mechanisms in the micro-length scale. It was found that the cement based syntactic foam has a higher capacity for dissipating impact energy with an insignificant reduction in strength as compared to the control cement paste core. When compared to a polymer based foam core having similar compositions, it was found that the cement based foam has a comparable energy dissipation capacity. The developed cement based syntactic foam would be a viable alternative for core materials in impact-tolerant composite sandwich structures

  1. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  2. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  3. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  4. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, F. P. [University of Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  5. Vitrified medical wastes bottom ash in cement clinkerization. Microstructural, hydration and leaching characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamarkou, S; Christopoulos, D; Tsakiridis, P E; Bartzas, G; Tsakalakis, K

    2018-04-19

    The present investigation focuses on the utilization of medical wastes incineration bottom ash (MBA), vitrified with soda lime recycled glass (SLRG), as an alternative raw material in cement clinkerization. Bottom ash is recovered from the bottom of the medical wastes incineration chamber, after being cooled down through quenching. It corresponds to 10-15 wt% of the initial medical wastes weight and since it has been classified in the category of hazardous wastes, its safe management has become a major environmental concern worldwide. MBA glasses of various syntheses were initially obtained during the MBA vitrification simultaneously with various amounts of silica scrap (20, 25 and 30 wt% correspondingly). The produced MBA glasses were in turn used for the production of Portland cement clinker, after sintering at 1400 °C, thus substituting traditional raw materials. Both evaluation of vitrification and sintering products was carried out by chemical and mineralogical analyses along with microstructure examination. The final cements were prepared by clinkers co-grinding in a laboratory ball mill with appropriate amounts of gypsum (≈5.0 wt%) and the evaluation of their quality was carried out by determining setting times, standard consistency, expansibility and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days. Finally, the leaching behaviour of the vitrified MBA and hydrated cements, together with the corresponding of the "as received" MBA, was further examined using the standard leaching tests of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the EN 12457-2. According to the obtained results, the quality of the produced cement clinkers was not affected by the addition of the vitrified MBA in the raw meal, with the trace elements detected in all leachates measured well below the corresponding regulatory limits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Does cement mantle thickness really matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Caruana, J.

    2008-01-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of differing thicknesses. This thesis is concerned with variability in cement thickness around the Stanmore Hip, due to surgical approach, broach size and stem orientation, and its effects on stress and cracking in the cement. The extent to which cement mantle thi...

  7. Soil fertility, nutrition and yield of maize and barley with gypsum application on soil surface in no-till

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Michalovicz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Annual crop yield and nutrition have shown differentiated responses to modifications in soil chemical properties brought about by gypsum application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gypsum application rates on the chemical properties of a Latossolo Bruno (Clayey Oxisol, as well as on the nutrition and yield of a maize-barley succession under no-till. The experiment was set up in November 2009 in Guarapuava, Parana, Brazil, applying gypsum rates of 0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 Mg ha-1 to the soil surface upon sowing maize, with crop succession of barley. Gypsum application decreased the levels of Al3+ and Mg2+ in the 0.0-0.1 m layer and increased soil pH in the layers from 0.2-0.6 m depth. Gypsum application has increased the levels of Ca2+ in all soil layers up to 0.6 m, and the levels of S-SO4(2- up to 0.8 m. In both crops, the leaf concentrations of Ca and S were increased while Mg concentrations have decreased as a function of gypsum rates. There was also an effect of gypsum rates on grain yield, with a quadratic response of maize and a linear increase for barley. Yield increases were up to 11 and 12 % in relation to control for the maximum technical efficiency (MTE rates of 3.8 and 6.0 Mg ha-1 of gypsum, respectively. Gypsum application improved soil fertility in the profile, especially in the subsurface, as well as plant nutrition, increasing the yields of maize and barley.

  8. Crop Response to Gypsum Application to Subtropical Soils Under No-Till in Brazil: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Tiecher

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of gypsum to improve the root environment in tropical soils in the southeastern and central-western regions of Brazil is a widespread practice with well-established recommendation criteria. However, only recently gypsum began to be used on subtropical soils in South of Brazil, so available knowledge of its effect on crop yield is incipient and mainly for soils under no-till (NT systems. Avaiable studies span a wide range of responses, from a substantial increase to a slight reduction in crop yield. Also, the specific conditions leading to a favorable effect of gypsum application on crop yield are yet to be accurately identified. The primary objectives of this study were to examine previously reported results to assess the likelihood of a crop response to gypsum and to develop useful recommendation criteria for gypsum application to subtropical soils under NT in Brazil. For this purpose, we examined the results of a total of 73 growing seasons, reported in 20 different scientific publications that assessed grain yield as a function of gypsum rates. Four different scenarios were examined, by the occurrence or not of high subsurface acidity (viz., Al saturation >20 % and/or exchangeable Ca 3 cmolc dm-3 failed to increase crop yield, irrespective of the soil water status. Under these conditions, high gypsum rates (6-15 Mg ha−1 may even reduce grain yield, possibly by inducing K and Mg deficiency. On the other hand, applying gypsum to soils with high subsurface acidity increased yield by 16 % in corn (87 % of cases and by 19 % in winter cereals (83 % of cases, whether or not the soil was water-deficient. By contrast, soybean yield was only increased by gypsum applied in the simultaneous presence of high soil subsurface acidity and water deficiency (average increase 27 %, 100 % of cases.

  9. Study of Zn-Pb ore tailings and their potential in cement technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouairi, J.; Hajjaji, W.; Costa, C. S.; Senff, L.; Patinha, C.; Ferreira da Silva, E.; Labrincha, J. A.; Rocha, F.; Medhioub, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of sulfobelite clinkers incorporating mining rejects. The targeted Zn-Pb tailing wastes generated in the diapiric zone (NW Tunisia) were tested in clinker/cement compositions to ensure the inertization of existing hazardous heavy metals. Mineralogical composition of the two selected samples revealed calcite, dolomite, quartz, kaolinite, galena, pyrite and gypsum as crystalline phases. Vertical distributions of dominant heavy metals (Pb, Zn and Cu) in soil profiles show enrichment in the surface layers and decrease towards the depth. In sintered clinkers powders, the presence of the targeted crystalline phases (trialuminate sulphate (C4A3Š), belite (C2S), and ferrite (C4AF)) are in the predicted desirable amounts. Heat flow generated during the hydration of different cement pastes showed a slower reaction for clinkers with higher amounts of C4A3Š or constituted by coarser particles. After 28 days curing, the best mechanical resistance (24.34 MPa under compression) was obtained for the clinker calcined at 1350 °C and showing a suitable particle size distribution. Concerning heavy metals, immobilisation of 75-85% of Pb, Zn and Cu was assessed in the mortars formulated with the produced clinker/cement, posing no hazardous risks to the environment.

  10. Preliminary investigation of cement materials in the Taif area, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of possible sources of cement rock in the Taft area was made during the latter part of August 1968. Adequate deposits of limestone, clay, quartz conglomerate and sandstone, and pisolitic iron ore, yet no gypsum, were located to support a Cement plant should it prove feasible to establish one in this area. These materials, made up mostly of Tertiary and later sediments, crop out in isolated, inconspicuous low hills in a north- trending belt, 10 to 15 kilometers wide, lying about 90 kilometers to-the east of At Taft. The belt extends for more than 90 kilometers from the vicinity of Jabal 'An in the south to the crushed rock pits at Radwan and beyond in the north. The area is readily accessible either from the Talf-Riyadh highway or from the Taif-Bishah road presently under construction. The limestone, which is quite pure and dense in some localities but dolomitic, argillaceous, and cherty in others, occurs in a variety of colors and would make suitable decorative building stone. The volcanic rocks of the Harrat Hadan, lying directly to the east of the limestone belt, include volcanic ash beds some of which may have been altered to bentonitlc clays. Others may have been lithified and might be suitable for light-weight aggregate. These possibilities remain to be investigated. Precambrian metamorphic rocks lying directly to the south and southeast of Taif were also investigated as possible cement rock sources, but no suitable material was found here.

  11. Effect of amino acids on the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Kubicki, James D.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2017-12-01

    Stirred gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) precipitation experiments (initial Ωgypsum = 2.4 ± 0.14, duration ≈ 1.0-1.5 h) were conducted in the presence of the amino acids glycine (190 μM), L-alanine (190 μM), D- and L-arginine (45 μM), and L-tyrosine (200 μM) to investigate the effect of simple organic compounds on both the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum. Relative to abiotic controls, glycine, tyrosine, and alanine inhibited precipitation rates by ∼22%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, while L- and D-arginine accelerated crystal growth by ∼8% and 48%, respectively. With the exception of tyrosine, amino acid induced inhibition resulted in fractionation factors (αs-f) associated with precipitation that were no more than 0.3‰ lower than amino acid-free controls. In contrast, the tyrosine and D- and L-arginine experiments had αs-f values associated with precipitation that were similar to the controls. Our experimental results indicate that Ca isotopic fractionation associated with gypsum precipitation is impacted by growth inhibition in the presence of amino acids. Specifically, we propose that the surface-specific binding of amino acids to gypsum can change the equilibrium fractionation factor of the bulk mineral. We investigate the hypothesis that amino acids can influence the growth of gypsum at specific crystal faces via adsorption and that different faces have distinct fractionation factors (αface-fluid). Accordingly, preferential sorption of amino acids at particular faces changes the relative, face-specific mass fluxes of Ca during growth, which influences the bulk isotopic composition of the mineral. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the energetic favorability of glycine sorption onto gypsum crystal faces occurs in the order: (1 1 0) > (0 1 0) > (1 2 0) > (0 1 1), while glycine sorption onto the (-1 1 1) face was found to be energetically unfavorable. Face-specific fractionation factors constrained by

  12. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  13. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  14. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  15. In Situ Observation of Gypsum-Anhydrite Transition at High Pressure and High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chuan-Jiang; ZHENG Hai-Fei

    2012-01-01

    An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC).The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 MPa.With increasing temperature,the anhydrite (CaSO4) phase precipitates at 250 320℃ in the pressure range of 1.0 1.5 GPa,indicating that under a saturated water condition,both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite.A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(GPa) =0.0068T - 0.7126 (250℃≤T≤320℃).Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber,showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is irreversible at high pressure and high temperature.%An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 Mpa. With increasing temperature, the anhydrite (CaSO4) phase precipitates at 250-320℃ in the pressure range of 1.0-1.5 Gpa, indicating that under a saturated water condition, both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite. A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(Gpa) = 0.0068T - 0.7126 (250℃≤T≤320℃). Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber, showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is

  16. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  18. Obtaining a sulfoaluminate belite cement by industrial waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkhadiri, L.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulfoaluminate belite clinkers by burning raw at moderate temperatures near 1250 °C were synthesized. The used mixtures were made by calcium carbonate blended to two industrial wastes: low calcium fly ash and phosphogypsum. The clinkers were characterised by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and free lime. The hydraulic behaviour of the obtained cements, by adequate clinkers with 7% of added gypsum, was followed by XRD, scaning electronic microscopy (SEM, FTIR and NMR.

    Los clínkeres belíticos de sulfoaluminatos se obtienen por cocción de crudos a temperaturas moderadas, hacia 1.250 ºC. Esos crudos se componen de carbonato de calcio mezclados con dos subproductos industriales: cenizas volantes pobres en óxido de calcio y fosfoyeso. Los clínkeres obtenidos se caracterizaron a través de Difracción de Rayos X (DRX, Espectroscopia Infrarroja por Transformada de Fourier (FTIR y por la determinación de CaO libre. El comportamiento hidráulico de los cementos elaborados de los clínkeres con el 7% de yeso se estudió por DRX, Microscopía Electrónica de Barrido (SEM, FTIR y Resonancia Magnética Nuclear (RMN

  19. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  20. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  1. Examination of the jarosite-alunite precipitate addition in the raw meal for the production of sulfoaluminate cement clinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioti, M; Tsakiridis, P E; Leonardou-Agatzini, S; Oustadakis, P

    2006-04-17

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the possibility of adding a jarosite-alunite chemical precipitate, a waste product of a new hydrometallurgical process developed to treat economically low-grade nickel oxides ores, in the raw meal for the production of sulfoaluminate cement clinker. For that reason, two samples of raw meals were prepared, one contained 20% gypsum, as a reference sample ((SAC)Ref) and another with 11.31% jarosite-alunite precipitate ((SAC)J/A). Both raw meals were sintered at 1300 degrees C. The results of chemical and mineralogical analyses as well as the microscopic examination showed that the use of the jarosite-alunite precipitate did not affect the mineralogical characteristics of the so produced sulfoaluminate cement clinker and there was confirmed the formation of the sulfoaluminate phase (C4A3S), the most typical phase of this cement type. Furthermore, both clinkers were tested by determining the grindability, setting time, compressive strength and expansibility. The hydration products were examined by XRD analysis at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days. The results of the physico-mechanical tests showed that the addition of jarosite-alunite precipitate did not negatively affect the quality of the produced cement.

  2. Development of cement material using inorganic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, Masumitsu; Satou, Tatsuaki; Wada, Mikio; Ishii, Tomoharu; Matsuo, Kazuaki.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic admixtures to enhance the fluidity of cement material was developed. These admixtures turned into easy to immobilize the miscellaneous radioactive waste using cement material. It was found that the ζ potential of cement particles was directly proportional to the content of the inorganic admixtures in cement paste and the particles of cement were dispersed at the high ζ potential. The condensed sodium phosphate, which was the main component of the inorganic admixtures, retarded the dissolution of Ca 2+ ion from the cement, and generated the colloids by incorporating dissolved Ca 2+ ion. The cement material containing the inorganic admixtures was found to have the same mechanical strength and adsorption potential of radionuclides in comparison to normal cement materials. It was confirmed that the cement material containing the inorganic admixture was effectively filled gaps of miscellaneous radioactive waste. (author)

  3. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  4. Gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling on polybenzimidazole and cellulose acetate hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Si Cong; Su, Jincai; Fu, Feng-Jiang; Mi, Baoxia; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI

  5. Crystallisation of Gypsum and Prevention of Foaming in Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun

    The aim of this project is to investigate two operational problems, which have been experienced during wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) operation, i.e. poor gypsum dewatering properties and foaming. The results of this work can be used for the optimization of wet FGD-plants in terms of reliabi......The aim of this project is to investigate two operational problems, which have been experienced during wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) operation, i.e. poor gypsum dewatering properties and foaming. The results of this work can be used for the optimization of wet FGD-plants in terms....... Experiments in a falling film wet FGD pilot plant have shown a strong non-linear behaviour (in a ln(n(l)) vs. l plot) at the lower end of the particle size range, compared to the well-known linear “mixed suspension mixed product removal (MSMPR)” model. A transient population balance model, fitted...

  6. Visible and Mid-Infrared Gypsum Optical Constants for Modeling of Martian Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Esposito, Francesca; Rossmann, George R.; Colangeli, Luigi

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: Recent and on-going remote and in situ observations indicate that sulfates are present in significant abundances at various locations on Mars [1-7]. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) imaging spectrometer (CRISM) is returning hyperspectral data at higher spatial resolution [8] than the OMEGA instrument on the Mars Express Mission [3]. Data from both OMEGA and CRISM have provided spectral evidence for the presence of gypsum and various hydrated sulfates on the Martian surface [e.g. 3-7] Thus, the optical properties of sulfates, in general, are of interest to quantitative interpretation of this increasing volume of remotely sensed data. This is because optical constants describe how a material interacts with electromagnetic radiation and represent the fundamental values used in radiative transfer calculations describing a variety of physical environments. Such environments include atmospheres where aerosols are present, planetary and satellite regoliths, and circumstellar dust clouds. Here we focus upon gypsum because of its applicability due to its identification on Mars. Also, gypsum is a mineral that is readily available in samples sizes that are suitable for study using a variety of spectral measurements. In the infrared (>5 μm) several studies reporting the optical constants of gypsum can be used in evaluating the approach used here. Most importantly, there is a general lack of data regarding the optical constants for gypsum at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) that are being observed by OMEGA and CRISM. Background: In the infrared, there have been several studies focused at determining the optical constants of gypsum using classical dispersion models [9-11]. These have used a variety of samples including; crystals, compressed pellets of pure materials, and grains suspended in a KBr matrix. Spectral measurements of gypsum, and other sulfates, have existed for about 100 years at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) [e

  7. Dehydration reactions of gypsum: A neutron and X-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriel, W.; Reisdorf, K.; Pannetier, J.

    1990-03-01

    The kinetics of the dehydration of gypsum was investigated by powder diffraction methods. Using the incoherent scattering effect of H with the neutron beam, the background intensity as a measure of the water content was checked in the temperature range 295-623 K. The superposed Bragg peaks yielded four major phases: Gypsum, subhydratesCaSO 4(H 2O) x (1 > x > 0),AIII-CaSO 4, AII-CaSO 4. For the subhydrates a maximum water content of x > = 0.74was determined. A different kinetic was found using Guinier X-ray technique with the heated sample prepared on a thin foil. Only with high local H 2O steam pressure, produced in the comparable larger sample container of the neutron diffraction experiment, could this high H 2O occupation of the subhydrate tunnel structure be found. A topotactic mechanism can describe the phase transitions for this reaction.

  8. Radioecology of and radiation dose from Dutch waste gypsum released into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, H.W.; Weers, A.W. van; Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten)

    1985-11-01

    The Dutch industries release 9 kinds of waste gypsum, 90% of the total quantity is phosphogypsum. Only waste gypsums from the phosphate industries show increased radioactivity, the strongest in phosphogypsum. All phosphogypsum, 2 Tg.a -1 , is disposed of into the Rhine at Rotterdam. This leads to an increase of radionuclides, from the U-238 chain, along the Dutch coast. The calculated increase of activity concentrations in sea food causes an increase of the individual radiation dose of maximal 150 μSv.a -1 and of the Dutch population dose of 170 manSv.a -1 . Stacking of the phosphogypsum would result in a dose increase of one order of magnitude lower. The need for environmental disposal or stacking of at least the fine and coarse fractions of the phosphogypsum, which are difficult to recycle, will remain. (Auth.)

  9. Thermal Dehydration Kinetics of Gypsum and Borogypsum under Non-isothermal Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.Y.Elbeyli; S.Piskin

    2004-01-01

    Thermal dehydration of gypsum and borogypsum was investigated under nonisothermal conditions in air by using simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential thermal analyzer. Nonisothermal experiments were carried out at various linear heating rates. Kinetics of dehydration in the temperature range of 373-503 K were evaluated from the DTA (differential thermal analysis)-TGA (thermogravimetric analysis) data by means of Coats-Redfern,Kissinger and Doyle Equations. Values of the activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of the dehydration were calculated. The results of thermal experiments and kinetic parameters indicated that borogypsum is similar to gypsum from dehydration mechanism point of view although it consists of boron and small amount of alkali metal oxides.

  10. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  11. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum on Reducing Soluble Phosphorus in Successive Runoff Events from a Coastal Plain Bermudagrass Pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dexter B; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the threat that pastures intensively managed with poultry litter (PL) pose to accelerating eutrophication is a major issue in the southeastern United States. Gypsum (CaSO) has been identified as a promising management tool for ameliorating litter P losses to runoff. Thus, research was conducted to elucidate gypsum's residual effects on P losses from a bermudagrass ( L.) pasture. Runoff events (60 min) were created using rainfall simulations. Treatments consisted of applying four flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum rates (0, 2.2, 4.4, and 8.9 Mg ha) to bermudagrass fertilized with 13.4 Mg ha PL plus a nonfertilized check (no litter or gypsum) and 8.9 Mg ha FGD gypsum only as controls. Rainfall simulations (∼ 85 mm h) were conducted immediately, 5 wk, and 6 mo (i.e., at the end of growing season) after PL application to determine gypsum's effectiveness at controlling P loss over successive runoff events. The greatest dissolved P (DP) in runoff occurred immediately after PL application. Gypsum effectively reduced cumulative DP concentration losses (54%) compared with PL alone in initial runoff events. Gypsum reduced DP concentrations in succeeding runoff events also regardless of timing, suggesting that its effect is persistent and will not diminish over a growing season. Generally, maximum DP reductions were achieved with 8.9 Mg ha. However, it was surmised from this study that optimal P reduction in a bermudagrass pasture can be achieved with 4.4 Mg ha. Information ascertained from this study may be useful in aiding land managers making prescriptions for management practices that reduce DP losses from agricultural fields. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. The effect of gypsum products and separating materials on the typography of denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firtell, D N; Walsh, J F; Elahi, J M

    1980-09-01

    The typography of polymethyl methacrylate processed against various gypsum products coated with various separating materials was studied under an SEM. Tinfoil and two commercial tin foil substitutes were used as separating material during processing, and the surfaces of the resulting acrylic resin forms were studied for topographical differences. Tinfoil and alpha 2 hemihydrates produced the smoothest surfaces. As a practical solution, a good quality tinfoil substitute and alpha 1 hemihydrate could be used when processing polymethyl methacrylate resin.

  13. Accuracy of Gypsum Casts after Different Impression Techniques and Double Pouring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephania Caroline Rodolfo Silva

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the accuracy of gypsum casts after different impression techniques and double pouring. Ten patients were selected and for each one it was obtained 5 partial putty/wash impressions with vinyl polysiloxane (VPS material from teeth #13 to #16 with partial metal stock trays. The following techniques were performed: (1 one-step; two-step relief with: (2 PVC film; (3 slow-speed tungsten carbide bur and scalpel blade, (4 small movements of the tray and (5 without relief-negative control. The impressions were disinfected with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes and stored during 110 and 230 minutes for the first and second pouring, respectively, with type IV gypsum. Three intra-oral lateral photographs of each patient were taken using a tripod and a customized radiographic positioner. The images were imported into ImageJ software and the total area of the buccal surface from teeth #13 to #16 was measured. A 4.0% coefficient of variance was criterion for using these measurements as Baseline values. The casts were photographed and analyzed using the same standardization for the clinical images. The area (mm2 obtained from the difference between the measurements of each gypsum cast and the Baseline value of the respective patient were calculated and analyzed by repeated-measures two way-ANOVA and Mauchly's Sphericity test (α = 0.05. No significant effect was observed for Impression technique (P = 0.23, Second pouring (P = 0.99 and their interaction (P = 0.25. The impression techniques and double pouring did not influence the accuracy of the gypsum casts.

  14. Effect of alginate chemical disinfection on bacterial count over gypsum cast

    OpenAIRE

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Dowah, Omir S.; Gana, Naif S.; Al-Hytham, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) and iodophor disinfectants on alginate impressions along with their effect on the survived bacterium count on the gypsum cast. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four alginate impression on each dentate patients were made, of which Group I were not washed or disinfected, Group II impressions were merely washed with water, Group III were disinfected by spraying with sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10), Group IV were disinfected with iodophor (1 : 21...

  15. 18O and 34S in the Upper Bartonium gypsum deposits of the Paris basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, J.C.; Letolle, R.

    1976-01-01

    Isotopic analyses ( 18 O and 34 S) of the Eocene gypsum from the Paris basin show a range beyond the normal Tertiary marine values. The possibility of a reduction process during diagenesis is discussed. A hypothesis of continental origin by leaching of Permotriassic deposits is proposed for this formation on the basis of a comparison of the isotopic contents recorded from Germany and eastern France

  16. The Environmental Impact and Cost Analysis of Concrete Mixing Blast Furnace Slag Containing Titanium Gypsum and Sludge in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyoung Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the environmental effects and cost of the Industrial Waste addictive Blast Furnace Slag (W-BFS using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA and compared it to general BFS. The environmental impacts of W-BFS were as follows: 1.12 × 10−1 kg-CO2 eq/kg, 3.18 × 10−5 kg-Ethylene eq/kg, 4.79 × 10−4 kg-SO2 eq/kg, 7.15 × 10−4 kg-PO43− eq/kg, 7.15 × 10−4 kg-CFC11 eq/kg and 3.94 × 10−3 kg-Antimony eq/kg. Among the environmental impact category, GWP and AP were 9.28 × 10−2 kg-CO2 eq/kg and 3.33 × 10−4 kg-SO2 eq/kg at a raw material stage, accounting for 80% and 70% of total environmental impact respectively. In EP, POCP and ADP, in addition, raw material stage accounted for a great portion in total environmental impact because of “W” among input materials. In ODP, however, compared to the environmental impact of raw materials, oil, which was used in transporting BFS to the W-BFS manufacturing factory, was more influential. In terms of GWP, POCP and ODP, W-BFS was higher than general BFS. In terms of AP, EP and ADP, in contrast, the former was lower than the latter. In terms of cost, W-BFS (41.7 US$/ton was lower than general BFS by about 17% because of the use of waste additives comprised of industrial wastes instead of natural gypsum ,which has been commonly used in general BFS. In terms of GWP and POCP, the W-BFS mixed (30% concrete was lower than plain concrete by 25%. In terms of AP and EP, the former was lower than the latter by 30%. In terms of ADP, furthermore, W-BFS mixed (30% concrete was lower than plain concrete by 11%. In aggregate-related ODP, however, almost no change was found. In terms of cost, when W-BFS was added by 10% and 30%, it was able to reduce cost by 3% and 7% respectively, compared to plain concrete. Compared to BFS-mixed concrete as well, cost could be saved by 1% additionally because W-BFS (US$41.7/ton is lower than common cement (US$100.3/ton by about 60% in terms of production costs.

  17. Developing biodiversity indicators on a stakeholders' opinions basis: the gypsum industry Key Performance Indicators framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Carline; Mahy, Grégory; Vermeulen, Cédric; Marlet, Christine; Séleck, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to establish a common Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) framework for reporting about the gypsum industry biodiversity at the European level. In order to integrate different opinions and to reach a consensus framework, an original participatory process approach has been developed among different stakeholder groups: Eurogypsum, European and regional authorities, university scientists, consulting offices, European and regional associations for the conservation of nature, and the extractive industry. The strategy is developed around four main steps: (1) building of a maximum set of indicators to be submitted to stakeholders based on the literature (Focus Group method); (2) evaluating the consensus about indicators through a policy Delphi survey aiming at the prioritization of indicator classes using the Analytic Hierarchy Process method (AHP) and of individual indicators; (3) testing acceptability and feasibility through analysis of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and visits to three European quarries; (4) Eurogypsum final decision and communication. The resulting framework contains a set of 11 indicators considered the most suitable for all the stakeholders. Our KPIs respond to European legislation and strategies for biodiversity. The framework aims at improving sustainability in quarries and at helping to manage biodiversity as well as to allow the creation of coherent reporting systems. The final goal is to allow for the definition of the actual biodiversity status of gypsum quarries and allow for enhancing it. The framework is adaptable to the local context of each gypsum quarry.

  18. Risk minimisation of FGD gypsum leachates by incorporation of aluminium sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Ayuso, E. [Department of Environmental Geology, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), C/ Lluis Sole i Sabaris, s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Environmental Geochemistry, IRNASA, CSIC, Apto. 257, 37071 Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: ealvarez@ija.csic.es; Querol, X. [Department of Environmental Geology, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), C/ Lluis Sole i Sabaris, s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ballesteros, J.C.; Gimenez, A. [Endesa Generacion, S.A., C/ Ribera de Loira, 60, 28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    The incorporation of aluminium sulphate to (flue gas desulphurisation) FGD gypsum before its disposal was investigated as a way to minimise the risk supposed by the high fluoride content of its leachates. Using a bath method the kinetic and equilibrium processes of fluoride removal by aluminium sulphate were studied at fluoride/aluminium molar concentration (F/Al) ratios in the range 1.75 10{sup -2}-1.75 under the pH conditions (about 6.5) of FGD gypsum leachates. It was found that fluoride removal was a very fast process at any of the (F/Al) ratios subject of study, with equilibrium attained within the first 15 min of interaction. High decreases in solution fluoride concentrations (50-80%) were found at the equilibrium state. The use of aluminium sulphate in the stabilization of FGD gypsum proved to greatly decrease its fluoride leachable content (in the range 20-90% for aluminium sulphate doses of 0.1-5%, as determined by the European standard EN 12457-4). Such fluoride leaching minimisation assures the characterization of this by-product as a waste acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous wastes according to the Council Decision 2003/33/EC on waste disposal. Furthermore, as derived from column leaching studies, the proposed stabilization system showed to be highly effective in simulated conditions of disposal, displaying fluoride leaching reduction values about 55 and 80% for aluminium sulphate added amounts of 1 and 2%, respectively.

  19. Mineral potential of clays that cover the gypsum deposits in Araripina-PE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, B.B.; Anjos, I.F. dos; Rego, S.A.B.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the applicability of the clays that cover the deposits of Gypsum Plaster in the region of Araripina - PE for use as the ceramic pigments and for bricks production in the red ceramic industry was analyzed. The clay minerals contained the illite, kaolinite and smectite, with high proportion of the last one. The possibility of industrial application of this mineral clay is considerable; however, the mining industries that mine and process the gypsum in the region do not take the clays into account as the potential mineral. In general, industries use the clay minerals in manufacturing processes or as key raw materials, or as the alternatives for some kinds of the chemical processing industries. This paper aims to highlight the potential of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum in reference. The material sampled from different deposit layers was characterized and the physical treatment of ore was applied. The results showed that the material analyzed can be used in various kinds of industry, such as the production of natural ceramic pigments. (author)

  20. In Situ Observation of Gypsum-Anhydrite Transition at High Pressure and High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chuan-Jiang; Zheng Hai-Fei

    2012-01-01

    An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 MPa. With increasing temperature, the anhydrite (CaSO 4 ) phase precipitates at 250–320°C in the pressure range of 1.0–1.5GPa, indicating that under a saturated water condition, both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO 4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite. A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(GPa) = 0.0068T−0.7126 (250°C≤T≤320°C). Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber, showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is irreversible at high pressure and high temperature. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  1. Implications of moisture content determination in the environmental characterisation of FGD gypsum for its disposal in landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Ayuso, E. [Department of Environmental Geology, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), C/ Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: ealvarez@ija.csic.es; Querol, X. [Department of Environmental Geology, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), C/ Lluis Sole i Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Tomas, A. [Endesa Generacion, S.A., C/ Ribera de Loira 60, 28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-05-01

    The leachable contents of elements of environmental concern considered in the Council Decision 2003/33/EC on waste disposal were determined in flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) gypsum. To this end, leaching tests were performed following the standard EN-12457-4 which specifies the determination of the dry mass of the material at 105 deg. C and the use of a liquid to solid (L/S) ratio of 10 l kg{sup -1} dry matter. Additionally, leaching tests were also carried out taking into account the dry mass of the material at 60 deg. C and using different L/S ratios (2, 5, 8, 10, 15 and 20 l kg{sup -1} dry matter). It was found that the dry mass determination at 105 deg. C turns out to be inappropriate for FGD gypsum since at this temperature gypsum transforms into bassanite, and so, in addition to moisture content, crystalline water is removed. As a consequence the moisture content is overvalued (about 16%), what makes consider a lower L/S ratio than that specified by the standard EN-12457-4. As a result the leachable contents in FGD gypsum are, in general, overestimated, what could lead to more strict environmental requirements for FGD gypsum when considering its disposal in landfills, specially concerning those elements (e.g., F) risking the characterisation of FGD gypsum as a waste acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous wastes.

  2. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO 2 . (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  3. Fabrication and properties of microencapsulated-paraffin/gypsum-matrix building materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Junfeng; Wang Xinyu; Wang Shengbao; Zhao Yunhui; Huang Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: DSC curves of microPCMs/gypsum composite samples before and after a thermal cycling treatment. Highlights: ► Microcapsules containing paraffin was fabricated by in-situ polymerization. ► Methanol-modified melamine–formaldehyde (MMF) was used as shell material. ► MicroPCMs/gypsum-matrix building materials were applied for solar energy storage. ► The structure and thermal conductivity of composites had been investigated. - Abstract: Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The aim of this work was to prepare and investigate the properties of microPCMs/gypsum-matrix building materials for thermal energy storage. MicroPCMs contain paraffin was fabricated by in situ polymerization using methanol-modified melamine–formaldehyde (MMF) as shell material. A series of microPCMs samples were prepared under emulsion stirring rates in range of 1000–3000 r min −1 with core/shell weight ratios of 3/1, 2/1, 1/1, 1/2 and 1/3, respectively. The shell of microPCMs was smooth and compact with global shape, its thickness was not greatly affected by the core/shell ratio and emulsion stirring rate. DSC tests showed that the shell of microPCMs did not influence the phase change behavior of pure paraffin. It was found from TGA analysis that microPCMs samples containing paraffin lost their weight at the temperature of nearly 250 °C, which indicated that the PCM had been protected by shell. More shell material in microPCMs could enhance the thermal stability and provide higher compact condition for core material. After a 100-times thermal cycling treatment, the microPCMs contain paraffin also nearly did not change the phase change behaviors of PCM. With the increasing of weight contents of microPCMs in gypsum board, the thermal conductivity (λ) values of composites had decreased. The simulation of temperature tests proved that the

  4. Surface controlled dissolution rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions exhibit nonlinear dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Alexander A.; Vosbeck, Katrin; Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The effective dissolution rates of gypsum are determined by mixed kinetics, where the rate constants of dissolution at the surface and the transport constant of molecular diffusion of dissolved material are similar. To obtain the surface reaction rate law it is necessary to know the transport constant. We have determined the surface rate law for monocrystalline selenite by using a rotating disc set-up, where the transport coefficients are well known. As a result, up to a calcium concentration of 0.6 · ceq, we find a nearly linear rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, where cs is the total calcium concentration at the surface and ceq the equilibrium concentration with respect to gypsum, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2, and ksl = 1.1 · 10 -4 mmol cm -2 s -1 ± 15%. We also employed batch-experiments for selenite, alabaster and gypsum rock samples. The result of these experiments were interpreted by using a transport constant determined by NaCl dissolution experiments under similar physical conditions. The batch experiments reveal a dissolution rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, ksl = 1.3 · 10 -4 mmol · cm -2 s -1, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2 for c ≤ 0.94 · ceq. Close to equilibrium a nonlinear rate law, Rs = ks2 (1- cs/ ceq) n2, is observed, where ks2 is in the order of 10 mmol · cm -2 s -1 and n2 ≈ 4.5. The experimentally observed gypsum dissolution rates from the batch experiments could be accurately fitted, with only minor variations of the surface reaction constant obtained from the rotating disk experiment and the transport coefficient from the NaCl dissolution batch experiment. Batch experiments on pure synthetic gypsum, reveal a linear rate law up to equilibrium. This indicates inhibition of dissolution in natural samples close to equilibrium, as is known also for calcite minerals.

  5. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  6. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... and Cement Clinker from Japan: Investigation No. 731- TA-461 (Third Review). By order of the...

  7. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  8. Reforestation and landscape reconstruction in gypsum mine area from the semiarid region of NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, S. M. B.; Straaten, P. V.; de Araujo Vieura Santos, M. de Fatima; Agra Bezerra da Silva, Y. J.; da Silva, M.; Saraiva de Melo Pinheiro, T.; Gusmao Didier de Moraes, F.; de Aguiar Accioly, A. M.; Alves de Santana, S. R.; dos Santos, H. A.; de Carvalho, D. M.; de Lima Ferreira, G.; de Carvalho Santos, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the Araripe region, Northeast Brazil, exist the world's second largest reserve of gypsum, estimated at over than one billion tons, which accounts for 95% of the Brazilian production and constitutes an important segment of the regional economy. The gypsum deposit occurs in the Lower Cretaceous Santana Formation of the Araripe basin, which is constituted by siltstones, marls, limestones, shales and gypsum layers. The ore extraction is from an open pit, on simple benches with a height of about 15 meters. Activities in mining operations involve stripping, drilling, loading explosives, blast, fragmentation and block loading / transport. Currently, gypsum mining and processing results in major changes in the landscape (pits and wastes heaps sedimentary rocks and soil mixture), deforestation of the "caatinga" ecosystem for use as firewood in small calcinations, dust pollution and changes in hydrology. To promote environmental remediation of this area, a multidisciplinary research has being done with the aim to support reforestation at the wastes heaps. The study involved the following activities: collection and physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of mine waste materials; a floristic survey around the mines (botanical identification and measuring physical parameters in 16 plots, in order to identify which species are best suited to the conditions of the substrate at the mine site); an experiment (randomized block design) developed in a greenhouse, where seedlings of various native tree species were grown in a "constructed soil" made up of gypsum waste combined with chicken, goat and cattle manure, aimed to select tree species and soil treatment to be used in a waste heap; and an assessment of water quality for irrigation of the reforestation areas. The waste materials consist of large clayey aggregates, which may present physical/chemical properties unfavorable for plant development. The mineralogy of the sand fraction (> 85% quartz, gypsum and

  9. Polymeric-SiO2-PCMs for improving the thermal properties of gypsum applied in energy efficient buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borreguero, Ana M.; Serrano, Angel; Garrido, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Juan F.; Carmona, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Inorganic–organic PCM microcapsules were incorporated into gypsum. • The physical and thermal properties of the gypsum composites were studied. • The gypsum composites presented better properties than some previously investigated. • 10.20 kW h/operating cycle could be saved in a room with 1 m 3 of this material. • 1.26 kg of CO 2 emissions could be reduced per one operating cycle. - Abstract: A new thermoregulating material containing the commercial paraffin Rubitherm®RT27 stabilized by SiO 2 with a polymeric shell from polystyrene–divinylbenzene (Polymeric-SiO 2 -PCMs) was incorporated into gypsum up to a 15 mass ratio respect to the initial hemihydrate in order to develop building materials with a high thermal energy store (TES) capacity. The effect of this material on the gypsum crystals and the main physical, thermal and mechanical properties were studied and compared to those caused by another three kinds of thermoregulating materials. Polymeric-SiO 2 -PCMs presented the lowest agglomeration and therefore, the best distribution into the gypsum pores. As expected, the thermoregulating effect of the PCM improved the thermal properties of the gypsum since, the higher the microcapsules content, the higher the equivalent heat capacity (c p ) and the accumulated heat power (q acc ). Considering a conversion of 100% of the accumulated heat into electricity savings, the addition of a 15% of microcapsules respect to the hemihydrate allowed to save 10.20 kW h/m 3 and, consequently, reduced the CO 2 emissions in a 1.26 kg of CO 2 per operating cycle. Besides, the addition of the Polymeric-SiO 2 -PCMs reduces the gypsum density, but it is always higher than 600 kg/m 3 , as required by the European regulation EN 13279-2. The thermal conductivity (k) is also reduced by the microcapsules addition but for the case of a content of 15%. On the other hand, the porosity is barely affected just varying always less than a 3.5%. Finally, despite of the

  10. Evaluation of potential for mercury volatilization from natural and FGD gypsum products using flux-chamber tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Scott S; Noggle, Jessica J; Bloom, Nicholas; Yost, Lisa J

    2009-04-01

    Synthetic gypsum produced by flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) in coal-fired power plants (FGD gypsum) is put to productive use in manufacturing wallboard. FGD gypsum wallboard is widely used, accounting for nearly 30% of wallboard sold in the United States. Mercury is captured in flue gas and thus is one of the trace metals present in FGD gypsum; raising questions about the potential for mercury exposure from wallboard. Mercury is also one of the trace metals present in "natural" mined gypsum used to make wall board. Data available in the literature were not adequate to assess whether mercury in wallboard from either FGD or natural gypsum could volatilize into indoor air. In this study, mercury volatilization was evaluated using small-scale (5 L) glass and Teflon flux chambers, with samples collected using both iodated carbon and gold-coated sand traps. Mercury flux measurements made using iodated carbon traps (n=6) were below the detection limit of 11.5 ng/m2-day for all natural and synthetic gypsum wallboard samples. Mercury flux measurements made using gold-coated sand traps (n=6) were 0.92 +/- 0.11 ng/m2-day for natural gypsum wallboard and 5.9 +/- 2.4 ng/m2-day for synthetic gypsum wallboard. Room air mercury concentrations between 0.028 and 0.28 ng/m3 and between 0.13 and 2.2 ng/m3 were estimated based on the flux-rate data for natural and synthetic gypsum wallboard samples, respectively, and were calculated assuming a 3 m x 4 m x 5 m room, and 10th and 90th percentile air exchange rates of 0.18/hour and 1.26/hour. The resulting concentration estimates are well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference concentration for indoor air elemental mercury of 300 ng/m3 and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry minimal risk level (MRL) of 200 ng/m3. Further, these estimates are below background mercury concentrations in indoor air and within or below the range of typical background mercury concentrations in outdoor air.

  11. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; James, J.M.; Lee, D.J.; Smith, D.L.; Walker, A.T.

    1982-03-01

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm 3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  12. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  13. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  14. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  15. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  16. Cement production from coal conversion residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.D.; Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Nahas, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Cement is produced by feeding residue solids containing carbonaceous material and ash constituents obtained from converting a carbonaceous feed material into liquids and/or gases into a cement-making zone and burning the carbon in the residue solids to supply at least a portion of the energy required to convert the solids into cement

  17. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  18. Why does carbon increase in highly weathered soil under no-till upon lime and gypsum use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Thiago Massao; de Moraes Sá, João Carlos; Caires, Eduardo Fávero; Gonçalves, Daniel Ruiz Potma

    2017-12-01

    Field experiments have been used to explain how soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics is affected by lime and gypsum applications, however, how SOC storage occurs is still debatable. We hypothesized that although many studies conclude that Ca-based soil amendments such as lime and gypsum may lead to SOC depletion due to the enhancement of microbial activity, the same does not occur under conservation agriculture conditions. Thus, the objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on soil microbial activity and SOC stocks in a no-till field and in a laboratory incubation study simulating no-till conditions. The field experiment was established in 1998 in a clayey Oxisol in southern Brazil following a completely randomized blocks design with a split-plot arrangement and three replications. Lime and gypsum were surface applied in 1998 and reapplied in 2013. Undisturbed soil samples were collected before the treatments reapplications, and one year after. The incubation experiment was carried out during 16months using these samples adding crop residues on the soil surface to simulate no-till field conditions. Lime and gypsum applications significantly increased the labile SOC stocks, microbial activity and soil fertility attributes in both field and laboratory experiments. Although the microbial activity was increased, no depletion of SOC stocks was observed in both experiments. Positive correlations were observed between microbial activity increase and SOC gains. Labile SOC and Ca 2+ content increase leads to forming complex with mineral soil fractions. Gypsum applications performed a higher influence on labile SOC pools in the field than in the laboratory experiment, which may be related to the presence of active root system in the soil profile. We conclude that incubation experiments using lime and gypsum in undisturbed samples confirm that soil microbial activity increase does not deplete SOC stocks under conservation agriculture

  19. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  20. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  1. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  2. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  3. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Ito, Akihiko

    1978-10-01

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  4. Fate of gypsum-sulphur applied to soybean on Typic haplustepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharan, Neelam; Rattan, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted on the sulphur-deficient Typic Haplustepts of the IARI farm for two consecutive, kharif seasons viz. 1996 and 1997 with soybean cultivar Pusa 22 as the crop. Varying rates of S as gypsum were basally applied in the main plots adjacent to the micro plots (1 m x 1 m) to quantify the partitioning of the fertilizer-sulphur taken up by soybean and its distribution in the soil profile. Soybean responded to the application of sulphur, with increase in yield being obtained up to rate of 40 kg S ha -1 . Data computed on distribution of the S derived from labelled gypsum and percent S utilization by the soybean crop increased from 13.23 and 4.15 to 23.41 and 6.39, respectively. During 1996, the per cent utilization of labelled S ranged from 5.6 to 8.8. Monitoring of added sulphur in the soil profile up to a depth of 1 m revealed maximum accumulation of the added S in 30-60 cm soil layer. With the help of 35 S around 11 to 18 per cent of the added S was traced in 60-100 cm soil layer. It can be concluded from the data for two years that during kharif season the application of S through water soluble sources like ammonium sulphate and ammonium phosphate sulphate should be avoided because even S from the sparingly soluble gypsum migrated to a depth of 1 m during the cropping season. (author)

  5. High Levels of Antibiotic Resistance but No Antibiotic Production Detected Along a Gypsum Gradient in Great Onyx Cave, KY, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Lavoie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study of antibiotic production and antibiotic resistance was conducted in Great Onyx Cave in Mammoth Cave National Park, KY, to determine if gypsum (CaSO4∙2H2O affects these bacterial activities. The cave crosses through the width of Flint Ridge, and passages under the sandstone caprock are dry with different amounts of gypsum. The Great Kentucky Desert hypothesis posits that gypsum limits the distribution of invertebrates in the central areas of Great Onyx Cave. Twenty-four bacterial isolates were cultivated from swabs and soils. Using three methods (soil crumb, soil crumb with indicator bacteria, and the cross-streak method using isolated bacteria we did not detect any production of antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance was widespread, with all 24 isolates resistant to a minimum of two antibiotics of seven tested, with three isolates resistant to all. Antibiotic resistance was high and not correlated with depth into the cave or the amount of gypsum. The Great Kentucky Desert hypothesis of the negative effects of gypsum seems to have no impact on bacterial activity.

  6. The impact of gypsum mine water: A case study on morphology and DNA integrity in the freshwater invertebrate, Gammarus balcanicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternjej, Ivančica; Mihaljević, Zlatko; Ivković, Marija; Previšić, Ana; Stanković, Igor; Maldini, Krešimir; Želježić, Davor; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate how exposure to heavy metal-rich waters from gypsum mining affects the morphology and levels of primary DNA damage in Gammarus balcanicus. Chemical analysis revealed increased concentrations of metals in water and sediment collected at a site impacted by gypsum mine wastewaters. The specimens also showed elevated total tissue metal levels when compared with the organisms collected at the reference site. The most prominent increase was observed for strontium, followed by iron, nickel, vanadium, aluminium, and manganese. The major pathway of entry for these toxic substances was through the degraded exoskeleton as a consequence of excessive strontium input (unbalanced calcium/strontium ratio) and altered permeability. Disturbed exoskeleton integrity was observed only in individuals collected downstream of the gypsum mine, which was confirmed by electron microscopy. Levels of primary DNA damage were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay in the haemolymph of the specimens. - Highlights: • Our findings suggest toxic potential of gypsum mine wastewaters. • The Gammarus specimens showed elevated total tissue metal levels. • Strontium uptake disturbed exoskeleton integrity. • Corrupted cuticle altered permeability to other toxic substances. • Combined effects of all contaminants caused genotoxicity. - Gypsum mine wastewaters have genotoxic potential and affect the gammarid exoskeleton morphology and biochemistry associated with a high strontium uptake

  7. Estimates of the radiation dose from phospho-gypsum plaster-board if used in domestic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.S.; Peggie, J.R.; Leith, I.S.

    1991-02-01

    This report presents the results of a study carried out to estimate the annual effective dose equivalent contribution from phospho-gypsum plaster-board if it were used as an internal lining in buildings. The study considered four sources of radiation exposure that would arise in such use, such as inhalation of 222 Rn and its daughters, inhalation of phospho-gypsum dust and exposure to beta and gamma radiation. Measurements of the 22 6Ra content and 222 Rn exhalation rate were made for a number of samples of phospho-gypsum plaster-board, and the behaviour of 222 Rn and its daughters in a typical building was modelled. The results of the study suggest that, for building ventilation rates greater than approximately 0.5 air changes per hour, the contribution to the total annual effective dose equivalent from inhalation of radon ( 222 Rn) and its daughters ( 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Po) exhaled from the phospho-gypsum plaster-board should be well below the recommended limit of 1 milli-Sievert for members of the public. The total annual effective dose equivalent from all these sources should be less than 0.6 milli-Sieverts, provided reasonable work practices are observed during installation of the phospho-gypsum plaster-board and the ventilation rate is kept above approximately 0.5 air changes per hour. 31 refs., 12 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Through BHA (Bottom Hole Assembly) cementing with proprietary cementing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanguy, Charles ' Joey' ; Mueller, Dan T. [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, J.C. [Palm Energy Partners, LLC, Metairie, LA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    There are many problems that can arise when drilling into sub-normally pressured or naturally fractured zones. Lost circulation is one problem that is commonly encountered while drilling oil and gas wells. Lost circulation can lead to increased costs associated with drilling due to rig time, spreadsheet costs, and expensive mud system losses. Cement is one of the most effective treatment options, although it is not normally considered the first option because most operators are forced to trip out of the wellbore and utilize a squeeze packer. This is not always a viable option because of potential well control issues associated with the hydrostatic pressure reduction due to the losses of the whole mud. One treatment option that is commonly overlooked is pumping cement slurries through the bottom hole assembly and drill bit. This is generally not attempted for a variety of reasons. These reasons include: I Concern about 'squeezing off' of the cement in the bit II Lack of potential quality control associated with mixing 'on the fly' III Lack of the ability to test the actual mixed slurry samples The use of a pre-mixed, storable cement slurry has eliminated the concerns associated with pumping cement slurries through mud motors, MWD tools, BHA's, and drill bits. This advanced cement technology has been successfully utilized while reducing the risks associated with these lost circulation treatments. In addition, this technology has eliminated the costs associated with using a squeeze packer and the rig time required for several trips out of the wellbore. The paper will describe the premixed slurry properties and QA/QC procedures that are required for successful through the bit operations. This paper will also provide case histories of successful through the bit operation, as well as background information leading to the treatments. The case histories include successful through the bit remediation of severe lost circulation zones and as well the

  9. Physical and mechanical characterization of gypsum boards containing phase change materials for latent heat storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver-Ramírez, A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design and manufacture of a gypsum board which, despite its 45 % wt content of phase change materials, meets the minimum physical and mechanical requirements laid down in the legislation on gypsum plasters (Spanish and European standard UNE EN 13279 and Spanish specifications for gypsum acceptance, RY 85. Under this design, a one-metre square, 1.5-cm thick board contains 4.75 kg of PCM, much more than in any prior drylining (the maximum attained to date is 3 kg per m2. The mechanical and physical characteristics of this new composite were previously improved with two joint-action additives: polypropylene fibres and melamine formaldehyde as a dispersing agent. In the 20-30 ºC temperature range, a gypsum board 1.5 cm thick containing this percentage of PCMs can store five times more thermal energy than conventional plasterboard of the same thickness, and the same amount of energy as half-foot hollow brick masonry.

    En esta investigación se ha diseñado y fabricado un panel de escayola que incorpora un 45% en peso de material de cambio de fase, manteniendo las propiedades físicas y mecánicas exigidas en la normativa de aplicación para yesos de construcción (UNE EN 13279 y referencias a la RY 85. Así, un panel de 1,0 m2 y 1,5 cm de espesor, contiene 4,75 kg de PCM, cantidad muy superior a la conseguida hasta la fecha (3 kg/m2. Para ello se ha mejorado previamente sus prestaciones mecánicas y físicas mediante adiciones binarias: fibras de polipropileno y dispersión de melanina formaldehído. Este porcentaje es capaz de almacenar en 1,5 cm de espesor cinco veces la energía térmica de un panel de cartón yeso con el mismo espesor y la misma cantidad que una fábrica de 1/2 pie de ladrillo hueco, en el rango de temperaturas próximas a la de confort (20-30 ºC.

  10. Luminescence rigidochromism as a probe for the setting of gypsum plaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkely, Horst; Vogler, Arnd

    2008-01-01

    The setting of gypsum plaster can be monitored by luminescence rigidochromism. The progress of the setting process which is accompanied by hardening is indicated by a blue shift of the phosphorescence of a suitable water soluble rhenium complex. This rigidity increase of the plaster/water mixture takes place in two phases. In the beginning the rigidity increase is rather large while in the second much longer phase it is relatively small. The addition of a plasticizer (or retarder) keeps the rigidity smaller in the beginning, but only slightly affects the final rigidity of the set plaster

  11. Climatic control on the growth of gigantic gypsum crystals within hypogenic caves (Naica mine, Mexico)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Paolo S.; Fricker, Mattias B.; Günther, Detlef; Forti, Paolo; Mercuri, Anna-Maria; Loreti, Mara; Capaccioni, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Three hypogenic caves within the Naica mine of Mexico ( Cueva de los Cristales — CLC, Ojo de la Reina — OR, and Cueva de las Velas — CLV) host spectacular gypsum crystals up to 11 m in length. These caves are close to another shallow cave of the area ( Cueva de las Espadas — CLE), with which they cover a 160 m-deep vertical section of the local drainage basin. Similar to other hypogenic caves, all these caves lack a direct connection with the land surface and should be unrelated with climate. A record of multi-technique fluid inclusion data and pollen spectra from cave and mine gypsum indicates surprisingly that climatic changes occurring at Naica could have controlled fluid composition in these caves, and hence crystal growth. Microthermometry and LA-ICP-Mass Spectrometry of fluid inclusions indicate that the shallow, chemically peculiar, saline fluid (up to 7.7 eq. wt.%NaCl) of CLE could have formed from evaporation, during a dry and hot climatic period. The fluid of the deep caves was instead of low salinity (˜ 3.5 eq. wt.% NaCl) and chemically homogeneous, and was poorly affected by evaporation. We propose that mixing of these two fluids, generated at different depths of the Naica drainage basin, determined the stable supersaturation conditions for the gigantic gypsum crystals to grow. Fluid mixing was controlled by the hydraulic communication between CLE and the other deep caves, and must have taken place during cycles of warm-dry and fresh-wet climatic periods, which are known to have occurred in the region. Pollen grains from a 35 ka-old gypsum crystal of CLC corresponds to a fairly homogenous catchment basin made of a mixed broadleaf wet forest, which suggests precipitation during a fresh-wet climatic period and confirms our interpretation of the fluid inclusion data. The unusual combination of geological and geochemical factors of Naica suggests that other hypogenic caves found elsewhere may not host similar crystals. However, this work shows that

  12. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  13. The Use of Fly Ash and Lime Sludge as Partial Replacement of Cement in Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Sahu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased demand of drinking water and power has led huge generation of water treatment plant residue i.e. sludge and the thermal power plant by-product such as fly ash. Large quantities of sludge and fly ash are produced in India and disposed off by landfilling or dumping in and around sites. In this study fly ash and water softening sludge (lime sludge has been utilized in mortar. Two types of mortar (type I and II with four binder combinations have been tried. Binder I consists of 70% fly ash (FA and 30% lime sludge (LS , 0 % gypsum (G, binder II is 70% FA, 30% LS and 1% G, binder III is 50% FA, 30% LS and 20% cement and the binder IV is 40% FA, 40% LS with 20% cement. The effect of various combinations on strength has been discussed here. This paper outlines the composition of the composite material, method of preparation of mortar specimen, testing procedure and salient results thereof.

  14. Design and manufacture of X-ray analyser of CaO, Fe2O3, SiO2 and Al2O3, investment opportunity of Vietnam cement factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Tuy; Luong Duc Long

    2008-01-01

    Cement is produced by heating naturally occurring raw materials containing the required oxides in kiln, which results in a product called clinker. To obtain the finished cement, the clinker is then ground together with gypsum, which controls setting properties, to a fine powder. Portland cement is a mixture of compounds formed from the oxides of Ca(CaO), Si(SiO 2 ), Al(Al 2 O 3 ), and Fe(Fe 2 O 3 ). In addition to these four main constituents it also contains smaller amounts of MgO, K 2 O, SO 3 , etc. Effective process control of cement is important to ensure high quality of the product. Traditionally wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometers are used for cement quality control at the modern cement factories. The XRF-NCS02 is a compact energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analyzer. These spectrometers also are used for cement quality control at the small size cement plant. Product description: The XRF-NCS02 , table-top cement analyzer is a computer-based EDXRF spectrometer. The high efficiency and high resolution Si PIN detector is coupled to a 4096 channel MCA for data collection. The special low-power x-ray tube of the system requires no cooling and obligates the need for radioisotopes, as commonly found on such instruments. Computer: Compatible notebook or desktop PC, Pentium processor with CD-ROM. Software: XRF - NCS02 software for quantitative analysis; Interactive, operation under Windows XP. Installation: dimensions 500x380x300 mm (W x D x H); weight: 10 kg. (author)

  15. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  16. The cement recycling of the earthquake disaster debris by Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    A tremendous quantity of earthquake disaster debris and tsunami sediment was resulted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd., a Sumitomo Osaka Cement subsidiary, was the first cement industry company to receive and process such waste materials outside of their usual prefecture area, while the company is performing their treatment and recycling services locally in Hachinohe City and Aomori Prefecture. This report provides an explanation about the recycling mechanism of waste materials and by-products in cement manufacturing process, and introduces an example of actual achievements for the disaster debris treatment by utilizing the cement recycling technologies at the Hachinohe Cement Plant. (author)

  17. Determination of Ra-226 and Th-232 in samples of natural phosphates, industrial gypsums and surface soils by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessenda, L.C.R.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do; Nadai, E.A. de; Barros Ferraz, E.S. de; Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba

    1988-01-01

    The natural radioactivity in Ra-226 and Th-232 in samples of natural phosphates, industrial gypsums (phosphogypsums) and surface soils of different regions was measured by γ-ray spectrometry. The majority of phosphates and gypsums examined showed significantly higher values than soils, mainly in relation to Ra-226 activity. The activity ranges found for phosphates, gypsums and soils were: 79.1 - 3180 Bq/kg, 56.3 - 986.6 Bq/kg, 8.8 - 54.3 Bq/kg for Ra-226 and 33.6 - 1450.3 Bq/kg; 17.4 - 130,1 Bq/kg, 9.8 - 108.9 Bq/kg for Th-232, respectively. (author) [pt

  18. An analysis of the persistent presence of opportunistic pathogens on patient-derived dental impressions and gypsum casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Watamoto, Takao; Abe, Keike; Kobayashi, Munemasa; Kaneda, Yoshitoshi; Ashida, Shunji; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the persistent presence of microorganisms on patient-derived dental impressions and gypsum casts, while highlighting important human pathogens such as Candida, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The practices and opinions regarding cross-infection control from 59 general dentists in Japan were obtained via a questionnaire. Alginate impressions were made from 56 patients. Using a brain heart infusion agar medium, impression and imprint cultures were carried out to visualize the microbial contamination on the surfaces of the impressions and gypsum casts, respectively. The colonies on the surfaces of the 30 impression cultures and 26 imprint cultures were collected by swabbing and then inoculated onto selective agar plates to detect streptococci, staphylococci, Candida, MRSA, and P aeruginosa. The questionnaire showed that only 54% of general dentists had a cross-infection policy in their dental clinics, and only 30% to 40% were aware of the possible persistence of MRSA or P aeruginosa on impressions and gypsum casts. The impression/imprint cultures grew a large number of visible bacterial colonies on all of impression/gypsum cast samples investigated. Selective agar cultures demonstrated the presence of streptococci (100, 100%), staphylococci (56.7, 65.4%), Candida (30, 46.2%), MRSA (26.7, 15.4%), and P aeruginosa (6.7, 7.7%) on the impressions and the gypsum casts, respectively. This investigation showed that patient-derived dental impressions and gypsum casts are contaminated with numerous microbes, including Candida, MRSA, and P aeruginosa, which are known pathogens responsible for nosocomial and/or life-threatening infection in the immunocompromised host.

  19. Leaching characteristics of trace elements in desulfurization gypsum from a coal-fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.K.; Zhuo, Y.Q.; Zhu, Z.W.; Chen, C.H. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The contents and leaching characteristics of Cr, Cd, As, Pb and Se in FGD gypsum from a 200 MW coal-fired power plant were investigated in this study. Experimental results revealed that: the leaching characteristics of As and Se were similar, both leaching rates were not obviously affected by pH but increased with increase of the liquid-solid ratio. Pb and Cr had similar leaching characteristics, their leaching rates were closely related with the pH of leaching solution and increased with the lowering of pH and both increased with the increasing of solid-liquid ratio. Along with the increase of the liquid-solid ratio, the leaching gradually achieved balance, and the balanced liquid-solid ratio was bigger when pH of leaching solution was lower. Cd content of leaching solution was below detect limit, and thus failed to get its leaching characteristics. The order of trace element content in leaching solution is Pb < Cr < As < Se, and the order of leaching rates is Cr < As < Pb < Se. BCR extraction procedure revealed that trace elements in FGD gypsum were mainly existed as available fraction and migration ability was stronger than that of trace elements in fly ash from coal-fired power plants.

  20. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of the Cavity Evolution in Gypsum Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2017-11-01

    When water flows through a preexisting cylindrical tube in gypsum rock, the nonuniform dissolution alters the tube into an enlarged tapered tube. A 2-D analytical model is developed to study the transport-controlled dissolution in an enlarged tapered tube, with explicit consideration of the tapered geometry and induced radial flow. The analytical model shows that the Graetz solution can be extended to model dissolution in the tapered tube. An alternative form of the governing equations is proposed to take advantage of the invariant quantities in the Graetz solution to facilitate modeling cavity evolution in gypsum rock. A 2-D finite volume model was developed to validate the extended Graetz solution. The time evolution of the transport-controlled and the reaction-controlled dissolution models for a single tube with time-invariant flow rate are compared. This comparison shows that for time-invariant flow rate, the reaction-controlled dissolution model produces a positive feedback between the tube enlargement and dissolution, while the transport-controlled dissolution does not.

  1. The production of hydroxyapatite prototypes from solid bodies of Gypsum/Polyvinyl Alcohol composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Amanda Alves; Ferraz, Andrea de Vasconcelos; Dantas, Alan Christie; Olivier, Nelson Cardenas, E-mail: andrea.ferraz@univasf.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco (UNIVASF), Juazeiro, BA (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Prototypes of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) were produced from Gypsum/PVA composite, using a mass proportion of 15% polymer. The material was obtained by means of chemical conversion in (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} 0.5 mol.L{sup -1} solution and NH{sub 4}OH 6.0 mol.L{sup -1} alkaline medium for pH control, maintained between 6.0 and 9.0. The reaction occurred at a temperature of 100°C at different test times. The obtained HAp was characterized by several techniques, such as FTIR, which identified the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} groups characteristic for the Gypsum block, and the PO{sub 4}{sup 2-} groups that are attributed to the biomaterial HAp, besides XRD and SEM, which made it possible to confirm a successful conversion of the material. Tests for mechanical resistance to compression (σ{sub c}) were carried out for both materials as well. (author)

  2. Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States). Department of Soil Science

    2009-07-15

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

  3. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike

    2012-12-01

    We report on changes in P and S-wave velocities and rock microstructure induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air, at ambient pressure, and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Dehydration did not proceed homogeneously but via a reaction front moving sample inwards separating an outer highly porous rim from the remaining gypsum which, above approximately 393 (±5) K, concurrently decomposed into hemihydrate. Overall porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% for fully hydrated samples to 30% for completely dehydrated ones. Concurrently, P and S-wave velocities linearly decreased with porosity from 5.2 and 2.7 km/s to 1.0 and 0.7 km/s, respectively. It is concluded that a linearized empirical Raymer-type model extended by a critical porosity term and based on the respective time dependent mineral and pore volumes reasonably replicates the P and S-wave data in relation to reaction progress and porosity.

  4. Regional transport of a chemically distinctive dust: Gypsum from White Sands, New Mexico (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Warren H.; Hyslop, Nicole P.; Trzepla, Krystyna; Yatkin, Sinan; Rarig, Randy S.; Gill, Thomas E.; Jin, Lixin

    2015-03-01

    The White Sands complex, a National Monument and adjoining Missile Range in southern New Mexico, occupies the dry bed of an ice-age lake where an active gypsum dunefield abuts erodible playa sediments. Aerosols entrained from White Sands are sometimes visible on satellite images as distinct, light-colored plumes crossing the Sacramento Mountains to the east and northeast. The IMPROVE network (Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments) operates long-term aerosol samplers at two sites east of the Sacramento range. In recent years a spring pulse of sulfate aerosol has appeared at these sites, eclipsing the regional summer peak resulting from atmospheric reactions of sulfur dioxide emissions. A significant fraction of this spring sulfate is contributed by gypsum and other salts from White Sands, with much of the sulfur in coarse particles and concentrations of calcium and strontium above regional levels. The increase in these gypsiferous species coincides with a drought following a period of above-average precipitation. White Sands and the IMPROVE samplers together provide a natural laboratory: a climatically sensitive dust source that is both well characterized and chemically distinct from its surroundings, with a signature that remains identifiable at long-term observatories 100-200 km downwind.

  5. Use sulfoferritic cements in construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samchenko, Svetlana V.; Zorin, Dmitriy A.

    2018-03-01

    Currently, high-rise construction has received increasing attention around the world. In the big cities under construction is less space and one solution is the high-rise construction. However, high-rise buildings use special requirements, such as strength, thermal insulation, wind load and others. When concrete is exposed to continuous loads by wind or to mechanical loads, it undergoes abrasion. Resistance to this process depends on the characteristics of materials that the concrete and finishing seams are made of. Research on increasing impact and abrasion resistance of calcium sulfoferrite-based cement stone from the perspective of formation of cement stone structure will be instrumental in developing durable materials for application in high-rise construction.

  6. Concrete research using blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete research increasingly involves the use of mixes containing one or more of the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), often in conjunction with chemical admixtures. The influence of materials is commonly evaluated on the basis of water/ cement or water/ binder ratio and SCM content as a percentage of total binder, with dosage level of chemical admixture varied to maintain workability. As a result, more than one variable is introduced at a time and the objectives of the research may not be achieved. The significance of water/ cement ratio and addition rates of admixtures are examined from a practical standpoint with suggestions for more appropriate means of evaluation of the influence of individual materials. Copyright (2001) The Australian Ceramic Society

  7. The density of cement phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonis, M.; Glasser, F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The densities of principal crystalline phases occurring in Portland cement are critically assessed and tabulated, in some cases with addition of new data. A reliable and self-consistent density set for crystalline phases was obtained by calculating densities from crystallographic data and unit cell contents. Independent laboratory work was undertaken to synthesize major AFm and AFt cement phases, determine their unit cell parameters and compare the results with those recorded in the literature. Parameters were refined from powder diffraction patterns using CELREF 2 software. A density value is presented for each phase, showing literature sources, in some cases describing limitations on the data, and the weighting attached to numerical values where an averaging process was used for accepted data. A brief discussion is made of the consequences of the packing of water to density changes in AFm and AFt structures.

  8. A plugging solution for cementing deep oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelopulo, O K; Bakshutov, V S; Bikbau, M Ya; Danyushevskiy, V S; Ilyukhin, V V; Khydyrov, M B; Lobov, L L; Nikolayeva, M K; Nikulin, V Ya; Nudelman, B I

    1983-01-01

    In order to use the solution in a temperature range of -10 to +250 degrees in conditions of salt agression, a plugging solution for cementing deep oil and gas wells, which contains a ground clinker, a mineral additive, a slaking liquid and a modifier additive, is made up in the following manner: ground chlorosilicate clinker is used as the clinker (alynite portland cement) (100 parts); a mixture of gypsum and limestone with peat or cope in a 1 to 3 to 4 to 3 to 8 ratio is used as the mineral additive (5 to 65 parts); the slaking liquid is water of a 1 to 2.5 percent aqueous solution of electrolytes of CaC/sub 12/ or K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (42 to 115.5 parts), while the modifier additive is an aqueous solution of liquid glass or polyacrylate (0.05 to 17.55 parts). The solution contains an analyte clinker of the following mineral composition, in parts by weight: Ca/sub 3/Si0/sub 4/C1/sub 2/ (alynite), 100; Ca/sub 2/Si0/sub 3/C1/sub 2/, 2.2 to 33.2; 12CuO with 7A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/, 2.2 to 25.0; CuO with 5A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/, 1.1 to 8.3; CuO with 2A10/sub 2/, 1.1 to 8.3; 4CaO with A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/ with Fe/sub 2/0/sub 3/, 15.6 to 25.0; 2CuO with Fe/sub 2/0/sub 3/, 0.1 to 5.0; a glass phase of 0.3 to 25.0 and free CuO, 0.6 to 2.5; and total MgO, 0.3 to 2.5.

  9. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV), coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive a...

  10. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU; B.SAI DOONDI; N. M .V .VAMSI KRISHNA; K.PRASANTHI

    2013-01-01

    India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green hous...

  11. Populations of some molds in water-damaged homes may differ if the home was constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in the 1940s, gypsum drywall began replacing plaster and lathe in the U.S. home construction industry. Our goal was to evaluate whether some mold populations differ in water- damaged homes primarily constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster. The dust samples fr...

  12. Modernization of Byuzmeyinsky Cement Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective of saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emission, investigations and discussions were given on a modernization project for Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory, the only cement factory in Turkmenistan. Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory uses the wet process which consumes a large amount of energy, is inferior in production efficiency and quality, and discharging a great amount of greenhouse effect gas. The present project will execute change of the raw material crusher into a vertical roll mill for one of the four wet kilns, and change of the facilities for raw material powder mixing and storing and clinker manufacturing into dry-type facilities using the NSP system. As a result of the discussions, the energy saving effect would be 86,321 tons of crude oil equivalent annually, and the greenhouse gas emission reducing effect would be 224,467 t-CO2 annually. The total fund amount required for the project is estimated to be 90,211,000 dollars. With regard to the profitability, the internal financial profit rate would be 9.71% after tax, and the ROE would be 18.62%, whereas the project is considered feasible. (NEDO)

  13. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  14. Use of Incineration Solid Waste Bottom Ash as Cement Mixture in Cement Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, N. H.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Jin, T. S.; Kadir, A. A.; Tugui, C. A.; Sandu, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Incineration solid waste bottom ash was use to examine the suitability as a substitution in cement production. This study enveloped an innovative technology option for designing new equivalent cement that contains incineration solid waste bottom ash. The compressive strength of the samples was determined at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. The result was compared to control cement with cement mixture containing incineration waste bottom ash where the result proved that bottom ash cement mixture able achieve its equivalent performance compared to control cement which meeting the requirement of the standards according to EN 196-1. The pozzolanic activity index of bottom ash cement mixture reached 0.92 at 28 days and 0.95 at 90 and this values can be concluded as a pozzolanic material with positive pozzolanic activity. Calcium hydroxide in Portland cement decreasing with the increasing replacement of bottom ash where the reaction occur between Ca(OH)2 and active SiO2.

  15. Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

    1999-10-01

    The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

  16. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  17. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  18. Chemistry of cements for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, P.; Glasser, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    In recent times the nuclear industry has thrown up challenges which cannot be met by the application of conventional civil and materials engineering knowledge. The contributions in this volume investigate all aspects of cement performance. The scope of the papers demonstrates the current balance of activities which have as their objective the elucidation of kinetics and immobilization, determining material interactions and of assessing future performance. The papers reflect the varied goals of the sponsors who include national governments, the Commission of the European Communities and the nuclear industries. In six parts attention is paid to the durability of cement and concrete in repository environment; interactions between cement, waste components and ground water; properties and performance of cement materials; leach behavior and mechanisms, diffusional properties of cement and concrete, including porosity-permeability relationships; and thermodynamics of cementitious systems and modelling of cement performance

  19. Influence of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Sulfate Attack upon Ordinary Portland Cement and Slag-Blended Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta-ur-Rehman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles on the sulfate attack resistance of ordinary Portland cement (OPC and slag-blended mortars were investigated. OPC and slag-blended mortars (OPC:Slag = 50:50 were made with water to binder ratio of 0.4 and a binder to sand ratio of 1:3. TiO2 was added as an admixture as 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% and 12% of the binder weight. Mortar specimens were exposed to an accelerated sulfate attack environment. Expansion, changes in mass and surface microhardness were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC tests were conducted. The formation of ettringite and gypsum crystals after the sulfate attack were detected. Both these products had caused crystallization pressure in the microstructure of mortars and deteriorated the mortars. Our results show that the addition of nano-TiO2 accelerated expansion, variation in mass, loss of surface microhardness and widened cracks in OPC and slag-blended mortars. Nano-TiO2 containing slag-blended mortars were more resistant to sulfate attack than nano-TiO2 containing OPC mortars. Because nano-TiO2 reduced the size of coarse pores, so it increased crystallization pressure due to the formation of ettringite and gypsum thus led to more damage under sulfate attack.

  20. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Parnell; Lennon, Alexander B; Kenny, Patrick J; O'Reilly, Peter; Prendergast, Patrick J

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct. Primary cement mantles were formed by cementing a polished stem into sections of tubular steel. If in the test group, the mantle underwent conditioning in saline to simulate ageing and was subject to a fatigue of 1 million cycles. If in the control group no such conditioning or fatigue was carried out. The cement-in-cement procedure was then undertaken. Both groups underwent a fatigue of 1 million cycles subsequent to the revision procedure. Application of a Mann-Whitney test on the recorded subsidence (means: 0.51, 0.46, n=10+10, P=0.496) and inducible displacement (means: 0.38, 0.36, P=0.96) revealed that there was no statistical difference between the groups. This study represents further biomechanical investigation of the mechanical behaviour of cement-in-cement revision constructs. Results suggest that pre-revision fatigue and ageing of the cement may not be deleterious to the mechanical performance of the revision construct. Thus, this study provides biomechanical evidence to back-up recent successes with this useful revision technique. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  2. Pulmonary Cement Embolism following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimal invasive procedure that is applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. During vertebroplasty, the leakage of bone cement outside the vertebral body leads to pulmonary cement embolism, which is a serious complication of this procedure. Here we report a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea after percutaneous vertebroplasty and diagnosed as pulmonary cement embolism.

  3. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yamawaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reactor or experimental rooms is a matter of problem for safety control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate these tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were studied by combining various experimental methods. From the basic studies on tritium-cement interactions, it has become possible to evaluate tritium uptake by cement or concrete and subsequent tritium release behavior as well as tritium removing methods from them

  4. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  5. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the products' properties. (author)

  6. Use of rubber crumbs in cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longvinenko, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Rubber crumb obtained from worn out tires has been increasingly used over the last 15-20 years, especially in manufacture of asphalt and cement concrete mixtures. This review pays principal attention to application of the rubber crumb to cement concrete mixtures. Use of the rubber crumb in cement concrete is not as successful as in asphalt concrete mixtures, due to incompatibility problems linked to chemical composition and a significant difference in rigidity between the rubber crumb and concrete mixture aggregates. Different methods are proposed and studied to mitigate the adverse influence and increase the beneficial effects of the rubber crumb when added to cement concrete.

  7. Controls on Cementation in a Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Hussein, A.; Welch, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we identify different controls on cementation in a chalk reservoir. Biot’s coefficient, a measure of cementation, stiffness and strength in porous rocks, is calculated from logging data (bulk density and sonic Pwave velocity). We show that Biot’s coefficient is correlated...... that some degree of pore filling cementation occurred in Kraka (Alam, 2010). Lack of correlation between Biot’s coefficient and Gamma Ray (GR) indicates that the small amount of clay present is generally located in the pore space, thus not contributing to frame stiffness. While there was no compositional...... control on cementation via clay, we could infer that stratigraphy impacts on the diagenetic process....

  8. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Pointer, C.; Cowie, J.; Wilding, C.R.; Mattingley, N.J.; Evans, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH) 2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U 6+ and iodine (I - , IO 3 - ) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO 2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  9. Integer programming of cement distribution by train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarsih

    2018-01-01

    Cement industry in Central Java distributes cement by train to meet daily demand in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. There are five destination stations. For each destination station, there is a warehouse to load cements. Decision maker of cement industry have a plan to redesign the infrastructure and transportation system. The aim is to determine how many locomotives, train wagons, and containers and how to arrange train schedules with subject to the delivery time. For this purposes, we consider an integer programming to minimize the total of operational cost. Further, we will discuss a case study and the solution the problem can be calculated by LINGO software.

  10. Prediction of hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water using a numerical cement hydration model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D numerical cement hydration model is used for predicting alkali and hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water. First, this numerical model is calibrated for Dutch cement employing both chemical shrinkage and calorimetric experiments. Secondly, the strength development of some

  11. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  12. Geotechnical Properties of Clayey Soil Stabilized with Cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-31

    Dec 31, 2017 ... ... to investigate the different effects of cement-sawdust ash and cement on a ... Keywords: Cement, Saw dust, strength test subgrade material, highway construction ... characteristics of lateritic soil stabilized with sawdust ash.

  13. Lipid and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Gypsum-hosted Endoevaporitic Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, K. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Green, S. J.; Kubo, M. D.; Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Gypsum evaporites host diverse, productive and volumetrically significant microbial communities and are relevant modern-day analogs to both Precambrian sabkha deposits and, potentially, Martian evaporites. Extensive evaporites form in subaqueous environments of high salinity ponds (>150 permil) maintained by the Exportadora de Sal, S. A. (ESSA) in Guerrero Negro, B.C.S., Mexico. A gypsarenite (reworked clastic gypsum) crust found along the southeast margin of ESSA's Pond 9 was collected in February 2004 and each vibrantly colored layer in the top centimeter was sampled. Extant microbial communities from each layer were characterized using complementary culture-independent molecular techniques, lipid biomarker analysis, and compound specific isotopic analysis. Coupling molecular analysis with lipid biomarker analysis revealed that oxygenic photosynthetic organisms dominate the surface layers (top 3 mm). Polar lipids from the surface layers consisted predominantly of glycolipids, which are characteristic of algae, cyanobacteria and green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Consistent with prior analyses of gypsum evaporites, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicate that cyanobacterial populations belong primarily to the genus Cyanothece. The bacterial community below the surface layers is more diverse and dominated by anaerobic organisms. Phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and Bacteroidetes were particularly abundant. The relative abundances of SRB increased with depth; Desulfobacteraceae clones were distributed throughout the crust, but not at the surface, while Desulfovibrionaceae clones were found predominantly in the deepest layers. These molecular results are consistent with fatty acid biomarker analysis. δ13C values of major lipid classes in the crust and sediment range from 14 to 36‰, which is considerably lower than corresponding values for benthic Microcoleus-dominated cyanobacterial mats found at lower salinities at ESSA

  14. Influence of clinker grinding-aids on the intrinsic characteristics of cements and on the behaviour of mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Luco, L.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In the production of portland cement, grinding aids are used to improve the grinding stage and reduce the energy required to achieve the required fineness. These additives remain in the final product and they might influence the characteristics and properties of the cement, and thus, mortar and concrete. This paper presents an evaluation of two grinding-aid additives used in the production of portland cement ground in a ball mill at a laboratory stage, with suitable proportions of portland cement clinker and gypsum. A control cement mix was also produced without using any admixture and the results are shown on a comparative basis. Conclusions indicate that grinding-aids additives have some influence on the characteristics of portland cement produced, increasing their specific surface and modifying microstructure and its packing ability. Mortars and concretes made with cements ground with the addition of gringing-aids exhibit higher strength at any age and a reduced water demand. Special attention should be taken to consider any interaction with water-reducing admixture in concretes and mortars.

    En la fabricación de cemento portland es una práctica creciente la utilización de aditivos para optimizar el proceso de molienda; éstos quedan incorporados en el producto final y pueden influir sobre las características y propiedades del cemento, morteros y hormigones. En este trabajo se presenta la evaluación de dos aditivos comerciales en la molienda conjunta de clínker de cemento portland y yeso comercial, tratados en un molino a bolas a escala de laboratorio, en forma comparativa con un cemento sin aditivo producido en forma equivalente. Las conclusiones indican que los aditivos de molienda tienen influencia en las características del cemento resultante, incrementando su superficie y modificando su microestructura y estado de agregación; los morteros mejoran sus prestaciones mecánicas a todas las edades y se reduce la demanda de agua

  15. High-yield synthesis of vaterite microparticles in gypsum suspension system via ultrasonic probe vibration/magnetic stirring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Pan, Zihe; Cheng, Huaigang; Chen, Zuliang; Cheng, Fangqin

    2018-06-01

    Vaterite-type calcium carbonate particles have some unique properties such as high hydrophilicity, large surface areas, and hierarchical structures consisting of primary vaterite particles in comparison with calcite or aragonite-type polymorphs. In this paper, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) suspension is used to synthesize micro-sized vaterite CaCO3 through magnetic stirring (MS) and ultrasonic probe vibration (UPV) methods. The effects of ammonia concentration, CO2 flow rate, solid-liquid ratio on the gypsum carbonation process, mineral phase composition, morphology and particle size distribution of CaCO3 are investigated. The results show that the carbonation process is significantly influenced by ammonia concentration, CO2 flow rate and ultrasound. Comparing with magnetic stirring, ultrasonic probe vibration take less time to reach the complete carbonate reaction. Gypsum is transformed to vaterite with the conversion rate about ∼95% when the mole ratio of NH4+/Ca2+ is 2.4 otherwise the carbonation reaction was uncompleted with gypsum residues left. Comparing with MS method, the UPV method resulted in smaller size and narrower size distribution of as-prepared microparticles and approximately 80% reduction of the particle size was achieved. It is established that increasing the solid-liquid ratio resulted in larger particle size in MS system and smaller particle size in UPV system. Increasing CO2 flow rate caused the particle size decreased in MS system and increased in UPV system.

  16. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  17. Towards establishing a combined rate law of nucleation and crystal growth - The case study of gypsum precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendel, Pedro M.; Gavrieli, Ittai; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2018-03-01

    The main obstacle in the formulation of a quantitative rate-model for mineral precipitation is the absence of a rigorous method for coupling nucleation and growth processes. In order to link both processes, we conducted a series of batch experiments in which gypsum nucleation was followed by crystal growth. Experiments were carried out using various stirring methods in several batch vessels made of different materials. In the experiments, the initial degree of supersaturation of the solution with respect to gypsum (Ωgyp) was set between 1.58 and 1.82. Under these conditions, heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mode. Based on changes in SO42- concentration with time, the induction time of gypsum nucleation and the following rate of crystal growth were calculated for each experiment. The induction time (6-104 h) was found to be a function of the vessel material, while the rates of crystal growth, which varied over three orders of magnitude, were strongly affected by the stirring speed and its mode (i.e. rocking, shaking, magnetic stirrer, and magnetic impeller). The SO42- concentration data were then used to formulate a forward model that couples the simple rate laws for nucleation and crystal growth of gypsum into a single kinetic model. Accordingly, the obtained rate law is based on classical nucleation theory and heterogeneous crystal growth.

  18. Metals in soil and runoff from a piedmont hayfield amended with broiler litter and flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) from coal-fired power plants is available for agricultural use in many US regions. Broiler litter (BL) provides plant available N, P, and K but may be a source of unwanted arsenic (As), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). FGDG provides Ca and S and can reduce runoff lo...

  19. Influence of gypsum on efflorescence in ceramic tiles; Influence da gipsita no surgimento de eflorescencia em telhas ceramicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, C.M.O.L. [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Nascimento, R.M.; Martinelli, A.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (PPgCEM/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    The red ceramic industry is recognized as of major importance in Piaui State. The State capital, Teresina, is the greatest producer of this material, which is used mainly for masonry sealing blocks. One of the most frequent problems in this kind of products is the efflorescence.This paper has the main objective of studying the influence of gypsum on tiles, using the local industry production standards. The raw materials were characterized by FRX, DRX, thermal analysis and sulfates. Extruded test specimens were made with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of gypsum in the ceramic paste, burned at 850 deg C, 950 deg C and 1050 deg C and submitted to further technological and analysis for MEV. The reference ceramic paste did not show tendency to efflorescence formation after burning for samples with 1% gypsum added to the paste. The reference ceramic paste showed tendency to efflorescence formation after drying and consolidated efflorescence after burning for samples with 5% gypsum added to the paste. (author)

  20. Gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling on polybenzimidazole and cellulose acetate hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Si Cong

    2013-11-08

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42 14.85 after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  1. Rietveld analysis, powder diffraction and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase quantification of cement is essential in its industrial use, however many methods are inaccurate and/or time consuming. Powder diffraction is one of the more accurate techniques used for quantitative phase analysis of cement. There has been an increase in the use of Rietveld refinement and powder diffraction for the analysis and phase quantification of cement and its components in recent years. The complex nature of cement components, existence of solid solutions, polymorphic variation of phases and overlapping phase peaks in diffraction patterns makes phase quantification of cements by powder diffraction difficult. The main phase in cement is alite, a solid solution of tricalcium silicate. Tricalcium silicate has been found to exist in seven modifications in three crystal systems, including triclinic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral structures. Hence, phase quantification of cements using Rietveld methods usually involves the simultaneous modelling of several tricalcium silicate structures to fit the complex alite phase. An industry ordinary Portland cement, industry and standard clinker, and a synthetic tricalcium silicate were characterised using neutron, laboratory x-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction. Diffraction patterns were analysed using full-profile Rietveld refinement. This enabled comparison of x-ray, neutron and synchrotron data for phase quantification of the cement and examination of the tricalcium silicate. Excellent Rietveld fits were achieved, however the results showed that the quantitative phase analysis results differed for some phases in the same clinker sample between various data sources. This presentation will give a short introduction about cement components including polymorphism, followed by the presentation of some problems in phase quantification of cements and the role of Rietveld refinement in solving these problems. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  2. Compressive Strength and Physical Properties Behavior of Cement Mortars with addition of Cement Klin Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Auday A Mehatlaf

    2017-01-01

    Cement Klin Dust (CKD) was the waste of almost cement industry factories, so that in this paper utilization of CKD as filler in cement and/or concrete was the main objective. CKD from the Karbala cement factory had been used and analysis to know the chemical composition of the oxides was done. In this paper cement mortars with different weight percentages of CKD (0,5,10,20,30,40) had been prepared. Physical properties such as density and porosity were done in different age curing (3, 7, 28) d...

  3. Age and speleogenesis of epigenic gypsum caves in the northern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbu, Andrea; Chiarini, Veronica; De Waele, Jo; Drysdale, Russell; Forti, Paolo; Hellstrom, John; Woodhead, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Triassic and Messinian gypsum beds host the majority of the caves in the eastern flank of the northern Apennines. To date, more than six hundreds voids have been mapped, including the longest known epigenic gypsum cave system in the world (Spipola-Acquafredda, ~11 km of tunnels) (De Waele et al., 2013). Superimposed caves are typically sub-horizontal (Klimchouk, 2000) and connected through vertical shafts, reflecting the palaeo base-level variations. When preserved, river terraces at the surface lie at the same palaeo altitude of the base level and horizontal cave passages. Notwithstanding the well-known geology of the area known (Vai and Martini, 2001), the age of these caves has been greatly underestimated in the past. Considering the rapid dissolution of the gypsum and uplifting of the area, the start of speleogenesis activity was considered to have occurred during the last glacial age. The age of karst voids can be only indirectly estimated by the dating of the infilling sediments. U-Th dating on carbonate speleothems provides high-precision and accurate ages (Hellstrom, 2003; Scholz and Hoffmann, 2008). We thus applied this methodology to 20 speleothems coming from 14 different caves belonging to the Monte Tondo, Spipola Acquafredda, Castelnuovo, Stella-Rio Basino and Brisighella systems. The results show that: i) caves were forming since at least ~300 ka; ii) the peak of speleogenesis was reached during relatively cold climate stages, when rivers formed terraces at the surface and aggradation caused paragenesis in the stable cave levels (Columbu et al., 2015). Besides the significant contribution to the understanding of the Apennines evaporite karst evolution, this study (and its further advancement) may also refine knowledge of the local vs regional uplifting rates and base-level variations since the late Pleistocene (Wegmann and Pazzaglia, 2009). References Columbu, A., De Waele, J., Forti, P., Montagna, P., Picotti, V., Pons-Branchu, E., Hellstrom, J

  4. Application of reject of gypsum from Trindade/PE in ceramic masses formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Thalles Confessor de; Souza, Marcondes Mendes de; Almeida, Ana Beatriz Dantas de; Farias, Debora Santos Umbelino de; Nobrega, Luiz Felipe Pereira de Medeiros; Mendes, Luciana Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    The mining industry is a major producer of waste is to be harmful to the environment besides not being made possible for use in producing means, since the product of economic interest has been extracted. In order to reduce this problem, this work shows the characterization of the waste generated by gypsum mining in Trindade/PE in the ceramic coating. The residue was collected, ground and sieved to #200, then was chemically characterized by XRF analysis process, to evaluate its potential to be incorporated into the formulation of ceramic material, the material studied can be used in porcelain tile formulation as a flux element for that were obtained in the laboratory ceramic bodies adding the residue then were performed physical testing of linear shrinkage, water absorption and flexural breaking strain technically order to evaluate the addition of this residue ceramic coating. (author)

  5. Effect of disinfection on irreversible hydrocolloid and alternative impression materials and the resultant gypsum casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprono, Montry S; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Winer, Myron S

    2012-10-01

    Many new products have been introduced and marketed as alternatives to traditional irreversible hydrocolloid materials. These alternative materials have the same structural formula as addition reaction silicone, also known as vinyl polysiloxane (VPS), impression materials. Currently, there is limited in vitro and in vivo research on these products, including on the effects of chemical disinfectants on the materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a spray disinfecting technique on a traditional irreversible hydrocolloid and 3 new alternative impression materials in vitro. The tests were performed in accordance with the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA) Specification Nos. 18 and 19. Under standardized conditions, 100 impressions were made of a ruled test block with an irreversible hydrocolloid and 3 alternative impression materials. Nondisinfected irreversible hydrocolloid was used as the control. The impressions were examined for surface detail reproduction before and after disinfection with a chloramine-T product. Type III and Type V dental stone casts were evaluated for linear dimensional change and gypsum compatibility. Comparisons of linear dimensional change were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA of mean ranks with the Scheffé post hoc comparisons (α=.05). Data for surface detail reproduction were analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank procedure and gypsum compatibility with the Kruskal-Wallis Rank procedure (α=.05). The alternative impression materials demonstrated significantly better outcomes with all 3 parameters tested. Disinfection with chloroamine-T did not have any effect on the 3 alternative impression materials. The irreversible hydrocolloid groups produced the most variability in the measurements of linear dimensional change. All of the tested materials were within the ADA's acceptable limit of 1.0% for linear dimensional change, except for the disinfected irreversible hydrocolloid

  6. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Wang; Oh, Sung-Rok; Choi, Byung-Keol

    2017-01-01

    We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite m...

  7. Analysis of Chemical Composition of Portland Cement in Ghana: A Key to Understand the Behavior of Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Bediako, Mark; Amankwah, Eric Opoku

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Portland cement in concrete or mortar formation is very well influenced by chemical compositions among other factors. Many engineers usually have little information on the chemical compositions of cement in making decisions for the choice of commercially available Portland cement in Ghana. This work analyzed five different brands of Portland cement in Ghana, namely, Ghacem ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland limestone cement (PLC), CSIR-BRRI Pozzomix, Dangote OPC, a...

  8. Effect Of Coir Fibres On The Compaction And Unconfined Compressive Strength Of Bentonite-Lime-Gypsum Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilak B. Vidya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of coir fibres on the compaction and unconfined compressive strength of a bentonite-lime-gypsum mixture. The coir fiber content varied from 0.5 to 2 %. The results indicated that the dry unit weight and the optimum moisture content of a bentonite – lime mix increased with the addition of gypsum. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the increase in the lime content up to 8 %. Beyond 8 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The dry unit weight of the reference mix decreased, and the optimum moisture content increased with the addition of coir fibre. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime mix increased up to 4 % with the gypsum. Beyond 4 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix increased with the addition of coir fibre up to a fibre content of 1.5 %. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix-coir fibre composite was less in comparison to the reference mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the addition of lime and gypsum and with the increase in the curing period. The improvement in the post-peak region was better for the reference mix with reinforced coir fibres as compared to the unreinforced reference mix. The improved post-peak behaviour of the bentonite-lime-gypsum-coir fibre mixture could boost the construction of temporary roads on such problematic soils. Further, its use will also provide an environmental motivation for providing a means of consuming large quantities of coir fibres.

  9. Influence of Cements Containing Calcareous Fly Ash as a Main Component Properties of Fresh Cement Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołaszewski, Jacek; Kostrzanowska-Siedlarz, Aleksandra; Ponikiewski, Tomasz; Miera, Patrycja

    2017-10-01

    The main goal of presented research was to examine usability of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) from technological point of view. In the paper the results of tests concerning the influence of CEM II and CEM IV cements containing fly ash (W) on rheological properties, air content, setting times and plastic shrinkage of mortars are presented and discussed. Moreover, compatibility of plasticizers with cements containing fly ash (W) was also studied. Additionally, setting time and hydration heat of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) were determined. In a broader aspect, the research contributes to promulgation of the possibility of using calcareous fly ash (W) in cement and concrete technology, what greatly benefits the environment protection (utilization of waste fly ash). Calcareous fly ash can be used successfully as the main component of cement. Cements produced by blending with processed fly ash or cements produced by interginding are characterized by acceptable technological properties. In respect to CEM I cements, cements containing calcareous fly ash worsen workability, decrease air content, delay setting time of mixtures. Cements with calcareous fly ash show good compatibility with plasticizers.

  10. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  11. Feasibility of producing nano cement in a traditional cement factory in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sada Abdalkhaliq Hasan Alyasri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the economic feasibility of producing nano cement through the establishment of a production line within an existing cement factory. Creating a nano cement production line within the Alkufa Cement factory in Iraq is selected as a case study. Evaluation measures including internal rate of return (IRR, net present value (NPV and breakeven point (BEP are used to evaluate the possible gain that can be achieved from this option. The results demonstrated a positive NPV. The IRR is found to be 26.8% and BEP is reached within 3 years after the establishment of the line. This indicates that producing nano cement in the existing cement factory is economically feasible and can be more advantageous than the ordinary cement.

  12. Is it cement to be? Downhole cement that uses zeolite additive may offer lightweight alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-05-01

    C2C Zeolite Corporation produces zeolites from a large deposit near Cache Creek, British Columbia, and processes them for use as an additive in downhole cement well casings. Early research indicates that zeolites can significantly improve the way downhole cement is made in the oil industry. Zeolites are made up mostly of silicates of aluminum and calcium. They have a great ability to absorb water, resulting in a lighter and more fluid cement than is currently available. C2C claims that zeolites will reduce cement weight, column pressure and operator costs. The cost benefits of using lighter cement downhole includes easier moving, processing and handling of the mix. Initial research suggests that zeolites might prove to be viable alternatives to other cement lighteners such as silica fumes or flyash. Zeolite-based cement also performed reasonably well in freeze-thaw tests and showed good adhesion and no evidence of shrinkage in downhole tests. 3 figs.

  13. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.A.; Glasser, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  14. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa...

  15. Development and design of a cementation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for the immobilization of intermediate level liquid waste in cement is presented. The cementation process adopted a vibration assisted mixing process. The solidified waste is packed in 200 litres drum with barite concrete lining. The waste package is classified as Type A package for transport. (Author) [pt

  16. Development and design of a cementation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, R.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for the immobilization of intermediate-level liquid wastes in cement is presented. The cementation process adopted a vibration assisted mixing process. The solidified waste is packed in 200 litres drum with barite concrete lining. The waste package is classified as Type A package for transport. (Author) [pt

  17. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  18. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  19. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  20. Facial skeletal augmentation using hydroxyapatite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, M L; Costantino, P D; Friedman, C D; Chow, L C

    1993-02-01

    This study investigates the use of a new calcium phosphate cement, which sets to solid, microporous hydroxyapatite, for facial bone augmentation. In six dogs, the supraorbital ridges were augmented bilaterally with this hydroxyapatite cement. On one side, the hydroxyapatite cement was placed directly onto the bone within a subperiosteal pocket. On the opposite side, the cement was contained within a collagen membrane tubule and then inserted into a subperiosteal pocket. The use of collagen tubules facilitated easy, precise placement of the cement. All implants maintained their original augmented height throughout the duration of the study. They were well tolerated without extrusion or migration, and there was no significant sustained inflammatory response. Histologic studies, performed at 3, 6, and 9 months revealed that when the cement was placed directly onto bone, progressive replacement of the implant by bone (osseointegration of the hydroxyapatite with the underlying bone) without a loss of volume was observed. In contrast, when the cement-collagen tubule combination was inserted, primarily a fibrous union was noted. Despite such fibrous union, the hydroxyapatite-collagen implant solidly bonded to the underlying bone, and no implant resorption was observed. Hydroxyapatite cement can be used successfully for the experimental augmentation of the craniofacial skeleton and may be applicable for such uses in humans.

  1. Elaborating the History of Our Cementing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Zhi; Shen, Lei; Løvik, Amund N.

    2017-01-01

    Modern cities and societies are built fundamentally based on cement and concrete. The global cement production has risen sharply in the past decades due largely to urbanization and construction. Here we deployed a top-down dynamic material flow analysis (MFA) model to quantify the historical deve...

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  3. Pre-portland cements and geopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Perná, Ivana; Ertl, Z.; Miller, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-62 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : caementum * cement itious * calcareous cement Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2012_01/5_Hanzlicek.pdf

  4. Contact dermatitis in cement workers in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraji Fariba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to recent industrialization and inadequately protected workers or in other words poor supervision on constructive workers habits in our large city of Isfahan cement contact dermatitis is relatively high especially among cement factory workers and constructive personnel. PURPOSES: To investigate the prevalence rate of cement contact dermatitis in cement factory workers in Isfahan. METHODS: A case-control clinical study was carried out by randomly selecing 150 factory workders and 150 official clerks in a cement factory in Isfahan in 2001. After a complete physical examination, data was recorded in observational checklists. FINDINGS: The percentages of contact dermatitis prevalences in the first and the second groups were 22% and 5.3% respectively. About 60% of cement workers with contact dermatitis were between 30-40 years of age. There was a direct relationship with age in both groups of the workers. In the high-exposure group, the hand eczema along was 70% but in the other group the percentage of involvement was the same in exposed and unexposed anatomical areas. CONCLUSIONS: There was a direct relationship between occurrence and the severity of involvement and duration of contact in the first group. Cent percent of cement workers had contact dermatitis after 10 or less years, but the percentage among the other group was 35%. LIMITATION: Irritant contact dermatitis to cement has not been detected.

  5. Leach characterization of cement encapsulated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Scheetz, B.E.; Wakeley, L.D.; Barnes, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix encapsulation of defense nuclear waste as well as intermediate-level commercial wastes within a low-temperature cementitious composite were investigated. The cements for this study included both as-received and modified calcium silicate and calcium aluminate cements. Specimens were prepared following conventional formulation techniques designed to produce dense monoliths, followed by curing at 60 0 C. An alternative preparation procedure is contrasted in which the specimens were ''warm'' pressed in a uniaxial press at 150 0 C at 50,000 psi for 0.5 h. Specimens of the waste/cement composites were leached in deionized water following three different procedures which span a wide range of temperatures and solution saturation conditions. Aluminate and compositionally adjusted silicate cements exhibited a better retentivity for Cs and Sr than did the as-received silicate cement. 15 refs

  6. Conditioning of radioactive waste solutions by cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelka, P.; Rudolph, G.; Kluger, W.; Koester, R.

    1992-02-01

    For the cementation of the low and intermediate level evaporator concentrates resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel numerous experiments were performed to optimize the waste form composition and to characterize the final waste form. Concerning the cementation process, properties of the waste/cement suspension were investigated. These investigations include the dependence of viscosity, bleeding, setting time and hydration heat from the waste cement slurry composition. For the characterization of the waste forms, the mechanical, thermal and chemical stability were determined. For special cases detailed investigations were performed to determine the activity release from waste packages under defined mechanical and thermal stresses. The investigations of the interaction of the waste forms with aqueous solutions include the determination of the Cs/Sr release, the corrosion resistance and the release of actinides. The Cs/Sr release was determined in dependence of the cement type, additives, setting time and sample size. (orig./DG) [de

  7. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  8. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator

  9. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  10. Cement and concrete options paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of concrete are projected to increase from 10.5 million tonnes in 1990 to almost 14 million tonnes in 2010. Over half of this amount will be non-energy related emissions of carbon dioxide resulting from the conversion of limestone to lime. According to this report by industry experts, the industry has an excellent record of improving energy efficiency and there are few easy gains remaining. Nevertheless, improvements in energy efficiency and fuel use, increased use of concrete where it can be shown to result in net reduction of GHG emissions, and partial replacement of cement by supplementary cementitious materials that involve no additional generation of GHGs, could yield an approximate reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of nearly seven million tons in 2010. The industry proposes three measures to realise these benefits: (1) encouraging replacement of fossil fuels by otherwise waste material, (2) encouraging increased use of concrete in constructing houses and roads, and (3) encouraging increased use of supplementary cementing materials. The industry is opposed to carbon or energy taxes that increase the cost of doing business, on the grounds that such taxes would adversely affect the industry's competitive position internationally. tabs

  11. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  12. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  13. Determination of Radium 226 in mexican phosphate fertilizers and gypsum by gamma spectrometry.; Determinacion de Radio 226 en fertilizantes fosfatados y en yeso mediante espectrometria gamma.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez A, M C

    1996-12-31

    The {sup 226} Ra isotope was determined in 17, 20 and 46% m/m phosphate fertilizers and gypsum. The samples of the fertilizers were dissolved in 10% v/v nitric acid solutions. The barium sulphate method was used for the precipitation of {sup 226} Ra. On the other hand, alkaline fusion method was used to separate the {sup 226} Ra from gypsum. The results indicated that {sup 226} Ra was present in the phosphate fertilizers and gypsum. The {sup 226} Ra concentrations present in these materials were between 10 {sup -4} - 10 {sup -5} {mu}g g{sup -1}. (Author).

  14. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO42, Ca3(AsO42, and Na2HAsO4.

  15. Cement-in-cement acetabular revision with a constrained tripolar component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidou, Andreas; Pagkalos, Joseph; Luscombe, Jonathan

    2012-02-17

    Dislocation of a total hip replacement (THR) is common following total hip arthroplasty (THA). When nonoperative management fails to maintain reduction, revision surgery is considered. The use of constrained acetabular liners has been extensively described. Complete removal of the old cement mantle during revision THA can be challenging and is associated with significant complications. Cement-in-cement revision is an established technique. However, the available clinical and experimental studies focus on femoral stem revision. The purpose of this study was to present a case of cement-in-cement acetabular revision with a constrained component for recurrent dislocations and to investigate the current best evidence for this technique. This article describes the case of a 74-year-old woman who underwent revision of a Charnley THR for recurrent low-energy dislocations. A tripolar constrained acetabular component was cemented over the primary cement mantle following removal of the original liner by reaming, roughening the surface, and thoroughly irrigating and drying the primary cement. Clinical and radiological results were good, with the Oxford Hip Score improving from 11 preoperatively to 24 at 6 months postoperatively. The good short-term results of this case and the current clinical and biomechanical data encourage the use of the cement-in-cement technique for acetabular revision. Careful irrigation, drying, and roughening of the primary surface are necessary. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.; Patzek, Tadeusz; van Oort, Eric

    2017-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  17. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  18. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  19. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housing and modern infrastructure, the aim of this paper is to analyse the Emergy and Ecological Footprint of different cement manufacturing processes for a particular cement plant. There are several mitigation measures that can be incorporated in the cement manufacturing process to reduce the demand for fossil fuels and consequently reduce the CO2 emissions. The mitigation measures considered in this paper were the use of alternative fuels and a more energy efficient kiln process. In order to estimate the sustainability effect of the aforementioned measures, Emergy and Ecological Footprint were calculated for four different scenarios. The results show that Emergy, due to the high input mass of raw material needed for clinker production, stays at about the same level. However, for the Ecological Footprint, the results show that by combining the use of alternative fuels together with a more energy efficient kiln process, the environmental impact of the cement manufacturing process can be lowered. The research paper presents an analysis of the sustainability of cement production , a major contributor to carbon emissions, with respect to using alternative fuels and a more efficient kiln. It show

  20. Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikan, H.; Justnes, H.; Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{d.cC 3 A + [1 - d].C 3 S}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C 3 A and C 3 S while cC 3 A and C 3 S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms

  1. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.” [67 FR 46855, July 17, 2002] ...

  2. Effect of Cement Grades on some properties of Sandcrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of cement grade on some properties of sandcrete. The cement used for this work was Ordinary Portland cement (Dangote brand) of grade 42.5 and 32.5 meeting the requirement of ASTM C150 type 1 cement. Three types of fine aggregate was also used to produce ...

  3. Energy economy and industrial ecology in the Brazilian cement sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Marina Elisabete Espinho; Schaeffer, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The article discusses the following issues of the Brazilian cement sector: the Brazilian cement main types specification, cement quantities evolution produced in Brazil from 1987 to 1997, energy conservation in the cement production process with additives, energy economy cost estimates from the utilization of additives, and several technologies energy economy cost used in the industrial sector

  4. Gypsum dissolution risk analysis in the Prealpine part of the Vaud County (Western Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, Pierrick; Choffet, Marc; Bohren, Delphine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauraux, Bertrand; Lance, Jean-Marc; Champod, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Subsidence or collapse due to bedrock dissolution is a relatively common phenomenon in Vaud County (Western Switzerland). Indeed, soluble rocks are present in the Jura and Prealpine parts. Solubility is significantly higher in evaporitic rocks (such as gypsum) than in Limestones, resulting in possibly important dissolution during a building's lifetime. In Limestone, subsidence results mainly from cover collapse over existing voids. This study aims at evaluating the cost of this phenomenon for the building portfolio of the region in which gypsum occurs. Currently, 2.5% of the portfolio value is located over gypsum-bearing formations and is therefore potentially affected. Since this phenomenon is not covered by the public building insurance yet, no centralized event record exists. Therefore, a survey has been conducted with the affected communities to estimate the events frequency and damage severity. Some records from the archives of BERTAND LAURAUX SA have been added and allow to compare reparation costs with insured values. From these cases, a frequency and a buildings vulnerability distribution are established. The vulnerability distribution is considered to represent the reality, whereas the frequency is corrected to take into account the different amount of information gathered in the different municipalities and the incompleteness of the inventory, even in the communities with more information. Assuming that the distribution of collapse events occurs with a constant average frequency and is time-independent, insurance financial years are modeled with a number of cases assigned randomly following a Poisson distribution. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed, where the affected buildings value is chosen among the potentially affected portfolio and its corresponding damage rate is assigned following the distribution previously established. The maximum damage for each building is limited to CHF 1,000,000 (EUR 827,000), to ignore unrealistic values. Thus, a cost

  5. Thermal behavior of asphalt cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudy, P.M.; Letoffe, J.M.; Martin, D.; Planche, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt cements are highly complex mixtures of hydrocarbon molecules whose thermal behavior is of prime importance for petroleum and road industry. From DSC, the determination of several thermal properties of asphalts is given, e.g. glass-transition temperature and crystallized fraction content.The dissolution of a pure n-paraffin C n H 2n+2 in an asphalt, as seen by DSC, should be a single peak. For 20 g of these glasses change with time and temperature. The formation of the crystallized phases is superposed to the enthalpic relaxation of the glasses, making a kinetic study very difficult. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Operating experience with KRAFTWERK UNION cementation line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podmaka, L.; Tomik, L.

    1988-01-01

    A facility is described designed for fixation in a cement matrix of the radioactive concentrate produced by thickening waste water from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. The cementation line output is 0.6 m 3 concentrate/h. The concentrate is put in 200 l drums. The individual operating units, cement management, air conditioning, dosimetric monitoring and the building part are described. The requirements for the operators and the assessment of the quality of raw materials and the product are discussed. (M.D.). 3 figs., 4 refs

  7. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases...... in Portland cement, i.e. tricalcium silicate, dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium alumino ferrite. Details of the The process of solid state synthesis are is described in general including practical advice on equipment and techniques. Finally In addition, some exemplary mix compositions...

  8. Estimation and measurement of porosity change in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eunyong; Jung, Haeryong; Kwon, Ki-jung; Kim, Do-Gyeum

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to understand the porosity change of cement pastes. The cement pastes were prepared using commercially available Type-I ordinary Portland cement (OPC). As the cement pastes were exposed in water, the porosity of the cement pastes sharply increased; however, the slow decrease of porosity was observed as the dissolution period was extended more than 50 days. As expected, the dissolution reaction was significantly influenced by w/c ratio and the ionic strength of solution. A thermodynamic model was applied to simulate the porosity change of the cement pastes. It was highly influenced by the depth of the cement pastes. There was porosity increase on the surface of the cement pastes due to dissolution of hydration products, such as portlandite, ettringite, and CSH. However, the decrease of porosity was estimated inside the cement pastes due to the precipitation of cement minerals. (author)

  9. Compressive Strength and Physical Properties Behavior of Cement Mortars with addition of Cement Klin Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auday A Mehatlaf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement Klin Dust (CKD was the waste of almost cement industry factories, so that in this paper utilization of CKD as filler in cement and/or concrete was the main objective. CKD from the Karbala cement factory had been used and analysis to know the chemical composition of the oxides was done. In this paper cement mortars with different weight percentages of CKD (0,5,10,20,30,40 had been prepared. Physical properties such as density and porosity were done in different age curing (3, 7, 28 day. In addition, mechanical properties included the coefficient of thermal conductivity and compressive strength had also observed with different age (3,7, and 28 for all prepared specimens. From the obtained the experimental results and their discussion, it was clear that the addition (20% of CKD had the good results in cement mortars.  

  10. Technical Note: Historic gypsum-kilns (Morata de Tajuña, Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llamas Borrajo, J. F.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In the locality of Morata de Tajuña and surroundings there was an important settlement of gypsum pits and limekilns, together with other historical industries, now disappear. These activities were developed mainly during the 1960´s and 70´s, but its production decreased because of changes in the productive processes (substitution of discontinuous processes by continuous ones, higher kilns, etc. (1. Nevertheless, some of these furnaces still remain, as well as ancient workers who have provided important information. Within the research project funded by the Madrid´s Government, entitled: Industrial archaeology: Conservation of the mining and metallurgical heritage of Madrid (IV, ancient gypsum pits have been identified and inventoried. The ancient gypsiferous extraction history was recovered and the productive processes fluxes were reconstructed. The state of the heritage is evaluated and the conservation of some of the elements is recommended. Likewise, the intangible heritage was also investigated, being able to show a legend related with these kilns.En Morata de Tajuña y pueblos limítrofes hay una importante tradición yesera y calera, así como de otras industrias de materiales de la construcción ya desaparecidas, sobre todo en los años 60-70 del pasado siglo, debido a cambios en los sistemas productivos (paso de sistemas discontinuos a continuos, hornos mayores, etc. (1. Por eso aún se conservan algunos hornos y también viven antiguos productores, a los que hemos podido preguntar sobre los procesos productivos. En el marco de un proyecto de investigación de la Consejería de Educación de la Comunidad de Madrid titulado “Arqueología Industrial: conservación del patrimonio minero-metalúrgico madrileño (IV” se están identificando e inventariando viejas yeserías, recuperando la historia yesera local, reconstruyendo los flujos productivos y entrevistando a antiguos operarios. De esta manera, se pretende evaluar

  11. Characterization and chemical activity of Portland cement and two experimental cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the chemical activity of Portland cement and two other cement types with similar chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate with the aim of developing these cements for further applications in dentistry. The chemical composition of the three cement types namely Portland cement, calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement was evaluated by elemental analysis using energy dispersive analysis with X-ray under the scanning electron microscope and by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to determine the phases. The constituents of the hydration reaction by-products were evaluated by XRD analysis of the set cements at 1, 7, 28 and 56 days and by analysis of the leachate by ion chromatography. The pH of both cements and leachate was determined at different time intervals. Cements admixed with micro-silica were also tested to determine the effect of micro-silica on the reaction by-products. All three cement types were composed of tricalcium silicate as the main constituent phase. The hydration reaction of Portland cement produced calcium hydroxide. However, this was not present in the other cements tested at all ages. Admixed micro-silica had little or no effect on the cements with regard to reaction by-products. The pH of all cements tested was alkaline. Both the experimental calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement had different hydration reactions to that of Portland cement even though calcium silicate was the major constituent element of both cement types. No calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product to cement hydration. Micro-silica addition to the cement had no effect on the hydration reaction.

  12. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-461 (Third Review)] Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States International...

  13. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  14. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an ac...

  15. Foamed cement for squeeze cementing low-pressure, highly permeable reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmllowski, W.; Kondratoff, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    Four different cement squeezing techniques have been used on wells producing from the Keg River formation in the Rainbow Lake area of Alberta, Canada. This paper evaluates 151 cement squeeze treatments performed at 96 wellsites and compares the use of foam cement vs. conventional squeeze treatments and techniques. Discussion includes key aspects, such as candidate selection, slurry design, treatment design, economic evaluation, and operational considerations

  16. Self-disinfecting Alginate vs Conventional Alginate: Effect on Surface Hardness of Gypsum Cast-An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Ranjith; George, Navia; Thummala, Niharika R; Ravi, S V; Nagpal, Ajay

    2017-11-01

    For the construction of any dental prosthesis, accurate impressions are necessary. Hence, we undertook the present study to evaluate and compare the surface hardness of gypsum casts poured from impressions made using conventional alginate and self-disinfecting alginate. A total of 30 impressions of stainless steel die were made, out of which 15 impressions were made with conventional alginate and 15 were made with self-disinfecting alginate and poured using Type III dental stone. Thirty stone specimens were subjected for hardness testing. Data were analyzed using independent samples t-test to compare the mean surface hardness. Difference in surface hardness was statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). Surface hardness of gypsum casts poured using impressions made from self-disinfecting alginate and conventional alginates were comparable. Self-disinfecting alginates may be employed in clinical practice as safe and effective materials to overcome the infection control issues without compromising on the properties of the material.

  17. Nanofunctionalized zirconia and barium sulfate particles as bone cement additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Gillani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Riaz Gillani1, Batur Ercan1, Alex Qiao3, Thomas J Webster1,21Division of Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3G3 Technology Innovations, LLC, Pittsford, NY, USAAbstract: Zirconia (ZrO2 and barium sulfate (BaSO4 particles were introduced into a methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA solution with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA beads during polymerization to develop the following novel bone cements: bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles, bone cements with ZrO2 nanoparticles functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMS, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 nanoparticles, and bone cements with BaSO4 nanoparticles functionalized with TMS. Results demonstrated that in vitro osteoblast (bone-forming cell densities were greater on bone cements containing BaSO4 ceramic particles after four hours compared to control unmodified bone cements. Osteoblast densities were also greater on bone cements containing all of the ceramic particles after 24 hours compared to unmodified bone cements, particularly those bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles. Bone cements containing ceramic particles demonstrated significantly altered mechanical properties; specifically, under tensile loading, plain bone cements and bone cements containing unfunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited brittle failure modes whereas bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited plastic failure modes. Finally, all bone cements containing ceramic particles possessed greater radio-opacity than unmodified bone cements. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated a positive impact on the properties of traditional bone cements for orthopedic applications with the addition of unfunctionalized and TMS functionalized ceramic nanoparticles

  18. Cement stabilization of hazardous and radioactive electroplating sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Pickett, J.B.; Martin, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Cement stabilization was evaluated for treatment of nickel and uranium in electroplating sludge at the Savannah River Site. Waste forms were prepared by pretreating the sludge and the solidifying it in a variety of cement, cement plus flyash, and cement-flyash-slag mixes. The sludge was also treated by one-step filtration-solidification. Leaching results and processing data indicate the cement solidification is an effective method of treating hazardous-low-level electroplating waste

  19. experimental study of cement grout: rheological behavior and sedimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Rosquoët , Frédéric; Alexis , Alain ,; Khelidj , Abdelhafid; Phelipot-Mardelé , Annabelle

    2002-01-01

    International audience; Three basic elements (cement, water and admixture) usually make up injectable cement grouts used for prestressed cable coating, repair and consolidation of masonry, soil grouting, etc... The present study was divided into two parts. First, in order to characterize rheologically fresh cement paste with W/C ratios (water/cement ratio) varying between 0.35 and 1, an experimental study was carried out and has revealed that the cement past behaves like a shear-thinning mate...

  20. Nanoscaled Mechanical Properties of Cement Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Barbhuiya, Salim; Chow, PengLoy

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on nanoscaled mechanical properties of cement composites. CNFs were added to cement composites at the filler loading of 0.2 wt % (by wt. of cement). Micrographs based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that CNFs are capable of forming strong interfacial bonding with cement matrices. Experimental results using nanoindentation reveal that the addition of CNFs in cement composites increases the proportions of high-density calcium...

  1. Effect of Cement Composition in Lampung on Concrete Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Riyanto, Hery

    2014-01-01

    The strength and durability of concrete depends on the composition of its constituent materials ie fine aggregate, coarse aggregate, cement, water and other additives. The cement composition is about 10% acting as a binder paste material fine and coarse aggregates. In the Lampung market there are several brands of portland cement used by the community to make concrete construction. Although there is a standard of the government of portland cement composition, yet each brand of cement has diff...

  2. The semidry acid-anhydrite process (the use of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum by development of a new process for the production of FGD anhydrite); Das quasitrockene Saeure-Anhydrit-Verfahren (Erweiterung der Verwendungsmoeglichkeiten von REA-Gips durch Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur Herstellung von REA-Anhydrit aus REA-Gips)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirsching, F. [Gebr. Knauf, Westdeutsche Gipswerke, Iphofen (Germany); Hueller, R. [Gebr. Knauf, Westdeutsche Gipswerke, Iphofen (Germany); Limmer, B. [Gebr. Knauf, Westdeutsche Gipswerke, Iphofen (Germany)

    1994-10-01

    A completely new reaction for conversion of FGD gypsum into FGD anhydrite was investigated in the research project which forms the basis for this article. The reaction takes place with moist, finely divided, FGD gypsum with the catalytic action of small quantities of sulphuric acid at temperatures around 100 to 200 C. Moisture-free FGD anhydrite with an orthorhombic crystalline structure ist obtained. The conversion of the crystalline lattice of calcium sulphate dihydrate into calcium anhydrite II takes place directly through neoformation. This conversion is developed into a new process called the `Semidry Acid-Anhydrite Process`. The reaction and its mechanism were first investigated in laboratory trials. Any finely divided calcium sulphate dihydrate is suitable as the starting material. The FGD gypsum with 10% residual moisture, which is already in a finely divided crystalline state when it is generated in the power station, is particularly advantageous as for this application it does not have to be dried or ground first. The process development was carried out up to a semi-industrial scale and the design principles were worked out for large-scale plants at power station sites. The directly heated rotary tube kiln proved to be a suitable reaction unit. The FGD anhydrite is obtained in this process as a dry, finely divided, product with reproducible properties. Investigations were carried out into its potential applications for the cement industry and as a raw material for producing fillers. In principle it is suitable for the cement industry. Applications as a filler allows the FGD gypsum to extend its uses outside the traditional areas of the gypsum industry. Initial trials indicate that after a processing procedure, which was also newly developed in the laborator, FGD anhydrite processes the characteristic features necessary for a high grade filler. (orig.) [Deutsch] In dem Forschungsprojekt wurde eine voellig neue Umwandlungsreaktion von REA-Gips in REA

  3. Assessment of Comprehensive Effects and Optimization of a Circular Economy System of Coal Power and Cement in Kongtong District, Pingliang City, Gansu Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suocheng Dong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a circular economy (CE, which differs from traditional linear economy with a high consumption of natural resources and pollution, has captured much interest and attention. This paper uses a CE system of coal power and cement in Kongtong District, Pingliang City, Gansu Province, China as a case study to analyze the comprehensive effects of CE paradigm. Our simulation results, based on system dynamics (SD modeling, infer that the transformation of manufacturing towards a CE system can prominently help coal power and cement enterprises reduce waste emission and increase economic profits. Through solid waste exchanges, a power plant can achieve over RMB 80 million of additional revenue per year at the highest level. CE also contributes to the reduction of regional pollution, saves mineral resources, and improves the atmospheric environment, an accumulated total of 14.11 million t of natural gypsum and 22.67 million t of coal can be saved. This sets a promising example for coal power and cement plants worldwide. Effective regulatory measures and further optimization towards a circular economy system are essential in maintaining the stable development of a CE system due to the risk of surplus production of upstream industries and other defects.

  4. Factors affecting the precipitation of pure calcium carbonate during the direct aqueous carbonation of flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyungsun; Jang, Young-Nam; Kim, Wonbaek; Lee, Myung Gyu; Shin, Dongbok; Bang, Jun-Hwan; Jeon, Chi Wan; Chae, Soo Chun

    2014-01-01

    The mineral carbonation of FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum was carried out through CO 2 sorption into ammonia solution containing FGD gypsum. High-purity calcium carbonate was precipitated from DCC (dissolved calcium carbonate) solution which was extracted during the induction period. The factors affecting the preparation of pure calcium carbonate were examined under the following conditions: CO 2 flow rate (1–3 L/min), ammonia content (4–12%), and S/L (solid-to-liquid) ratio (5–300 g/L). X-Ray diffraction study revealed that the PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate) was round-shaped vaterite. The induction time for PCC decreased as the CO 2 flow rate increased. The maximum formation efficiency for pure PCC was seen to increase linearly with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure PCC was the highest (90%) for S/L ratio of 5 g/L but it decreased as S/L ratio increased. On the other hand, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of DCC. It is believed that the pure PCC would add an economic value to the FGD gypsum carbonation for industrial CO 2 sequestration. - Highlights: • Pure and white CaCO 3 was synthesized using induction period during direct carbonation of FGD gypsum. • Its formation efficiency was increased with ammonia content but decreased with solid-to-liquid ratio. • This method is expected to extend to other industrial CO 2 sequestration for the enhanced economic value of precipitated CaCO 3

  5. Synthesis of Fluorite (CaF2 Crystal from Gypsum Waste of Phosphoric Acid Factory in Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Misbah Khunur

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper report the synthesis and characterization of fluorite single crystal prepared from gypsum waste of phosphoric acid production in silica gel. Instead of its high calcium, gypsum was used to recycle the waste which was massively produces in the phosphoric acid production. The gypsum waste, the raw material of CaCl2 supernatant, was dissolved in concentrated HCl and then precipitated as calcium oxalate (CaC2O4 by addition of ammonium oxalate. The CaCl2 was obtained by dissolving the CaC2O4 with HCl 3M. The crystals were grown at room temperature in silica gel and characterized by AAS, FTIR and powder XRD. The optimum crystal growth condition, which is pH of gel, CaCl2 concentration and growth time, were investigated. The result shows that at optimum condition of pH 5.80, CaCl2 concentrations of 1.2 M, and growth time of 144 hours, colorless crystals with the longest size of 3 mm, were obtained (72.57%. Characterization of the synthesized crystal by AAS indicates that the obtained crystal has high purity. Meanwhile, analysis by FTIR spectra shows a Ca–F peak at 775 cm-1, and powder-XRD analysis confirms that the obtained crystal was fluorite (CaF2. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 11st April 2012; Revised: 4th June 2012; Accepted: 13rd June 2012[How to Cite: M.M. Khunur, A. Risdianto, S. Mutrofin, Y.P. Prananto. (2012. Synthesis of Fluorite (CaF2 Crystal from Gypsum Waste of Phosphoric Acid Factory in Silica Gel. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 71-77.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.3171.71-77 ][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.3171.71-77 ] | View in 

  6. INFLUENCE OF WINE ACID ON RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WELL BORE CEMENT SLURRIES AND HARDENED CEMENT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of commercial types of domestic cements for use in cementing the deep wells is a process by which Yugoslav oil industry tends to solve problems of completion of those wells independently. In order to design a domestic, cheep and effective retarder, tests of applicability of wine acid on cement slurries have been carried out. Besides examining the necessary wine acid content to achieve desirable Theological properties, the influence of this additive on properties of hardened cement samples has been tested too (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. Considerations on the mechanical behavior and hydration process supersulphated cement (CSS) formulated with phosphogypsum; Consideracoes sobre a resistencia mecanica e o processo de hidratacao de cimentos supersulfatados (CSS) formulados com fosfogesso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracioli, Bruna; Varela, Maxwell Vinicius Favero; Beutler, Cheila Sirlene; Frare, Andreza; Luz, Caroline Angulski da; Pereira Filho, Jose Ilo, E-mail: maxwell@alunos.utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: cheila.beutler@gmail.com, E-mail: andreza2694@hotmail.com, E-mail: ilofilho@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: angulski@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Pato Branco, PR (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Supersulfated Cements (SSC) are composed from blast furnace slag (90%), calcium sulfate (10-20%) and a small amount of alkali activator (up 5%). Gypsum is a conventional source of calcium sulfate, however, it can be replaced by phosphogypsum (PG), a byproduct from the production of phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) with similar chemical and mineralogical composition of the gypsum. In Brazil, the production of this material is about 4.5 million tons per year. Because the SSC contains a higher calcium sulfate content (20%) in relation to Portland cement, a higher consumption of phosphogypsum is possible. The goal of this study was to investigate the phosphogypsum (PG) as an alternative source of calcium sulfate in order to obtain CSS. In addition to use of PG, the effects of both calcium sulfate and alkali activator content on the process of hydration were investigated. The results showed that SSC made with phosphogypsum met the minimum compressive strength required by the European standard for SSC (EN 15743/2010). Low heat of hydration rates mainly influenced by the low alkali activator content was observed. The excess of alkali activator (KOH) had different influences according to calcium sulfate content. In pastes made with low content (10%), 0.8% of KOH reduced the compressive strength, while in those with a high calcium sulfate content (20%) the high alkaline content resulted in the instability of ettringite. (author)

  8. Composting of waste paint sludge containing melamine resin as affected by nutrients and gypsum addition and microbial inoculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yongqiang; Chen Liming; Gao Lihong; Michel, Frederick C.; Wan Caixia; Li Yebo; Dick, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    Melamine formaldehyde resins have hard and durable properties and are found in many products, including automobile paints. These resins contain high concentrations of nitrogen and, if properly composted, can yield valuable products. We evaluated the effects of starter compost, nutrients, gypsum and microbial inoculation on composting of paint sludge containing melamine resin. A bench-scale composting experiment was conducted at 55 °C for 91 days and then at 30 °C for an additional 56 days. After 91 days, the composts were inoculated with a mixed population of melamine-degrading microorganisms. Melamine resin degradation after the entire 147 days of composting varied between 73 and 95% for the treatments with inoculation of microorganisms compared to 55–74% for the treatments without inoculation. Degradation was also enhanced by nutrients and gypsum additions. Our results infer that large scale composting of melamine resins in paint sludge is possible. - Highlights: ► Melamine resin in waste paint sludges could be efficiently composted at bench scale. ► Melamine resin degradation after 147 days of composting was 73–95% complete. ► Nutrients, gypsum and melamine-degrading microorganisms increased composting rate. ► Melamine degradation products first increased and then decreased in the compost. ► Final compost was enriched in nitrogen and other essential plant nutrients. - Melamine resin in waste paint sludges was efficiently composted at bench scale, with finished composts having low levels of heavy metals and enriched in plant nutrients.

  9. Remediation of saline-sodic soil with flue gas desulfurization gypsum in a reclaimed tidal flat of southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yumei; Li, Xiaping; Dick, Warren A; Chen, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Salinization and sodicity are obstacles for vegetation reconstruction of coastal tidal flat soils. A study was conducted with flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum applied at rates of 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60Mg/ha to remediate tidal flat soils of the Yangtze River estuary. Exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), exchangeable sodium (ExNa), pH, soluble salt concentration, and composition of soluble salts were measured in 10cm increments from the surface to 30cm depth after 6 and 18months. The results indicated that the effect of FGD-gypsum is greatest in the 0-10cm mixing soil layer and 60Mg/ha was the optimal rate that can reduce the ESP to below 6% and decrease soil pH to neutral (7.0). The improvement effect was reached after 6months, and remained after 18months. The composition of soluble salts was transformed from sodic salt ions mainly containing Na(+), HCO3(-)+CO3(2-) and Cl(-) to neutral salt ions mainly containing Ca(2+) and SO4(2-). Non-halophyte plants were survived at 90%. The study demonstrates that the use of FGD-gypsum for remediating tidal flat soils is promising. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Potential of Soil Amendments (Biochar and Gypsum in increasing Water Use Efficiency of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniqa eBatool

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water being an essential component for plant growth and development, its scarcity poses serious threat to crops around the world. Climate changes and global warming are increasing the temperature of earth hence becoming an ultimate cause of water scarcity. It is need of the day to use potential soil amendments that could increase the plants’ resistance under such situations. Biochar and gypsum were used in the present study to improve the water use efficiency and growth of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Lady’s Finger. A six weeks experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions. Stress treatments were applied after thirty days of sowing. Plant height, leaf area, photosynthesis, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and water use efficiency were determined weekly under stressed (60% field capacity and non-stressed (100% field capacity conditions. Stomatal conductance and transpiration rate decreased and reached near to zero in stressed plants. Stressed plants also showed resistance to water stress upto five weeks and gradually perished at sixth week. On the other hand, water use efficiency improved in stressed plants containing biochar and gypsum as compared to untreated plants. Biochar alone is a better strategy to promote plant growth and WUE specifically of Abelmoschus esculentus, compared to its application in combination with gypsum.

  11. Basalt waste added to Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Melanda Mendes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is widely used as a building material and more than 4.3 billion tons were produced in 2014, with increasing environmental impacts by this industry, mainly through CO2 emissions and consumption of non-removable raw materials. Several by-products have been used as raw materials or fuels to reduce environmental impacts. Basaltic waste collected by filters was employed as a mineral mixture to Portland cement and two fractions were tested. The compression strength of mortars was measured after 7 days and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Electron Diffraction Scattering (EDS were carried out on Portland cement paste with the basaltic residue. Gains in compression strength were observed for mixtures containing 2.5 wt.% of basaltic residue. Hydration products observed on surface of basaltic particles show the nucleation effect of mineral mixtures. Clinker substitution by mineral mixtures reduces CO2 emission per ton of Portland cement.

  12. Subgrade stabilization alternatives to lime and cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    This project involved four distinct research activities, (1) the influence of temperature on lime-stabilized soils, (2) the influence of temperature on cement-stabilized soils (3) temperature modeling of stabilized subgrade and (4) use of calcium chl...

  13. Cement materials for cesium and iodine confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, G.; Lequeux, N.; Boch, P.; Prene, S.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: radioactive waste storage, cement materials reacting with radioactive cesium and iodine, chemical barrier formation against radioactive pollution, ceramization, long term stability, XRD, PIXE analysis

  14. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  15. Recycled materials in Portland cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    This report pertains to a comprehensive study involving the use of recycled materials in Portland cement concrete. Three different materials were studied including crushed glass (CG), street sweepings (SS), and recycled concrete (RC). Blast furnace s...

  16. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained by...... on assumptions of degree of reaction and product densities gave for plain cement pastes results comparable to MIP data.......Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also...

  17. High performance concrete with blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, P.P.; Saraswati, S.; Basu, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Principal objectives of the proposed project are two folds. Firstly, to develop the HPC mix suitable to NPP structures with blended cement, and secondly to study its durability necessary for desired long-term performance. Three grades of concrete to b considered in the proposed projects are M35, M50 and M60 with two types of blended cements, i.e. Portland slag cement (PSC) and Portland pozzolana cement (PPC). Three types of mineral admixtures - silica fume, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag will be used. Concrete mixes with OPc and without any mineral admixture will be considered as reference case. Durability study of these mixes will be carried out

  18. Problems and possible remedies concerning NORM in by-Product gypsum produced by the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, W.C.; Hull, C.D

    1996-01-01

    Large quantities (∼ 30 million tons/year) of phosphogypsum are produced as a by-product of fertilizer production in Florida. The sedimentary phosphate rock, used as the raw material for phosphoric acid production, is enriched in uranium and daughter products. Relatively high concentrations of some of these U-series daughters, particularly 226 Ra (av. = 910 Bq.Kg -1 ), prevent use of the by-product gypsum for construction or other purposes. The material is thus stockpiled on huge stacks which are unsightly and a potential threat to the surrounding air and especially groundwater resources. It is estimated that ∼ 10 9 tons of this material will be on Florida stacks by the turn of the century. We have been investigating the detailed radiochemistry of phosphogypsum in the hope that can understanding of how these radionuclides are fixed in the material may lead to cost-effective purification schemes. Our work has focused on the distribution of 226 Ra but has also included 210 Pb and 210 Po (av. = 860 Bq.Kg -1 ) which are also enriched in phosphogypsum. This paper summarizes the problems associated with this material and reviews its radiochemistry as elucidated by sequential extraction and other methodologies. We also present some possible alternatives to long-term storage as a solution to the phosphogypsum problem. (author)

  19. Development of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum exploited in the polo plasterer in Pernambuco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rego, S.A.B.C.; Moraes, A.S. de; Anjos, I.F. dos; Lira, B.B.

    2012-01-01

    The mineral clay found on the surface of gypsum deposits in the region of Recife - PE are considered mining tailings and job search reference in new industrial applications for these minerals, ores. In this context, we performed the characterization of these materials with the purpose of its use as inorganic pigments in the ceramic coating. These minerals present 'in locus' different colors ranging from beige to reddish. After heat treatment at 1000° C their colors have varied tones that can be used as natural pigments in the ceramic industry. The techniques of fluorescence X-ray diffraction X-ray, infrared and colorimetry were applied in the characterization of mineral-ore in question. Using mineral processing techniques we obtain a physical separation of clay minerals associated. The use of concentrated after processing showed that the material has the potential to replace traditional pigments used in ceramic industry, and thus represent a new alternative on the market of natural pigments. Another potential comprehensive analysis of the material is its use associated with polymers in order to develop new materials. (author)

  20. Removal of Hg, As in FGD gypsum by different aqueous ammonia (amines) during CO2 sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenyi, Tan; Wenhui, Fan; Hongyi, Li; Zixin, Zhang; Yunkun, Zhu

    2017-12-01

    CO 2 sequestration by flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has become a promising FGDG disposal technology due to simultaneous CO 2 emission reduction and FGDG conversion into calcium carbonate. In this paper, another merit of the novel technology, i.e., the removal of toxic elements (e.g., Hg and As) in FGDG, will be addressed for the first time. In three different aqueous ammonia (or amines) media, removal efficiencies of Hg and As in FGDG samples were evaluated during CO 2 sequestration. Higher than 90% and 20% removal efficiencies, respectively, for Hg and As are achieved at 40°C in aqueous ammonia media, but they decrease at elevated temperatures. Ammonia loss takes place at 80°C and pH varies greatly with temperatures in aqueous ammonia. This is disadvantageous for the formation of Hg-ammonia complexes and for the yield of carbonates, which are responsible for Hg or As re-adsorption. The sequential chemical extraction method suggests that the speciation changes of Hg are induced by FGDG carbonation, and that unstable Hg speciation in triethanolamine increases at elevated temperatures.

  1. A comparative study of AMF diversity in annual and perennial plant species from semiarid gypsum soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, M. M.; Torrecillas, E.; Roldán, A.; Díaz, G.; Torres, P.

    2012-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities composition regulate plant interactions and determine the structure of plant communities. In this study we analysed the diversity of AMF in the roots of two perennial gypsophyte plant species, Herniaria fruticosa and Senecio auricula, and an annual herbaceous species, Bromus rubens, growing in a gypsum soil from a semiarid area. The objective was to determine whether perennial and annual host plants support different AMF communities in their roots and whether there are AMF species that might be indicators of specific functional plant roles in these ecosystems. The roots were analysed by nested PCR, cloning, sequencing of the ribosomal DNA small subunit region and phylogenetic analysis. Twenty AMF sequence types, belonging to the Glomus group A, Glomus group B, Diversisporaceae, Acaulosporaceae, Archaeosporaceae and Paraglomeraceae, were identified. Both gypsophyte perennial species had differing compositions of the AMF community and higher diversity when compared with the annual species, showing preferential selection by specific AMF sequences types. B. rubens did not show host specificity, sharing the full composition of its AMF community with both perennial plant species. Seasonal variations in the competitiveness of AM fungi could explain the observed differences in AMF community composition, but this is still a working hypothesis that requires the analysis of further data obtained from a higher number of both annual and perennial plant species in order to be fully tested.

  2. Effects of the super plasticizers and the water/cement ratio on the mini-slump of Portland cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirelles, J.R.; Morelli, A.C.; Baldo, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    The rheology of Portland cement concrete is dominated by the cement paste rheology. In general the rheological behavior of cement pastes is evaluated by means of the mini-slump test. In the present paper it was investigated the effect of the water/cement ratio was as of two types of superplasticizers (melamine and naftalen based) on the mini-slump of pastes of common cement pastes. (author)

  3. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    OpenAIRE

    R. Fujiyama; F. Darwish; M.V. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the eff...

  4. Topics in cement and concrete research

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwers, Jos; Russel, M.I.; Basheer, P.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper addresses several topics in regard to the sustainable design and use of concrete. First, major features concerning the sustainable aspects of the material concrete are summarised. Then the major constituent, from an environmental point of view, cement is discussed in detail, particularly the hydration and application of slag cement. The intelligent combining of mineral oxides, which are found in clinker, slag, fly ashes etc., is designated as mineral oxide engineering. It re...

  5. Indoor Pollution Emissions from Building Materials; Case of Study: Gypsum Boards Indoor Pollution Emissions from Building Materials; Case of Study: Gypsum Boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverio Hernández Moreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Este reporte presenta una evaluación de las emisiones de materiales de construcción, al interior de los edificios que pueden causar daño a la salud de los usuarios durante la ocupación, pues emiten sustancias tóxicas al interior de los edificios. Este reporte presenta un caso de studio que evalúa a los tableros de yeso, frecuentemente usados en la construcción de muros divisorios y falsos plafones. La parte experimental se basa en un espacio tridimensional el cual simula un cuarto de cualquier tipo de edificación; por ejemplo: un salón de clases u oficina. Las condiciones ambientales al interior, tales como: ventilación, temperatura y humedad, afectan directamente las emisiones de sustancias químicas por los materiales de construcción. La metodología se basa en la comparación de materiales convencionales y materiales alternativos con distinta composición y similares características, en donde usamos métodos de prueba, condiciones ambientales, instrumentos y herramientas similares. Este es un estudio muy importante para entender los problemas relacionadoscon la contaminación ambiental, específicamente del aire y sus efectos en el interior de los edificios, y que se relaciona directamente con la salud pública e indirectamente con los sistemas constructivos y la selección de materiales en los edificios. Las pruebas concluyen que los materiales alternativos (de contenido reciclado son mejores que los tradicionales, porque reducen la contaminación del aire al interior de los edificios. This report presents an evaluation of emissions from indoor building materials that may cause health damage to the people who occupy the building, since these materials emit toxic chemicals into the air and indoor surfaces. This report presents a case study which evaluates Gypsum Boards, frequently used in the construction of dividing walls and ceilings. The experimental part of this report is based on a three-dimensional space that simulates a

  6. Study on properties and testing methods of thermo-responsive cementing system for well cementing in heavy oil thermal recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, thermo-responsive cement slurry system were being developed, the properties of conventional cement slurry, compressive strength high temperature of cement sheath, mechanical properties of cement sheath and thermal properties of cement sheath were being tested. Results were being used and simulated by Well-Life Software, Thermo-responsive cement slurry system can meet the requirements of heavy oil thermal recovery production. Mechanical and thermal properties of thermo-responsive cement sheath were being tested. Tensile fracture energy of the thermo-responsive cement sheath is larger than conventional cement. The heat absorption capacity of conventional cement sheath is larger than that of thermo-responsive cement sheath, this means more heat is needed for the unit mass once increasing 1.0 °C, which also indicates that thermo-responsive cement own good heat insulating and preservation effects. The heat conductivity coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of thermo-responsive cement is less than and conventional cement, this means that thermo-responsive cement have good heat preservation and insulation effects with good thermal expansion stabilities.

  7. Photoactive glazed polymer-cement composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Liana; Patachia, Silvia; Tierean, Mircea; Ekincioglu, Ozgur; Ozkul, Hulusi M.

    2018-04-01

    Macro defect free cements (MDF), a kind of polymer-cement composites, are characterized by remarkably high mechanical properties. Their flexural strengths are 20-30 times higher than those of conventional cement pastes, nearly equal to that of an ordinary steel. The main drawback of MDF cements is their sensitivity to water. This paper presents a method to both diminish the negative impact of water on MDF cements mechanical properties and to enlarge their application by conferring photoactivity. These tasks were solved by glazing MDF cement with an ecological glaze containing nano-particles of TiO2. Efficiency of photocatalytic activity of this material was tested against methylene blue aqueous solution (4.4 mg/L). Influence of the photocatalyst concentration in the glaze paste and of the contact time on the photocatalysis process (efficiency and kinetic) was studied. The best obtained photocatalysis yield was of 97.35%, after 8 h of exposure to 254 nm UV radiation when used an MDF glazed with 10% TiO2 in the enamel paste. Surface of glazed material was characterized by optic microscopy, scratch test, SEM, XRD, and EDS. All these properties were correlated with the aesthetic aspect of the glazed surface aiming to propose using of this material for sustainable construction development.

  8. Pre-cementation of deep shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, W. F.

    1988-12-01

    Pre-cementation or pre-grouting of deep shafts in South Africa is an established technique to improve safety and reduce water ingress during shaft sinking. The recent completion of several pre-cementation projects for shafts deeper than 1000m has once again highlighted the effectiveness of pre-grouting of shafts utilizing deep slimline boreholes and incorporating wireline technique for drilling and conventional deep borehole grouting techniques for pre-cementation. Pre-cementation of deep shaft will: (i) Increase the safety of shaft sinking operation (ii) Minimize water and gas inflow during shaft sinking (iii) Minimize the time lost due to additional grouting operations during sinking of the shaft and hence minimize costly delays and standing time of shaft sinking crews and equipment. (iv) Provide detailed information of the geology of the proposed shaft site. Informations on anomalies, dykes, faults as well as reef (gold bearing conglomerates) intersections can be obtained from the evaluation of cores of the pre-cementation boreholes. (v) Provide improved rock strength for excavations in the immediate vicinity of the shaft area. The paper describes pre-cementation techniques recently applied successfully from surface and some conclusions drawn for further considerations.

  9. Analysis of rheological properties of bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, M K D; Waters, M G J; Holford, K M; Adusei, G

    2007-07-01

    The rheological properties of three commercially available bone cements, CMW 1, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC, were investigated. Testing was undertaken at both 25 and 37 degrees C using an oscillating parallel plate rheometer. Results showed that the three high viscosity cements exhibited distinct differences in curing rate, with CMW 1 curing in 8.7 min, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC in 13 min at 25 degrees C. Furthermore it was found that these curing rates were strongly temperature dependent, with curing rates being halved at 37 degrees C. By monitoring the change of viscosity with time over the entire curing process, the results showed that these cements had differing viscosity profiles and hence exhibit very different handling characteristics. However, all the cements reached the same maximum viscosity of 75 x 10(3) Pa s. Also, the change in elastic/viscous moduli and tan delta with time, show the cements changing from a viscous material to an elastic solid with a clear peak in the viscous modulus during the latter stages of curing. These results give valuable information about the changes in rheological properties for each commercial bone cement, especially during the final curing process.

  10. Development of a biodegradable bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof Abdullah; Nurhaslinda Ee Abdullah; Wee Pee Chai; Norita Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradable bone cement is a newly developed bone repair material, which is able to give immediate support to the implant area, and does not obstruct the bone repairing and regeneration process through appropriate biodegradation rate, which is synchronized with the mechanical load it should bear. The purpose of this study is to locally produce biodegradable bone cement using HA as absorbable filler. The cement is composed of an absorbable filler and unsaturated polyester for 100% degradation. Cross-linking effect is achieved through the action of poly (vinyl pyrrol lidone) (PVP) and an initiator. On the other hand, PPF was synthesized using direct esterification method. Characteristics of the bone cement were studied; these included the curing time, cross-linking effect and curing temperature. The products were characterized using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) to perform phase analysis and Scanning Electrons Microscopes to determine the morphology. The physical and mechanical properties of the bone cement were also investigated. The biocompatibility of the bone cement was tested using simulated body physiological solution. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  12. Cement Types, Composition, Uses and Advantages of Nanocement, Environmental Impact on Cement Production, and Possible Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Dunuweera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We first discuss cement production and special nomenclature used by cement industrialists in expressing the composition of their cement products. We reveal different types of cement products, their compositions, properties, and typical uses. Wherever possible, we tend to give reasons as to why a particular cement type is more suitable for a given purpose than other types. Cement manufacturing processes are associated with emissions of large quantities of greenhouse gases and environmental pollutants. We give below quantitative and qualitative analyses of environmental impact of cement manufacturing. Controlling pollution is a mandatory legal and social requirement pertinent to any industry. As cement industry is one of the biggest CO2 emitters, it is appropriate to discuss different ways and means of CO2 capture, which will be done next. Finally, we give an account of production of nanocement and advantages associated with nanocement. Nanofillers such as nanotitania, nanosilica, and nanoalumina can be produced in large industrial scale via top-down approach of reducing size of naturally available bulk raw materials to those in the nanorange of 1 nm–100 nm. We mention the preparation of nanotitania and nanosilica from Sri Lankan mineral sands and quartz deposits, respectively, for the use as additives in cement products to improve performance and reduce the amount and cost of cement production and consequent environmental impacts. As of now, mineral sands and other treasures of minerals are exported without much value addition. Simple chemical modifications or physical treatments would add enormous value to these natural materials. Sri Lanka is gifted with highly pure quartz and graphite from which silica and graphite nanoparticles, respectively, can be prepared by simple size reduction processes. These can be used as additives in cements. Separation of constituents of mineral sands is already an ongoing process.

  13. Compatibility of hydrogarnet, Ca3Al2(SiO4)x(OH)4(3−x), with sulfate and carbonate-bearing cement phases: 5–85 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoronkwo, Monday Uchenna; Glasser, Fredrik Paul

    2016-01-01

    The stable existence of hydrogarnet in Portland cement compositions cured at temperatures below 55 °C has long been predicted from application of equilibrium thermodynamics. However hydrogarnet is not often reported in hydrated commercial Portland cements. The substitutions (SO 4 –CO 3 –OH) in AFm have previously been shown to stabilise AFm to higher temperatures and raise the temperature at which AFm converts to Si-free hydrogarnet, C 3 AH 6 . But unanswered question remains about the compatibility of AFm and AFm solid solutions with Si-substituted hydrogarnet, Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) x (OH) 4(3 − x) . Phase relations of C 3 AH 6 and Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) x (OH) 4(3 − x) at sulfate and carbonate activities conditioned respectively by (gypsum and SO 4 -AFt) and (calcite and CO 3 -AFt) have been determined experimentally in the range 5–85 °C. The results confirm the instability of Si-free hydrogarnet with carbonate and sulfate-bearing cement phases, but do indicate that a range of silica-substituted hydrogarnet solid solutions are stable under conditions likely to be encountered in blended cement systems.

  14. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied.

  15. Analyzing the rules of fracture and damage, and the characteristics of the acoustic emission signal of a gypsum specimen under uniaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, En-yuan; Li, Nan

    2017-08-01

    In order to study the mechanism of rock bursts in a mined-out area of a gypsum mine, in this paper acoustic emission testing of the uniaxial compression of gypsum and sandstone samples is carried out. The case of rupture of the specimen is observed, and the load axial deformation curve and acoustic emission parameters are obtained for the whole process of specimen rupture. The similarities and differences between the gypsum and sandstone samples are determined in terms of their mechanical properties, their damage evolution laws and frequency band energy distributions, and the instantaneous energy characteristics of their acoustic emission. The results show that the main fracture morphology of gypsum is ‘eight’-type, and the macroscopic fracture morphology of sandstone is mainly of partial ‘Y’-type and inverted Y-type. The intensity and uniformity of the gypsum and sandstone of the medium are different; because the gypsum is more uniform, it does not show as much variation as sandstone, instead suddenly increasing and decreasing. The maximum value of the damage variable D of gypsum reached 1, but the maximum value of D of the sandstone only reached 0.9. The frequency band of the maximum energy of gypsum and sandstone gradually decreased across the the four stages of rupture, while the maximum energy percentage increased gradually. From the stage where damage gradually increases to the stage of integral fracture of the specimen, the instantaneous energy showed a certain degree of increase. With an increase in the strength of the sample, the maximum energy percentage of the two materials corresponding to each phase gradually increases, and from the stage where damage gradually increases to the stage of integral fracture of the specimen, the value of instantaneous energy obviously increases. The results indicate that gypsum mines will also experience rock bursts, as coal mines do, but the intensity will be different. Therefore, using the three indicators, the

  16. Study on Cr(VI) Leaching from Cement and Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palascakova, Lenka; Kanuchova, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on hexavalent chromium leaching from cement samples and cement composites containing silica fume and zeolite additions that were subjected to various leaching agents. The water-soluble Cr(VI) concentrations in cements ranged from 0.2 to 3.2 mg/kg and represented only 1.8% of the total chromium content. The presence of chromium compounds with both chromium oxidation states of III and VI was detected in the cement samples by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Leaching tests were performed in a Britton-Robinson buffer to simulate natural conditions and showed increased dissolution of Cr(VI) up to 6 mg/kg. The highest amount of leached hexavalent chromium was detected after leaching in HCl. The findings revealed that the leaching of chromium from cements was higher by 55–80% than that from the cement composites. A minimum concentration was observed for all cement samples when studying the relationship between the soluble Cr(VI) and the cement storage time. PMID:29690550

  17. Sulphur cement pre-composition and process for preparing such sulphur cement pre-composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides a process for the preparation of a sulphur cement pre-composition comprising reacting sulphur modifier with polysulphide-containing organosilane to obtain in the presence of sulphur the sulphur cement pre-composition, wherein the organosilane has the general molecular formula:

  18. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  19. Ceramic residue for producing cements, method for the production thereof, and cements containing same

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Rojas, María Isabel; Frías, Moisés; Asensio, Eloy; Medina Martínez, César

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a ceramic residue produced from construction and demolition residues, as a puzzolanic component of cements. The invention also relates to a method for producing said ceramic residues and to another method of producing cements using said residues. This type of residue is collected in recycling plants, where it is managed. This invention facilitates a potential commercial launch.

  20. Analysis of CCRL proficiency cements 151 and 152 using the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Stutzman, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    To test the ability of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software to predict cement hydration properties, characterization of mineralogy and phase distribution is necessary. Compositional and textural characteristics of Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) cements 151 and 152 were determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis followed by computer modeling of hydration properties. The general procedure to evaluate a cement is as follows: (1) two-dimensional SEM backscattered electron and X-ray microanalysis images of the cement are obtained, along with a measured particle size distribution (PSD); (2) based on analysis of these images and the measured PSD, three-dimensional microstructures of various water-to-cement ratios are created and hydrated using VCCTL, and (3) the model predictions for degree of hydration under saturated conditions, heat of hydration (ASTM C186), setting time (ASTM C191), and strength development of mortar cubes (ASTM C109) are compared to experimental measurements either performed at NIST or at the participating CCRL proficiency sample evaluation laboratories. For both cements, generally good agreement is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data