WorldWideScience

Sample records for gymnosperm pinus radiata1w

  1. Envelope-like retrotransposons in the plant kingdom: evidence of their presence in gymnosperms (Pinus pinaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Célia; Simões, Marta; Oliveira, Maria Margarida; Rocheta, Margarida

    2008-11-01

    Retroviruses differ from retrotransposons due to their infective capacity, which depends critically on the encoded envelope. Some plant retroelements contain domains reminiscent of the env of animal retroviruses but the number of such elements described to date is restricted to angiosperms. We show here the first evidence of the presence of putative env-like gene sequences in a gymnosperm species, Pinus pinaster (maritime pine). Using a degenerate primer approach for conserved domains of RNaseH gene, three clones from putative envelope-like retrotransposons (PpRT2, PpRT3, and PpRT4) were identified. The env-like sequences of P. pinaster clones are predicted to encode proteins with transmembrane domains. These sequences showed identity scores of up to 30% with env-like sequences belonging to different organisms. A phylogenetic analysis based on protein alignment of deduced aminoacid sequences revealed that these clones clustered with env-containing plant retrotransposons, as well as with retrotransposons from invertebrate organisms. The differences found among the sequences of maritime pine clones isolated here suggest the existence of different putative classes of env-like retroelements. The identification for the first time of env-like genes in a gymnosperm species may support the ancestrality of retroviruses among plants shedding light on their role in plant evolution.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a serotonin N-acetyltransferase from a gymnosperm, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangkyu; Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Kim, Young-Soon; Ahn, Taeho; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in both animals and plants. SNAT catalyzes serotonin into N-acetylserotonin, an immediate precursor for melatonin biosynthesis by N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT). We cloned the SNAT gene from a gymnosperm loblolly pine (Pinus teada). The loblolly pine SNAT (PtSNAT) gene encodes 255 amino acids harboring a transit sequence with 67 amino acids and shows 67% amino acid identity with rice SNAT when comparing the mature polypeptide regions. Purified recombinant PtSNAT showed peak activity at 55°C with the K(m) (428 μM) and Vmax (3.9 nmol/min/mg protein) values. As predicted, PtSNAT localized to chloroplasts. The SNAT mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues, including leaf, bud, flower, and pinecone, whereas the corresponding protein was detected only in leaf. In accordance with the exclusive SNAT protein expression in leaf, melatonin was detected only in leaf at 0.45 ng per gram fresh weight. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gymnosperm PtSNAT had high homology with SNATs from all plant phyla (even with cyanobacteria), and formed a clade separated from the angiosperm SNATs, suggestive of direct gene transfer from cyanobacteria via endosymbiosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Aux/IAA gene family is conserved in the gymnosperm, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Barry; Lanz-Garcia, Carmen; Lian, Zhigang; Whetten, Ross

    2003-12-01

    We isolated five members of the Aux/IAA gene family in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Degenerate primers complementary to conserved regions of angiosperm Aux/IAA genes were used to amplify fragments that were, in turn, used as probes to screen a cDNA library constructed from auxin-treated hypocotyls. The five unique clones, named PTIAA1-5, contain the four highly conserved domains that are characteristic of the Aux/IAA proteins. All clones contain the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) between Domains I and II that is predicted in most angiosperm Aux/IAA genes, but only one, PTIAA2, contains the conserved NLS in Domain IV. The five invariant residues in Domain II that have been found to constitute part of a protein destabilization element in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. are conserved in all the PTIAAs. A postulated phosphorylation site located between Domains I and II and proximal to the conserved bipartite NLS was conserved in 20 out of 36 genes in this analysis, including the pine genes. Transcripts of all five PTIAAs accumulated specifically in the hypocotyls in response to exogenous auxin treatment and were induced by all auxins tested. Transcript abundance above basal levels in response to 1-naphthaleneacetic acid treatment was first detected after 10 min (PTIAA3) to 3 h (PTIAA2) in the different genes and remained above basal levels throughout 7 days. Induction of PTIAA2 was inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, indicating that PTIAA2 is a secondary response gene. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all five pine genes clustered within a single class (Class I) of the dendrogram. Clone PTIAA2 has a sequence that is relatively distinct from the other four and is the most closely related to the angiosperm genes of Class I. Class I contains both primary and secondary auxin response genes, suggesting that it is the original lineage and that other gene classes have evolved subsequent to the angiosperm/gymnosperm divergence.

  4. Suppression of 4-coumarate-CoA ligase in the coniferous gymnosperm Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Donaldson, Lloyd; Kim, Hoon; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Steward, Diane; Torr, Kirk; Koch, Gerald; Schmitt, Uwe; Ralph, John

    2009-01-01

    Severe suppression of 4-coumarate-coenzyme A ligase (4CL) in the coniferous gymnosperm Pinus radiata substantially affected plant phenotype and resulted in dwarfed plants with a "bonsai tree-like" appearance. Microscopic analyses of stem sections from 2-year-old plants revealed substantial morphological changes in both wood and bark tissues. This included the formation of weakly lignified tracheids that displayed signs of collapse and the development of circumferential bands of axial parenchyma. Acetyl bromide-soluble lignin assays and proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies revealed lignin reductions of 36% to 50% in the most severely affected transgenic plants. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry studies indicated that lignin reductions were mainly due to depletion of guaiacyl but not p-hydroxyphenyl lignin. 4CL silencing also caused modifications in the lignin interunit linkage distribution, including elevated beta-aryl ether (beta-O-4 unit) and spirodienone (beta-1) levels, accompanied by lower phenylcoumaran (beta-5), resinol (beta-beta), and dibenzodioxocin (5-5/beta-O-4) levels. A sharp depletion in the level of saturated (dihydroconiferyl alcohol) end groups was also observed. Severe suppression of 4CL also affected carbohydrate metabolism. Most obvious was an up to approximately 2-fold increase in galactose content in wood from transgenic plants due to increased compression wood formation. The molecular, anatomical, and analytical data verified that the isolated 4CL clone is associated with lignin biosynthesis and illustrated that 4CL silencing leads to complex, often surprising, physiological and morphological changes in P. radiata.

  5. A DEF/GLO-like MADS-box gene from a gymnosperm: Pinus radiata contains an ortholog of angiosperm B class floral homeotic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradov, A; Hamdorf, B; Teasdale, R D; Kim, J T; Winter, K U; Theissen, G

    1999-09-01

    The specification of floral organ identity during development depends on the function of a limited number of homeotic genes grouped into three classes: A, B, and C. Pairs of paralogous B class genes, such as DEF and GLO in Antirrhinum, and AP3 and PI in Arabidopsis, are required for establishing petal and stamen identity. To gain a better understanding of the evolutionary origin of petals and stamens, we have looked for orthologs of B class genes in conifers. Here we report cDNA cloning of PrDGL (Pinus radiata DEF/GLO-like gene) from radiata pine. We provide phylogenetic evidence that PrDGL is closely related to both DEF- and GLO-like genes of angiosperms, and is thus among the first putative orthologs of floral homeotic B function genes ever reported from a gymnosperm. Expression of PrDGL is restricted to the pollen strobili (male cones) and was not detected in female cones. PrDGL expression was first detected in emergent male cone primordia and persisted through the early stages of pollen cone bud differentiation. Based on the results of our phylogeny reconstructions and expression studies, we suggest that PrDGL could play a role in distinguishing between male (where expression is on) and female reproductive structures (where expression is off) in radiata pine. We speculate that this could be the general function of DEF/GLO-like genes in gymnosperms that may have been recruited for the distinction between stamens and carpels, the male and female reproductive organs of flowering plants, during the evolution of angiosperms out of gymnosperm-like ancestors. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. 1-Hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase (IDS) is encoded by multicopy genes in gymnosperms Ginkgo biloba and Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Kobayashi, Akio; Sando, Tomoki; Chang, Yung-Jin; Kim, Soo-Un

    2008-01-01

    Isoprenoids are synthesized through the condensation of five-carbon intermediates, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), derived from two distinct biosynthetic routes: cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) and plastidial 2-C-methyl-D: -erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways. 1-Hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase (IDS; EC 1.17.1.2), which catalyzes the last step of MEP pathway, was cloned as a multicopy gene from gymnosperms Ginkgo biloba (GbIDS1, GbIDS2, and GbIDS2-1) and Pinus taeda (PtIDS1 and PtIDS2), and characterized. Phylogenetic tree constructed with other plant IDSs demonstrated gymnosperm IDSs were distinctively different from angiosperm IDSs. The gymnosperm IDS clade contained two subclades, one composed of GbIDS1 and PtIDS1, and the other composed of GbIDS2, GbIDS2-1, and PtIDS2. G. biloba IDSs, except GbIDS2-1, successfully complemented Escherichia coli DLYT1, a lytB disruptant, confirming the in vivo competency of isozymes. During the 4 weeks study period, although transcript levels of GbIDS1s were similar both in roots and leaves of cultured G. biloba embryo, the transcripts of GbIDS2 predominantly occurred in the embryo roots, where diterpene ginkgolides are biosynthesized. Levels of PtIDS2 transcripts in the diterpenoid resin-producing wood were 4-5 times higher than those in other tissues. Higher levels of GbIDS1 transcripts were induced by light, whereas those of GbIDS2 were increased by methyl jasmonate treatment. These results strongly imply GbIDS2 and PtIDS2 have high correlation with secondary metabolism. In Arabidopsis transient expression system, N-terminal 100 amino acid residues of GbIDS1 delivered fused GFP protein into chloroplast as well as cytosol and nucleus, whereas those of GbIDS2, GbIDS2-1, and two PtIDSs delivered GFP only into chloroplast.

  7. Isolation and Purification of Mitochondrial Mn-Superoxide Dismutase from the Gymnosperm Pinus sylvestris L. : PROTEINS, ENZYMES AND METABOLISM

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Streller; Silke, Kromer; Gunnar, Wingsle; Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Faculty of Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Department of Plant Physiology, University of Umea; Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Faculty of Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

    1994-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) was purified from germinating seeds of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) 3 days after the start of imbibition. The purification schedule included (NH_4)_2SO_4 fractionation, anion-exchange and hydrophobic-interaction chromatographies and chromatofocusing. Purified Mn-SOD had an apparent specific activity of 4,130 McCord-Fridovich units (mg protein)^. The molecular mass of the holoenzyme was estimated to be 91 kDa by size-exclusion chromatogr...

  8. Evolution and biogeography of gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Quan; Ran, Jin-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Living gymnosperms comprise only a little more than 1000 species, but represent four of the five main lineages of seed plants, including cycads, ginkgos, gnetophytes and conifers. This group has huge ecological and economic value, and has drawn great interest from the scientific community. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of gymnosperm evolution and biogeography, including phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, patterns of species diversification, roles of vicariance and dispersal in development of intercontinental disjunctions, modes of molecular evolution in different genomes and lineages, and mechanisms underlying the formation of large nuclear genomes. It is particularly interesting that increasing evidence supports a sister relationship between Gnetales and Pinaceae (the Gnepine hypothesis) and the contribution of recent radiations to present species diversity, and that expansion of retrotransposons is responsible for the large and complex nuclear genome of gymnosperms. In addition, multiple coniferous genera such as Picea very likely originated in North America and migrated into the Old World, further indicating that the center of diversity is not necessarily the place of origin. The Bering Land Bridge acted as an important pathway for dispersal of gymnosperms in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, the genome sequences of conifers provide an unprecedented opportunity and an important platform for the evolutionary studies of gymnosperms, and will also shed new light on evolution of many important gene families and biological pathways in seed plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring Diversification and Genome Size Evolution in Extant Gymnosperms through Phylogenetic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Burleigh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gymnosperms, comprising cycads, Ginkgo, Gnetales, and conifers, represent one of the major groups of extant seed plants. Yet compared to angiosperms, little is known about the patterns of diversification and genome evolution in gymnosperms. We assembled a phylogenetic supermatrix containing over 4.5 million nucleotides from 739 gymnosperm taxa. Although 93.6% of the cells in the supermatrix are empty, the data reveal many strongly supported nodes that are generally consistent with previous phylogenetic analyses, including weak support for Gnetales sister to Pinaceae. A lineage through time plot suggests elevated rates of diversification within the last 100 million years, and there is evidence of shifts in diversification rates in several clades within cycads and conifers. A likelihood-based analysis of the evolution of genome size in 165 gymnosperms finds evidence for heterogeneous rates of genome size evolution due to an elevated rate in Pinus.

  10. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) gene family shows a gymnosperm-specific lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) is a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that catalyzes the deamination of phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid, a precursor for the lignin and flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. To date, PAL genes have been less extensively studied in gymnosperms than in angiosperms. Our interest in PAL genes stems from their potential role in the defense responses of Pinus taeda, especially with respect to lignification and production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds under various biotic and abiotic stimuli. In contrast to all angiosperms for which reference genome sequences are available, P. taeda has previously been characterized as having only a single PAL gene. Our objective was to re-evaluate this finding, assess the evolutionary history of PAL genes across major angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages, and characterize PAL gene expression patterns in Pinus taeda. Methods We compiled a large set of PAL genes from the largest transcript dataset available for P. taeda and other conifers. The transcript assemblies for P. taeda were validated through sequencing of PCR products amplified using gene-specific primers based on the putative PAL gene assemblies. Verified PAL gene sequences were aligned and a gene tree was estimated. The resulting gene tree was reconciled with a known species tree and the time points for gene duplication events were inferred relative to the divergence of major plant lineages. Results In contrast to angiosperms, gymnosperms have retained a diverse set of PAL genes distributed among three major clades that arose from gene duplication events predating the divergence of these two seed plant lineages. Whereas multiple PAL genes have been identified in sequenced angiosperm genomes, all characterized angiosperm PAL genes form a single clade in the gene PAL tree, suggesting they are derived from a single gene in an ancestral angiosperm genome. The five distinct PAL genes detected and verified in P. taeda

  11. [Characterization of 5S rRNA gene sequence and secondary structure in gymnosperms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In higher plants the primary and the secondary structures of 5S ribosomal RNA gene are considered highly conservative. Little is known about the 5S rRNA gene structure, organization and variation in gyimnosperms. In this study we analyzed sequence and structure variation of 5S rRNA gene in Pinus through cloning and sequencing multiple copies of 5S rDNA repeats from individual trees of five pines, P. bungeana, P. tabulaeformis, P. yunnanensis, P. massoniana and P. densata. Pinus bungeana is from the subgenus Strobus while the other four are from the subgenus Pinus (diploxylon pines). Our results revealed variations in both primary and secondary structure among copies of 5S rDNA within individual genomes and between species. 5S rRNA gene in Pinus is 120 bp long in most of the 122 clones we sequenced except for one or two deletions in three clones. Among these clones 50 unique sequences were identified and they were shared by different pine species. Our sequences were compared to 13 sequences each representing a different gymnosperm species, and to six sequences representing both angiosperm monocots and dicots. Average sequence similarity was 97.1% among Pinus species and 94.3% between Pinus and other gymnosperms. Between gymnosperms and angiosperms the sequence similarity decreased to 88.1%. Similar to other molecular data, significant sequence divergence was found between the two Pinus subgenera. The 5S gene tree (neighbor-joining tree) grouped the four diploxylon pines together and separated them distinctly from P. bungeana. Comparison of sequence divergence within individuals and between species suggested that concerted evolution has been very weak especially after the divergence of the four diploxylon pines. The phylogenetic information contained in the 5S rRNA gene is limited due to its shorter length and the difficulties in identifying orthologous and paralogous copies of rDNA multigene family further complicate its phylogenetic application. Pinus densata is a

  12. Moonlight pollination in the gymnosperm Ephedra (Gnetales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Catarina; Bolinder, Kristina

    2015-04-01

    Most gymnosperms are wind-pollinated, but some are insect-pollinated, and in Ephedra (Gnetales), both wind pollination and insect pollination occur. Little is, however, known about mechanisms and evolution of pollination syndromes in gymnosperms. Based on four seasons of field studies, we show an unexpected correlation between pollination and the phases of the moon in one of our studied species, Ephedra foeminea. It is pollinated by dipterans and lepidopterans, most of them nocturnal, and its pollination coincides with the full moon of July. This may be adaptive in two ways. Many nocturnal insects navigate using the moon. Further, the spectacular reflection of the full-moonlight in the pollination drops is the only apparent means of nocturnal attraction of insects in these plants. In the sympatric but wind-pollinated Ephedra distachya, pollination is not correlated to the full moon but occurs at approximately the same dates every year. The lunar correlation has probably been lost in most species of Ephedra subsequent an evolutionary shift to wind pollination in the clade. When the services of insects are no longer needed for successful pollination, the adaptive value of correlating pollination with the full moon is lost, and conceivably also the trait. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Moonlight pollination in the gymnosperm Ephedra (Gnetales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Catarina; Bolinder, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Most gymnosperms are wind-pollinated, but some are insect-pollinated, and in Ephedra (Gnetales), both wind pollination and insect pollination occur. Little is, however, known about mechanisms and evolution of pollination syndromes in gymnosperms. Based on four seasons of field studies, we show an unexpected correlation between pollination and the phases of the moon in one of our studied species, Ephedra foeminea. It is pollinated by dipterans and lepidopterans, most of them nocturnal, and its pollination coincides with the full moon of July. This may be adaptive in two ways. Many nocturnal insects navigate using the moon. Further, the spectacular reflection of the full-moonlight in the pollination drops is the only apparent means of nocturnal attraction of insects in these plants. In the sympatric but wind-pollinated Ephedra distachya, pollination is not correlated to the full moon but occurs at approximately the same dates every year. The lunar correlation has probably been lost in most species of Ephedra subsequent an evolutionary shift to wind pollination in the clade. When the services of insects are no longer needed for successful pollination, the adaptive value of correlating pollination with the full moon is lost, and conceivably also the trait. PMID:25832814

  14. Evolution of genome size and complexity in Pinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Morse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome evolution in the gymnosperm lineage of seed plants has given rise to many of the most complex and largest plant genomes, however the elements involved are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gymny is a previously undescribed retrotransposon family in Pinus that is related to Athila elements in Arabidopsis. Gymny elements are dispersed throughout the modern Pinus genome and occupy a physical space at least the size of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. In contrast to previously described retroelements in Pinus, the Gymny family was amplified or introduced after the divergence of pine and spruce (Picea. If retrotransposon expansions are responsible for genome size differences within the Pinaceae, as they are in angiosperms, then they have yet to be identified. In contrast, molecular divergence of Gymny retrotransposons together with other families of retrotransposons can account for the large genome complexity of pines along with protein-coding genic DNA, as revealed by massively parallel DNA sequence analysis of Cot fractionated genomic DNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most of the enormous genome complexity of pines can be explained by divergence of retrotransposons, however the elements responsible for genome size variation are yet to be identified. Genomic resources for Pinus including those reported here should assist in further defining whether and how the roles of retrotransposons differ in the evolution of angiosperm and gymnosperm genomes.

  15. Functional bisporangiate cones in Pinus johannis (Pinaceae): Implications for the evolution of bisexuality in seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Vázquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Whipple, Amy V; Piñero, Daniel; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith; Domínguez, C A

    2011-01-01

    Bisexuality (male and female function in one structure) has been reported as a key innovation of angiosperms. Although there are several reports of "teratological" bisporangiate (bisexual) cones in gymnosperms, there have been none on the viability of their ovules and pollen. Analyses of the development and arrangement of female and male structures on bisporangiate cones of Pinus johannis enables us to gain insight on the origin of bisexuality in seed plants, for both angiosperms and gymnosperms. Viability of bisporangiate cones was assayed by performing manual crosses and using anatomical and histological methods. We determined that bisporangiate cones of P. johannis produce functional pollen and ovules. Male and female organs occupy basal and apical positions, respectively, the same positions found in almost all bisporangiate strobili in gymnosperms and bisexual flowers in angiosperms. The viability and spatial distribution of female and male organs of bisporangiate cones and their frequent occurrence in gymnosperms suggest a common mechanism in all seed plants for the production of bisporangiate structures. This idea is further supported by the presence of homologous genes for sexual organ identity in gymnosperms and angiosperms as reported by other authors. The lack of bisporangiate structure in gymnosperms may be primarily due to selection to avoid inbreeding rather than to genetic constraint.

  16. Histological investigations of the secondary phloem of gymnosperms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outer, den R.W.

    1967-01-01

    An anatomical study of secondary phloem of the different species of Gymnosperms showed that three categories could be distinguished, which may represent three evolutionary stages. These three categories were:

    Pseudotsuga taxifolia type, to which belong many Pinaceae (while the other

  17. A novel Au SINE sequence found in a gymnosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Eiki; Akita, Toru; Kawahara, Taihachi

    2011-01-01

    Although many SINE families have been identified in the animal kingdom, only a few SINE families have been identified in plants, and their distribution is somewhat limited. The Au SINE (Au) has been found discontinuously in basal angiosperms, monocots, and eudicots. In this study, we examined the presence of the Au in gymnosperms and ferns by PCR using internal primers for Au. As a result, we found Au in a gymnosperm species, Ephedra ciliata. Therefore, Au was supposed to be present in the common ancestor of angiosperms and gymnosperms. The Au in E. ciliate was 15 bp shorter than the consensus sequence, which is similar to the Au SINE found in Glycine. However, the 3'end of the Au found in E. ciliate was more similar to the 3'end of the Medicago-type Au than that of the Glycine-type Au. A phylogenetic tree indicated that the Au sequence from E. ciliate is more closely related to the sequence found in Glycine than that found in Medicago/Lotus. These results indicated that Au were present in both angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  18. Monocotyledons and Gymnosperms of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Acevedo-Rodr¡guez; M. T. Strong

    2005-01-01

    The present treatment constitutes an updated revision for the monocotyledon and gymnosperm flora (excluding Orchidaceae and Poaceae) for the biogeographical region of Puerto Rico (including all islets and islands) and the Virgin Islands. With this contribution, we fill the last major gap in the flora of this region, since the dicotyledons have been previously revised....

  19. Phylogenetic and functional signals in gymnosperm ovular secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepi, Massimo; Little, Stefan; Guarnieri, Massimo; Nocentini, Daniele; Prior, Natalie; Gill, Julia; Barry Tomlinson, P; Ickert-Bond, Stefanie M; Pirone, Cary; Pacini, Ettore; von Aderkas, Patrick

    2017-11-28

    Gymnosperms are either wind-pollinated (anemophilous) or both wind- and insect-pollinated (ambophilous). Regardless of pollination mode, ovular secretions play a key role in pollen capture, germination and growth; they are likely also involved in pollinator reward. Little is known about the broad-scale diversity of ovular secretions across gymnosperms, and how these may relate to various reproductive functions. This study analyses the sugar and amino acid profiles of ovular secretions across a range of ambophilous (cycads and Gnetales) and anemophilous gymnosperms (conifers) to place them in an evolutionary context of their possible functions during reproduction. Ovular secretions from 13 species representing all five main lineages of extant gymnosperms were sampled. High-performance liquid chromatography techniques were used to measure sugar and amino acid content. Multivariate statistics were applied to assess whether there are significant differences in the chemical profiles of anemophilous and ambophilous species. Data were compared with published chemical profiles of angiosperm nectar. Chemical profiles were placed in the context of phylogenetic relationships. Total sugar concentrations were significantly higher in ovular secretions of ambophilous species than wind-pollinated taxa such as Pinaceae and Cupressophyta. Ambophilous species had lower amounts of total amino acids, and a higher proportion of non-protein amino acids compared with anemophilous lineages, and were also comparable to angiosperm nectar. Results suggest that early gymnosperms likely had ovular secretion profiles that were a mosaic of those associated with modern anemophilous and ambophilous species. Ginkgo, thought to be anemophilous, had a profile typical of ambophilous taxa, suggesting that insect pollination either exists in Gingko, but is undocumented, or that its ancestral populations were insect-pollinated. Chemical profiles of ovular secretions of ambophilous gymnosperms show a clear

  20. Phytochrome types in Picea and Pinus. Expression patterns of PHYA-Related types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, D H; Kolukisaoglu, H U; Larsson, C T; Qamaruddin, M; Ekberg, I; Wiegmann-Eirund, C; Schneider-Poetsch, H A; von Arnold, S

    1999-07-01

    Knowledge of the genes in gymnosperms encoding the apoproteins of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome is currently scanty as for gymnosperm nuclear protein coding sequences in general. Here we report two complete cDNA-derived sequences which code for two different types of gymnosperm phytochrome. One sequence stems from Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the other from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). More detailed studies have shown that both types of phytochrome gene are present in Norway spruce. From phylogenetic analyses, these types appear to branch off from progenitors that are also the common ancestors of the angiosperm PHYA/PHYC and PHYB/PHYD/PHYE lineages. Partial phytochrome sequences of other gymnosperms cluster with either the one type or the other of the gymnosperm phytochrome genes characterized here. Southern blot analysis of Picea DNA using probes derived from the full-length Picea gene indicated a family of at least five members. Whether they code for new types may be doubted since only two phylogenetic clusters were found. Studies using RNA-PCR of Picea RNA extracted from either light- or dark-grown seedlings indicated that the steady-state levels of the transcripts of two PHYA/C-related genes were hardly affected by light.

  1. Exploring Diversification and Genome Size Evolution in Extant Gymnosperms through Phylogenetic Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Burleigh, J. Gordon; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Davis, John M.; Morse, Alison M.; Soltis, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    Gymnosperms, comprising cycads, Ginkgo, Gnetales, and conifers, represent one of the major groups of extant seed plants. Yet compared to angiosperms, little is known about the patterns of diversification and genome evolution in gymnosperms. We assembled a phylogenetic supermatrix containing over 4.5 million nucleotides from 739 gymnosperm taxa. Although 93.6% of the cells in the supermatrix are empty, the data reveal many strongly supported nodes that are generally consistent with previous ph...

  2. Cenozoic extinctions account for the low diversity of extant gymnosperms compared with angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Michael D; Cook, Lyn G

    2011-12-01

    We test the widely held notion that living gymnosperms are 'ancient' and 'living fossils' by comparing them with their sister group, the angiosperms. This perception derives partly from the lack of gross morphological differences between some Mesozoic gymnosperm fossils and their living relatives (e.g. Ginkgo, cycads and dawn redwood), suggesting that the rate of evolution of gymnosperms has been slow. We estimated the ages and diversification rates of gymnosperm lineages using Bayesian relaxed molecular clock dating calibrated with 21 fossils, based on the phylogenetic analysis of alignments of matK chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and 26S nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) sequences, and compared these with published estimates for angiosperms. Gymnosperm crown groups of Cenozoic age are significantly younger than their angiosperm counterparts (median age: 32 Ma vs 50 Ma) and have long unbranched stems, indicating major extinctions in the Cenozoic, in contrast with angiosperms. Surviving gymnosperm genera have diversified more slowly than angiosperms during the Neogene as a result of their higher extinction rate. Compared with angiosperms, living gymnosperm groups are not ancient. The fossil record also indicates that gymnosperms suffered major extinctions when climate changed in the Oligocene and Miocene. Extant gymnosperm groups occupy diverse habitats and some probably survived after making adaptive shifts. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Analysis of the soluble cell wall proteome of gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzal, Esther Novo; Gómez-Ros, Laura V; Hernández, Jose A; Pedreño, María A; Cuello, Juan; Ros Barceló, Alfonso

    2009-05-15

    We analyzed the cell wall proteome of lignifying suspension cell cultures (SCCs) from four gymnosperms that differ in evolution degree. This analysis showed the presence of "peptide sequence tags" (PSTs) corresponding to glucan endo-1,3-beta-D-glucosidase, xyloglucan-endotrans-glucosylase/hydrolase, chitinases, thaumatin-like proteins and proteins involved in lignin/lignan biosynthesis, such as dirigent-like proteins and peroxidases. Surprisingly, and given the abundance of peroxidases in the cell wall proteome of these gymnosperms, PSTs corresponding to peroxidases were only detected in tryptic fragments of the cell wall proteome of Cycas revoluta. The current lack of knowledge regarding C. revoluta peroxidases led us to purify, characterize and partially sequence the peroxidases responsible for lignin biosynthesis in this species. This yielded three peroxidase-enriched fractions: CrPrx 1, CrPrx 2 and CrPrx 3. Analyses of tryptic peptides of CrPrx 2 (32kDa) and CrPrx 3 (26kDa) suggest that CrPrx 3 arises from CrPrx 2 by protein truncation, and that CrPrx 3 apparently constitutes a post-translational modification of CrPrx 2. That CrPrx 2 and CrPrx 3 are apparently the same enzyme was also deduced from the similarity between the k(cat) shown by both peroxidases for the three monolignols. These results emphasize the analogies between the cell wall proteome of gymnosperms and angiosperms, the complexity of the peroxidase proteome, and the difficulties involved in establishing fine structure-function relationships.

  4. Evolutionary Analysis of MIKCc-Type MADS-Box Genes in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MIKCc-type MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that control floral organ morphogenesis and flowering time in flowering plants. Here, in order to determine when the subfamilies of MIKCc originated and their early evolutionary trajectory, we sampled and analyzed the genomes and large-scale transcriptomes representing all the orders of gymnosperms and basal angiosperms. Through phylogenetic inference, the MIKCc-type MADS-box genes were subdivided into 14 monophyletic clades. Among them, the gymnosperm orthologs of AGL6, SEP, AP1, GMADS, SOC1, AGL32, AP3/PI, SVP, AGL15, ANR1, and AG were identified. We identified and characterized the origin of a novel subfamily GMADS within gymnosperms but lost orthologs in monocots and Brassicaceae. ABCE model prototype genes were relatively conserved in terms of gene number in gymnosperms, but expanded in angiosperms, whereas SVP, SOC1, and GMADS had dramatic expansions in gymnosperms but conserved in angiosperms. Our results provided the most detailed evolutionary history of all MIKCc gene clades in gymnosperms and angiosperms. We proposed that although the near complete set of MIKCc genes had evolved in gymnosperms, the duplication and expressional transition of ABCE model MIKCc genes in the ancestor of angiosperms triggered the first flower.

  5. Evolutionary Analysis of MIKCc-Type MADS-Box Genes in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Zhang, Xingtan; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Liangsheng

    2017-01-01

    MIKCc-type MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that control floral organ morphogenesis and flowering time in flowering plants. Here, in order to determine when the subfamilies of MIKCc originated and their early evolutionary trajectory, we sampled and analyzed the genomes and large-scale transcriptomes representing all the orders of gymnosperms and basal angiosperms. Through phylogenetic inference, the MIKCc-type MADS-box genes were subdivided into 14 monophyletic clades. Among them, the gymnosperm orthologs of AGL6, SEP, AP1, GMADS, SOC1, AGL32, AP3/PI, SVP, AGL15, ANR1, and AG were identified. We identified and characterized the origin of a novel subfamily GMADS within gymnosperms but lost orthologs in monocots and Brassicaceae. ABCE model prototype genes were relatively conserved in terms of gene number in gymnosperms, but expanded in angiosperms, whereas SVP, SOC1, and GMADS had dramatic expansions in gymnosperms but conserved in angiosperms. Our results provided the most detailed evolutionary history of all MIKCc gene clades in gymnosperms and angiosperms. We proposed that although the near complete set of MIKCc genes had evolved in gymnosperms, the duplication and expressional transition of ABCE model MIKCc genes in the ancestor of angiosperms triggered the first flower. PMID:28611810

  6. Contrasting Rates of Molecular Evolution and Patterns of Selection among Gymnosperms and Flowering Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Li, Zhen; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2017-06-01

    The majority of variation in rates of molecular evolution among seed plants remains both unexplored and unexplained. Although some attention has been given to flowering plants, reports of molecular evolutionary rates for their sister plant clade (gymnosperms) are scarce, and to our knowledge differences in molecular evolution among seed plant clades have never been tested in a phylogenetic framework. Angiosperms and gymnosperms differ in a number of features, of which contrasting reproductive biology, life spans, and population sizes are the most prominent. The highly conserved morphology of gymnosperms evidenced by similarity of extant species to fossil records and the high levels of macrosynteny at the genomic level have led scientists to believe that gymnosperms are slow-evolving plants, although some studies have offered contradictory results. Here, we used 31,968 nucleotide sites obtained from orthologous genes across a wide taxonomic sampling that includes representatives of most conifers, cycads, ginkgo, and many angiosperms with a sequenced genome. Our results suggest that angiosperms and gymnosperms differ considerably in their rates of molecular evolution per unit time, with gymnosperm rates being, on average, seven times lower than angiosperm species. Longer generation times and larger genome sizes are some of the factors explaining the slow rates of molecular evolution found in gymnosperms. In contrast to their slow rates of molecular evolution, gymnosperms possess higher substitution rate ratios than angiosperm taxa. Finally, our study suggests stronger and more efficient purifying and diversifying selection in gymnosperm than in angiosperm species, probably in relation to larger effective population sizes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Pinus sylvestris L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    . Growth characters and number of strobili in clonal seed orchards of Pinus sylvestris. Euphytica, 152: 293-301. Bhumibhamon S (1978). Studies on Scots pine seed orchards in. Finland with special emphasis on the genetic ...

  8. Slower phloem transport in gymnosperm trees can be attributed to higher sieve element resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesche, Johannes; Windt, Carel; Bohr, Tomas; Schulz, Alexander; Jensen, Kaare H

    2015-04-01

    In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Angiosperm and gymnosperm trees have a fundamentally different phloem anatomy with respect to cell size, shape and connectivity. Whether these differences have an effect on the physiology of carbohydrate transport, however, is not clear. A meta-analysis of the experimental data on phloem transport speed in trees yielded average speeds of 56 cm h(-1) for angiosperm trees and 22 cm h(-1) for gymnosperm trees. Similar values resulted from theoretical modeling using a simple transport resistance model. Analysis of the model parameters clearly identified sieve element (SE) anatomy as the main factor for the significantly slower carbohydrate transport speed inside the phloem in gymnosperm compared with angiosperm trees. In order to investigate the influence of SE anatomy on the hydraulic resistance, anatomical data on SEs and sieve pores were collected by transmission electron microscopy analysis and from the literature for 18 tree species. Calculations showed that the hydraulic resistance is significantly higher in the gymnosperm than in angiosperm trees. The higher resistance is only partially offset by the considerably longer SEs of gymnosperms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Morphologic interpretation of fertile structures in glossopterid gymnosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of determining affinity among glossopterid gymnosperms is beset by deficiencies in preservation, natural dissociation of parts, and scarcity of features assuredly critical for morphologic comprarison. The glossopterids probably are not a very heterogeneous group of plants, but this is difficult to prove. The Gondwana glacial "hiatus" has resulted in the omission of a critical chapter glossopterid evolution. As a consequence, morphologic features and phyletic probabilities must be evaluated on a much more hypothetical basis than would otherwise be justified. Confusion has arisen from the lack of morphologic terms that permit clear discussion of a newly evolved type of reproductive structure in glossopterids. The structure, here designated a "fertiliger", consists of a leafy bract, a partially adnate stalk, and a fertile head or capitulum. Seven types of fertile structures are discussed, all of which are bilaterally symmetrical and have different features on dorsiventral surfaces. I regard all fertiligers as ovulate but this interpretation may bot be acceptable to some workers; others may not accept dorsiventral organization of the capitulum as being fundamental. Among glossopterids, however, in spite of differences in preservation that may seem to support a variant interpretation, these ovulate fertiligers are the distinctive features that show general consistency. A single fertile bract bearing several capitula, as exemplified by Lidgettonia, is called a compound fertiliger. Staminate structures (microsporophylls) of glossopterids are separately classified as Eretmonia, Glossotheca, and possibly as other taxa. Only the manner of sporangial attachment is not entirely clear. It seems likely the staminate parts have previously been confused with scale leaves and are actually coextensive in distribution with the glossopterids. A tentative phyletic model suggests the distant derivation of glossopterids from middle Carboniferous cordaiteans. Many details must

  10. Slower phloem transport in gymnosperm trees can be attributed to higher sieve element resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Windt, Carel; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Angiosperm and gymnosperm trees have a fundamentally different phloem anatomy with respect to cell size, shape...... and connectivity. Whether these differences have an effect on the physiology of carbohydrate transport, however, is not clear. A meta-analysis of the experimental data on phloem transport speed in trees yielded average speeds of 56 cm h−1 for angiosperm trees and 22 cm h−1 for gymnosperm trees. Similar values...... resulted from theoretical modeling using a simple transport resistance model. Analysis of the model parameters clearly identified sieve element (SE) anatomy as the main factor for the significantly slower carbohydrate transport speed inside the phloem in gymnosperm compared with angiosperm trees. In order...

  11. Nystroemiaceae, a new family of Permian gymnosperms from China with an unusual combination of features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Pfefferkorn, Hermann W.

    2010-01-01

    Nystroemiaceae is proposed as a new family of gymnosperms from the Permian of Cathaysia that adds to the diversity of gymnosperms known from this critical time in seed plant evolution. This family is characterized by bifurcating and highly branched pinnate ovuliferous organs bearing bicornute ovules (seeds) and entire leaves with anastomozing veins that are born on complex and modern-looking branching systems with clear axillary branching. The reconstruction is based on numerous large specimens from two localities in North China, in which the different plant parts are attached to each other. The ovulate structures show some apparently plesiomorphic (primitive) character states more typical of early seed plants, whereas the leaves and branches show the clearly apomorphic (derived) character states of broad-leaved gymnosperms. PMID:19656793

  12. Phylogeny and divergence times of gymnosperms inferred from single-copy nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Ran, Jin-Hua; Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms.

  13. Ginkgotides: Proline-Rich Hevein-Like Peptides from Gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang; Serra, Aida; Xiao, Tianshu; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yang, Daiwen; Tam, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Hevein and hevein-like peptides belong to the family of chitin-binding cysteine-rich peptides. They are classified into three subfamilies, the prototypic 8C- and the 6C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides. Thus far, only five 8C-hevein-like peptides have been characterized from three angiosperms and none from gymnosperm. To determine their occurrence and distribution in the gymnosperm, Ginkgo biloba leaves were examined. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of eleven novel 8C-hevein-l...

  14. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay of selected gymnosperm and angiosperm species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaćković Peđa T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol extracts of selected species of flowering plants Anthemis cotula, A. ruthenica, Centaurea dubia (Asteraceae, Ajuga genevensis, A. chamaepitys, A. reptans, Micromeria albanica, M. cristata, M. dalmatica, M. juliana, Thymus tosevii (Lamiaceae and conifers - Abies alba, Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii (Pinaceae and Taxus baccata (Taxaceae, as well as diethyl ether extracts of ten species Anthemis cotula, A. ruthenica, Centaurea dubia, Ajuga genevensis, A. chamaepitys, A. reptans, Micromeria albanica, M. cristata, M. dalmatica and M. juliana from two flowering plant families (Asteraceae and Lamiaceae were tested for general bioactivity using brine shrimp (Artemia salina lethality test. Lethal concentration (LC50 and 95% confidence intervals were determined by computer program LdP line. Out of fifteen tested methanol extracts, three possessed cytotoxic effect. Taxus baccata methanol extract showed the highest effect (LC50 = 18.60 μg/ml, while Thymus tosevii methanol extract expressed the lowest (LC50 = 842.50 μg/ml. All other analyzed species did not express significant cytotoxicity. Also, diethyl ether extracts of all tested species did not show significant cytotoxicity. The obtained results for methanol extracts which show certain cytotoxic effect could be guide for further phytochemical and pharmacological investigations. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173029

  15. Pinus sylvestris L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... 1548-1552. Bergmann F (1978). The allelic distribution at an acid phosphatase locus in Norway spruce (Picea abies) along climatic gradients. Theor. Appl. Gen. 52: 57-64. Bilgen BB, Kaya N (2007). Allozyme variations in six natural popula- tions of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Turkey. Biologia, Volume ...

  16. EST analysis in Ginkgo biloba: an assessment of conserved developmental regulators and gymnosperm specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Eric D; Katari, Manpreet S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Rudd, Stephen A; Douglas, Andrew W; Moss, Walter N; Twigg, Richard W; Runko, Suzan J; Stellari, Giulia M; McCombie, W R; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2005-10-15

    Ginkgo biloba L. is the only surviving member of one of the oldest living seed plant groups with medicinal, spiritual and horticultural importance worldwide. As an evolutionary relic, it displays many characters found in the early, extinct seed plants and extant cycads. To establish a molecular base to understand the evolution of seeds and pollen, we created a cDNA library and EST dataset from the reproductive structures of male (microsporangiate), female (megasporangiate), and vegetative organs (leaves) of Ginkgo biloba. RNA from newly emerged male and female reproductive organs and immature leaves was used to create three distinct cDNA libraries from which 6,434 ESTs were generated. These 6,434 ESTs from Ginkgo biloba were clustered into 3,830 unigenes. A comparison of our Ginkgo unigene set against the fully annotated genomes of rice and Arabidopsis, and all available ESTs in Genbank revealed that 256 Ginkgo unigenes match only genes among the gymnosperms and non-seed plants--many with multiple matches to genes in non-angiosperm plants. Conversely, another group of unigenes in Gingko had highly significant homology to transcription factors in angiosperms involved in development, including MADS box genes as well as post-transcriptional regulators. Several of the conserved developmental genes found in Ginkgo had top BLAST homology to cycad genes. We also note here the presence of ESTs in G. biloba similar to genes that to date have only been found in gymnosperms and an additional 22 Ginkgo genes common only to genes from cycads. Our analysis of an EST dataset from G. biloba revealed genes potentially unique to gymnosperms. Many of these genes showed homology to fully sequenced clones from our cycad EST dataset found in common only with gymnosperms. Other Ginkgo ESTs are similar to developmental regulators in higher plants. This work sets the stage for future studies on Ginkgo to better understand seed and pollen evolution, and to resolve the ambiguous phylogenetic

  17. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Editing site analysis in a gymnosperm mitochondrial genome reveals similarities with angiosperm mitochondrial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Salmans, Michael Lee; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Lin, Ching-Ping; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh; Wu, Yu-Wei; Mulligan, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Sequence analysis of organelle genomes and comprehensive analysis of C-to-U editing sites from flowering and non-flowering plants have provided extensive sequence information from diverse taxa. This study includes the first comprehensive analysis of RNA editing sites from a gymnosperm mitochondrial genome, and utilizes informatics analyses to determine conserved features in the RNA sequence context around editing sites. We have identified 565 editing sites in 21 full-length and 4 partial cDNA...

  19. Testing the recent theories for the origin of the hermaphrodite flower by comparison of the transcriptomes of gymnosperms and angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares Raquel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different theories for the origin of the angiosperm hermaphrodite flower make different predictions concerning the overlap between the genes expressed in the male and female cones of gymnosperms and the genes expressed in the hermaphrodite flower of angiosperms. The Mostly Male (MM theory predicts that, of genes expressed primarily in male versus female gymnosperm cones, an excess of male orthologs will be expressed in flowers, excluding ovules, while Out Of Male (OOM and Out Of Female (OOF theories predict no such excess. Results In this paper, we tested these predictions by comparing the transcriptomes of three gymnosperms (Ginkgo biloba, Welwitschia mirabilis and Zamia fisheri and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, using EST data. We found that the proportion of orthologous genes expressed in the reproductive organs of the gymnosperms and in the angiosperms flower is significantly higher than the proportion of orthologous genes expressed in the reproductive organs of the gymnosperms and in the angiosperms vegetative tissues, which shows that the approach is correct. However, we detected no significant differences between the proportion of gymnosperm orthologous genes expressed in the male cone and in the angiosperms flower and the proportion of gymnosperm orthologous genes expressed in the female cone and in the angiosperms flower. Conclusions These results do not support the MM theory prediction of an excess of male gymnosperm genes expressed in the hermaphrodite flower of the angiosperms and seem to support the OOM/OOF theories. However, other explanations can be given for the 1:1 ratio that we found. More abundant and more specific (namely carpel and ovule expression data should be produced in order to further test these theories.

  20. Testing the recent theories for the origin of the hermaphrodite flower by comparison of the transcriptomes of gymnosperms and angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Different theories for the origin of the angiosperm hermaphrodite flower make different predictions concerning the overlap between the genes expressed in the male and female cones of gymnosperms and the genes expressed in the hermaphrodite flower of angiosperms. The Mostly Male (MM) theory predicts that, of genes expressed primarily in male versus female gymnosperm cones, an excess of male orthologs will be expressed in flowers, excluding ovules, while Out Of Male (OOM) and Out Of Female (OOF) theories predict no such excess. Results In this paper, we tested these predictions by comparing the transcriptomes of three gymnosperms (Ginkgo biloba, Welwitschia mirabilis and Zamia fisheri) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa), using EST data. We found that the proportion of orthologous genes expressed in the reproductive organs of the gymnosperms and in the angiosperms flower is significantly higher than the proportion of orthologous genes expressed in the reproductive organs of the gymnosperms and in the angiosperms vegetative tissues, which shows that the approach is correct. However, we detected no significant differences between the proportion of gymnosperm orthologous genes expressed in the male cone and in the angiosperms flower and the proportion of gymnosperm orthologous genes expressed in the female cone and in the angiosperms flower. Conclusions These results do not support the MM theory prediction of an excess of male gymnosperm genes expressed in the hermaphrodite flower of the angiosperms and seem to support the OOM/OOF theories. However, other explanations can be given for the 1:1 ratio that we found. More abundant and more specific (namely carpel and ovule) expression data should be produced in order to further test these theories. PMID:20682074

  1. Palyno-morphological characteristics of gymnosperm flora of pakistan and its taxonomic implications with LM and SEM methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raees; Ul Abidin, Sheikh Zain; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad; Liu, Jie; Amina, Hafiza

    2018-01-01

    The present study is intended to assess gymnosperms pollen flora of Pakistan using Light Microscope (LM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for its taxonomic significance in identification of gymnosperms. Pollens of 35 gymnosperm species (12 genera and five families) were collected from its various distributional sites of gymnosperms in Pakistan. LM and SEM were used to investigate different palyno-morphological characteristics. Five pollen types (i.e., Inaperturate, Monolete, Monoporate, Vesiculate-bisaccate and Polyplicate) were observed. Six In equatorial view seven types of pollens were observed, in which ten species were sub-angular, nine species were Traingular, six species were Perprolate, three species were Rhomboidal, three species were semi-angular, two species were rectangular and two species were prolate. While five types of pollen were observed in polar view, in which ten species were Spheroidal, nine species were Angular, eight were Interlobate, six species were Circular, two species were Elliptic. Eighteen species has rugulate and 17 species has faveolate ornamentation. Eighteen species has verrucate and 17 have gemmate type sculpturing. The data was analysed through cluster analysis. The study showed that these palyno-morphological features have significance value in classification and identification of gymnosperms. Based on these different palyno-morphological features, a taxonomic key was proposed for the accurate and fast identifications of gymnosperms from Pakistan. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. EST analysis in Ginkgo biloba: an assessment of conserved developmental regulators and gymnosperm specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runko Suzan J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginkgo biloba L. is the only surviving member of one of the oldest living seed plant groups with medicinal, spiritual and horticultural importance worldwide. As an evolutionary relic, it displays many characters found in the early, extinct seed plants and extant cycads. To establish a molecular base to understand the evolution of seeds and pollen, we created a cDNA library and EST dataset from the reproductive structures of male (microsporangiate, female (megasporangiate, and vegetative organs (leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Results RNA from newly emerged male and female reproductive organs and immature leaves was used to create three distinct cDNA libraries from which 6,434 ESTs were generated. These 6,434 ESTs from Ginkgo biloba were clustered into 3,830 unigenes. A comparison of our Ginkgo unigene set against the fully annotated genomes of rice and Arabidopsis, and all available ESTs in Genbank revealed that 256 Ginkgo unigenes match only genes among the gymnosperms and non-seed plants – many with multiple matches to genes in non-angiosperm plants. Conversely, another group of unigenes in Gingko had highly significant homology to transcription factors in angiosperms involved in development, including MADS box genes as well as post-transcriptional regulators. Several of the conserved developmental genes found in Ginkgo had top BLAST homology to cycad genes. We also note here the presence of ESTs in G. biloba similar to genes that to date have only been found in gymnosperms and an additional 22 Ginkgo genes common only to genes from cycads. Conclusion Our analysis of an EST dataset from G. biloba revealed genes potentially unique to gymnosperms. Many of these genes showed homology to fully sequenced clones from our cycad EST dataset found in common only with gymnosperms. Other Ginkgo ESTs are similar to developmental regulators in higher plants. This work sets the stage for future studies on Ginkgo to better understand seed and

  3. EST analysis in Ginkgo biloba: an assessment of conserved developmental regulators and gymnosperm specific genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Eric D; Katari, Manpreet S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Rudd, Stephen A; Douglas, Andrew W; Moss, Walter N; Twigg, Richard W; Runko, Suzan J; Stellari, Giulia M; McCombie, WR; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2005-01-01

    Background Ginkgo biloba L. is the only surviving member of one of the oldest living seed plant groups with medicinal, spiritual and horticultural importance worldwide. As an evolutionary relic, it displays many characters found in the early, extinct seed plants and extant cycads. To establish a molecular base to understand the evolution of seeds and pollen, we created a cDNA library and EST dataset from the reproductive structures of male (microsporangiate), female (megasporangiate), and vegetative organs (leaves) of Ginkgo biloba. Results RNA from newly emerged male and female reproductive organs and immature leaves was used to create three distinct cDNA libraries from which 6,434 ESTs were generated. These 6,434 ESTs from Ginkgo biloba were clustered into 3,830 unigenes. A comparison of our Ginkgo unigene set against the fully annotated genomes of rice and Arabidopsis, and all available ESTs in Genbank revealed that 256 Ginkgo unigenes match only genes among the gymnosperms and non-seed plants – many with multiple matches to genes in non-angiosperm plants. Conversely, another group of unigenes in Gingko had highly significant homology to transcription factors in angiosperms involved in development, including MADS box genes as well as post-transcriptional regulators. Several of the conserved developmental genes found in Ginkgo had top BLAST homology to cycad genes. We also note here the presence of ESTs in G. biloba similar to genes that to date have only been found in gymnosperms and an additional 22 Ginkgo genes common only to genes from cycads. Conclusion Our analysis of an EST dataset from G. biloba revealed genes potentially unique to gymnosperms. Many of these genes showed homology to fully sequenced clones from our cycad EST dataset found in common only with gymnosperms. Other Ginkgo ESTs are similar to developmental regulators in higher plants. This work sets the stage for future studies on Ginkgo to better understand seed and pollen evolution, and to

  4. Seasonal monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Pinus taeda and Pinus virginiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal volatile organic compound emission data from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) were collected using branch enclosure techniques in Central North Carolina, USA. Pinus taeda monoterpene emission rates were at least ten times higher than oxyge...

  5. Genes Sufficient for Synthesizing Peptidoglycan are Retained in Gymnosperm Genomes, and MurE from Larix gmelinii can Rescue the Albino Phenotype of Arabidopsis MurE Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaofei; Li, Ningning; Kudo, Hiromi; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jinyu; Wang, Li; Zhang, Wenbo; Takechi, Katsuaki; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2017-03-01

    The endosymbiotic theory states that plastids are derived from a single cyanobacterial ancestor that possessed a cell wall. Peptidoglycan (PG), the main component of the bacteria cell wall, gradually degraded during plastid evolution. PG-synthesizing Mur genes have been found to be retained in the genomes of basal streptophyte plants, although many of them have been lost from the genomes of angiosperms. The enzyme encoded by bacterial MurE genes catalyzes the formation of the UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc) tripeptide in bacterial PG biosynthesis. Knockout of the MurE gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens resulted in defects of chloroplast division, whereas T-DNA-tagged mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana for MurE revealed inhibition of chloroplast development but not of plastid division, suggesting that AtMurE is functionally divergent from the bacterial and moss MurE proteins. Here, we could identify 10 homologs of bacterial Mur genes, including MurE, in the recently sequenced genomes of Picea abies and Pinus taeda, suggesting the retention of the plastid PG system in gymnosperms. To investigate the function of gymnosperm MurE, we isolated an ortholog of MurE from the larch, Larix gmelinii (LgMurE) and confirmed its presence as a single copy per genome, as well as its abundant expression in the leaves of larch seedlings. Analysis with a fusion protein combining green fluorescent protein and LgMurE suggested that it localizes in chloroplasts. Cross-species complementation assay with MurE mutants of A. thaliana and P. patens showed that the expression of LgMurE cDNA completely rescued the albefaction defects in A. thaliana but did not rescue the macrochloroplast phenotype in P. patens. The evolution of plastid PG and the mechanism behind the functional divergence of MurE genes are discussed in the context of information about plant genomes at different evolutionary stages. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of

  6. A spruce gene map infers ancient plant genome reshuffling and subsequent slow evolution in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extant conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Pavy, Nathalie; Pelgas, Betty; Laroche, Jérôme; Rigault, Philippe; Isabel, Nathalie; Bousquet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Seed plants are composed of angiosperms and gymnosperms, which diverged from each other around 300 million years ago. While much light has been shed on the mechanisms and rate of genome evolution in flowering plants, such knowledge remains conspicuously meagre for the gymnosperms. Conifers are key representatives of gymnosperms and the sheer size of their genomes represents a significant challenge for characterization, sequencing and assembling. Results To gain insight int...

  7. Benzyladenine metabolism and temporal competence of Pinus pinea cotyledons to form buds in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortizo, Millán; Cuesta, Candela; Centeno, María Luz; Rodríguez, Ana; Fernández, Belén; Ordás, Ricardo

    2009-07-01

    Germination negatively affects adventitious shoot formation induced by cytokinins in pine cotyledons. To investigate the causes of this decrease in the organogenic response, uptake and metabolism of benzyladenine (BA) were studied in stone pine cotyledons (Pinus pinea) isolated from in vitro germinating embryos and cultured in bud induction medium. As embryos grew, cotyledons showed a progressive decrease in the amount of BA taken up from the medium. BA was barely metabolized; however, a BA metabolite previously undescribed in conifers was found. It was identified as a glucoside of the BA riboside, a type of metabolite recently described in other gymnosperms. Data revealed that differences in the organogenic capacity of P. pinea cotyledons associated with embryo germination are related primarily to their ability to absorb BA from the bud induction medium.

  8. Revisiting the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family reveals cryptic FLOWERING LOCUS T gene homologs in gymnosperms and sheds new light on functional evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Yan; Yang, Ke-Zhen; Wei, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2016-11-01

    Angiosperms and gymnosperms are two major groups of extant seed plants. It has been suggested that gymnosperms lack FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), a key integrator at the core of flowering pathways in angiosperms. Taking advantage of newly released gymnosperm genomes, we revisited the evolutionary history of the plant phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family through phylogenetic reconstruction. Expression patterns in three gymnosperm taxa and heterologous expression in Arabidopsis were studied to investigate the functions of gymnosperm FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like genes. Phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that an ancient gene duplication predating the divergence of seed plants gave rise to the FT and TFL1 genes. Expression patterns indicate that gymnosperm TFL1-like genes play a role in the reproductive development process, while GymFT1 and GymFT2, the FT-like genes resulting from a duplication event in the common ancestor of gymnosperms, function in both growth rhythm and sexual development pathways. When expressed in Arabidopsis, both spruce FT-like and TFL1-like genes repressed flowering. Our study demonstrates that gymnosperms do have FT-like and TFL1-like genes. Frequent gene and genome duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the plant PEBP gene family. The expression patterns of gymnosperm PEBP genes provide novel insight into the functional evolution of this gene family. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. The Pinus taeda genome is characterized by diverse and highly diverged repetitive sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Allen; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Parra, Genis; Holt, Carson; Bruening, George E; Loopstra, Carol A; Hartigan, James; Yandell, Mark; Langley, Charles H; Korf, Ian; Neale, David B

    2010-07-07

    In today's age of genomic discovery, no attempt has been made to comprehensively sequence a gymnosperm genome. The largest genus in the coniferous family Pinaceae is Pinus, whose 110-120 species have extremely large genomes (c. 20-40 Gb, 2N = 24). The size and complexity of these genomes have prompted much speculation as to the feasibility of completing a conifer genome sequence. Conifer genomes are reputed to be highly repetitive, but there is little information available on the nature and identity of repetitive units in gymnosperms. The pines have extensive genetic resources, with approximately 329000 ESTs from eleven species and genetic maps in eight species, including a dense genetic map of the twelve linkage groups in Pinus taeda. We present here the Sanger sequence and annotation of ten P. taeda BAC clones and Genome Analyzer II whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequences representing 7.5% of the genome. Computational annotation of ten BACs predicts three putative protein-coding genes and at least fifteen likely pseudogenes in nearly one megabase of sequence. We found three conifer-specific LTR retroelements in the BACs, and tentatively identified at least 15 others based on evidence from the distantly related angiosperms. Alignment of WGS sequences to the BACs indicates that 80% of BAC sequences have similar copies (> or = 75% nucleotide identity) elsewhere in the genome, but only 23% have identical copies (99% identity). The three most common repetitive elements in the genome were identified and, when combined, represent less than 5% of the genome. This study indicates that the majority of repeats in the P. taeda genome are 'novel' and will therefore require additional BAC or genomic sequencing for accurate characterization. The pine genome contains a very large number of diverged and probably defunct repetitive elements. This study also provides new evidence that sequencing a pine genome using a WGS approach is a feasible goal.

  10. The Pinus taeda genome is characterized by diverse and highly diverged repetitive sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandell Mark

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In today's age of genomic discovery, no attempt has been made to comprehensively sequence a gymnosperm genome. The largest genus in the coniferous family Pinaceae is Pinus, whose 110-120 species have extremely large genomes (c. 20-40 Gb, 2N = 24. The size and complexity of these genomes have prompted much speculation as to the feasibility of completing a conifer genome sequence. Conifer genomes are reputed to be highly repetitive, but there is little information available on the nature and identity of repetitive units in gymnosperms. The pines have extensive genetic resources, with approximately 329000 ESTs from eleven species and genetic maps in eight species, including a dense genetic map of the twelve linkage groups in Pinus taeda. Results We present here the Sanger sequence and annotation of ten P. taeda BAC clones and Genome Analyzer II whole genome shotgun (WGS sequences representing 7.5% of the genome. Computational annotation of ten BACs predicts three putative protein-coding genes and at least fifteen likely pseudogenes in nearly one megabase of sequence. We found three conifer-specific LTR retroelements in the BACs, and tentatively identified at least 15 others based on evidence from the distantly related angiosperms. Alignment of WGS sequences to the BACs indicates that 80% of BAC sequences have similar copies (≥ 75% nucleotide identity elsewhere in the genome, but only 23% have identical copies (99% identity. The three most common repetitive elements in the genome were identified and, when combined, represent less than 5% of the genome. Conclusions This study indicates that the majority of repeats in the P. taeda genome are 'novel' and will therefore require additional BAC or genomic sequencing for accurate characterization. The pine genome contains a very large number of diverged and probably defunct repetitive elements. This study also provides new evidence that sequencing a pine genome using a WGS approach is

  11. Ginkgo and Welwitschia Mitogenomes Reveal Extreme Contrasts in Gymnosperm Mitochondrial Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Fan, Weishu; Young, Gregory J; Knoop, Volker; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of flowering plants are well known for their extreme diversity in size, structure, gene content, and rates of sequence evolution and recombination. In contrast, little is known about mitogenomic diversity and evolution within gymnosperms. Only a single complete genome sequence is available, from the cycad Cycas taitungensis, while limited information is available for the one draft sequence, from Norway spruce (Picea abies). To examine mitogenomic evolution in gymnosperms, we generated complete genome sequences for the ginkgo tree (Ginkgo biloba) and a gnetophyte (Welwitschia mirabilis). There is great disparity in size, sequence conservation, levels of shared DNA, and functional content among gymnosperm mitogenomes. The Cycas and Ginkgo mitogenomes are relatively small, have low substitution rates, and possess numerous genes, introns, and edit sites; we infer that these properties were present in the ancestral seed plant. By contrast, the Welwitschia mitogenome has an expanded size coupled with accelerated substitution rates and extensive loss of these functional features. The Picea genome has expanded further, to more than 4 Mb. With regard to structural evolution, the Cycas and Ginkgo mitogenomes share a remarkable amount of intergenic DNA, which may be related to the limited recombinational activity detected at repeats in Ginkgo Conversely, the Welwitschia mitogenome shares almost no intergenic DNA with any other seed plant. By conducting the first measurements of rates of DNA turnover in seed plant mitogenomes, we discovered that turnover rates vary by orders of magnitude among species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Ginkgotides: Proline-Rich Hevein-Like Peptides from GymnospermGinkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang; Serra, Aida; Xiao, Tianshu; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yang, Daiwen; Tam, James P

    2016-01-01

    Hevein and hevein-like peptides belong to the family of chitin-binding cysteine-rich peptides. They are classified into three subfamilies, the prototypic 8C- and the 6C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides. Thus far, only five 8C-hevein-like peptides have been characterized from three angiosperms and none from gymnosperm. To determine their occurrence and distribution in the gymnosperm, Ginkgo biloba leaves were examined. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of 11 novel 8C-hevein-like peptides, namely ginkgotides gB1-gB11. Proteomic analysis showed that the ginkgotides contain 41-44 amino acids (aa), a chitin-binding domain and are Pro-rich, a distinguishing feature that differs from other hevein-like peptides. Solution NMR structure determination revealed that gB5 contains a three β-stranded structure shaped by a cystine knot with an additional disulfide bond at the C-terminus. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the ginkgotide precursors contain a three-domain architecture, comprised of a C-terminal tail (20 aa) that is significantly shorter than those of other 8C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides, which generally contain a protein cargo such as a Barwin-like protein (126 aa) or class I chitinase (254 aa). Transcriptomic data mining found an additional 48 ginkgotide homologs in 39 different gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ginkgotides and their homologs belong to a new class of 8C-hevein-like peptides. Stability studies showed that ginkgotides are highly resistant to thermal, acidic and endopeptidase degradation. Ginkgotides flanked at both the N- and C-terminal ends by Pro were resistant to exopeptidase degradation by carboxypeptidase A and aminopeptidase. Antifungal assays showed that ginkgotides inhibit the hyphal growth of phyto-pathogenic fungi. Taken together, ginkgotides represent the first suite of hevein-like peptides isolated and characterized from gymnosperms. As a group, they represent a novel class of 8C-hevein-like peptides that

  13. Ginkgotides: Proline-Rich Hevein-Like Peptides from Gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang; Serra, Aida; Xiao, Tianshu; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yang, Daiwen; Tam, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Hevein and hevein-like peptides belong to the family of chitin-binding cysteine-rich peptides. They are classified into three subfamilies, the prototypic 8C- and the 6C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides. Thus far, only five 8C-hevein-like peptides have been characterized from three angiosperms and none from gymnosperm. To determine their occurrence and distribution in the gymnosperm, Ginkgo biloba leaves were examined. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of 11 novel 8C-hevein-like peptides, namely ginkgotides gB1–gB11. Proteomic analysis showed that the ginkgotides contain 41–44 amino acids (aa), a chitin-binding domain and are Pro-rich, a distinguishing feature that differs from other hevein-like peptides. Solution NMR structure determination revealed that gB5 contains a three β-stranded structure shaped by a cystine knot with an additional disulfide bond at the C-terminus. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the ginkgotide precursors contain a three-domain architecture, comprised of a C-terminal tail (20 aa) that is significantly shorter than those of other 8C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides, which generally contain a protein cargo such as a Barwin-like protein (126 aa) or class I chitinase (254 aa). Transcriptomic data mining found an additional 48 ginkgotide homologs in 39 different gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ginkgotides and their homologs belong to a new class of 8C-hevein-like peptides. Stability studies showed that ginkgotides are highly resistant to thermal, acidic and endopeptidase degradation. Ginkgotides flanked at both the N- and C-terminal ends by Pro were resistant to exopeptidase degradation by carboxypeptidase A and aminopeptidase. Antifungal assays showed that ginkgotides inhibit the hyphal growth of phyto-pathogenic fungi. Taken together, ginkgotides represent the first suite of hevein-like peptides isolated and characterized from gymnosperms. As a group, they represent a novel class of 8C-hevein-like peptides

  14. Ginkgotides: Proline-rich Hevein-like Peptides from Gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Ho Wong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hevein and hevein-like peptides belong to the family of chitin-binding cysteine-rich peptides. They are classified into three subfamilies, the prototypic 8C- and the 6C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides. Thus far, only five 8C-hevein-like peptides have been characterized from three angiosperms and none from gymnosperm. To determine their occurrence and distribution in the gymnosperm, Ginkgo biloba leaves were examined. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of eleven novel 8C-hevein-like peptides, namely ginkgotides gB1–gB11. Proteomic analysis showed that the ginkgotides contain 41–44 amino acids (aa, a chitin-binding domain and are Pro-rich, a distinguishing feature that differs from other hevein-like peptides. Solution 1H-NMR structure determination revealed that gB5 contains a three β-stranded structure shaped by a cystine knot with an additional disulfide bond at the C-terminus. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the ginkgotide precursors contain a three-domain architecture, comprised of a C-terminal tail (20 aa that is significantly shorter than those of other 8C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides, which generally contain a protein cargo such as a Barwin-like protein (126 aa or class I chitinase (254 aa. Transcriptomic data mining found an additional 48 ginkgotide homologs in 39 different gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ginkgotides and their homologs belong to a new class of 8C-hevein-like peptides. Stability studies showed that ginkgotides are highly resistant to thermal, acidic and endopeptidase degradation. Ginkgotides flanked at both the N- and C-terminal ends by Pro were resistant to exopeptidase degradation by carboxypeptidase A and aminopeptidase. Antifungal assays showed that ginkgotides inhibit the hyphal growth of phyto-pathogenic fungi. Taken together, ginkgotides represent the first suite of hevein-like peptides isolated and characterized from gymnosperms. As a group, they represent a novel class of 8C

  15. The internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA in the gymnosperm Gnetum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hyosig; Renner, Susanne S

    2005-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2 of the nuclear ribosomal DNA in the gymnosperm Gnetum, using a phylogenetic framework derived mainly from an intron in the nuclear low-copy LEAFY gene. Gnetum comprises 25-35 species in South America, Africa, and Asia, of which we sampled 16, each with two to six clones. Criteria used to assess ITS functionality were highly divergent nucleotide substitution, GC content, secondary structure, and incongruent phylogenetic placement of presumed paralogs. The length of ITS1 ranged from 225 to 986 bp and that of ITS2 from 259 to 305 bp, the largest ranges so far reported from seed plants. Gnetum ITS1 contains two informative sequence motifs, but different from other gymnosperms, there are only few and short (7-13 bp) tandem repeats. Gnetum ITS2 contains two structural motifs, modified in different clades by shortening of stems and loops. Conspecific sequences grouped together except for two recombinant pseudogenes that had ITS1 of one clade and ITS2 of another. Most of the pseudogenic ITS copies, paralogs, and putative chimeras occurred in a clade that according to a fossil-calibrated chloroplast-DNA clock has an age of a few million years. Based on morphology and chromosome numbers, the most plausible causes of the observed high levels of ITS polymorphism are hybridization, allopolyploidy, and introgression.

  16. Physicochemical evolution and positive selection of the gymnosperm matK proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da Cheng; Mu, Jun; Chen, Shi Lin; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2010-04-01

    It is not clear whether matK evolves under Darwinian selection. In this study, the gymnosperm Taxaceae, Cephalotaxaceae and Pinaceae were used to illustrate the physicochemical evolution, molecular adaptation and evolutionary dynamics of gene divergence in matKs. matK sequences were amplified from 27 Taxaceae and 12 Cephalotaxaceae species. matK sequences of 19 Pinaceae species were retrieved from GenBank. The phylogenetic tree was generated using conceptual-translated amino acid sequences. Selective influences were investigated using standard dN/dS ratio methods and more sensitive techniques investigating the amino acid property changes resulting from nonsynonymous replacements in a phylogenetic context. Analyses revealed the presence of positive selection in matKs (N-terminal region, RT domain and domain X) of Taxaceae and Pinaceae,and found positive destabilizing selection in N-terminal region and RT domain of Cephalotaxaceae matK. Moreover, various amino acid properties were found to be influenced by destabilizing positive selection. Amino acid sites relating to these properties and to different secondary structures were found and have the potential to affect group II intron maturase function. Despite the evolutionary constraint on the rapidly evolving matK, this protein evolves under positive selection in gymnosperm. Several regions of matK have experienced molecular adaptation which fine-tunes maturase performance.

  17. Development and Characterisation of Irap Markers From Expressed Retrotransposon-like sequences in Pinus sylvestris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronova Angelika

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conifer genomes are large and stably diploid, in contrast to angiosperms, which are more variable both in genome size and ploidy. Conifer genomes are characterised by multiple gene families and pseudogenes, contain large inter-gene regions and a considerable proportion of repetitive sequences. All members of plant retrotransposon orders have been identified in gymnosperm genomes, however active elements have not been described. Investigation of transposable elements in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. could offer insights into transposon-mediated reorganisation under stress conditions in complex and ancient plant genomes. Nine Pinus sylvestris specific markers were developed to hypothetical long terminal repeats (LTRs from differentially expressed retrotransposon-like fragments after heat stress and insect damage. Genetic diversity of 150 trees from a naturally regenerated pine stand was investigated using the IRAP method. The developed markers revealed high levels of genetic diversity and were able to distinguish subpopulations growing in long-term differential environmental conditions. Somaclonal variation was also investigated using these markers and polymorphic fragments were identified between ramets of Scots pine clones growing in two different plantations, possibly indicating evidence of recent transposition events. Sequencing of the polymorphic fragments identified two groups of sequences containing LTR sequences of an unknown retrotransposon with homology to the LTRs of the Copia-17-PAb-I element.

  18. Re-evaluating the isotopic divide between angiosperms and gymnosperms using n-alkane δ13C values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    Angiosperm δ13C values are typically 1-3‰ more negative than those of co-occurring gymnosperms. This is known for both bulk leaf and compound-specific values from n-alkanes, which are stable, straight-chain hydrocarbons (C23-C35) found in the epicuticular leaf wax of vascular plants. For n-alkanes, there is a second distinction between the δ13C values of angiosperms and gymnosperms—δ13C values generally decrease with increasing chain-length in angiosperms, while in gymnosperms they increase. These two distinctions have been used to support the ‘plant community change hypothesis’ explaining the difference between the terrestrial and marine carbon isotope excursions during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM.) Preserved n-alkanes from terrestrial paleosols in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming reveal a negative carbon isotope excursion during the PETM of 4-5‰, which is 1-2‰ greater than the excursion recorded by marine carbonates. The local plant community, known from macrofossils as well as palynoflora, shifted from a deciduous, mixed angiosperm/gymnosperm flora to a suite of evergreen angiosperm species during the PETM. At the end of the PETM, the community returned to a mixed deciduous flora very similar to the original. This change in the plant community could thus magnify the terrestrial negative carbon isotope excursion to the degree necessary to explain its divergence from the marine record. However, the comparison between modern angiosperms and gymnosperms has been made mostly between broadleaf, deciduous angiosperms and evergreen, coniferous gymnosperms. New data analyzing deciduous, coniferous gymnosperms, including Metasequoia glyptostroboides and Taxodium distichum, suggests that the division previously ascribed to taxonomy may actually be based on leaf habit and physiology, specifically broadleaf, deciduous versus needle-leaf, evergreen plants. If differences in n-alkane δ13C values can be described not as angiosperms versus gymnosperms

  19. Photosynthesis and respiration in the needles of Pinus sibirica and Pinus pumila and their putative hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Zotikova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A putative interspecific hybridization in Pinaceae family was investigated. Very rarely the physiological methods were involved in hybridization processes that occurs in the hybrid zones. It is well known that in most gymnosperms, the plastid genome is inherited from the paternal component while the mitochondrion is inherited from the maternal one. Therefore functioning pattern of organelles in the hybrid plant can suggest parent, from which they were inherited. The aim of this study was to indirectly establish the inheritance energy-transducing organelles (mitochondria, chloroplast according to their functioning. Current year needles from Siberian Stone Pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour and Japanese Stone Pine (Pinus pumila (Pall. Regel as parent species and their putative hybrids were collected from Baikal Region. The photosynthesis rate was determined by using the spectrophotometer. The study of emission CO2 under dark respiration of needle was conducted with laser optical-acoustic gasanalyzer. The quantity was measured at 1, 2 and 3 hour after experiment start. The rate of the photoreduction ferricyanide potassium was characterized by the primary photochemical processes activity at the level of photosystem II. Comparison of pure species was shown that Japanese Stone Pine had higher functional activity of chloroplast as compared with SiberianStone Pine in spite of the fact that they are growing in similar environment conditions. Two of three analyzed hybrids had decreasedactivity of their chloroplasts. Unfortunately, in this case we can't conclude if the chloroplasts were inherited from Siberian Stone Pine orfrom Japanese Stone Pine. Chloroplast activity of the third hybrid was approximately similar to that of Japanese Stone Pine suggesting thatits chloroplasts were inherited from this parent. Consequently, the Siberian Stone Pine and the Japanese Stone Pine were maternal and paternal, respectively parents of

  20. Characterization of a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase gene from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J R; Lorenz, W W; Dean, J F D

    2008-04-30

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase catalyzes what is typically the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of ethylene, a gaseous plant growth regulator that plays numerous roles in the growth and development of higher plants. Although ACC synthase genes have been characterized from a wide variety of angiosperm plant species, no ACC synthase genes have been described previously for gymnosperms. Evidence suggests that ethylene helps to regulate wood formation in trees, and may also signal for the metabolic shifts that lead to compression wood formation on the undersides of branches and leaning stems in gymnosperm trees. Since compression wood is an inferior feedstock for the manufacturing of most wood products, a better understanding of the factors influencing its formation could lead to substantial economic benefits. This study describes the isolation and characterization of a putative ACC synthase gene, PtaACS1, from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), an important commercial forest tree species. Also described is an apparent splice variant of PtaACS1 (PtaACS1s) that is missing 138 bp from the 5' end of the transcript, including bases that encode a conserved amino acid residue considered critical for ACC synthase activity. The two sequences share interesting homologies with a group of plant aminotransferases, in addition to ACC synthases, but structural models and the conservation of critical catalytic amino acid residues strongly support PtaACS1 as encoding an active ACC synthase. The two transcripts were differentially expressed in various tissues of loblolly pine, as well as in response to perturbations of pine seedling stems. Transcript levels of this ACC synthase gene increased rapidly in response to bending stress but returned to near starting levels within 30 min. It remains unclear to what extent bending-induced expression of this gene product plays a role in compression wood formation.

  1. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees

    OpenAIRE

    C?t?, Caroline L; Boileau, Francis; Roy, Vicky; Ouellet, Mario; Levasseur, Caroline; Morency, Marie-Jos?e; Cooke, Janice EK; S?guin, Armand; MacKay, John J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip III) proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cambium identity, as well as primary and secondary vascular differentiation and patterning in herbaceous plants. They have been proposed to regulate wood formation but relatively little evidence is available to validate such a role. We characterised and compared HD-Zip III gene family in an angiosperm tree, Populus spp. (poplar), and the gymnosperm Picea glauca (white spruc...

  2. Leaf traits and herbivory levels in a tropical gymnosperm, Zamia stevensonii (Zamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Alberto; Sierra, Adriel; Windsor, Donald; Bede, Jacqueline C

    2014-03-01

    Slow-growing understory cycads invest heavily in defenses to protect the few leaves they produce annually. The Neotropical cycad Zamia stevensonii has chemical and mechanical barriers against insect herbivores. Mechanical barriers, such as leaf toughness, can be established only after the leaf has expanded. Therefore, chemical defenses may be important during leaf expansion. How changes in leaf traits affect the feeding activity of cycad specialist insects is unknown. We investigated leaf defenses and incidence of specialist herbivores on Z. stevensonii during the first year after leaf flush. Herbivore incidence, leaf production, and leaf traits that might affect herbivory-including leaf age, lamina thickness, resistance-to-fracture, work-to-fracture, trichome density, and chlorophyll, water, and toxic azoxyglycoside (AZG) content-were measured throughout leaf development. Principal component analysis and generalized linear models identified characteristics that may explain herbivore incidence. Synchronized leaf development in Z. stevensonii is characterized by quick leaf expansion and delayed greening. Specialist herbivores feed on leaves between 10 and 100 d after flush and damage ∼37% of all leaflets produced. Young leaves are protected by AZGs, but these defenses rapidly decrease as leaves expand. Leaves older than 100 d are protected by toughness. Because AZG concentrations drop before leaves become sufficiently tough, there is a vulnerable period during which leaves are susceptible to herbivory by specialist insects. This slow-growing gymnosperm invests heavily in constitutive defenses against highly specialized herbivores, underlining the convergence in defensive syndromes by major plant lineages.

  3. The chloroplast genome of Ephedra foeminea (Ephedraceae, Gnetales), an entomophilous gymnosperm endemic to the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chen; Wikström, Niklas; Rydin, Catarina

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the chloroplast genome of Ephedra foeminea, an entomophilous gymnosperm, sister to the remaining (wind-pollinated) species of Ephedra (Ephedraceae, Gnetales). Based on the reference-guided assembly, the length of the chloroplast genome was estimated to be 109 584 bp, comprising a large single copy region of 60 027 bp, a small single copy 8079 bp, and inverted repeat regions of 20 739 bp. In total, 118 genes were detected, including 73 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes. The gene density is 1.076 (genes/kb) and the GC content is 36.7%. The genomic sequence of the entomophilous, Mediterranean species E. foeminea, differs from that of the anemophilous, Asian species E. equisetina by 1018 point mutations and 1334 indels. The detected variation is useful for future development of new plastid markers for phylogenetic purposes. Our phylogenetic analysis based on 55 protein-coding chloroplast genes resolve Ephedra as monophyletic and sister to a Gnetum-Welwitschia clade. The Gnetales are sister to Cupressophytes.

  4. Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) thrived in gymnosperm forests following the end-Triassic extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schootbrugge, Bas; van Eldijk, Timo; Wappler, Torsten; Strother, Paul; van der Weijst, Carolien; Rajaei, Hossein; Visscher, Henk

    2017-04-01

    The oldest evidence for Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) and the Coelolepida (hollow-scaled moths and butterflies) is presented based on an assemblage of fossilized scales encountered in uppermost Triassic and lowermost Jurassic sediments from a core drilled in northern Germany. The diverse assemblage of scales points to a Triassic origin of the Lepidoptera and a radiation of some lineages just before or right after the end-Triassic mass extinction (201 Ma). These findings confirm molecular clock estimates for splits within the Amphiesmenoptera that led to the evolution of true butterflies. Not only did Lepidoptera survive the end-Triassic extinction, they also appear to have radiated directly following this environmental crisis, which could be related to the dramatic changes in paleoclimate triggered by the eruption of the CAMP, especially an increase in humidity. Seen in combination with high-resolution palynological records that show an Early Jurassic dominance of conifer pollen, the presence of scales derived from angiospermivorous Coelolepida likely signifies a host-shift (for multiple lineages of crown group Lepidoptera) from gymnosperms to angiosperms during the Mesozoic.

  5. Exploring the bark thickness-stem diameter relationship: clues from lianas, successive cambia, monocots and gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A; Olson, Mark E; Anfodillo, Tommaso; Martínez-Méndez, Norberto

    2017-07-01

    Bark thickness is ecologically crucial, affecting functions from fire protection to photosynthesis. Bark thickness scales predictably with stem diameter, but there is little consensus on whether this scaling is a passive consequence of growth or an important adaptive phenomenon requiring explanation. With a comparative study across 913 species, we test the expectation that, if bark thickness-stem diameter scaling is adaptive, it should be possible to find ecological situations in which scaling is predictably altered, in this case between species with different types and deployments of phloem. 'Dicots' with successive cambia and monocots, which have phloem-free bark, had predictably thinner inner (mostly living) bark than plants with single cambia. Lianas, which supply large leaf areas with limited stem area, had much thicker inner bark than self-supporting plants. Gymnosperms had thicker outer bark than angiosperms. Inner bark probably scales with plant metabolic demands, for example with leaf area. Outer bark scales with stem diameter less predictably, probably reflecting diverse adaptive factors; for example, it tends to be thicker in fire-prone species and very thin when bark photosynthesis is favored. Predictable bark thickness-stem diameter scaling across plants with different photosynthate translocation demands and modes strongly supports the idea that this relationship is functionally important and adaptively significant. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Phylogenetic assemblage structure of North American trees is more strongly shaped by glacial-interglacial climate variability in gymnosperms than in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-05-01

    How fast does biodiversity respond to climate change? The relationship of past and current climate with phylogenetic assemblage structure helps us to understand this question. Studies of angiosperm tree diversity in North America have already suggested effects of current water-energy balance and tropical niche conservatism. However, the role of glacial-interglacial climate variability remains to be determined, and little is known about any of these relationships for gymnosperms. Moreover, phylogenetic endemism, the concentration of unique lineages in restricted ranges, may also be related to glacial-interglacial climate variability and needs more attention. We used a refined phylogeny of both angiosperms and gymnosperms to map phylogenetic diversity, clustering and endemism of North American trees in 100-km grid cells, and climate change velocity since Last Glacial Maximum together with postglacial accessibility to recolonization to quantify glacial-interglacial climate variability. We found: (1) Current climate is the dominant factor explaining the overall patterns, with more clustered angiosperm assemblages toward lower temperature, consistent with tropical niche conservatism. (2) Long-term climate stability is associated with higher angiosperm endemism, while higher postglacial accessibility is linked to to more phylogenetic clustering and endemism in gymnosperms. (3) Factors linked to glacial-interglacial climate change have stronger effects on gymnosperms than on angiosperms. These results suggest that paleoclimate legacies supplement current climate in shaping phylogenetic patterns in North American trees, and especially so for gymnosperms.

  7. The lectin from leaves of Japanese cycad, Cycas revoluta Thunb. (gymnosperm) is a member of the jacalin-related family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Fumio; Iwaya, Toshinobu; Haraguchi, Tomokazu; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2002-09-01

    A novel lectin was isolated from leaves of the Japanese cycad, Cycas revoluta Thunb. (gymnosperm), and its characteristics including amino acid composition, molecular mass, carbohydrate binding specificity and partial amino acid sequences were examined. The inhibition analysis of hemagglutinating activity with various sugars showed that the lectin has a carbohydrate-binding specificity similar to those of mannose recognizing, jacalin-related lectins. Partial amino acid sequences of the lysylendopeptic peptides shows that the lectin might have a repeating structure and belong to the jacalin-related lectin family.

  8. Zoidogamy in fossil gymnosperms: The centenary of a concept, with special reference to prepollen of late Paleozoic conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poort, R J; Visscher, H; Dilcher, D L

    1996-10-15

    This year is the centenary of the surprising discovery in 1896 of zoidogamy in extant cycadophytes and Ginkgo. But by coincidence, also in the same year, the concept of prepollen was introduced. The morphology of prepollen was considered justification for the probable production of motile antherozoids in extinct gymnosperms. In this paper, the history of the prepollen concept is briefly outlined. It is emphasized that, in addition to well-known examples in pteridosperms and cordaitaleans, a prepollen condition also occurred among late Paleozoic conifers.

  9. Molecular evolution of rbcL in three gymnosperm families: identifying adaptive and coevolutionary patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Lei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chloroplast-localized ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, the primary enzyme responsible for autotrophy, is instrumental in the continual adaptation of plants to variations in the concentrations of CO2. The large subunit (LSU of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene. Although adaptive processes have been previously identified at this gene, characterizing the relationships between the mutational dynamics at the protein level may yield clues on the biological meaning of such adaptive processes. The role of such coevolutionary dynamics in the continual fine-tuning of RbcL remains obscure. Results We used the timescale and phylogenetic analyses to investigate and search for processes of adaptive evolution in rbcL gene in three gymnosperm families, namely Podocarpaceae, Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae. To understand the relationships between regions identified as having evolved under adaptive evolution, we performed coevolutionary analyses using the software CAPS. Importantly, adaptive processes were identified at amino acid sites located on the contact regions among the Rubisco subunits and on the interface between Rubisco and its activase. Adaptive amino acid replacements at these regions may have optimized the holoenzyme activity. This hypothesis was pinpointed by evidence originated from our analysis of coevolution that supported the correlated evolution between Rubisco and its activase. Interestingly, the correlated adaptive processes between both these proteins have paralleled the geological variation history of the concentration of atmospheric CO2. Conclusions The gene rbcL has experienced bursts of adaptations in response to the changing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. These adaptations have emerged as a result of a continuous dynamic of mutations, many of which may have involved innovation of functional Rubisco features. Analysis of the protein structure and the functional

  10. Molecular evolution of rbcL in three gymnosperm families: identifying adaptive and coevolutionary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Lin; Fares, Mario A; Liang, Bo; Gao, Lei; Wang, Bo; Wang, Ting; Su, Ying-Juan

    2011-06-03

    The chloroplast-localized ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the primary enzyme responsible for autotrophy, is instrumental in the continual adaptation of plants to variations in the concentrations of CO2. The large subunit (LSU) of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene. Although adaptive processes have been previously identified at this gene, characterizing the relationships between the mutational dynamics at the protein level may yield clues on the biological meaning of such adaptive processes. The role of such coevolutionary dynamics in the continual fine-tuning of RbcL remains obscure. We used the timescale and phylogenetic analyses to investigate and search for processes of adaptive evolution in rbcL gene in three gymnosperm families, namely Podocarpaceae, Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae. To understand the relationships between regions identified as having evolved under adaptive evolution, we performed coevolutionary analyses using the software CAPS. Importantly, adaptive processes were identified at amino acid sites located on the contact regions among the Rubisco subunits and on the interface between Rubisco and its activase. Adaptive amino acid replacements at these regions may have optimized the holoenzyme activity. This hypothesis was pinpointed by evidence originated from our analysis of coevolution that supported the correlated evolution between Rubisco and its activase. Interestingly, the correlated adaptive processes between both these proteins have paralleled the geological variation history of the concentration of atmospheric CO2. The gene rbcL has experienced bursts of adaptations in response to the changing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. These adaptations have emerged as a result of a continuous dynamic of mutations, many of which may have involved innovation of functional Rubisco features. Analysis of the protein structure and the functional implications of such mutations put forward the conclusion that

  11. Molecular evolution of rbcL in three gymnosperm families: identifying adaptive and coevolutionary patterns

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sen, Lin

    2011-06-03

    Abstract Background The chloroplast-localized ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase\\/oxygenase (Rubisco), the primary enzyme responsible for autotrophy, is instrumental in the continual adaptation of plants to variations in the concentrations of CO2. The large subunit (LSU) of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene. Although adaptive processes have been previously identified at this gene, characterizing the relationships between the mutational dynamics at the protein level may yield clues on the biological meaning of such adaptive processes. The role of such coevolutionary dynamics in the continual fine-tuning of RbcL remains obscure. Results We used the timescale and phylogenetic analyses to investigate and search for processes of adaptive evolution in rbcL gene in three gymnosperm families, namely Podocarpaceae, Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae. To understand the relationships between regions identified as having evolved under adaptive evolution, we performed coevolutionary analyses using the software CAPS. Importantly, adaptive processes were identified at amino acid sites located on the contact regions among the Rubisco subunits and on the interface between Rubisco and its activase. Adaptive amino acid replacements at these regions may have optimized the holoenzyme activity. This hypothesis was pinpointed by evidence originated from our analysis of coevolution that supported the correlated evolution between Rubisco and its activase. Interestingly, the correlated adaptive processes between both these proteins have paralleled the geological variation history of the concentration of atmospheric CO2. Conclusions The gene rbcL has experienced bursts of adaptations in response to the changing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. These adaptations have emerged as a result of a continuous dynamic of mutations, many of which may have involved innovation of functional Rubisco features. Analysis of the protein structure and the functional implications of such

  12. Carbohydrate-related genes and cell wall biosynthesis in vascular tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, Campbell J; Lennon, Denise M; Wood-Jones, Alicia; Nairn, Alison V; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2008-07-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), the most widely planted tree species in the United States, is an important source of wood and wood fibers for a multitude of consumer products. Wood fibers are primarily composed of secondary cell walls, and cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are major components of wood. Fiber morphology and cell wall composition are important determinants of wood properties. We used comparative genomics to identify putative genes for cellulose and hemicellulose synthesis in loblolly pine that are homologous to genes implicated in cell wall synthesis in angiosperms. Sequences encoding putative secondary cell wall cellulose synthase genes, cellulose synthase-like genes, a membrane-bound endoglucanase gene, a sucrose synthase gene, a UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene and GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase genes were identified in expressed sequence tag (EST) collections from loblolly pine. Full-length coding sequences were obtained from cDNA clones isolated from a library constructed from developing xylem. Phylogenetic relationships between the genes from loblolly pine and angiosperm taxa were examined and transcriptional profiling in vascular tissues was conducted by real-time quantitative, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The putative cell wall synthesis genes were expressed at high levels in vascular tissues and a subset was differentially regulated in xylem and phloem tissues. Inferred phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns for the genes from loblolly pine were consistent with roles in synthesis of complex carbohydrates of the cell wall. These studies suggest functional conservation of homologous wood formation genes in gymnosperm and angiosperm taxa.

  13. A Floricaula/Leafy gene homolog is preferentially expressed in developing female cones of the tropical pine Pinus caribaea var. caribaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carnier Dornelas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, flower formation is controlled by meristem identity genes, one of which, FLORICAULA (FLO/LEAFY (LFY, plays a central role. It is not known if the formation of reproductive organs of pre-angiosperm species is similarly regulated. Here, we report the cloning of a conifer (Pinus caribaea var. caribaea FLO/LFY homolog, named PcLFY. This gene has a large C-terminal region of high similarity to angiosperm FLO/LFY orthologs and shorter regions of local similarity. In contrast to angiosperms, conifers have two divergent genes resembling LFY. Gymnosperm FLO/LFY proteins constitute a separate clade, that can be divided into two divergent groups. Phylogenetic analysis of deduced protein sequences has shown that PcLFY belongs to the LFY-like clade. Northern hybridization analysis has revealed that PcLFY is preferentially expressed in developing female cones but not in developing male cones. This expression pattern was confirmed by in situ hybridization and is consistent with the hypothesis of PcLFY being involved in the determination of the female cone identity. Additionally, mutant complementation experiments have shown that the expression of the PcLFY coding region, driven by the Arabidopsis LFY promoter, can confer the wild-type phenotype to lfy-26 transgenic mutants, suggesting that both gymnosperm and angiosperm LFY homologs share the same biological role.

  14. A spruce gene map infers ancient plant genome reshuffling and subsequent slow evolution in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extant conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavy, Nathalie; Pelgas, Betty; Laroche, Jérôme; Rigault, Philippe; Isabel, Nathalie; Bousquet, Jean

    2012-10-26

    Seed plants are composed of angiosperms and gymnosperms, which diverged from each other around 300 million years ago. While much light has been shed on the mechanisms and rate of genome evolution in flowering plants, such knowledge remains conspicuously meagre for the gymnosperms. Conifers are key representatives of gymnosperms and the sheer size of their genomes represents a significant challenge for characterization, sequencing and assembling. To gain insight into the macro-organisation and long-term evolution of the conifer genome, we developed a genetic map involving 1,801 spruce genes. We designed a statistical approach based on kernel density estimation to analyse gene density and identified seven gene-rich isochors. Groups of co-localizing genes were also found that were transcriptionally co-regulated, indicative of functional clusters. Phylogenetic analyses of 157 gene families for which at least two duplicates were mapped on the spruce genome indicated that ancient gene duplicates shared by angiosperms and gymnosperms outnumbered conifer-specific duplicates by a ratio of eight to one. Ancient duplicates were much more translocated within and among spruce chromosomes than conifer-specific duplicates, which were mostly organised in tandem arrays. Both high synteny and collinearity were also observed between the genomes of spruce and pine, two conifers that diverged more than 100 million years ago. Taken together, these results indicate that much genomic evolution has occurred in the seed plant lineage before the split between gymnosperms and angiosperms, and that the pace of evolution of the genome macro-structure has been much slower in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extent conifers than that seen for the same period of time in flowering plants. This trend is largely congruent with the contrasted rates of diversification and morphological evolution observed between these two groups of seed plants.

  15. A spruce gene map infers ancient plant genome reshuffling and subsequent slow evolution in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extant conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavy Nathalie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed plants are composed of angiosperms and gymnosperms, which diverged from each other around 300 million years ago. While much light has been shed on the mechanisms and rate of genome evolution in flowering plants, such knowledge remains conspicuously meagre for the gymnosperms. Conifers are key representatives of gymnosperms and the sheer size of their genomes represents a significant challenge for characterization, sequencing and assembling. Results To gain insight into the macro-organisation and long-term evolution of the conifer genome, we developed a genetic map involving 1,801 spruce genes. We designed a statistical approach based on kernel density estimation to analyse gene density and identified seven gene-rich isochors. Groups of co-localizing genes were also found that were transcriptionally co-regulated, indicative of functional clusters. Phylogenetic analyses of 157 gene families for which at least two duplicates were mapped on the spruce genome indicated that ancient gene duplicates shared by angiosperms and gymnosperms outnumbered conifer-specific duplicates by a ratio of eight to one. Ancient duplicates were much more translocated within and among spruce chromosomes than conifer-specific duplicates, which were mostly organised in tandem arrays. Both high synteny and collinearity were also observed between the genomes of spruce and pine, two conifers that diverged more than 100 million years ago. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that much genomic evolution has occurred in the seed plant lineage before the split between gymnosperms and angiosperms, and that the pace of evolution of the genome macro-structure has been much slower in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extent conifers than that seen for the same period of time in flowering plants. This trend is largely congruent with the contrasted rates of diversification and morphological evolution observed between these two groups of seed

  16. Regeneration of Pinus cubensis Griseb. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raima Cantillo Ardebol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Micropropagation of plants from the genus Pinus has been done in several species. However, micropropagation of Pinus cubensis Griseb has not been reported. This species has a great economical importance. Then, the aim of the current research was to achieve in vitro propagation of Pinus cubensis Griseb. to increase the number of individuals in their natural habitat. The concentration of sodium hypochlorite and immersion time were determined for seeds disinfection and embryos establishment. The effect of the presence or absence of the seed coat was also studied. Two growth regulators and three concentrations of each one were tested to achieve the emission of axillary buds in the multiplication phase. Five subcultures every 21 days were done. Rooting and acclimatization were carried out simultaneously. Shoots were individualized and immersed in a rooting solution. Zygotic embryos of P. cubensis wer e dev el o ped in vitro. The highest percentages of disinfection and germination were obtained by introducing the seeds in a solution of sodium hypochlorite at 20% for 15 minutes, planting them after that without the seed coat. The number and length of axillary buds increased by using 22.5 µM of 6-benzylaminopurine and 5.4 µM naphthaleneacetic acid in the multiplication phase. The in vitro propagation of Pinus cubensis Griseb. from zygotic embryos was achieved for the first time. A protocol was also established, reaching 50% of survival in the acclimatization phase. Key words: acclimatization, axillary buds, forestry, multiplication, pinus

  17. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Caroline L; Boileau, Francis; Roy, Vicky; Ouellet, Mario; Levasseur, Caroline; Morency, Marie-Josée; Cooke, Janice E K; Séguin, Armand; MacKay, John J

    2010-12-11

    Class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip III) proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cambium identity, as well as primary and secondary vascular differentiation and patterning in herbaceous plants. They have been proposed to regulate wood formation but relatively little evidence is available to validate such a role. We characterised and compared HD-Zip III gene family in an angiosperm tree, Populus spp. (poplar), and the gymnosperm Picea glauca (white spruce), representing two highly evolutionarily divergent groups. Full-length cDNA sequences were isolated from poplar and white spruce. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that some of the gymnosperm sequences were derived from lineages that diverged earlier than angiosperm sequences, and seem to have been lost in angiosperm lineages. Transcript accumulation profiles were assessed by RT-qPCR on tissue panels from both species and in poplar trees in response to an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. The overall transcript profiles HD-Zip III complexes in white spruce and poplar exhibited substantial differences, reflecting their evolutionary history. Furthermore, two poplar sequences homologous to HD-Zip III genes involved in xylem development in Arabidopsis and Zinnia were over-expressed in poplar plants. PtaHB1 over-expression produced noticeable effects on petiole and primary shoot fibre development, suggesting that PtaHB1 is involved in primary xylem development. We also obtained evidence indicating that expression of PtaHB1 affected the transcriptome by altering the accumulation of 48 distinct transcripts, many of which are predicted to be involved in growth and cell wall synthesis. Most of them were down-regulated, as was the case for several of the poplar HD-Zip III sequences. No visible physiological effect of over-expression was observed on PtaHB7 transgenic trees, suggesting that PtaHB1 and PtaHB7 likely have distinct roles in tree development, which is in agreement with the functions that

  18. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooke Janice EK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip III proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cambium identity, as well as primary and secondary vascular differentiation and patterning in herbaceous plants. They have been proposed to regulate wood formation but relatively little evidence is available to validate such a role. We characterised and compared HD-Zip III gene family in an angiosperm tree, Populus spp. (poplar, and the gymnosperm Picea glauca (white spruce, representing two highly evolutionarily divergent groups. Results Full-length cDNA sequences were isolated from poplar and white spruce. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that some of the gymnosperm sequences were derived from lineages that diverged earlier than angiosperm sequences, and seem to have been lost in angiosperm lineages. Transcript accumulation profiles were assessed by RT-qPCR on tissue panels from both species and in poplar trees in response to an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. The overall transcript profiles HD-Zip III complexes in white spruce and poplar exhibited substantial differences, reflecting their evolutionary history. Furthermore, two poplar sequences homologous to HD-Zip III genes involved in xylem development in Arabidopsis and Zinnia were over-expressed in poplar plants. PtaHB1 over-expression produced noticeable effects on petiole and primary shoot fibre development, suggesting that PtaHB1 is involved in primary xylem development. We also obtained evidence indicating that expression of PtaHB1 affected the transcriptome by altering the accumulation of 48 distinct transcripts, many of which are predicted to be involved in growth and cell wall synthesis. Most of them were down-regulated, as was the case for several of the poplar HD-Zip III sequences. No visible physiological effect of over-expression was observed on PtaHB7 transgenic trees, suggesting that PtaHB1 and PtaHB7 likely have distinct roles in tree development

  19. Pinus taeda AND Pinus oocarpa PLYWOOD MANUFACTURING WITH FENOL-FORMALDHEYDE RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the plywood, manufactured from Pinus taeda and Pinus oocarpa, with 20 and 24 years old respectively, using three differentformulations of the fenol-formaldheyde resin. The results of the glue line shearing tests not showed statistical differences between the species and three resin formulations. In the hot water test, all of the boards were classified as “BR” and, the boards of the Pinus oocarpa produced with formulations (1and (3, were classified as “WBP”. The different resin formulations not influenced on the modulus ofelasticity (MOE and modulus of rupture (MOR The boards of Pinus taeda with formulations (1 and(2 showed higher values of MOE in comparison of the Pinus oocarpa. The MOR of the Pinus oocarpa withformulation (2 was higher than Pinus taeda. The mechanical properties of the plywood wereprobably influenced by wood variability related to sapwood and hartwood, thickness of growth ringsand, springwood and summerwood.

  20. Evaluation of the present genetic conservation efforts in Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Quercus spp., Fagus sylvatica, and Pinus pinaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.

    2015-01-01

    Information on genetic diversity and gene conservation activities were combined with climatic data to evaluate the present genetic conservation efforts in Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Quercus spp., Fagus sylvatica, and Pinus pinaster. Combinations of climatic variables explained much of the

  1. Results from six Pinus taeda nursery trials with the herbicide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pendimethalin is used by some nursery managers to control weeds in Eucalyptus and Pinus seedbeds and cutting beds of Pinus. Six trials were implemented in open-rooted seedbeds to test the response of Pinus taeda to postemergence (to the crop) applications of 2.2 kg ha–1 active ingredient of pendimethalin (the ...

  2. Genetic transformation of Pinus palustris (longleaf pine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex M. Diner

    1999-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) is an important softwood species in the Southeast United States. In presettlement times, this species occupied extensive, pure stands throughout the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains from southeastern Virginia to eastern Texas, as well as south...

  3. Ecosystem carbon stocks in Pinus palustris forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa Samuelson; Tom Stokes; John R. Butnor; Kurt H. Johnsen; Carlos A. Gonzalez-Benecke; Pete Anderson; Jason Jackson; Lorenzo Ferrari; Tim A. Martin; Wendell P. Cropper

    2014-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) restoration in the southeastern United States offers opportunities for carbon (C) sequestration. Ecosystem C stocks are not well understood in longleaf pine forests, which are typically of low density and maintained by prescribed fire. The objectives of this research were to develop allometric equations for...

  4. Estudio sobre la influencia del contenido de humedad de la madera en ensayos no destructivos para Pinus nigra Arn, Pinus radiata D. Don y Pinus sylvestris L.

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón Arias, Luis

    2012-01-01

    El presente proyecto se centra en el estudio de la influencia que ejerce el contenido de humedad en la madera sobre mediciones realizadas mediante diversos ensayos no destructivos (NDT – Non Destructive Tests-). El objetivo es encontrar la relación entre el contenido de humedad de la madera de varias especies del género Pinus (Pinus nigra Arn, Pinus radiata D.Don. y Pinus sylvestris Ait.) y los resultados de diferentes NDT (penetrómetro, resistencia al arranque de tornillos y velocidad de pr...

  5. A comparative study of glutathione and ascorbate metabolism during germination of Pinus pinea L. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasi, F; Paciolla, C; de Pinto, M C; De Gara, L

    2001-08-01

    The ascorbate and glutathione systems have been studied during the first stages of germination in orthodox seeds of the gymnosperm Pinus pinea L. (pine). The results indicate that remarkable changes in the content and redox balance of these metabolites occur in both the embryo and endosperm; even if with different patterns for the two redox pairs. Dry seeds are devoid of the ascorbate reduced form (ASC) and contain only dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). By contrast, glutathione is present both in the reduced (GSH) and in the oxidized (GSSG) forms. During imbibition the increase in ASC seems to be mainly caused by the reactivation of its biosynthesis. On the other hand, the GSH rise occurring during the first 24 h seems to be largely due to GSSG reduction, even if GSH biosynthesis is still active in the seeds. The enzymes of the ascorbate--glutathione cycle also change during germination, but in different ways. ASC peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activities progressively rise both in the embryo and in endosperm. These changes are probably required for counteracting production of reactive oxygen species caused by recovery of oxidative metabolism. The two enzymes involved in the ascorbate recycling, ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and DHA reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), show different behaviour: the DHA reductase activity decreases, while that of AFR reductase remains unchanged. The relationship between ascorbate and glutathione metabolism and their relevance in the germination of orthodox seeds are also discussed.

  6. Expression patterns of conserved microRNAs in the male gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Christina R; Iriyama, Rie; Fernando, Danilo D

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate genes involved in various aspects of plant development, but their presence and expression patterns in the male gametophytes of gymnosperms have not yet been established. Therefore, this study identified and compared the expression patterns of conserved miRNAs from two stages of the male gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), which are the mature (ungerminated) and germinated pollen. Microarray was used to identify conserved miRNAs that varied in expression between these two stages of the loblolly pine male gametophyte. Forty-seven conserved miRNAs showed significantly different expression levels between mature and germinated loblolly pine pollen. In particular, miRNAs representing 14 and 8 families were up- and down-regulated in germinated loblolly pine pollen, respectively. qRT-PCR was used to validate their expression patterns using representative miRNAs. Target genes and proteins were identified using psRNATarget program. Predicted targets of the 22 miRNA families belong mostly to classes of genes involved in defense/stress response, metabolism, regulation, and signaling. qRT-PCR was also used to validate the expression patterns of representative target genes. This study shows that conserved miRNAs are expressed in mature and germinated loblolly pine pollen. Many of these miRNAs are differentially expressed, which indicates that the two stages of the male gametophyte examined are regulated at the miRNA level. This study also expands our knowledge of the male gametophytes of seed plants by providing insights on some similarities and differences in the types and expression patterns of conserved miRNAs between loblolly pine with those of rice and Arabidopsis.

  7. Towards male sterility in Pinus radiata--a stilbene synthase approach to genetically engineer nuclear male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfig, Kai P; Möller, Ralf; Donaldson, Lloyd; Putterill, Joanna; Walter, Christian

    2006-05-01

    A male cone-specific promoter from Pinus radiata D. Don (radiata pine) was used to express a stilbene synthase gene (STS) in anthers of transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants, resulting in complete male sterility in 70% of transformed plants. Three plants were 98%-99.9% male sterile, as evidenced by pollen germination. To identify the stage at which transgenic pollen first developed abnormally, tobacco anthers from six different developmental stages were assayed microscopically. Following the release of pollen grains from tetrads, transgenic pollen displayed an increasingly flake-like structure, which gradually rounded up during the maturation process. We further investigated whether STS expression may have resulted in an impaired flavonol or sporopollenin formation. A specific flavonol aglycone stain was used to demonstrate that significant amounts of these substances were produced only in late stages of normal pollen development, therefore excluding a diminished flavonol aglycone production as a reason for pollen ablation. A detailed analysis of the exine layer by transmission electron microscopy revealed minor structural changes in the exine layer of ablated pollen, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy indicated that the biochemistry of sporopollenin production was unaffected. The promoter-STS construct may be useful for the ablation of pollen formation in coniferous gymnosperms and male sterility may potentially be viewed as a prerequisite for the commercial use of transgenic conifers.

  8. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Differential Responses of Pinus massoniana and Taxus wallichiana var. mairei to Simulated Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Simon, Martin; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Acid rain (AR), a serious environmental issue, severely affects plant growth and development. As the gymnosperms of conifer woody plants, Pinus massoniana (AR-sensitive) and Taxus wallichiana var. mairei (AR-resistant) are widely distributed in southern China. Under AR stress, significant necrosis and collapsed lesions were found in P. massoniana needles with remarkable yellowing and wilting tips, whereas T. wallichiana var. mairei did not exhibit chlorosis and visible damage. Due to the activation of a large number of stress-related genes and the synthesis of various functional proteins to counteract AR stress, it is important to study the differences in AR-tolerance mechanisms by comparative proteomic analysis of tolerant and sensitive species. This study revealed a total of 65 and 26 differentially expressed proteins that were identified in P. massoniana and T. wallichiana var. mairei, respectively. Among them, proteins involved in metabolism, photosynthesis, signal transduction and transcription were drastically down-regulated in P. massoniana, whereas most of the proteins participating in metabolism, cell structure, photosynthesis and transcription were increased in T. wallichiana var. mairei. These results suggest the distinct patterns of protein expression in the two woody species in response to AR, allowing a deeper understanding of diversity on AR tolerance in forest tree species. PMID:24625662

  9. Phylogenetic assemblage structure of North American trees is more strongly shaped by glacial–interglacial climate variability in gymnosperms than in angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody Steven; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    to recolonization to quantify glacial-interglacial climate variability. We found: i) Current climate is the dominant factor explaining the overall patterns, with more clustered angiosperm assemblages towards lower temperature, consistent with tropical niche conservatism. ii) Long-term climate stability...... and tropical niche conservatism. However, the role of glacial-interglacial climate variability remains to be determined, and little is known about any of these relationships for gymnosperms. Moreover, phylogenetic edemism, patterns of unique lineages in restricted ranges is also related to glacial......-interglacial climate variability and needs more attention. We used a refined phylogeny of both angiosperms and gymnosperms to map phylogenetic diversity, clustering and endemism of North American trees in 100-km grid cells, and climate change velocity since Last Glacial Maximum together with postglacial accessibility...

  10. Modeling natural regeneration biomass of Pinus stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cubas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reliable biomass data are very important in the evaluation of ecosystems, and help in understanding the contribution of forests in climate change. Variables that describe the size of the tree, like diameter and height are directly associated with biomass, which allows the use of regression models to estimate this element. Therefore, this study aimed to estimate by regression models, the biomass of different compartments of natural regeneration of trees of a Pinus taeda L. stand. The data were obtained through direct destructive method, using 100 randomly selected trees in the understory of a stand of Pinus taeda. We analyzed three arithmetical models, three logarithmic and two models developed by Stepwise process. Logarithmic equations developed by Stepwise procedure showed the best estimates of total and stems biomass. However, for needles and twigs compartments the best adjust was observed with Husch model and for root biomass Berkhout model proved to be the most suitable.

  11. Comparative mapping in Pinus: sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.).Tree Genet Genomes 7:457-468

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen D. Jermstad; Andrew J. Eckert; Jill L. Wegrzyn; Annette Delfino-Mix; Dean A Davis; Deems C. Burton; David B. Neale

    2011-01-01

    The majority of genomic research in conifers has been conducted in the Pinus subgenus Pinus mostly due to the high economic importance of the species within this taxon. Genetic maps have been constructed for several of these pines and comparative mapping analyses have consistently revealed notable synteny. In contrast,...

  12. Fast evolution of the retroprocessed mitochondrial rps3 gene in Conifer II and further evidence for the phylogeny of gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jin-Hua; Gao, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2010-01-01

    The popular view that plant mitochondrial genome evolves slowly in sequence has been recently challenged by the extraordinarily high substitution rates of mtDNA documented mainly from several angiosperm genera, but high substitution rate acceleration accompanied with great length variation has been very rarely reported in plant mitochondrial genes. Here, we studied evolution of the mitochondrial rps3 gene that encodes the ribosomal small subunit protein 3 and found a dramatically high variation in both length and sequence of an exon region of it in Conifer II. A sequence comparison between cDNA and genomic DNA showed that there are no RNA editing sites in the Conifer II rps3 gene. Southern blotting analyses of the total DNA and mtDNA, together with the real-time PCR analysis, showed that rps3 exists as a single mitochondrial locus in gymnosperms. It is very likely that the Conifer II rps3 gene has experienced retroprocessing, i.e., the re-integration of its cDNA into the mitochondrial genome, followed by an evolutionary acceleration due to the intron loss. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of rps3 supports the sister relationship between conifers and Gnetales. In particular, the monophyly of conifer II is strongly supported by the shared loss of two rps3 introns. Our results also indicate that the mitochondrial gene tree would be affected in topology when the "edited" paralogs are analyzed together with their genomic sequences.

  13. Foliar fungi of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    OpenAIRE

    Millberg, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is an ecologically and economically important tree species in Fennoscandia. Scots pine needles host a variety of fungi, some with the potential to profoundly influence their host. These fungi can have beneficial or detrimental effects with important implications for both forest health and primary production. In this thesis, the foliar fungi of Scots pine needles were investigated with the aim of exploring spatial and temporal patterns, and development with needle...

  14. Functional characterization of nine Norway Spruce TPS genes and evolution of gymnosperm terpene synthases of the TPS-d subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (-)-limonene synthase, (-)-alpha/beta-pinene synthase, and (-)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-alpha-farnesene synthase, and E-alpha-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed.

  15. The flexural properties of young Pinus elliottii × Pinus caribaea var ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the bending strength and stiffness properties of young Pinus elliottii × P. caribaea var. hondurensis timber from the Southern Cape, South Africa, and to evaluate the predictability of these properties from acoustic measurements on standing trees, logs and their sawn boards.

  16. Growth and dynamic modulus of elasticity of Pinus patula × Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field establishment of South Africa's most important commercial pine species, Pinus patula, is severely hampered by the pitch canker fungus, Fusarium circinatum. Importantly, hybrids between P. patula and other pine species tolerant to the pitch canker fungus, such as P. tecunumanii and P. oocarpa, have been identified ...

  17. Rust resistance in seedling families of Pinus albicaulis and Pinus strobiformis and implications for restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. A. Sniezko; A. Kegley; R. Danchok; J. Hamlin; J. Hill; D. Conklin

    2011-01-01

    Infection and mortality levels from Cronartium ribicola, the fungus causing white pine blister rust, are very high in parts of the geographic range of Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine) and P. strobiformis (Southwestern white pine). Genetic resistance to this non-native fungus will be one of the key factors in maintaining or restoring populations of these species in...

  18. Critical water stress levels in Pinus patula seedlings and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical water stress levels in Pinus patula seedlings and their relation to measures of seedling morphology. ... Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science ... A pot trial was implemented to determine the effect of soil water stress following transplanting on shoot water potential and stomatal conductance of Pinus patula ...

  19. Effect on nursery and field performance of Pinus patula seedlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium circinatum is an important fungal pathogen of Pinus species. In South Africa, it is the most significant pathogen of Pinus patula seedlings in forestry nurseries where it presents a substantial constraint to productivity and can continue to cause mortality in-field for up to two years after establishment. This study ...

  20. Determination of processed soybean meal degradability by Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of processed soybean meal degradability by Pinus eldarica methanol extract. ... Protected soybean meal is an important part of high producing dairy cow diet and many methods are used for its safe and economic processing. Pinus eldarica contains xylose and resins and results show that these components ...

  1. An evaluation of wood properties of Pinus caribeae (Morelet) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the effects of within tree variation on wood density, ring width and anisotropic shrinkage of Pinus caribeae (Morelet) among tree partitions in Oluwa pine plantation. Five 15-year old Pinus caribeae (Morelet) in three partitions were randomly selected from the plantation and felled for the study. Wood ...

  2. Growth and provenance variation of Pinus caribaea var ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CAMCORE has visited 33 populations of Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Quintana Roo, Mexico. Seed collections have been made in 29 provenances from 1, 325 mother trees. A total of 21 provenances and sources of Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis were ...

  3. MORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON CHROMOSOMES OF TROPICAL Pinus SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lília Rosário Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Karyotypic analysis of Pinus oocarpa Schiede ex Schltdl., Pinus patula Schltdl. & Cham. and of provenances Jócon Yoro, Las Camelias and San Rafael del Norte of Pinus tecunumanii Eguiluz & J. P. Perry were accomplished to provide information for definition of Pinus tecunumanii taxonomic status. Characterization of mitotic chromosomes stained with Giemsa and with 4', 6-diamidino-2- phenylindoldihydrochlorid (DAPI fluorochrome confirmed the karyotypic pattern reported for most of the Pinus species, which present eleven pairs of metacentric chromosomes, very similar in regard to length and morphology, and a submetacentric pair for all the taxa studied. Sharp definition of secondary constrictionsrevealed by DAPI staining allowed distinction of species and provenances by the number and position of this cytological marker. Pinus tecunumanii was also different from the other two species in regard to total length of haploid set. The results support the species status for Pinus tecunumanii as well as present evidence that in addition to point mutations, structural alterations contributed toward intra and interspecies differentiation into the genus Pinus.

  4. Development and validation of stem volume models for Pinus kesiya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem volume equations (overbark) were developed, using established volume equation forms, and validated using a subset of the data collected for Pinus kesiya in Benguet province, Philippines. A total of 481 trees from Pinus kesiya stands in Benguet were measured through non-destructive sampling. The data set was ...

  5. Morphological evaluation of the Pinus kesiya complex (Pinaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Businský, R.; Frantík, Tomáš; Vít, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 300, č. 2 (2014), s. 273-285 ISSN 0378-2697 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : morphological var iation * Pinus densata ssp. tibetica * Pinus kesiya complex Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.422, year: 2014

  6. Germination and early seedling growth of Pinus densata Mast. provenances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulan Xu; Nianhui Cai; Bin He; Ruili Zhang; Wei Zhao; Jianfeng Mao; Anan Duan; Yue Li; Keith Woeste

    2016-01-01

    We studied seed germination and early seedling growth of Pinus densata to explore the range of variability within the species and to inform afforestation practices. Phenotypes were evaluated at a forest tree nursery under conditions that support Pinus yunnanensis, one of the presumed parental species of P. densata...

  7. Trees and Weathering: Using Soil Petrographic and Chemical Analyses to Compare the Relative Weathering Effects of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M. Y.; Ague, J. J.; Berner, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Knowledge of the long-term carbon cycle and its control on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the Phanerozoic is crucial to understanding the impending dynamics of contemporary anthropogenic carbon contributions to the atmosphere. One aspect of the long-term carbon cycle that is poorly understood is the role of large vascular plants (trees) in contributing to the chemical weathering of silicate minerals. In particular, little is known about the differences in weathering rates between gymnosperms and angiosperms and how these dissimilarities may have impacted the carbon cycle subsequent to the evolution of angiosperm trees in the Mesozoic. One approach to evaluating these potential differences in weathering is to examine and quantitatively compare the chemistry and petrology of the soil mineral constituents from beneath modern groves of each broad tree type, where the groves have been subject to nearly identical environmental and geological conditions. This particular study focuses on field samples collected along transects through adjacent groves of angiosperms and gymnosperms in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State. Preliminary data demonstrate a significant difference in the soil texture and composition beneath the two types of trees. While soil at each field site has been generated from a homogeneous parent material, and subjected to similar inorganic environmental phenomena, soil density, particle size, and organic content vary across the transects. Soils beneath the angiosperms are denser and have a more clay-like texture, while soils beneath the gymnosperms are more organic-rich and have a sandy texture. Additional macroscopic and microscopic differences in the chemistry and petrology of these soils will illuminate the varied impacts these trees have on the silicate minerals in their immediate environment, and therefore lend insight into the potential impact these groups of organisms have had on the long-term carbon cycle over the past five hundred

  8. FTIR-derived characteristics of fossil-gymnosperm leaf remains of Cordaites principalis and Cordaites borassifolius (Pennsylvanian, Maritimes Canada and Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zodrow, E.L.; Mastalerz, Maria; Simunek, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Cordaites principalis and Cordaites borassifolius, gymnosperm trees of the Carboniferous, are distinguished based on compression and cuticular morphology. A new distinction between them is suggested on the basis of differences in functional groups. Cuticular and compression spectra of C. borassifolius have lower CH2/CH3 ratios, suggesting more branched aliphatic chains in comparison with cuticles and compressions of C. principalis. Other differences are observed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique, but they vary from sample to sample of the two species to suggest other than chemotaxonomic-based sources of variations. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of planting depth on growth of open-rooted Pinus elliottii and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of planting depth on growth of open-rooted Pinus elliottii and Pinus taeda seedlings in the United States: review paper. ... P. taeda showed no adverse effects on growth when planting seedlings up to 15 cm deep. ... Key words: Pinus elliottii, Pinus taeda, Survival, Seedling quality, Planting quality, Reforestation ...

  10. POTENSI ALELOPAT DAUN PINUS (Pinus spp. SEBAGAI BIOHERBISIDA PRA TUMBUH PADA GULMA KROKOT (Portulaca oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfy Ditya Cahyanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to study the effectof pine leaf as allelophaty on purslane germination. Theexperiment were conducted at screen house Departmentof Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Science, BrawijayaUniversity. The research is experimental design by nonfactorial Completely Randomized Blok Design, with threereplications, consisted of eleven levels. Purslane seeds sprout with control treatment, signifi cantly different from seedssprout ability in treatment solution leaves Pinus merkusii 2000ppm, and solution leaves of P. longaeva 2000 ppm. The resultshowed that 2000 ppm of P. merkusii extraction signifi cantlysuppressed 46% of purslane germination whereas 2000 ppmPinus longeava extraction signifi cantly suppressed of 41%campared to without any treatments (control.

  11. Genetic Analysis of Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus sylvestris forma turfosa L. Using RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beáta ÁBRAHÁM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the level of genetic diversity within and among Ciuc basin, Romania (populations from Mohos and Luci raised bogs in Harghita Mountain and Sumuleu in Ciuc Mountain Pinus sylvestris populations using molecular markers. Two of populations (Mohos and Luci seems to be the descendants that survived the continental glaciation. Genetic diversity was analyzed by RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA. Nine primers were selected for analysis, which generated reproducible bands. On base of presence or absence of homologues bands Nei’s gene diversity, the percentage of polymorphic loci and Nei’s unbiased genetic distance were calculated. The level of genetic variation among populations was found to be low. For both populations the variation values among populations were higher than within populations. The fossil records and geological historical data explain the extremely low genetic diversity of this species. Pinus sylvestris experienced strong bottlenecks during its evolutionary history, which caused the loss of genetic variation. Genetic drift and breeding in post-bottlenecked small populations may be the major forces that contribute to low genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations. Human activities may have accelerated the loss of genetic diversity in Pinus sylvestris.

  12. Responses to recent climate warming of Pinus sylvestris and Pinus cembra within their montane transition zone in the Swiss Alps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haettenschwiler, S.; Koerner, C. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Botanisches Inst.

    1995-06-01

    Altitudinal and latitudinal distribution limits of trees are mainly controlled by temperature. Therefore climate warming is expected to induce upslope or poleward migrations. In the Swiss Central Alps, summers in the period 1982-1991 were on average 0.8 deg C warmer than those of the period 30 yr before. We investigated whether populations of conifers at the montane Pinus sylvestris-Pinus cembra ecocline exhibit demographic trends in response to that warming. We found no evidence for this. Young seedlings of Pinus sylvestris, the species which is expected to expand its range upward in a warmer climate, were virtually absent from all sites, whereas large fractions of Pinus cembra populations were observed in the seedlings and juvenile categories even below the present lower distribution limit of adult trees. This suggests that there are no major altitudinal shifts in response to the recent sequence of warmer summers. Germination and seedling survival trials with Pinus sylvestris suggest that temperature per se would not exclude this species even from establishing at the current treeline in the Swiss Central Alps. Similar results were found at the polar treeline. Phytotron tests of seedling survival showed much less drought resistance in Pinus sylvestris than in Pinus cembra which is in contrast to their phytogeographic distributions. Thus, the montane pine ecocline in the Swiss Central Alps seems to be stabilized by species interactions and may not be directly responsive to moderate climatic change, which needs to be taken into account in predictive attempts. 56 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  13. Characterization of MADS genes in the gymnosperm Gnetum parvifolium and its implication on the evolution of reproductive organs in seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, S; Ito, M; Ueda, K; Kato, M; Hasebe, M

    1999-01-01

    Gnetales, one of the extant gymnosperm orders, has traditionally been recognized to be most closely related to flowering plants, because the reproductive organ of Gnetales has some morphological characteristics similar to flowering plants. Most recent molecular phylogenetic studies do not support the sister relationship of the Gnetales and flowering plants, but instead support a close relationship between Gnetales and other extant gymnosperms. The MADS genes are transcription factors, some of which are involved in reproductive organ development in flowering plants. To resolve the discrepancy in phylogenetic inferences, and to provide insights into the evolution of reproductive organs in seed plants, four MADS genes (GpMADS1-4) were cloned from Gnetum parvifolium. GpMADS2 is likely to be a pseudogene and the other three genes were characterized. A MADS gene tree based on partial amino acid sequences showed that GpMADS3 is included in the AGL6 group, but the other two genes do not cluster with any previously reported MADS gene. The three GpMADS genes were expressed during the early stage of ovule development in the differentiating nucellus and three envelopes. A comparison of MADS gene expression among conifers, Gnetum, and flowering plants suggests that the comparable reproductive organs in Gnetum and flowering plants evolved in parallel, and is likely to support the homology between the ovule-ovuliferous scale complex of conifers and the Gnetum ovules, including the three envelopes.

  14. Fire effects in Pinus uncinata Ram plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Cardil Forradellas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Understanding fire ecology of main forest species is essential for a sound, scientifically based on managing of wildlands and also to assess likely implications due to changes in fire regime under a global change scenario. Few references can be found about fire ecology of Pinus uncinata Ram. (PU. PU species grows in the Central Pyrenees where large, severe wildland fires did not occur frequently in the past. However, several fires with extreme fire behavior have affected PU stands in last years and they might disturb other PU forest in the future.Area of study: Cabdella fire (February 2012, in Lleida province, is one of the several wildland fires occurred in 2012 (winter season in the Central Pyrenees. Fire affected a large PU plantation (102 ha located at 1.800-2,100 meters above the sea.Material and methods: We have analyzed first order fire effects in three fireline intensity thresholds along three years in terms of mortality ratio, scorched height, percentage of scorched crown volume and bark char height.Main results: PU seems to be a very tolerant species to low and medium fire line intensity but fire effects were very significant when fire line intensity was high. In medium fireline intensity sites, probability of mortality ranged from 15 to 30% and the dead trees had the highest values on scorched height and percentage of scorched crown volume.Research highlights: Results from this work supports that prescribed burning might be used to efficiently decrease fuel load and fuel vertical continuity while avoiding considerable PU mortality. It also displayed that when fuel management has been implemented, PU mortality might be limited even under extreme fire behavior.Abbreviations used: PU: Pinus uncinata Ram.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis highlights epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during zygotic embryo development of Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vega-Bartol, José J; Simões, Marta; Lorenz, W Walter; Rodrigues, Andreia S; Alba, Rob; Dean, Jeffrey F D; Miguel, Célia M

    2013-08-30

    It is during embryogenesis that the plant body plan is established and the meristems responsible for all post-embryonic growth are specified. The molecular mechanisms governing conifer embryogenesis are still largely unknown. Their elucidation may contribute valuable information to clarify if the distinct features of embryo development in angiosperms and gymnosperms result from differential gene regulation. To address this issue, we have performed the first transcriptomic analysis of zygotic embryo development in a conifer species (Pinus pinaster) focusing our study in particular on regulatory genes playing important roles during plant embryo development, namely epigenetic regulators and transcription factors. Microarray analysis of P. pinaster zygotic embryogenesis was performed at five periods of embryo development from early developing to mature embryos. Our results show that most changes in transcript levels occurred in the first and the last embryo stage-to-stage transitions, namely early to pre-cotyledonary embryo and cotyledonary to mature embryo. An analysis of functional categories for genes that were differentially expressed through embryogenesis highlighted several epigenetic regulation mechanisms. While putative orthologs of transcripts associated with mechanisms that target transposable elements and repetitive sequences were strongly expressed in early embryogenesis, PRC2-mediated repression of genes seemed more relevant during late embryogenesis. On the other hand, functions related to sRNA pathways appeared differentially regulated across all stages of embryo development with a prevalence of miRNA functions in mid to late embryogenesis. Identification of putative transcription factor genes differentially regulated between consecutive embryo stages was strongly suggestive of the relevance of auxin responses and regulation of auxin carriers during early embryogenesis. Such responses could be involved in establishing embryo patterning. Later in

  16. cDNA isolation, functional expression, and characterization of (+)-alpha-pinene synthase and (-)-alpha-pinene synthase from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda): stereocontrol in pinene biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael A; Wildung, Mark R; Williams, David C; Hyatt, David C; Croteau, Rodney

    2003-03-15

    The complex mixture of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes that comprises oleoresin provides the primary defense of conifers against bark beetles and their associated fungal pathogens. Monoterpene synthases produce the turpentine fraction of oleoresin, which allows mobilization of the diterpene resin acid component (rosin) and is also toxic toward invading insects; this is particularly the case for alpha-pinene, a prominent bicyclic monoterpene of pine turpentine. The stereochemistry of alpha-pinene is a critical determinant of host defense capability and has implications for host selection, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and tritrophic-level interactions. Pines produce both enantiomers of alpha-pinene, which appear to arise through antipodal reaction mechanisms by distinct enzymes. Using a cDNA library constructed with mRNA from flushing needles of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), we employed a homology-based cloning strategy to isolate, and confirm by functional expression, the genes encoding (+)-(3R:5R)-alpha-pinene synthase, (-)-(3S:5S)-alpha-pinene synthase, and several other terpene synthases. The pinene synthases, which produce mirror-image products, share only 66% amino acid identity (72% similarity) but are similar in general properties to other monoterpene synthases of gymnosperms. The stereochemical control of monoterpene cyclization reactions, the evolution of "antipodal" enzymes, and the implications of turpentine composition in ecological interactions are discussed.

  17. Increase in leaf temperature opens stomata and decouples net photosynthesis from stomatal conductance in Pinus taeda and Populus deltoides x nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Josef; Ingwers, Miles W; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O

    2017-03-01

    The effect of temperature on stomatal conductance (gs) and corresponding gas exchange parameters was studied in two tree species with contrasting leaf anatomy and ecophysiology-a broadleaf angiosperm, Populus deltoides x nigra (poplar), and a needle-leaf gymnosperm, Pinus taeda (loblolly pine). Experiments were conducted in growth chambers across a leaf temperature range of 19-48°C. Manipulations of temperature were done in well-watered and drought soil conditions and under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (800 ppm) air CO2 concentrations. Increases in leaf temperature caused stomatal opening at both ambient and elevated [CO2]. The gs increased by 42% in poplar and by 40% in loblolly pine when leaf temperature increased from 30°C to 40°C at a vapour pressure difference of 1 kPa. Stomatal limitation to photosynthesis decreased in elevated temperature in loblolly pine but not in poplar. The ratio of net photosynthesis to gs depended on leaf temperature, especially at high temperatures. Evaporative cooling of transpiring leaves resulted in reductions in leaf temperature up to 9°C in well-watered poplar but only 1°C in drought-stressed poplar and in loblolly pine. As global mean temperatures rise and temperature extremes become more frequent and severe, understanding the effect of temperature on gs, and modelling that relationship, will become increasingly important. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Conserved genetic regions across angiosperms as tools to develop single-copy nuclear markers in gymnosperms: an example using cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E; Meerow, Alan W; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M Patrick; Stevenson, Dennis W; Nakamura, Kyoko

    2014-07-01

    Several individuals of the Caribbean Zamia clade and other cycad genera were used to identify single-copy nuclear genes for phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies in Cycadales. Two strategies were employed to select target loci: (i) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis conserved ortholog sequence (COS) set and (ii) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis-Populus-Vitis-Oryza Shared Single-Copy genes (APVO SSC) against the EST Zamia databases in GenBank. From the first strategy, 30 loci were selected, and from the second, 16 loci. In both cases, the matching GenBank accessions of Zamia were used as a query for retrieving highly similar sequences from Cycas, Picea, Pinus species or Ginkgo biloba. After retrieving and aligning all the sequences in each locus, intron predictions were completed to assist in primer design. PCR was carried out in three rounds to detect paralogous loci. A total of 29 loci were successfully amplified as a single band of which 20 were likely single-copy loci. These loci showed different diversity and divergence levels. A preliminary screening allowed us to select 8 promising loci (40S, ATG2, BG, GroES, GTP, LiSH, PEX4 and TR) for the Zamia pumila complex and 4 loci (COS26, GroES, GTP and HTS) for all other cycad genera. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  19. Land plants drive photorespiration as higher electron-sink: comparative study of post-illumination transient O2 -uptake rates from liverworts to angiosperms through ferns and gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanawa, Hitomi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nohira, Kana; Takagi, Daisuke; Shimakawa, Ginga; Sejima, Takehiro; Shaku, Keiichiro; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2017-09-01

    In higher plants, the electron-sink capacity of photorespiration contributes to alleviation of photoinhibition by dissipating excess energy under conditions when photosynthesis is limited. We addressed the question at which point in the evolution of photosynthetic organisms photorespiration began to function as electron sink and replaced the flavodiiron proteins which catalyze the reduction of O 2 at photosystem I in cyanobacteria. Algae do not have a higher activity of photorespiration when CO 2 assimilation is limited, and it can therefore not act as an electron sink. Using land plants (liverworts, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms) we compared photorespiration activity and estimated the electron flux driven by photorespiration to evaluate its electron-sink capacity at CO 2 -compensation point. In vivo photorespiration activity was estimated by the simultaneous measurement of O 2 -exchange rate and chlorophyll fluorescence yield. All C3-plants leaves showed transient O 2 -uptake after actinic light illumination (post-illumination transient O 2 -uptake), which reflects photorespiration activity. Post-illumination transient O 2 -uptake rates increased in the order from liverworts to angiosperms through ferns and gymnosperms. Furthermore, photorespiration-dependent electron flux in photosynthetic linear electron flow was estimated from post-illumination transient O 2 -uptake rate and compared with the electron flux in photosynthetic linear electron flow in order to evaluate the electron-sink capacity of photorespiration. The electron-sink capacity at the CO 2 -compensation point also increased in the above order. In gymnosperms photorespiration was determined to be the main electron-sink. C3-C4 intermediate species of Flaveria plants showed photorespiration activity, which intermediate between that of C3- and C4-flaveria species. These results indicate that in the first land plants, liverworts, photorespiration started to function as electron sink. According to

  20. Pinus Monophylla (Single Needled Pinyon Pine) show morphological changes in needle cell size and stomata over the past 100 years of rising CO2 in Western Arid Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Water, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    The size, frequency, and morphology of leaf surface stomata is used to reconstruct past levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide over geologic time. This technique relies on measuring cell and cell-clusters to correlate with changes of known carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, not all plants are suitable because the occurrence and placement of stomatal cell-complexes differ significantly between plant families. Monocot and dicot angiosperms exhibit different types of stomata and stomatal complexes that lack order and thus are unsuitable. But, in gymnosperms, the number and distribution of stomata and pavement cells is formalized and can be used to reconstruct past atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. However, characteristic of each plant species must still be considered. For example, conifers are useful but are divided into two-needle to five-needle pines, or have irregular surface morphology (Pseudotsuga sp. and Tsuga sp. needles). This study uses Pinus monophylla an undivided needle morphology, that being a cylinder has no interior surface cells. Pinus monophylla (single needle pinyon) needles were collected along Geiger Grade (Nevada State Highway 341, Reno) in 2005 and 2013 from 1500m to 2195m. Herbarium samples were also collected from 13 historic collections made between 1911 and 1994. The study determined changes with elevation and/or over time using in these populations. Using Pinus monophylla, insured needles represented a single surface with stomata, stomatal complex cells, and co-occurring pavement cell types. Results show decreased stomatal densities (stomata/area), stomatal index (stomata/stomata + epidermal cells) and stable stomata per row (stomata/row) . Epidermal cell density (Epidermal Cells /Area), and Pavement cell density (Pavement cell/area) track stomatal density similarly. Data comparison, using elevation in the 2005 and 2013 collections showed no-significant trends. Individual stomatal complexes show no differences in the size

  1. by Pinus virginiana in Mine Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenise M. Bauman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of planting sites on the establishment and ectomycorrhizal (ECM colonization of American chestnut (Castanea denetata (Marsh. Borkh. on an abandoned coal mine in an Appalachian region of the United States. Root morphotyping and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS region were used to identify the ECM species associated with the chestnut seedlings. Germination, survival, ECM root colonization, and growth were assessed in three habitats: forest edge, center (plots without vegetation, and pine plots (a 10-year-old planting of Pinus virginiana. Seedlings in pine plots had higher survival (38% than the other plot types (center 9% and forest edge 5%; P=0.007. Chestnuts found colonized by ECM within the pine plots were larger (P=0.02, contributed by a larger root system (P=0.03. Forest edge and pine plots had more ECM roots than seedlings in center plots (P=0.04. ITS fungal sequences and morphotypes found among chestnut and pine matched Scleroderma, Thelephora, and Pisolithus suggesting these two plant species shared ECM symbionts. Results indicated that the presence of P. virginiana had a greater facilitative effect on growth and survival of chestnut seedlings.

  2. Gravitational stress on germinating Pinus pinea seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaldi, Francesco; Giachetti, Eugenio; Guerin, Elizabeth; Bacci, Stefano; Paoletti, Elena; Boddi, Vieri; Vanni, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    In the germination of lipid-rich seeds, the glyoxylate cycle plays a control role in that, bypassing the two decarboxylative steps of the Krebs cycle; it allows the net synthesis of carbohydrates from lipids. The activity of isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, is an indicator of the state of seed germination: stage of germination, growth of embryo, activation and progress of protein synthesis, depletion of lipidic supplies. In order to investigate the effects of gravity on seed germination, we carried out a study on the time pattern of germination of Pinus pinea seeds that were subjected to a hypergravitational stress (1000 g for 64 h at 4 degrees C), either in a dry or in a wet environment, before to be placed in germination plates. During the whole time of germination, we monitored the state of embryo growth and the most representative enzymes of the main metabolic pathways. In treated wet seeds, we observed an average germination of only 20% with a slowdown of the enzyme activities assayed and a noticeable degradation of lipidic reserves with respect to the controls. These differences in germination are not found for dry seeds.

  3. Dendrochronology of bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1953 the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has conducted dendrochronological studies of bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) in the White Mountains of California. This research resulted in the establishment of a continuous tree-ring sequence of 8253 yr. The millennia-old pines have emerged as a unique source of chronological data and the precisely dated wood is essential to certain paleoenvironmental and geophysical investigations. Over 1000 dendrochronologically dated decade samples of bristlecone pine supplied to three C-14 laboratories have been used to calibrate the radiocarbon time scale for the past seven millennia, a development of far reaching consequences in the fields of archaeology and geology. In addition, recent advances in other methods of analyzing past climatic variability - techniques involving stable isotope ratios, amino acid racemization, remanent magnetism, and trace element abundances - have greatly increased the demand for the wood of known age and, hence, for chronology development. Spanning the past 7500 yr, 1138 prepared decade samples, with a total weight of nearly 16 kg are available for study.

  4. Pinus cembra distribution in the Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Blada

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A map with the distribution of the Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L. in Romania was never made. However, long time ago, some poor or confused data collected from the Romanian Carpathians were inserted in a compiled at European level map; but this map do not reflects the species real geographic distribution in the Romanian Carpathians. Consequently, a initiative to build up a not to far from realitymap was made. A comprehensive literature and field survey concerning Swiss stone pine natural distribution in Romania was made. Two other sources of information were used, such as: the senior author's direct field survey to localize the species populations and information obtained from people involved in this issue. Based on the acquired data, the species digital distribution map of the Romanian Carpathians, was in premiere made. Because the distribution boundary of the species encompasses a large area, it does not mean that all hachured mountains and valley on the map are fully occupied by species.

  5. Pinus cembra distribution in the Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Blada

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A map with the distribution of the Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L. in Romania was never made. However, long time ago, some poor or confused data collected from the Romanian Carpathians were inserted in a compiled at European level map; but this map do not reflects the species real geographic distribution in the Romanian Carpathians. Consequently, a initiative to build up a not to far from reality map was made. A comprehensive literature and field survey concerning Swiss stone pine natural distribution in Romania was made. Two other sources of information were used, such as: the senior author's direct field survey to localize the species populations and information obtained from people involved in this issue. Based on the acquired data, the species digital distribution map of the Romanian Carpathians, was in premiere made. Because the distribution boundary of the species encompasses a large area, it does not mean that all hachured mountains and valley on the map are fully occupied by species.

  6. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  7. PENYAKIT HAWAR DAUN PINUS MERKUSII DI BERBAGAI PERSEMAIAN KAWASAN UTAMA HUTAN PINUS JAWA TIMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutarman .

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf blight disease of Pinus merkusii in various nurseries of pine forest in major area of East Java. This study aims to: (i obtain isolates of pathogens, (ii determine disease on seedling growth during the critical period and the young plants, (iii determine the effect of pathogenic isolates on disease severity, and (iv determine the effect of altitude on severity of seedling’s leaf blight disease of Pinus merkusii from various nursery locations in East Java. The experiment was conducted in February-August 2014 at nine locations in the nursery and one young pine plantation site. Disease index data were analyzed using Microsoft Office Excel 2007 software to determine the regression model of the relationship between the index of disease with the independent variables and with Anova followed by Duncan test to find out the effect of altitude difference to the index of disease. Pathogen that causes late blight is Pestalotia theae Sawada. In the critical period, seedling disease index increased from 7.38 to an average of 26.96 in the nursery RPH Celaket; while on the young plants in the field in RPH Kemiri disease index ranged 28-31. Differences in altitude did not affect disease index difference. Based on disease index, three isolates of pathogens that require serious attention are Wagir isolates (985 m asl., the most virulent, Ngantang (500 m asl., and South Pujon (1200 m asl..

  8. Differential impacts of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis, on Pinus palustris and Pinus taeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, N.A.; Whited, B.M.; Slone, D.H.; Martinson, S.J.; Ayres, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of host use by herbivore pests can have serious consequences for natural and managed ecosystems but are often poorly understood. Here, we provide the first quantification of large differential impacts of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, on loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., and longleaf pine, Pinus palustris P. Mill., and evaluate putative mechanisms for the disparity. Spatially extensive survey data from recent epidemics indicate that, per square kilometre, stands of loblolly versus longleaf pine in four forests (380-1273 km2) sustained 3-18 times more local infestations and 3-116 times more tree mortality. Differences were not attributable to size or age structure of pine stands. Using pheromone-baited traps, we found no differences in the abundance of dispersing D. frontalis or its predator Thanasimus dubius Fabricius between loblolly and longleaf stands. Trapping triggered numerous attacks on trees, but the pine species did not differ in the probability of attack initiation or in the surface area of bark attacked by growing aggregations. We found no evidence for postaggregation mechanisms of discrimination or differential success on the two hosts, suggesting that early colonizers discriminate between host species before a pheromone plume is present. ?? 2007 NRC.

  9. Fusariose em Mudas de Pinus taeda Fusarium disease on Pinus taeda seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Grigoletti Júnior

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Viveiros comerciais têm apresentado mudas de Pinus taeda com sintomas de murcha e seca de ponteiros e morte, na Região Sul do Brasil. Isolamento em meio BDA e câmara úmida, teste de patogenicidade e microcultivo foram feitos para identificar o patógeno. Uma espécie de Fusarium foi isolada, cuja identificação encontra-se em andamento. Verificou-sepelos postulados de Koch que Fusarium sp. foi o agente causal dessa doença.
    Nurseries has presented Pinus taeda seedling with symptoms of wilt, tip blight and death, in Southern Region of Brazil. Isolation on PDA medium, moist chamber, pathogenicity test and microculture were made to identify the pathogen. A species of Fusarium was isolated, which is under identification. It was verified by Koch postulates that Fusarium sp. was the causal agent of this disease.

  10. Fire effects in Pinus uncinata Ram plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardil Forradellas, A.; Molina Terrén, D.M.; Oliveres, J.; Castellnou, M.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: Understanding fire ecology of main forest species is essential for a sound, scientifically based on managing of wildlands and also to assess likely implications due to changes in fire regime under a global change scenario. Few references can be found about fire ecology of Pinus uncinata Ram. (PU). PU species grows in the Central Pyrenees where large, severe wildland fires did not occur frequently in the past. However, several fires with extreme fire behavior have affected PU stands in last years and they might disturb other PU forest in the future. Area of study: Cabdella fire (February 2012), in Lleida province, is one of the several wildland fires occurred in 2012 (winter season) in the Central Pyrenees. Fire affected a large PU plantation (102 ha) located at 1.800-2,100 meters above the sea. Material and methods: We have analyzed first order fire effects in three fireline intensity thresholds along three years in terms of mortality ratio, scorched height, percentage of scorched crown volume and bark char height. Main results: PU seems to be a very tolerant species to low and medium fire line intensity but fire effects were very significant when fire line intensity was high. In medium fireline intensity sites, probability of mortality ranged from 15 to 30% and the dead trees had the highest values on scorched height and percentage of scorched crown volume. Research highlights: Results from this work supports that prescribed burning might be used to efficiently decrease fuel load and fuel vertical continuity while avoiding considerable PU mortality. It also displayed that when fuel management has been implemented, PU mortality might be limited even under extreme fire behavior. (Author)

  11. Reference karyotype and cytomolecular map for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Nurul Islam-faridi; C. Dana Nelson; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    2007-01-01

    A reference karyotype is presented for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L., subgenus Pinus , section Pinus, subsection Australes), based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using 18s-28s rDNA, 5s rDNA, and Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence (A-type TRS). Well...

  12. PRODUÇÃO DE CHAPAS DE MADEIRA COMPENSADA DE CINCO ESPÉCIES DE PINUS TROPICAIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o potencial de utilização de 5 espécies de pinus tropicais para produção de painéis compensados. As espécies estudadas foram: Pinus caribaea, Pinus chiapensis, Pinus maximinoi, Pinus oocarpa, Pinus tecunumannii e Pinus taeda, sendo esta última espécie como testemunha. Foram produzidos compensados de 5 lâminas com resinas uréia-formaldeído e fenol-formaldeído. Os resultados de inchamento e recuperação em espessura foram estatisticamente iguais entre as espécies estudadas, com exceção para inchamento em espessura das chapas coladas com resina fenol-formaldeído. As chapas de Pinus maximinoi e Pinus oocarpa, apresentaram melhores resultados de módulos de elasticidade. Para o módulo de ruptura, as chapas de Pinus maxininoi, Pinus oocarpa e Pinus taeda, coladas com resina fenol-formaldeído, apresentaram valores estatisticamente superiores em relação às demais espécies. Quanto a resistência da linha de cola, as chapas de Pinus maximinoi, Pinus taeda e Pinus chiapensis, foram as que apresentaram melhor desempenho. Com base nos resultados gerais da pesquisa, pode-se destacar a potencialidade da madeira de Pinus maximinoi e Pinus oocarpa para produção de chapas de madeira compensada.

  13. Mejoramiento genético de Pinus caribaea

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Wilfredo H.

    1987-01-01

    El pino del Caribe (Pinus caribaea) fue elegido para esta propuesta de mejoramiento por ser una especie tro pical de crecim iento rápido que produce una madera apta para aserrado y debobinado como también utilizable para la industria celulósica papelera. En regiones tropicales del mundo y también en el país, ha obtenido un crecimiento que puede duplicar el de otras especies de pinos explotadas comercialmente. En sitios cálidos puece reemplazar con ventaja a Pinus e llio ttii y P. ta...

  14. Nutrient use and uptake in Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Timothy J; Allen, H Lee; Fox, Thomas R

    2008-07-01

    We quantified nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) content, use (nutrient amount for one growth year), retranslocation (nutrients recycled before foliage senescence), uptake (use minus retranslocation), volume production per unit of uptake and fertilizer-uptake efficiency (percent applied taken up) in a 2 x 2 (nutrient and water) factorial experiment replicated four times in an 8-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stand growing on a nutrient-poor sandy soil in Scotland County, North Carolina, USA. Over 14 years, we applied 1140, 168, 393, 168 and 146 kg ha(-1) of elemental N, P, K, Ca and Mg fertilizer, respectively, and an average of 710 mm year(-1) of irrigation. All plots received complete vegetation control. Fertilization about doubled tissue N, P, K and Mg contents at age 21, whereas irrigation resulted in smaller increases in nutrient contents. Maximum annual uptake was 101, 9.3, 44, 37 and 13 kg ha(-1) year(-1) and volume production per unit of nutrient uptake was 0.35, 3.5, 0.66, 1.1 and 3.1 m(3) kg(-1), for N, P, K, Ca and Mg, respectively. Irrigated plots had greater volume production per unit of N, P, K and Mg uptake than control plots, likely because irrigation allowed photosynthesis to continue during dry periods. Fertilized plus irrigated plots had less volume production per unit of these elements than the fertilized plots either because nutrient uptake exceeded the requirement for optimum growth or because available water (rainfall plus irrigation) was insufficient for the leaf area achieved with fertilization. At age 19, fertilizer-uptake efficiencies for N, P, K, Ca and Mg were 53, 24, 62, 57 and 39%, respectively, and increased with irrigation to 68, 36, 78, 116 and 55%, respectively. The scale of fertilizer uptake was likely a result of low native site nutrient availability, study longevity, measurement of all tissue components on site, a comprehensive assessment of coarse roots, and the 3-m rooting

  15. Estudio de potenciales alelopáticos originados por Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Pinus pinaster Ait. y Pinus radiata D.

    OpenAIRE

    Ballester, A.; Arias, A. M.; Cobián, B.; López Calvo, E.; Vieitez, E.

    2011-01-01

    Se ha estudiado el potencial alelopático de Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Pinus pinaster Ait. y Pinus radiata D. sobre el crecimiento y la germinación de diferentes especies herbáceas. Extractos acuosos de hojas y acículas recogidas en los meses de enero y abril inhiben fundamentalmente la germinación de las semillas de festuca, siendo la acción más importante en el mes de abril que en el de enero. El contacto directo entre hojas y acículas y las semillas a ensayar produce una inhibición muy f...

  16. Produção de chapas de madeira compensada de cinco espécies de pinus tropicais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was developed aiming at evaluating the feasibility of the use of 5 species of tropical pine to plywood manufacture. The following species were studied: Pinus caribaea, Pinus chiapensis, Pinus maximinoi, Pinus oocarpa, Pinus tecunumannii and Pinus taeda, being the last used as the referential species. Plywood were manufactured with 5 plies, bonded with ureaformaldheyde and fenol-formaldheyde resin. The results of thickness sweeling and recovering were the same for all species studied, with exception to thickness sweeling for the boards glued with fenolformaldheyde resin. The boards made from Pinus maximinoi and Pinus oocarpa, showed the higher values in modulus of elasticity. The boards of Pinus maximinoi, Pinus oocarpa and Pinus taeda, glued with fenol-formaldheyde resin, resulted in higher values of the modulus of rupture, in comparison to other species. For the glue line strength, the boards of Pinus maximinoi, Pinus taeda and Pinus chiapensis, showed the better results. Based on the general results of this research it, could be said that the Pinus maximinoi and Pinus oocarpa present the high potentiality to plywood manufacture.

  17. In vitro regeneration of Pinus brutia Ten. var. eldarica (Medw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes two in vitro regeneration systems through direct and indirect organogenesis in Pinus brutia using fascicles aseptic cultures as explants. Mechanical scarification and gibberellic acid (GA3) were evaluated on in vitro seed germination. Scarification was the treatment that allowed for in vitro seed ...

  18. Growth process and diameter structure of Pinus tabulaeformis forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Using stem analysis method, the biomass, growing process and diameter structure of 21-year shady and sunny slope Pinus tabulaeformis forest were investigated in hilly loess-gully region. Results showed that there were distinct difference in the indexes, tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH).

  19. Bishop pine (Pinus muricata) of inland Marin County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance I. Millar

    1986-01-01

    The locations and characteristics of five, small, previously undescribed stands of bishop pine (Pinus muricata) in central Marin Co., California, are reported. Three stands lie on dry sites in the Kent Lake Drainage north of Mt. Tamalpais: San Geronimo Ridge, a spur ridge above Little Carson Cr., and Oat Hill. These stands are anomalous in occurring...

  20. Relative size and stand age determine Pinus banksiana mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han Y. H. Chen; Songling Fu; Robert A. Monserud; Ian C. Gillies

    2008-01-01

    Tree mortality is a poorly understood process in the boreal forest. Whereas large disturbances reset succession by killing all or most trees, background tree mortality was hypothesized to be affected by competition, ageing, and stand composition. We tested these hypotheses on jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) mortality using data from long-term...

  1. Growth process and diameter structure of Pinus tabulaeformis forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using stem analysis method, the biomass, growing process and diameter structure of 21-year shady and sunny slope Pinus tabulaeformis forest were investigated in hilly loess-gully region. Results showed that there were distinct difference in the indexes, tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH) and timber volume ...

  2. Genomic DNA extraction from sapwood of Pinus roxburghii for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method for extraction of genomic DNA from sapwood tissues of mature tall trees of Pinus roxburghii, where collection of needle tissues is extremely difficult has been standardized. The extracted DNA was comparable to that obtained from the needle tissue in terms of yield and purity. The yield of extracted DNA ranged ...

  3. Antifungal metabolites from fungal endophytes of Pinus strobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumarah, Mark W; Kesting, Julie R; Sørensen, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The extracts of five foliar fungal endophytes isolated from Pinus strobus (eastern white pine) that showed antifungal activity in disc diffusion assays were selected for further study. From these strains, the aliphatic polyketide compound 1 and three related sesquiterpenes 2-4 were isolated and c...

  4. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Online resources. Evaluation of genetic diversity of Portuguese Pinus sylvestris L. populations based on molecular data and inferences about the future use of this germplasm. J. Cipriano A. Carvalho C. Fernandes M. J. Gaspar J. Pires J. Bento L. Roxo J. Louzada J. Lima- ...

  5. Diversity and identification of fungi associated with needles of Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity and identification of fungi associated with needles of Pinus radiata in Tasmania. ... Previous studies of P. radiata have been based on fungal isolation and not direct PCR detection from needles. This research was a component ... Keywords: endophyte, environmental PCR, fungal isolation, MOTU, needle fungi, OTU ...

  6. Missing and dark rings associated with drought in Pinus halepensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemen Novak; Martin De Luis; Jozica Gricar; Peter Prislan; Maks Merela; Kevin T. Smith; Katarina. Cufar

    2016-01-01

    The responses of the vascular cambium and tracheid differentiation to extreme drought in Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) were investigated. The research focused on the drought year of 2005, in the primary study area at Maigmo (MAI) in southeastern Spain, with comparisons in Jarafuel (JAL) and Guardamar (GUA). The climate in this region is...

  7. Aboveground tree biomass for Pinus ponderosa in northeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin W. Ritchie; Jianwei Zhang; Todd A. Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Forest managers need accurate biomass equations to plan thinning for fuel reduction or energy production. Estimates of carbon sequestration also rely upon such equations. The current allometric equations for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) commonly employed for California forests were developed elsewhere, and are often applied without consideration potential for...

  8. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models.

  9. Evaluation of seed production of scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out to investigate seed production in a 13 years-old scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) clonal seed orchard, including 30 clones. Eight of cone and seed traits as number of fertile and infertile scales, cone volume, cone number, filled and empty seed number, seed efficiency and 1000 seed weight were ...

  10. Nomenclatural Notes on the Pinus mugo Complex in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Businský, R.; Kirschner, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2006), s. 129-139 ISSN 0079-2047 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/05/2448 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Pinus mungo group * taxonomy * nomenclatura Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.076, year: 2006

  11. Evolutionary relationships of Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii ) with its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    llozymes in bud tissue and monoterpene contents in xylem oleoresin of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) were analyzed from populations across the natural distribution, as well as those from other species in the AUSTRALES pines. Allozyme diversity measures of slash pine were similar to those found in other southern pines.

  12. Establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures of Pinus radiata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of embryonal suspensor mass (ESM) from immature embryos of Pinus radiata on a solidified growth medium containing 0, 5 mgl -1 benzyladenine, 3, 0 mgl -1 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 500 mgl -1 casein hydrolysate and 250 mgl -1 L-glutamine was used as inoculum to establish cell suspension ...

  13. Growth models for Pinus patula in Angola | Delgado-Matas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study developed growth models for Pinus patula Schiede ex Schltdl. et Cham. for the Central Highlands of Angola for simulating the development of stand characteristics. The model set included dominant height, individual-tree diameter increment, individual-tree height and self-thinning models. The study was based ...

  14. An interesting chemical polymorphism in Pinus sylvestris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Szweykowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra- and interpopulational polymorphism in the production of phenolic compounds is described in Polish populations of Pinus sylvestris L. Two mutually exclusive forms of pine trees are present in changing proportions in all populations studied. This allows three groups of populations to be distinguished. The character of this differentiation is discussed.

  15. Some physical and strength properties of immature Pinus patula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine physical and strength properties of immature Pinus patula grown in Iringa and Njombe regions of Tanzania. Sample trees aged 5 to 15 years were collected from farmers' woodlots. The trees were categorized into 5 age classes: 5 - 7, 8 - 10, 11 - 12, 13 - 14 and 15 years. Four trees from ...

  16. Experiments in rooting bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance I. Millar

    1987-01-01

    Presented here are results of rooting studies using hedges established from juvenile seedlings of "blue" and "green" foliaged bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) from Mendocino and Sonoma Counties, California. Rootability, averaged over all clones and all setting dates, was 88%. The average time for 50% of the...

  17. Calonectria (Cylindrocladium) species associated with dying Pinus cuttings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Rodas, C.A.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Calonectria (Ca.) species and their Cylindrocladium (Cy.) anamorphs are well-known pathogens of forest nursery plants in subtropical and tropical areas of the world. An investigation of the mortality of rooted Pinus cuttings in a commercial forest nursery in Colombia led to the isolation of two

  18. The effects of fepeated prescribed burning on Pinus ponderosa growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Peterson; Stephen S. Sackett; Lindsay J. Robinson; Sally M. Haase

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated prescribed burning on long term growth of Pinus ponderosa in northern Arizona was examined. Fire treatments for hazard reduction were initiated in 1976,and growthwas evaluated in 1988 for fire rotations of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. Dendroecological analysis shows that there were only small changes in treegrowth (compared tocontrols) in the...

  19. Percentile-based Weibull diameter distribution model for Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a site index equation and stem volume model developed for Pinus kesiya in the Philippines, a yield prediction system was created to predict the volume per ha (VPH) for each diameter class and, subsequently, the total volume of a stand. To evaluate the yield prediction system, the predicted mean VPH for each ...

  20. Comparing EST-based genetic maps between Pinus sylvestris and Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, P; Brown, G R; Mikkonen, M; Karhu, A; García-Gil, M R; O'Malley, D; Lee, B; Neale, D B; Savolainen, O

    2003-08-01

    A genetic map of Pinus sylvestris was constructed using ESTP (expressed sequence tag polymorphism) markers and other gene-based markers, AFLP markers and microsatellites. Part of the ESTP markers (40) were developed and mapped earlier in Pinus taeda, and additional markers were generated based on P. sylvestris sequences or sequences from other pine species. The mapping in P. sylvestris was based on 94 F(1) progeny from a cross between plus-tree parents E635C and E1101. AFLP framework maps for the parent trees were first constructed. The ESTP and other gene sequence-based markers were added to the framework maps, as well as five published microsatellite loci. The separate maps were then integrated with the aid of AFLPs segregating in both trees (dominant segregation ratios 3:1) as well as gene markers and microsatellites segregating in both parent trees (segregation ratios 1:1:1:1 or 1:2:1). The integrated map consisted of 12 groups corresponding to the P. taeda linkage groups, and additionally three and six smaller groups for E1101 and E635C, respectively. The number of framework AFLP markers in the integrated map is altogether 194 and the number of gene markers 61. The total length of the integrated map was 1,314 cM. The set of markers developed for P. sylvestris was also added to existing maps of two P. taeda pedigrees. Starting with a mapped marker from one pedigree in the source species resulted in a mapped marker in a pedigree of the other species in more than 40% of the cases, with about equal success in both directions. The maps of the two species are largely colinear, even if the species have diverged more than 70 MYA. Most cases of different locations were probably due to problems in identifying the orthologous members of gene families. These data provide a first ESTP-containing map of P. sylvestris, which can also be used for comparing this species to additional species mapped with the same markers.

  1. Characterization of the expression patterns of LEAFY/FLORICAULA and NEEDLY orthologs in female and male cones of the conifer genera Picea, Podocarpus, and Taxus: implications for current evo-devo hypotheses for gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Carlsbecker, Annelie; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; Piñero, Daniel; Engström, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The identity of genes causally implicated in the development and evolutionary origin of reproductive characters in gymnosperms is largely unknown. Working within the framework of plant evolutionary developmental biology, here we have cloned, sequenced, performed phylogenetic analyses upon and tested the expression patterns of LEAFY/FLORICAULA and NEEDLY orthologs in reproductive structures from selected species of the conifer genera Picea, Podocarpus, and Taxus. Contrary to expectations based on previous assessments, expression of LFY/FLO and NLY in cones of these taxa was found to occur simultaneously in a single reproductive axis, initially overlapping but later in mutually exclusive primordia and/or groups of developing cells in both female and male structures. These observations directly affect the status of the "mostly male theory" for the origin of the angiosperm flower. On the other hand, comparative spatiotemporal patterns of the expression of these genes suggest a complex genetic regulatory network of cone development, as well as a scheme of functional divergence for LFY/FLO with respect to NLY homologs in gymnosperms, both with clear heterochronic aspects. Results presented in this study contribute to the understanding of the molecular-genetic basis of morphological evolution in conifer cones, and may aid in establishing a foundation for gymnosperm-specific, testable evo-devo hypotheses.

  2. Terpene chemodiversity of relict conifers Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii, and Pinus peuce, endemic to Balkan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Biljana; Ristić, Mihailo; Tešević, Vele; Marin, Petar D; Bojović, Srdjan

    2011-12-01

    Terpenes are often used as ecological and chemotaxonomic markers of plant species, as well as for estimation of geographic variability. Essential oils of relic and Balkan endemic/subendemic conifers, Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii, and P. peuce, in central part of Balkan Peninsula (Serbia and Montenegro), on the level of terpene classes and common terpene compounds were investigated. In finding terpene combinations, which could show the best diversity between species and their natural populations, several statistical methods were applied. Apart from the content of different terpene classes (P. omorika has the most abundant O-containing monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes; P. heldreichii and P. peuce have the largest abundance of sesquiterpene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, resp.), the species are clearly separated according to terpene profile with 22 common compounds. But, divergences in their populations were established only in combination of several compounds (specific for each species), and they were found to be the results of geomorphologic, climatic, and genetic factors. We found similarities between investigated species and some taxa from literature with respect to terpene composition, possibly due to hybridization and phylogenetic relations. Obtained results are also important regarding to chemotaxonomy, biogeography, phylogeny, and evolution of these taxa. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Male and Female Conelets and Development of Microsatellite Markers in Pinus bungeana, an Endemic Conifer in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Duan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The sex determination in gymnosperms is still poorly characterized due to the lack of genomic/transcriptome resources and useful molecular genetic markers. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the determination of sexual recognition of reproductive structures in conifers, the transcriptome of male and female conelets were characterized in a Chinese endemic conifer species, Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl. The 39.62 Gb high-throughput sequencing reads were obtained from two kinds of sexual conelets. After de novo assembly of the obtained reads, 85,305 unigenes were identified, 53,944 (63.23% of which were annotated with public databases. A total of 12,073 differentially expressed genes were detected between the two types of sexes in P. bungeana, and 5766 (47.76% of them were up-regulated in females. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG enriched analysis suggested that some of the genes were significantly associated with the sex determination process of P. bungeana, such as those involved in tryptophan metabolism, zeatin biosynthesis, and cysteine and methionine metabolism, and the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathways. Meanwhile, some important plant hormone pathways (e.g., the gibberellin (GA pathway, carotenoid biosynthesis, and brassinosteroid biosynthesis (BR pathway that affected sexual determination were also induced in P. bungeana. In addition, 8791 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs from 7859 unigenes were detected in P. bungeana. The most abundant repeat types were dinucleotides (1926, followed by trinucleotides (1711. The dominant classes of the sequence repeat were A/T (4942 in mononucleotides and AT/AT (1283 in dinucleotides. Among these EST-SSRs, 84 pairs of primers were randomly selected for the characterization of potential molecular genetic markers. Finally, 19 polymorphic EST-SSR primers were characterized. We found low to moderate levels of genetic diversity (NA = 1.754; HO

  4. Seasonal variations in red pine (Pinus resinosa) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) foliar physio-chemistry and their potential influence on stand-scale wildland fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt Jolly; John Hintz; Rodman L. Linn; Rachael C. Kropp; Elliot T. Conrad; Russell A. Parsons; Judith Winterkamp

    2016-01-01

    The 'Spring Dip' in conifer live foliar moisture content (LFMC) has been well documented but the actual drivers of these variations have not been fully investigated. Here we span this knowledge gap by measuring LFMC, foliar chemistry, foliar density and foliar flammability on new and old foliage for an entire year from both Pinus resinosa (red pine) and Pinus...

  5. A consensus genetic map for Pinus taeda and Pinus elliottii and extent of linkage disequilibrium in two genotype-phenotype discovery populations of Pinua taeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared W. Westbrook; Vikram E. Chhatre; Le-Shin Wu; Srikar Chamala; Leandro Gomide Neves; Patricio Munoz; Pedro J. Martinez-Garcia; David B. Neale; Matias Kirst; Keithanne Mockaitis; C. Dana Nelson; Gary F. Peter; John M. Davis; Craig S. Echt

    2015-01-01

    A consensus genetic map for Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) and Pinus elliottii (slash pine) was constructed by merging three previously published P. taeda maps with a map from a pseudo-backcross between P. elliottii and P. taeda. The consensus map positioned 3856 markers via...

  6. Calonectria (Cylindrocladium) species associated with dying Pinus cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, L; Rodas, C A; Crous, P W; Wingfield, B D; Wingfield, M J

    2009-12-01

    Calonectria (Ca.) species and their Cylindrocladium (Cy.) anamorphs are well-known pathogens of forest nursery plants in subtropical and tropical areas of the world. An investigation of the mortality of rooted Pinus cuttings in a commercial forest nursery in Colombia led to the isolation of two Cylindrocladium anamorphs of Calonectria species. The aim of this study was to identify these species using DNA sequence data and morphological comparisons. Two species were identified, namely one undescribed species, and Cy. gracile, which is allocated to Calonectria as Ca. brassicae. The new species, Ca. brachiatica, resides in the Ca. brassicae species complex. Pathogenicity tests with Ca. brachiatica and Ca. brassicae showed that both are able to cause disease on Pinus maximinoi and P. tecunumanii. An emended key is provided to distinguish between Calonectria species with clavate vesicles and 1-septate macroconidia.

  7. Accelerated Stem Growth Rates and Improved Fiber Properties of Loblolly Pine: Functional Analysis Of CyclinD from Pinus taeda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. John Cairney, School of Biology and Institute of Paper Science and Technology @ Georgia Tech, Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr. Gary Peter, University of Florida; Dr. Ulrika Egertsdotter, Dept. of Forestry, Virgina Tech; Dr. Armin Wagner, New Zealand Forest Research Institute Ltd. (Scion Research.)

    2005-11-30

    A sustained supply of low-cost, high quality raw materials is essential for the future success of the U.S. forest products industry. To maximize stem (trunk) growth, a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell divisions within the cambial meristem is essential. We hypothesize that auxin levels within the cambial meristem regulate cyclin gene expression and this in turn controls cell cycle progression as occurs in all eukaryotic cells. Work with model plant species has shown that ectopic overexpression of cyclins promotes cell division thereby increasing root growth > five times. We intended to test whether ectopic overexpression of cambial cyclins in the cambial zone of loblolly pine also promotes cell division rates that enhance stem growth rates. Results generated in model annual angiosperm systems cannot be reliably extrapolated to perennial gymnosperms, thus while the generation and development of transgenic pine is time consuming, this is the necessary approach for meaningful data. We succeeded in isolating a cyclin D gene and Clustal analysis to the Arabidopsis cyclin D gene family indicates that it is more closely related to cyclin D2 than D1 or D3 Using this gene as a probe we observed a small stimulation of cyclin D expression in somatic embryo culture upon addition of auxin. We hypothesized that trees with more cells in the vascular cambial and expansion zones will have higher cyclin mRNA levels. We demonstrated that in trees under compressive stress where the rates of cambial divisions are increased on the underside of the stem relative to the top or opposite side, there was a 20 fold increase in the level of PtcyclinD1 mRNA on the compressed side of the stem relative to the opposite. This suggests that higher secondary growth rates correlate with PtcyclinD1 expression. We showed that larger diameter trees show more growth during each year and that the increased growth in loblolly pine trees correlates with more cell

  8. Genomic DNA extraction from sapwood of Pinus roxburghii for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashish

    2013-02-22

    Feb 22, 2013 ... A method for extraction of genomic DNA from sapwood tissues of mature tall trees of Pinus roxburghii, .... DNA as a template. PCR was performed on a thermal cycler. (Biorad, Mycycler) incorporating 10 ng genomic DNA to a 25 µl reaction mix containing 1X Taq buffer, 3 mM MgCl2, 0.2 mM each of dNTPs ...

  9. evaluation of the leave and bud decoctions pinus halepensis mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 déc. 2014 ... La détermination de la composition chimique des huiles essentielles de Pinus halepensis M. a fait l'objet de ... végétale présente des activités antibactérienne, chimique et biologique [7,9]. L'objectif de ... Divers protocoles d'études étaient constatés dans des publications internationales en ce qui concerne ...

  10. Calonectria (Cylindrocladium) species associated with dying Pinus cuttings

    OpenAIRE

    Lombard, L.; Rodas, C.A.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Calonectria (Ca.) species and their Cylindrocladium (Cy.) anamorphs are well-known pathogens of forest nursery plants in subtropical and tropical areas of the world. An investigation of the mortality of rooted Pinus cuttings in a commercial forest nursery in Colombia led to the isolation of two Cylindrocladium anamorphs of Calonectria species. The aim of this study was to identify these species using DNA sequence data and morphological comparisons. Two species were identified, namely one unde...

  11. Biological invasion of Pinus ponderosa and Pinus contorta: case study of a forest plantation in Northwestern Patagonia; Invasion biologica de Pinus ponderosa y Pinus contorta: estudio de caso de una plantacion en la Patagonia noroccidental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezzotti, A.; Sbrancia, R.; Mortoro, A.; Monte, C.

    2009-07-01

    In the Southern Hemisphere, Pinus species from plantations can bring about processes of biological invasion that cause significant and permanent changes on the structure and functioning of surrounding natural ecosystems. The invasive character of Pinus ponderosa (P) and Pinus contorta (C) was examined for a 20-year old plantation located in the Alicura Forest Station (40 degree centigrade 40' S and 71 degree centigrade 00' W), through the analysis of abundance, age and spatial structures, and dispersal of natural regeneration. Seedlings and saplings were located largely within the plantation boundaries, and exhibited a density of 6.9 ind / ha (41 % for P and 59 % for C), a clustered spatial pattern with clumps dispersed not randomly, and a mean dispersal rate of 9.5 m / yr for P. ponderosa and 5.4 m / yr for P. contorta. Both species were invading the adjacent area, according to technical criteria based on ecological responses. However, regeneration niche is strongly hindering tree establishment and dispersal, probably due to high plant cover, presence of vertic soils, and absence of ectomycorrhizal fungi. These results can contribute to predict the capability of P. contorta and P. ponderosa to become invasive, in order to maximize the positive balance of forestry based on these species in northwestern Patagonia. (Author) 50 refs.

  12. Functional Characterization of Nine Norway Spruce TPS Genes and Evolution of Gymnosperm Terpene Synthases of the TPS-d Subfamily1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M.; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (−)-limonene synthase, (−)-α/β-pinene synthase, and (−)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-α-farnesene synthase, and E-α-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed. PMID:15310829

  13. Mineral Analysis of Pine Nuts (Pinus spp. Grown in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo P. Vanhanen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral analysis of seven Pinus species grown in different regions of New Zealand; Armand pine (Pinus armandii Franch, Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L., Mexican pinyon (Pinus cembroides Zucc. var. bicolor Little, Coulter pine (Pinus coulteri D. Don, Johann’s pine (Pinus johannis M.F. Robert, Italian stone pine (Pinus pinea L. and Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana Parry ex Carrière, was carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES analysis. Fourteen different minerals (Al, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn were identified in all seven varieties, except that no Al or Na was found in Pinus coulteri D. Don. New Zealand grown pine nuts are a good source of Cu, Mg, Mn, P and Zn, meeting or exceeding the recommended RDI for these minerals (based on an intake of 50 g nuts/day while they supplied between 39%–89% of the New Zealand RDI for Fe. Compared to other commonly eaten tree-nuts New Zealand grown pine nuts are an excellent source of essential minerals.

  14. Mineral Analysis of Pine Nuts (Pinus spp.) Grown in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhanen, Leo P.; Savage, Geoffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral analysis of seven Pinus species grown in different regions of New Zealand; Armand pine (Pinus armandii Franch), Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L.), Mexican pinyon (Pinus cembroides Zucc. var. bicolor Little), Coulter pine (Pinus coulteri D. Don), Johann’s pine (Pinus johannis M.F. Robert), Italian stone pine (Pinus pinea L.) and Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana Parry ex Carrière), was carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES) analysis. Fourteen different minerals (Al, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn) were identified in all seven varieties, except that no Al or Na was found in Pinus coulteri D. Don. New Zealand grown pine nuts are a good source of Cu, Mg, Mn, P and Zn, meeting or exceeding the recommended RDI for these minerals (based on an intake of 50 g nuts/day) while they supplied between 39%–89% of the New Zealand RDI for Fe. Compared to other commonly eaten tree-nuts New Zealand grown pine nuts are an excellent source of essential minerals. PMID:28239104

  15. Ectomycorrhizal diversity associated with Cedrus deodara and Pinus wallichiana in the Kashmir Himalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoo, Zahoor Ahmad; Reshi, Zafar A

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to document the ectomycorrhizal diversity associated with the Cedrus deodara and Pinus wallichiana in the Kashmir Himalaya, India. The extensive field surveys carried out in the Kashmir Himalaya at five study sites resulted in the collection and identification of 76 potential ectomycorrhizal fungal species associated with the Cedrus deodara and Pinus wallichiana. Maximum 32 number of species were found associated with Pinus wallichiana, 19 with Cedrus deodara and 25 species were found growing in association with both the conifers. The present study reveals that Cedrus deodara and Pinus wallichiana in the Kashmir Himalaya, India harbour diverse ectomycorrhizal fungal species.

  16. A Consensus Genetic Map for Pinus taeda and Pinus elliottii and Extent of Linkage Disequilibrium in Two Genotype-Phenotype Discovery Populations of Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Jared W; Chhatre, Vikram E; Wu, Le-Shin; Chamala, Srikar; Neves, Leandro Gomide; Muñoz, Patricio; Martínez-García, Pedro J; Neale, David B; Kirst, Matias; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Nelson, C Dana; Peter, Gary F; Davis, John M; Echt, Craig S

    2015-06-11

    A consensus genetic map for Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) and Pinus elliottii (slash pine) was constructed by merging three previously published P. taeda maps with a map from a pseudo-backcross between P. elliottii and P. taeda. The consensus map positioned 3856 markers via genotyping of 1251 individuals from four pedigrees. It is the densest linkage map for a conifer to date. Average marker spacing was 0.6 cM and total map length was 2305 cM. Functional predictions of mapped genes were improved by aligning expressed sequence tags used for marker discovery to full-length P. taeda transcripts. Alignments to the P. taeda genome mapped 3305 scaffold sequences onto 12 linkage groups. The consensus genetic map was used to compare the genome-wide linkage disequilibrium in a population of distantly related P. taeda individuals (ADEPT2) used for association genetic studies and a multiple-family pedigree used for genomic selection (CCLONES). The prevalence and extent of LD was greater in CCLONES as compared to ADEPT2; however, extended LD with LGs or between LGs was rare in both populations. The average squared correlations, r(2), between SNP alleles less than 1 cM apart were less than 0.05 in both populations and r(2) did not decay substantially with genetic distance. The consensus map and analysis of linkage disequilibrium establish a foundation for comparative association mapping and genomic selection in P. taeda and P. elliottii. Copyright © 2015 Westbrook et al.

  17. Proteomic analysis of early seed development in Pinus massoniana L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Yan; Zhao, Zhen-Zhou; Zheng, Ren-Hua; Shi, Jisen

    2012-05-01

    Understanding seed development is important for large-scale propagation and germplasm conservation for the Masson pine. We undertook a proteomic analysis of Masson pine seeds during the early stages of embryogenesis. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) was used to quantify the differences in protein expression during early seed development. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, we identified proteins from 43 gel spots that had been excised from preparative "pick" gels. Proteins involved in carbon metabolism were identified and were predominantly expressed at higher levels during the cleavage polyembryony and columnar embryo stages. Functional annotation of one seed protein revealed it involvement in programmed cell death and translation of selective mRNAs, which may play an important role in subordinate embryo elimination and suspensor degeneration in polyembryonic seed gymnosperms. Other identified proteins were associated with protein folding, nitrogen metabolism, disease/defense response, and protein storage, synthesis and stabilization. The comprehensive protein expression profiles generated by this study will provide new insights into the complex developmental process of seed development in Masson pine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. First discovery of fossil winged seeds of Pinus L. (family Pinaceae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahasin Ali Khan

    2017-07-04

    Jul 4, 2017 ... In this study,. Pinus arunachalensis sp. nov. is described on the basis of two well preserved winged seeds. The occurrence of winged seeds provides unequivocal evidence that Pinus trees were part of Arunachal. Pradesh flora during the middle to late Miocene. (Dafla Formation). This taxon does not occur.

  19. Influence of gap-scale disturbance on developmental and successional pathways in Quercus-Pinus stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.A. Weber; J.L. Hart; C. Schweitzer; D.C. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Quercus-Pinus forests of the eastern USA cover millions of hectares and span a variety of ecoregions. Understanding the influence of natural disturbance on developmental and successional pathways is important for managers that wish to sustain Pinus spp. in these mixtures. Quantifying developmental and successional patterns in this...

  20. Development of site index curves for Pinus kesiya in the Philippines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of site index curves for Pinus kesiya in the Philippines. RIC Lumbres, YJ Lee, YO Seo, FG Calora JR. Abstract. This study was conducted to develop a height–age growth model and site index curves for site quality evaluation of old secondary-growth stands of Pinus kesiya in the northern Philippines.

  1. Resistance to white pine blister rust in Pinus flexilis and P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna W. Schoettle; Richard A. Sniezko; Angelia Kegley; Jerry Hill; Kelly S. Burns

    2010-01-01

    The non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola, that causes white pine blister rust (WPBR), is impacting or threatening limber pine, Pinus flexilis, and Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata. In the Southern Rockies, where the rust invasion is still expanding, we have the opportunity to be proactive and prepare the landscape for invasion. Genetic...

  2. Studies on ovulate strobili and seed production of Pinus patula in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on ovulate strobili and seed production of Pinus patula in KwaZulu-Natal: scientific paper. ... Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science ... Cone and seed production studies in Pinus patula were conducted by the Institute for Commercial Forestry Research (ICFR) in KwaZulu-Natal as part of the improvement ...

  3. Germinación in vitro de Pinus cubensis Griseb

    OpenAIRE

    Raima Cantillo Ardebol; Luis Rodríguez de Francisco; Yamila Rosales; Omar Guadalupe Alvarado

    2006-01-01

    Se hace alusión a la micropropagación de Pinus cubensis, Griseb, como aspecto que satisface la demanda de semillas para la reforestación en áreas de Pinares de Mayarí, hábitat de esta endémica región, amenazada por minería y explotación maderera. Se utilizaron semillas, determinando el mejor método de desinfección, evaluando su germinación en medio con diferentes composiciones de reguladores del crecimiento, y la influencia de la presencia o ausencia de la cubierta seminal. El mejor resultado...

  4. Synthetic seed production from somatic embryos of Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquea, Felipe; Poupin, María Josefina; Matus, José Tomás; Gebauer, Marlene; Medina, Consuelo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2008-10-01

    Pinus radiata is one of the most important forestry species in the southern hemisphere. This work describes the regeneration of this plant via somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic embryos. To improve this process, somatic embryogenic cell suspensions were established in liquid media for the generation of material for embryo maturation. Each developmental stage of these suspensions was characterized by microscopy and their growth phases quantified. An alginate-containing medium was used as an encapsulation method for the somatic embryos that were then germinated as artificial seeds in vitro. The protocols described in this work are both useful and reliable for industrial purposes.

  5. Pine weevil (Hylobius abietis) antifeedants from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, K; Sunnerheim, K; Nordenhem, H; Nordlander, G; Langström, B

    2001-11-01

    Pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) fed less on bark of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) than on bark of Scots pine (P. sylvestris). Two pine weevil antifeedants, ethyl trans-cinnamate and ethyl 2,3-dibromo-3-phenyl-propanoate, were isolated from bark of lodgepole pine. These two compounds significantly reduced pine weevil feeding in a laboratory bioassay. In field assays, the second compound significantly decreased pine weevil damage on planted seedlings. Ethyl 2,3-dibromo-3-phenylpropanoate has not previously been reported as a natural product.

  6. Modeling productivity and transpiration of Pinus radiata: climatic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheriff, D. W.; Mattay, J. P. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Canberra, ACT (Australia). Div. of Forestry and Forest Products; McMurtrie, R. E. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1996-01-01

    Using a process-based forest growth model, BIOMASS, the climatic effect on annual net carbon gain, stem biomass and annual transpiration were simulated for Pinus radiata. Regional variation in climate between Canberra and Mt. Gambier resulted in a 20 per cent difference in simulated annual transpiration rate, but only a relatively small difference in simulated productivity. Simulated carbon gain values averaged about 1.4 per cent; this result was not consistent with the predicted 8 per cent annual carbon assimilation difference between the two sites, based on differences in climate. These results suggest that climatic differences do not account for differences in productivity. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  7. Genetic diversity and gene exchange in Pinus oocarpa, a Mesoamerican pine with resistance to the pitch canker fungus (Fusarium circinatum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.S. Dvorak; K.M. Potter

    2009-01-01

    Eleven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to determine the genetic structure and levels of diversity in 51 natural populations of Pinus oocarpa across its geographic range of 3000 km in Mesoamerica. The study also included 17 populations of Pinus patula and Pinus tecunumanii chosen for their resistance or susceptibility to the pitch canker fungus based...

  8. Reproductive Success and Inbreeding Differ in Fragmented Populations of Pinus rzedowskii and Pinus ayacahuite var. veitchii, Two Endemic Mexican Pines under Threat

    OpenAIRE

    Paty Castilleja Sánchez; Patricia Delgado Valerio; Cuauhtémoc Sáenz-Romero; Yvonne Herrerías Diego

    2016-01-01

    Seed production, quality, germination and seedling establishment are indicators of reproductive success in conifers. Monitoring of these parameters is essential to determine the viability of populations for the purposes of conservation. We analyze cone and seed traits as indicators of reproductive success in the endangered Rzedowski´s pine (Pinus rzedowskii (Madrigal et Caballero) and near-threatened veitchii pine (Pinus ayacahuite var. veitchii (Shaw)) in west-central Michoacán, Mexico. Thes...

  9. Composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest respond to spatial climatic changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although some studies have indicated that climate changes can affect Pinus koraiensis mixed forest, the responses of composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forests to climatic changes are unknown and the key climatic factors controlling the composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest are uncertain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Field survey was conducted in the natural Pinus koraiensis mixed forests along a latitudinal gradient and an elevational gradient in Northeast China. In order to build the mathematical models for simulating the relationships of compositional and structural attributes of the Pinus koraiensis mixed forest with climatic and non-climatic factors, stepwise linear regression analyses were performed, incorporating 14 dependent variables and the linear and quadratic components of 9 factors. All the selected new models were computed under the +2°C and +10% precipitation and +4°C and +10% precipitation scenarios. The Max Temperature of Warmest Month, Mean Temperature of Warmest Quarter and Precipitation of Wettest Month were observed to be key climatic factors controlling the stand densities and total basal areas of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest. Increased summer temperatures and precipitations strongly enhanced the stand densities and total basal areas of broadleaf trees but had little effect on Pinus koraiensis under the +2°C and +10% precipitation scenario and +4°C and +10% precipitation scenario. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the Max Temperature of Warmest Month, Mean Temperature of Warmest Quarter and Precipitation of Wettest Month are key climatic factors which shape the composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest. Although the Pinus koraiensis would persist, the current forests dominated by Pinus koraiensis in the region would all shift and become broadleaf-dominated forests due to the dramatic increase of broadleaf trees under the future global

  10. Composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest respond to spatial climatic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingli; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Guangsheng; Xiao, Chunwang

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies have indicated that climate changes can affect Pinus koraiensis mixed forest, the responses of composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forests to climatic changes are unknown and the key climatic factors controlling the composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest are uncertain. Field survey was conducted in the natural Pinus koraiensis mixed forests along a latitudinal gradient and an elevational gradient in Northeast China. In order to build the mathematical models for simulating the relationships of compositional and structural attributes of the Pinus koraiensis mixed forest with climatic and non-climatic factors, stepwise linear regression analyses were performed, incorporating 14 dependent variables and the linear and quadratic components of 9 factors. All the selected new models were computed under the +2°C and +10% precipitation and +4°C and +10% precipitation scenarios. The Max Temperature of Warmest Month, Mean Temperature of Warmest Quarter and Precipitation of Wettest Month were observed to be key climatic factors controlling the stand densities and total basal areas of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest. Increased summer temperatures and precipitations strongly enhanced the stand densities and total basal areas of broadleaf trees but had little effect on Pinus koraiensis under the +2°C and +10% precipitation scenario and +4°C and +10% precipitation scenario. These results show that the Max Temperature of Warmest Month, Mean Temperature of Warmest Quarter and Precipitation of Wettest Month are key climatic factors which shape the composition and structure of Pinus koraiensis mixed forest. Although the Pinus koraiensis would persist, the current forests dominated by Pinus koraiensis in the region would all shift and become broadleaf-dominated forests due to the dramatic increase of broadleaf trees under the future global warming and increased precipitation.

  11. Modelagem do crescimento e de biomassa individual de Pinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Schikowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivo testar modelos matemáticos para estimativas de biomassa de diferentes compartimentos de Pinus spp., a partir de variáveis de fácil mensuração. Os dados utilizados são provenientes de plantios localizados no centro sul do estado do Paraná. Foram utilizados dados de peso seco total e parcial de 35 árvores de Pinus spp., obtidos por meio do método destrutivo direto. De cada árvore amostrada foram medidos também o CAP (circunferência à altura do peito e a altura total. Os modelos para estimativa de biomassa de folhagem não apresentaram bom desempenho, verificado pelos indicadores de ajuste. Entretanto, para os compartimentos: galhos, raízes, casca, fuste e para biomassa total, os ajustes apresentaram elevados valores de R² e baixos valores de Syx%. O modelo de crescimento de Richards obteve melhor desempenho que os demais testados para a estimativa da biomassa total.

  12. The complete plastid genome of Bunge's pine Pinus bungeana (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Hu; Zhu, Juan; Yang, Yi-Xin; Yang, Jie; He, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Gui-Fang

    2016-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Bunge's pine Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl. chloroplast genome (cp DNA) was determined in this study. The cpDNA was 117 861 bp in length, containing a pair of 475 bp inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb), which were separated by large and small single copy regions (LSC and SSC) of 65 373 and 51 538 bp, respectively. The cpDNA contained 111 genes, including 71 protein-coding genes (71 PCG species), 4 ribosomal RNA genes (4 rRNA species) and 36 tRNA genes (32 tRNA species). In these genes, 13 harbored a single intron and 1 (ycf3) contained a couple of introns. The overall AT content of Bunge's pine cpDNA is 61.2%, while the corresponding values of the LSC, SSC and IR regions are 61.9%, 60.2% and 62.5%, respectively. A phylogenetic reconstruction based on the maximum parsimony analysis suggested that all the sampled Pinus species clustered a monophyletic clade and have a high bootstrap support, and the cpDNA of P. bungeana is closely related to that of congeneric P. gerardiana.

  13. Emerging Needle Blight Diseases in Atlantic Pinus Ecosystems of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Ortíz de Urbina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Red band needle blight caused by Dothistroma septosporum and D. pini, and brown spot needle blight caused by Lecanosticta acicola provoke severe and premature defoliation in Pinus, and subsequent reduction of photosynthetic surfaces, vitality, and growth in young and adult trees. The recurrent damage results in branch and tree death. Until recently, pine needle blight diseases have had only minor impacts on native and exotic forest trees in the North of Spain, but in the past five years, these pathogen species have spread widely and caused severe defoliation and mortality in exotic and native plantations of Pinus in locations where they were not detected before. In an attempt to understand the main causes of this outbreak and to define the effectiveness of owners’ management strategies, four research actions were implemented: a survey of the management activities implemented by the owners to reduce disease impact, the evaluation of specific symptoms and damage associated with infection, and the identification of the causative pathogenic species and their reproductive capacity. Morphological characteristics of the fungus and molecular identification were consistent with those of Lecanosticta acicola and Dothistroma spp., D. septosporum, D. Pini, and both mating types were present for the three identified pathogens. The local silvicultural management performed, mainly pruning and thinning, was not resulting in the expected improvement. The results of this study can be applied to establish guidelines for monitoring and controlling the spread of needle blight pathogens.

  14. Origin and structure of Ubisch bodies in Pinus sylvestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Rowley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Pinus sylvestris Ubisch bodies are produced repeatedly, and each crop is formed at a distinct phase in the secretory cycles of tapetal cells. While each production has a Ubisch body wall similar to the then current state of the exine with regard to thickening and ornamentation, the survivers of previous productions do not change. Examples of all the structurally different Ubisch body wall forms can be seen when terminally, at the time of pollen shedding, the relict Ubisch bodies become spatially concentrated on the minimal surface area of the senescent cells of the tapetum. In angiosperms after one or a few periods of initiation Ubisch bodies may remain in association with the surface of tapetal cells where the Ubisch body wall undergoes changes like those of the maturing pollen exine. We conclude that as a consequence of Ubisch body detachment from the plasma membrane of tapetal cells there is in Pinus sylvestris no updated information for modification of the wall and the Ubisch body wall remains static.

  15. Factors Affecting Growth of Pinus radiata in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Munoz, Jose Santos

    The Chilean forestry industry is based on hundreds of thousands of hectares of Pinus radiata plantations that have been established in a variety of soil and climate conditions. This approach has resulted in highly variable plantation productivity even when the best available technology was used. Little information is known about the ecophysiology basis for this variability. We explored the spatial and temporal variation of stand growth in Chile using a network of permanent sample plots from Modelo Nacional de Simulacion de Pino radiata. We hypothesized that the climate would play an important role in the annual variations in productivity. To answer these questions we developed the following projects: (1) Determination of site resource availability from historical data from automatic weather stations (rainfall, temperatures) and a geophysical model for solar irradiation, (2) Determination of peak annual leaf area index (LAI) for selected permanent sample plots using remote sensing technologies, (3) Analysis of soil, climate, canopy and stand factors affecting the Pinus radiata plantation growth and the use efficiency of site resources. For project 1, we estimated solar irradiation using the r.sun , Hargreaves-Samani (HS), and Bristow-Campbell (BC) models and validated model estimates with observations from weather stations. Estimations from a calibrated r.sun model accounted for 94% of the variance (r2=0.94) in monthly mean measured values. The r.sun model performed quite well for a wide range of Chilean conditions when compared with the HS and BC models. Our estimates of global irradiation may be improved with better estimates of cloudiness as they become available. Our model was able to provide spatial estimates of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly solar irradiation. For project 2, we estimated the inter-annual variation of LAI (Leaf Area Index), using remote sensing technologies. We determined LAI using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data covering a 5 year period

  16. Bleached kraft pulp production from Pinus tecunumanii (Eguiluz e Perry Produção de polpa kraft branqueada de Pinus tecunumanii (Eguiluz e Perry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel F. Torres

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of 12-year-old Pinus tecunumanii (Eguiluz e Perry grown in Colombia was evaluated for bleached kraft pulp production. Kraft pulps of kappa number 30 ± 1 were produced, and oxygen delignified and bleached to 90% ISO with ECF processes. The bleached pulps produced under optimum conditions were evaluated with regard to their strength properties. Pinus tecunumanii wood required low effective alkali charge to reach the desired kappa number and the unbleached pulp showed high oxygen delignification efficiency and bleachability when a OD(EODED sequence was used. The bleached pulps presented good physical-mechanical properties, which are comparable to those obtained with more traditional pines such as Pinus taeda and Pinus radiata. The results demonstrate that this tropical pine species is a suitable raw material for bleached kraft pulp productionForam avaliadas amostras de Pinus tecunumanii de (Eguiluz e Perry com 12 anos de idade procedente da Colômbia, para produção de polpa de kraft branqueada. Produziram-se polpas kraft com número kappa 30±1, deslignificada com oxigênio e branqueada a 90% ISO por processo ECF. As polpas branqueadas foram produzidas em condições ótimas e avaliadas com relação às suas propriedades de resistência. A madeira de Pinus tecunumanii exigiu baixa carga de álcali efetivo para alcançar o número kappa desejado, e a polpa marrom mostrou eficiência na deslignificação com oxigênio e alta branqueabilidade quando submetida à seqüência OD(EODED. As polpas branqueadas apresentaram boas propriedades físico-mecânicas, em comparação com aquelas obtidas das espécies tradicionais de Pinus, como o Pinus taeda e o Pinus radiata. Os resultados indicaram que essa espécie de pinus tropical é uma matéria-prima satisfatória para produção de polpa de kraft branqueada.

  17. Impact of solar activity on growth of pine trees (Pinus cembra: 1610 - 1970; Pinus pinaster: 1910 -1989)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surový, P.; Dorotovič, I.; Karlovský, V.; Rodrigues, J. C.; Rybanský, M.; Fleischer, P.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we have focused on the analysis of the data on the annual growth of cembra pine (Pinus cembra) grown in the Kôprová dolina Valley in the High Tatra Mountains. The database covers the period of 1406 - 1970, however, the sunspot data (minima and maxima) at the NGDC web site are only available since 1610. Moreover, reliable sunspot data are only available since 1749. The results of this analysis agree with the observation made in our previous work, i.e. there is a negative impact of high SA on the pine tree growth. However, it should be noted that statistical significance of the results is low. We also applied wavelet analysis to the data on the tree growth evolution, with the results indicating growth variations' period of about 20 years (duration of approximately two solar cycles or one magnetic cycle, respectively). A negative impact of the SA was also observed in growth of a 90 year-old maritime pine tree (Pinus pinaster) grown in northern Portugal. The width of the annual rings was smaller in the years of maximum SA; furthermore, it was found that it is the latewood growth that it is affected while the earlywood growth is not, and consequently the latewood additions also show a significative negative correlation with SA.

  18. Chemical composition, antimicrobial, insecticidal, phytotoxic and antioxidant activities of Mediterranean Pinus brutia and Pinus pinea resin essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukanli, Zeynep; Karabörklü, Salih; Bozok, Fuat; Ates, Burhan; Erdogan, Selim; Cenet, Menderes; Karaaslan, Merve Göksin

    2014-12-01

    Essential oils of the resins of Pinus brutia and Pinus pinea were evaluated for their biological potential. Essential oils were characterized using GC-MS and GC/FID. in vitro antimicrobial, phytotoxic, antioxidant, and insecticidal activities were carried out using the direct contact and the fumigant assays, respectively. The chemical profile of the essential oils of the resins of P. pinea and P. brutia included mainly α-pinene (21.39% and 25.40%), β-pinene (9.68% and 9.69%), and caryophyllene (9.12% and 4.81%). The essential oils of P. pinea and P. brutia exerted notable antimicrobial activities on Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis, insecticidal activities on Ephestia kuehniella eggs, phytotoxic activities on Lactuca sativa, Lepidium sativum, and Portulaca oleracea, as well as antioxidant potential. Indications of the biological activities of the essential oils suggest their use in the formulation of ecofriendly and biocompatible pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of Phenolic Compounds in Pinus laricio Needles and Their Responses to Prescribed Burnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Ferrat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire is a dominant ecological factor in Mediterranean-type ecosystems. Management strategies include prescribed (controlled burning, which has been used in the management of several species, such as Pinus nigra ssp laricio var. Corsicana, a pine endemic to Corsica of great ecological and economic importance. The effects of prescribed burning on Pinus laricio have been little studied. The first aim of this study was to characterize total and simple phenolic compounds in Pinus laricio. The second aim was to understand: i the short term (one to three months and medium term (three years effects of prescribed burning, and ii the effects of periodic prescribed burning on the production of phenolic compounds in Pinus laricio. The first result of this study is the presence of total and simple phenolic compounds in the needles of Pinus laricio. 3-Vanillyl propanol is the major compound. After a prescribed burning, the synthesis of total phenolic compounds increases in Pinus laricio for a period of three months. Total phenolic compounds could be used as bioindicators for the short-term response of Pinus laricio needles to prescribed burning. Simple phenolic compounds do not seem to be good indicators of the impact of prescribed burning because prescribed burnings are low in intensity.

  20. Productivity and adaptation of Pinus in the north litoral of Bahia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Ferraz, E.S. de; Rezende, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The productivity and climatic adaptation of two species of Pinus in the north litoral of Bahia State has been studied through the variability of wood density in a comercial plantation. The gamma-ray attenuation method of the 100 mCi 241-Am source, 59,6 KeV, was used for density variability analysis. The results show that Pinus caribaea hondurensis is better adapted to the region than Pinus caribaea caribaea, with a superior mean productivity of 26% at 8 years. (Author) [pt

  1. Pinus x rhaetica Brugger, nuevo taxón para la Comunidad Valenciana

    OpenAIRE

    González López, Emilio; Olivares Tormo, Amparo; Laguna Lumbreras, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Se corrobora la presencia en la provincia de Valencia de ejemplares con caracteres transitorios entre Pinus uncinata Ramond ex DC y P. sylvestris L., que inicialmente atribuimos al híbrido Pinus × rhaetica Brügger. Las plantas se sitúan enclaves cercanos a la cima del Alto de las Barracas o Calderón (1839 m, Puebla de San Miguel) el monte más elevado del territorio valenciano, de donde ya existían referencias verbales no contrastadas que apuntaban a la posible presencia de Pinus uncinata Ramo...

  2. Radiation induced pollen tube growth stimulation of Pinus silvestris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelles, L.; Seibold, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Pollen grains of Pinus silvestris were irradiated with different quantum energies (30 and 300 kV X-ray, Cobalt-60γ-ray and UV-light of 240, 260 and 280 nm) of radiation and at different dose rates. A stimulatory effect on tube growth induced by ionizing radiation as well as UV-light was obtained by using suitable doses at appropriate dose rates. The stimulatory effect induced by UV-light and by ionizing radiation, occurred between 5000 and 400,000 erg/cm 2 at the dose rate of 40 and 250 erg/cm 2 sec and between 200 and 2000 rad at dose rates of 20 and 50 rad/sec, respectively. UV-light at 240 nm did not stimulate the pollen tube growth in contrast to UV-light of 260 and 280 nm. This suggests, that nucleic acid- and protein-like substances may be involved in the stimulation mechanism. (author)

  3. Protein synthesis in the embryo of Pinus thunbergii seed, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Naoaki; Sasaki, Satohiko.

    1977-01-01

    14 C-Amino acid incorporating activity in the absence of exogenous mRNA was found in a cell-free system from embryos of light-germinated Pinus thunbergii seeds, but not in that from dark-imbibed seed embryos. Template activity in the cell-free system from the light-germinated seed embryos was observed in the ribosome fraction, especially the polyribosome fraction, but not in the 100,000 x g supernatant fraction (s100). These facts suggest that the nature of the block in protein synthesis during the imbibition of seeds in the dark is due to the lack or inactivity of mRNA. The s100 from light-germinated seed embryos was found to be less active in amino acid incorporation than that from dark-imbibed seed embryos. (auth.)

  4. ESTABLISHMENT OF Pinus elliottii Engelm STANDS WITH DIRECT FIELD SOWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Guimarães Finger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was undertaken to test the possibility of use of direct field sowing as a method of  forest formation. The soil preparation consisted of mechanic mowing followed by cleaning of small circles of 40 cm of diameter, where four seeds of Pinus elliottii Engelm were sowed, previously stratified, and protected by a bottomless plastic glass fastened to the sowing point. The treatments tested were direct sowing, sowing of seeds involved by paper envelop and seedling plantation as testify treatment. The results were not satisfactory, however, being observed at the most 38.46% of the sowing places with seedlings after 84 days of sowing. The main factor that contribuited to the failure of the method was seedling mortality caused by water deficit and high temperatures.

  5. Needles of Pinus halepensis as biomonitors of bioaerosol emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Galès

    Full Text Available We propose using the surface of pine trees needles to biomonitor the bioaerosol emissions at a composting plant. Measurements were based on 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula, a bioindicator of composting plant emissions. A sampling plan was established based on 29 samples around the emission source. The abundance of 16S rRNA gene copies of S. rectivirgula per gram of Pinus halepensis needles varied from 104 to 102 as a function of the distance. The signal reached the background level at distances around the composting plant ranging from 2 km to more than 5.4 km, depending on the local topography and average wind directions. From these values, the impacted area around the source of bioaerosols was mapped.

  6. NUTRIENTS CONCENTRATION AND RETRANSLOCATION IN THE Pinus taeda L. NEEDLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at evaluating nutrients concentration and retranslocation in the Pinus taeda L. needles, this study was developed in two stands, in native grass area and in second rotation area, with same species and same age (7.5 years old in Cambará do Sul, RS. The needles were collected in plants in four orthogonal points (South, North, East and West, sampled new needles, mature needles and old needles. The material was dried in a stove, milled and chemically analyzed (macro and micronutrients. The concentrations of N, P, K, B, Cu and Zn had decreased, of Ca, Fe and Mn increased, and the Mg and S have remained constant with the age of the needles. The retranslocation rate (old-new needles was more than 50% for most nutrients, except for Mn and Fe, showed that cumulative effect and the Ca reference element.

  7. Effect of two culture media on Pinus taeda shoots elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paula Imbrogno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pinus taeda L. is a forest species of great international importance and in Argentina. Biotechnological techniques can provide an alternative to propagate this species, as well as for obtaining mother plants. The aim of this study was to achieve adequate elongation of in vitro shoots before transfer to the rooting stage. The shoots were obtained from acclimatized mother plants. It was disinfected for in vitro establishment. Two types of basal culture media: WV5 and DCR were studied. The best results were achieved with the combination of the WV5 salts supplement with 0.5% activated carbon, 0.01 mg l-1 ANA to obtain vigorous and longer than 40.0 mm in length shoots. Key words: forest, micropropagation, pine

  8. [Pinus koraiensis seed consumption by rodents and birds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiao-lin; Piao, Zheng-ji; Li, Bu-hang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xu-gao; Ye, Ji; Hao, Zhan-qing

    2008-08-01

    An investigation from 2006 to 2007 was made on the Pinus koraiensis seed consumption by rodents and birds in the broad-leaved P. koraiensis mixed forest and birch forest at the same altitude in Changbai Mountains. The results showed that in broad-leaved P. koraiensis mixed forest, rodents consumed more pinecone seeds than birds; while in birch forest, birds did more than rodents. In the two forests, the total number of pinecone seeds consumed by rodents was significantly higher than that consumed by birds (P < 0.01). In addition, rodents consumed more embedded seeds in broad-leaved P. koraiensis mixed forest than in birch forest, and the consumption amount in the two forests decreased with increasing embedded depth.

  9. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Pinus eldarica Bark Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Iravani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, development of reliable experimental protocols for synthesis of metal nanoparticles with desired morphologies and sizes has become a major focus of researchers. Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles using organisms has emerged as a nontoxic and ecofriendly method for synthesis of metal nanoparticles. The objectives of this study were production of silver nanoparticles using Pinus eldarica bark extract and optimization of the biosynthesis process. The effects of quantity of extract, substrate concentration, temperature, and pH on the formation of silver nanoparticles are studied. TEM images showed that biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (approximately in the range of 10–40 nm were predominantly spherical in shape. The preparation of nano-structured silver particles using P. eldarica bark extract provides an environmentally friendly option, as compared to currently available chemical and/or physical methods.

  10. Climate variation and the stable carbon isotope composition of tree ring cellulose: an intercomparison of Quercus robur, Fagus sylvatica and Pinus silvestris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, D. L.; Switsur, V. R.; Waterhouse, J. S.; Heaton, T. H. E.; Carter, A. H. C.

    1998-02-01

    The relationship between climate parameters and the carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C), of annual tree ring cellulose is examined for three native British tree species; Common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). The last 100 annual tree rings of six trees, two of each species, were cut into slivers and the a-cellulose extracted. Annual δ13C values of each species were averaged to produce three species δ13C chronologies. These were compared with climate parameters from a nearby meteorological station. The carbon stable isotope discrimination (Δ13C) of pine is consistently lower, by approximately 2.5‰, than that of beech and oak. Although the exact cause of this offset cannot be identified, similar differences in carbon isotope ratios have been noted between other gymnosperm and angiosperm species and attributed to inherent physiological differences. As this offset is consistent, once centred around the same mean δ13C and Δ13C chronologies from these 3 species can be combined. Δ13C chronologies of the three species demonstrate strong cross-correlations in both high and low frequency fluctuations. Low frequency fluctuations, although consistent between species, show no direct climate relationship, and may be linked with physiological responses to increasing CO2 concentrations. Significant correlations do exist between the high frequency δ13C fluctuations and climate parameters. The high frequency δ13C series of all three species are most significantly correlated with the same two climate parameters and have the same seasonal timing; July October average maximum temperature and June September average relative humidity. Pine δ13C is the most responsive species to climate changes and displays the most significant correlations with all the climate parameters studied. However, an average series of all three high frequency species δ13C series shows the most significant correlations with

  11. Evidence for stage-specific modulation of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and miRNA processing components in zygotic embryo and female gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Thomas J; Wartell, Roger M; Cairney, John; Pullman, Gerald S

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to regulate plant development, but have not been studied in gymnosperm seed tissues. The presence and characteristics of several miRNAs were examined in zygotic embryos (ZEs) and female gametophytes (FGs) of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine). Evidence for miRNAs was obtained using northern analyses and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) mediated with poly(A) polymerase. Partial sequences of two miRNAs were verified. Three regions of putative mRNA targets were analyzed by qRT-PCR to monitor the occurrence of stage-dependent miRNA-mediated cleavage. Five miRNAs were identified in ZEs and FGs along with partial sequences of Pta-miR166 and Pta-miR167. Both miRNAs showed differing degrees of tissue-specific and stage-specific modulation. Analysis of HB15L mRNA (a potential Pta-miR166 target) suggested miRNA-guided cleavage in ZEs and FGs. Analysis of ARF8L mRNA (a potential Pta-miR167 target) implied cleavage in ZEs but not in FGs. Argonaute9-like mRNA (ptAGO9L) showed stage-specific modulation of expression in ZEs that appeared to be inverted in the corresponding FGs. MicroRNAs and argonaute genes varied spatiotemporally during seed development. The peak levels of Pta-miR166 in FGs and ptAGO9L in embryos occurred at stage 9.1, a critical transition point during embryo development and a point where somatic embryo maturation often stops. MicroRNAs identified in FG tissue may play a role in embryogenesis.

  12. Prospects for the biological control of invasive Pinus species (Pinaceae) in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hoffmann, JH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nine Pinus species (Pinaceae) have become invasive plants in South Africa after being deliberately introduced and cultivated in commercial forests, for timber. A proposal to use biological control to contain the problem raised concerns among...

  13. Effects of ammonium and nitrate on mycorrhizal seedlings of Pinus sylvestris.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen, A.J.; Ket, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of ammonium sulphate and sodium nitrate on Pinus sylvestris seedlings inoculated with Paxillus involutus and Suillus bovinus were investigated. Weekly fertilization (26 weeks) positively affected the plant dry weight, but inhibited the mycorrhizal formation and decreased the root

  14. Family 34 glycosyltransferase (GT34) genes and proteins in Pinus radiata (radiata pine) and Pinus taeda (loblolly pine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Carsten P; Bemm, Felix; Dickson, James M J; Walter, Christian; Harris, Philip J

    2014-04-01

    Using a functional genomics approach, four candidate genes (PtGT34A, PtGT34B, PtGT34C and PtGT34D) were identified in Pinus taeda. These genes encode CAZy family GT34 glycosyltransferases that are involved in the synthesis of cell-wall xyloglucans and heteromannans. The full-length coding sequences of three orthologs (PrGT34A, B and C) were isolated from a xylem-specific cDNA library from the closely related Pinus radiata. PrGT34B is the ortholog of XXT1 and XXT2, the two main xyloglucan (1→6)-α-xylosyltransferases in Arabidopsis thaliana. PrGT34C is the ortholog of XXT5 in A. thaliana, which is also involved in the xylosylation of xyloglucans. PrGT34A is an ortholog of a galactosyltransferase from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) that is involved in galactomannan synthesis. Truncated coding sequences of the genes were cloned into plasmid vectors and expressed in a Sf9 insect cell-culture system. The heterologous proteins were purified, and in vitro assays showed that, when incubated with UDP-xylose and cellotetraose, cellopentaose or cellohexaose, PrGT34B showed xylosyltransferase activity, and, when incubated with UDP-galactose and the same cello-oligosaccharides, PrGT34B showed some galactosyltransferase activity. The ratio of xylosyltransferase to galactosyltransferase activity was 434:1. Hydrolysis of the galactosyltransferase reaction products using galactosidases showed the linkages formed were α-linkages. Analysis of the products of PrGT34B by MALDI-TOF MS showed that up to three xylosyl residues were transferred from UDP-xylose to cellohexaose. The heterologous proteins PrGT34A and PrGT34C showed no detectable enzymatic activity. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mean canopy stomatal conductance responses to water and nutrient availabilities in Picea abies and Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, B E; Oren, R; Phillips, N; Strömgren, M; Linder, S

    2001-08-01

    We compared sap-flux-scaled, mean, canopy stomatal conductance (GS) between Picea abies (L.) Karst. in Sweden and Pinus taeda (L.) in North Carolina, both growing on nutritionally poor soils. Stomatal conductance of Picea abies was approximately half that of Pinus taeda and the sensitivity of GS in Picea abies to vapor pressure deficit (D) was lower than in Pinus taeda. Optimal fertilization increased leaf area index (L) two- and threefold in Pinus taeda and Picea abies, respectively, regardless of whether irrigation was increased. Although it increased L, fertilization did not increase GS in Picea abies unless irrigation was also provided. In Pinus taeda growing on coarse, sandy soils, the doubling of L in response to fertilization reduced GS sharply unless irrigation was also provided. The reduction in GS with fertilization in the absence of irrigation resulted from the production of fine roots with low saturated hydraulic conductivity. When Pinus taeda received both fertilization and irrigation, the increase in L was accompanied by a large increase in GS. In Pinus taeda, a reference GS (defined as GS at D = 1 kPa; GSR) decreased in all treatments with decreasing volumetric soil water content (theta). In Picea abies, theta varied little within a treatment, but overall, GSR declined with theta, reaching lowest values when drought was imposed by the interception of precipitation. Despite the large difference in GS both between Picea abies and Pinus taeda and among treatments, stem growth was related to absorbed radiation, and stem growth response to treatment reflected mostly the changes in L.

  16. Expression of a gymnosperm PIN homologous gene correlates with auxin immunolocalization pattern at cotyledon formation and in demarcation of the procambium during Picea abies somatic embryo development and in seedling tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palovaara, Joakim; Hallberg, Henrik; Stasolla, Claudio; Luit, Bert; Hakman, Inger

    2010-04-01

    In seed plants, the body organization is established during embryogenesis and is uniform across gymnosperms and angiosperms, despite differences during early embryogeny. Evidence from angiosperms implicates the plant hormone auxin and its polar transport, mainly established by the PIN family of auxin efflux transporters, in the patterning of embryos. Here, PaPIN1 from Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.), a gene widely expressed in conifer tissues and organs, was characterized and its expression and localization patterns were determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization during somatic embryo development and in seedlings. PaPIN1 shares the predicted structure of other PIN proteins, but its central hydrophilic loop is longer than most PINs. In phylogenetic analyses, PaPIN1 clusters with Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. PIN3, PIN4 and PIN7, but its expression pattern also suggests similarity to PIN1. The PaPIN1 expression signal was high in the protoderm of pre-cotyledonary embryos, but not if embryos were pre-treated with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). This, together with a high auxin immunolocalization signal in this cell layer, suggests a role of PaPIN1 during cotyledon formation. At later stages, high PaPIN1 expression was observed in differentiating procambium, running from the tip of incipient cotyledons down through the embryo axis and to the root apical meristem (RAM), although the mode of RAM specification in conifer embryos differs from that of most angiosperms. Also, the PaPIN1 in situ signal was high in seedling root tips including root cap columella cells. The results thus suggest that PaPIN1 provides an ancient function associated with auxin transport and embryo pattern formation prior to the separation of angiosperms and gymnosperms, in spite of some morphological differences.

  17. Genetic relationships among some Pinus, Picea and Abies species revealed by RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were undertaken to identify genetic relationships among ten different species of the family Pinaceae through randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. Eighteen arbitrary RAPD primers produced 123 fragments of which 107 were polymorphic (87%. The similarity coefficient values varied from 0.34 to 0.67. The highest similarity coefficient was detected between Pinus wallichiana and P. strobus as well as between Picea abies and P. orientalis, and the lowest was detected between threePinus species (P. heldreichii, P. peuce and P. wallichiana and Picea omorika. The analysis of RAPD markers confirmed the genetic relationships among species. GenusPicea is clearly separated from genus Pinus and is closer to genus Abies (A. concolor than to genus Pinus, what confirms up-to-date numerous comparative-morphological, anatomical, chemotaxonomic and molecular results of these closely related genera. Furthermore, on the basis of our results, pine species from different subgenera -Pinus and Strobus are clearly separated. This statement is in agreement with contemporary intrageneric classification of the genus Pinus. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br.173029

  18. Sequencing of the needle transcriptome from Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst L. reveals lower substitution rates, but similar selective constraints in gymnosperms and angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed knowledge about spatial and temporal gene expression is important for understanding both the function of genes and their evolution. For the vast majority of species, transcriptomes are still largely uncharacterized and even in those where substantial information is available it is often in the form of partially sequenced transcriptomes. With the development of next generation sequencing, a single experiment can now simultaneously identify the transcribed part of a species genome and estimate levels of gene expression. Results mRNA from actively growing needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies was sequenced using next generation sequencing technology. In total, close to 70 million fragments with a length of 76 bp were sequenced resulting in 5 Gbp of raw data. A de novo assembly of these reads, together with publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST data from Norway spruce, was used to create a reference transcriptome. Of the 38,419 PUTs (putative unique transcripts longer than 150 bp in this reference assembly, 83.5% show similarity to ESTs from other spruce species and of the remaining PUTs, 3,704 show similarity to protein sequences from other plant species, leaving 4,167 PUTs with limited similarity to currently available plant proteins. By predicting coding frames and comparing not only the Norway spruce PUTs, but also PUTs from the close relatives Picea glauca and Picea sitchensis to both Pinus taeda and Taxus mairei, we obtained estimates of synonymous and non-synonymous divergence among conifer species. In addition, we detected close to 15,000 SNPs of high quality and estimated gene expression differences between samples collected under dark and light conditions. Conclusions Our study yielded a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as estimates of gene expression on transcriptome scale. In agreement with a recent study we find that the synonymous substitution rate per year (0.6 × 10

  19. Genetic diversity and the mating system of a rare Mexican Piñon, Pinus pinceana, and a comparison with Pinus maximartinezii (Pinaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Thomas Ledig; Miguel A. Capó-Arteaga; Paul D. Hodgskiss; Hassan Sbay; Celestino Flores-López; M. Thompson Conkle; Basilio Bermejo-Velázquez

    2001-01-01

    Weeping piñon (Pinus pinceana) has a restricted and fragmented range, trees are widely scattered within populations, and reproduction is limited. Nevertheless, genetic diversity was high; based on 27 isozyme loci in 18 enzyme systems, unbiased expected heterozygosity averaged 0.174. Differentiation also was high (FST = 0.152),...

  20. Biocontrol of Fusarium circinatum Infection of Young Pinus radiata Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Iturritxa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch canker, caused by the fungus Fusarium circinatum, is a major disease of Pinus radiata currently controlled to some extent in nurseries by good hygiene and application of synthetic fungicides. The aim of this study was to evaluate alternative strategies to control fungal infections in nurseries and young pine plantations. The antagonistic effects of biocontrol bacteria and essential oils against F. circinatum in vitro and in young P. radiata trees were assessed. Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia billingiae, and Bacillus simplex reduced the growth of the fungus in vitro by 17%–29%, and decreased the density of the mycelial mat. In young P. radiata trees, the length of F. circinatum lesions was reduced by 22%–25% by the same bacterial strains. Direct application of cinnamon and/or clove essential oils to wounds in stems of two-year-old P. radiata trees also limited the damage caused by F. circinatum. Lesion length was reduced by 51% following treatment with cinnamon oil (10% v/v, and by 45% following treatment with clove oil (15% v/v or a combination of both oils. However, the oils were toxic to younger trees. The biocontrol bacteria and essential oils show promise as prophylactic treatments to reduce the devastating effects of F. circinatum on P. radiata.

  1. THE INFECTION PROCESS OF Fusarium subglutinans IN Pinus merkusii SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Widyastuti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pinus merkusii or tusam is an original Indonesian plant and it is naturally distributed in Aceh and North Sumatra. Damping-off disease is the main problem in its nurseries. Fusarium subglutinans is one of the leading causes of damping-off disease. The knowledge of fungal infections process of tusam seedlings is essential to control damping- off disease effectively.The aim of this research is to understand (1 infection process of F. subglutinans in tusam seedlings and the defence response of seedlings against the infection of F. subglutinans. The methods used in this research were (1 identification of fungal pathogens that causing the disease, (2 pathogenicity test of F. subglutinans, (3 detection the accumulation of lignin, accumulation of callose and hypersensitive reactions by staining of seedling tissue using phloroglucinol, aniline blue and lactophenol trypan blue.The results of this study revealed that spores germination occurred in two days after inoculation. Direct penetration through cell wall and stomata was observed on the third day after inoculation. There was hypersensitive reaction in stomata. Accumulation of callose and lignin appeared on the third day after inoculation. However, defence response of seedlings was not effective, as F. subglutinans is a necrotroph fungus.

  2. Various response of Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. regeneration in artifical gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibin; Zhao, Kuangji; Yang, Haijiao; Ma, Lvyi; Jia, Zhongkui

    2017-11-06

    Understanding the influence of gaps in promoting canopy recruitment will help to maintain structural stability and achieve continuous forest cover. We established three control plots and experimental plots with three replications each (gap sizes L-I, L-II, L-III, and L-IV) in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) plantation to test the short-term effects of gap size on the age distribution, density and growth, and annual height and ground diameter growth for regeneration established before (REBG) and after (REAG) gap creation. Age distribution exhibited an approximately normal distribution, with the numbers of REBG and REAG decreasing and increasing, respectively, as the age increased. Although there was no difference in density among gap size classes, regeneration growth positively responded to gap size, with maximum values observed in class L-III. Annual average height growth after (AAH-A) gap creation was significantly greater than that before (AAH-B) gap creation for REBG among gap sizes, suggesting that gaps promote the rapid growth of regeneration. However, the responses of height and ground diameter growth in REBG to gap size were not immediate and exhibited a response delay of 2-4 years. Similarly, for the height and ground diameter growth of REAG, significant differences were first observed within years 2-4 after germination in the same growing season for all gap size classes.

  3. VARIABILITY OF THE MORPHOLOGIC PARAMETERS IN Pinus elliottii Engelm SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Righi dos Reis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Even whith the advance in the techniques of seedlings production, many problems still remain to be solved, mainly thoseproblems related to seedlings delivery. This work verified the variability of the growth parameters in seedlings of Pinus elliottii indifferent positions inside the production tray, along the time, seeking to identify the best time and form of delivery of homogeneous andhigh quality seedlings. In order to achieve these purposes, an experiment was installed in the forest nursery of Santa Maria FederalUniversity RS. Ten evaluations of height, diameter of the collar and height/diameter relationship were performed, in intervals of 15days. It was simulated each tray of the repetition parcel in order to determine the best form of seedlings delivery from the green house.It was verified that, 135 days after germination, uniformity among morphologic parameters of seedlings delivery were achieved forthe simulations when dividing the tray in Border x Center (BxC, Right x Center x Left (DxCxE, and Quadrants, and that after 180days, Front x Center x Bottom (FrxCxF standardization was achieved. Differences in the quality pattern of seedlings collected indifferent places and submitted to the same development condition were observed and that seedlings delivered on a regular scheduleallows obtaining homogeneous quality pattern.

  4. [Variation of dormancy characteristic of different Pinus bungeana seed sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Liu, J; Wang, J

    2000-02-01

    Studies on the dormancy characteristics of Pinus bungeana seeds from 7 representative seed sources show that the difference of water permeability of seed capsule was very significant among seed sources. The seeds from northern part of distribution area had a much higher water permeability than from the south. According to water permeability, the seven seed sources were divided into 2 geographical groups, with Qinling Mountain as the division line. The difference of seed ventilation was caused firstly by outer seed capsule, and secondly by inner one. The variation of permeability had a similar trend with the ventilation. The inhibition ability of seed extracts was significantly different among different seed sources, which was increased with the concentration of seed extracts. Based on the inhibition ability of extracts from seed capsule and endosperm, the seven seed sources were divided into 2 and 3 geographical groups, respectively. The germination capacity decreased with increasing latitude, and seeds with poor germination capacity took relatively more time for germination. All population groups based on different division criteria showed such a character, i.e., the difference of seed characteristics was more significant among groups than in same group, and the distance of seed source was longer among groups than in a group. The difference of dormancy characteristics of different P. bungeana seed sources was the result of interaction between climatic and geographical factors.

  5. Local variations in microfungal populations on Pinus sylvestris needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourbière, François; Debouzie, Domitien

    2003-10-01

    We studied the fungal colonization of Pinus sylvestris needles in two neighbouring sites, comparing stands of isolated and grouped trees. We observed large variations among the proportions of needles bearing fruit bodies of Cyclaneusma minus, Lophodermium pinastri, Verticicladium trifidum and black lines characteristic of L. pinastri colonization. Variations between sites and within trees were greater than that between stands or between trees. The frequency of L. pinastri colonization was negatively correlated with C. minus fruit body frequency, while the frequency of V. trifidum conidiophores was positively correlated with L. pinastri colonization frequency without fruiting, and negatively correlated with C. minus apothecia frequency. Although L. pinastri black lines and C. minus apothecia were nearly randomly associated on individual needles in each sample, the two fungi occupied different segments when they occupied the same needle. These patterns at needle and sample scales do not explain the negative correlation between the frequencies of these two species observed at larger scales. In each sample, frequency of V. trifidum conidiophores was highest on needles colonized by L. pinastri without fruiting. On individual needles, V. trifidum conidiophores developed on segments colonized by L. pinastri without fruiting, but not on segments bearing fruit bodies of L. pinastri or C. minus. These patterns at needle and sample scales were consistent with the correlations between frequencies observed at larger scales. These results were compared to variations observed with stand age and climate in others studies. The observed variations might result from both microclimate variations and fungal interactions.

  6. Effects of "short" photoperiods on seedling growth of Pinus brutia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovoglou, V; Radoglou, K; Kostopoulou, P; Dini-Papanastasi, O

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated how nurseries could benefit by inducing "short" photoperiods as low as 4 hr to produce "better" seedlings characterized by more vigorous roots; a substantial feature to overcome transplanting stress. The carryover effect of the photoperiod was also investigated on seedlings that grew for 30 days more underthe consistent 14 hr photoperiod. Seedlings of Pinus brutia were subjected to 4, 6, 8 and 14 hr photoperiod for 3 week. Fifteen seedlings were used to evaluate the leaf area, the root and shoot dry weight and their ratio. Six and sixteen seedlings were used to evaluate the shoot electrolyte leakage and the root growth potential, respectively. Based on the results, the 6 and 8 hr photoperiod indicated greater root allocation (4.8 and 4.9 mg, respectively) and chlorophyll content (3.7 and 4.4, respectively). They also indicated greater leaf area values (3.3 and 3.5 cm2, respectively) along with the 14 hr (3.4 cm2). The photoperiod effect continued even after seedlings were subjected at consistent photoperiod. Overall, "short" photoperiods could provide "better" P. brutia seedlings to accommodate immediate massive reforestation and afforestation needs.

  7. Variation among individuals in cone production in Pinus palustris (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Kelly L; Fox, Gordon A

    2012-04-01

    Reproductive output varies considerably among individuals within plant populations, and this is especially so in cone production of conifers. While this variation can have substantial effects on populations, little is known about its magnitude or causes. We studied variation in cone production for 2 years within a population of Pinus palustris Mill. (longleaf pine; Pinaceae). Using hurdle models, we evaluated the importance of burn treatments, tree size (dbh), canopy status (open, dominant, subordinate), and number of conspecific neighbors within 4 m (N(4)). Cone production of individuals-even after accounting for other variables-was strongly correlated between years. Trees in plots burned every 1, 2, or 5 years produced more cones than those burned every 7 years, or unburned. Larger trees tend to produce more cones, but the large effects of the other factors studied caused substantial scatter in the dbh-cone number relationship. Among trees in the open, dbh had little explanatory power. Subordinate trees with three neighbors produced no cones. Tree size alone was a weak predictor of cone production. Interactions with neighbors play an important role in generating reproductive heterogeneity, and must be accounted for when relating cone production to size. The strong between-year correlation, together with the large variance in cone production among trees without neighbors, suggests that still more of the variance may be explainable, but requires factors outside of our study.

  8. Association genetics in Pinus taeda L. II. Carbon isotope discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, S C; Huber, D; Ersoz, E; Davis, J M; Neale, D B

    2008-07-01

    Dissection of complex traits that influence fitness is not only a central topic in evolutionary research but can also assist breeding practices for economically important plant species, such as loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L). In this study, 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 41 disease and abiotic stress-inducible genes were tested for their genetic association with carbon isotope discrimination (CID), a time-integrated trait measure of stomatal conductance. A family-based approach to detect genotype/phenotype genetic association was developed for the first time in plants by applying the quantitative transmission disequilibrium test on an association population of 961 clones from 61 families (adopted from previous breeding programs) evaluated for phenotypic expression of CID at two sites. Two particularly promising candidates for their genetic effects on CID are: dhn-1, involved in stabilization of cell structures, and lp5-like, a glycine rich protein putatively related to cell wall reinforcement proteins, both of which were shown in previous studies to be water-deficit inducible. Moreover, association in lp5-like involves a nonsynonymous mutation in linkage disequilibrium with two other nonsynonymous polymorphisms that could, by acting together, enhance overall phenotypic effects. This study highlights the complexity of dissecting CID traits and provides insights for designing second-generation association studies based on candidate gene approaches in forest trees.

  9. Nitrogen metabolism in Lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, P. S.; Towers, G. H.; Lewis, N. G.

    1996-01-01

    The primary metabolic fate of phyenylalanine, following its deamination in plants, is conscription of its carbon skeleton for lignin, suberin, flavonoid, and related metabolite formation. Since this accounts for approximately 30-40% of all organic carbon, an effective means of recycling the liberated ammonium ion must be operative. In order to establish how this occurs, the uptake and metabolism of various 15N-labeled precursors (15N-Phe, 15NH4Cl, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Glu) in lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures was investigated, using a combination of high performance liquid chromatography, 15N NMR, and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analyses. It was found that the ammonium ion released during active phenylpropanoid metabolism was not made available for general amino acid/protein synthesis. Rather it was rapidly recycled back to regenerate phenylalanine, thereby providing an effective means of maintaining active phenylpropanoid metabolism with no additional nitrogen requirement. These results strongly suggest that, in lignifying cells, ammonium ion reassimilation is tightly compartmentalized.

  10. Selfed embryo death in Pinus taeda: a phenotypic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Claire G

    2008-01-01

    Selective elimination of selfed embryos, or inbreeding depression, is shared among many members of the Pinaceae but it has not been fully characterized at the phenotypic level. Here, two death pattern model hypotheses are tested using 10 621 Pinus taeda embryos sampled in two cohorts. Cones from a single pedigree based on selfed, outbred, parent-offspring and offspring-parent matings were destructively sampled weekly before, during and after fertilization. Selfed embryo deaths adhered to two patterns over the course of development: death was linear with respect to days from fertilization; and a stage-specific death peak occurred during the early embryogeny stage. This death peak occurred from 23 to 36 d after fertilization in the 2004 cohort and from 27 to 34 d after fertilization in the 2006 cohort. Of those selfed embryos that died, 64-83% died at stages where a single dominant embryo was elongating inside the female gametophyte. Additional genetic models are needed to account for the stage-specific death component of selfed P. taeda embryos.

  11. Association genetics of the loblolly pine (Pinus taeda, Pinaceae) metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Andrew J; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Cumbie, W Patrick; Goldfarb, Barry; Huber, Dudley A; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Fiehn, Oliver; Neale, David B

    2012-03-01

    The metabolome of a plant comprises all small molecule metabolites, which are produced during cellular processes. The genetic basis for metabolites in nonmodel plants is unknown, despite frequently observed correlations between metabolite concentrations and stress responses. A quantitative genetic analysis of metabolites in a nonmodel plant species is thus warranted. Here, we use standard association genetic methods to correlate 3563 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to concentrations of 292 metabolites measured in a single loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) association population. A total of 28 single locus associations were detected, representing 24 and 20 unique SNPs and metabolites, respectively. Multilocus Bayesian mixed linear models identified 2998 additional associations for a total of 1617 unique SNPs associated to 255 metabolites. These SNPs explained sizeable fractions of metabolite heritabilities when considered jointly (56.6% on average) and had lower minor allele frequencies and magnitudes of population structure as compared with random SNPs. Modest sets of SNPs (n = 1-23) explained sizeable portions of genetic effects for many metabolites, thus highlighting the importance of multi-SNP models to association mapping, and exhibited patterns of polymorphism consistent with being linked to targets of natural selection. The implications for association mapping in forest trees are discussed. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Hydraulic adjustments underlying drought resistance of Pinus halepensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Cohen, Shabtai; Yakir, Dan

    2011-06-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality has increased over the last decades in forests around the globe. Our objective was to investigate under controlled conditions the hydraulic adjustments underlying the observed ability of Pinus halepensis to survive seasonal drought under semi-arid conditions. One hundred 18-month saplings were exposed in the greenhouse to 10 different drought treatments, simulating combinations of intensities (fraction of water supply relative to control) and durations (period with no water supply) for 30 weeks. Stomata closed at a leaf water potential (Ψ(l)) of -2.8 MPa, suggesting isohydric stomatal regulation. In trees under extreme drought treatments, stomatal closure reduced CO(2) uptake to -1 µmol m(-2) s(-1), indicating the development of carbon starvation. A narrow hydraulic safety margin of 0.3 MPa (from stomatal closure to 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity) was observed, indicating a strategy of maximization of CO2 uptake in trees otherwise adapted to water stress. A differential effect of drought intensity and duration was observed, and was explained by a strong dependence of the water stress effect on the ratio of transpiration to evapotranspiration T/ET and the larger partitioning to transpiration associated with larger irrigation doses. Under intense or prolonged drought, the root system became the main target for biomass accumulation, taking up to 100% of the added biomass, while the stem tissue biomass decreased, associated with up to 60% reduction in xylem volume.

  13. Asexual propagation of Pinus leiophylla Schiede ex Schltdl. et Cham.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Cuevas-Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El efecto del sustrato, tipo de estaca y concentración de ácido indolbutírico (AIB se evaluó en el enraizado de estacas de Pinus leiophylla con el propósito de multiplicar progenies de familias de medios hermanos con crecimiento sobresaliente. Para ello se utilizaron dos tipos de sustratos (agrolita y una mezcla de turba-agrolita-vermiculita 1:1:1, dos tipos de estacas (apicales y basales y dos concentraciones de AIB (0 y 10,000 ppm. La probabilidad y porcentaje de enraizado, crecimiento de la estaca y características de las raíces formadas de P. leiophylla se evaluaron. Los resultados indican que usando estacas basales es 3.5 veces más probable que el enraizamiento de P. leiophylla sea exitoso que utilizando estacas apicales. El tratamiento formado por la mezcla de turba-agrolita-vermiculita, estaca basal y 10,000 ppm de AIB produjo 45.3 % de enraizamiento (mayor porcentaje, mientras que con el testigo solo se obtuvo 8.6 % de enraizamiento (agrolita, estaca basal y sin AIB. Las interacciones que incluyeron el tipo de sustrato mostraron diferencias significativas (P ≤ 0.05 en el crecimiento de la estaca. El uso de agrolita y la aplicación de AIB favorecieron un mayor número de raíces, particularmente en las estacas tipo basal de P. leiophylla.

  14. [Soil microbial functional diversity of different altitude Pinus koraiensis forests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-xue; Wang, Ning; Wang, Nan-nan; Sun, Xue; Feng, Fu-juan

    2015-12-01

    In order to comprehensively understand the soil microbial carbon utilization characteristics of Pinus koraiensis forests, we took the topsoil (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm) along the 700-1100 m altitude in Changbai Mountains and analyzed the vertical distributed characteristics and variation of microbial functional diversity along the elevation gradient by Biolog microplate method. The results showed that there were significant differences in functional diversity of microbial communities at different elevations. AWCD increased with the extension of incubation time and AWCD at the same soil depth gradually decreased along with increasing altitude; Shannon, Simpson and McIntosh diversity index also showed the same trend with AWCD and three different diversity indices were significantly different along the elevation gradient; Species diversity and functional diversity showed the same variation. The utilization intensities of six categories carbon sources had differences while amino acids were constantly the most dominant carbon source. Principal component analysis (PCA) identified that soil microbial carbon utilization at different altitudes had obvious spatial differentiation, as reflected in the use of carbohydrates, amino acids and carboxylic acids. In addition, the cluster of the microbial diversity indexes and AWCD values of different altitudes showed that the composition of vegetation had a significant impact on soil microbial composition and functional activity.

  15. Aboveground Tree Biomass for Pinus ponderosa in Northeastern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A. Hamilton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest managers need accurate biomass equations to plan thinning for fuel reduction or energy production. Estimates of carbon sequestration also rely upon such equations. The current allometric equations for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa commonly employed for California forests were developed elsewhere, and are often applied without consideration potential for spatial or temporal variability. Individual-tree aboveground biomass allometric equations are presented from an analysis of 79 felled trees from four separate management units at Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest: one unthinned and three separate thinned units. A simultaneous set of allometric equations for foliage, branch and bole biomass were developed as well as branch-level equations for wood and foliage. Foliage biomass relationships varied substantially between units while branch and bole biomass estimates were more stable across a range of stand conditions. Trees of a given breast height diameter and crown ratio in thinned stands had more foliage biomass, but slightly less branch biomass than those in an unthinned stand. The observed variability in biomass relationships within Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest suggests that users should consider how well the data used to develop a selected model relate to the conditions in any given application.

  16. Occurrence of Ganoderma adspersum on Pinus pinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele De SIMONE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During a survey in a pine stand in Rome, six basidiomes of Ganoderma adspersum were collected from declining 50-60 year-old Pinus pinea. Species identification was accomplished through observation of macroscopic and microscopic morphological traits. Furthermore, ITS sequences of the collected specimens, 28 samples collected elsewhere, one isolate from the German collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ, and 21 sequences from GenBank were analyzed using MP and UPGMA. Both analyses showed that isolates fell into four well-delineated clades, namely G. adspersum, G. applanatum, G. resinaceum and G. lucidum. All the isolates collected from P. pinea were confirmed as G. adspersum. Previously, G. adspersum had been reported on hardwood trees and infrequently on a few conifers. Only sporocarps identified on the basis of morphological characters as G. applanatum have sporadically been recorded on P. pinea; there is no previous record of G. adspersum on this host. Somatic incompatibility tests showed that infections, probably via basidiospores, and symptoms apparently associated with wood colonization by G. adspersum, worsened during the 3-year course of the study.

  17. Ethnobotany and phytopharmacology of Pinus roxburghii Sargent: a plant review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Pawan; Kaushik, Dhirender; Khokra, Sukhbir Lal

    2013-11-01

    Traditional medicine is a blend of information gathered over generations from various communities and cultures. Pinus roxburghii Sargent (Pinaceae) commonly known as "chir pine" is widely used in traditional and folkloric systems of medicine. The all parts of the plant are believed to possess medicinal qualities in Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine. In these traditional systems of medicine, the plant is used to heal many diseases, including afflictions of the eyes, ears, throat, blood, and skin. The plant parts are rich in various bioactive compounds such as α-pinene, abietic acid, quercetin and xanthone. Resin acids and flavanoid form a major portion of these bioactive compounds. This review presents examples of traditional medicinal uses for P. roxburghii, and subsequently explores the current understanding of the chemical, pharmacological, and biochemical properties of the extracts and the main active constituents found in each tissue of the plant. Clinical trial information is also included where available. Careful evaluation of these data may be helpful for scientists and researchers to discover and evaluate the specific chemical entities responsible for the traditional medicinal uses of P. roxburghii.

  18. Modeling productivity and transpiration of Pinus radiata: climatic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, D. W.; Mattay, J. P.; McMurtrie, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Climatic effects on annual net carbon gain, stem biomass and annual transpiration were simulated for Pinus radiata D. Don at Canberra and Mt. Gambier. Simulations were conducted with an existing process-based forest growth model (BIOMASS, Model 1) and with a modified version of the BIOMASS model (Model 2) in which response functions for carbon assimilation and leaf conductance were replaced with those derived from field gas exchange data collected at Mt. Gambier. Simulated carbon gain was compared with a published report stating that mean annual stem volume increment (MAI) at Mt. Gambier was 1.8 times greater than at Canberra and that the difference could be the result solely of differences in climate. Regional differences in climate resulted in a 20% greater simulated annual transpiration at Canberra than at Mt. Gambier but only small differences in simulated productivity, indicating that climatic differences did not account for the reported differences in productivity. With Model 1, simulated annual net carbon gain and annual increase in stem biomass were greater at Canberra than at Mt. Gambier, whereas Model 2 indicated a similar annual net carbon gain and annual stem biomass increase in both regions.

  19. Urbanization in China drives soil acidification of Pinus massoniana forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Mo, Jiangming; Wang, Shizhong; Liu, Juxiu; Chen, Hao

    2015-09-24

    Soil acidification instead of alkalization has become a new environmental issue caused by urbanization. However, it remains unclear the characters and main contributors of this acidification. We investigated the effects of an urbanization gradient on soil acidity of Pinus massoniana forests in Pearl River Delta, South China. The soil pH of pine forests at 20-cm depth had significantly positive linear correlations with the distance from the urban core of Guangzhou. Soil pH reduced by 0.44 unit at the 0-10 cm layer in urbanized areas compared to that in non-urbanized areas. Nitrogen deposition, mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation were key factors influencing soil acidification based on a principal component analysis. Nitrogen deposition showed significant linear relationships with soil pH at the 0-10 cm (for ammonium N(NH4+(-N)), P < 0.05; for nitrate N(NO3-(-N)), P < 0.01) and 10-20 cm (for NO3-(-N), P < 0.05) layers. However, there was no significant loss of exchangeable non-acidic cations along the urbanization gradient, instead their levels were higher in urban than in urban/suburban area at the 0-10 cm layer. Our results suggested N deposition particularly under the climate of high temperature and rainfall, greatly contributed to a significant soil acidification occurred in the urbanized environment.

  20. Paleoclimatic implications of glacial and postglacial refugia for Pinus pumila in western Beringia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, P M; Lozhkin, A V; Solomatkina, T B; Brown, T A

    2010-02-05

    Palynological results from Julietta Lake currently provide the most direct evidence to support the existence of a glacial refugium for Pinus pumila in mountains of southwestern Beringia. Both percentages and accumulation rates indicate the evergreen shrub survived until at least {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. in the Upper Kolyma region. Percentage data suggest numbers dwindled into the late glaciation, whereas pollen accumulation rates point towards a more rapid demise shortly after {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. Pinus pumila did not re-establish in any great numbers until {approx}8100 14C yr B.P., despite the local presence {approx}9800 14C yr B.P. of Larix dahurica, which shares similar summer temperature requirements. The postglacial thermal maximum (in Beringia {approx}11,000-9000 14C yr B.P.) provided Pinus pumila shrubs with equally harsh albeit different conditions for survival than those present during the LGM. Regional records indicate that in this time of maximum warmth Pinus pumila likely sheltered in a second, lower-elevation refugium. Paleoclimatic models and modern ecology suggest that shifts in the nature of seasonal transitions and not only seasonal extremes have played important roles in the history of Pinus pumila over the last {approx}21,000 14C yr B.P.

  1. Highly effective fog-water collection with Pinus canariensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, A.

    2010-07-01

    Fog-collecting nets require constant manpower in terms of maintainance. Also, those nets are made of artificial material, and they do not really fit into the natural environment. They are, by far, not as effective as plants that are specialised for catching humidity from the air. The probably most effective plant to serve this purpose is Pinus canariensis, a tree native to the Canary Islands. It is well-known for its capability of collecting air moisture, and has already been used for many centuries for this purpose. This tree would allow a much more effective and environmentally friendly way of supplying arid regions with drinking water than this could be done with fog-catching nets. Moreover, it would also help to establish or re-establish vegetation in a natural way. Agriculture would profit from it, too, because vegetables could be produced, watered with the help of P. canariensis. In those places, where the net-projects are currently running, it is the right time now to plant P. canariensis seedlings underneath the nets, which they will soon replace. The surface of the trees is much larger than the surface of the nets, thus enabling much more water to condensate. Within a few years, a population of P. canariensis will be established that collects many times more water than the nets. With regard to ecological aspects, the introduction of P. canariensis into the environments concerned do not cause a problem, since in those desert areas, there are no native trees that could be superseded, and the P. canariensis trees are easy to control. They are a natural alternative to the unnatural plastic nets, and can even help to enhance any local flora.

  2. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in endangered Pinus amamiana forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Masao; Kanetani, Seiichi; Nara, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between trees and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are critical for the growth and survival of both partners. However, ECM symbiosis in endangered trees has hardly been explored, complicating conservation efforts. Here, we evaluated resident ECM roots and soil spore banks of ECM fungi from endangered Pinus amamiana forests on Yakushima and Tanegashima Islands, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. Soil samples were collected from remaining four forests in the two islands. The resident ECM roots in soil samples were subjected to molecular identification. Soil spore banks of ECM fungi were analyzed via bioassays using a range of host seedlings (P. amamiana, P. parviflora, P. densiflora and Castanopsis sieboldii) for 6-8 months. In all remaining P. amamiana forests, we discovered a new Rhizopogon species (Rhizopogon sp.1), the sequence of which has no match amoung numerous Rhizopogon sequences deposited in the international sequence database. Host identification of the resident ECM roots confirmed that Rhizopogon sp.1 was associated only with P. amamiana. Rhizopogon sp.1 was far more dominant in soil spore banks than in resident ECM roots, and its presence was confirmed in nearly all soil samples examined across the major remaining populations. While Rhizopogon sp.1 did not completely lose compatibility to other pine species, its infection rate in the bioassays was highest in the original host, P. amamiana, the performance of which was improved by the infection. These results indicate that Rhizopogon sp.1 is very likely to have a close ecological relationship with endangered P. amamiana, probably due to a long co-evolutionary period on isolated islands, and to play the key role in seedling establishment after disturbance. We may need to identify and utilize such key ECM fungi to conserve endangered trees practically.

  3. Cytogenetic variability in pinus sylvestris L. populations experiencing anthropogenic influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, A.; Geras'kin, S.; Vasiliev, D.; Dikarev, V.

    2004-01-01

    Techno-genic pollution has become one of the most significant ecological factors determining biosphere existence and development. An analysis of genetic consequences of the radiation accidents in the South Urals and Chernobyl has shown that mutation and recombination processes are considerably accelerated in plant and animal's populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This implies that there are complicated adaptation processes leading to changes in genetic structure of populations and increasing genetic load. Pinus sylvestris L. populations growing at the territory of the 'radon' Leningrad regional radioactive waste reprocessing enterprise and Sosnovy Bor town were monitored 6 years (1997-2002) by a set of cyto-genetical and morphological tests. Cytogenetic damage levels within intercalary meristem of needle as well as in root meristem of seedlings were found to significantly exceed corresponding controls. A higher radioresistance of the Scots pine seeds analyzed was demonstrated with an acute γ-radiation that also revealed a selection process directed at an enhancement of repair efficiency and resulting in a shift of mean values of radioresistance in populations towards higher values. An enlargement of variance of studied cytogenetic parameters was found in the populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This indicates, with an account of phenomenon of the enhanced radioresistance, that there are processes of cyto-genetical adaptation in the investigated regions. An analysis of the structure of ecological-genetical variability was carried out with the purpose of separating two components in the inter-population variability - the first is engaged to the genetically determined variability of biological characteristics intrinsic for this species, and the second is responsible for the variability originating from anthropogenic contamination of the natural habitat. Changes of these two types of variability were studied in dependence on time and techno

  4. Cytogenetic variability in pinus sylvestris L. populations experiencing anthropogenic influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A.; Geras' kin, S.; Vasiliev, D.; Dikarev, V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Techno-genic pollution has become one of the most significant ecological factors determining biosphere existence and development. An analysis of genetic consequences of the radiation accidents in the South Urals and Chernobyl has shown that mutation and recombination processes are considerably accelerated in plant and animal's populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This implies that there are complicated adaptation processes leading to changes in genetic structure of populations and increasing genetic load. Pinus sylvestris L. populations growing at the territory of the 'radon' Leningrad regional radioactive waste reprocessing enterprise and Sosnovy Bor town were monitored 6 years (1997-2002) by a set of cyto-genetical and morphological tests. Cytogenetic damage levels within intercalary meristem of needle as well as in root meristem of seedlings were found to significantly exceed corresponding controls. A higher radioresistance of the Scots pine seeds analyzed was demonstrated with an acute {gamma}-radiation that also revealed a selection process directed at an enhancement of repair efficiency and resulting in a shift of mean values of radioresistance in populations towards higher values. An enlargement of variance of studied cytogenetic parameters was found in the populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This indicates, with an account of phenomenon of the enhanced radioresistance, that there are processes of cyto-genetical adaptation in the investigated regions. An analysis of the structure of ecological-genetical variability was carried out with the purpose of separating two components in the inter-population variability - the first is engaged to the genetically determined variability of biological characteristics intrinsic for this species, and the second is responsible for the variability originating from anthropogenic contamination of the natural habitat. Changes of these two types of variability were studied in dependence on

  5. Modeling seed dispersal distances: implications for transgenic Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Claire G; LaDeau, Shannon L; Oren, Ram; Katul, Gabriel G

    2006-02-01

    Predicting forest-tree seed dispersal across a landscape is useful for estimating gene flow from genetically engineered (GE) or transgenic trees. The question of biocontainment has yet to be resolved, although field-trial permits for transgenic forest trees are on the rise. Most current field trials in the United States occur in the Southeast where Pinus taeda L., an indigenous species, is the major timber commodity. Seed dispersal distances were simulated using a model where the major determinants were: (1) forest canopy height at seed release, (2) terminal velocity of the seeds, (3) absolute seed release, and (4) turbulent-flow statistics, all of which were measured or determined within a P. taeda plantation established from seeds collected from wild forest-tree stands at the Duke Forest near Durham, North Carolina, USA. In plantations aged 16 and 25 years our model results showed that most of the seeds fell within local-neighborhood dispersal distances, with estimates ranging from 0.05 to 0.14 km from the source. A fraction of seeds was uplifted above the forest canopy and moved via the long-distance dispersal (LDD) process as far as 11.9-33.7 km. Out of 10(5) seeds produced per hectare per year, roughly 440 seeds were predicted to be uplifted by vertical eddies above the forest canopy and transported via LDD. Of these, 70 seeds/ha traveled distances in excess of 1 km from the source, a distance too great to serve as a biocontainment zone. The probability of LDD occurrence of transgenic conifer seeds at distances exceeding 1 km approached 100%.

  6. Chemical properties of tannic extracts from bark of Pinus oocarpa and their use as adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Cardoso Vieira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the properties of aqueous extracts obtained from the bark of Pinus oocarpa under addition of sodium sulfite and sodium bisulfite and the possibility of employment of tannins from the bark as an adhesive for bonding wood. After evaluation of the chemical properties of tannic extracts it was decided to employ the extraction with distilled water under addition of / 5% sodium sulfite to prepare for the tannin-formaldehyde adhesive. Adhesive phenol formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde were modified with 10% tannin Pinus oocarpa and the effect of this addition on the quality of the adhesive was evaluated. The addition from the bark of Pinus oocarpa showed that it is possible to use pure tannin as an adhesive because of its good gluing characteristics. The addition of tannic extract to synthetic adhesives contributed to increase viscosity values. Thus the substitution of synthetic adhesives by tannins is possible only up to 10%.

  7. The characteristics of soil and water loss in Pinus Massoniana forest in Quaternary red soil area of south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuejun; Huang, Yanhe; Jie, Yang

    2017-08-01

    The soil and water loss in Pinus massoniana forests is an urgent environmental problem in the red soil region of southern China.Using the method of field monitoring, by analogy and statistical analysis, The characteristics of soil and water loss of Pinus massoniana forests in Quaternary red soil region under 30 rainfall were analyzed,the results show that the relationship models of rainfall,runoff and sediment of pure Pinus massoniana plot were slightly different from the naked control plot,were all the univariate quadratic linear regression models.the contribution of runoff and sediment in different rain types were different, and the water and soil loss in Pinus massoniana forest was most prominent under moderate rain.The merging effect of sparse Pinus massoniana forest on raindrop, aggravated the degree of soil and water loss to some extent.

  8. Growth decline assessment in Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus nigra Arnold. forest by using 3-PG model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Cerrillo, R.M.; Beira, J.; Suarez, J.; Xenakis, G.; Sánchez-Salguero, R.; Hernández-Clemente, R.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: We assessed the ability of the 3-PG process-based model to accurately predict growth of Pinus sylvestris and P. nigra plantations across a range of sites, showing declining growth trends, in southern Spain. Area of study: The study area is located in “Sierra de Los Filabres” (Almería). Material and methods: The model was modified in fifteen parameters to predict diameter (DBH, cm), basal area increment (BAI, cm2 yr-1) and leaf area index (LAI, m2 m-2) in healthy trees and trees showing declining growth. We assumed that a set of specific physiological parameters (stem partitioning ratio-pFS20, maximum litterfall rate-γFx, maximum canopy conductance-gCx, specific leaf area for mature aged stands-σ1, age at which specific leaf area = ½ (σ0 + σ1), age at full canopy cover-tc, and canopy boundary layer conductance-gB) included in 3-PG would be suitable for predicting growth decline related to climate conditions. The calibrated model was evaluated using dendrochronological and LAI data obtained from plots. Main results: Observed and simulated DBH showed a high correlation (R2 > 0.99) between modelled and measured values for both species. In contrast, modelled and observed BAI showed lower correlation (R2 < 0.68). Sensitivity analysis on 3-PG outputs showed that the foliage parameters - maximum litterfall rate, maximum canopy conductance, specific leaf area for mature aged stands, age at which specific leaf area, and age at full canopy cover - were important for DBH and BAI predictions under drought stress. Research highlights: Our overall results indicated that the 3-PG model could predict growth response of pine plantations to climatic stress with desirable accuracy in southern Spain by using readily available soil and climatic data with physiological parameters derived from experiments. (Author)

  9. [Acceleration of Embryonic Development of Pinus sibirica Trees with a One-Year Reproductive Cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tret'yakova, I N; Lukina, N V

    2016-01-01

    The study of the formation of embryonic structures in Pinus sibirica forms with a one-year reproductive cycle showed that the acceleration of the embryonic process manifested itself as a reduction of the coenocytic stage of the female gametophyte development (1.5 months instead of 1 year). The egg was not fertilized because of the asynchronous maturation of male and female gametophytes. Seeds without embryos were formed. We assumed that the acceleration of the reproductive process in Pinus sibirica was caused by a mutation in the female generative organs.

  10. Chemical, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Investigations of Pinus cembra L. Bark and Needles

    OpenAIRE

    Apetrei, Cristina Lungu; Tuchilus, Cristina; Aprotosoaie, Ana Clara; Oprea, Adrian; Malterud, Karl Egil; Miron, Anca

    2011-01-01

    The chemical constituents and biological activity of Pinus cembra L. (Pinaceae), native to the Central European Alps and the Carpathian Mountains, are not well known. The aim of the present work was to examine the phenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of hydromethanolic extracts of Pinus cembra L. bark and needles. Bark extract had higher concentrations of total phenolics (299.3 vs. 78.22 mg gallic acid equivalents/g extract), flavonoids (125.3 vs. 19.84 mg catechin equivale...

  11. Reproduction ecology of Pinus halepensis : a monoecious, wind-pollinated and partially serotinous Mediterranean pine tree

    OpenAIRE

    Goubitz, Shirrinka

    2001-01-01

    Fire is an important factor in the evolution and ecology of Mediterranean plant species. The fire frequency has increased in the 20st century. Pines are the most important tree species in the area. Pinus halepensis is the only natural pine in parts of the east Mediterranean basin, such as Israel and Jordan. This pine tree is a monoecious, wind-pollinated tree. Pinus halepensis regenerates in absence of fire as well as after fire, because it is a partially serotinous species. This study aims t...

  12. The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce (Picea abies) belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subclass of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed cones and pollen cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsbecker, Annelie; Sundström, Jens; Tandre, Karolina; Englund, Marie; Kvarnheden, Anders; Johanson, Urban; Engström, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Transcription factors encoded by different members of the MADS-box gene family have evolved central roles in the regulation of reproductive organ development in the flowering plants, the angiosperms. Development of the stamens and carpels, the pollen- and seed-bearing organs, involves the B- and C-organ-identity MADS-box genes. B- and C-type gene orthologs with activities specifically in developing pollen- and seed-bearing organs are also present in the distantly related gymnosperms: the conifers and the gnetophytes. We now report on the characterization of DAL10, a novel MADS-box gene from the conifer Norway spruce, which unlike the B- and C-type conifer genes shows no distinct orthology relationship to any angiosperm gene or clade in phylogenetic analyses. Like the B- and C-type genes, it is active specifically in developing pollen cones and seed cones. In situ RNA localization experiments show DAL10 to be expressed in the cone axis, which carry the microsporophylls of the young pollen cone. In contrast, in the seed cone it is expressed both in the cone axis and in the bracts, which subtend the ovuliferous scales. Expression data and the phenotype of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing DAL10 suggest that the gene may act upstream to or in concert with the B- and C-type genes in the establishment of reproductive identity of developing cones.

  13. Xylem hydraulic efficiency versus vulnerability in seedlings of four contrasting Mediterranean tree species (Cedrus atlantica, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis and Pinus nigra)

    OpenAIRE

    Froux, Fabienne; Huc, Roland; Ducrey, Michel; Dreyer, Erwin

    2002-01-01

    International audience; We studied the xylem hydraulic traits and anatomy of four diverse Mediterranean conifers to determine how these species protect themselves against catastrophic xylem failure. Cedrus atlantica, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus nigra and P. halepensis seedlings were grown for two years in pots in a greenhouse under well-watered conditions. Measurements were conducted in April and September. The vulnerability to cavitation was lower in April in the two pines and cedar wherea...

  14. Seed source variation and conservation of Pinus wallichiana in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Thapliyal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pinus wallichiana A.B. Jacks is an important component of the middle and high altitude Himalayan forests having large natural distribution ranging between 260 to 360 N latitude and 690 to 750 E longitudes. It is commonly known as Himalayan blue pine or blue pine, being indigenous to Himalayan Mountain regions and because of its bluish or grayish-green leaves. It is a five needle pine which gained world-wide attention for its resistance to blister rust among white pines. This species has been crossed successfully with other white pines and vigorous hybrids have been obtained. Considerable variation in morphological and anatomical characteristics of needles, cones and seeds in natural stands exists across the natural distribution of the species, especially in mesic and xeric habitats. These variations suggested the differentiation of this species in ecotypes or varieties as reported by various authors. However, the level of genetic diversity was found to be relatively high and the degree of genetic differentiation was low compared to other pines. The wide range of climatic conditions in the natural distribution of this pine is expected to result in high genetic variation within different populations of the species. The study aims to determine the nature and extent of variation present in the populations of the species in respect to cone and seed characteristics across its natural distribution. Seed of 17 seed sources from the states of Uttaranchal and Himachal Pradesh was collected and analyzed for cone characters (fresh weight of cones, cone length, cone width, specific gravity and seed characters (seed weight, moisture content, germination percent, cotyledon number. Significant variations have been observed in these traits among different seed sources of the species. The cone weight varied from 44.4 to114g and the higher cone weight was recorded at higher altitudes. The germination percent varied from 40 to 85 whereas cotyledon number varied

  15. Seed source variation and conservation of Pinus wallichiana in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thapliyal

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pinus wallichiana A.B. Jacks is an important component of the middleand high altitude Himalayan forests having large natural distribution ranging between 260 to 360 N latitude and 690 to 750 E longitudes. It is commonly known as Himalayan blue pine or blue pine, being indigenous to Himalayan Mountain regions and because of its bluish or grayish-green leaves. It is a five needle pine which gained world-wide attention for its resistance to blister rust among white pines. This species has been crossed successfully with other white pines and vigorous hybrids have been obtained. Considerable variation in morphological and anatomical characteristics of needles, cones and seeds in natural stands exists across the natural distribution of the species, especially in mesic and xeric habitats. These variationssuggested the differentiation of this species in ecotypes or varieties as reported by various authors. However, the level of genetic diversity was found to be relatively high and the degree of genetic differentiation was low compared to other pines. Thewide range of climatic conditions in the natural distribution of this pine is expected to result in high genetic variation within different populations of the species. The study aims to determine the nature and extent of variation present in the populations of the species in respect to cone and seed characteristics across its natural distribution. Seed of 17 seed sources from the states of Uttaranchal and Himachal Pradesh was collected and analyzed for cone characters (fresh weight of cones, cone length, cone width, specific gravity and seed characters (seed weight, moisture content, germination percent, cotyledon number. Significant variations have beenobserved in these traits among different seed sources of the species. The cone weight varied from 44.4 to114g and the higher cone weight was recorded at higher altitudes.The germination percent varied from 40 to 85 whereas cotyledon number varied from 7

  16. Intra-annual nutrient flux in Pinus taeda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Timothy J; Allen, H Lee; Stape, Jose L; Fox, Thomas R; Rubilar, Rafael A; Price, James W

    2012-10-01

    Intra-annual nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium) flux was quantified for Pinus taeda L. at a nutrient-poor, well-drained sandy site in Scotland County, NC, USA where a 2 × 2 factorial of irrigation and nutrition was applied in four replications in a 10-year-old stand with 1200 stems ha(-1). Treatments were applied with the goal of providing optimum nutrition (no nutritional deficiencies) and water availability. Component (foliage, branch, stem and root) nutrient content was estimated monthly for 2 years using nutrient concentration and phenology assessments combined with destructive harvests. Positive flux values indicated nutrient accumulation in the trees while negative values indicated nutrient loss from the trees. Fertilization significantly increased nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium flux 140%, on average, over non-fertilized. Irrigation significantly increased calcium flux 28% while there was no significant irrigation effect on nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium or magnesium. Maximum nutrient fluxes (kg ha(-1) day(-1)) for non-fertilized and fertilized stands were 0.36 and 1.05 for nitrogen, 0.042 and 0.095 for phosphorus, 0.13 and 0.51 for potassium, 0.27 and 0.42 for calcium, and 0.04 and 0.12 for magnesium, respectively. Maximum flux was coincident with ephemeral tissue (foliage and fine root) development and likely would be higher in stands with more foliage than those observed in this study (projected leaf area indices were 1.5 and 3.0 for the non-fertilized and fertilized stands). Minimum nutrient fluxes (kg ha(-1) day(-1)) for non-fertilized and fertilized stands were -0.18 and -0.42 for nitrogen, -0.029 and -0.070 for phosphorus, -0.05 and -0.18 for potassium, -0.04 and -0.05 for calcium, and -0.02 and -0.03 for magnesium, respectively. Minimum fluxes were typically observed in the dormant season and were linked to foliage senescence and branch death. Foliage and branch component nutrient contents

  17. Reproduction ecology of Pinus halepensis : a monoecious, wind-pollinated and partially serotinous Mediterranean pine tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goubitz, Shirrinka

    2001-01-01

    Fire is an important factor in the evolution and ecology of Mediterranean plant species. The fire frequency has increased in the 20st century. Pines are the most important tree species in the area. Pinus halepensis is the only natural pine in parts of the east Mediterranean basin, such as Israel and

  18. [Study of some characteristics of morphogenesis and germination of Pinus pallasiana D. Don. pollen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, V P

    2004-01-01

    Investigation of Pinus pallasiana D. Don. pollen morphogenesis in natural forest plantations of the southern slope of the Main ridge of Crimean mountains has been carried out. Some abnormalities of pollen grain and pollen tube formation in the course of pollen germination in vitro are described. The dynamics of developmental abnormalities of P. allasiana male gametophyte is characterized.

  19. The wood quality of Pinus chiapensis (Mart.) Andresen grown in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wood quality of Pinus chiapensis (Mart.) Andresen grown in the Mpumalanga forest region: scientific paper. ... When present, the amounts of included resin, pieces of bark and other debris at the occluded pruning cuts, were small and of little practical significance. The wood machined without any difficulty in the wet and ...

  20. Growth and physiological responses to varied environments among populations of Pinus ponderosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwei Zhang; Bert M. Cregg

    2005-01-01

    We investigated population responses in physiology, morphology, and growth of mature Pinus ponderosa trees to an environmental gradient across Nebraska, USA. Ten populations from western Nebraska and eastern Wyoming were grown in three 26-year-old provenance tests from the warmest and wettest site in the east (Plattsmouth) to the intermediate site in...

  1. Effects of temperature on Pinus patula seedlings growing in pots in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The re-establishment of Pinus patula seedlings into sites with high harvesting residue (slash) loads can negatively affect the survival of these plants. Field trials have examined the role that insect pests and fungal diseases play in causing this phenomenon. Research has also indicated that temperatures at ground level tend ...

  2. Results from four Pinus patula water planting trials in the summer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planting with water is used by some forestry companies in South Africa to reduce post-planting water stress. Four trials were implemented to test the response in survival of Pinus patula to water applied at planting. Two trials each were situated in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands and Mpumalanga escarpment. The first trial at ...

  3. Vector Analysis Identify Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) Phosphorus Deficiency on a Beauregard Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Bekele; W.H. Hundall; A.E. Tiarks

    1999-01-01

    We studied the response of densely stocked one-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) to N and P fertilizers on a Beauregard silt loam (fine silty, siliceous, thermic, Plinthaquic Paleudults). A continuous function" experimental design with three replications was used. Each replication consisted of 12 m X 12 m plots, with three trees planted...

  4. DNA analysis for section identification of individual Pinus pollen grains from Belukha glacier, Altai Mountains, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Fumio; Uetake, Jun; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Kaneko, Ryo; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Fujita, Koji; Motoyama, Hideaki; Imura, Satoshi; Kanda, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    Pollen taxon in sediment samples can be identified by analyzing pollen morphology. Identification of related species based on pollen morphology is difficult and is limited primarily to genus or family. Because pollen grains of various ages are preserved at below 0 °C in glaciers and thus are more likely to remain intact or to suffer little DNA fragmentation, genetic information from such pollen grains should enable identification of plant taxa below the genus level. However, no published studies have attempted detailed identification using DNA sequences obtained from pollen found in glaciers. As a preliminary step, this study attempted to analyze the DNA of Pinus pollen grains extracted from surface snow collected from the Belukha glacier in the Altai Mountains of Russia in the summer of 2003. A 150-bp rpoB fragment from the chloroplast genome in each Pinus pollen grain was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and DNA products were sequenced to identify them at the section level. A total of 105 pollen grains were used for the test, and sequences were obtained from eight grains. From the sequences obtained, the pollen grains were identified as belonging to the section Quinquefoliae. Trees of the extant species Pinus sibirica in the section Quinquefoliae are currently found surrounding the glacier. The consistency of results for this section suggests that the pollen in the glacier originated from the same Pinus trees as those found in the immediate surroundings.

  5. Strength reduction in slash pine (Pinus elliotii) wood caused by decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong Yang; Zhehui Jiang; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Small wood specimens selected from slash pine (Pinus elliotii )trees at three growth rates (fast, medium, and slow) were inoculated with brown-rot and white-rot fungi and then evaluated for work to maximum load (WML), modulus of rupture (MOR), and modulus of elasticity (MOE). The experimental variables studied included a brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum...

  6. Modeling contemporary climate profiles of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and predicting responses to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus V. Warwell; Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Nicholas L. Crookston

    2006-01-01

    The Random Forests multiple regression tree was used to develop an empirically-based bioclimate model for the distribution of Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine) in western North America, latitudes 31° to 51° N and longitudes 102° to 125° W. Independent variables included 35 simple expressions of temperature and precipitation and their interactions....

  7. Procyanidins from Pinus koraiensis bark inhibits HeLa cell growth by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, the development of herbal medicine is an important advancement in anticancer therapy. Pinus koraiensis ... PKBPE could make the agarose gel electrophoresis of HeLa cells appear with “ladder” zone in a dose-dependent manner, increase the expression of Bax, reduce Bcl-2 and survivin protein expressions.

  8. First discovery of fossil winged seeds of Pinus L.(family Pinaceae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    winged seeds; middle-to-late Miocene; Siwaliks; palaeobiogeography; Arunachal Pradesh; biogeosciences; climate; geology. Abstract. The occurrences of Pinus L. (family Pinaceae) megafossils (cones and leaf remains) have been abundantly documented from the Cenozoic sediments of eastern Asia (Japan and China), ...

  9. Assessing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) restoration after southern pine beetle kill using a compact experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.-P. Berrill; C.M. Dagley

    2010-01-01

    A compact experimental design and analysis is presented of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) survival and growth in a restoration project in the Piedmont region of Georgia, USA. Longleaf pine seedlings were planted after salvage logging and broadcast burning in areas of catastrophic southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) attacks on even-aged mixed pine-hardwood...

  10. First discovery of fossil winged seeds of Pinus L. (family Pinaceae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    18

    America, Mexico, North Africa, West Indies, Eurasia and the Pacific Islands in Sumatra (Kral. 6. 1993; Price et al. 1998). In India, Pinus is widely distributed in the hills and is an important. 7 source of resin and timber. Seven species are commonly found to occur in the North-West and. 8. North-East Himalayas from 150-3,000 ...

  11. Detection of possible Phytophthora pinifolia infection in pinus radiata green sawn timber produced in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Ahumada; C. Díaz; M. Peredo; C. Barría; P. González; G. Cuevas

    2010-01-01

    A new needle blight disease was observed on Pinus radiata in Chile during 2004. The disease, known in Chile as Daño Foliar del Pino (DFP), stretches southward from the Arauco to Valdivia Provinces, and was present over an area of about 60 000 ha in 2006, with different levels of intensity. The disease is typified by needle infections and...

  12. Comparative genetic responses to climate in the varieties of Pinus ponderosa and Pseudotsuga menziesii: reforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Barry C. Jaquish; Cuauhtemoc Saenz-Romero; Dennis G. Joyce; Laura P. Leites; J. Bradley St Clair; Javier Lopez-Upton

    2014-01-01

    Impacts of climate change on the climatic niche of the sub-specific varieties of Pinus ponderosa and Pseudotsuga menziesii and on the adaptedness of their populations are considered from the viewpoint of reforestation. In using climate projections from an ensemble of 17 general circulation models targeting the decade surrounding 2060, our analyses suggest that a...

  13. The future of subalpine forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains: Trajectories for Pinus aristata genetic lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkle L. Malone; Anna W. Schoettle; Jonathan D. Coop

    2018-01-01

    Like many other high elevation alpine tree species, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata Engelm.) may be particularly vulnerable to climate change. To evaluate its potential vulnerability to shifts in climate, we defined the suitable climate space for each of four genetic lineages of bristlecone pine and for other subalpine tree species in close proximity to...

  14. The effect of mid-rotation fertilization on the wood properties of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finto Antony; Lewis Jordan; Laurence R. Schimleck; Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark III

    2009-01-01

    Mid-rotation fertilization is a common practice in the management of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations, typically providing large improvements in growth. However, concerns exist about the quality of wood produced following fertilization. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of wood property changes following fertilization. Wood...

  15. Using flotation in ethanol to separate filled and empty seeds of Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the separation of filled and empty seeds of Crimean pine [Pinus nigra Arn. ssp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe] by flotation in ethanol and the effect of this treatment on seed germination were investigated. Flotation tests in 96% ethanol by the density method and then germination tests were made on the seeds ...

  16. Mechanical resistance by an ectorganic soil layer on roo development of seedling Pinus sylvestris.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, den J.; Vogels, D.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated early root development of Pinus sylvestris seedlings in relation to bulk density and natural particle layering in an ectorganic soil layer from a bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) stand. Responses in root development to two levels of bulk density (0.07 and 0.15 g/cm3) in mixed bracken

  17. Growth and Site Relationships of Pinus caribaea Across the Caribbean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon H. Liegel; [Compiler

    1991-01-01

    Summarizes results of growth, volume, basal area, and stand conditions for Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis in five countries. Past pine management practices are reviewed for all countries. Implications of new forestry and soils research are discussed in terms of their impact on future local reforestation and afforestation...

  18. Multi-Season Monoterpene and Sesquiterpene Analysis of Pinus taeda Needle Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinus taeda (Loblolly pine) is one of the worlds most important timber crop and accounts for a significant portion of the southeastern U.S. landcover. Biogenic voltile organic compound (BVOC) content was extracted from the tissue material of P. taeda needles and analyzed over a m...

  19. Reference karyotype and cytomolecular map for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam-Faridi, M Nurul; Nelson, C Dana; Kubisiak, Thomas L

    2007-02-01

    A reference karyotype is presented for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L., subgenus Pinus, section Pinus, subsection Australes), based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using 18S-28S rDNA, 5S rDNA, and an Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence (A-type TRS). Well separated somatic chromosomes were prepared from colchicine-treated root meristems, using an enzymatic digestion technique. Statistical analyses performed on chromosome-arm lengths, centromeric indices, and interstitial rDNA and telomeric positions were based on observations from 6 well-separated metaphase cells from each of 3 unrelated trees. Statistically, 7 of the 12 loblolly pine chromosomes could be distinguished by their relative lengths. Centromeric indices were unable to distinguish additional chromosomes. However, the position and relative strength of the rDNA and telomeric sites made it possible to uniquely identify all of the chromosomes, providing a reference karyotype for use in comparative genome analyses. A dichotomous key was developed to aid in the identification of loblolly pine chromosomes and their comparison to chromosomes of other Pinus spp. A cytomolecular map was developed using the interstitial 18S-28S rDNA and A-type TRS signals. A total of 54 bins were assigned, ranging from 3 to 5 bins per chromosome. This is the first report of a chromosome-anchored physical map for a conifer that includes a dichotomous key for accurate and consistent identification of the P. taeda chromosomes.

  20. Presettlement Pinus taeda in the Mississippi Valley Alluvial Plain of the Monroe County, Arkansas area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg

    2005-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) is the most dominant conifer in the southeastern United States (Baker and Langdon, 1990). However, loblolly pine was conspicuously absent from virtually the entire Mississippi Valley Alluvial Plain during presettlement times. A map (Fig. 1) of the native distribution of loblolly from Baker and Langdon (1990) identifies 2 exceptions to this...

  1. Influences of community composition on biogeochemistry of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.G. Lockaby; J.H. Miller; R.G. Clawson

    1995-01-01

    Litterfall and decomposition processes were compared among four forest plantations that were dominated by loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L) but that differed.in terms of presence or absence of deciduous and herbaceous components. Based on aboveground litterfall, the pine-only community was the most productive but had the slowest turnover of organic...

  2. JUVENILE-MATURE GENETIC CORRELATIONS IN Pinus taeda CLONES PROPAGATED VIA SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Coqueiro Dias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to estimate the genetic correlation among selection ages (juvenile - adult and efficiency of early selection for the height, diameter, and volume traits of individuals from Pinus taeda families propagated via somatic embryogenesis. This study was carried out by genetic-statistical analysis, estimation procedure of variance (Reml, and prediction components of breeding values (Blup, using the Selegen-Reml/Blup software. Genetic correlations among juvenile ages and rotation age were performed by applying the linear model developed by Lambeth (1980. In accordance with results of the established model, the early selection can be performed in clones of Pinus taeda with high selection efficiency. Ages from 4 to 6 years old are enough to select Pinus taeda clones propagated via somatic embryogenesis for harvesting at 8 and 12 years old; and 6 to 10 years old are enough to select them for harvesting at 20 years old. On the basis of the genetic correlations estimates from the environments, the clones' selection of Pinus taeda propagated via somatic embryogenesis should be developed specifically for each environment. The clones' selection can be performed considering the diameter due to the high correlation between volume and diameter.

  3. LEAF AREA INDEX (LAI) CHANGE DETECTION ANALYSIS ON LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA) FOLLOWING COMPLETE UNDERSTORY REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The confounding effect of understory vegetation contributions to satellite-derived estimates of leaf area index (LAI) was investigated on two loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forest stands located in Virginia and North Carolina. In order to separate NDVI contributions of the dominantc...

  4. ECTOMYCORRHIZAL DIVERSITY IN A LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L.) GENETICS PLANTATION: INFLUENCE OF FERTILIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) Has co-evolved a high dependency on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) associations most likely because its natural range includes soils of varying moisture that are P- and/or N-deficient. Because of its wide geographic distrubition, we would expect its roots t...

  5. Loblolly pine: the ecology and culture of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Schultz

    1997-01-01

    Loblolly pine ranks as a highly valuable tree for its pulp, paper, and lumber products. In the South, loblolly is planted more than any other conifer. Loblolly Pine: The Ecology and Culture of Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) adds to the technical foundations laid by Ashe (1915) and Wahlenberg (1960). Agriculture Handbook 713 encompasses genetics, tree...

  6. Cogongrass ( Imperata cylindrica ) affects above- and belowground processes in commercial loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda ) stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam N. Trautwig; Lori G. Eckhardt; Nancy J. Loewenstein; Jason D. Hoeksema; Emily A. Carter; Ryan L. Nadel

    2017-01-01

    Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica), an invasive grass species native to Asia, has been shown to reduce tree vigor in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations, which comprise more than 50% of growing stock in commercial forests of the United States. I. cylindrica produces exudates with possible allelopathic effects that may influence abundance of P. taeda symbionts, such...

  7. Mosaic stunting in bareroot Pinus banksiana seedlings is unrelated to colonization by mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynette R. Potvin; Martin F. Jurgensen; R. Kasten Dumroese; Dana L. Richter; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Mosaic stunting, the occurrence of random patches of chlorotic seedlings with reduced shoot and diameter growth amidst more robust cohorts within bareroot nurseries, is classically associated with poor colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. We examined possible relationships among soil fertility, mycorrhizas, and random patches of mosaic stunting in bareroot Pinus...

  8. Fusarium spp. and Pinus strobus seedlings: root disease pathogens and taxa associated with seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. M. Ocamb; J. Juzwik; F. B. Martin

    2002-01-01

    Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L .) seeds were sown in soil infested wlth Fusarium proliferatum, root necrosis developed on seedling roots, and F. proliferatum as reisolated from symptomatic roots; thus, demonstrating that F. proliferatum is pathogenic to eastern white pine seedling. Soils...

  9. Simulatd Nitrogen Cycling Response to Elevated CO2 in Pinus taeda and Mixed Dediduous Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.W. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between elevated CO2 and N cycling were explored with a nutrient cycling model (NuCM, Johnson et al. 1993, 1995) for a Pinus tuedu L. site at Duke University North Carolina, and a mixed deciduous site at Walker Branch, Tennessee. The simulations tested whether N limitation would prevent growth increases in response to elevated CO...

  10. Water availability and genetic effects on wood properties of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. A. Gonzalez-Benecke; T. A. Martin; Alexander Clark; G. F. Peter

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effect of water availability on basal area growth and wood properties of 11-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees from contrasting Florida (FL) (a mix of half-sib families) and South Carolina coastal plain (SC) (a single, half-sib family) genetic material. Increasing soil water availability via irrigation increased average wholecore specific...

  11. [Genetic control of the isoenzymes in Cembra pine (Pinus cembra L.) in the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirko, Ia V; Korshikov, I I

    2001-01-01

    Genetic control of GOT, GDH, DIA, MDH, SOD, FDH, ADH, ACP, and LAP enzymes was studied in the seed megagametophytes of cembra pine (Pinus cembra L.) from the natural population of the Ukrainian Carpa-thian mountains. Efficient electrophoretic separation was obtained for 21 loci products. The analysis of allele segregation in heterozygous trees confirms monogenic inheritance of the revealed variants.

  12. Soil enzyme activities in Pinus tabuliformis (Carriere) plantations in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiwei Wang; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Ruiheng Lv; Chen Xiao; Guolei Li; Yong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Changes in forest stand structure may alter the activity of invertase, urease, catalase and phenol oxidase after thinning Pinus tabuliformis (Carriére) plantations in Yanqing County of Beijing, China. We examined changes in these soil enzymes as influenced by time since thinning (24, 32, and 40 years since thinning) for 3 seasons (spring, summer and autumn)...

  13. Forest floor depth mediates understory vigor in xeric Pinus palustris ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Kevin Hiers; Joseph J. O' Brien; Rodney E. Will; Robert J. Mitchell

    2007-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) woodlands and savannas are among the most frequently burned ecosystems in the world with fire return intervals of 1–10 years. This fire regime has maintained high levels of biodiversity in terms of both species richness and endemism. Land use changes have reduced the area of this ecosystem by .95%, and inadequate fire...

  14. Polyamine levels during the development of zygotic and somatic embryos of Pinus radiata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Dale R. Smith; Cathie Reeves; Kevin D. Steele; Subhash C. Minocha

    1999-01-01

    Changes in the cellular content of three polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) were compared at different stages of development in zygotic and somatic embryos of Pinus radiata D. Don. During embryo development, both the zygotic and the somatic embryos showed a steady increase in spermidine content, with either a small decrease or no...

  15. Fungal endophytes in woody roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Hoff; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Geral I. McDonald; Jonalea R. Tonn; Mee-Sook Kim; Paul J. Zambino; Paul F. Hessburg; J. D. Rodgers; T. L. Peever; L. M. Carris

    2004-01-01

    The fungal community inhabiting large woody roots of healthy conifers has not been well documented. To provide more information about such communities, a survey was conducted using increment cores from the woody roots of symptomless Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) growing in dry forests...

  16. Procyanidins from Pinus koraiensis bark inhibits HeLa cell growth by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    that the mechanism of PKBPE inducing apoptosis might be associated with increasing the expression of Bax protein, reducing Bcl-2 and survivin protein expressions. Key words: Pinus koraiensis bark, procyanidins, HeLa cell, apoptosis. INTRODUCTION ..... dent apoptosis, mitosis regulation and apoptosis suppression, but ...

  17. Nuclear genetic variation across the range of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa): Phylogeographic, taxonomic and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Valerie D. Hipkins; Mary F. Mahalovich; Robert E. Means

    2015-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is among the most broadly distributed conifer species of western North America, where it possesses considerable ecological, esthetic, and commercial value. It exhibits complicated patterns of morphological and genetic variation, suggesting that it may be in the process of differentiating into distinct regional...

  18. Influence of ammonia and ozone on growth and drought sensitivity of Pinus sylvestris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dueck, Th.A.; Zuin, A.; Elderson, J.

    1998-01-01

    Four-year-old Pinus sylvestris trees were exposed to ammonia (16, 55, 110 ppb for 24 h d-1)and ozone (0, 45 and 68 ppb, 9 h d-1) in a factorial design in open-top chambers for 15 months. Treatment effects on tree growth and architecture were assessed during two growing seasons; effects on

  19. Mortalidade em florestas de Pinus palustris causada por tempestade de raios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth W. Outcalt; Jorge Paladino Corrêa de Lima; Jose Américo de Mello Filho

    2002-01-01

    The importance of lightning as an ignition source for the fire driven Pinus palustris ecosystem is widely recognized. Lightning also impacts this system on a smaller scale by causing individual tree mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the level of mortality due to lightning activity at the Department of Energy's Savannah...

  20. The variation of microfibril angle in South African grown Pinus patula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been shown for some species that the microfibril angle (MFA) of the S2 layer of tracheids is strongly related to the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of wood, even more so than wood density, especially in wood formed during juvenile growth. The objectives of this study were to describe the variation in MFA in young Pinus ...

  1. Effects of intermediate-severity disturbance on composition and structure in mixed Pinus-hardwood stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin Trammell; Justin Hart; Callie Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey; Michael Steinberg

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, forest managers intend to create or maintain mixed Pinus-hardwood stands. This stand assemblage may be driven by a variety of objectives but is often motivated by the desire to enhance native forest diversity and promote resilience to perturbations. Documenting the effects of natural disturbances on species composition and stand...

  2. Effects of air pollution on morphological and anatomical characteristics of Pinus Eldarica Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidreza Safdari; Moinuddin Ahmed; Margaret S. Devall; Vilma Bayramzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution, including automobile exhaust pollution, can affect anatomical and morphological characteristics of wood. In order to evaluate this subject, the Pinus eldarica trees of Chitgar Park in Tehran, which extends from a crowded highway in the south (polluted site) to the semi polluted midsection and to Alborz Mountain in the north (unpolluted...

  3. The genetics of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata mill.) with implications for restoration and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Stewart; Rodney E. Will; Barbara S. Crane; C. Dana Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) is an important commercial timber resource and forest ecosystem component in the southeastern USA. The species occurs in mainly drier sites as an early- to mid-successional species, is fireadapted, and it plays an important role in the fire ecology of the region. However, shortleaf pine genetics are not well-studied, especially in...

  4. Pinus mugo and P. uncinata as Parents of Hybrids. A Taxonomic and Nomenclatural Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Businský, R.; Kirschner, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-57 ISSN 0079-2047 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Pinaceae * Pinus mugo * hybridization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.462, year: 2010

  5. CO2 AND O3 ALTER PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND WATER VAPOR EXCHANGE FOR PINUS PONDEROSA NEEDLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Effects of CO2 and O3 were determined for a key component of ecosystem carbon and water cycling: needle gas exchange (photosynthesis, conductance, transpiration and water use efficiency). The measurements were made on Pinus ponderosa seedlings grown in outdoor, sunlit, mesoc...

  6. Classification of Pinus patula, P. tecunumanii, P. oocarpa, P. caribaea var. hondurensis, and Related Taxonomic Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.E. Squillace; Jesse P. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Stem xylem terpenes of 75 pine populations were studied to determine relationships among taxonomic entities. Typical Pinus patula populations occurring in areas north and west of Oaxaca, Mexico, had very high proportions of 3-phellandrene and low proportions of other constituents. Terpene compositions of populations of variety longipeduncalatain...

  7. Effect of plantation density on kraft pulp production from red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; G.C. Myers

    2006-01-01

    Red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) butt logs from 38 year old research plots were used to study the effect of plantation stand density on kraft pulp production. Results indicate that plantation stand density can affect pulp yield, unrefined pulp mean fibre length, and the response of pulp fibre length to pulp refining. However, the effect of plantation stand density on...

  8. Effects of plantation density on wood density and anatomical properties of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Y. Zhu; C. Tim Scott; Karen L. Scallon; Gary C. Myers

    2007-01-01

    This study demonstrated that average ring width (or average annual radial growth rate) is a reliable parameter to quantify the effects of tree plantation density (growth suppression) on wood density and tracheid anatomical properties. The average ring width successfully correlated wood density and tracheid anatomical properties of red pines (Pinus resinosa Ait.) from a...

  9. Stand-level Allometry in Pinus taeda as Affected by Irrigation and Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. King; T.J. Albaugh; H.L. Allen; L.W. Kress

    1999-01-01

    Changing environmental conditions have the potential to alter allometric relationships between plant parts, possibly leading to ecosystem-level feedbacks. We quantified allometric shifts in field-grown loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in response to altered resource availability based on data from multiple harvests to correct for size-related changes...

  10. Regeneration Methods Affect Genetic Variation and Structure in Shortleaf Pine (Pinus Echinata Mill.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv G. Raja; Charles G. Tauer; Robert F. Wittwer; Yinghua Huang

    1998-01-01

    The effects of regene ration methods on genetic diversity and structure in shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) were examined by quantifying the changes in genetic composition of shortleaf pine stands following harvest by monitoring changes in allele number and frequency at heterozygous loci over time. The results were also compared to the genetic...

  11. Nursery response of container Pinus palustris seedlings to nitrogen supply and subsequent effects on outplanting performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Paul Jackson; R. Kasten Dumroese; James P. Barnett

    2012-01-01

    Container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) seedlings often survive and grow better after outplanting than bareroot seedlings. Because of this, most longleaf pine are now produced in containers. Little is known about nursery fertilization effects on the quality of container longleaf pine seedlings and how that influences outplanting performance. We compared various...

  12. Alkanes and terpenes in wood and leaves of Pinus jeffreyi and P. sabiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Adams; Jessica W. Wright

    2012-01-01

    The wood oils of Pinus jeffreyi and P. sabiniana contain considerable amounts of heptane (76.6%, 92%), on a monoterpene basis. However, when entire wood extractables is considered, the amounts drop considerably (3.4%, 36.8%) with the major portion of the wood oils being diterpene acids. The leaf oil of P. jeffreyi...

  13. Modeling future plant distributions on the Colorado Plateau: An example using Pinus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Cole; Kirsten E. Ironside; Samantha T. Arundel; Philip Duffy; John Shaw

    2008-01-01

    The recent mortality of some plant species in the U.S. Southwest has been attributed to the ongoing drought conditions over the last decade. This mortality has been especially acute in populations of Pinus edulis (Colorado pinyon pine; hereafter abbreviated as pinyon), a widespread and highly visible species (Shaw 2006; Shaw et al. 2005; Mueller et...

  14. The effects of ontogenetic maturation in Pinus patula – Part II: hedge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early studies suggest that the juvenile period, during which favourable rooting can be achieved from Pinus patula seedling hedges, may be as short as 2 years from the date of sowing. If the effects of hedge maturation cannot be delayed, productivity from seedling hedges will be severely limited. The most common ...

  15. Ectomycorrhizal fungi and Pinus sylvestris: aluminium toxicity, base cation deficiencies and exudation of organic anions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schöll, van L.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: aluminium (Al), base cations, BC:Alratio, magnesium (Mg), organic anions, oxalate, malonate, ectomycorrhizal fungi, Paxillus involutus, Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine)The finding of microscopic-small tunnels in mineral grains

  16. The seed bank in Pinus stand regeneration in NW Spain after wildfire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Calvo

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Cantabrian area (northwest Spain Pinus stands occupy many of the original shrub communities that have been considered unproductive. These Pinus stands represent the vegetation which is most affected by fire. Regeneration after fire may occur in different ways: by resprouting or by germination or both. Germination was the only regeneration mechanism in Pinus species that appeared in these areas. The aim of this study is to determine the role of the soil seed bank in regeneration in this type of ecosystem. In order to carry out the study, three communities dominated by Pinus sylvestris which had suffered wildfires were chosen. In each of the three experimental sites of Pinus sylvestris stands the seed bank composition and above-ground vegetation were studied. The results allowed three species groups in the seed bank to be differentiated: those favoured by fire, amongst which some hardseeds, mainly belonging to Cistaceae and Leguminosae, were found; another group formed by outsider or opportunist species from outside the community and which used anemochory as their main dispersion mechanism; and the third group formed by those negatively affected, amongst which were species using vegetative resprout as the main regeneration mechanism. The species of greatest quantitative importance in the seed bank was Erica australis. In general, anemochorous species were predominant in the soil seed bank. During the first stages of succession chamaephytes were dominant and in the two years after fire therophytes were. No great similarity was observed between the bank composition and field vegetation from a qualitative viewpoint, due to differences in the presence of seeds of outsider plants in the bank and to the significance of the resprouting species in the field.

  17. Fossils matter: improved estimates of divergence times in Pinus reveal older diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Bianca; Leslie, Andrew B; Wüest, Rafael O; Litsios, Glenn; Conti, Elena; Salamin, Nicolas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E

    2017-04-04

    The taxonomy of pines (genus Pinus) is widely accepted and a robust gene tree based on entire plastome sequences exists. However, there is a large discrepancy in estimated divergence times of major pine clades among existing studies, mainly due to differences in fossil placement and dating methods used. We currently lack a dated molecular phylogeny that makes use of the rich pine fossil record, and this study is the first to estimate the divergence dates of pines based on a large number of fossils (21) evenly distributed across all major clades, in combination with applying both node and tip dating methods. We present a range of molecular phylogenetic trees of Pinus generated within a Bayesian framework. We find the origin of crown Pinus is likely up to 30 Myr older (Early Cretaceous) than inferred in most previous studies (Late Cretaceous) and propose generally older divergence times for major clades within Pinus than previously thought. Our age estimates vary significantly between the different dating approaches, but the results generally agree on older divergence times. We present a revised list of 21 fossils that are suitable to use in dating or comparative analyses of pines. Reliable estimates of divergence times in pines are essential if we are to link diversification processes and functional adaptation of this genus to geological events or to changing climates. In addition to older divergence times in Pinus, our results also indicate that node age estimates in pines depend on dating approaches and the specific fossil sets used, reflecting inherent differences in various dating approaches. The sets of dated phylogenetic trees of pines presented here provide a way to account for uncertainties in age estimations when applying comparative phylogenetic methods.

  18. Comparative recruitment success of pine provenances (Pinus sylvestris, Pinus nigra) under simulated climate change in the Swiss Rhone valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sarah; Moser, Barbara; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Wohlgemuth, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Low elevation Scots pine forests of European inner-alpine dry valleys may potentially disappear under continued climate warming, largely in response to increased warming and drought effects. In the upper Rhone valley, the driest region in Switzerland, increased Scots pine mortality in mature forest stands and sparse tree establishment after a large-scale forest fire already give evidence for ongoing climate change. Furthermore, vegetation models predict a decline of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens) even under a moderate temperature increase of 2-3°C. A decline of tree species in the region may lead to a transition from forest to a steppe-like vegetation. Such a change is of considerable concern for both biodiversity and natural hazard protection. Although changing climate conditions affect all life stages of a tree, its most vulnerable stage is recruitment. We tested P. sylvestris and P. nigra seedlings to simulated temperature increase and water stress, using seeds from the upper Rhone valley, Switzerland (CH), and from Peñyagolosa, Spain (ES). The experiment was located outdoors at the bottom of the Rhone Valley. Treatments consisted of factorial combinations of 3 precipitation regimes (‘wet spring-wet summer', ‘dry spring-dry summer' and ‘wet spring-dry summer') and 3 soil heating levels (+0 °C, +2.5 °C, +5 °C). Automatically operated shelters intercepted natural rainfall and different precipitation regimes were simulated by manual irrigation. We found significantly lower germination rates under dry conditions compared to wet conditions, whereas soil temperature affected germination rates only for P. nigra and when elevated by 5°C. Contrastingly, an increase of soil temperatures by 2.5 °C already caused a substantial decrease of survival rates under both ‘dry spring-dry summer' and ‘wet spring-dry summer' conditions. Precipitation regime was more important for survival than temperature increase. Seasonality of

  19. Volume de madeira de Pinus taeda L. em diferentes espaços vitais de crescimento. Wood volume of Pinus taeda L. at different growing spacings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo LIMA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pinus taeda L. é uma das espécies do gênero Pinus mais plantadas na região Sul do Brasil por apresentar excelente crescimento e ótima adaptação às condições climáticas e de solo. Essa espécie é utilizada em larga escala, principalmente para a produção de celulose, construção civil, laminação, produção de móveis, particulados e serraria. Objetivou-se avaliar a produção volumétrica de Pinus taeda L. em diferentes espaços vitais de crescimento (entre 1 m2 e 16 m2 por planta propiciados por nove diferentes espaçamentos entre árvores de um ensaio em cinco blocos ao acaso. O trabalho baseou-se nas medidas de altura e DAP em 25 árvores internas da parcela, aos sete anos após plantio das mudas oriundas de pomar de sementes clonal. Valores estimados de volume por hectare foram inversamente proporcionais ao aumento do espaço vital, alcançando entre 74,2 e 274,8 m3 /ha. Os incrementos médios em volume atingiram entre 10,60 e 39,25 m3 /ha/ano. Concluiu-se que, se o objetivo é a produção volumétrica mesmo com diâmetros pequenos, deve-se optar por espaços vitais menores. Quando se deseja maiores diâmetros, a opção é por espaços maiores. No presente caso, o melhor compromisso entre produção volumétrica e diâmetros grandes pode estar nos espaços vitais intermediários, entre 5 e 8 m2 para cada árvore. Pinus taeda L. is one of the most Pinus species planted in southern Brazil, because it presents excellent growth and optimum adaptation to climatic and soil condition. The species is used in large scale, mainly for cellulose production, construction, laminating, production of furniture, particulates and sawmill. It was aimed to evaluate the Pinus taeda L. volumetric production at different growth vital spaces (ranging 1 m² and 16 m² per plant provided by nine different spacings between plants, the trial was installed in a randomized blocks with five replications. The study was based on height and DBH measurements

  20. Streamflow responses to afforestation with Eucalyptus grandis and Pinus patula and to felling in the Mokobulaan experimental catchments, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scott, DF

    1997-12-10

    Full Text Available The reductions in streamflow following the afforestation of grassland with Eucalyptus grandis and Pinus patula in the Mokobulaan research catchments on the Mpumalanga escarpment, and the subsequent response in streamflow to clearfelling...

  1. Cytoprotective effects of essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Hfaiedh, Najla; Bouaziz, Mouhamed; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Talarmin, Hélène

    2017-12-01

    Essential oils from Pinus species have been reported to have various therapeutic properties. This study was undertaken to identify the chemical composition and cytoprotective effects of the essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. against aspirin-induced damage in cells in vitro. The cytoprotection of the oil against toxicity of aspirin on the small intestine epithelial cells IEC-6 was tested. The obtained results have shown that 35 different compounds were identified. Aspirin induced a decrease in cell viability, and exhibited significant damage to their morphology and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. However, the co-treatment of aspirin with the essential oil of Pinus induced a significant increase in cell viability and a decrease in SOD and CAT activities. Overall, these finding suggest that the essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. has potent cytoprotective effect against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

  2. Usage of the pruned log index for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Aplicação do Índice de Tora Podada para Pinus taeda e Pinus elliottii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Jeton Cardoso

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The assessment of the quality of clearwood produced in pruned plantations of pine is necessary, especially to set price and know the utilization potential. The pruned log index (PLI, index used in Chile and New Zealand to characterize the quality of the logs, is a function of measurable variables of each log as diameter with defects, diameter 1.3 m from the largest end and the ratio between the cylinder volume common to the entire length of the log and the scaling volume through the method Smalian. This study aims at evaluating the ITP usage for slash pine (Pinus elliottii logs at the age 24 years and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda at 19, harvested
    in the regions of Ibaiti, Paraná, and Itapeva, São Paulo. The PLI values did not exceed 2.3, which  indicates that there is little clearwood on the logs. This has been proven through the veneering results, in which the potentially clear volume in relation to the log volume ranged between 52% and 55%, but 10.3% at the maximum, was turned into clearwood veneer. The slicing procedure in the lathe proved to be suitable, since it allowed the diameter of the knotty core to be measured as soon as the knot came out. The PLI showed itself as applicable for the Brazilian conditions.

    doi: 10.4336/2010.pfb.30.62.119

  1. Optimization of seasonality and mother plant nutrition for vegetative propagation of Pinus pinaster Ait

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Alonso, Celia; Kidelman, Angelo; Feito, Isabel; Velasco, Tania; Alía, Ricardo; Joao, Maria; Majada, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high economic importance of Pinus pinaster Ait., there is considerable interest in developing, improving and extending the use of its families for mass clonal propagation and in breeding programmes. In the current study, we evaluated shoot growth, rooting ability and mini-cuttings production of P. pinaster in response to nitrogen fertilization and seasons. We compared eight half-sib families of P. pinaster from Asturias and Galicia (Northern Iberian Peninsula), searching for useful...

  2. Horse grazing systems: understory biomass and plant biodiversity of a Pinus radiata stand

    OpenAIRE

    Rigueiro-Rodríguez,Antonio; Mouhbi,Rabia; Santiago-Freijanes,José Javier; González-Hernández,María del Pilar; Mosquera-Losada,María Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Horse grazing systems may affect productivity and biodiversity of understory developed under Pinus radiata D. Don silvopastoral systems, while acting as a tool to reduce the risk of fire. This study compared continuous and rotational grazing systems effect upon biomass, fractions of stem, sprouts, leaves and woody parts of Ulex europaeus L. and alpha (Species Richness, Shannon-Wiener) and beta (Jaccard and Magurran) biodiversity for a period of four years in a P. radiata silvopastoral system....

  3. Aridification determines changes in forest growth in Pinus halepensis forests under semiarid Mediterranean climate conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Lasanta, Teodoro; Gracia, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Using a set of 16 Landsat TM and Landsat ETM+ images from 1984 to 2006, we tested whether climate trends in the last three decades differentially controlled the vegetal activity of eight Pinus halepensis forests located across a marked bioclimatic gradient. Our results show spatial differences in trends in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) between 1984 and 2006, which were highly related to the spatial distribution of aridity. There was a strong correlation between the change ...

  4. Adaptation of stone pines Pinus sibirica Du Tour and Pinus koraiensis Siebold et Zucc. to various environmental factors in the testing sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kuznetsova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Provenance trials of Pinus sibirica Du Tour and Pinus koraiensis Siebold et Zucc. (here after «studied species» were studied. In our study we assessed the growth parameters as well as anatomical and morphological parameters of the studied species corresponding to different provenances of their testing in the south of the Krasnoyarsk and Khabarovsk territories.We determined that the growth rate of trees corresponding to different provenances is determined not only by the inherited characteristics, but also by adaptation. At both experimental regions the offspring of trees corresponding to local provenance are clearly better adapted. Nevertheless, at Krasnoyarsk Krai provenance trials, we found that the phenotypic indicators and degree of preservation of the offspring of two Korean pine corresponding to Obluchensky and Chuguevsky provenances are at the same level as for the local Siberian pine. Tree rings widths have been measured for the Siberian pine corresponding to different provenances at both plantations. We conclude that at the Ermakovskoe plantation there is a positive impact of the environmental conditions on tree-ring width for Korean pine corresponding to different provenances, and in Khabarovsk Krai there is a negative impact of the environmental conditions on tree-ring width for the Siberian pine corresponding to different provenances.

  5. Biomarker genes highlight intraspecific and interspecific variations in the responses of Pinus taeda L. and Pinus radiata D. Don to Sirex noctilio F. acid gland secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeaux, John Michael; Lorenz, W Walter; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2012-10-01

    Sirex noctilio F., a Eurasian horntail woodwasp recently introduced into North America, oviposits in pines and other conifers and in the process spreads a phytopathogenic fungus that serves as a food source for its larvae. During oviposition the woodwasp also deposits mucus produced in its acid (venom) gland that alters pine defense responses and facilitates infection by the fungus. A 26,496-feature loblolly pine cDNA microarray was used to survey gene expression of pine tissue responding to S. noctilio venom. Six genes were selected for further assessment by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), including one that encoded an apparent PR-4 protein and another that encoded a thaumatin-like protein. Expression of both was strongly induced in response to venom, while expression of an apparent actin gene (ACT1) was stable in response to the venom. The pattern of gene response was similar in Pinus taeda L. and Pinus radiata D. Don, but the magnitude of response in P. radiata was significantly stronger for each of the induced genes. The magnitude of the biomarker gene response to venom also varied according to genotype within these two species. The qRT-PCR assay was used to demonstrate that the primary bioactive component in S. noctilio venom is a polypeptide.

  6. Reproductive Success and Inbreeding Differ in Fragmented Populations of Pinus rzedowskii and Pinus ayacahuite var. veitchii, Two Endemic Mexican Pines under Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paty Castilleja Sánchez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Seed production, quality, germination and seedling establishment are indicators of reproductive success in conifers. Monitoring of these parameters is essential to determine the viability of populations for the purposes of conservation. We analyze cone and seed traits as indicators of reproductive success in the endangered Rzedowski´s pine (Pinus rzedowskii (Madrigal et Caballero and near-threatened veitchii pine (Pinus ayacahuite var. veitchii (Shaw in west-central Michoacán, Mexico. These traits were systematically quantified and their variation assessed using Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMMs. We found that the reproductive success of Rzedowski’s pine seems to be critical, presenting low seed efficiency (17.10%, germination (5.0% and seedling establishment (27.7%, with high levels of inbreeding (0.79. In contrast, veitchii pine presents moderate seed efficiency (54.9%, high germination (71.5% and seedling establishment (84%–97% and low inbreeding (0.33. Reproductive indicators differed significantly among zones and populations for each species, where fragment sizes mainly affected seed production and efficiency. This result indicates that fragmentation has played a more important role in the reproductive success of Rzedowski’s pine than in veitchii pine, perhaps by limiting pollen flow among zones and populations and producing higher levels of inbreeding and lower seed efficiency in the former species. We propose a conservation strategy for these important pine species in order to increase their long-term genetic viability.

  7. Differences in defence responses of Pinus contorta and Pinus banksiana to the mountain pine beetle fungal associate Grosmannia clavigera are affected by water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Velez, Adriana; El Kayal, Walid; Copeland, Charles C J; Zaharia, L Irina; Lusebrink, Inka; Cooke, Janice E K

    2016-04-01

    We tested the hypotheses that responses to the mountain pine beetle fungal associate Grosmannia clavigera will differ between the evolutionarily co-evolved host lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and the naïve host jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and that these responses will be influenced by water availability. G. clavigera inoculation resulted in more rapid stem lesion development in lodgepole than in jack pine; water deficit delayed lesion development in both species. Decreased hydraulic conductivity was observed in inoculated lodgepole pine seedlings, likely because of tracheid occlusion by fungal hyphae and/or metabolite accumulation. Drought but not inoculation significantly impacted bark abscisic acid levels. Jasmonic and salicylic acid were implicated in local and systemic responses of both species to G. clavigera, with salicylic acid appearing to play a greater role in jack pine response to G. clavigera than lodgepole pine. Water deficit increased constitutive levels and/or attenuated induced responses to G. clavigera for several monoterpenes in lodgepole but not jack pine. Instead, inoculation of well-watered but not water deficit jack pine resulted in a greater number of xylem resin ducts. These findings reveal mechanisms underlying differences in G. clavigera-induced responses between lodgepole and jack pine hosts, and how water availability modulates these responses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mycorrhization of containerised Pinus nigra seedlings with Suillus granulatus under open field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarevic, J.; Keca, N.; Martinovie, A.

    2012-07-01

    Seedling mycorrhization acts as an efficient tool for improving the quality of seedlings. In this study, the effectiveness of Suillus granulatus, originating from Pinus heldreichii forests (Montenegro), to produce containerized ectomycorrhizal seedlings of autochthonous Pinus nigra in open field conditions was investigated. Spore (106, 107, 108) and vegetative (1:16, 1:8, 1:4) inoculation on ectomycorrhizal formation and seedling growth were tested. Spore and vegetative inoculums of autochthonous Pisolithus arhizus were used in the same trial as additional control treatments. The utilization of vegetative and spore inoculums of autochthonous S. granulatus has proven to be an effective method of obtaining containerized ectomycorrhizal P. nigra seedlings under open field conditions after 11 months. S. granulatus spore inoculations resulted in well developed ectomycorrhiza, decreasing the growth of the P. nigra seedlings in the first growing season. Mycelial inoculations resulted in slightly developed S. granulatus ectomycorrhiza, which increased the growth of the seedlings. Therefore, it would be feasible to use spore inocula of S. granulatus, with 10{sup 6} spores per plant, to produce ectomycorrhizal P. nigra plants on a large scale. Controlled mycorrhizal inoculation of seedlings is not a common practice in Montenegrin and Serbian nurseries; as such, the obtained results will contribute to the enhancement of nursery production of Pinus nigra and other conifers. This also could be assumed as a starting point for many further efforts and investigations with autochthonous fungal and plant material in this region. (Author) 47 refs.

  9. Effects Of Drought Stress on Germination in Fourteen Provenances of Pinus Brutia Ten. Seeds in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Şevik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pinus brutia Ten., Red pine, known to be tough drought resistant pine specie, could effectively be used for afforestation of disturbed areas. It is of great interest for the afforestation in arid zones. Appropriate seed sources for the specific areas guarantees reforestation success. Away from its native areas Pinus brutia Ten. is planted for its ornamental value and timber production purposes. Selection of drought resistant provenances can very well increase the survival success. In this study, the effects of water potential on germination were studied in fourteen provenances of Pinus brutia Ten. from Turkey. Water potentials between 0 and -8 bars were obtained using polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-6000 solutions. Seeds were kept for 35 day at 20 ± 0.5°C. A decrease in water potential produced a marked reduction in germination percentage and germination value. As a result, significant variations between the provenances were found. It was determined that, under a -8 bar water stress, Isparta-Bucak and Mersin-Silifke, respectively corresponding to 58% and 57% of the control group, were the least water stress affected provenances.

  10. Post-fire ecological restoration of a mixed Pinus-Quercus forest in northeastern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alanís-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación se desarrolló en un bosque de Pinus-Quercus en el Parque Ecológico Chipinque (noreste de México, el cual fue afectado por un incendio forestal y sometido a tratamiento de restauración ecológica. Los objetivos fueron evaluar el establecimiento artificial de Pinus pseudostrobus (Lindl. y analizar el efecto de las barreras de retención de suelo después de 10 años de su instalación. Para ello se estableció un área de estudio con tratamiento de restauración ecológica y otra área sin tratamiento en las que se muestreó la comunidad vegetal y la profundidad del suelo. De acuerdo con los resultados, se registró 35 % de supervivencia de la plantación, la cual se considera como no aceptable. Las barreras de retención de suelo tuvieron efecto positivo, pues incrementaron la profundidad del suelo hasta 25 %. Con la investigación se concluye que las técnicas de restauración post-incendio aplicadas han sido eficaces, ya que incorporan una especie clave de ecosistemas maduros y evitan la pérdida de suelo por arrastre, por lo que se recomienda su uso en rodales de Pinus-Quercus afectados por incendios en la Sierra Madre Oriental.

  11. De Novo Sequencing and Assembly Analysis of Transcriptome in Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Cai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To enrich the molecular data of Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl. and study the regulating factors of different morphology controled by apical dominance. In this study, de novo assembly of transcriptome annotation was performed for two varieties of Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl. that are obviously different in morphology. More than 147 million reads were produced, which were assembled into 88,092 unigenes. Based on a similarity search, 11,692 unigenes showed significant similarity to proteins from Picea sitchensis (Bong. Carr. From this collection of unigenes, a large number of molecular markers were identified, including 2829 simple sequence repeats (SSRs. A total of 158 unigenes expressed differently between two varieties, including 98 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated unigenes. Furthermore, among the differently expressed genes (DEGs, five genes which may impact the plant morphology were further validated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. The five genes related to cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX, two-component response regulator ARR-A family (ARR-A, plant hormone signal transduction (AHP, and MADS-box transcription factors have a close relationship with apical dominance. This new dataset will be a useful resource for future genetic and genomic studies in Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl.

  12. Anchored reference loci in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) for integrating pine genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G R; Kadel, E E; Bassoni, D L; Kiehne, K L; Temesgen, B; van Buijtenen, J P; Sewell, M M; Marshall, K A; Neale, D B

    2001-01-01

    Anchored reference loci provide a framework for comparative mapping. They are landmarks to denote conserved chromosomal segments, allowing the synthesis of genetic maps from multiple sources. We evaluated 90 expressed sequence tag polymorphisms (ESTPs) from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) for this function. Primer sets were assayed for amplification and polymorphism in six pedigrees, representing two subgenera of Pinus and a distant member of the Pinaceae, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco). On average, 89% of primer sets amplified in four species of subgenus Pinus, 49% in one species of subgenus Strobus, and 22% in Douglas-fir. Polymorphisms were detected for 37-61% of the ESTPs within each pedigree. Comparative mapping in loblolly and slash pine (P. elliottii Englm.) revealed that ESTPs mapped to the same location. Disrupted synteny or significant disruptions in colinearity were not detected. Thirty-five ESTPs met criteria established for anchor loci. The majority of those that did not meet these criteria were excluded when map location was known in only a single species. Anchor loci provide a unifying tool for the community, facilitating the creation of a "generic" pine map and serving as a foundation for studies on genome organization and evolution. PMID:11606554

  13. Fusarium oxysporum and F. verticillioides associated with damping-off in Pinus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caciara Gonzatto Maciel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Occurrence of Fusarium spp. is one of the problems, most limiting to growth of seedlings, in nurseries. This pathogen can be transmitted via seeds and causes damages to the seedlings during pre- and post-emergence stages. The present study aimed to identify Fusarium spp. at the species level based on morphological and molecular characteristics and to verify the pathogenicity of these isolates in seeds lots of Pinus elliottii and P. taeda. For this, we used two Fusarium isolates and five lots of Pinus spp. seeds. Morphological characterization was performed based on a key, specific to Fusarium spp. identification, whereas, molecular identification was carried out by amplification and sequencing of the regions from internal transcribed spacer (ITS and the elongation factor 1-α (tef1. The pathogenicity test was conducted through the contact of the seeds with fungal culture for 48 h, followed by sowing them in sand. The variables evaluated were emergency speed index, percentage of emergency, non-emergency seeds, symptomatic seedlings, and seedling damping-off. One isolate, F1UFSM, was identified as F. verticillioides and another isolate, F2UFSM, was identified as F. oxysporum. Both the isolates were pathogenic to the seeds of Pinus spp., causing a reduction in the percentage of emergence and seedling damping-off.

  14. Effects of Fusarium circinatum on Disease Development and Gas Exchange in the Seedlings of Pinus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan-Soo Woo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-year-old seedlings of Pinus thunbergii, Pinus densiflora and Pinus rigida were inoculated with Fusarium circinatum isolate (FT-7, the pitch canker fungus, from P. thunbergii, to evaluate the effects of the pathogen on disease development and gas exchange rate. Needle dehydration was evident on 2 of 10 seedlings of P. thunbergii and P. rigida at 18 and 21 days after inoculation, respectively, while no symptoms were observed in P. densiflora seedlings throughout the experiment. Gas exchange stopped completely in 4 of 5 measured seedlings of P. thunbergii and 2 of 5 measured seedlings of P. rigida at 25 days after inoculation, and in the remaining 3 seedlings of P. rigida at 39 days after inoculation. Disease development in P. thunbergii seedlings was faster than that in P. rigida seedlings. By the time, the experiment was ended at 78 days after inoculation, 9 of 10 seedlings of P. rigida and 8 of 10 seedlings of P. thunbergii seedlings treated with FT-7 was almost dead, but all seedlings of P. densiflora were still healthy. We suggest that P. densiflora is resistant to F. circinatum in the current study, and gas exchange rate of the species after inoculation does not differ significantly compared to that of untreated control.

  15. Chloroplast evolution in the Pinus montezumae complex: a coalescent approach to hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J A; Schaal, B A

    2000-08-01

    This study addresses the evolutionary history of the chloroplast genomes of two closely related pine species, Pinus hartwegii Lindl. and P. montezumae Lamb (subsect. Ponderosae) using coalescent theory and some of the statistical tools that have been developed from it during the past two decades. Pinus hartwegii and P. montezumae are closely related species in the P. montezumae complex (subsect. Ponderosae) of Mexico and Central America. Pinus hartwegii is a high elevation species, whereas P. montezumae occurs at lower elevations. The two species occur on many of the same mountains throughout Mexico. A total of 350 individuals of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae were collected from Nevado de Colima (Jalisco), Cerro Potosí (Nuevo León), Iztaccihuatl/Popocatepetl (México), and Nevado de Toluca (México). The chloroplast genome of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae was mapped using eight restriction enzymes. Fifty-one different haplotypes were characterized; 38 of 160 restriction sites were polymorphic. Clades of most parsimoniously related chloroplast haplotypes are geographically localized and do not overlap in distribution, and the geographically localized clades of haplotypes include both P. hartwegii and P. montezumae. Some haplotypes in the clades occur in only one of the two species, whereas other haplotypes occur in both species. These data strongly suggest ancient and/or ongoing hybridization between P. hartwegii and P. montezumae and a shared chloroplast genome history within geographic regions of Mexico.

  16. High population differentiation and genetic variation in the endangered Mexican pine Pinus Rzedowskii (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, P; Piñero, D; Chaos, A; Pérez-Nasser, N; Alvarez-Buylla, E R

    1999-05-01

    Pinus rzedowskii is an endangered pine species from Michoacán (central México), which has been previously reported from only three localities. Classified within the subgenus Strobus, it exhibits intermediate morphological characters between subgenera Strobus and Pinus. We analyzed genetic aspects that could shed light on the evolution and conservation of this species. The genetic structure of nine populations was examined using 14 isozyme loci. Pinus rzedowskii has a relatively high level of genetic variation with 46.8% of the loci assayed being polymorphic, a total of 35 alleles, and a mean heterozygosity per population of 0.219. We calculated Wright's F(ST) statistic to estimate gene flow indirectly and to evaluate whether or not there was genetic structuring among populations. We found a marked differentiation among populations (F(ST) = 0.175) and significant inbreeding (F(IS) = 0.247). No pattern of isolation by distance was found. We also constructed a dendrogram based on a genetic distance matrix to obtain an overview of the possible historical relationships among populations. Finally, we found a convex relationship between the genetic distance among populations and the number of ancestral lineages, suggesting that demographically this species has not been at risk recently. Although endangered, with small and fragmented populations, P. rzedowskii shows higher levels of genetic variation than other conifer species with larger populations or similar conservation status.

  17. Experimental study of Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zuccarini on Hyperlipidemia and lipid in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of Pinus densiflora on hyperlipidemia and lipid in rats, we divided the rats into groups(Normal group, Control group and Sample group and perfomed the experimental research. Hyperlipidemia and lipid in rats were induced by high fat diets for 8weeks. The sample group was administerd the extract of Pinus densiflora for 14 days and control group was administerd equal dose of oral. And then we measured the amount of serum triglyceride, Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, Free Fatty Acid, phospholipid, Insuline, Laptin, Body weight, epididymis fat weight & rate, epididymis fat cell, Cardiac Risk Factor(CRF. The results were as followers : 1. Sample Group showed decreasing effects on Total cholesterol, Trigylceride, LDL-cholesterol, and Phospholipid levels in serum and CRF significantly. 2. Sample Group showed increasing effects on HDL-cholesterol level in serum significantly. 3. Sample Group showed decreasing effects on Insuline in serum significantly. 4. Sample Group showed increasing effects on Laptin in serum significantly. 5. Sample Group showed decreasing effects on Body weight, epididymis fat weight & rate, epididymis fat cell significantly. According to the above results, Pinus densiflora showed significant decreasing effects on hyperlipidemia and lipid in rats, it is considered that it is appropriate to apply for hyperlipidemia, obesity.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of needle essential oil of Pinus peuce Griseb. (Pinaceae from Macedonian flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Karapandzova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of needle essential oil, obtained by hydrodistillation from wild Pinus peuce Griseb. (Pinaceae, growing on three different locations in R. Macedonia were investigated in period 2008/2009. Carried out GC/FID/MS analysis, one hundred and three constituents were identified belonging to the six different classes of components: monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and other non-terpene components, representing 88.61/94.04% of the entire oil. The most abundant constituents were α-pinene (12.89/27.34%, β-pinene (6.16/13.13%, limonene + β-phellandrene (2.09/6.64% and bornyl acetate (2.92/11.67% as well as trans-(E-caryophyllene (4.63/7.13% and germacrene D (8.75/20.14%. Antimicrobial screening of Pinus peuce needle essential oil was made by hole-plate diffusion and broth dilution method against 13 bacterial isolates of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and one strain of Candida albicans. The most sensitive bacteria against tested Pinus peuce essential oils were Streptococcus pneumonia encompassing Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Acinetobacter spp. and Streptococcus pyogenes. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the oils ranged from 7.5- 62.5 µl/ml.

  19. Inoculation of Pinus taeda Seedlings with Plant Growth-promoting Rhizobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fernandes dos Santos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Azospirillum brasilense , Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens on the growth of Pinus taeda seedlings. Bacterial inoculants were applied in two different forms: at sowing and 20 days after emergence. At 30, 60 and 90 days after emergence, we evaluated plant height and root-colar diameter. At 180 days after emergence, we also measured shoot and root dry weight. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and means were ranked by Duncan’s test. The most pronounced results were observed for root and shoot biomass when plants were inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Bacillus subtilis increased root and shoot biomass by 67.1% and 33.1%, respectively, when comparing values with those of non-inoculated plants. On the other hand, inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens decreased root biomass up to 31.42%. Inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense did not promote any difference in Pinus taeda seedling growth and may not be an efficient alternative for inoculation practices. According to these results, inoculation of Pinus taeda seedlings with Bacillus subtilis has great potential to improve plant growth regarding adaptation to field conditions.

  20. SHEAR STRENGTH IN THE GLUE LINE OF Eucalyptus sp. AND Pinus sp.WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Jerásio Bianche

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the adhesive efficiency on the union of glued joints in a particular temperature and humidity conditions for a specified time the adhesive must be submitted to specific load tests, such as shear in the glue line. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shear strength in the glue line of Eucalyptus sp and Pinus sp.woods. Five adhesives (castor oil, sodium silicate, modified silicate, , PVA and resorcinol-formaldehyde, three weights (150 g/m2, 200 g/m2, and 250 g/m2 and two species (Eucalyptus sp. and Pinus sp. of wood were used. Twelve specimens were obtained from each repetition per treatment, corresponding to 108 specimens that were conditioned at a temperature of 23 ± 1°C and relative humidity of 50 ± 2%. The interaction between the weight and type of adhesive was significant for the shear strength in the glue line of eucalyptus wood. However, no interaction between the weight and the adhesive was found for pinus, only the isolated from the adhesive effect. Chemical bonds originated in the polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde adhesives and castor bi-component conferred upon these adhesives the greatest resistance in the glue line. Castor and resorcinol-formaldehyde adhesives showed the highest shear strength values in the line of glue and wood failure. Castor adhesive presented satisfactory performance for bonding of eucalyptus and pine woods.

  1. Characterization and expression of a Pinus radiata putative ortholog to the Arabidopsis SHORT-ROOT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Alicia; Sánchez, Conchi; Vielba, Jesús M; Valladares, Silvia; Abarca, Dolores; Díaz-Sala, Carmen

    2008-11-01

    We characterized a Pinus radiata D. Don putative ortholog to the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. SHORT--ROOT gene (AtSHR) and analyzed its expression in different organs during vegetative development and in response to exogenous auxin during adventitious rooting. The predicted protein sequence contained domains characteristic of the GRAS protein family and showed a strong similarity to the SHORT--ROOT (SHR) proteins. Quantitative reverse transcriptase--polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization showed that the gene is predominantly expressed in roots, root primordia and in the cambial region of hypocotyl cuttings. Increased mRNA levels were observed, independently of the presence or absence of exogenous auxin, in the cambial region and rooting competent cells of hypocotyl cuttings within the first 24 h of adventitious rooting, before the activation of cell divisions and the organization of the adventitious root meristem. The expression pattern in organs and during adventitious rooting was similar to that of a Pinus radiata SCARECROW-LIKE (PrSCL1) gene, except that PrSCL1 is induced in response to exogenous auxin. Results suggest that the Pinus radiata SHORT-ROOT (PrSHR) gene has a role in root meristem formation and maintenance and in the cambial region of hypocotyl cuttings.

  2. Distribution of chemical compartments of soil organic matter and c stocks of a cambisol from south Brazil as affected by Pinus afforestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Cesar Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution and stocks of soil organic matter (SOM compartments after Pinus monoculture introduction in a native pasture area of a Cambisol, Santa Catarina, Brazil, were investigated. Pinus introduction increased soil acidity, content of exchangeable Al+3 and diminished soil nutrients. Nevertheless, soil C stock increased in all humic fractions of the 0-5 cm layer after Pinus afforestation. In the subsurface, the vegetation change only promoted SOM redistribution from the NaOH-extractable humic substances to a less hydrophobic humin fraction. Under Pinus, soil organo-mineral interactions were relevant up to a 15 cm depth, while in pasture environment, this mechanism occurred mainly in the surface layer.

  3. Bioecology of the fungus Sphaeropsis sapinea dyko & Sutton - agents of pinus species decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijašević Tanja

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphaeropsis sapinea is a cosmopolitan fungus, identified in more than 50 countries of the world, on all continents, but it is primarily the species of warm lands. It is also a polyphagous fungus recorded from 11 coniferous genera. The most endangered and the most frequent host plants are Pinus species - it occurs on 48 pine species, among which the most susceptible are Pinus Radiata, P. nigra, P. sylvestris, P. ponderosa, P. resinosa, P. mugo, P. pinaster and P. elliotti. The greatest damage is caused on the introduced Pinus species and on those cultivated in artificial plantations, shelterbelts and in urban environments. In Yugoslavia S. sapinea is widely distributed both in the continental and in the Mediterranean parts. It was identified from ten pine species and six hosts from other coniferous genera. By the study in our country, the new hosts of this fungus were detected - Pinus jeffrey, P. peuce and P. heldreichii. The most endangered species in our country is Austrian pine, both in urban environments, and in plantations The symptoms of the disease are bud wilt, curling, stunting and necrosis of current year shoots and needles, dieback of top shoots, parts of crown or tree tops, branch and stem bark canker, root collar rot on the young plants in nurseries and their dying. This fungus also prevents seed germination of Pinus species and causes blue sap stain of the freshly cut wood, although sap stain was also observed on standing trees. More rarely it causes root rot and crown wilt of Pinus species. The main symptoms of infection, both of young plants and older trees, are the dieback of current year shoots S. sapinea can penetrate through buds, bark of young shoots and needles. The critical time of infection is the period from mid April to mid May. Then infection mainly penetrates through the bark of young shoots, which results in their dying. Infection through the needles occurs mainly at the time of their sudden growth or during summer

  4. Eficiência dos herbicidas oxadiazil, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen e Imazapyr sobre a cultura de pinus Efficiency of the oxadiazil, oxadiazon, oxyfluorfen and imazapyr herbicides on Pinus cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson da Silva

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a seletividade de alguns herbicidas para mudas de Pinus caribaea var. Hondurensis e suas eficiências no controle de plantas daninhas. As mudas com 20 cm de altura, produzidas em tubetes, foram transplantadas num espaçamento de 2,0 m x 2,0 m, em parcelas de quatro fileiras com 10,0 m de comprimento. Os tratamentos utilizados foram oxadiazil (600; 800 e 1000 g ha-1, oxadiazon (1140; 1520 e 1900 g ha-1, oxyfluorfen (720 g ha-1, imazapyr (250 g ha-1 e testemunhas (capinada e sem capina, dispostos em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. Os herbicidas foram aplicados sete dias após o transplante, usando-se pulverizador costal, pressurizado com CO2, calibrado para 200 L ha- 1 de calda. As principais plantas daninhas com maior infestação foram: Brachiaria plantaginea e Ipomoea grandifolia e com menor infestação: Galinsoga parviflora e Bidens pilosa. O oxadiazil apresentou excelente controle de B. plantaginea, I. grandifolia e G. parviflora, não sendo eficiente para controle de B. pilosa, embora proporcionasse controle superior ao observado pelo oxadiazon. O oxadiazon foi eficiente até 45 dias após o tratamento para B. plantaginea, G. parviflora e até 90 dias para I. grandifolia. Tanto o oxyfluorfen quanto o imazapyr apresentaram excelente controle das plantas daninhas. De todos os herbicidas avaliados, apenas o imazapyr não deve ser recomendado para aplicação sobre o dossel de Pinus caribaea var. Hondurensis, em face da toxicidade provocada.The selectivity of some herbicides were evaluated on Pinus caribaea var. Hondurensis seedlings as well as these herbicide efficiencies in the weed control. When the tubule-produced seedlings were 20 cm height they were transplanted at 2,0 m x 2,0 m spacings in fourrows plots with 10,0 m length. The treatments with oxadiazil (600; 800 and 1000 g ha-1, oxadiazon (1140; 1520 and 1900 g ha-1, oxyfluorfen (720 g ha-1, imazpyr (250 g ha-1 and controls (weeded and without weeding were disposed

  5. Cambial activity and xylem cell development inPinus cembraandPinus sylvestrisat their climatic limits in the Eastern Alps in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidrak, Irene; Gruber, Andreas; Oberhuber, Walter

    2011-12-20

    It has been frequently stressed that at distributional boundaries, like at the Alpine timberline and within dry inner Alpine environments, tree growth will be affected first by changing climate conditions. Climate in 2007 was characterized by the occurrence of exceptionally mild temperatures in spring (3.4 and 2.7 °C above long-term mean (LTM) at timberline and the valley sites, respectively) with an almost continuous drought period recorded in April and slightly warmer than average temperatures throughout summer (1.3 °C above LTM at both sites). We compared temporal dynamics of cambial activity and xylem cell development in Pinus cembra at the Alpine timberline (1950 m a.s.l.) and Pinus sylvestris at a xeric inner Alpine site (750 m a.s.l.) by repeated cellular analyses of micro-cores (n = 5 trees/site). While onset of wood formation in P. sylvestris and P. cembra differed by about two weeks (12 and 27 April, respectively), maximum daily growth rates peaked on 6 May at the valley site and on 23 June at timberline. At both sites maximum tracheid production was reached prior to occurrence of more favourable climatic conditions during summer, i.e. an increase in precipitation and temperature. Xylem formation ended on 31 August and 28 October at the xeric site and at timberline, respectively. This study demonstrates the plasticity of tree-ring formation along an altitudinal transect in response to water availability and temperature. Whether early achievement of maximum growth rates is an adaptation to cope with extreme environmental conditions prevailing at limits of tree growth needs to be analysed more closely by taking belowground carbon allocation into account.

  6. Cambial activity and xylem cell development in Pinus cembra and Pinus sylvestris at their climatic limits in the Eastern Alps in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidrak, Irene; Gruber, Andreas; Oberhuber, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Summary It has been frequently stressed that at distributional boundaries, like at the Alpine timberline and within dry inner Alpine environments, tree growth will be affected first by changing climate conditions. Climate in 2007 was characterized by the occurrence of exceptionally mild temperatures in spring (3.4 and 2.7 °C above long-term mean (LTM) at timberline and the valley sites, respectively) with an almost continuous drought period recorded in April and slightly warmer than average temperatures throughout summer (1.3 °C above LTM at both sites). We compared temporal dynamics of cambial activity and xylem cell development in Pinus cembra at the Alpine timberline (1950 m a.s.l.) and Pinus sylvestris at a xeric inner Alpine site (750 m a.s.l.) by repeated cellular analyses of micro-cores (n = 5 trees/site). While onset of wood formation in P. sylvestris and P. cembra differed by about two weeks (12 and 27 April, respectively), maximum daily growth rates peaked on 6 May at the valley site and on 23 June at timberline. At both sites maximum tracheid production was reached prior to occurrence of more favourable climatic conditions during summer, i.e. an increase in precipitation and temperature. Xylem formation ended on 31 August and 28 October at the xeric site and at timberline, respectively. This study demonstrates the plasticity of tree-ring formation along an altitudinal transect in response to water availability and temperature. Whether early achievement of maximum growth rates is an adaptation to cope with extreme environmental conditions prevailing at limits of tree growth needs to be analysed more closely by taking belowground carbon allocation into account. PMID:24273354

  7. Chemotaxonomic implications of the n-alkane composition and the nonacosan-10-ol content in Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii, and Pinus peuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Biljana; Tešević, Vele; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar D

    2013-04-01

    The n-alkane composition and the nonacosan-10-ol content in the needle cuticular waxes of Serbian spruce (Picea omorika), Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii), and Macedonian pine (Pinus peuce) were compared. The amount of nonacosan-10-ol in the needle waxes of P. omorika was higher than those in P. heldreichii and P. peuce. The range of n-alkanes was also wider in P. omorika (C18 -C35 ) than in P. heldreichii and P. peuce (C18 -C33 ). The dominant n-alkanes were C29 in the needle waxes of P. omorika, C23 , C27 , and C25 in those of P. heldreichii, and C29 , C25 , C27 , and C23 in those of P. peuce. The waxes of P. omorika contained higher amounts of n-alkanes C29 , C31 , and C33 , while those of P. heldreichii and P. peuce had higher contents of n-alkanes C21 , C22 , C23 , C24 , and C26 . The principal component analysis of the contents of nine n-alkanes showed a clear separation of the Serbian spruce populations from those of the two investigated pine species, which partially overlapped. The separation of the species was due to high contents of the n-alkanes C29 and C31 (P. omorika), C19 , C20 , C21 , C22 , C23 , and C24 (P. heldreichii), and C28 (P. peuce). Cluster analysis also showed a clear separation between the P. omorika populations on one side and the P. heldreichii and P. peuce populations on the other side. The n-alkane and terpene compositions are discussed in the light of their usefulness in chemotaxonomy as well as with regard to the biogeography and phylogeny of these rare and endemic conifers. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  8. Transcriptome resources and functional characterization of monoterpene synthases for two host species of the mountain pine beetle, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E; Yuen, Macaire M S; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet K; Li, Maria; Henderson, Hannah; Arango-Velez, Adriana; Liao, Nancy Y; Docking, Roderick T; Chan, Simon K; Cooke, Janice Ek; Breuil, Colette; Jones, Steven Jm; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-05-16

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) across an area of more than 18 million hectares of pine forests in western Canada, and is a threat to the boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest. Defence of pines against MPB and associated fungal pathogens, as well as other pests, involves oleoresin monoterpenes, which are biosynthesized by families of terpene synthases (TPSs). Volatile monoterpenes also serve as host recognition cues for MPB and as precursors for MPB pheromones. The genes responsible for terpene biosynthesis in jack pine and lodgepole pine were previously unknown. We report the generation and quality assessment of assembled transcriptome resources for lodgepole pine and jack pine using Sanger, Roche 454, and Illumina sequencing technologies. Assemblies revealed transcripts for approximately 20,000 - 30,000 genes from each species and assembly analyses led to the identification of candidate full-length prenyl transferase, TPS, and P450 genes of oleoresin biosynthesis. We cloned and functionally characterized, via expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, nine different jack pine and eight different lodgepole pine mono-TPSs. The newly identified lodgepole pine and jack pine mono-TPSs include (+)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-β-pinene synthases, (+)-3-carene synthases, and (-)-β-phellandrene synthases from each of the two species. In the absence of genome sequences, transcriptome assemblies are important for defence gene discovery in lodgepole pine and jack pine, as demonstrated here for the terpenoid pathway genes. The product profiles of the functionally annotated mono-TPSs described here can account for the major monoterpene metabolites identified in lodgepole pine and jack pine.

  9. Molecular phylogenetics and evolutionary history of sect. Quinquefoliae (Pinus): implications for Northern Hemisphere biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Yan-Yan; Nazaire, Mare; Wei, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-06-01

    Climatic changes and tectonic events in the Cenozoic have greatly influenced the evolution and geographic distribution of the temperate flora. Such consequences should be most evident in plant groups that are ancient, widespread, and diverse. As one of the most widespread genera of trees, Pinus provides a good model for investigating the history of species diversification and biogeographic disjunction in the Northern Hemisphere. In this study, we reconstructed the phylogeny and investigated the evolutionary and biogeographic history of sect. Quinquefoliae (Pinus), a species-rich lineage disjunctly distributed in Asia, Europe and North America, based on complete taxon sampling and by using nine DNA fragments from chloroplast (cp), mitochondrial (mt) and nuclear genomes. The monophyly of the three subsections, Krempfianae, Gerardianae, and Strobus, is well-supported by cpDNA and nuclear gene phylogenies. However, neither subsect. Gerardianae nor subsect. Strobus forms a monophyletic group in the mtDNA phylogeny, in which sect. Quinquefoliae was divided into two major clades, one consisting of the North American and northeastern Asian species as well as the European P. peuce of subsect. Strobus, and the other comprising the remaining Eurasian species belonging to three subsections. The significant topological incongruence among the gene trees, in conjunction with divergence time estimation and ancestral area reconstruction, indicates that both ancient and relatively recent introgressive hybridization events occurred in the evolution of sect. Quinquefoliae, particularly in northeastern Asia and northwestern North America. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis suggests that the species of subsect. Strobus from subtropical eastern Asia and neighboring areas may have a single origin, although species non-monophyly is very widespread in the nuclear gene trees. Moreover, our study seems to support a Tethyan origin of sect. Quinquefoliae given the distributions and

  10. Novel taxa in the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex from Pinus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, D.A.; Wingfield, M.J.; Wingfield, B.D.; Rodas, C.A.; Marincowitz, S.; Steenkamp, E.T.

    2015-01-01

    The pitch canker pathogen Fusarium circinatum has caused devastation to Pinus spp. in natural forests and non-natives in commercially managed plantations. This has drawn attention to the potential importance of Fusarium species as pathogens of forest trees. In this study, we explored the diversity of Fusarium species associated with diseased Pinus patula, P. tecunumanii, P. kesiya and P. maximinoi in Colombian plantations and nurseries. Plants displaying symptoms associated with a F. circinatum-like infection (i.e., stem cankers and branch die-back on trees in plantations and root or collar rot of seedlings) were sampled. A total of 57 isolates were collected and characterised based on DNA sequence data for the translation elongation factor 1-α and β-tubulin gene regions. Phylogenetic analyses of these data allowed for the identification of more than 10 Fusarium species. These included F. circinatum, F. oxysporum, species within the Fusarium solani species complex and seven novel species in the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (formerly the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), five of which are described here as new. Selected isolates of the new species were tested for their pathogenicity on Pinus patula and compared with that of F. circinatum. Of these, F. marasasianum, F. parvisorum and F. sororula displayed levels of pathogenicity to P. patula that were comparable with that of F. circinatum. These apparently emerging pathogens thus pose a significant risk to forestry in Colombia and other parts of the world. PMID:26955193

  11. Chemical, antioxidant and antimicrobial investigations of Pinus cembra L. bark and needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetrei, Cristina Lungu; Tuchilus, Cristina; Aprotosoaie, Ana Clara; Oprea, Adrian; Malterud, Karl Egil; Miron, Anca

    2011-09-13

    The chemical constituents and biological activity of Pinus cembra L. (Pinaceae), native to the Central European Alps and the Carpathian Mountains, are not well known. The aim of the present work was to examine the phenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of hydromethanolic extracts of Pinus cembra L. bark and needles. Bark extract had higher concentrations of total phenolics (299.3 vs. 78.22 mg gallic acid equivalents/g extract), flavonoids (125.3 vs. 19.84 mg catechin equivalents/g extract) and proanthocyanidins (74.3 vs. 12.7 mg cyanidin equivalents/g extract) than needle extract and was more active as a free radical scavenger, reducing agent and antimicrobial agent. The EC₅₀ values in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and reducing power assays were 71.1, 6.3 and 26 mg/mL for bark extract and 186.1, 24 and 104 mg/mL for needle extract, respectively. In addition, needle extract showed ferrous ions chelating effects (EC₅₀ = 1,755 μg/mL). The antimicrobial effects against Staphylococcus aureus, Sarcina lutea, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans were assessed by the agar diffusion method. Both extracts (4 mg/well) were active against all the microorganisms tested; bark extract showed higher inhibition on all strains. These results indicate that Pinus cembra L. bark and needles are good sources of phytochemicals with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

  12. Chemical, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Investigations of Pinus cembra L. Bark and Needles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Miron

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The chemical constituents and biological activity of Pinus cembra L. (Pinaceae, native to the Central European Alps and the Carpathian Mountains, are not well known. The aim of the present work was to examine the phenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of hydromethanolic extracts of Pinus cembra L. bark and needles. Bark extract had higher concentrations of total phenolics (299.3 vs. 78.22 mg gallic acid equivalents/g extract, flavonoids (125.3 vs. 19.84 mg catechin equivalents/g extract and proanthocyanidins (74.3 vs. 12.7 mg cyanidin equivalents/g extract than needle extract and was more active as a free radical scavenger, reducing agent and antimicrobial agent. The EC50 values in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS and reducing power assays were 71.1, 6.3 and 26 mg/mL for bark extract and 186.1, 24 and 104 mg/mL for needle extract, respectively. In addition, needle extract showed ferrous ions chelating effects (EC50 = 1,755 μg/mL. The antimicrobial effects against Staphylococcus aureus, Sarcina lutea, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans were assessed by the agar diffusion method. Both extracts (4 mg/well were active against all the microorganisms tested; bark extract showed higher inhibition on all strains. These results indicate that Pinus cembra L. bark and needles are good sources of phytochemicals with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

  13. Drought Tolerance in Pinus halepensis Seed Sources As Identified by Distinctive Physiological and Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Taïbi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the main constraints determining forest species growth, survival and productivity, and therefore one of the main limitations for reforestation or afforestation. The aim of this study is to characterize the drought response at the physiological and molecular level of different Pinus halepensis (common name Aleppo pine seed sources, previously characterized in field trials as drought-sensitive or drought-tolerant. This approach aims to identify different traits capable of predicting the ability of formerly uncharacterized seedlings to cope with drought stress. Gas-exchange, water potential, photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, free amino acids, glutathione and proteomic analyses were carried out on control and drought-stressed seedlings in greenhouse conditions. Gas-exchange determinations were also assessed in field-planted seedlings in order to validate the greenhouse experimental conditions. Drought-tolerant seed sources presented higher values of photosynthetic rates, water use efficiency, photosynthetic pigments and soluble carbohydrates concentrations. We observed the same pattern of variation of photosynthesis rate and maximal efficiency of PSII in field. Interestingly drought-tolerant seed sources exhibited increased levels of glutathione, methionine and cysteine. The proteomic profile of drought tolerant seedlings identified two heat shock proteins and an enzyme related to methionine biosynthesis that were not present in drought sensitive seedlings, pointing to the synthesis of sulfur amino acids as a limiting factor for drought tolerance in Pinus halepensis. Our results established physiological and molecular traits useful as distinctive markers to predict drought tolerance in Pinus halepensis provenances that could be reliably used in reforestation programs in drought prone areas.

  14. Changes in plant species composition along an elevation gradient in an old-growth bottomland hardwood-Pinus taeda forest in southern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian G. Grell; Michael G. Shelton; Eric Heitzman

    2005-01-01

    Old-growth bottomland hardwood-Pinus taeda L. forests are rare in Arkansas, and the complex relationships between plant communities and environmental conditions have not been well described in these forests. To investigate these relationships, a digital elevation model was developed for a 16.2 ha old-growth bottomland hardwood-Pinus taeda forest in...

  15. Tree-ring analysis of crown competition and climatic sensitivity in Pinus strobus and P. sylvestris stands in the Elbe River Sandstone Mountains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mácová, Marcela

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2001), s. 103-113 ISSN 1125-7865 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6005801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : dendroclimatology * Pinus strobus * Pinus sylvestris Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  16. Chapter 8 optimized test design for identification of the variation of elastic stiffness properties of Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) pith to bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Kretschmann; John Considine; F. Pierron

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the design optimization of an un-notched Iosipescu test specimen whose goal is the characterization of the material elastic stiffnesses of a Loblolly (Pinus taeda) or Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) sample in one single test. A series of finite element (FE) and grid simulations were conducted to determine displacement and strain fields for various...

  17. Managing succession in conifer plantations: converting young red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantations to native forest types by thinning and underplantiing

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Parker; Ken A. Elliott; Daniel C. Dey; Eric Boysen; Steven G. Newmaster

    2001-01-01

    The effects of thinning on growth and survival of white pine (Pinus strobus L.), white ash (Fraxinus americana L.), and red oak (Quercus rubra L.), and understory plant diversity were examined in a young red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantation. Five years after thinning, seedling diameter,...

  18. Resistance to Fungal Diseases of the Siberian (Pinus sibirica Du Tour and Korean (Pinus koraiensis Siebold et Zucc. Stone Pines in the Provenance Trails at the South of Krasnoyarsk Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Grodnitskaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The reason of the epiphytoty in the provenance trials of the Siberian (Pinus sibirica Du Tour and Korean (Pinus koraiensis Siebold et Zucc. stone pines in the foothills of the Western Sayan (south of Krasnoyarsk territory was established. The cause of stone pine needles drying was disease – grey pine-leaf cast (grey Schutte. The causative agent was pathogenic fungus Lophodermella sulcigena. The Siberian stone pine trees of Tashtagolskii climate type were drying (fatally to the greatest extent (21 %. The populations of the Korean stone pine showed higher resistance to fungal infections comparing to the Siberian stone pine climate type.

  19. Reproductive biology and early establishment of Pinus elliottii var. elliottii in Brazilian sandy coastal plain vegetation: implications for biological invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campanhã Bechara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pinus is the most invasive woody taxon, exceeded only by herbaceous plants. This study reports the reproductive biology and early establishment of Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii, describing its invasive properties in a protected natural area of the Brazilian coastal sandy plains. We evaluated the seed germination and rain, longevity of seed viability and the initial dynamics of the seedlings of Pinus elliottii var elliottii through field and laboratory experiments. We recorded a continuous seed rain of about 204.0 viable seeds m- 2 per year, with a 90 % germination rate. The seeds exhibited a low longevity of viability in the soil and a dense, permanent seedling bank that may explain the high levels of pine invasion. The environmental impact caused by the pine's biological invasion suggests the recommendation for its immediate eradication, together with a restoration plan to restitute the native biodiversity gradually.

  20. Pinus roxburghii plant needles as a three-season biomonitor for elemental air pollution monitoring along roadside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daud, Muhammad; Wasim, Mohammad; Khalid, Nasir; Waheed, Shahida [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Chemistry Div.

    2015-07-01

    The present study deals with the determination of 36 elements in Pinus roxburghii plant needles to assess their potential as biomonitor for elemental air pollution monitoring. The elemental quantification was made by employing Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometric (AAS) techniques. The needles of Pinus roxburghii were collected in spring, summer and winter seasons from various sites in Islamabad. The method validation was performed by analyzing two certified reference materials i.e., Citrus leaves - NIST-SRM-1572 and IAEA-Soil-7. Pollution level was assessed by using three indicators: enrichment factor, pollution load index and average toxic element concentration. The results indicated that the needles of Pinus roxburghii plant had potential to monitor the extent of air pollution in the vicinity of high traffic areas.

  1. Effect of years and origins into the seed production of Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Díez Alonso, María

    2013-01-01

    Ocho áreas ocupadas de forma natural por Pinus sylvestris y localizadas a diferentes latitudes en Finlandia fueron seleccionadas y estudiadas desde 1997 hasta 2001para analizar las diferencias en el ratio de flores femeninas que desarrollan cono y el número de semillas por cono. Las condiciones climatológicas, las condiciones del lugar y el tiempo de floración son algunos de los factores que pueden afectar la producción de semilla. Los resultados muestran la posibilidad de existen...

  2. Quality and growth of Pinus taeda L. seedlings submitted to roots pruning with cupper and ethefon.

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Vera Lucia

    2005-01-01

    O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos da poda química das raízes com sulfato de cobre, oxicloreto de cobre e ethefon (ácido 2-cloroetilfosfônico) sobre o crescimento e qualidade de mudas de Pinus taeda L. produzidas em tubetes. O experimento foi conduzido em viveiro comercial de produção de mudas no município de Lages, SC. Os tratamentos a base de sulfato de cobre ou oxicloreto de cobre foram feitos através da imersão dos tubetes em uma mistura de partes iguais de água e t...

  3. Effects of pollen of pinus thunbergii induced by different radiant factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunce; Liang Qiuxia; Li Guoping

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pollens and pollen tubes of Pinus thunbergii induced respectively by N + beam, γ-ray and ultraviolet ray were measured, and the differences of the effects caused by the different radiant factors were distinguished. The results showed that there was obvious difference in the damages of the pollen germination and the pollen tube growth led by the radiant factors. The curve of dose effects from γ-ray irradiation was similarly S type, and that from ultraviolet ray treatment approximately L type. The effects from ion implantation expressed the two characteristics, the curve of the saddle type and the top inflation of pollen tube. (authors)

  4. ADDITION OF Eucalyptus pellita F. MUELL. BARK TO Pinus elliottii ENGELM PARTICLEBOARD PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvá Oliveira Brito

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluated the physical and mechanical properties of particleboards manufactured with Eucalyptus pellitabark added to Pinus elliottii wood. The mechanical properties evaluated were static bending (modulus of rupture and modulus ofelasticity and tensile strength perpendicular to surface, while the physical ones were thickness swelling and water absorption. UreaformaldehydePB 2346 adhesive was used in the rates of 6% and 8%, in particleboard manufacturing. The bark/wood rates were:0/100, 10/90, 20/100 and 30/70, with three repetitions to each treatment. Bark inclusion into particleboard production showed to betechnically possible, according to physical and mechanical results obtained.

  5. Consumption of seeds of southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis) by Black Bear (Ursus americanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, David J.; Arundel, Terry A.

    2013-01-01

    We report a discovery of black bears (Ursus americanus) consuming seeds of southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis) on north slopes of the San Francisco Peaks near Flagstaff, Arizona, in high-elevation, mixed-species conifer forest. In one instance, a bear had obtained seeds from cones excavated from a larder horde made by a red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Consumption of seeds of southwestern white pine by bears had not been previously documented. This discovery adds to the number of species of pine used by bears for food as well as the geographic range within which the behavior occurs.

  6. Fungi inhabiting stumps of Pinus nigra depending on the period of their exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jankowiak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the species composition of communities of fungi inhabiting stumps of Pinus nigra depending on the period of their exposure. After 6 and 18 months of stump exposure two species of Basidiomycota distinctly dominaled: Stereum sanguinolentum and Phanerochaete gigantea. After 30 months of exposure the communities of fungi were the most diversified. A longer period of stump exposure resulted in the decrease of numbers of isolates of Ph. gigantea and S. sanguinolentum. However, other species belonging to Basidiomycota increased their numbers. As the wood decompositionn progressed, however, the fungi belonging to Deuteromycota were isolated more often.

  7. ORIGEM DOS COMPOSTOS HIDROFÓBICOS E SEUS EFEITOS EM FLORESTAS DE Pinus E Eucalyptus

    OpenAIRE

    Vogelmann, Eduardo Saldanha; Prevedello, Juliana; Reichert, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A hidrofobicidade pode ser entendida como a repelência do solo à água, dificultando o seu molhamento. Esse fenômeno está associado ao recobrimento das partículas do solo por substâncias orgânicas hidrofóbicas, sendo que atualmente existem inúmeros relatos de repelência à água em áreas de florestas de Eucalyptus e Pinus. Assim, este trabalho teve por objetivo revisar e elencar os aspectos relacionados à origem dos compostos hidrofóbicos e os seus efeitos na dinâmica da água no ambiente florest...

  8. (14C)-glucose metabolism during shoot bud development in cultured cotyledon explants of Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, L.; Joy, R.W.; Thorpe, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    Excised cotyledons of Pinus radiata D. Don cultured under shoot-forming (plus benzyladenine) and non shoot-forming (minus benzyladenine) conditions for 10 and 21 days were fed U-[ 14 C]-glucose for 3 h in the light followed by a 3 h chase period. The labelling of individual metabolites as well as 14 C incorporation into protein was assessed. It was found that the general metabolic patterns were qualitatively the same in shoot-forming and non shoot-forming conditions, however, metabolism leading to respiration as well as to the synthesis of some amino acids and protein synthesis was enhanced in the shoot-forming cultures. (author)

  9. Allelopathic of Pinus taeda needles on the germination and development of Avena strigosa seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Sartor, Laércio Ricardo; Adami, Paulo Fernando; Chini, Nelso; Martin, Thomas Newton; Marchese, José Abramo; Soares, André Brugnara

    2009-01-01

    O trabalho teve por objetivo caracterizar o efeito alelopático do extrato aquoso de acículas de Pinus taeda na germinação e no desenvolvimento inicial de plântulas de aveia preta comum (Avena strigosa). O experimento foi conduzido no Laboratório de Bioquímica e Fisiologia Vegetal da Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Campus de Pato Branco, utilizando o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com tratamento fatorial (bifatorial com parcela subdividida no tempo), com três repeti...

  10. Storage products and tissue interaction in the ovule of Pinus silvestris (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Engels

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organel-sequence in ovular cells of Pinus silvestris was investigated by light- and electronmicroscopy during the post-pollination and pre-fertilization period. Changes in starch and lipid storage suppose starch to be a pool for lipid synthesis and a reserve for ovule development. The base nucellus plays an important role in the distribution of metabolites all over the ovular tissues. Lipid, starch and callose are of interest for the cells to protect them against low temperatures by means of isolation, antifreeze and plug formation respectively.

  11. Furfurilasi pada Kayu Tusam (Pinus Merkusii Jungh. Et De Vr.) dan Mangium (Acacia Mangium Willd.)

    OpenAIRE

    Balfas, Jamal

    1995-01-01

    Wood specimens of tusam (Pinus merkusii Jungh. et de Vr.) and mangium (Acaciamangium Willd.) were air-dried to approximately16-18% moisture content. One group of the specimens was further oven-dried ttJ reach moisture content of 6-8%. Furfurylation was undertaken by soaking wood specimens/or 24 hours in a 98%.furfuryl alcohol solution containing 0.35% (vlv) of ZnCl2 as catalyst. Furfurylated specimens were then cured at 1 OO°C for 48 hours. Wood characteristics observed in this study include ...

  12. Keawetan Kayu Tusam (Pinus Merkusii Jungh. Et De Vr.) dan Mangium (Acacia Mangium Willd.) Setelah Furfurilasi

    OpenAIRE

    Balfas, Jamal; Sumarni, Ginuk

    1995-01-01

    Two regrowth wood species, i.e. tusam (Pinus merkusii Jungh. et de Vr.) and mangium (Acacia mangium Wild.) were used in this study. Specimens measuring 25 mm x 25 mm x 50 mm and 5 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm were prepared for testing against dry-wood termite (Cryptotermes) and subteranean termite (Coptotermes) respectively. All specimens were air-dried to approxi mately 16-18% moisture content. One group of the specimens was further oven - dried to reach moisture content of 6-8%. Furfurylation ...

  13. PLANTAS NODRIZA EN LA REFORESTACIÓN CON Pinus hartwegii Lindl.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ramírez-Contreras; D. A. Rodríguez-Trejo

    2009-01-01

    En el Ajusco, Distrito Federal, fueron plantados Pinus hartwegii en cinco tratamientos de plantas nodriza: al noreste (NE) de Lupinus montanus, al NE de Penstemon gentianoides, entre Festuca tolucensis, entre F. tolucensis con chaponeo, y en pequeños claros naturales. Se evaluó supervivencia, diámetro, altura, biomasa y concentración de N, P y K a seis (temporada de sequía) y doce meses (lluvias) de establecida la plantación. Se midió la radiación fotosintéticamente activa (RFA) en los distin...

  14. Use of spatial and colour cues by foraging pine siskins (Carduelis pinus): a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humber, Jessica M; Brodbeck, David R; Warkentin, Ian G

    2009-03-01

    Pine siskins (Carduelis pinus) frequently forage at known high quality food supplies such as backyard feeders. In this field study, pine siskins visited backyard feeders of differing colour and spatial position. The three feeders contained varying amounts of food in a ratio of 3:2:1. The birds quickly distributed their visits in this ratio to the three feeders. During unbaited tests, two feeders on a given day had their positions swapped. The siskins appeared to primarily use both large-scale spatial or distal cues when foraging as well as local colour cues.

  15. Essential oils composition of Pinus peuce Griseb. (Pinaceae growing on Pelister Mtn., Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Karapandzova

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from needles, from branches without needles and from branches with needles of Pinus peuce Griseb. (Pinaceae from Pelister Mtn. (R. Macedonia was analyzed by GC/FID/MS. One hundred and seven components (40 monoterpenes, 37 sesquiterpenes, 9 diterpenes and 21 other components - aliphatic and cyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic alcohols, aldehydes, and acids; phenols and other oxygenated benzene derivates were identified. The most abundant constituents were terpene hydrocarbons, encompassing the monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene + β-phellandrene and bornyl acetate and the sesquiterpenes: trans (E-caryophyllene and germacrene D.

  16. Resistência das madeiras de pinus, cedro australiano e seus produtos derivados ao ataque de Cryptotermes brevis

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Marcelo Xisto; Bufalino, Lina; Mendes, Lourival Marin; Sá, Vania Aparecida de; Santos, Alexandre dos; Tonoli, Gustavo Henrique Denzin

    2014-01-01

    Neste trabalho, objetivou-se comparar a resistência das madeiras de cedro australiano (Toona ciliata) e pinus (Pinus sp.) e de painéis aglomerados produzidos com essas espécies ao ataque do cupim de madeira seca Cryptotermes brevis, bem como quantificar a mortalidade dos insetos. Foram colocados 30 pseudo-operários em placas de Petri de acrílico de 9,5 cm de diâmetro, contendo as amostras (1,5 x 1,5 x 0,5 cm) e folhas de algodão posicionadas sobre as tampas perfuradas umedecidas diariamente c...

  17. Effect of gamma rays doses on pollen germination, polysiphony and pollen tube elongation in Pinus patula Schiede et Deppe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katiyar, S.R.; Chauhan, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present study aimed to study the effects of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) on pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in Pinus patula. Pollen germination and pollen tube elongation are stimulated by low doses of radiation. Although higher doses of radiation inhibit the germination of pollen, pollen tube elongation remains unaffected. Thus in Pinus patula pollen tube elongation is less radiosensitive than pollen germination. Compared to control pollen, irradiated pollen produced more number of long pollen tubes. Therefore pollen tube size can be improved using low doses of radiation. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tables

  18. Chloroplast microsatellites and mitochondrial nad1 intron 2 sequences indicate congruent phylogenetic relationships among Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra), Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica), and Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerli, F; Senn, J; Anzidei, M; Madaghiele, A; Büchler, U; Sperisen, C; Vendramin, G G

    2001-06-01

    We studied the phylogenetic relationships among the three stone pine species, Pinus cembra, P. sibirica, and P. pumila, using chloroplast microsatellites and mitochondrial nad1 intron 2 sequences. The three chloroplast microsatellite loci combined into a total of 18 haplotypes. Fourteen haplotypes were detected in 15 populations of P. cembra and one population of P. sibirica, five of which were shared between the two species, and the two populations of P. pumila comprised four species-specific haplotypes. Mitochondrial intron sequences confirmed this grouping of species. Sequences of P. cembra and P. sibirica were identical, but P. pumila differed by several nucleotide substitutions and insertions/deletions. A repeat region found in the former two species showed no intraspecific variation. These results indicate a relatively recent evolutionary separation of P. cembra and P. sibirica, despite their currently disjunct distributions. The species-specific chloroplast and mitochondrial markers of P. sibirica and P. pumila should help to trace the hybridization in their overlapping distribution area and to identify fossil remains with respect to the still unresolved postglacial re-colonization history of these two species.

  19. Selection of seed lots of Pinus taeda L. for tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Pascoal Golle

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify the fungi genera associated with three Pinus taeda L. seed lots and to assess the sanitary and physiological quality of these lots for use as selection criteria for tissue culture and evaluate the in vitro establishment of explants from seminal origin in different nutritive media. It was possible to discriminate the lots on the sanitary and physiological quality, as well as to establish in vitro plants of Pinus taeda from cotyledonary nodes obtained from aseptic seed germination of a selected lot by the sanitary and physiological quality higher. The nutritive media MS, ½ MS and WPM were equally suitable for this purpose. For the sanitary analysis the fungal genera Fusarium, Penicillium and Trichoderma were those of the highest sensitivity. For the physiological evaluation were important the variables: abnormal seedlings, strong normal seedlings; length, fresh and dry weight of strong normal seedlings. The analyzes were favorable to choose lots of seeds for in vitro culture and all culture media were adequate for the establishment of this species in tissue culture.

  20. The effects of high energy radiation on the pulping properties of Pinus radiation and Eucalyptus regnans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, K.G.; Garland, C.P.; Higgins, H.G.

    1976-01-01

    Studies have been made of the effects of high energy radiation on the pulping behaviour of Eucalyptus regnans and Pinus radiata. Pre-irradiation of wood chips with small doses of 60 Co gamma radiation (up to about 0.2 Mrad) caused little degradation of the cellulose, and had only minor effects on the kraft pulping properties of both wood species. Pulp yield, Kappa number and strength properties of the pulps showed little change. There was also little effect on the bisulphite cooking of Pinus radiata. As the dose was increased to 1 Mrad, degradation of cellulose (as indicated by degree of polymerisation measurements) became significant, and Kraft pulp yields from both woods showed small reductions. The Kappa number and physical properties of these pulps were little affected at this dose level. A gamma radiation dose of 10 Mrad produced marked depolymerisation of the cellulose, and big reductions in kraft and neutral sulphite semi-chemical pulp yields. The kraft pulps showed a much higher lignin content. Some low dose (0.15 Mrad) irradiations on thin chips were carried out with a 1 MeV electron accelerator. In contrast to comparable gamma irradiations, this treatment produced discernible changes in kraft pulping behaviour. The pulp yield, under the same cooking conditions, appears to be slightly higher, but the Lignin content of the pulp was increased. (Author)

  1. A review of Sphaeropsis sapinea occurrence on Pinus species in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Georgieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphaeropsis sapinea (Fr. Dyko & Sutton causes shoot blight and canker disease throughout the world on conifers predisposed by stress. The disease is most important to Pinus species that are affected from the seedling stage in nurseries to mature trees in ornamental planting, forest plantations and natural stands. In Bulgaria, the first findings of the disease were noted in 1989 on Pinus nigra plantations in the North-eastern part of the country. Over the past few years, new emergency and severe damages have developed rapidly as a consequence of the prolonged drought periods during the last growing seasons. The high existence of S. sapinea outbreaks contributed considerably to the physiological weakness of pine trees that become more susceptible to attack by aggressive xylophages and other fungal pathogens. Disease occurrence and its pathogenicity are economically important affecting a number of pine trees from all ages. In Bulgaria, S. sapinea has been obtained on six pine species P. nigra, P. strobus, P. radiata, P. ponderosa, P. pinaster and P. halepensis. The aim of this review is to present the available knowledge on distribution, host specificity, biology, ecology, management of the disease, and to discuss its current prevalence and pathogenicity effect on pine species in Bulgaria.

  2. EFEITOS ECONÔMICOS DE DIFERENTES PROGRAMAS DE DESBASTE EM POVOAMENTOS DE Pinus elliottii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Spathelf

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudado o efeito de diferentes programas de desbaste (desbaste leve, médio e pesado em povoamentos de Pinus elliottii sobre a rentabilidade calculada por meio da taxa interna de retorno. Os povoamentos amostrados foram plantados no ano 1976 em espaçamento de 2 X 2 m. A determinação da intensidade de desbaste foi feita mediante o índice de densidade de Reinecke (SDI. O volume desbastado foi avaliado conforme os sortimentos de Pinus elliottii segundo a tabela de produção de SCHNEIDER & OESTEN (1991 e os custos/preços do ano 1998 fornecidos pela AGEFLOR, Porto Alegre. A maior taxa interna de retorno obteve-se em desbaste leve com 15 anos de rotação e uma densidade inicial de 2.500 árvores por hectare. A menor taxa interna de retorno também ocorreu com desbaste leve, mas em 45 anos e com uma densidade no plantio de 1.500 árvores. No geral, a taxa interna de retorno diminuiu com o aumento do período de rotação. Uma análise de sensibilidade mostrou que o preço obtido pela madeira é a variável mais sensível por influenciar a rentabilidade.

  3. Growth and Survival Variation among Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L. Provenances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Gülcü

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tree height, basal diameter, and survival were examined in thirteen-year-old provenance test established by 30 seed sources of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. at two exotic sites of the species in Southern part of Turkey. Variations within provenance and among provenances and relations among the traits were estimated to compare Scots pine provenance and two other native species. Averages of tree height and basal diameter were 350 cm and 52.7 mm in Aydogmus site and 385 cm and 51.2 mm in Kemer site, respectively. There were large differences within and among provenances for the characters. Sites were similar (p>0.05 for the characters, while there were significant differences (p≤0.05 among provenances within site according to results of variance analysis (ANOVA. Scots pine provenances were higher and had more thickness than that of black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold and Taurus cedar (Cedrus libani A. Rich. which were natural species of the region. There were positive and significant (p<0.05 correlations between height and basal diameter in the species. Average survivals were 56% and 35% of the provenances in the sites. They were 71% and 11% in black pine and 53% in Taurus cedar for the sites respectively.

  4. Primer registro de Naupactus ruizi (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea asociado con Pinus ponderosa (Gymnospermae: Pinaceae en Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia A. GOMEZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Naupactus ruizi (Brèthes es un gorgojo de rostro corto, distribuido en la Argentina y Chile, que habita en ambientes áridos asociado con vegetación xerofítica y alcanza el rango más austral entre los miembros de la tribu Naupactini. Un relevamiento de insectos y de patógenos como plagas potenciales, realizado durante el 2005 en plantaciones de Pinus spp. en la Patagonia andina argentina, resultó en el hallazgo de adultos de N. ruizi que se alimentaban de acículas de Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. Este hallazgo es sorprendente dado que las especies de Naupactini, consumen casi exclusivamente angiospermas. Interpretamos que el cambio de huésped, habría ocurrido como consecuencia de una colonización reciente favorecida por la amplia distribución geográfica del gorgojo y su capacidad para sobrevivir en hábitats marginales, donde probablemente las plantas nativas son escasas y el nuevo huésped presenta una gran abundancia local.

  5. Bio-ecological Peculiarities of Genus Pinus L. Species Under Conditions of Eastern Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Nadiradze

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses bio-ecological peculiarities of the following species of genus Pinus L. spread in eastern Georgia: Pinus eldarica Medw., P. griffithii McCleland., P. cembra L., P. pallasiana Lamb., P. pinea L., P. sabiniana Dougl., P. sylvestris L., P. sosnowskyi Nakai, P. strobus L., the perspectives of their usage in Green Building and contemporary problems. We have studied the periods of bud opening, vegetation ending, starting and finishing of cambium action, sprout woodening process, time and rate of growing in height, and regularities of accumulation-transformation of storage carbohydrates. The studies revealed that the annual development cycle of all these species includes all morphological -physiological periods: sprout growth, latent growth, organic and forced rest. They are characterized by the good growth-development; almost all of them are perspective for eastern Georgia, particularly, for all regions of inner Kakheti. However, in recent years, massive drying up of pine forests groves takes place in eastern Georgia. That is why it is necessary to conduct the fitopatologic research, identify the pest causing the damage and plan the measures against it.

  6. ORIGEM DOS COMPOSTOS HIDROFÓBICOS E SEUS EFEITOS EM FLORESTAS DE Pinus E Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Saldanha Vogelmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobicity can be understood as the soil water repellency or difficulty to soil wetting. This is associated with the coating of soil particles by hydrophobic organic substances and currently there are numerous reports of water repellency in forest areas of Eucalyptus and Pinus. Thus, this study aims at reviewing and listing the aspects related to the origin of hydrophobic compounds and the effects of the water dynamics in the forest environment, as well as implications in growth and development of trees in Eucalyptus and Pinus forests. It is recognized that the local vegetation and some bacteria and fungi, depending on their chemical composition, may release hydrophobic organic substances. Another risk factor is the occurrence of burnings which induce changes in organic compounds and promote soil drying. Furthermore, the particle size distribution and the soil pH may be indirectly associated with the occurrence of soil water repellency The occurrence of hydrophobicity requires special attention regarding the soil use and management, because this repellency affects the water movement on the surface and inside the soil profile. Changes in sorptivity, reduction in water infiltration, increase in runoff and occurrence of preferential flow are the main hydrological effects of this phenomenon. Due to their lower infiltration rates there is increased the surface flow and reducing the amount of water available, increasing the erosion and, consequently affecting the growth and development of plants.

  7. Modeling Dominant Height Growth in Planted Pinus pinea Stands in Northwest of Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sghaier Tahar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Six generalized algebraic difference equations (GADAs derived from the base models of log-logistic, Bertalanffy-Richards, and Lundqvist-Korf were used to develop site index model for Pinus pinea plantations in north-west of Tunisia. To assure the base-age invariance of the model parameter estimates, a dummy variable approach was used. Data from stem analysis, corrected with Carmean's method, were used for modelling. To take into account the inherent autocorrelation of the longitudinal data, a second-order continuous-time autoregressive error structure was used, which allows the models to be applied to irregularly spaced, unbalanced data. Both a qualitative analysis based on the biological realism of the models and numerical and graphical analyses based on the accuracy of the models as well were used to evaluate the performance of candidate models. The relative error in site index predictions was used to select 30 years as the best reference age. Based on the analysis, a generalized algebraic difference equation (GADA derived from the base model of Lundqvist-Korf realized the best compromise between biological and statistical constraints, producing the most adequate site index curves. It is a polymorphic model with site-dependent asymptotes. This model is therefore recommended for height growth prediction and site classification of Pinus pinea plantations in north-west of Tunisia.

  8. Effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honghua; Lin Kunde; Wang Hailong; Gan, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Biochars are anthropogenic carbonaceous sorbent and their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants need to be characterized. Here we evaluated the effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene. Two biochars separately produced at 350 o C and 700 o C and three soils were tested. Biochar amendment generally enhanced the soil sorption of phenanthrene. The biochar produced at 700 o C generally showed a greater ability at enhancing a soil's sorption ability than that prepared at 350 o C. The single-step desorption measurement showed an apparent hysteresis in biochar-amended soils. After 28 d equilibration, the sorptive capacity of biochar-amended soil (with an organic carbon content of 0.16%) significantly decreased. This study clearly suggested that biochar application enhanced soil sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds, but the magnitude of enhancement depended on the preparation of biochars, the indigenous soil organic carbon levels, and the contact time between soil and biochar. - Pinus radiata derived biochars influence soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene.

  9. Simulation of Tsunami Resistance of a Pinus Thunbergii tree in Coastal Forest in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, K.; Suzuki, S.; Noguchi, H.; Hagino, H.

    2015-12-01

    Forests reduce fluid force of tsunami, whereas extreme tsunami sometimes breaks down the forest trees. It is difficult to estimate the interactive relationship between the fluid and the trees because fluid deform tree architecture and deformed tree changes flow field. Dynamic tree deformation and fluid behavior should be clarified by fluid-structure interaction analysis. For the initial step, we have developed dynamic simulation of tree sway and breakage caused by tsunami based on a vibrating system with multiple degrees of freedom. The target specie of the simulation was Japanese black pine (pinus thunbergii), which is major specie in the coastal forest to secure livelihood area from the damage by blown sand and salt in Japanese coastal area. For the simulation, a tree was segmented into 0.2 m long circular truncated cones. Turning moment induced by tsunami and self-weight was calculated at each segment bottom. Tree deformation was computed on multi-degree-of-freedom vibration equation. Tree sway was simulated by iterative calculation of the tree deformation with time step 0.05 second with temporally varied flow velocity of tsunami. From the calculation of bending stress and turning moment at tree base, we estimated resistance of a Pinus thunbergii tree from tsunami against tree breakage.

  10. Using Landsat satellite imagery to detect small-size forest stands of Pinus nigra Arn. and Pinus sylvestris L. affected by Scolytidae; Uso de imagenes satelite Landsat para la deteccion de rodales de Pinus nigra Arn. y Pinus sylvestris L. afectados por escolitidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, E.; Bonet, J. A.; Eizaguirre, M.

    2009-07-01

    Medium resolution images from multispectral sensors like Landsat TM have been extensively used for decades in order to identify decline and defoliation generated by insects and other forest pests. The present work analyses the usefulness of these kinds of images to detect small-size stands of Pinus nigra Arn. and Pinus sylvestris L. affected by Scolytidae attacks. The study area was located in the Solsones region (Eastern Pyrenees), selecting 34 training zones (17 damaged small-size stands and 17 healthy small-size stands). The exploratory analysis of the images was conducted with the ERDAS IMAGINE 8.x. program.The results of the study showed significant differences between the affected and non-affected stands in 5 of the 7 spectral bands analysed. TM5 and TM7 bands were identified as those having the highest power to detect damaged stands. The digital levels obtained and the spaces of characteristics created, both showed trends to group small-size affected stands versus healthy, achieving improvements in the methodological procedure employed. (Author) 31 refs.

  11. Short Communication. Physiological effects of Rhizopogon Roseolus on Pinus halepensis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Alfonso Domínguez Núñez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The inoculation of forest seedlings with ectomycorrhizal fungi can improve the morphological and physiological qualities of plants, especially those used for regeneration of arid areas. Rhizopogon roseolus is an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM commonly used for reforestation. In this study, the specific objectives were to know some morphophysiological effects of Rhizopogon Roseolus on Pinus halepensis seedlings under standard nursery conditionsArea of study: ETSI Montes and EUIT Forestal, Madrid.Material and Methods: In nursery, under well watered conditions and peat growing substrates, Aleppo pine seedlings were inoculated with R. roseolus. Five months after the inoculations, we examined the growth, water parameters (osmotic potential at full turgor [Ψπfull], osmotic potential at zero turgor [Ψπ0], and the tissue modulus of elasticity near full turgor [Emax], mycorrhizal colonization, and concentration and content of macronutrients in the seedlings. Subsequently, a trial was conducted to assess the root growth potential.Main results: The mycorrhization decreased the height and diameter of mycorrhizal seedlings but increased the root weight and root branching. R. roseolus did not cause any significant effect on the regeneration of new roots or on any of the tested hydric parameters, but it did improve N uptake of the seedlings.Research highlights: The mycorrhizal inoculation increased the N uptake. The mycorrhizal inoculation caused opposite effects on some growth parametersKeywords: Osmotic adjustment; elastic adjustment; mineral nutrition; root growth potential; nursery; Rhizopogon roseolus;  Pinus halepensis. 

  12. Economic analysis and revenue optimization in management regimes of Pinus taeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Camil David

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this work was to select, using operational research techniques, management regimes of Pinus taeda L. that maximize the revenue generated by the wood, considering different attractiveness rates. The OpTimber-LP® software, which performs the simulations using SisPinus® software, was used for forest optimization. The regimes consisted of different combinations of forest sites, planting densities, thinning regimes and clearcutting ages, totaling 17,760 regimes per site. Wood production was quantified and evaluated by assortment classes. Planting, thinning and harvesting costs were considered. The Annualized Net Present Value (ANPV and the Internal Rate of Return (IRR of each management regime were calculated. As a result, the density of 1,600 plants per ha optimized ANPV for most cases. Optimized regimes included no or only one thinning and provided ANPV of 2,753 and 158 BRL per ha and IRR of 22.9% and 2.9% for sites I and IV, respectively. It was concluded that the optimal number of thinning is reduced in lower quality sites, and the less productive the site, the later the optimal year for clearcutting. The attractiveness rate is a parameter that contributes to the selection of thinning regimes, because the larger the rate, the larger the number of thinning and the earlier they should be carried out.

  13. Unique features of the loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) megagenome revealed through sequence annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Jill L; Liechty, John D; Stevens, Kristian A; Wu, Le-Shin; Loopstra, Carol A; Vasquez-Gross, Hans A; Dougherty, William M; Lin, Brian Y; Zieve, Jacob J; Martínez-García, Pedro J; Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark; Zimin, Aleksey V; Yorke, James A; Crepeau, Marc W; Puiu, Daniela; Salzberg, Steven L; Dejong, Pieter J; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Main, Doreen; Langley, Charles H; Neale, David B

    2014-03-01

    The largest genus in the conifer family Pinaceae is Pinus, with over 100 species. The size and complexity of their genomes (∼20-40 Gb, 2n = 24) have delayed the arrival of a well-annotated reference sequence. In this study, we present the annotation of the first whole-genome shotgun assembly of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), which comprises 20.1 Gb of sequence. The MAKER-P annotation pipeline combined evidence-based alignments and ab initio predictions to generate 50,172 gene models, of which 15,653 are classified as high confidence. Clustering these gene models with 13 other plant species resulted in 20,646 gene families, of which 1554 are predicted to be unique to conifers. Among the conifer gene families, 159 are composed exclusively of loblolly pine members. The gene models for loblolly pine have the highest median and mean intron lengths of 24 fully sequenced plant genomes. Conifer genomes are full of repetitive DNA, with the most significant contributions from long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons. In depth analysis of the tandem and interspersed repetitive content yielded a combined estimate of 82%.

  14. Modeling and mapping basal area of Pinus taeda L. plantation using airborne LiDAR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos A; Klauberg, Carine; Hudak, Andrew T; Vierling, Lee A; Fennema, Scott J; Corte, Ana Paula D

    2017-01-01

    Basal area (BA) is a good predictor of timber stand volume and forest growth. This study developed predictive models using field and airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data for estimation of basal area in Pinus taeda plantation in south Brazil. In the field, BA was collected from conventional forest inventory plots. Multiple linear regression models for predicting BA from LiDAR-derived metrics were developed and evaluated for predictive power and parsimony. The best model to predict BA from a family of six models was selected based on corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) and assessed by the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj. R²) and root mean square error (RMSE). The best model revealed an adj. R²=0.93 and RMSE=7.74%. Leave one out cross-validation of the best regression model was also computed, and revealed an adj. R² and RMSE of 0.92 and 8.31%, respectively. This study showed that LiDAR-derived metrics can be used to predict BA in Pinus taeda plantations in south Brazil with high precision. We conclude that there is good potential to monitor growth in this type of plantations using airborne LiDAR. We hope that the promising results for BA modeling presented herein will stimulate to operate this technology in Brazil.

  15. Photosynthetic temperature adaptation of Pinus cembra within the timberline ecotone of the Central Austrian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Gerhard; Oberhuber, Walter; Walder, Lisa; Spieler, Daniela; Gruber, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Temperature is suggested to determine the upper limit of tree life. Therefore, future climate warming may be of importance for tree distribution within the European Alps, where low temperatures limit carbon metabolism.We focused on the effects of air and soil temperature on net photosynthesis (P(n)) of Pinus cembra an evergreen climax species of the timberline ecotone of the Central Austrian Alps. Light response and temperature response curves were estimated along an altitudinal gradient ranging from the forest limit up to the krummholz limit in both summer and fall.In general, P(n) was significantly lower in fall as compared to summer. Nevertheless, independent from season mean P(n) values tended to increase with elevation and were positively correlated with root zone temperatures. The specific leaf area by contrast declined with increasing elevation. Furthermore, the temperature optimum of net photosynthesis declined with increasing elevation and was positively correlated with the mean maximum air temperature of the 10 days prior the date of measurement.Thus, our findings appear to reflect a long-term adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus of Pinus cembra to the general temperature conditions with respect to elevation combined with a short term acclimation to the prevailing temperature regime.

  16. Resistance of Pinus taeda plywood treated with preservativesto attack by decay fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Farinassi Mendes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the effect of different preservatives products and retentions on the resistance of Pinus taeda plywood to attack by decay fungi. The experiment consisted of six treatments, two types of products preservatives (CCA and CCB, two retentions (4.0 and 6.5 kg / m³, one treatment with water only, which aimed to evaluate the effect only the process of preservatives application, and a control (no treatment. The plywood was produced with Pinus taeda wood, five veneers of 3 mm thickness and phenol-formaldehyde adhesive at a weight of 420 g / m² (double line. To evaluate the resistance to biodegradation of plywood was used the methodology proposed by ASTM D2017 (2005, and evaluated the fungi Trametes versicolor and Gloeophyllum trabeum. In the resistance evaluation of the panels biodeterioration to attack the fungus Trametes versicolor was no significant effect of product type and retention. The resistance evaluation to attack by fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum, CCA applied in retention of 4.0 kg/cm ³ provided greater resistance to biodeterioration than CCB in the same retention, and in the evaluation of two retentions of CCB there was observed that retention increase to 6.5 kg / m³ resulted in significant improvement in the panels resistance to biodegradation..

  17. Molecular weight distribution of Pinus radiata kraft mill wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, G; Videla, S; Diez, M C

    2001-04-01

    Kraft mill is responsible for massive discharge of highly polluted effluents. The main characteristics of this effluent are high toxicity and low biodegradability due to tannin, lignin and chlorophenol compounds. The composition may vary dramatically depending, for instance, on the utilised feedstock and process. The purpose of this work was to investigate the molecular weight distribution of Pinus radiata kraft pulping wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion by using two types of anaerobic reactors: fixed bed and sludge blanket. Anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and anaerobic filter (AF) were operated. In both reactors, the total alkalinity ranged between 1.0 and 1.5 g CaCO3/l, while the organic load rate (OLR) was increasing during operation from 1.2 to 3.3 gCOD/l d. COD and total phenolic compounds (UV215) removal ranged between 30-50% and 13-20%, respectively, while the BOD5 removal ranged 60-90%. However only a partial biodegradation (10-43%) of tannin and lignin was observed. Results from ultrafiltration analyses indicated that the fraction with a molecular weight (MW) 10,000 MW fraction, colour and COD fraction increased by 14% and 5%, respectively, after anaerobic treatment. It can be concluded from this study, that treatment with UASB or AF reactors is not enough, under the conditions tested, for a large COD removal from Pinus radiata wastewater.

  18. Markers, Reactions, and Interactions during the Aging of Pinus Resin Assessed by Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Victoria; Salvadó, Nati; Butí, Salvador; Cinque, Gianfelice; Pradell, Trinitat

    2017-04-28

    The resin extracted from the species of the Pinus genus (Pinaceae family) is a widely used material. Primarily, resins are made up of two types of diterpenoids: abietanes and pimaranes. Their composition changes with aging, affecting their chemical and physical properties; however, the chemical changes that occur during aging are not yet fully known. Understanding the evolution of pimaranes and abietanes and the chemical composition of the aged resins is essential to make the most of this substance and of its derivatives. A systematic study of the aging of Pinus resin with Raman complemented with infrared (IR) spectroscopy was carried out. This study provided new information about the interactions among the constituting molecules in resins aged over many years. In particular the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aged samples was detected for the first time, and the formation of acid anhydrides from the reaction between pimaranes was demonstrated. Furthermore, Raman and IR spectra band assignments are proposed, and the specific markers of the main compounds of the resin are tagged. This will facilitate the qualitative analysis of resin compounds.

  19. High seed dispersal ability of Pinus canariensis in stands of contrasting density inferred from genotypic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unai López de Heredia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Models that combine parentage analysis from molecular data with spatial information of seeds and seedlings provide a framework to describe and identify the factors involved in seed dispersal and recruitment of forest species. In the present study we used a spatially explicit method (the gene shadow model in order to assess primary and effective dispersal in Pinus canariensis. Area of study: Pinus canariensis is endemic to the Canary Islands (Spain. Sampling sites were a high density forest in southern slopes of Tenerife and a low density stand in South Gran Canaria. Materials and methods: We fitted models based on parentage analysis from seeds and seedlings collected in two sites with contrasting stand density, and then compared the resulting dispersal distributions. Main results: The results showed that: 1 P. canariensis has a remarkable dispersal ability compared to other pine species; 2 there is no discordance between primary and effective dispersals, suggesting limited secondary dispersal by animals and lack of Janzen-Connell effect; and 3 low stand densities enhance the extent of seed dispersal, which was higher in the low density stand. Research highlights: The efficient dispersal mechanism of P. canariensis by wind inferred by the gene shadow model is congruent with indirect measures of gene flow, and has utility in reconstructing past demographic events and in predicting future distribution ranges for the species.

  20. [Spectral features analysis of Pinus massoniana with pest of Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and levels detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang-Hua; Liu, Jian; Yu, Kun-Yong; Gong, Cong-Hong; Xie, Wan-Jun; Tang, Meng-Ya; Lai, Ri-Wen; Li, Zeng-Lu

    2013-02-01

    Taking 51 field measured hyperspectral data with different pest levels in Yanping, Fujian Province as objects, the spectral reflectance and first derivative features of 4 levels of healthy, mild, moderate and severe insect pest were analyzed. On the basis of 7 detecting parameters construction, the pest level detecting models were built. The results showed that (1) the spectral reflectance of Pinus massoniana with pests were significantly lower than that of healthy state, and the higher the pest level, the lower the reflectance; (2) with the increase in pest level, the spectral reflectance curves' "green peak" and "red valley" of Pinus massoniana gradually disappeared, and the red edge was leveleds (3) the pest led to spectral "green peak" red shift, red edge position blue shift, but the changes in "red valley" and near-infrared position were complicated; (4) CARI, RES, REA and REDVI were highly relevant to pest levels, and the correlations between REP, RERVI, RENDVI and pest level were weak; (5) the multiple linear regression model with the variables of the 7 detection parameters could effectively detect the pest levels of Dendrolimus punctatus Walker, with both the estimation rate and accuracy above 0.85.

  1. Biogeochemical assessment of environmental risk by the example of Pinus sylvestris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybakov Dmitry Sergeevich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using annual rings of Pinus sylvestris L. to assess chemical pollution in the Republic of Karelia is discussed. With the help of principal component factor analysis the relationship between the contents of chemical elements and dendrological parameters – the width of annual rings and wood density - was revealed. The main factors contributing to the pollution of the northern part of the Republic of Karelia by the emission from iron-ore enterprise JSC «Karelsky Okatysh» are frequent ecologically significant wind directions, the distance from the source and the total mass of the emission. The value of radial growth (the average width of annual rings for five-years of Pinus sylvestris L. is connected negatively with the content of Cu, Cd, Ni and Fe. As an element of nutrition, Mn is positively correlated with the density of wood wherein it is an antagonist of Fe and partially of Cr in northern areas . Several peaks of Pb content coincide with the most intense tests of atomic weapons. Sharp maximums of Pb can also be due to a cross-border pollution and emission from regional sources.

  2. Agentes limitantes à implantação de Pinus taeda L. por semeadura direta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmar Luciano Mattei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Este trabalho analisa a possibilidade de implantação de povoamentos de Pinus taeda por semeadura direta, combinando 4 épocas de semeadura; 3 técnicas de preparo do solo e 2 sistemas de implantação, utilizando 5 sementes por ponto de semeadura. No campo foram analisados os danos causados por agentes bióticos e não bióticos e o número de pontos com pelo menos uma planta. A análise dos resultados permitiu determinar que os pássaros foram os principais destruidores de sementes, principalmente na fase inicial de emergência,. As formigas constituem-se em pragas de alto risco para a semeadura direta da espécie. A utilização de protetores foi indispensável para a semeadura direta de Pinus taeda e o outono foi a melhor época de semeadura.

  3. Liming and fertilisation in Pinus taeda plantations with severe nutrient deficiency in savanna soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araína Hulmann Batista

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soils with high acidity and low exchangeable bases may be responsible for low yields of Pinus taeda in a forest plantation at Jaguariaíva, Paraná State, Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liming and fertilisation, applied over litter, on two selected areas with Pinus taeda plantations. Soil, litter and pine needles were evaluated for K, Ca and Mg concentrations and soil acidity parameters. Seven treatments were applied: (i complete (N, P, K, Zn, Cu, B, Mo, and lime; (ii without N, P, and K; (iii without Zn, Cu, B, and Mo; (iv without K; (v without Zn; (vi without lime; and (vii control (without nutrients and lime. Soil samples were collected at five soil depths (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm simultaneously with litter samples. Needles were also collected from the first and second pine flushes. Liming induced soil pH, Ca2+, and Mg2+ increases, and the opposite was observed for Al3+ and Al saturation. Fertilisation increased soil exchangeable K+ concentrations and needle and litter K concentrations. The low Ca and Mg concentrations found in the plant needles might be attributable to their low mobility.

  4. Phisyological quality of Pinus elliotti Engelm. seeds subjected to differents storage methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Geraldo Fonseca

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the growing demand for forest products, it is necessary to increase knowledge about the tree species of economic importance, especially in relation to seed storage. One method to study forest species is the storage of seeds. Cryopreservation is the cheapest and the most efficient method of seed preservation. The objective of this study was to test the behavior of Pinus elliottii Engelm. seeds storaged on liquid nitrogen; laboratory environment and refrigerator. The experiment was conducted in the seed Laboratory of the Federal University of the Jequitinhonha and Mucuri Valley. The seeds were donated by Rigesa Ltda on June 2007. Three types of storage were tested: 1 liquid nitrogen temperature of -196 º C, 2 laboratory environment, 3 refrigerator. All treatments were evaluated at 0, 40, 80 and 120 days of storage. The vigor, germination and germination rate tests were mounted on gerbox with blotters and moistened with distilled water and kept in BOD incubator chamber at 25 º C. Seeds length, green mass and dry mass were also evaluated. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and means compared by Tukey test at 5% significance level. It was found that there was loss of quality of the Pinus elliottii seeds in all treatments. Cryopreservation of P. elliotii seeds can be used as an alternative of storage in genebanks.

  5. HISTOPATOLOGÍA DEL PINO DE LAS ALTURAS (Pinus hartwegii Lindl. INOCULADO CON TRES HONGOS OPHIOSTOMATOIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alejandro Pérez-Vera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar las alteraciones histológicas en el pino de las alturas (Pinus hartwegii causadas por tres especies de hongos ophiostomatoides, por medio de microscopia de luz. En Pinus hartwegii hubo acumulación de resina en la zona de inoculación a los diez días, y el follaje se tornó de amarillo a café rojizo a los 60 días. En las inoculaciones con Leptographium guttulatum y Ophiostoma olivaceapinii se observó que inducen la metabolización de polifenoles, depositándose en las paredes de las células de la corteza, el floema, cambium vascular y en la médula se necrosaron. O. ips causó necrosis más severa en corteza, floema, cambium vascular y médula. En xilema, las hifas de los tres hongos penetran en las traqueidas y avanzan longitudinalmente por las puntuaciones aeroladas y se distribuyen radialmente por células parenquimatosas y radios.

  6. Ecophysiological responses of Pinus leucodermis at high elevation in the Mediterranean area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrieri MR

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Pinus leucodermis Antoine (= Pinus heldreichii var. leucodermis is a species of the Balkan flora which in Italy grows in a small area between the Regions of Basilicata and Calabria, in the Pollino National Park. A relict of the oro-Mediterranean Tertiary forests, it is found from the lower vegetation belt, where it is mixed with evergreen sclerophyllous vegetation, up to the alpine vegetation belt beyond the closed formations of Fagus sylvatica, where it makes up stands with very old, isolated and big trees growing in open spaces between rocks. The ecophysiological and dendrochronolgy features of the P. leucodermis stands growing on the west slope of Serra di Crispo (Monte Pollino, between 1800 and 2000 m a.s.l., have been studied during recent years and some of the results are presented in this work. Ecophysiological measurements in situ show that reduced atmospheric vapour pressure deficit conditions, due to humid currents from the western Tyrrhenian Sea, allow the trees to escape from summer drought. When day summer weather conditions are optimal P. leucodermis exhibits a remarkable photosynthetic activity and adaptation to high irradiance. The tree ring width chronology documents a marked reduction of radial growth from 1950 to 1985, followed by a strong recovery, still continuing. In the same period differences between the annual minimum and maximum temperatures tend to increase. Anthropic and grazing pressure is reduced markedly after the institution of the National Park of Pollino.

  7. Photosynthesis, chloroplast pigments, and antioxidants in Pinus canariensis under free-air ozone fumigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Then, Ch.; Herbinger, K.; Luis, V.C.; Heerdt, C.; Matyssek, R.; Wieser, G.

    2009-01-01

    High O 3 levels, driving uptake and challenging defense, prevail on the Canary Islands, being associated with the hot and dry summers of the Mediterranean-type climate. Pinus canariensis is an endemic conifer species that forms forests across these islands. We investigated the effects of ozone on photosynthesis and biochemical parameters of P. canariensis seedlings exposed to free-air O 3 fumigation at Kranzberg Forest, Germany, where ambient O 3 levels were similar to those at forest sites in the Canary Islands. The twice-ambient O 3 regime (2xO 3 ) neither caused visible injury-like chlorotic or necrotic spots in the needles nor significantly affected violaxanthin, antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin levels and the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle. In parallel, stomatal conductance for water vapour, net photosynthesis, intercellular CO 2 concentration, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, as well as antioxidant levels were hardly affected. It is concluded that presently prevailing O 3 levels do not impose severe stress on P. canariensis seedlings. - Twice-ambient ozone does not significantly affect the physiological behavior of Pinus canariensis seedlings

  8. Orthogonal cutting forces in juvenile and mature Pinus taeda wood Forças de corte ortogonal na madeira juvenil e adulta de Pinus taeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Gonçalves

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The distinct characteristics of juvenile and mature woods, which are observed particularly in softwoods, have an influence on processing due to their different mechanical resistance properties in relation to cutting operations. In the past, when most of the wood used industrially came from adult trees of natural forests, little importance was given to a distinction between different zones of the tree stem. At present, however, as the supply of mature trees with large diameters from native forests is constantly decreasing, the use of short-cycle trees has become a common practice, through the adoption of species that grow relatively fast, such as pines and eucalyptus. In both softwoods and hardwoods, juvenile wood cells are generally smaller and thinner than in mature wood, and this reflects on their density and mechanical resistance, which should have an effect on the cutting forces developed during processing. The main object of this research was to evaluate orthogonal cutting forces in juvenile and mature Pinus taeda woods. Cutting force magnitude differences were observed for those two regions of the trunk, with parallel cutting forces being 33.4% higher, on average, at the mature wood region for 90-0 cutting, and 12% higher for 90-90 cutting. This result is consistent with the distinct anatomical structures of the material, since the forces developed during machining depend directly upon its properties.As características distintas dos lenhos juvenil e adulto, existentes principalmente na formação das coníferas, influenciam na usinagem devido às diferentes propriedades de resistência mecânica ao corte. No passado, quando a maior parte da madeira utilizada industrialmente era proveniente de árvores adultas de florestas naturais, pouca importância era dada à diferenciação de zonas no tronco. Atualmente, no entanto, com o decréscimo constante do suprimento de árvores adultas de grandes diâmetros, provenientes de florestas nativas

  9. Effect of average growing season temperature on seedling germination, survival and growth in jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. David; E. Humenberger

    2017-01-01

    Because jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) is serotinous, it retains multiple years of cones until environmental conditions are favorable for releasing seed. These cones, which contain seed cohorts that developed under a variety of growing seasons, can be accurately aged using bud scale scars on twigs and branches. By calculating the average daily...

  10. In vitro zygotic embryo culture of Pinus peuce Gris.: Optimization of culture conditions affecting germination and early seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojičić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a protocol for the germination and early seedling growth of Pinus peuce Gris. using zygotic embryo culture. In order to overcome seed dormancy and optimize organogenesis, the effect of nutritional, plant growth regulatory and physical factors on in vitro germination and growth of isolated mature zygotic embryos of P. peuce were investigated.

  11. Impact of Experimentally Elevated Ozone on Seed Germination and Growth of Russian Pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Spruce (Picea spp.) Provenances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prozherina, Nadezda; Nakvasina, Elena; Oksanen, Elina

    2009-01-01

    The impact of elevated ozone concentrations on early ontogenetic stages of pine (Pinus sylvestris) and spruce (Picea abies, Picea obovata, P. abies X P. obovata) seedlings originating from different provenances in Russia were studied in the open-field ozone fumigation system located in Kuopio,

  12. Germination of CO2-enriched Pinus taeda L. seeds and subsequent seedling growth responses to CO2 enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Hussain; M. E. Kubiske; K. F. Connor

    2001-01-01

    1. Pinus tuedli seeds, developed under ambient or elevated (ambient + 200 Ч1-1) [CO2], were collected from Duke Forest, North Carolina, USA in October 1998. Seeds were germinated in nutrient-deficient soil in either ambient or elevated [COJ (ambient + 200 Ч1-1) greenhouse...

  13. Restoring fire to long-unburned Pinus palustris ecosystems: novel fire effects and consequences for long-unburned ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan J. Varner; Doria r. Gordon; Francis E. Putz; J. Kevin Hiers

    2005-01-01

    Biologically rich savannas and woodlands dominated by Pinus palustris once dominated the southeastern U.S. landscape. With European settlement, fire suppression, and landscape fragmentation, this ecosystem has been reduced in area by 97%. Half of remnant forests are not burned with sufficient frequency, leading to declines in plant and animal species...

  14. 75 FR 42033 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Pinus albicaulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... composition will occur, which will increase fuel loads and lead to greater stress in Pinus albicaulis forests... stress-tolerant pine, and its hardiness allows it to grow where other conifer species cannot (Tomback et... successional replacement by other conifer species, resulting in conversion to a more shade-tolerant forest type...

  15. Spatial structure and associations in Pinus canariensis population at the treeline, Pico del Teide, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrůtek, Miroslav; Doležal, J.; Hara, T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2002), s. 201-210 ISSN 1523-0430 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Pinus canariensis * Canary Islands Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2002

  16. Spatial structure and associations in Pinus canariensis population at the treeline, Pico del Teide, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrůtek, Miroslav; Doležal, J.; Hara, T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2002), s. 201-210 ISSN 1523-0430 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/00/1445; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Pinus canariensis * Canary Islands Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2002

  17. Predicting age-age genetic correlations in tree-breeding programs: a case study of Pinus taeda L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.P. Gwaze; F.E. Bridgwater; T.D. Byram; J.A. Woolliams; C.G. Williams

    2000-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 520 parents and 51,439 individuals was used to develop two equations for predicting age-age genetic correlations in Pinus taeda L. Genetic and phenotypic family mean correlations and heritabilities were estimated for ages ranging from 2 to 25 years on 31...

  18. Frequency of hypersensitive-like reaction and stem infections in a large full-sib family of Pinus monticola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. Danchok; R.A. Sniezko; S. Long; A. Kegley; D. Savin; J.B. Mayo; J.J. Liu; J. Hill

    2012-01-01

    Western white pine (WWP) (Pinus monticola Douglas ex D. Don) is a long-lived forest tree species with a large native range in western North America. The tree species is highly susceptible to the non-native fungal pathogen, Cronartium ribicola, the causative agent of white pine blister rust (WPBR)....

  19. Development of Screening Trials to Rank Pinus radiata Genotypes for Resistance to Defoliation by Monterey Pine Aphid (Essigella californica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Elms; Peter Ades; Nick Collet

    2012-01-01

    The Monterey pine aphid (Essigella californica) is a recent arrival in Australia, having first been detected in 1998. It quickly spread throughout the national radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plantation estate, causing seasonal defoliation and compromising tree growth in many areas. Selection of resistant radiata...

  20. Association genetics of growth and adaptive traits in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using whole-exome-discovered polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengmeng Lu; Konstantin V. Krutovsky; C. Dana Nelson; Jason B. West; Nathalie A. Reilly; Carol A. Loopstra

    2017-01-01

    In the USA, forest genetics research began over 100 years ago and loblolly pine breeding programs were established in the 1950s. However, the genetics underlying complex traits of loblolly pine remains to be discovered. To address this, adaptive and growth traits were measured and analyzed in a clonally tested loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) population. Over 2.8 million...

  1. Development of Cytoplasmatic SSR-Markers for Population Genetic Studies of the Siberian Stone Pine (Pinus Sibirica Du Tour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. А. Shilkina

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Three chloroplast and one mitochondrial DNA markers were developed and used for genotyping of 60 trees in two populations of the Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour. Two chloroplast loci were monomorphic in both populations, and one polymorphic with two alleles. Therefore, four chloroplast haplotypes were revealed totally. A mitochondrial DNA marker had two alleles or haplotypes (mitotypes.

  2. Improved recruitment and early growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings after fire and soil scarification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, M.G.; Ouden, den J.

    2004-01-01

    The success of seedling recruitment of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is strongly dependent on soil surface properties, such as humus depth and moisture content. In an undisturbed forest floor, seedlings are seldom able to become established due to the high incidence of desiccation in the organic

  3. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype distribution patterns in Pinus ponderosa (pinaceae): range-wide evolutionary history and implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Valerie D. Hipkins; Mary F. Mahalovich; Robert E. Means

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P. Lawson & C. Lawson) exhibits complicated patterns of morphological and genetic variation across its range in western North America. This study aims to clarify P. ponderosa evolutionary history and phylogeography using a highly polymorphic...

  4. Natural production of Tuber aestivum in central Spain: Pinus spp. versus Quercus spp. brûlés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis G. Garcia-Montero; Domingo Moreno; Vicente J. Monleon; Fernando Arredondo-Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: Tuber aestivum is the most widespread edible truffle, with increasing commercial interest. This species can produce carpophores with conifer hosts, in contrast with the inability of Pinus spp. to induce fruiting in other truffle species such as Tuber melanosporum. Therefore the objective is to...

  5. Canopy Level Emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes from a Pinus taeda Experimental Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) observed during 2007 from a Pinus taeda experimental plantation in Central North Carolina are compared with model estimates from MEGAN 2.1. Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) estimates of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) fluxes are ...

  6. Soil C02 efflux across four age classes of plantation loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) on the Virginia Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Eric Wiseman; John R. Seiler

    2004-01-01

    Soil CO2 efflux resulting from microbial and root respiration is a major component of the forest C cycle. In this investigation, we examined in detail how soil CO2 efflux differs both spatially and temporally with respect to stand age for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations on the Virginia Piedmont...

  7. Correlation between infection by ophiostomatoid fungi and the presence of subterranean termites in Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Observations of subterranean termites feeding in pine sapwood containing ophiostomatoid fungi prompted a study to investigate the effect of infection by Leptographium fungi on the probability of encountering subterranean termites in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) roots. Root samples were collected f...

  8. Public preferences for nontimber benefits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands regenerated by different site preparation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianbang Gan; Stephen H. Kolison; James Miller

    2000-01-01

    This study assesses public preferences for nontimber benefits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)stands regenerated 1.5 yr earlier using different site preparation treatments at national forest and industrial forestry sites. Treatments tested on the Tuskegee National Forest were none, chainsaw felling, tree injection, and soil-active herbicide. At the...

  9. Monthly leaf area index estimates from point-in-time measurements and needle phenology for Pinus taeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.A. Sampson; T.J. Albaugh; Kurt H. Johnsen; H.L. Allen; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: Leaf area index (LAI) of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees of the southern United States varies almost twofold interannually; loblolly pine, essentially, carries two foliage cohorts at peak LAI (September) and one at minimum (March–April). Herein, we present an approach that may be site invariant to estimate monthly...

  10. Diet of southern toads (Bufo terrestris) in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands subject to coarse woody debris manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtis R. Moseley; Steven B. Castleberry; James L. Hanula; W. Mark Ford

    2004-01-01

    In the southeastern United States, coarse woody debris (CWD) typically harbors high densities of invertebrates. However, its importance as a foraging substrate for southeastern amphibians is relatively unknown. We examined effects of CWD manipulations on diet composition of southern toads (Bufo tmrestns) in upland loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands...

  11. Modeling the longitudinal variation in wood specific gravity of planted loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Antony; L. R. Schimleck; R. F. Daniels; Alexander Clark; D. B. Hall

    2010-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is a major plantation species grown in the southern United States, producing wood having a multitude of uses including pulp and lumber production. Specific gravity (SG) is an important property used to measure the quality of wood produced, and it varies regionally and within the tree with height and radius. SG at different height levels...

  12. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  13. Internal and external control of net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance of mature eastern white pine (Pinus strobus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris A. Maier; R.O. Teskey

    1992-01-01

    Leaf gas exchange and water relations were monitored in the upper canopy of two 25 m tall eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) trees over two consecutive growing seasons (1986 and 1987). Examination of the seasonal and diurnal patterns of net photosynthesis and leaf conductance showed that both internal and external (environmental) factors were...

  14. Influence of residual basal area on longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) first year germination and establishment under selection silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhat Kara; Edward F. Loewenstein

    2015-01-01

    Even-aged silvicultural methods have been successfully used to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests for wood production; however, successful use of uneven-aged methods to manage this ecosystem is less well documented. In this study, the effects of varying levels of residual basal area (RBA) (9.2, 13.8, and 18.4 m2...

  15. Modeling silviculture after natural disturbance to sustain biodiversity in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem : balancing complexity and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian J. Palik; Robert J. Mitchell; J. Kevin Hiers

    2002-01-01

    Modeling silviculture after natural disturbance to maintain biodiversity is a popular concept, yet its application remains elusive. We discuss difficulties inherent to this idea, and suggest approaches to facilitate implementation, using longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) as an example. Natural disturbance regimes are spatially and temporally variable. Variability...

  16. Individual-tree Green Weight Equations for Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) Sawtimber in the Coastal Plain of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis E. Posey; Paul F. Doruska; David W. Patterson

    2005-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) weight equations were developed to predict outside-bark, green bole weight to a 4-inch diameter-inside-bark (dib) top and an 8-inch dib top in southeast Arkansas. Trees were sampled from 8 different tracts over the first half of 2002: 4 tracts during winter and spring, respectively. The sampled trees ranged from 10 to...

  17. Effect of seedling stock on the early stand development and physiology of improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakuntala Sharma; Joshua P. Adams; Jamie L. Schuler; Robert L. Ficklin; Don C. Bragg

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of spacing and genotype on the growth and physiology of improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings from three distinct genotypes planted in Drew County, Arkansas (USA). Genotype had a significant effect on survival and height. Clone CF Var 1 showed greater height and survival compared to other seedlings....

  18. Family-site interaction in Pinus radiata: implications for progeny testing strategy and regionalised breeding in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.R. Johnson; R.D. Brudon

    1990-01-01

    A progeny test of 170 open-pollinated families from second-generation plus trees of Pinus radiata was established on four sites in New Zealand in 1981. Two test sites were on volcanic purnice soils in the Central North Island region and two were on phosphate-retentive clay soils in the Northland region.Assessments of volume growth, stem straightness, mal-...

  19. Linking nonstructural carbohydrate dynamics to gas exchange and leaf hydraulic behavior in Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Woodruff; Frederick C. Meinzer; Danielle E. Marias; Sanna Sevanto; Michael W. Jenkins; Nate G. McDowell

    2014-01-01

    Leaf hydraulics, gas exchange and carbon storage in Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma, two tree species on opposite ends of the isohydry–anisohydry spectrum, were analyzed to examine relationships between hydraulic function and carbohydrate dynamics.Leaf hydraulic vulnerability,...

  20. First discovery of fossil winged seeds of Pinus L. (family Pinaceae) from the Indian Cenozoic and its palaeobiogeographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahasin Ali; Bera, Subir

    2017-07-01

    The occurrences of Pinus L. (family Pinaceae) megafossils (cones and leaf remains) have been abundantly documented from the Cenozoic sediments of eastern Asia (Japan and China), but none has been confirmed from the Indian Cenozoic till date. Here, we describe Pinus arunachalensis Khan and Bera, sp. nov. on the basis of seed remains from the middle to late Miocene Siwalik sediments of the Dafla Formation exposed around West Kameng district in Arunachal Pradesh, eastern Himalaya. Seeds are winged, broadly oblong to oval in outline, 1.3-1.5 cm long and 0.4-0.6 cm broad (in the middle part), located basipetally and symmetrically to wing, cellular pattern of wing is seemingly undulatory and parallel with the long axis of the wing. So far, this report provides the first ever fossil record of Pinus winged seeds from India. This record suggests that Pinus was an important component of tropical-subtropical evergreen forest in the area during the Miocene and this group subsequently declined from the local vegetation probably because of the gradual intensification of MSI (monsoon index) from the Miocene to the present. We also review the historical phytogeography and highlight the phytogeographic implication of this genus.

  1. Fire Frequency Effects on Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris P. Miller) Vegetation in South Carolina and Northeast Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff S. Glitzenstein; Donna R. Streng; Dale D. Wade

    2003-01-01

    Southeastern United States habitats dominated by longleaf pine (Pinus pulutris P. Miller) have declined precipitously in area and extent. Conservation of diverse ground-layer vegetation in these endangered habitats depends on prescribed fire. While the need for prescribed fire is now generally accepted, there is disagreement concerning the most...

  2. Resin flow responses to fertilization, wounding and fungal inoculation in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larissa Knebel; Daniel J. Robinson; Thomas R. Wentworth; Kier D. Klepzig

    2009-01-01

    Resin flow is the primary means of natural defense against southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.), the most important insect pest of Pinus spp. in the southern United States. As a result, factors affecting resin flowa are of interest to researchers and forest managers. We examined the influence of fertilization, artificial...

  3. Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) restoration on gulf lower coastal plain flatwoods sites: role of shrub control and phosphorous fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Holzmueller; Johanna E. Freeman; Shibu Jose; Diomides S. Zamora; Jason Liddle

    2010-01-01

    The longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem is one of the most threatened ecosystems in North America. Restoration of this ecosystem on flatwoods sites is difficult because of the thick shrub layer and limited nutrient availability of phosphorus (P) that can cause longleaf pine seedlings to remain in the grass stage for a number of years. We...

  4. Competition for nitrogen between Pinus sylvestris and ectomycorrhizal fungi generates potential for negative feedback under elevated CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberton, O.; Kuyper, T.W.; Gorissen, A.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated fungal species-specific responses of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings on growth and nutrient acquisition together with mycelial development under ambient and elevated CO2. Each seedling was associated with one of the following ECM species: Hebeloma

  5. Modeling the effects of fire and climate change on carbon and nitrogen storage in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. A. H. Smithwick; M. G. Ryan; D. M. Kashian; W. H. Romme; D. B. Tinker; M. G. Turner

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between disturbance and climate change and resultant effects on ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes are poorly understood. Here, we model (using CENTURY version 4.5) how climate change may affect C and N fluxes among mature and regenerating lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm. ex S.Wats.)...

  6. Do climate and outbreak frequency affect levels of foliar phytochemistry in different lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Louden) is a widely distributed tree in North American forests and is found in a variety of environments, each with different levels of disease activity. We quantified the levels of defense-associated metabolites (including soluble phenolics, lignin, and ter...

  7. Can we expect to protect threatened species in protected areas? A case study of the genus Pinus in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguirre Gutiérrez, J.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of 56 Pinus species in Mexico was modelled with MAXENT. The pine species were classified as threatened according to IUCN criteria. Our aim was to ascertain whether or not threatened pine species were adequately represented in protected areas. Almost 70% of the species had less than

  8. Needle terpenoid composition of Pinus halepensis (Mill.) Trees infested by the scale insect Marchalina hellenica (Genn.) in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassios Gallis; Carlos Arrabal; Aristotle C. Papageorgiou; Maria C. Garcia-Vallejo

    2012-01-01

    Needle terpenoid composition was determined by using GLC-MS in Pinus halepensis (Mill.) trees that were infested and not infested by the scale insect Marchalina hellenica. The study area was within the Forest National Park of the Cape Sounion, southern Attica region, Greece. A total of 43 compounds, 32 of which were identified...

  9. HYDROLOGICAL AND CLIMATIC RESPONSES OF OLD-GROWTH PINUS ELLIOTTII VAR. DENSA IN MESIC PINE FLATWOODS FLORIDA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinus elliottii Englem. var. densa Little & Dorman (Southern Slash Pine) is unique in that it is the only native sub-tropical pine in the USA. Once occupying much of the south Florida landscape, it is now restricted to an estimated 3% of its pre human settlement area. Land manag...

  10. Use of multi-temporal UAV-derived imagery for estimating individual tree growth in Pinus pinea stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Guerra-Hernández; Eduardo González-Ferreiro; Vicente Monleon; Sonia Faias; Margarida Tomé; Ramón Díaz-Varela

    2017-01-01

    High spatial resolution imagery provided by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can yield accurate and efficient estimation of tree dimensions and canopy structural variables at the local scale. We flew a low-cost, lightweight UAV over an experimental Pinus pinea L. plantation (290 trees distributed over 16 ha with different fertirrigation treatments)...

  11. Chemical profiling and biological activity analysis of cone, bark and needle of Pinus roxburghii collected from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Thapa

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that among that needle, cone and bark of Pinus roxburghii as a huge source of biological active metabolites. Furthermore, bark extract revealed the presence of diverse chemical constituent. [J Complement Med Res 2018; 7(1.000: 66-75

  12. Efficacy of two insecticides for protecting loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordon L. Burke; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Jackson P. Audley; Kamal JK. Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two insecticides (carbaryl and bifenthrin) for excluding subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae) from loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Two trap designs (single- and double-pane windows) and two trapping heights (1.5 and 4m) were also evaluated for maximizing beetle catches.

  13. Earthworms, arthropods and plant litter decomposition in aspen (Populus tremuloides) and lodgepole pine(Pinus contorta) forests in Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizelle Gonzalez; Timothy R. Seastedt; Zugeily Donato

    2003-01-01

    We compared the abundance and community composition of earthworms, soil macroarthropods, and litter microarthropods to test faunal effects on plant litter decomposition rates in two forests in the subalpine in Colorado, USA. Litterbags containing recently senesced litter of Populus tremuloides (aspen) and Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) were placed in aspen and pine...

  14. Appraisal on the wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils obtained from the cones and needles of Pinus species by in vivo and in vitro experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süntar, Ipek; Tumen, Ibrahim; Ustün, Osman; Keleş, Hikmet; Akkol, Esra Küpeli

    2012-01-31

    According to ethnobotanical data, Pinus species have been used against rheumatic pain and for wound healing in Turkish folk medicine. Essential oils from the cones and needles of five different Pinus species (Pinus brutia Ten., Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus nigra Arn., Pinus pinea L. and Pinus sylvestris L.) were evaluated for their in vivo wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities. In vivo wound healing activity of the ointments prepared from essential oils was evaluated by linear incision and circular excision experimental wound models subsequently histopathological analysis and hydroxyproline content. Furthermore, the essential oils were screened for anti-hyaluronidase activity. Additionally anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by using the method of Whittle, which is based on the inhibition of acetic acid-induced increase in capillary permeability. The essential oils obtained from the cones of Pinus pinea and Pinus halepensis demonstrated the highest effects on the wound healing activity models. On the other hand, the rest of the essential oils did not show any significant wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities. The experimental study revealed that essential oils obtained from the cones of Pinus pinea and Pinus halepensis display remarkable wound healing activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy rating and productive of wood from reforestation of Eucalyptus and Pinus genetically improved in the state of Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammal Filho, Fawaz Ali; Bruder, Edson Marcelo; Rezende, Marcos Antonio de [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text: In recent years, wood consumption is increasing, and the need to increase the availability of commercial wood reforestation becomes essentially important. In the state of Sao Paulo a few species of Eucalyptus and Pinus have stood out for having high productivity and with updated technical genetic improvements to productivity can be increased to 60 %. The work has to evaluate the productivity and quality of wood provided with commercial reforestation species of Eucalyptus and Pinus genetically improved in the midwestern region of Sao Paulo. In this study we used six treatments: a seminal Eucalyptus grandis; two clones of Eucalyptus grandis, three hybrid clones of Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis. Pinus were analyzed for five hybrid progenies of Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis and Pinus tecunumanii. We evaluated the productivity rates of each treatment and the quality of wood produced, by studying their average density and specific variations possible by the methods: TARG (Technique attenuation of gamma radiation from {sup 241}Am) and immersion. Productivity mass IMAM treatments for Eucalyptus S1, C1, C2, H1, H2 and H3 were 18.7, 17.0, 21.2, 28.1, 30.1 and 27.2 ton/ha.years respectively, and the density point to 12 % treatments S1, C1, C2, H1, H2 and H3 were 451.3, 439.0, 411.9, 518.8, 526.4 and 526.3 kg/m{sup 3}. Productivity for Pinus mass IMAM treatments H1, H2, H3, H4, H5 and S1 were 14.7, 13.5, 13.7, 14.8, 12.4 and 13.0 ton/ha.years respectively, and the density point to 12 % treatments H1, H2, H3, H4, H5 and S1 were 475, 522, 459, 478, 430 and 514 kg/m{sup 3}. These results are extremely important and come to contradict some literature results that correlate productivity gains with losses in density. It was concluded that the values of density and productivity of each treatment and sperm Pinus hybrids there was significant improvement in the indices assessed. While in the Eucalyptus the results were remarkable, reflecting the improvement in

  16. Natural production of Tuber aestivum in central Spain: Pinus spp. versus Quercus spp. brûlés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Garcia-Montero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Tuber aestivum is the most widespread edible truffle, with increasing commercial interest. This species can produce carpophores with conifer hosts, in contrast with the inability of Pinus spp. to induce fruiting in other truffle species such as Tuber melanosporum. Therefore the objective is to compare the characteristics and carpophore production of T. aestivum brûlés associated with Pinus spp. versus Quercus spp.Area of study: We studied the natural habitats of T. aestivum in the Alto Tajo Nature Reserve in central Spain.Material and methods: During 5 years, we monitored the production of carpophores and brûlé size of 145 T. aestivum brûlés associated with Pinus nigra subsp. salzmanni and P. sylvestris and Quercus ilex subsp. ballota and Q. faginea hosts. Statistical treatment was performed using the Statistica Program v. 6.Main Results: The size of brûlés associated with Pinus was significantly smaller than that of brûlés associated with Quercus. However, carpophore production per brûlé, and especially for brûlés of similar size, was greater when the host plant was a pine. After accounting for brûlé size, the production of brûlés associated with Pinus spp. was 2.23 (95% CI, between 1.35 and 3.69 and 1.61 (95% CI, between 1.02 and 2.54 times greater than the production of brûlés associated with Quercus faginea and Q. ilex subsp. ballota, respectively.Research highlights: The considerable ability of Pinus nigra subsp. salzmanni and P. sylvestris to form effective brûlés and to produce carpophores of Tuber aestivum in natural conditions was clearly demonstrated, and suggest that those species can be of use in the culture of T. aestivum.Key words: Summer truffle; Tuber aestivum; truffle culture; truffle ecology; Pinus spp.; Quercus spp.

  17. [Physiological characteristics of Pinus densiflora var. zhangwuensis and Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica seedlings on sandy lands under salt-alkali stresses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Peng; Li, Yu-Ling; Zhang, Bai-xi

    2013-02-01

    For the popularization of Pinus densiflora var. zhangwuensis, a new afforestation tree species on the desertified and salinized-alkalized lands in Northern China, and to evaluate the salinity-alkalinity tolerance of the tree species and to better understand the tolerance mechanisms, a pot experiment with 4-year old P. densiflora var. zhangwuensis and P. sylvestris var. mongolica was conducted to study their seedlings growth and physiological and biochemical indices under the effects of three types salt (NaCl, Na2CO3, and NaHCO3 ) stresses and of alkali (NaOH) stress. Under the salt-alkali stresses, the injury level of P. densiflora var. zhangwuensis was lower, and the root tolerance index was higher. The leaf catalase (CAT) activity increased significantly by 22. 6 times at the most, as compared with the control; the leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) content had no significant increase; the leaf chlorophyll (Chl) content had a smaller decrement; and the leaf water content (LWC) increased slightly. P. sylvestris var. mongolica responded differently to the salt-alkali stresses. Its leaf CAT activity had less change, MDA content increased significantly, Chl content had significant decrease, and LWC decreased slightly. It was suggested that P. densi-flora var. zhangwuensis had a greater salinity-alkalinity tolerance than P. sylvestris var. mongolica. The higher iron concentration in P. densiflora var. zhangwuensis needles enhanced the CAT activity and Chl content, whereas the higher concentrations of zinc and copper were associated with the stronger salinity-alkalinity tolerance.

  18. UTILIZAÇÃO DE ADESIVO PVA EM COMPENSADOS DE Pinus sp. E Eucalyptus sp. / UTILIZATION OF PVA ADHESIVES IN Pinus sp. and Eucalyptus sp. PLYWOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. De Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudos sobre novos adesivos ou resinas para colagem de madeira e derivados estão sendo realizados com a intenção de diminuir o impacto ambiental sem alterar suas propriedades. Por este motivo, novas formulações de adesivos PVA (Acetato de Polivinila vêm sendo desenvolvidas. Este trabalho testou a utilização deste adesivo na produção de compensado de Eucalyptus sp. e Pinus sp., com tempo e temperatura de prensagem, respectivamente, de 10 minutos e90°C. Foram realizados os ensaios físicos de densidade, teor de umidade e absorção, e os ensaios mecânicos de flexão estática e de resistência ao cisalhamento na linha de cola, todos de acordo com as normas ABNT. Obtiveram-se bons resultados com relação à resistência ao cisalhamento na linha de cola, a qual foi superior para os adesivos PVA, se comparados com compensados produzidos com ureia-formaldeído e o fenol-formaldeído, enquanto que os resultados de MOE e MOR apresentaram-se inferiores em ambos os casos. 

  19. Pinus roxburghii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Net short wave and long wave radiative fluxes substantially varied with cloud dynamics, season, rainfall induced surface wetness, and green growth. The study clearly brought out the ..... The storage heat of the canopy is being ignored in seasonal cycle, with the assumption that the amount of energy stored during the ...

  20. Pinus ayacahuite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-04

    Jan 4, 2008 ... This work was supported by a SEP-CONACYT grant (33129-B), Universidad de Guadalajara. REFERENCES. Azevedo H, Lino-Neto T, Tavares RM (2003). An improved method for high-quality RNA isolation from needle of adult maritime pine trees. Plant Mol. Biol. Rep. 21: 333-338. Bousquet J, Simon L, ...

  1. Pinus roxburghii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (500–2000 m) and oak (Quercus leucotricophora). (2000–3500m) forests. These ecosystems have synchronous, distinct ..... varied from 0.08 to 0.12 for jack pine, white pine, and slash pine system with age varying between .... Coniferous trees such as pine, in general, have a clear annual cycle of photosynthetic activity, the.

  2. MÉTODOS DE DETECÇÃO, TRANSMISSÃO E PATOGENICIDADE DE Fusarium spp. EM SEMENTES DE Pinus taeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisa Wendhausen Ramos da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The root rots (RR, caused by the Fusarium spp., causes loss of seedling in the nursery that show, initially, discoloration of the needles to a yellowish-green tone followed by apical curvature, wilt and the consequent death of the seedling. The objectives of this work were to: a define the most appropriate and efficient method to detect Fusarium spp. in Pinus taeda seeds; b verify if there is transmission of Fusarium spp. from seeds to Pinus taeda seedlings; c develop a descriptive scale to evaluate the severity of the RR in Pinus taeda seedlings; d evaluate the pathogenicity, aggressiveness and area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC of isolated Fusarium subglutinans . For detection three treatments were applied to six lots of Pinus taeda seeds, bein four repetitions of 25 seeds: blotter test, paper card and selective medium. The transmission was evaluated in seeds from six lots of Pinus taeda during 60 days counting the percentage of emerged plantlet (EP, non-germinated seeds (NGS and from NGS seeds with Fusarium spp. A descriptive scale of grades was developed to evaluate the severity of RR in Pinus taeda seedlings. The severity and the incidence of the illness were evaluated at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after the inoculation from Pinus taeda seedlings of six months of age. The pathogenicity, severity and incidence of twelve isolated Fusarium subglutinans obtained in the detection test. To test for pathogenicity and aggressiveness 13 treatments with 15 replications were applied. The most sensitive detection method to detect Fusarium spp. on Pinus taeda seeds was the selective medium; transmission was not observed of Fusarium spp. from seeds to the seedlings; the descriptive scale allowed evaluating the progression of RR symptoms; nine isolated of Fusarium spp. were found to be pathogenic to Pinus taeda seedlings, reproducing typical symptoms of RR, being isolated L3R2, the most aggressive and that exhibited higher AUDPC.

  3. Metal(loid) allocation and nutrient retranslocation in Pinus halepensis trees growing on semiarid mine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parraga-Aguado, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.parraga@upct.es [Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agraria Paseo Alfonso XIII, Cartagena 48. 30203 (Spain); Querejeta, Jose-Ignacio [Water and Soil Conservation Department, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura CEBAS-CSIC Campus Universitario de Espinardo, PO Box 164, Espinardo-Murcia ES-30100 (Spain); González-Alcaraz, María Nazaret; Conesa, Hector M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología Agraria Paseo Alfonso XIII, Cartagena 48. 30203 (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate internal metal(loid) cycling and the risk of metal(loid) accumulation in litter from Pinus halepensis trees growing at a mine tailing disposal site in semiarid Southeast Spain. Internal nutrient retranslocation was also evaluated in order to gain insight into the ability of pine trees to cope with the low-fertility soil conditions at the tailings. We measured metal(loid) concentrations in the foliage (young and old needles), woody stems and fresh leaf litter of pine trees growing on tailings. The nutrient status and stable isotope composition of pine foliage (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O as indicators of photosynthesis and water use efficiency) were also analyzed. Tailing soil properties in vegetation patches and in adjacent bare soil patches were characterized as well. Significant amounts of metal(loid)s such us Cd, Cu, Pb and Sb were immobilized in the woody stems of Pinus halepensis trees growing on tailings. Leaf litterfall showed high concentrations of As, Cd, Sb, Pb and Zn, which thereby return to the soil. However, water extractable metal(loid) concentrations in tailing soils were similar between vegetation patches (mineral soil under the litter layer) and bare soil patches. The pines growing on mine tailings showed very low foliar P concentrations in all leaf age classes, which suggests severe P deficiency. Young (current year) needles showed lower accumulation of metal(loid)s, higher nutrient concentrations (P and K), and higher water use efficiency (as indicated by and δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 18}O data) than older needles. Substantial nutrient resorption occurred before leaf litterfall, with 46% retranslocation efficiency for P and 89% for K. In conclusion, phytostabilization of semiarid mine tailings with Pinus halepensis is feasible but would require careful monitoring of the trace elements released from litterfall, in order to assess the long term risk of metal(loid) transfer to the food chain

  4. Analysis of mating system in two Pinus cembra L. populations of the Ukrainian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri V. Politov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Volume 51 (1, 2008, pages 11-18Back Analysis of mating system in two Pinus cembra L. populations of the Ukrainian Carpathians     D.V. PolitovLaboratory of Population Genetics, Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences Y.V. PirkoInstitute of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering, Ukraine N.N. PirkoInstitute of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering, Ukraine E.A. MudrikDonetsk Botanical Gardens, Ukraine I.I. KorshikovDonetsk Botanical Gardens, Ukraine  contact authors by Editorial Office  SUMMARY  In natural pine populations, a mixed mating system is typical, characterized by the proportions of selfed and outcrossed seeds. Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L. is one of the least studied European conifers in this respect. The mating system of six polymorphic allozyme loci were studied in haploid megagametophytes and diploid open-pollinated embryos in two stands located in the East Carpathians. In the 'Gorgany' population (24 trees, 198 seeds the mean singlelocus estimated outcrossing rate (ts was 0.731, and the multilocus estimate (tm was 0.773. In the 'Yayko' population the outcrossing rate was lower (27 trees, 213 seeds, ts=0.645, tm=0.700, suggesting 23-30% of seeds are self-pollinated. Correlation of outcrossing rate estimates among loci was less than 1, (0.300 in 'Gorgany' and 0.469 in 'Yayko' indicating biparental inbreeding occurred. Differences between tm and ts (0.042 in 'Gorgany' and 0.056 in 'Yayko' can also be influenced by consanguineous mating, indicated by the presence of spatial and genetic family structure. In small isolated populations of Pinus cembra, which are typical for the Carpathian part of the species' range, inbreeding depression may negatively affect seed quality. The high proportion of selfed seeds observed here can be expected in any seedlot of this species and should be taken into account while planning gene conservation or reforestation measures. Maternal trees in these populations

  5. Metal(loid) allocation and nutrient retranslocation in Pinus halepensis trees growing on semiarid mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parraga-Aguado, Isabel; Querejeta, Jose-Ignacio; González-Alcaraz, María Nazaret; Conesa, Hector M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate internal metal(loid) cycling and the risk of metal(loid) accumulation in litter from Pinus halepensis trees growing at a mine tailing disposal site in semiarid Southeast Spain. Internal nutrient retranslocation was also evaluated in order to gain insight into the ability of pine trees to cope with the low-fertility soil conditions at the tailings. We measured metal(loid) concentrations in the foliage (young and old needles), woody stems and fresh leaf litter of pine trees growing on tailings. The nutrient status and stable isotope composition of pine foliage (δ 13 C, δ 15 N, δ 18 O as indicators of photosynthesis and water use efficiency) were also analyzed. Tailing soil properties in vegetation patches and in adjacent bare soil patches were characterized as well. Significant amounts of metal(loid)s such us Cd, Cu, Pb and Sb were immobilized in the woody stems of Pinus halepensis trees growing on tailings. Leaf litterfall showed high concentrations of As, Cd, Sb, Pb and Zn, which thereby return to the soil. However, water extractable metal(loid) concentrations in tailing soils were similar between vegetation patches (mineral soil under the litter layer) and bare soil patches. The pines growing on mine tailings showed very low foliar P concentrations in all leaf age classes, which suggests severe P deficiency. Young (current year) needles showed lower accumulation of metal(loid)s, higher nutrient concentrations (P and K), and higher water use efficiency (as indicated by and δ 13 C and δ 18 O data) than older needles. Substantial nutrient resorption occurred before leaf litterfall, with 46% retranslocation efficiency for P and 89% for K. In conclusion, phytostabilization of semiarid mine tailings with Pinus halepensis is feasible but would require careful monitoring of the trace elements released from litterfall, in order to assess the long term risk of metal(loid) transfer to the food chain. - Highlights: • Significant

  6. Respuesta a la sequía de Pinus radiata D. Don y su implicación en los procesos de tolerancia

    OpenAIRE

    De Diego Sánchez, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    160 p. (Bibliogr. 141-160) Correo electrónico de la autora: [ES] En este estudio se evaluaron cinco ecotipos de Pinus radiata D. Don y un híbrido de especie (O4, Pinus radiata x Pinus attenuata) con el fin de caracterizar fisiológicamente su respuesta al estrés hídrico y determinar su tolerancia, capacidad de recuperación y endurecimiento. La plantas de O4 fueron incluidas como modelo de tolerancia debido a la alta resistencia a la sequía descrita en P. attenuata (Begle...

  7. Relationship between fiber porosity and cellulose digestibility in steam-exploded Pinus radiata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.K.Y.; Deverell, K.F.; Mackie, K.L.; Clark, T.A.; Donaldson, L.A.

    1988-04-05

    The use of lignocellulosic materials in bioconversion processes may be improved if the critical factors limiting conversion are better understood. Steam explosion after sulfur dioxide impregnation of wood chips is an effective method for improving the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose in the softwood Pinus radiata. Digestibility of pretreated fiber was progressively increased by altering the conditions of steam explosion. With increasing digestibility, there was an observed increase in fiber porosity as measured by the solute exclusion technique. Accessible pore volume and accessible surface area to a 5-nm dextran probe positively correlated with both 2- and 24-h digestion yields from pretreated fiber. The increase in accessibility was probably the result of hemicellulose extraction and lignin redistribution. A subsequent loss in accessibility, brought about by structural collapse or further lignin redistribution, resulted in a corresponding loss in digestibility. It appears that steam explosion increases cellulose digestibility in P. radiata by increasing fiber porosity.

  8. Factors influencing germination and growth of isolated embryos of Pinus heldreichii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojičić Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nutritional, hormonal, and physical factors on the germination and growth of isolated mature zygotic embryos of Pinus heldreichii were studied under in vitro conditions. The optimum medium for embryo germination and adequate conversion into seedlings was basal Gresshoff and Doy (1GD medium. All tested carbohydrates at the applied concentrations stimulated embryo growth, but only 3% sucrose increased embryo germination compared to the control, while maltose had an inhibitory effect. Among the applied plant growth regulators, only gibberelic acid (GA3 had a few benefits on the development of isolated embryos into plantlets, while the others had a negative effect. Embryos cultured on an agar-solidified medium grew better and the germination percentage was higher than in a liquid medium. Light treatment did not affect embryo germination, but generally stimulated seedling growth.

  9. Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oils of Pinus patula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Ismail; Lamia, Hamrouni; Gargouri, Samia; Hanana, Mohsen; Mahfoudhia, Mariem; Fezzani, Tarek; Ezzeddine, Ferjani; Jamoussi, Bassem

    2011-10-01

    Essential oils isolated from needles of Pinus patula by hydrodistillation were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty-eight compounds were identified, representing 98.3% of the total oil. The oil was rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons (62.4%), particularly alpha-pinene (35.2%) and beta-phellandrene (19.5%). The in vitro antifungal assay showed that P. patula oil significantly inhibited the growth of 9 plant pathogenic fungi. The oil, when tested on Sinapis arvensis, Lolium rigidum, Phalaris canariensis and Trifolium campestre, completely inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of all species. Our preliminary results showed that P. patula essential oil could be valorized for the control of weeds and fungal plant diseases.

  10. PATOGENESIS HAWAR DAUN BIBIT PINUS MERKUSII YANG DISEBABKAN OLEH PESTALOTIA THEAE DI PESEMAIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutarman .

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of Needle Blight of Pinus merkusii Seedlings Incited by Pestalotia theae in The Nunery. The objectives of theiudy were to clarify the mechanism by which Pestalotia theae  incites the disease and the defense mechanism of the pine seedling  against the attack by the pathogen. The germination tube,2.9 µm in diameter, produced by the germinating conidiospore penetrated the leaf cells via the stomata, which were wider in diameter. The pathogen was able to produce pectinolytic and cellulolytic enzymes required for the degrading of the host cell wall components. The epidermis was covered-by a thick cuticulae layer. The activity of the peroxidase reduced in the cotyledon, the primary leaf and in the secondary leaf decreased, when the seedlings were 1-2,2-3, and >3 month old.

  11. Effects of three irradiation methods on pollen germination and pollen tube growth of Pinus thunbegii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoping; Yang Lusheng; Chen Suying; Huang Zhiming; Hu Wenying

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 30 keV nitrogen ion beams, UV and γ-rays irradiation on pollen germination and pollen tube growth of Pinus thunbergii were investigated. Results showed that the biological effects induced by ion beam implantation were different from those induced by UV and γ-rays irradiation. The dose response curve of ion implantation treatment presented a particular 'saddle-likepattern, and ion implantation also significantly induced pollen tube tip swelling. These results indicated that low energy ion implantation might work in different way compared to UV and γ-rays irradiation. It was suggested that pollen could be served as an excellent model system to study the underlying mechanisms responsible for biological effects of ion beam irradiation at cellular level. (authors)

  12. Environmental pollution changes in membrane lipids, antioxidants and vitality of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł M. Pukacki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out on pollen grains of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. collected from trees at 1.5, 3, 4 km and control, 20 km from the Luboń factory producing mineral fertilisers. The percentage of germination of pollen formed close to the pollution source was ca 20% lower compared to the control pollen. Lowered vitality of the pollen was effected in changes of the structure of cytoplasmic membranes. Pollen from the polluted area contained ca 15% less total phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine and phosphatytidylinositol and had a lower content of soluble proteins and less of low molecular antioxidants, such as thiols and ascorbic acid. Composition of total fatty acid in phospholipids fractions showed a significant reduction in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids. Pollen originating from the polluted area and stored at -30°C showed considerably stronger degradation of cytoplasmic membranes than control.

  13. Chemical modification of coating of Pinus halepensis pollen by ozone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naas, Oumsaad; Mendez, Maxence; Quijada, Melesio; Gosselin, Sylvie; Farah, Jinane; Choukri, Ali; Visez, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Pollen coating, located on the exine, includes an extractible lipid fraction. The modification of the pollen coating by air pollutants may have implications on the interactions of pollen with plant stigmas and human cells. Pinus halepensis pollen was exposed to ozone in vitro and the pollen coating was extracted with organic solvent and analyzed by GC-MS. Ozone has induced chemical changes in the coating as observed with an increase in dicarboxylic acids, short-chain fatty acids and aldehydes. 4-Hydroxybenzaldehyde was identified as the main reaction product and its formation was shown to occur both on native pollen and on defatted pollen. 4-Hydroxybenzaldehyde is very likely formed via the ozonolysis of acid coumaric-like monomers constitutive of the sporopollenin. Modification of pollen coating by air pollutants should be accounted for in further studies on effect of pollution on germination and on allergenicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of water stress on germination of Pinus nigra Arnold. seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topacoglu, O.; Sevik, H.; Akkuzu, E.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change, global warming and the deterioration of related environmental conditions cause an important problem for forest tree species. For this reason, it is necessary to determine the response of trees to these conditions. The Objective of this study was to investigate the effects of water stress on seed germination of fifteen Pinus nigra Arnold. provenances in Turkey. For this purpose, the water stresses between 0 and -8.0 bars were obtained using polyethylene glycol-6000 (PEG) solutions. Seeds were kept for 35 days at 20 ± 0.5 degree C. In this study, significant variations between the provenances were found. Ankara Uluhan ( percent 95, 08) and Isparta Tota ( percent 85, 41) provenances at -8.0 bars having the highest cumulative germination percentages were the most resistant provenances against the water stress. This study has shown that the water stress reduced the germination speed, germination percentage and germination value. (author)

  15. Physical-mechanical properties and chemical composition of Pinus taeda mature wood following a forest fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletto Júnior, G; Moreschi, J C

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of heat released during forest fires on wood properties of Pinus taeda L. trees submitted to different burning levels (increasing fire intensity, I-IV). Wood samples were collected from trees in each of the burning levels and also from trees not affected by fire (control). Specimens were then extracted to evaluate the physical and mechanical wood properties; chemical composition was evaluated only for burning level IV and control. The analysis of the results showed that fire effects over the physical-mechanical properties and chemical composition in all burning levels did not cause sufficient chemical degradation and strength reduction, which could be cause for rejection of those woods for normal use. In the case of structural use caution should be adopted for the wood from burning levels III and IV, which had their mechanical property values reduced.

  16. Removal and recovery of uranium by modified Pinus radiata D. Don Bark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freer, J.; Baeza, J.; Maturana, H.; Palma, G.; Duran, N.

    1989-01-01

    Bark from Pinus radiata D. Don was treated with both sulfuric acid/formaldehyde and nitric acid/formaldehyde. The ability to adsorb uranium by the bark was improved by these treatments, with essentially zero bleed colour into solution. The resin produced by nitric acid/formaldehyde treatment showed, in general, a better retention capacity than that of sulfuric acid/formaldehyde treatment. The nitric acid/formaldehyde modified bark showed 96% of adsorption of uranium after 1h and 63% of desorption from the loaded resin after 3h in 0.5M sulfuric acid solution. Unmodified bark and some bark components were also analyzed. Bark was shown to be an excellent adsorber, comparable in efficiency, but costing less than the commercial adsorbing agents. (author).

  17. Wood properties of Eucalyptus grandis and Pinus caribaea estimated by colorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Gomes Ribeiro Amorim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-destructive technologies has been very effective in characterization and evaluation of wood quality. This study aimed to characterize the technologically wood of Pinus caribaea and Eucalyptus grandis by Colorimetry. The study was conducted at the University of Brasilia (UNB in Physics and Engineering Laboratory the Laboratory of Forest Products/LPF - Brazilian Forest Service (SFB. Species were subjected to standard tests of basic density, shrinkage and bending. For the colorimetric determination of the parameters it was used a spectrophotometer according to the methodology adopted by Camargos (1999. The radial surface of the wood is most suitable for the collecting of the colorimetric parameters and prediction of properties. Property best estimated by this technique was the density, followed by modulus of elasticity (MOE and modulus of rupture (MOR.

  18. Characterization of Pinus spp needles and evaluation of their potential use for energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Inés Bolzon de Muñiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for new energy sources is growing and awakening interest in the use of forest residues. Charcoal was prepared at carbonization temperatures of 500 ºC, 600 °C and 700 °C in order to evaluate the potential use of Pinus sp needles for energy. The anatomical and chemical characteristics of the needles and the charcoal produced were also evaluated. The needles were found to have ash content of 2.32% and gross calorific value of 20.30 MJ/kg. The calorific value increased by 45%, reaching 29.64 MJ/kg, after carbonization carried out at 600 ºC. This value is higher than that for charcoal made from eucalyptus (19.25 MJ/kg and even coconut husks (23.55 MJ/kg, showing the high energy potential of these needles.

  19. Effects on cuytoskeleton system in pollen tube of pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunce; Liang Qiuxia; Li Guopin

    2008-01-01

    The damage of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen and the pollen tube of Pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation were researched. The results showed that the disorganization of the micro-tubules in the pollen tube was produced by N + implantation. The abnormal states of the pollen tube in morphology were very correlative with the abnormality of the cytoskeleton system. N + implantation was responsible for morphological abnormalities in the pollen tubes. There was a distinct correlation between the damage effects and the ion implantation dose. The add of dose caused more obvious damage effects. Furthermore, the state of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen tube was influenced by the ion implantation. The impact grade depended also on the ion implantation dose. (authors)

  20. [Age dynamics of population gene pool of the Crimean pine (Pinus pallasiana D. Don) in Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Mudrik, E A; Krasnoshtan, O V; Velikorid'ko, T I; Kalafat, L A; Podgornyĭ, D Iu

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphism of young (14-16 years), middle-aged (70-80 years) and old (120-150 years) plants and their seed embryos has been studied using 20 and 10 allozyme loci correspondingly in the population of Pinus pallasiana D. Don from Mountain Crimea. It was revealed that the old-aged trees had significantly lower level of expected heterozygosity than the young plants. The level of observed heterozygosity of embryos of the uneven-aged plants was slightly different among the embryo samples and significantly lower than in the samples of maternal trees. Supernumerary homozygotation of the embryos is caused by low level of cross-pollination in three studied samples of plants (t(m) = 0,537-0,637).