WorldWideScience

Sample records for gusts

  1. Spirit Feels Dust Gust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    On sol 1149 (March 28, 2007) of its mission, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit caught a wind gust with its navigation camera. A series of navigation camera images were strung together to create this movie. The front of the gust is observable because it was strong enough to lift up dust. From assessing the trajectory of this gust, the atmospheric science team concludes that it is possible that it passed over the rover. There was, however, no noticeable increase in power associated with this gust. In the past, dust devils and gusts have wiped the solar panels of dust, making it easier for the solar panels to absorb sunlight.

  2. Detection and statistics of gusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannesdóttir, Ásta; Kelly, Mark C.; Mann, Jakob

    In this project, a more realistic representation of gusts, based on statistical analysis, will account for the variability observed in real-world gusts. The gust representation will focus on temporal, spatial, and velocity scales that are relevant for modern wind turbines and which possibly affect...

  3. Modelling of extreme gusts for design calculations (NewGust)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierbooms, W; Cheng, Po-Wen [Delft Univ. of Technology, Inst. for Wind Energy, Delft (Netherlands); Larsen, G [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Juul Pedersen, B [Vestas Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Hansen, K [Tecnical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The main objective of the NewGust project is to come to a realistic and verified description of extreme gusts based on the stochastic properties of wind. In this paper the first results of the project are presented. Theoretical considerations indicate that the shape of extreme gusts is very sharp. Based on simulated wind time series, mean gust shapes (for several amplitudes and mean wind speeds) are determined and compared with the theoretical curves. The resemblance turned out to be very good. Furthermore, the influence of the sampling rate and the dynamics of a cup anemometer on the empirical mean gust shape are examined. The promising results are confirmed by a (preliminary) verification based on measured wind time series, available from the database on wind characteristics. The mean shape of gusts, of certain amplitude, together with their probability of occurrence can be used to obtain the distribution of the extreme response of wind turbines to gust loading. (au)

  4. Validation of the NewGust approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2003-01-01

    , and subsequently to compare these with analogues simulations applying the NewGust method in order toestablish a (synthetic) gust loading. Eight load cases, representing four mean wind speed regimes that reflect different control characteristics, have been analysed. Attention has been paid to select the largest......The gust events described in the IEC-standard are formulated as coherent gusts of an inherent deterministic character, whereas the gusts experienced in real situation are of a stochastic nature with a limited spatial extension. This conceptual differencemay cause substantial differences in the load...... is restricted to gust events associated with the longitudinal turbulence component, and consequently no attention is paid to wind direction gusts. Theverification is performed by analysing existing measurements of wind speed gust situations and associated structural loads on a Vestas V39 turbine...

  5. In search of a gust definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Casanova, M.; Courtney, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    We propose a simple gust definition based on the theory of excursions by Rice (1944 and 1945). We discuss the relation to the distribution of extreme events and demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the most probable extreme event is very close to being identical to the gust according...... to our definition. We demonstrate how it is possible to predict the gust on the basis of the measured mean wind and variance rather than rely on actually measured extreme excursions. Our gust definition also allows us to predict the average duration of a gust....

  6. Aeroelastic tailoring for gust load alleviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancelot, P.M.G.J.; De Breuker, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results from the equivalent static load method applied to gust response optimisation of an aircraft wing. Through the different optimisation runs, it is assessed that gust load cases can be critical and are difficult to constrain with the sole use of static load cases.

  7. On the vertical structure of wind gusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, I.; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The increasing size of wind turbines, their height and the area swept by their blades have revised the need for understanding the vertical structure of wind gusts. Information is needed for the whole profile. In this study, we analyzed turbulence measurements from a 100m high meteorological mast...... and the turbulence intensity, of which the turbulence intensity was found to dominate over the peak factor in determining the effects of stability and height above the surface on the gust factor. The peak factor only explained 15% or less of the vertical decrease of the gust factor, but determined the effect of gust...... duration on the gust factor. The statistical method to estimate the peak factor did not reproduce the observed vertical decrease in near-neutral and stable conditions and near-constant situation in unstable conditions. Despite this inconsistency, the theoretical method provides estimates for the peak...

  8. Extreme gust wind estimation using mesoscale modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Kruger, Andries

    2014-01-01

    , surface turbulence characteristics. In this study, we follow a theory that is different from the local gust concept as described above. In this theory, the gust at the surface is non-local; it is produced by the deflection of air parcels flowing in the boundary layer and brought down to the surface...... from the Danish site Høvsøre help us to understand the limitation of the traditional method. Good agreement was found between the extreme gust atlases for South Africa and the existing map made from a limited number of measurements across the country. Our study supports the non-local gust theory. While...... through turbulent eddies. This process is modeled using the mesoscale Weather Forecasting and Research (WRF) model. The gust at the surface is calculated as the largest winds over a layer where the averaged turbulence kinetic energy is greater than the averaged buoyancy force. The experiments have been...

  9. Wind gust models derived from field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, W.

    1995-01-01

    Wind data measured during a field experiment were used to verify the analytical model of wind gusts. Good coincidence was observed; the only discrepancy occurred for the azimuth error in the front and back winds, where the simulated errors were smaller than the measured ones. This happened because of the assumption of the spatial coherence of the wind gust model, which generated a symmetric antenna load and, in consequence, a low azimuth servo error. This result indicates a need for upgrading the wind gust model to a spatially incoherent one that will reflect the real gusts in a more accurate manner. In order to design a controller with wind disturbance rejection properties, the wind disturbance should be known at the input to the antenna rate loop model. The second task, therefore, consists of developing a digital filter that simulates the wind gusts at the antenna rate input. This filter matches the spectrum of the measured servo errors. In this scenario, the wind gusts are generated by introducing white noise to the filter input.

  10. Dynamic Gust Load Analysis for Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic load of helicopter rotors due to gust directly affects the structural stress and flight performance for helicopters. Based on a large deflection beam theory, an aeroelastic model for isolated helicopter rotors in the time domain is constructed. The dynamic response and structural load for a rotor under the impulse gust and slope-shape gust are calculated, respectively. First, a nonlinear Euler beam model with 36 degrees-of-freedoms per element is applied to depict the structural dynamics for an isolated rotor. The generalized dynamic wake model and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model are applied to calculate the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic forces on rotors. Then, we transformed the differential aeroelastic governing equation to an algebraic one. Hence, the widely used Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is employed to simulate the dynamic gust load. An isolated helicopter rotor with four blades is studied to validate the structural model and the aeroelastic model. The modal frequencies based on the Euler beam model agree well with published ones by CAMRAD. The flap deflection due to impulse gust with the speed of 2m/s increases twice to the one without gust. In this numerical example, results indicate that the bending moment at the blade root is alleviated due to elastic effect.

  11. Gust loading on streamlined bridge decks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larose, Guy; Mann, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    The current analytical description of the buffeting action of wind on long-span bridges is based on the strip assumption. However, recent experiments on closed-box girder bridge decks have shown that this assumption is not valid and is the source of an important part of the error margin...... of the analytical prediction methods. In this paper, an analytical model that departs from the strip assumption is used to describe the gust loading on a thin airfoil. A parallel is drawn between the analytical model and direct measurements of gust loading on motionless closed-box girder bridge decks. Empirical...

  12. Novel Design for a Wind Tunnel Vertical Gust Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary; Jones, Anya; Hrynuk, John

    2017-11-01

    Gust response of MAVs is a fundamental problem for flight stability and control of such aircraft. Current knowledge about the gust response of these vehicles is limited and gust interaction often results in damage to vehicles. Studying isolated gust effects on simple airfoil models in a controlled environment is a necessity for the further development of MAV control laws. Gusts have typically been generated by oscillating an airfoil causing the shedding of vortices to propagate through the system. While effective, this method provides only a transient up and downdraft behavior with small changes in angle of attack, not suitable for studying MAV scale gust interactions. To study these interactions, a gust that creates a change in flow angle larger than the static stall angle of typical airfoils was developed. This work was done in a low speed, low turbulence wind tunnel at base operating speed of 1.5 m/s, generating a Reynolds number of 12,000 on a NACA 0012 wing. It describes the fundamental mechanisms of how this gust was generated and the results obtained from the gust generator. The gust, which can alter the flow field in less than 1 second, was characterized using PIV and the interactions with a stationary airfoil at several angles of attack are evaluated.

  13. Hanford Site peak gust wind speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1998-01-01

    Peak gust wind data collected at the Hanford Site since 1945 are analyzed to estimate maximum wind speeds for use in structural design. The results are compared with design wind speeds proposed for the Hanford Site. These comparisons indicate that design wind speeds contained in a January 1998 advisory changing DOE-STD-1020-94 are excessive for the Hanford Site and that the design wind speeds in effect prior to the changes are still appropriate for the Hanford Site

  14. Project "Convective Wind Gusts" (ConWinG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Susanna; Richter, Alexandra; Kunz, Michael; Ruck, Bodo

    2017-04-01

    Convectively-driven strong winds usually associated with thunderstorms frequently cause substantial damage to buildings and other structures in many parts of the world. Decisive for the high damage potential are the short-term wind speed maxima with duration of a few seconds, termed as gusts. Several studies have shown that convectively-driven gusts can reach even higher wind speeds compared to turbulent gusts associated with synoptic-scale weather systems. Due to the small-scale and non-stationary nature of convective wind gusts, there is a considerable lack of knowledge regarding their characteristics and statistics. Furthermore, their interaction with urban structures and their influence on buildings is not yet fully understood. For these two reasons, convective wind events are not included in the present wind load standards of buildings and structures, which so far have been based solely on the characteristics of synoptically-driven wind gusts in the near-surface boundary layer (e. g., DIN EN 1991-1-4:2010-12; ASCE7). However, convective and turbulent gusts differ considerably, e.g. concerning vertical wind-speed profiles, gust factors (i.e., maximum to mean wind speed), or exceedance probability curves. In an effort to remedy this situation, the overarching objective of the DFG-project "Convective Wind Gusts" (ConWinG) is to investigate the characteristics and statistics of convective gusts as well as their interaction with urban structures. Based on a set of 110 climate stations of the German Weather Service (DWD) between 1992 and 2014, we analyzed the temporal and spatial distribution, intensity, and occurrence probability of convective gusts. Similar to thunderstorm activity, the frequency of convective gusts decreases gradually from South to North Germany. A relation between gust intensity/probability to orography or climate conditions cannot be identified. Rather, high wind speeds, e.g., above 30 m/s, can be expected everywhere in Germany with almost

  15. New generation aircraft design problems relative to turbulence stability, aeroelastic loads and gust alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbaugh, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    Past history, present status, and future of discrete gusts are schematically presented. It is shown that there are two approaches to the gust analysis: discrete and spectral density. The role of these two approaches to gust analysis are discussed. The idea of using power spectral density (PSD) in the analysis of gusts is especially detailed.

  16. Coherent Lidar Turbulence Measurement for Gust Load Alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. J.; Soreide, David; Bagley, Hal

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence adversely affects operation of commercial and military aircraft and is a design constraint. The airplane structure must be designed to survive the loads imposed by turbulence. Reducing these loads allows the airplane structure to be lighter, a substantial advantage for a commercial airplane. Gust alleviation systems based on accelerometers mounted in the airplane can reduce the maximum gust loads by a small fraction. These systems still represent an economic advantage. The ability to reduce the gust load increases tremendously if the turbulent gust can be measured before the airplane encounters it. A lidar system can make measurements of turbulent gusts ahead of the airplane, and the NASA Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) program is developing such a lidar. The ACLAIM program is intended to develop a prototype lidar system for use in feasibility testing of gust load alleviation systems and other airborne lidar applications, to define applications of lidar with the potential for improving airplane performance, and to determine the feasibility and benefits of these applications. This paper gives an overview of the ACLAIM program, describes the lidar architecture for a gust alleviation system, and describes the prototype ACLAIM lidar system.

  17. Response of a Light Aircraft Under Gust Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chudý

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This project presents work performed by the Institute of Aerospace Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The primary purpose of this work was to estimate the aeroelastic response of a light aircraft under gust loads. In the past, the gust response has been investigated using the Pratt - Walker formula. This formula is derived from the response of a rigid airplane to a discrete gust. However, the Pratt-Walker formula does not capture either the stochastic nature of continuous turbulence or the effects of structural flexibility. The analysis described here was performed using the advanced FEM software package MSC Nastran.

  18. Gust-Tunnel Investigation of the Effect of a Sharp-Edge Gust on the Flapwise Blade Bending Moments of a Model Helicopter Rotor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maglieri, Domenic

    1955-01-01

    Preliminary investigations have been made in the Langley gust tunnel to determine the effects of a sharp-edge vertical gust on the blade flapwise vibratory bending moments of small model rotors having...

  19. Methodology for obtaining wind gusts using Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, Irene; Gryning, Sven-Erik; O'Connor, Ewan J.

    2017-01-01

    reduced the bias in the Doppler lidar gust factors from 0.07 to 0.03 and can be improved further to reduce the bias by using a realistic estimate of turbulence. Wind gust measurements are often prone to outliers in the time series, because they represent the maximum of a (moving-averaged) horizontal wind...... detection also outperformed the traditional Doppler lidar quality assurance method based on carrier-to-noise ratio, by removing additional unrealistic outliers present in the time series.......A new methodology is proposed for scaling Doppler lidar observations of wind gusts to make them comparable with those observed at a meteorological mast. Doppler lidars can then be used to measure wind gusts in regions and heights where traditional meteorological mast measurements are not available...

  20. Gusts and Shear in an Idealized LES-modeled Hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, R.; Lundquist, J. K.; Bryan, G. H.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical cyclone winds can cause extreme loading and damage to coastal structures such as buildings and energy infrastructure. Offshore wind energy development is underway along the US East Coast where hurricanes pose a substantial risk. Understanding wind gusts, gust factor, shear, and veer in the hurricane boundary layer (HBL) can help manufacturers assess risk and design wind turbines to better withstand these extreme wind conditions. Because of the paucity of observational data at low-levels (200 m and below), we use the Cloud Model Version I (CM1) large-eddy simulation numerical model to simulate high spatial- (10 m) and temporal- (0.1 s) resolution data. This unique dataset is used to answer the following questions: do severe mean wind speeds and gusts that exceed current design limits occur?; how does the gust factor vary with distance from the eye?; and lastly, how does wind direction vary horizontally and with height? We find that mean winds and gusts near the eyewall can exceed current turbine design thresholds of 50 m s-1 and 70 m s-1, respectively. Gust factors are greatest at the eye-eyewall interface just inward of the peak gust location and can exceed the 1.4 value used to convert a 50 m s-1 reference wind speed to a 50-year 3-second gust. Strong veer (15-30 degrees) across a 120 m-layer suggests that veer should be assessed against standard design prescriptions. Lastly, wind directions can shift 10-25 degrees in durations shorter than 10 minutes, which can challenge structures designed to endure winds from a consistent direction for periods longer than 10 minutes, including wind turbines.

  1. A study of helicopter gust response alleviation by automatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S.

    1983-01-01

    Two control schemes designed to alleviate gust-induced vibration are analytically investigated for a helicopter with four articulated blades. One is an individual blade pitch control scheme. The other is an adaptive blade pitch control algorithm based on linear optimal control theory. In both controllers, control inputs to alleviate gust response are superimposed on the conventional control inputs required to maintain the trim condition. A sinusoidal vertical gust model and a step gust model are used. The individual blade pitch control, in this research, is composed of sensors and a pitch control actuator for each blade. Each sensor can detect flapwise (or lead-lag or torsionwise) deflection of the respective blade. The acturator controls the blade pitch angle for gust alleviation. Theoretical calculations to predict the performance of this feedback system have been conducted by means of the harmonic method. The adaptive blade pitch control system is composed of a set of measurements (oscillatory hub forces and moments), an identification system using a Kalman filter, and a control system based on the minimization of the quadratic performance function.

  2. Surface Wind Gust Statistics at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    The Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) collects meteorological data for many purposes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) including weather forecasting. This study focuses on wind gusts and also, to a lesser degree, turbulence intensities that occur in fair weather conditions near the surface over time periods from 1 hour to one week (168 hours)

  3. 14 CFR 25.341 - Gust and turbulence loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... structural degrees of freedom including rigid body motions. (2) The shape of the gust must be: ER09FE96.018... § 25.1527. At sea level, the flight profile alleviation factor is determined by the following equation: EN08MR96.004 Zmo=Maximum operating altitude defined in § 25.1527. (7) When a stability augmentation system...

  4. Gust Response Analysis for Helicopter Rotors in the Hover and Forward Flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linpeng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic load due to gust for helicopter rotors directly affects the structural stress and flight performance. In case of gust, it may cause the loss of trust force or the increase of deflection for rotors. In current work, an effective coupled aeroelastic model based on a medium-deflection beam theory and a nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic model in the time domain were constructed. Three types of gust in vertical direction were added in the model. The dynamic response and structural load for helicopter rotors under three types of gust were calculated, respectively. Results indicated that when rotors suffer a gust in hover at downward direction, the thrust force on rotor disk would decrease significantly when the gust amplitude increases, which should be paid attention in the design. Among the three gust types with the same gust strength, the maximum instantaneous shear force due to impulse shape gust is the largest. When the rotors suffer a gust in a forward flight, the shear force at the root of rotors would increase with the gust strength first but then it decreases. More attention should be paid to the decrease of thrust force and the increase of structural load in a forward flight.

  5. Wind Gust Measurement Techniques—From Traditional Anemometry to New Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Suomi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Information on wind gusts is needed for assessment of wind-induced damage and risks to safety. The measurement of wind gust speed requires a high temporal resolution of the anemometer system, because the gust is defined as a short-duration (seconds maximum of the fluctuating wind speed. Until the digitalization of wind measurements in the 1990s, the wind gust measurements suffered from limited recording and data processing resources. Therefore, the majority of continuous wind gust records date back at most only by 30 years. Although the response characteristics of anemometer systems are good enough today, the traditional measurement techniques at weather stations based on cup and sonic anemometers are limited to heights and regions where the supporting structures can reach. Therefore, existing measurements are mainly concentrated over densely-populated land areas, whereas from remote locations, such as the marine Arctic, wind gust information is available only from sparse coastal locations. Recent developments of wind gust measurement techniques based on turbulence measurements from research aircraft and from Doppler lidar can potentially provide new information from heights and locations unreachable by traditional measurement techniques. Moreover, fast-developing measurement methods based on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs may add to better coverage of wind gust measurements in the future. In this paper, we provide an overview of the history and the current status of anemometry from the perspective of wind gusts. Furthermore, a discussion on the potential future directions of wind gust measurement techniques is provided.

  6. Aerodynamic loads on buses due to crosswind gusts: extended analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugge, Lars; Juhlin, Magnus

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to use inverse simulations on measured vehicle data in order to estimate the aerodynamic loads on a bus when exposed to crosswind situations. Tyre forces, driver input, wind velocity and vehicle response were measured on a typical coach when subjected to natural crosswind gusts. Based on these measurements and a detailed MBS vehicle model, the aerodynamic loads were estimated through inverse simulations. In order to estimate the lift force, roll and pitch moments in addition to the lateral force and yaw moment, the simulation model was extended by also incorporating the estimation of the vertical road disturbances. The proposed method enables the estimation of aerodynamic loads due to crosswind gusts without using a full scale wind tunnel adapted for crosswind excitation.

  7. How birds can negate gusts and maintain heading by crabbing into the wind passively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Daniel; Kress, Daniel; Stein, Andrea; Wegrzynski, Michal; Hamzah, Latifah; Lentink, David

    2017-11-01

    Everyday observations show birds flying stably in strong lateral gusts in which aerial robots cannot operate reliably. However, the mechanisms that birds use to negate lateral gusts are unknown. Therefore, we studied the motions of lovebirds as they flew through strong gusts in a long mesh corridor. The corridor was painted to simulate a forest (vertical stripes), a lake (horizontal stripe), and a cave (dark with a small light at the end). Fan arrays outside the corridor imposed three wind conditions: still air, a uniform gust, and wind shear. We found that lovebirds consistently yaw their body into the wind direction, crabbing like a fixed-wing aircraft, while keeping their head oriented towards the landing perch, unlike aircraft. These results were the same for all three visual conditions, showing how lovebirds can even negate gusts in the dark with a faint point source as a target. Because the naive birds had never experienced gusts before, the gust mitigation behavior is innate. Motivated by these observations, we developed a physical model that shows how yaw corrections can be passive in flapping flight. Our model offers a foundation for understanding wind negation in birds and other flying animals and offers inspiration for aerial robots that are more robust to gusts. How birds can negate gusts and maintain heading by crabbing into the wind passively.

  8. Data Mining Methods to Generate Severe Wind Gust Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subana Shanmuganathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaining knowledge on weather patterns, trends and the influence of their extremes on various crop production yields and quality continues to be a quest by scientists, agriculturists, and managers. Precise and timely information aids decision-making, which is widely accepted as intrinsically necessary for increased production and improved quality. Studies in this research domain, especially those related to data mining and interpretation are being carried out by the authors and their colleagues. Some of this work that relates to data definition, description, analysis, and modelling is described in this paper. This includes studies that have evaluated extreme dry/wet weather events against reported yield at different scales in general. They indicate the effects of weather extremes such as prolonged high temperatures, heavy rainfall, and severe wind gusts. Occurrences of these events are among the main weather extremes that impact on many crops worldwide. Wind gusts are difficult to anticipate due to their rapid manifestation and yet can have catastrophic effects on crops and buildings. This paper examines the use of data mining methods to reveal patterns in the weather conditions, such as time of the day, month of the year, wind direction, speed, and severity using a data set from a single location. Case study data is used to provide examples of how the methods used can elicit meaningful information and depict it in a fashion usable for management decision making. Historical weather data acquired between 2008 and 2012 has been used for this study from telemetry devices installed in a vineyard in the north of New Zealand. The results show that using data mining techniques and the local weather conditions, such as relative pressure, temperature, wind direction and speed recorded at irregular intervals, can produce new knowledge relating to wind gust patterns for vineyard management decision making.

  9. Active gust load alleviation system for flexible aircraft: Mixed feedforward/feedback approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mushfiqul; Hromcik, Martin; Hanis, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight flexible blended-wing-body (BWB) aircraft concept seems as a highly promising configuration for future high capacity airliners which suffers from reduced stiffness for disturbance loads such as gusts. A robust feedforward gust load alleviation system (GLAS) was developed to alleviate ...

  10. Airfoil wake and linear theory gust response including sub and superresonant flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic gust response of a high solidity stator vane row is examined in terms of the fundamental gust modeling assumptions with particular attention given to the effects near an acoustic resonance. A series of experiments was performed with gusts generated by rotors comprised of perforated plates and airfoils. It is concluded that, for both the perforated plate and airfoil wake generated gusts, the unsteady pressure responses do not agree with the linear-theory gust predictions near an acoustic resonance. The effects of the acoustic resonance phenomena are clearly evident on the airfoil surface unsteady pressure responses. The transition of the measured lift coefficients across the acoustic resonance from the subresonant regime to the superresonant regime occurs in a simple linear fashion.

  11. Gust alleviation of highly flexible UAVs with artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weihua; Reich, Gregory W.

    2015-04-01

    Artificial hair sensors (AHS) have been recently developed in Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) using carbon nanotube (CNT). The deformation of CNT in air flow causes voltage and current changes in the circuit, which can be used to quantify the dynamic pressure and aerodynamic load along the wing surface. AFRL has done a lot of essential work in design, manufacturing, and measurement of AHSs. The work in this paper is to bridge the current AFRL's work on AHSs and their feasible applications in flight dynamics and control (e.g., the gust alleviation) of highly flexible aircraft. A highly flexible vehicle is modeled using a strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation, coupled with finite-state inflow aerodynamics. A feedback control algorithm for the rejection of gust perturbations will be developed. A simplified Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller will be implemented based on the state-space representation of the linearized system. All AHS measurements will be used as the control input, i.e., wing sectional aerodynamic loads will be defined as the control output for designing the feedback gain. Once the controller is designed, closed-loop aeroelastic simulations will be performed to evaluate the performance of different controllers with the force feedback and be compared to traditional controller designs with the state feedback. From the study, the feasibility of AHSs in flight control will be assessed. The whole study will facilitate in building a fly-by-feel simulation environment for autonomous vehicles.

  12. Aeroelastic scaling laws for gust load alleviation control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Bo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gust load alleviation (GLA tests are widely conducted to study the effectiveness of the control laws and methods. The physical parameters of models in these tests are aeroelastic scaled, while the scaling of GLA control system is always unreached. This paper concentrates on studying the scaling laws of GLA control system. Through theoretical demonstration, the scaling criterion of a classical PID control system has been come up and a scaling methodology is provided and verified. By adopting the scaling laws in this paper, gust response of the scaled model could be directly related to the full-scale aircraft theoretically under both open-loop and closed-loop conditions. Also, the influences of different scaling choices of an important non-dimensional parameter, the Froude number, have been studied in this paper. Furthermore for practical application, a compensating method is given when the theoretical scaled actuators or sensors cannot be obtained. Also, the scaling laws of some non-linear elements in control system such as the rate and amplitude saturations in actuator have been studied and examined by a numerical simulation.

  13. Gust factor based on research aircraft measurements: A new methodology applied to the Arctic marine boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, Irene; Lüpkes, Christof; Hartmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    There is as yet no standard methodology for measuring wind gusts from a moving platform. To address this, we have developed a method to derive gusts from research aircraft data. First we evaluated four different approaches, including Taylor's hypothesis of frozen turbulence, to derive the gust...... in unstable conditions (R2=0.52). The mean errors for all methods were low, from -0.02 to 0.05, indicating that wind gust factors can indeed be measured from research aircraft. Moreover, we showed that aircraft can provide gust measurements within the whole boundary layer, if horizontal legs are flown...

  14. Wind‐gust parametrizations at heights relevant for wind energy: a study based on mast observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, I.; Vihma, T.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Wind gusts are traditionally observed and reported at the reference height of 10 m and most gust parametrization methods have been developed only for this height. In many practical applications, e.g. in wind energy, the relevant heights are, however, up to a few hundred metres. In this study, mean...... speed, which is parametrized on the basis of the surface friction velocity, the Obukhov length and height and the boundary‐layer height. The new gust parametrization method outperformed the two older methods: the effects of surface roughness, stability and the height above the surface were well...

  15. The effects of gusts on the fluctuating airloads of airfoils in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Unsteady interactions of distributed and sharp-edged gusts with a stationary airfoil have been analyzed in two-dimensional transonic flow.A simple method of introducing such disturbances has been numerically implemented within the framework of unsteady, transonic small-disturbance theory. Representative solutions for various airfoils subjected to chordwise and transverse gusts show that the strength and unsteady motion of the shock wave on the airfoil significantly affect the flowfield development and, consequently, the dynamic airloads. Also a study was made of the reductions in the unsteady airloads that can be achieved by the proper active control motion of a trailing-edge flap, and a simple gust-alleviation strategy was developed. However, the chordwise pressure distributions associated with gusts are very different from those produced by trailing-edge flap oscillations. Consequently, the fluctuating lift and the unsteady pitching moments cannot both be eliminated simultaneously.

  16. Observational Constraints on Ephemeral Wind Gusts that MobilizeSoil Dust Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. L.; Leung, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    Dust aerosol models resolve the planetary scale winds that disperse particles throughout the globe, but the winds raising dust are often organized on smaller scales that are below the resolution of the model. These winds, including ephemeral wind gusts associated with boundary layer mixing, are typically parameterized. For example, gusts by dry convective eddies are related to the sensible heat flux. What remains is to constrain the magnitude of the wind gusts using boundary layer measurements, so that dust emission has the correct sensitivity to these gusts, relative to the resolved wind. Here, we use a year of ARM measurements with high temporal resolution from Niamey, Niger in the Sahel to evaluate our parameterization. This evaluation is important for dust aerosol models that use 'nudging' to reproduce observed transport patterns.

  17. Implementation of a gust front head collapse scheme in the WRF numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lompar, Miloš; Ćurić, Mladjen; Romanic, Djordje

    2018-05-01

    Gust fronts are thunderstorm-related phenomena usually associated with severe winds which are of great importance in theoretical meteorology, weather forecasting, cloud dynamics and precipitation, and wind engineering. An important feature of gust fronts demonstrated through both theoretical and observational studies is the periodic collapse and rebuild of the gust front head. This cyclic behavior of gust fronts results in periodic forcing of vertical velocity ahead of the parent thunderstorm, which consequently influences the storm dynamics and microphysics. This paper introduces the first gust front pulsation parameterization scheme in the WRF-ARW model (Weather Research and Forecasting-Advanced Research WRF). The influence of this new scheme on model performances is tested through investigation of the characteristics of an idealized supercell cumulonimbus cloud, as well as studying a real case of thunderstorms above the United Arab Emirates. In the ideal case, WRF with the gust front scheme produced more precipitation and showed different time evolution of mixing ratios of cloud water and rain, whereas the mixing ratios of ice and graupel are almost unchanged when compared to the default WRF run without the parameterization of gust front pulsation. The included parameterization did not disturb the general characteristics of thunderstorm cloud, such as the location of updraft and downdrafts, and the overall shape of the cloud. New cloud cells in front of the parent thunderstorm are also evident in both ideal and real cases due to the included forcing of vertical velocity caused by the periodic collapse of the gust front head. Despite some differences between the two WRF simulations and satellite observations, the inclusion of the gust front parameterization scheme produced more cumuliform clouds and seem to match better with real observations. Both WRF simulations gave poor results when it comes to matching the maximum composite radar reflectivity from radar

  18. Gust-Front and Outflow Related Waterspouts: Timely Warnings, Formation, and Impact on Public Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappucci, M.

    2013-12-01

    Massachusetts may be over a thousand miles away from the traditional "tornado alley", but as the deadly tornadoes that killed four on June 1st 2011 proved, we are not immune to such storms. Over the course of half a century or so, Massachusetts has bore witness to scores of tornadoes, including an F5 twister that touched down on June 9th 1953, resulting in the death of 94 people. Since this tornado, none other in the United States had caused as many deaths, until the Joplin, Missouri catastrophe of May 22, 2011 (161 deaths). In Massachusetts, however, storms of such destructive magnitude are generally confined to the western half of the state, as the June 1, 2011 tornadoes in South Central Massachusetts illustrated. Despite this, a recently observed trend has revealed that the eastern Massachusetts coastline may boast as many, if not more, tornadoes, albeit undocumented. On June 23rd, 2012, a strong thunderstorm produced a spectacular gust front over Boston Harbor. This gust front was associated with intense thunderstorm outflow that helped to spawn a waterspout that roared ashore in Scituate as an EF-0 tornado. This waterspout, however, developed ahead of the gust front, yet merged with the cloud structure of the outflow, hinting at a type of interaction between the thunderstorm downdraft and the waterspout. This tornado caused minor damage. A similar situation occurred in Plymouth, MA, on July 24th, when three waterspouts formed ahead of the gust front of a severe thunderstorm; one of these tempests roared ashore on White Horse Beach as an EF-0 storm, causing minor damage to the sum of a few hundred dollars. Photos taken of these spouts reveal their formation ahead of the gust front, with a downdraft/waterspout interaction similar to the situation of June 23rd. Time-lapse videography of the gust front taken moments after the dissipation of the spouts reveals a horizontally oriented vortex a few hundred meters ahead of the storm's outflow boundary. The spinning of

  19. Optimality study of a gust alleviation system for light wing-loading STOL aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, M.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study was made of an optimal gust alleviation system that employs a vertical gust sensor mounted forward of an aircraft's center of gravity. Frequency domain optimization techniques were employed to synthesize the optimal filters that process the corrective signals to the flaps and elevator actuators. Special attention was given to evaluating the effectiveness of lead time, that is, the time by which relative wind sensor information should lead the actual encounter of the gust. The resulting filter is expressed as an implicit function of the prescribed control cost. A numerical example for a light wing loading STOL aircraft is included in which the optimal trade-off between performance and control cost is systematically studied.

  20. Gusts and shear within hurricane eyewalls can exceed offshore wind turbine design standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Rochelle P.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Bryan, George H.; Damiani, Rick; Musial, Walt

    2017-06-01

    Offshore wind energy development is underway in the U.S., with proposed sites located in hurricane-prone regions. Turbine design criteria outlined by the International Electrotechnical Commission do not encompass the extreme wind speeds and directional shifts of hurricanes stronger than category 2. We examine a hurricane's turbulent eyewall using large-eddy simulations with Cloud Model 1. Gusts and mean wind speeds near the eyewall of a category 5 hurricane exceed the current Class I turbine design threshold of 50 m s-1 mean wind and 70 m s-1 gusts. Largest gust factors occur at the eye-eyewall interface. Further, shifts in wind direction suggest that turbines must rotate or yaw faster than current practice. Although current design standards omit mention of wind direction change across the rotor layer, large values (15-50°) suggest that veer should be considered.

  1. Gust load alleviation wind tunnel tests of a large-aspect-ratio flexible wing with piezoelectric control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Bi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An active control technique utilizing piezoelectric actuators to alleviate gust-response loads of a large-aspect-ratio flexible wing is investigated. Piezoelectric materials have been extensively used for active vibration control of engineering structures. In this paper, piezoelectric materials further attempt to suppress the vibration of the aeroelastic wing caused by gust. The motion equation of the flexible wing with piezoelectric patches is obtained by Hamilton’s principle with the modal approach, and then numerical gust responses are analyzed, based on which a gust load alleviation (GLA control system is proposed. The gust load alleviation system employs classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID controllers which treat piezoelectric patches as control actuators and acceleration as the feedback signal. By a numerical method, the control mechanism that piezoelectric actuators can be used to alleviate gust-response loads is also analyzed qualitatively. Furthermore, through low-speed wind tunnel tests, the effectiveness of the gust load alleviation active control technology is validated. The test results agree well with the numerical results. Test results show that at a certain frequency range, the control scheme can effectively alleviate the z and x wingtip accelerations and the root bending moment of the wing to a certain extent. The control system gives satisfying gust load alleviation efficacy with the reduction rate being generally over 20%.

  2. Aerodynamic response of an airfoil with thickness to a longitudinal and transverse periodic gust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, G.; Atassi, H.

    1980-01-01

    The unsteady lift of an airfoil with thickness subject to a two-dimensional periodic gust is analyzed using the recent theory of Goldstein and Atassi. It is found that to properly account for the coupling between the steady potential flow and the unsteady vortical flow, one has to consider the contribution of order alpha-squared (when alpha is steady state disturbance) to the potential flowfield. A closed form analytical formula is then derived for the lift function. The results show strong dependence on the wave members of the gust.

  3. Vertical gust response prediction of cable-stayed bridges in yawed wind; Shachokyo no shafu ni yoru enchoku gust oto no yosoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, S.; Nagamachi, K.; Kawai, Y. [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, K.; Fujino, Y. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Tanaka, H.

    1996-03-01

    This paper outlines the vertical gust response analysis method in a yawed wind, gives an analytic example, and compares the experimental result with the analytic result to investigate the application of an analysis method and the validity of assumption and approximation. The vertical gust response to two cable-stayed bridges under construction in a yawed wind was predicted by applying assumption and approximation to the gust response prediction method in a yawed wind with the cantilever model having a plate cross-section manipulated. In this case, the wind velocity component perpendicular to the leading edge was defined as an effective wind velocity, and a bridge axis and the component perpendicular to a bridge axis were separately calculated in response. Moreover, some aerodynamic coefficients of a bridge girder cross-section were approximately obtained from the characteristics of the flat blades with same aspect ratio. The obtained analytic result was compared with the wind tunnel test result based on all bridge models. The result showed that the former almost coincides with the latter, the assumption and approximation of this time are verified in validity, and this analysis method can be used for cable-stayed bridges under construction. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Wind and thermodynamic profiler observations of a late-mature gust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ground level during the gust front passage. These updrafts were present from above the nose level to top of the head. ... Land/sea breezes, thunderstorm outflows, and some shallow cold ..... orological events that accompanied GFs: a rise in pressure, a ...... ation, organization, and lifetime associated with Florida boundary ...

  5. Analyses of gust fronts by means of limited area NWP model outputs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Marek

    67-68, - (2003), s. 559-572 ISSN 0169-8095 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/00/1451 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : gust front * limited area NWP model * output Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.012, year: 2003

  6. The variability of maximum wind gusts in the Czech Republic between 1961 and 2014

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, Rudolf; Hostýnek, J.; Řezníčková, Ladislava; Zahradníček, Pavel; Tolasz, R.; Dobrovolný, Petr; Štěpánek, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2017), s. 1961-1978 ISSN 0899-8418 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Czech Republic * Emma wind storm * Homogenisation * Kyrill wind storm * Maximum wind gust * Spatial variability * Temporal variability * Wind measurement Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences Impact factor: 3.760, year: 2016

  7. Application of microwave radiometer and wind profiler data in the estimation of wind gust associated with intense convective weather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P W; Wong, K H

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the wind gusts associated with intense convective weather could be obtained using empirical relationships such as GUSTEX based on radiosonde measurements. However, such data are only available a couple of times a day and may not reflect the rapidly changing atmospheric condition in spring and summer times. The feasibility of combining the thermodynamic profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer and wind profiles given by radar wind profilers in the continuous estimation of wind gusts is studied in this paper. Based on the results of a 4-month trial of a microwave radiometer in Hong Kong in 2004, the estimated and the actual gusts are reasonably well correlated. It is also found that the wind gusts so estimated provide better indications of the strength of squalls compared with those based on radiosonde measurements and with a lead time of about one hour

  8. GUST86 - An analytical ephemeris of the Uranian satellites. [General Uranus Satellite Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, J.; Jacobson, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The General Uranus Satellite Theory GUST (Laskar, 1986) is used for the construction of an analytical ephemeris for the Uranian satellites. The theory is fitted against earth-based observations from 1911 to 1986, and all radio and optical data obtained during Voyager encounter with Uranus. Earth-based observations alone allow the determination of masses which are within 15 percent of the values determined by the Uranus flyby. The analysis of all the observations confirm the values of the masses obtained during the encounter (Stone and Miner, 1986) and give a complete set of dynamical parameters for the analytical theory. An analytical ephemeris, GUST86, with an estimated precision of about 100 km with respect to Uranus is obtained.

  9. Aerodynamic robustness in owl-inspired leading-edge serrations: a computational wind-gust model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chen; Liu, Hao

    2018-06-08

    Owls are a master to achieve silent flight in gliding and flapping flights under natural turbulent environments owing to their unique wing morphologies. While the leading-edge serrations are recently revealed, as a passive flow control micro-device, to play a crucial role in aerodynamic force production and sound suppression [25], the characteristics of wind-gust rejection associated with leading-edge serrations remain unclear. Here we address a large-eddy simulation (LES)-based study of aerodynamic robustness in owl-inspired leading-edge serrations, which is conducted with clean and serrated wing models through mimicking wind-gusts under a longitudinal fluctuation in free-stream inflow and a lateral fluctuation in pitch angle over a broad range of angles of attack (AoAs) over 0° ≤ Φ ≤ 20°. Our results show that the leading-edge serration-based passive flow control mechanisms associated with laminar-turbulent transition work effectively under fluctuated inflow and wing pitch, indicating that the leading-edge serrations are of potential gust fluctuation rejection or robustness in aerodynamic performance. Moreover, it is revealed that the tradeoff between turbulent flow control (i.e., aero-acoustic suppression) and force production in the serrated model holds independently to the wind-gust environments: poor at lower AoAs but capable of achieving equivalent aerodynamic performance at higher AoAs > 15o compared to the clean model. Our results reveal that the owl-inspired leading-edge serrations can be a robust micro-device for aero-acoustic control coping with unsteady and complex wind environments in biomimetic rotor designs for various fluid machineries. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Active control law design for flutter suppression and gust alleviation of a panel with piezoelectric actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Fazelzadeh, S; Mohammad Jafari, S

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an active optimal integral/feedforward control for a supersonic panel under gust disturbance effects with piezoelectric actuators. Classical laminate theory with induced strain actuation and a generalized form of Hamilton's principle are used to formulate the governing equations of motion. The total charge developed on the sensor layer is calculated from the direct piezoelectric equation. The piezoelectric sensor distributed output is also integrated, since the output voltage is dependent on the integrated strain rates over the sensor area. Aerodynamic modeling is accomplished by first-order piston theory with gust velocity effects. The model reduction is performed to the state space system of equations for the control design and the time domain simulation. Moreover, the disturbance dynamics are modeled through the addition to the equations of motion for various conditions. The optimal control problem is set up to minimize the panel deflection using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR). Using an integral control model as a part of the feedback loop, together with a feedforward of the disturbances, greatly enhances the transient response, and the steady state error characteristics of this system are observed. Also, parametric studies for three piezoelectric actuator configurations are demonstrated. Simulation results show that the controller model is effective for flutter suppression and gust alleviation for various piezo configurations

  11. Gust alleviation for a STOL transport by using elevator, spoilers, and flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Control laws were developed to investigate methods of alleviating the response of a STOL transport to gusty air. The transport considered in the study had triple-slotted, externally blown jet flaps and a large T-tail. The control devices used were the elevator, spoilers, and flaps. A hybrid computing system was used to simulate linearized longitudinal dynamics of the aircraft and to implement a conjugate gradient optimal search algorithm. The aircraft was simulated in the low-speed approach condition only. Feedback control matrices were found which minimized the average of a quadratic functional involving passenger compartment accelerations, pitch angle and rate, flight path angle and speed variations. The optimization was performed for artificially designed gust inputs in the form of predetermined rectangular waveforms. Results were obtained for elevator, spoilers, and flaps acting singly and in combination. Additional results were obtained for unit sinusoidal gust inputs by using the gain matrices computed for the artificial test gusts. Various sensor configurations were also investigated.

  12. Wind gust estimation by combining numerical weather prediction model and statistical post-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlakas, Platon; Drakaki, Eleni; Galanis, George; Spyrou, Christos; Kallos, George

    2017-04-01

    The continuous rise of off-shore and near-shore activities as well as the development of structures, such as wind farms and various offshore platforms, requires the employment of state-of-the-art risk assessment techniques. Such analysis is used to set the safety standards and can be characterized as a climatologically oriented approach. Nevertheless, a reliable operational support is also needed in order to minimize cost drawbacks and human danger during the construction and the functioning stage as well as during maintenance activities. One of the most important parameters for this kind of analysis is the wind speed intensity and variability. A critical measure associated with this variability is the presence and magnitude of wind gusts as estimated in the reference level of 10m. The latter can be attributed to different processes that vary among boundary-layer turbulence, convection activities, mountain waves and wake phenomena. The purpose of this work is the development of a wind gust forecasting methodology combining a Numerical Weather Prediction model and a dynamical statistical tool based on Kalman filtering. To this end, the parameterization of Wind Gust Estimate method was implemented to function within the framework of the atmospheric model SKIRON/Dust. The new modeling tool combines the atmospheric model with a statistical local adaptation methodology based on Kalman filters. This has been tested over the offshore west coastline of the United States. The main purpose is to provide a useful tool for wind analysis and prediction and applications related to offshore wind energy (power prediction, operation and maintenance). The results have been evaluated by using observational data from the NOAA's buoy network. As it was found, the predicted output shows a good behavior that is further improved after the local adjustment post-process.

  13. Statistical Downscaling of Gusts During Extreme European Winter Storms Using Radial-Basis-Function Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Kruschke, T.; Osinski, R.; Ulbrich, U.; Leckebusch, G. C.

    2012-04-01

    Winterstorms and related gusts can cause extensive socio-economic damages. Knowledge about the occurrence and the small scale structure of such events may help to make regional estimations of storm losses. For a high spatial and temporal representation, the use of dynamical downscaling methods (RCM) is a cost-intensive and time-consuming option and therefore only applicable for a limited number of events. The current study explores a methodology to provide a statistical downscaling, which offers small scale structured gust fields from an extended large scale structured eventset. Radial-basis-function (RBF) networks in combination with bidirectional Kohonen (BDK) maps are used to generate the gustfields on a spatial resolution of 7 km from the 6-hourly mean sea level pressure field from ECMWF reanalysis data. BDK maps are a kind of neural network which handles supervised classification problems. In this study they are used to provide prototypes for the RBF network and give a first order approximation for the output data. A further interpolation is done by the RBF network. For the training process the 50 most extreme storm events over the North Atlantic area from 1957 to 2011 are used, which have been selected from ECMWF reanalysis datasets ERA40 and ERA-Interim by an objective wind based tracking algorithm. These events were downscaled dynamically by application of the DWD model chain GME → COSMO-EU. Different model parameters and their influence on the quality of the generated high-resolution gustfields are studied. It is shown that the statistical RBF network approach delivers reasonable results in modeling the regional gust fields for untrained events.

  14. Maximized gust loads for a nonlinear airplane using matched filter theory and constrained optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Perry, Boyd, III; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes and illustrates two matched-filter-theory based schemes for obtaining maximized and time-correlated gust-loads for a nonlinear airplane. The first scheme is computationally fast because it uses a simple one-dimensional search procedure to obtain its answers. The second scheme is computationally slow because it uses a more complex multidimensional search procedure to obtain its answers, but it consistently provides slightly higher maximum loads than the first scheme. Both schemes are illustrated with numerical examples involving a nonlinear control system.

  15. A complete second-order theory for the unsteady flow about an airfoil due to a periodic gust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Atassi, H.

    1976-01-01

    A uniformly valid second-order theory is developed for calculating the unsteady incompressible flow that occurs when an airfoil is subjected to a convected sinusoidal gust. Explicit formulas for the airfoil response functions (i.e., fluctuating lift) are given. The theory accounts for the effect of the distortion of the gust by the steady-state potential flow around the airfoil, and this effect is found to have an important influence on the response functions. A number of results relevant to the general theory of the scattering of vorticity waves by solid objects are also presented.

  16. Airfoil gust response and the sound produced by airifoil-vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contributes to the understanding of the noise generation process of an airfoil encountering an unsteady upwash. By using a fast Fourier transform together with accurate airfoil response functions, the lift-time waveform for an airfoil encountering a delta function gust (the indicial function) is calculated for a flat plate airfoil in a compressible flow. This shows the interesting property that the lift is constant until the generated acoustic wave reaches the trailing edge. Expressions are given for the magnitude of this constant and for the pressure distribution on the airfoil during this time interval. The case of an airfoil cutting through a line vortex is also analyzed. The pressure-time waveform in the far field is closely related to the left-time waveform for the above problem of an airfoil entering a delta function gust. The effects of varying the relevant parameters in the problem are studied, including the observed position, the core diameter of the vortex, the vortex orientation and the airfoil span. The far field sound varies significantly with observer position, illustrating the importance of non-compactness effects. Increasing the viscous core diameter tends to smooth the pressure-time waveform. For small viscous core radius and infinite span, changing the vortex orientation changes only the amplitude of the pressure-time waveform, and not the shape.

  17. On Wind Forces in the Forest-Edge Region During Extreme-Gust Passages and Their Implications for Damage Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromke, Christof; Ruck, Bodo

    2018-03-01

    A damage pattern that is occasionally found after a period of strong winds shows an area of damaged trees inside a forest stand behind an intact stripe of trees directly at the windward edge. In an effort to understand the mechanism leading to this damage pattern, wind loading in the forest-edge region during passages of extreme gusts with different characteristics are investigated using a scaled forest model in the wind tunnel. The interaction of a transient extreme gust with the stationary atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) as a background flow at the forest edge leads to the formation of a vortex at the top of the canopy. This vortex intensifies when travelling downstream and subsequently deflects high-momentum air from above the canopy downwards resulting in increased wind loading on the tree crowns. Under such conditions, the decrease in wind loading in the streamwise direction can be relatively weak compared to stationary ABL approach flows. The resistance of trees with streamwise distance from the forest edge, however, is the result of adaptive growth to wind loading under stationary flow conditions and shows a rapid decline within two to three tree heights behind the windward edge. For some of the extreme gusts realized, an exceedance of the wind loading over the resistance of the trees is found at approximately three tree heights behind the forest edge, suggesting that the damage pattern described above can be caused by the interaction of a transient extreme gust with the stationary ABL flow.

  18. Unsteady lift forces on highly cambered airfoils moving through a gust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, H.; Goldstein, M.

    1974-01-01

    An unsteady airfoil theory in which the flow is linearized about the steady potential flow of the airfoil is presented. The theory is applied to an airfoil entering a gust. After transformation to the W-plane, the problem is formulated in terms of a Poisson's equation. The solutions are expanded in a Fourier-Bessel series. The theory is applied to a circular arc with arbitrary camber. Closed form expressions for the velocity and pressure on the surface of the airfoil are obtained. The unsteady aerodynamic forces are then calculated and shown to contain two terms. One in an explicit closed analytical form represents the contribution of the oncoming vortical disturbance, the other depends on a single quadrature and accounts for the effect of the wake.

  19. Wind gust measurements using pulsed Doppler wind-lidar: comparison of direct and indirect techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The measurements of wind gusts, defined as short duration wind speed maxima, have traditionally been limited by the height that can be reached by weather masts. Doppler lidars can potentially provide information from levels above this and thereby fill this gap in our knowledge. To measure the 3D...... is 3.9 s) which can provide high resolution turbulent measurements, both in the vertical direction, and potentially in the horizontal direction. In this study we explore different strategies of wind lidar measurements to measure the wind speed maxima. We use a novel stochastic turbulence reconstruction...... model, driven by the Doppler lidar measurements, which uses a non-linear particle filter to estimate the small-scale turbulent fluctuations. The first results show that the reconstruction method can reproduce the wind speed maxima measured by the sonic anemometer if a low-pass filter with a cut...

  20. Acoustic radiation due to gust-airfoil and blade-vortex interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, R.K. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). National Inst. for Aviation Research

    2001-07-01

    An accurate and efficient method for computing acoustic radiation due to gust-airfoil and blade-vortex interactions is developed. In these types of problems, sound is generated as a result of interaction between the unsteadiness in the flow and the body. The acoustic governing equations are derived by linearizing the compressible unsteady Euler equations about the steady mean flow. From these equations, the frequency domain acoustic equations are obtained assuming a single frequency disturbance. The equations are solved by employing a multi-stage Runge-Kutta finite-volume time-stepping scheme with a fourth-order compact spatial discretization. In the farfield, both the Giles' nonreflecting boundary condition and the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions are employed. This report describes the technical approach and shows the results calculated for the interactions. (orig.)

  1. On mathematical modeling of fluid-structure interactions with nonlinear effects: Finite element approximations of gust response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sváček, P.; Horáček, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 273, Januar 2015 (2015), s. 394-403 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : turbulent flow * gust * aeroelasticity * RANS equations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.328, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cam.2014.05.006

  2. A new method for estimating maximum wind gust speed with a given return period and a high areal resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pop, Lukáš; Sokol, Zbyněk; Hanslian, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 158, November (2016), s. 51-60 ISSN 0167-6105 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0843 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : wind gusts * extreme wind map * return period * gumbel distribution * extreme value analysis Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.049, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167610515301677

  3. Wind Tunnel Model and Test to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a Passive Gust Alleviation Device for a Flying Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    spars made of HE30 aluminium alloy were divided into 3 parts including two spars (front spar and rear spar) for the inboard wing and one outboard spar...unit. The assembled gust generator is shown in Figure 1-10. The supporting frame was built of 60x60 aluminium extrusion. The power unit was an off-the... aluminium beams and ball bearings were used to construct the mechanism. The blades were made of high density modelling foam, which was shaped as a

  4. Robust control of drag and lateral dynamic response for road vehicles exposed to cross-wind gusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Jens; King, Rudibert

    2018-03-01

    A robust closed-loop active flow control strategy for road vehicles under unsteady cross-wind conditions is presented. It is designed based on black-box models identified from experimental data for a 3D bluff body equipped with Coanda actuators along the rear edges. The controller adjusts the blowing rates of the actuators individually, achieving a drag reduction of about 15% while simultaneously improving cross-wind sensitivity. Hereby, the lateral vehicle dynamics and driver behavior are taken into account and replicated in the wind tunnel via a novel model support system. The effectiveness of the control strategy is demonstrated via cross-wind gust experiments.

  5. Overview and first results of the Wind and Storms Experiment (WASTEX): a field campaign to observe the formation of gusts using a Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantillon, Florian; Wieser, Andreas; Adler, Bianca; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Knippertz, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Wind gusts are responsible for most damages in winter storms over central Europe, but capturing their small scale and short duration is a challenge for both models and observations. This motivated the Wind and Storms Experiment (WASTEX) dedicated to investigate the formation of gusts during the passage of extratropical cyclones. The field campaign took place during the winter 2016-2017 on a former waste deposit located close to Karlsruhe in the Upper Rhine Valley in southwest Germany. Twelve extratropical cyclones were sampled during WASTEX with a Doppler lidar system performing vertical scans in the mean wind direction and complemented with a Doppler C-band radar and a 200 m instrumented tower. First results are provided here for the three most intense storms and include a potential sting jet, a unique direct observation of a convective gust and coherent boundary-layer structures of strong winds.

  6. The development of a closed-loop flight controller with panel method integration for gust alleviation using biomimetic feathers on aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Christopher J.; Lee, Woody; Wickenheiser, Adam M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the development of a biomimetic closed-loop flight controller that integrates gust alleviation and flight control into a single distributed system. Modern flight controllers predominantly rely on and respond to perturbations in the global states, resulting in rotation or displacement of the entire aircraft prior to the response. This bio-inspired gust alleviation system (GAS) employs active deflection of electromechanical feathers that react to changes in the airflow, i.e. the local states. The GAS design is a skeletal wing structure with a network of featherlike panels installed on the wing's surfaces, creating the airfoil profile and replacing the trailing-edge flaps. In this study, a dynamic model of the GAS-integrated wing is simulated to compute gust-induced disturbances. The system implements continuous adjustment to flap orientation to perform corrective responses to inbound gusts. MATLAB simulations, using a closed-loop LQR integrated with a 2D adaptive panel method, allow analysis of the morphing structure's aerodynamic data. Non-linear and linear dynamic models of the GAS are compared to a traditional single control surface baseline wing. The feedback loops synthesized rely on inertial changes in the global states; however, variations in number and location of feather actuation are compared. The bio-inspired system's distributed control effort allows the flight controller to interchange between the single and dual trailing edge flap profiles, thereby offering an improved efficiency to gust response in comparison to the traditional wing configuration. The introduction of aero-braking during continuous gusting flows offers a 25% reduction in x-velocity deviation; other flight parameters can be reduced in magnitude and deviation through control weighting optimization. Consequently, the GAS demonstrates enhancements to maneuverability and stability in turbulent intensive environments.

  7. Measurements of erosion potential using Gust chamber in Yolo Bypass near Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Paul A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2018-04-27

    This report describes work performed to quantify the erodibility of surface soils in the Yolo Bypass (Bypass) near Sacramento, California, for use in the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) Yolo Bypass D-MCM mercury model. The Bypass, when not serving as a floodway, is heavily utilized for agriculture. During flood events, surface water flows over the soil, resulting in the application of a shear stress to the soil. The shear stress is a function of flow speed and is often assumed to vary as the square of flow speed. Once the shear stress reaches a critical value, erosion commences, and the erosion rate typically increases with applied shear stress. The goal of the work described here was to quantify this process and how it varies throughout the major land uses found in the Yolo Bypass.Each of the major land uses found in the Bypass was targeted for sediment coring and two side-by-side cores, 10 centimeters in diameter, were extracted at each site for testing in a Gust erosion chamber. This device consists of a cylinder with a piston and cap installed to contain a sediment sample and overlying water. In most instances, coring was done with the cylinder, the piston and cap were installed, and testing commenced immediately. The cap at the top of the cylinder contains vanes to induce rotation of the flow and is driven by an electric motor, simulating the bed shear stress experienced by the soil in a flood event. Ambient water is introduced to the cylinder, passes through the device, and carries eroded sediment out of the chamber. The exiting water is tested for turbidity, and water samples obtained to relate turbidity to suspended sediment concentration are used to compute erosion rates for each of the applied shear stresses.The result for each sediment core is (1) definition of the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment erosion and (2) estimation of coefficients required to relate erosion rate to applied shear

  8. Effect of Frontal Gusts and Stroke Deviation in Forward Flapping Flight and Deconstructing the Aerodynamics of a Fruit Bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Kamal

    This dissertation broadly seeks to understand the effect different kinematic parameters, external forces, and dynamic wing conformation have on the fluid dynamics of flapping flight. The primary motivation is to better grasp the fundamental fluid phenomena driving efficient flapping flight in the Reynolds number regime of birds, bats, and man made fliers of similar scale. The CFD solver (GenIDLEST) used is a Navier-Stokes solver in a finite volume formulation on non-staggered structured multiblock meshes. It has the capability for both body-fitted moving grid simulations and Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) for simulating complex bodies moving within a fluid. To that purpose we investigate the response of a rigid flapping thin surface planar wing in forward flight, at Re=10,000, subjected to frontal gusts. Gusts are a common ecological hazard for flapping fliers, especially in crowded environments. Among the various temporal and spatial scales of gust possible, we look at the phasing and duration of very large spatial scale gusts and their impact on the unsteady fluid dynamics of flapping within a single flapping cycle. The gust is characterized by a step function with time scale much smaller than the flapping time period. Having the advantage of prescribing the motion, as well as the timing and duration of the gust, this allowed the observation of the effect of angle of attack (AOA) and wing rotation on the evolution of the Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) and, hence the instantaneous lift and thrust profiles, by varying the parameters. During the downstroke, frontal gusts accelerated the flow development resulting in early separation of existing LEVs and formation of new ones on the wing surface which influenced the force generation by increasing the lift and thrust. These phenomena underscored the importance of the unsteady vortex structures as the primary force generators in flapping flight. The effect of the gust is observed to be diminished when it occurs during rapid

  9. Common aspects and differences in the behaviour of classical configuration versus canard configuration aircraft in the presence of vertical gusts, assuming the hypothesis of an elastic fuselage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian PREOTU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes, in parallel, common aspects and differences in the behavior of classical configuration versus canard configuration aircraft in the presence of vertical gusts, assuming the hypothesis of an elastic fuselage. The effects of the main constructional dimensions of the horizontal empennage on lift cancelling and horizontal empennage control are being analyzed

  10. The Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aerodynamics and systems: Description and analysis. [maneuver control and gust alleviators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, D., II; Daughaday, H.; Dittenhauser, J.; Rynaski, E.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamics, control system, instrumentation complement and recording system of the USAF Total In/Flight Simulator (TIFS) airplane are described. A control system that would allow the ailerons to be operated collectively, as well as, differentially to entrance the ability of the vehicle to perform the dual function of maneuver load control and gust alleviation is emphasized. Mathematical prediction of the rigid body and the flexible equations of longitudinal motion using the level 2.01 FLEXSTAB program are included along with a definition of the vehicle geometry, the mass and stiffness distribution, the calculated mode frequencies and mode shapes, and the resulting aerodynamic equations of motion of the flexible vehicle. A complete description of the control and instrumentation system of the aircraft is presented, including analysis, ground test and flight data comparisons of the performance and bandwidth of the aerodynamic surface servos. Proposed modification for improved performance of the servos are also presented.

  11. A comparison study of the two-bladed partial pitch turbine during normal operation and an extreme gust conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T; Petersen, M M; Larsen, T J

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the load comparisons between the numerical simulation and the full-scale load measurement data. First part of this paper includes the comparisons of statistic load in terms of maximum, mean, and minimum values for the selected normal operation cases. The blade root bending moments and tower top bending moments are compared. Second part of this paper introduces the dynamic response comparisons during an extreme wind gust condition where the wind speed changed approximately 10 m/s during three seconds. The rotor speed and blade root flapwise and edgewise bending moment are compared. The nonlinear aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2 is used for the simulations. A very fine agreement between the simulated and the full-scale measured loads is seen for the both comparisons

  12. Explosive cyclogenesis of extra-tropical cyclone Klaus and its effects in Catalonia. A case study of hurricane force gusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, J.; López, J. A.; Martín, F.; Morales, G.; Pascual, R.

    2009-09-01

    On 23th and 24th of January 2009, the extra-tropical cyclone Klaus crossed the north of Spain and the south of France producing several deaths and generalized damages. The cyclone of Atlantic origin underwent an explosive deepening of more than 1 hPa per hour at the surface level. Catalonia region was affected by gale-force winds and hurricane gusts. The Atlantic depression underwent a process called explosive cyclogenesis (when a surface cyclone deepens at a rate higher than 1 hPa/hr over 24 hours, approximately) in front of the Spanish Atlantic coasts. In this study we focus on its impact in the Catalonia areas where both synoptic and local effects were important. Also we evaluate the performance of the numerical weather prediction model outputs against observed data.

  13. Poslední léta Gustáva Husáka ve vězení a jeho klopotná cesta ke svobodě (1958–1960)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doskočil, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, [1] (2014), s. 25-39 ISSN 1211-8184 Institutional support: RVO:67985963 Keywords : Gustáv Husák * Slovak Comunist representants * Czechoslovakia * Rehabilitation * Political processes * Communism Subject RIV: AB - History

  14. Technology Integration (Task 20) Aeroservoelastic Modeling and Design Studies. Part A; Evaluation of Aeroservoelastic Effects on Flutter and Dynamic Gust Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, K. S.; Kraft, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    The HSCT Flight Controls Group has developed longitudinal control laws, utilizing PTC aeroelastic flexible models to minimize aeroservoelastic interaction effects, for a number of flight conditions. The control law design process resulted in a higher order controller and utilized a large number of sensors distributed along the body for minimizing the flexibility effects. Processes were developed to implement these higher order control laws for performing the dynamic gust loads and flutter analyses. The processes and its validation were documented in Reference 2, for selected flight condition. The analytical results for additional flight conditions are presented in this document for further validation.

  15. A Comparison of Tropical Storm (TS) and Non-TS Gust Factors for Assessing Peak Wind Probabilities at the Eastern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Crawford, Winifred C.

    2010-01-01

    Peak wind speed is an important forecast element to ensure the safety of personnel and flight hardware at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in East-Central Florida. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), the organization that issues forecasts for the KSC/CCAFS area, finds that peak winds are more difficult to forecast than mean winds. This difficulty motivated the 45 WS to request two independent studies. The first (Merceret 2009) was the development of a reliable model for gust factors (GF) relating the peak to the mean wind speed in tropical storms (TS). The second (Lambert et al. 2008) was a climatological study of non-TS cool season (October-April) mean and peak wind speeds by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et al. 2004) without the use of GF. Both studies presented their statistics as functions of mean wind speed and height. Most of the few comparisons of TS and non-TS GF in the literature suggest that non-TS GF at a given height and mean wind speed are smaller than the corresponding TS GF. The investigation reported here converted the non-TS peak wind statistics calculated by the AMU to the equivalent GF statistics and compared them with the previous TS GF results. The advantage of this effort over all previously reported studies of its kind is that the TS and non-TS data were taken from the same towers in the same locations. This eliminates differing surface attributes, including roughness length and thermal properties, as a major source of variance in the comparison. The goal of this study is two-fold: to determine the relationship between the non-TS and TS GF and their standard deviations (GFSD) and to determine if models similar to those developed for TS data in Merceret (2009) could be developed for the non-TS environment. The results are consistent with the literature, but include much more detailed, quantitative information on the nature of the relationship between TS and non-TS GF and GFSD as a function

  16. Extreme Vertical Gusts in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Density Currents Sea breezes, thunderstorm outflows and cold fronts are all physically similar, but differ in size22. They cause lift as the cold air...the consideration of sea breezes and other density currents. Moreover, some thunderstorm outflows run far ahead of their parent storm and may even...substantially opaque to these frequencies means most of the infra- red radiation from water molecules to space is coming from the top of the cloud. On

  17. Passive Gust Alleviation for a Flying Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Lanchester -Prandtl Theory ......................................................................... 29 A.2.2 The Weissinger Theory...distribution has a smoother shape at the tip and keeps a positive value at the tip. A.2 Aerodynamic methods A.2.1 The Lanchester -Prandtl Theory... Lanchester -Prandtl Theory, named also as the Prandtl’s Lifting Line Theory is a theoretical model of the lift distribution based on the three-dimensional

  18. No nos gustó: el transeúnte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Samper Pizano

    1965-11-01

    Full Text Available Entendemos nosotros la crítica de arte -especialmente la crítica literaria- como un intento de interpretación o valoración objetiva de una serie de elementos subjetivos. Porque aunque en ocasiones se preste para una confrontación de cuestiones objetivas -sería el caso de los análisis gramaticales en una obra- la crítica será siempre un encuentro entre algo subjetivo, como es la obra literaria, con una pretendida visión objetiva -como es su análisis- de otro elemento subjetivo -como es el concepto del crítico-.

  19. LIDAR Correlation to Extreme Flapwise Moment : Gust Impact Prediction Time and Feedforward Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meseguer Urban, Albert; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    A Conventional wind turbine controller uses feedback parameters reacting to wind disturbances after they have already impacted the rotor. LIDARs are able to measure the wind speed before it reaches the wind turbine rotor. These anticipated values can be used in control systems designed to reduce...

  20. Numerical computation of gust aerodynamic response for realistic airfoils : Application of Amiet’s theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto; de Santana, Leandro Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge on the noise generation mechanisms of an airfoil subjected to a turbulent flow indicates that an increment to the airfoil thickness leads to a reduction of the leading-edge noise. This effect is generally attributed to the turbulence distortion occurring close upstream the airfoil

  1. Gust Wind Effects on Stability and Ride Quality of Actively Controlled Maglev Guideway Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ju Min

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a framework to analyze the interaction between an actively controlled magnetic levitation vehicle and a guideway structure under gusty wind. The equation of motion is presented for a 30-dof maglev vehicle model consisting of one cabin and four bogies. In addition, a lateral electromagnetic suspension (EMS system is introduced to improve the running safety and ride quality of the maglev vehicle subjected to turbulent crosswind. By using the developed simulation tools, the effects of various parameters on the dynamic response of the vehicle and guideway are investigated in the case of the UTM maglev vehicle running on a simply supported guideway and cable-stayed guideway. The simulation results show that the independent lateral EMS and associated control scheme are definitely helpful in improving the running safety and ride quality of the vehicle under gusty wind. In the case of the cable-stayed guideway, at low wind speed, vehicle speed is the dominant factor influencing the dynamic responses of the maglev vehicle and the guideway, but at wind speed over 10 m/s, wind becomes the dominant factor. For the ride quality of the maglev vehicle, wind is also the most influential factor.

  2. Wing Shaping and Gust Load Controls of Flexible Aircraft: An LPV Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerton, Jared R.; Su, Weihua; Zhu, Guoming; Swei, Sean Shan-Min

    2018-01-01

    In the proposed paper, the optimum wing shape of a highly flexible aircraft under varying flight conditions will be controlled by a linear parameter-varying approach. The optimum shape determined under multiple objectives, including flight performance, ride quality, and control effort, will be determined as well. This work is an extension of work done previously by the authors, and updates the existing optimization and utilizes the results to generate a robust flight controller.

  3. 78 FR 31851 - Harmonization of Airworthiness Standards-Gust and Maneuver Load Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... airplanes equipped with wing-mounted engines; revise the engine torque loads criteria; add an engine failure...;'' 6. Add Sec. 25.362, ``Engine failure loads;'' 7. Amend Sec. 25.371, ``Gyroscopic loads;'' 8. Amend... of the design envelope analysis method. The elimination of the optional mission analysis method would...

  4. Horizontal gust response of `Tatara Bridge` under construction; `Tatara ohashi` kasetsuji no taifu anteisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Tokushige, M.; Toriumi, R. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a long-span cable-stayed bridge under construction were conducted with two types of turbulent boundary layer simulations. The level of agreement between the wind tunnel measurements and a wind buffeting analysis varied with the type of turbulent boundary layer. An investigation of this behavior found that the aerodynamic admittance used in the buffeting analysis was different from the measured aerodynamic admittance. Past research showed that buffeting analysis based on strip theory, which assumes a spanwise correlation between the fluctuating wind velocity and the fluctuating aerodynamic loads, does not always hold. (author)

  5. ENHANCING THE STABILITY OF UNMANNED GROUND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES THROUGH COORDINATED CONTROL UNDER MU-SPLIT AND GUST OF WIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FITRI YAKUB

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a comparative study of steering and yaw moment control manoeuvres in model predictive control (MPC and linear quadratic control approaches for path following unmanned vehicles for different control manoeuvres: two-wheel steering, four-wheel steering, and direct yaw moment control. We then propose MPC with a proportional-integral (PI controller for the coordination of active front steering (AFS and active braking system, which particularly highlights direct yaw moment control (DYC manoeuvres. Based on the known trajectory, we tested a vehicle at middle forward speed with the disturbance consideration of the road surface adhesion and the wind for a double lane change scenario in order to follow the desired trajectory as close as possible, minimizing tracking errors, and enhancing vehicle stability and drivability. We compared two different controllers; i MPC with PI of an AFS and, ii MPC with PI for coordination of AFS and DYC. The operation of the proposed integrated control is demonstrated in a Matlab simulation environment by manoeuvring the vehicle along the desired trajectory. Simulation results showed that the proposed method had yielded better tracking performances, and were able to enhance the vehicle’s stability at a given speed even under road surface coefficient and wind.

  6. Distributed, Passivity-Based, Aeroservoelastic Control (DPASC) of Structurally Efficient Aircraft in the Presence of Gusts, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Control of extremely lightweight, long endurance aircraft poses a challenging aeroservoelastic (ASE) problem due to significantly increased flexibility, and...

  7. Distributed, Passivity-Based, Aeroservoelastic Control (DPASC) of Structurally Efficient Aircraft in the Presence of Gusts, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Control of extremely lightweight, long endurance aircraft poses a challenging aeroservoelastic (ASE) problem due to significantly increased flexibility, and...

  8. Gust load estimation and rejection with application to robust flight control design for HALE aircraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) aircraft have garnered increased interest in recent years as they can serve several purposes, including many of the objectives of...

  9. CURRENT DIRECTION, WIND GUST and other data from FIXED PLATFORM from 1974-02-23 to 1974-04-25 (NCEI Accession 7601418)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and other data were collected from fixed platforms from 23 February 1974 to 25 April 1974. Data were collected by Oregon State University (OSU) as part...

  10. Horizontal gust response of 'Tatara Bridge' under construction. 'Tatara ohashi' kasetsuji no taifu anteisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Tokushige, M.; Toriumi, R. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1999-03-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a long-span cable-stayed bridge under construction were conducted with two types of turbulent boundary layer simulations. The level of agreement between the wind tunnel measurements and a wind buffeting analysis varied with the type of turbulent boundary layer. An investigation of this behavior found that the aerodynamic admittance used in the buffeting analysis was different from the measured aerodynamic admittance. Past research showed that buffeting analysis based on strip theory, which assumes a spanwise correlation between the fluctuating wind velocity and the fluctuating aerodynamic loads, does not always hold. (author)

  11. Unsteady aerodynamic coefficients obtained by a compressible vortex lattice method.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiano Hernandes

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady solutions for the aerodynamic coefficients of a thin airfoil in compressible subsonic or supersonic flows are studied. The lift, the pitch moment, and pressure coefficients are obtained numerically for the following motions: the indicial response (unit step function) of the airfoil, i.e., a sudden change in the angle of attack; a thin airfoil penetrating into a sharp edge gust (for several gust speed ratios); a thin airfoil penetrating into a one-minus-cosine gust and sinusoidal gust...

  12. Information retrieval from wide-band meteorological data - An example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelfang, S. I.; Smith, O. E.

    1983-01-01

    The methods proposed by Smith and Adelfang (1981) and Smith et al. (1982) are used to calculate probabilities over rectangles and sectors of the gust magnitude-gust length plane; probabilities over the same regions are also calculated from the observed distributions and a comparison is also presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the statistical model. These and other statistical results are calculated from samples of Jimsphere wind profiles at Cape Canaveral. The results are presented for a variety of wavelength bands, altitudes, and seasons. It is shown that wind perturbations observed in Jimsphere wind profiles in various wavelength bands can be analyzed by using digital filters. The relationship between gust magnitude and gust length is modeled with the bivariate gamma distribution. It is pointed out that application of the model to calculate probabilities over specific areas of the gust magnitude-gust length plane can be useful in aerospace design.

  13. Biological Inspiration for Agile Autonomous Air Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evers, Johnny H

    2007-01-01

    .... Flying animals exhibit capabilities for aerial acrobatics, insensitivity to wind gusts, avoiding collision with or intercepting fixed and moving objects, landing and take off from small perches...

  14. Turbulence Hazard Metric Based on Peak Accelerations for Jetliner Passengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations are made of the approximate hazard due to peak normal accelerations of an airplane flying through a simulated vertical wind field associated with a convective frontal system. The calculations are based on a hazard metric developed from a systematic application of a generic math model to 1-cosine discrete gusts of various amplitudes and gust lengths. The math model simulates the three degree-of- freedom longitudinal rigid body motion to vertical gusts and includes (1) fuselage flexibility, (2) the lag in the downwash from the wing to the tail, (3) gradual lift effects, (4) a simplified autopilot, and (5) motion of an unrestrained passenger in the rear cabin. Airplane and passenger response contours are calculated for a matrix of gust amplitudes and gust lengths. The airplane response contours are used to develop an approximate hazard metric of peak normal accelerations as a function of gust amplitude and gust length. The hazard metric is then applied to a two-dimensional simulated vertical wind field of a convective frontal system. The variations of the hazard metric with gust length and airplane heading are demonstrated.

  15. Extreme wind conditions for a Danish offshore site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of extreme wind speed gust values measured at a shallow water offshore site and at a coastal onshore site in Denmark. An estimate of 50-year extreme values has been evaluated using a new statistical method. In addition a mean gust shape is determined, based on a la...

  16. Strong wind climatic zones in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, AC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available of cold fronts over the southern African subcontinent. Over the eastern and central interior of South Africa annual maximum wind gusts are usually caused by thunderstorm gust fronts during summer, while in the western and southern interior extratropical...

  17. A Study of Airline Passenger Susceptibility to Atmospheric Turbulence Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2000-01-01

    A simple, generic, simulation math model of a commercial airliner has been developed to study the susceptibility of unrestrained passengers to large, discrete gust encounters. The math model simulates the longitudinal motion to vertical gusts and includes (1) motion of an unrestrained passenger in the rear cabin, (2) fuselage flexibility, (3) the lag in the downwash from the wing to the tail, and (4) unsteady lift effects. Airplane and passenger response contours are calculated for a matrix of gust amplitudes and gust lengths of a simulated mountain rotor. A comparison of the model-predicted responses to data from three accidents indicates that the accelerations in actual accidents are sometimes much larger than the simulated gust encounters.

  18. Two-dimensional unsteady lift problems in supersonic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslet, Max A; Lomax, Harvard

    1949-01-01

    The variation of pressure distribution is calculated for a two-dimensional supersonic airfoil either experiencing a sudden angle-of-attack change or entering a sharp-edge gust. From these pressure distributions the indicial lift functions applicable to unsteady lift problems are determined for two cases. Results are presented which permit the determination of maximum increment in lift coefficient attained by an unrestrained airfoil during its flight through a gust. As an application of these results, the minimum altitude for safe flight through a specific gust is calculated for a particular supersonic wing of given strength and wing loading.

  19. determination of the power law exponent for southern highlands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    site located in the southern highland zone of Tanzania, was established using wind speeds measured at heights ... distribution, turbulence and wind gusts at the ... mathematical models, which normally .... other locations that have similar wind.

  20. ZEUS-DO: A Design Oriented CFD-Based Unsteady Aerodynamic Capability for Flight Vehicle Multidisciplinary Configuration Shape Optimization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In practically all air-vehicle MDO studies to date involving configuration shape optimization, dynamic Aeroservoelastic constraints had to be left out. Flutter, gust...

  1. Systems and Control Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    design of civil engineering structures has been noted. Protecting ci vil ... R despite disturbing forces such as wind gusts, changes in ambient temperature, etc .. Brief History of ... frequency regulation, boiler control for steam generation, electric.

  2. Nová mapa extrémních nárazů větru v České republice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pop, Lukáš; Sokol, Zbyněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 3 (2016), s. 90-95 ISSN 0026-1173 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : extreme value analysis * Gumbel distribution * wind measurements * wind gusts * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  3. Vertical axis darrieus windmills for microinvestments in Patagonia Region of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labriola, C.V.M.; Chiapero, R.; Castaso, P.E.; Tabarrozzi, R.

    2000-01-01

    Wind converters used during last decades were either Horizontal Axis Converter (HAC) or Vertical Axis Converters (VAC): Darrieus, Savonius, etc. ). HAC technology, takes advantage of aerodynamic development and the progress of the last years on structural materials and electronics controls, sufficiently tested in gust wind. Thereby the manufacturers allow reaching the maximum speed that the mill can afford in the guaranteed parameter range, minimising the outs of service by gust of wind and consequently the non-supply energy periods. (Authors)

  4. 14 CFR 23.333 - Flight envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...,000 feet to 38 f.p.s. at 50,000 feet. (2) The following assumptions must be made: (i) The shape of the... altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from 50 f.p.s. at 20,000 feet to 25 f.p.s. at 50,000 feet. (ii) Positive and negative gusts of 25 f.p.s. at V D must be...

  5. Energy extraction from atmospheric turbulence to improve flight vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chinmay Karsandas

    Small 'bird-sized' Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have now become practical due to technological advances in embedded electronics, miniature sensors and actuators, and propulsion systems. Birds are known to take advantage of wind currents to conserve energy and fly long distances without flapping their wings. This dissertation explores the possibility of improving the performance of small UAVs by extracting the energy available in atmospheric turbulence. An aircraft can gain energy from vertical gusts by increasing its lift in regions of updraft and reducing its lift in downdrafts - a concept that has been known for decades. Starting with a simple model of a glider flying through a sinusoidal gust, a parametric optimization approach is used to compute the minimum gust amplitude and optimal control input required for the glider to sustain flight without losing energy. For small UAVs using optimal control inputs, sinusoidal gusts with amplitude of 10--15% of the cruise speed are sufficient to keep the aircraft aloft. The method is then modified and extended to include random gusts that are representative of natural turbulence. A procedure to design optimal control laws for energy extraction from realistic gust profiles is developed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). A feedback control law is designed to perform well over a variety of random gusts, and not be tailored for one particular gust. A small UAV flying in vertical turbulence is shown to obtain average energy savings of 35--40% with the use of a simple control law. The design procedure is also extended to determine optimal control laws for sinusoidal as well as turbulent lateral gusts. The theoretical work is complemented by experimental validation using a small autonomous UAV. The development of a lightweight autopilot and UAV platform is presented. Flight test results show that active control of the lift of an autonomous glider resulted in approximately 46% average energy savings compared to glides with fixed

  6. Aerodynamic coefficients in generalized unsteady thin airfoil theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    Two cases are considered: (1) rigid body motion of an airfoil-flap combination consisting of vertical translation of given amplitude, rotation of given amplitude about a specified axis, and rotation of given amplitude of the control surface alone about its hinge; the upwash for this problem is defined mathematically; and (2) sinusoidal gust of given amplitude and wave number, for which the upwash is defined mathematically. Simple universal formulas are presented for the most important aerodynamic coefficients in unsteady thin airfoil theory. The lift and moment induced by a generalized gust are evaluated explicitly in terms of the gust wavelength. Similarly, in the control surface problem, the lift, moment, and hinge moments are given as explicit algebraic functions of hinge location. These results can be used together with any of the standard numerical inversion routines for the elementary loads (pitch and heave).

  7. Roll paper pilot. [mathematical model for predicting pilot rating of aircraft in roll task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, F. R.; Dillow, J. D.; Hannen, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for predicting the pilot rating of an aircraft in a roll task is described. The model includes: (1) the lateral-directional aircraft equations of motion; (2) a stochastic gust model; (3) a pilot model with two free parameters; and (4) a pilot rating expression that is a function of rms roll angle and the pilot lead time constant. The pilot gain and lead time constant are selected to minimize the pilot rating expression. The pilot parameters are then adjusted to provide a 20% stability margin and the adjusted pilot parameters are used to compute a roll paper pilot rating of the aircraft/gust configuration. The roll paper pilot rating was computed for 25 aircraft/gust configurations. A range of actual ratings from 2 to 9 were encountered and the roll paper pilot ratings agree quite well with the actual ratings. In addition there is good correlation between predicted and measured rms roll angle.

  8. Relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Sørensen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Seeking relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models, the scale of turbulence and the gust factor have been estimated from data and compared with predictions from first-order models of these two quantities. It is found that the mean of the measured length scales is approx. 10......% smaller than the IEC model, for wind turbine hub height levels. The mean is only marginally dependent on trends in time series. It is also found that the coefficient of variation of the measured length scales is about 50%. 3sec and 10sec pre-averaging of wind speed data are relevant for MW-size wind...... turbines when seeking wind characteristics that correspond to one blade and the entire rotor, respectively. For heights exceeding 50-60m the gust factor increases with wind speed. For heights larger the 60-80m, present assumptions on the value of the gust factor are significantly conservative, both for 3...

  9. Analysis of wind data for airport runway design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bellasio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To provide a methodology, and examples of application, for analyzing wind data for the correct orientation of airport runways. Design/methodology/approach: More than 90000 observed wind data have been analyzed for each one of the three airports used as case studies. Both observed and estimated gusts have been considered. Findings: If only observed data are considered, each single runway of the three airports used as case studies is correctly oriented. When estimated gusts are considered, the FAA requirements are not satisfied by a single runway in some airports (which anyway satisfy such requirements by using more runways. Practical implications: The correct orientation of runways minimize the crosswind components, then increase the safety of the airports. Originality/value: The paper provides a methodology to evaluate the orientation of existing runways and to design new runways. Such methodology is based on the analysis wind data, considering both observed values and estimated gusts.

  10. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  11. Terminal Information Processing System (TIPS) Consolidated CAB Display (CCD) Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    Barometric pressure 3. Center field wind speed, direction and gusts 4. Runway visual range 5. Low-level wind shear 6. Vortex advisory 7. Runway equipment...PASSWORD Command (standard user) u. PAUSE Command (standard user) v. PMSG Command (standard user) w. PPD Command (standard user) x. PURGE Command (standard

  12. 76 FR 36865 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special... already established for this evaluation. These criteria are only applicable to structure whose failure... as gusts or pilot actions, or lower flutter margins). B. Effects of Systems on Structures 1. General...

  13. Continuous-time state-space unsteady aerodynamic modelling for efficient aeroelastic load analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werter, N.P.M.; De Breuker, R.; Abdalla, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, wings have become lighter and more flexible, making them more prone to aeroelastic effects. Thus, aeroelasticity in design becomes more important. In order to determine the response of an aircraft to, for example, a gust, an unsteady aerodynamic model is required to determine the

  14. Certificate for Safe Emergency Shutdown of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Svenstrup, Mikael; Pedersen, Andreas Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    To avoid damage to a wind turbine in the case of a fault or a large wind gust, a detection scheme for emergency shutdown is developed. Specifically, the concept of a safety envelope is introduced. Within the safety envelope, the system can be shutdown without risking structural damage to the turb...

  15. Numerical computation of aeroacoustic transfer functions for realistic airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, Leandro Dantas; Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Based on Amiet's theory formalism, we propose a numerical framework to compute the aeroacoustic transfer function of realistic airfoil geometries. The aeroacoustic transfer function relates the amplitude and phase of an incoming periodic gust to the respective unsteady lift response permitting,

  16. Spatial, seasonal and inter-seasonal variations of thunderstorm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SilverFlossie

    the updraft flows arise as a result of the formation of a gust front ahead of a .... of the following days, the rainfall was added against the day during which the storm ... thunderstorm with rain occurred later in the evening/night of the same day.

  17. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwencke, M.; Smolders, L.A.; Bergknut, N.; Gustas, P.; Meij, B.P.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Vet Surg. 2012 Oct;41(7):829-37. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.01021.x. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis. Schwencke M, Smolders LA, Bergknut N, Gustås P, Meij BP, Hazewinkel HA. Source Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals,, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine,

  18. Estimation of air-sea CO2 flux in the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Latha, T.P.; Rao, K.H.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Seetaram, P.; Choudhury, S.B.; Nagamani, P.V.; Dutt, B.S.; Dhadwal, V.K.; Manna, S.

    radiation, humidity, wind speed, direction and gust were measured using AWS (Watch Dog, 2000 series) instrument which was mounted on the top of the boat. The atmospheric CO2 was measured using Li-COR 840A. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2...

  19. Photogrammetric Verification of Fiber Optic Shape Sensors on Flexible Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason P.; Rogge, Matthew D.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-core fiber (MCF) optic shape sensing offers the possibility of providing in-flight shape measurements of highly flexible aerospace structures and control surfaces for such purposes as gust load alleviation, flutter suppression, general flight control and structural health monitoring. Photogrammetric measurements of surface mounted MCF shape sensing cable can be used to quantify the MCF installation path and verify measurement methods.

  20. ARL Support and Analysis to the Army Public Health Command Kabul Air Quality Data Collection (Spring 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    gust in miles per hour 39–41 CLG = cloud ceiling —lowest opaque layer with 5/8 or greater coverage, in hun- dreds of feet, 722 = unlimited 43–45 SKC = sky...Isolated star-like snow crystals (with or without fog) 79 Ice pellets 80–99 Showery precipitation, or precipitation with current or recent thunderstorm

  1. A New Xeromorphic Species of Clusia em>(Clusiaceae) from Dry Valleys of Northern Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Clusia magnoliiflora M. H. G. Gust. is described as new for the Clusiaceae. It grows in dry scrub in the river valleys of the Marañón and its tributaries in northern Peru, a kind of habitat that harbors very few Clusia species. The species is distinct on account of its extremely thick, obovate le...

  2. Generating Excitement: Build Your Own Generator to Study the Transfer of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kurt; Rommel-Esham, Katie; Farthing, Dori; Sheldon, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of energy from one form to another can be difficult to understand. The electrical energy that turns on a lamp may come from the burning of coal, water falling at a hydroelectric plant, nuclear reactions, or gusts of wind caused by the uneven heating of the Earth. The authors have developed and tested an exciting hands-on activity to…

  3. Applying Aerodynamics Inspired Organizational Dynamic Fit Model Disaster Relief Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    gusts, and a dynamically stable organization returns quickly to its intended profit level, for instance, after deviation by changed consumer preferences . Hence...dynamic stability limits the level, for instance, by changed consumer preferences . Hence static stability limits initial performance... consumer preferences Maneuverability Quickness of a controlled system’s planned change from one trajectory to another Quickness of planned

  4. Designing Inter-Organisational Collectivities for Dynamic Fit: Stability, maneuvrability and Application in Disaster Relief Endeavours

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    changed consumer preferences . Hence, static stability limits initial performance deviation (e.g., maintaining desired airplane altitude, maintaining...by changed consumer preferences . Hence, dynamic stability limits the duration of performance deviation (e.g., maintaining desired airplane altitude...altitude from wind gust. Initial resistance to deviation in profit level from change in consumer preferences . Dynamic stability Quickness of a

  5. Experimental and numerical study of an autonomous flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhammer, L.O.; Navalkar, S.T.; Sodja, J.; De Breuker, R.; Karpel, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental and numerical study of an autonomous load alleviation concept using trailing edge flaps. The flaps are autonomous units, which for instance can be used for gust load alleviation. The unit is self-powered and self-actuated through trailing edge tabs which are

  6. Exploiting Sun's Energy Effectively as a Source of Renewable Energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inorganic active site consisting of four Mn ions and one Ca ion. (Mn4Ca) ..... organic Chemistry, Vol.44 No.20, pp.6841–6851, 2005. [7] D Gust, T A ... [9] A Mutalikdesai, S K Ramasesha, Emerging Solar Technologies: Perovskite. Solar Cell ...

  7. Wind turbine control with constraint handling: a model predictive control approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2012-01-01

    on model predictive control, a control method well suited for constraint handling. The performance of the presented controller during an extreme operating gust is compared to that of a proportional-integral controller with integrator anti-windup. Furthermore, the presented controller-s capability...

  8. Capturing the journey of wind from the wind turbines (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giyanani, A.H.; Bierbooms, W.A.A.M.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Wind turbine design, control strategies often assume Taylor’s frozen turbulence where the fluctuating part of the wind is assumed to be constant. In practise, the wind turbine faces higher turbulence in case of gusts and lower turbulence in some cases. With Lidar technology, the frozen turbulence

  9. Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, Leandro Dantas; Schram, C.; Desmet, W.

    2015-01-01

    The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization

  10. Aviation Human-in-the-Loop Simulation Studies: Experimental Planning, Design, and Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    requires careful planning and execution. It also involves people working as a team. In addition to providing detailed information about how data...RA BKN005 OVC008 20/17 A29.85 Teterboro 1253 Zulu automated weather, wind is 220° at 9 gusting to 15, visibility 2 miles in light rain, 500

  11. Meteotsunami Detection with ASOS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. Y.; Angove, M.

    2017-12-01

    A meteotsunami can strike almost any coast. Recent researches have shown that meteotsunamis are more common than previously thought and suggest that some past events may have been mistaken for other types of coastal floods, such as storm surges or seiches. In the United States, conditions for destructive meteotsunamis are most favorable along the East Coast, Gulf of Mexico, and in the Great Lakes, where they may pose a greater threat than earthquake-generated tsunamis. It is evident that meteotsunamis are strongly related to a mesoscale convective system or derecho of sufficient intensity and translational speed. Meteotsunamis are generated by pressure and wind disturbances related to the convective system above continental shelf area of the ocean. In this study it is noted that air pressure, wind gust speed, and air temperature display specific simultaneous changes favorable for meteotsunami development. Sudden wind gust rise, air pressure rise, and air temperature drop occur due to gust front related to cloud downdrafts. Therefore, we suggest that such a consistent tendency of wind gust speed, air pressure, and air temperature associated with mesoscale convective system capable of generating meteotsunami can be used for meteotsunami detection about one or two days before the event in the ocean. It was applied for the June 13, 2013 meteotsunami with automated surface observing systems (ASOS) meteorological data. For operational use of the detection of potential for meteotsunami development at U.S. East or Gulf of Mexico coasts in waters, detection threshold values for the three variables are also discussed.

  12. Some Aeronautical Experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progress that had been made up to that time. Since then .... A few others have built gliding machines, but nearly all that is of real value is due to the ... backward under the pressure of the wind gusts, so that the travel of the center of pressure ...

  13. Kawasaki Steel Giho, Vol. 27, No. 4, 1995. Special issue on steel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    ;Contents (Partial): Vertical Gust Prediction of Cable-Stayed Bridges in Yawed Wind; Design and Construction of a Super Platform Structure Made of Steel; Prefabricated Steel Deck of Battledeck Floor Type for Redecking; Aesthetic Design of Structures; and Lift-up Construction Method for Multi-layer Building.

  14. Aerodynamic performance prediction of Darrieus-type wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion NILĂ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of Darrieus wind turbine aerodynamic performances provides the necessarydesign and operational data base related to the wind potential. In this sense it provides the type ofturbine suitable to the area where it is to be installed. Two calculation methods are analyzed for arotor with straight blades. The first one is a global method that allows an assessment of the turbinenominal power by a brief calculation. This method leads to an overestimation of performances. Thesecond is the calculation method of the gust factor and momentum which deals with the pale as beingcomposed of different elements that don’t influence each other. This method, developed based on thetheory of the turbine blades, leads to values close to the statistical data obtained experimentally. Thevalues obtained by the calculation method of gust factor - momentum led to the concept of a Darrieusturbine, which will be tested for different wind values in the INCAS subsonic wind tunnel.

  15. Extreme wind estimate for Hornsea wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    The purpose of this study is to provide estimation of the 50-year winds of 10 min and 1-s gust value at hub height of 100 m, as well as the design parameter shear exponent for the Hornsea offshore wind farm. The turbulence intensity required for estimating the gust value is estimated using two...... approaches. One is through the measurements from the wind Doppler lidar, WindCube, which implies serious uncertainty, and the other one is through similarity theory for the atmospheric surface layer where the hub height is likely to belong to during strong storms. The turbulence intensity for storm wind...... strength is taken as 0.1. The shear exponents at several heights were calculated from the measurements. The values at 100 m are less than the limit given by IEC standard for all sectors. The 50-year winds have been calculated from various global reanalysis and analysis products as well as mesoscale models...

  16. Production of the Finnish Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammelin, Bengt; Vihma, Timo; Atlaskin, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    ) the parameterization method for gust factor was extended to be applicable at higher altitudes; and (vii) the dissemination of the Wind Atlas was based on new technical solutions. The AROME results were calculated for the heights of 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 200, 300 and 400 m, and the WAsP results for the heights of 50......, 75, 100, 125 and 150 m. In addition to the wind speed, the results included the values of the Weibull distribution parameters, the gust factor, wind power content and the potential power production, which was calculated for three turbine sizes. The Wind Atlas data are available for each grid point......The Finnish Wind Atlas was prepared applying the mesoscale model AROME with 2.5 km horizontal resolution and the diagnostic downscaling method Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programme (WAsP) with 250 m resolution. The latter was applied for areas most favourable for wind power production: a 30...

  17. Numerical solutions of the linearized Euler equations for unsteady vortical flows around lifting airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James R.; Atassi, Hafiz M.

    1990-01-01

    A linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis is presented for unsteady, subsonic vortical flows around lifting airfoils. The analysis fully accounts for the distortion effects of the nonuniform mean flow on the imposed vortical disturbances. A frequency domain numerical scheme which implements this linearized approach is described, and numerical results are presented for a large variety of flow configurations. The results demonstrate the effects of airfoil thickness, angle of attack, camber, and Mach number on the unsteady lift and moment of airfoils subjected to periodic vortical gusts. The results show that mean flow distortion can have a very strong effect on the airfoil unsteady response, and that the effect depends strongly upon the reduced frequency, Mach number, and gust wave numbers.

  18. A conceptual framework for using Doppler radar acquired atmospheric data for flight simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.

    1983-01-01

    A concept is presented which can permit turbulence simulation in the vicinity of microbursts. The method involves a large data base, but should be fast enough for use with flight simulators. The model permits any pilot to simulate any flight maneuver in any aircraft. The model simulates a wind field with three-component mean winds and three-component turbulent gusts, and gust variation over the body of an aircraft so that all aerodynamic loads and moments can be calculated. The time and space variation of mean winds and turbulent intensities associated with a particular atmospheric phenomenon such as a microburst is used in the model. In fact, Doppler radar data such as provided by JAWS is uniquely suited for use with the proposed model. The concept is completely general and is not restricted to microburst studies. Reentry and flight in terrestrial or planetary atmospheres could be realistically simulated if supporting data of sufficient resolution were available.

  19. Modeling of steady motion and vertical-plane dynamics of a tunnel hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaney Christopher S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High-speed marine vehicles can take advantage of aerodynamically supported platforms or air wings to increase maximum speed or transportation efficiency. However, this also results in increased complexity of boat dynamics, especially in the presence of waves and wind gusts. In this study, a mathematical model based on the fully unsteady aerodynamic extreme-ground-effect theory and the hydrodynamic added-mass strip theory is applied for simulating vertical-plane motions of a tunnel hull in a disturbed environment, as well as determining its steady states in calm conditions. Calculated responses of the boat to wind gusts and surface waves are demonstrated. The present model can be used as a supplementary method for preliminary estimations of performance of aerodynamically assisted marine craft.

  20. Full scale experimental analysis of wind direction changes (EOD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    wind direction gust amplitudes associated with the investigated European sites are low compared to the recommended IEC- values. However, these values, as function of the mean wind speed, are difficult to validate thoroughly due to the limited number of fully correlated measurements....... the magnitudes of a joint gust event defined by a simultaneously wind speed- and direction change in order to obtain an indication of the validity of the magnitudes specified in the IEC code. The analysis relates to pre-specified recurrence periods and is based on full-scale wind field measurements. The wind......A coherent wind speed and wind direction change (ECD) load case is defined in the wind turbine standard. This load case is an essential extreme load case that e.g. may be design driving for flap defection of active stall controlled wind turbines. The present analysis identifies statistically...

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Expected Wind Extremes over the Northwestern Sahara and High Atlas Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bustamante, E.; González-Rouco, F. J.; Navarro, J.

    2017-12-01

    A robust statistical framework in the scientific literature allows for the estimation of probabilities of occurrence of severe wind speeds and wind gusts, but does not prevent however from large uncertainties associated with the particular numerical estimates. An analysis of such uncertainties is thus required. A large portion of this uncertainty arises from the fact that historical observations are inherently shorter that the timescales of interest for the analysis of return periods. Additional uncertainties stem from the different choices of probability distributions and other aspects related to methodological issues or physical processes involved. The present study is focused on historical observations over the Ouarzazate Valley (Morocco) and in a high-resolution regional simulation of the wind in the area of interest. The aim is to provide extreme wind speed and wind gust return values and confidence ranges based on a systematic sampling of the uncertainty space for return periods up to 120 years.

  2. Rational Calibration of Four IEC 61400-1 Extreme External Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2008-01-01

    Based on a set of asymptotic statistical models on closed form this paper presents a rational and consistent calibration of four extreme external conditions defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-1 standard: extreme operating gust, extreme wind shear, extreme coheren...... and proposed specifications of the magnitudes of the extreme external wind conditions are highlighted and discussed using an illustrative example based on two selected terrain types. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....... gust with direction change and extreme wind direction change. These four extreme external conditions are used in the definition of six of the IEC 61400-1 ultimate load cases. The statistical models are based on simple and easily accessible mean wind speed and turbulence characteristics...

  3. Assessment of Gearbox Operational Loads and Reliability under High Mean Wind Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowski, Dariusz; Natarajan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    wind turbine that operates in storm conditions with mean wind speeds less than 30 m/s is presented. In the study, normal shut-downs of a wind turbine in storm conditions were investigated. The analysis were conducted for two storm control strategies and different wind conditions from an extreme...... operating gust, normal turbulence model and extreme turbulence model. In the paper, loads in the planetary gear are quantified as well as the torsional moments in the main shaft. On the basis of simulation results the annual probability of failure of the gearbox in a wind turbine with soft storm controller...... is calculated, and compared with the one had the gearbox working in a wind turbine operating with hard storm controller. In the study, it was found that normal shut-downs do not have a significant influence on the ultimate loads in the gearbox, since they are related mostly to the gusts occurring during...

  4. INVESTINGATION DOWNWARD WIND PRESSURE ON A SMALL QUADROTOR HELICOPTER

    OpenAIRE

    RAHMATI, Sadegh; GHASED, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Small rotary-wing UAVs are susceptible to gusts and other environmental disturbances that affect inflow at their rotors. Inflow variations cause unexpected aerodynamic forces through changes in thrust conditions and unmodeled blade-flapping dynamics. This pa­per introduces an onboard, pressure-based flow measurement system developed for a small quadrotor helicopter. The probe-based instrumentation package provides spatially dis­tributed airspeed measurements along each of the aircra...

  5. AM05-13-009 Experimental simulation of non-supercell tornadoes

    OpenAIRE

    佐々, 浩司; Koji, Sassa; 高知大理; Kochi Univ.

    2005-01-01

    The non-supercell tornadoes was experimentally simulated by the combination of the gust made of dry ice and the updraft fan. Three typical patterns of tornadoes were observed in relation to the change of updraft velocity. These patterns are a laminar vortex, a turbulent vortex and a spiral vortex. The resultant tornadoes were found to move with the updraft fan. They broke down when the moving velocity was larger than the mean velocity in the shear line.

  6. Implementing a low cost distributed architecture for real-time behavioural modelling and simulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, WH

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available at different levels of which some are: 1. Comprehensiveness (completeness) – Are the sun and moon positions accurate for the time of day and time of year in the flight simulator? Are wind gusts taken into account for the projectile trajectory? 2... system, referred to as the Virtual GBADS Demonstrator (VGD), to the first GBADS acquisition phase. The GBADS procurement programme follows a phased approach of which acquisition of the SABLE2 Air Defence System forms the first phase [1...

  7. Experimental Investigation of a Passively Deforming Airfoil Under Dynamic Flow Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cordes, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    A rigid and a passively deforming airfoil, designed to alleviate fatigue causing load fluctuations that appear during normal operation of wind turbines, is investigated under unsteady conditions in two dimensional wind tunnel experiments. In a first series of experiments, a vertical gust encounter is generated by means of an active grid. This approximates the wind turbine blade’s passage through the atmospheric boundary layer and corresponds to the theoretical formulation of the Sears problem...

  8. Evaluation of the Thorax of Manduca Sexta for Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    subject to the effects of low Reynolds number flight. These effects extend from wind gusts to unstable aerodynamic flow and viscous dominated flow (Shyy...operate as a mechanical spring damper at resonance during flapping flight (Bolsman 2010). For wing actuation, the M.sexta has two fairly simple and...freshly eclosed moth a surface to climb up, which is an absolute necessity. The moth must climb off of the ground in order to pump fluids through

  9. The influence of vehicle aerodynamic and control response characteristics on driver-vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandridis, A. A.; Repa, B. S.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of changes in understeer, control sensitivity, and location of the lateral aerodynamic center of pressure (c.p.) of a typical passenger car on the driver's opinion and on the performance of the driver-vehicle system were studied in a moving-base driving simulator. Twelve subjects with no prior experience on the simulator and no special driving skills performed regulation tasks in the presence of both random and step wind gusts.

  10. Rotorwash Operational Footprint Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    I-13. Francis, J. K., and Gillespie, A., “Relating Gust Speed to Tree Damage in Hurricane Hugo , 1989,” Journal of Arboriculture, November 1993...statement has been Rotorwash Operational Footprint Modeling 72 found to be correct. In many parts of the United States, the requirements for hurricane ...On August 18, 1983, Hurricane Alicia struck downtown Houston, Texas. Researchers were allowed into downtown Houston the following day to help survey

  11. Optimized variational analysis scheme of single Doppler radar wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshi K.; Allen, Steve; Mizuno, Koki; Whitehead, Victor; Wilk, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A computer scheme for extracting singularities has been developed and applied to single Doppler radar wind data. The scheme is planned for use in real-time wind and singularity analysis and forecasting. The method, known as Doppler Operational Variational Extraction of Singularities is outlined, focusing on the principle of local symmetry. Results are presented from the application of the scheme to a storm-generated gust front in Oklahoma on May 28, 1987.

  12. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  13. The winds regime of surface in the Colombian coffee area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando Guzman Martinez; Lucia Gomez Gomez

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of the address and gust of wind of the surface winds have been studied in 15 stations of the Colombian coffee area. It was found that the relief plays an important paper in the wind circulation so that during the day (7 a.m. - 7 p.m.) these they blow of the low sector toward the mountain and at night (7 p.m. - 7 a.m.) this situation is invested, that which is consistent with the characteristic pattern of circulation valley-mountain of the mountainous regions. For this fact, in most of the analyzed places a single day and night dominant address that it takes the orientation in that it is the respective hydrographic basin. It was not observed that the Alisios winds of the northeast and southeast modify the address settled down by the local circulation (valley-mountain) on the other hand a remarkable increase of the gust of wind was appreciated in July and August in the Florida and Ospina, stations located to the south of the country, as direct consequence of the Alisios of the southeast. The daily gust of wind in most of the studied places is low and it doesn't exceed of the 10 km/h, reason why it can consider that the Colombian coffee area is free of important damages for the action of the wind. Nevertheless, in some stations as Alban, Maracay and Paraguaicito the daily maximum gust of wind can surpass the 30 km/h and in occasions to cause damage mechanic to cultivations of high behavior and not well anchored facilities

  14. Analyses of possible changes in intense and extreme wind speeds over northern Europe under climate change scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, Sara; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Regional Climate Models. Additionally, internal (inherent) variability and initial conditions exert a strong impact on projected wind climates throughout the twenty-first century. Simulations of wind gusts by one of the RCMs (RCA3) indicate some evidence for increased magnitudes (of up to +10...... be used in interpreting this inference given the high degree of wind climate projection spread that derives from the specific AOGCM and RCM used in the downscaling....

  15. Sensitivity study of surface wind flow of a limited area model simulating the extratropical storm Delta affecting the Canary Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Marrero, C.; Jorba, O.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    In November 2005 an extratropical storm named Delta affected the Canary Islands (Spain). The high sustained wind and intense gusts experienced caused significant damage. A numerical sensitivity study of Delta was conducted using the Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW). A total of 27 simulations were performed. Non-hydrostatic and hydrostatic experiments were designed taking into account physical parameterizations and geometrical factors (size and position of the outer domain, d...

  16. Laser as a storm detector; Laser als Sturmmelder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rentzing, Sascha

    2013-11-15

    Gusts abruptly increase the speed of wind turbines and shake the machine. A new early warning system detects violent air movement in advance, turns the blades out of the wind in the right time and lowers the load. [German] Boeen erhoehen schlagartig die Drehzahl von Windturbinen und erschuettern die Maschinen. Ein neues Fruehwarnsystem erkennt heftige Luftbewegungen im Voraus, dreht die Rotorblaetter rechtzeitig aus dem Wind und senkt so die Belastung.

  17. MODELING OF AN AIRPLANE WING MOMENTS INDUCED BY ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Antonova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have used Diederich’s theory of wingspan average correlation functions to obtain analytical expressions for the local spectral density of aircraft wing moments induced by horizontal and vertical wind gusts. We have assumed that the correlation functions of atmospheric turbulence belong to the Bullen family which includes both partial cases of known Dryden’s model as well as von Karman’s  model.

  18. Warm-season severe wind events in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    A 15-year data set of wind measurements was analyzed with regard to warm season severe wind gusts in Germany. For April to September of the years 1997 to 2011, 1035 wind measurements of 26 m/s or greater were found. These wind reports were associated with 268 wind events. In total, 252 convective wind events contributed to 837 (81%) of the wind reports, 16 non-convective synoptic-scale wind events contributed to 198 reports (19%). Severe wind events were found with synoptic situations characterized by rather strong mid-level flow and advancing mid-level troughs. Severe convective wind events were analyzed using radar images and classified with respect to the observed radar structure. The most important convective mode was squall lines that were associated with one third of all severe wind gusts, followed by groups, bow echo complexes, and bow echoes. Supercells and cells were not associated with many wind reports. The low contribution of isolated cells indicates that rather large-scale forcing by synoptic-scale features like fronts is important for German severe wind events. Bow echoes were found to be present for 58% of all wind reports. The movement speed of bow echoes indicated a large variation with a maximum speed of 33 m/s. Extreme wind events as well as events with more than 15 wind reports were found to be related to higher movement speeds. Concentrating on the most intense events, derechos seem to be very important to the warm season wind threat in Germany. Convective events with a path length of more than 400 km contributed to 36% of all warm-season wind gusts in this data set. Furthermore, eight of nine extreme gusts exceeding 40 m/s were recorded with derecho events.

  19. Control design and performance analysis of a 6 MW wind turbine-generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, A.; Winkelman, J. R.; Javid, S. H.; Barton, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to the modeling and performance for the preliminary design phase of a large (6.2 MW) horizontal axis wind turbine generator (WTG). Two control philosophies are presented, both of which are based on linearized models of the WT mechanical and electrical systems. The control designs are compared by showing the performance through detailed non-linear time simulation. The disturbances considered are wind gusts, and electrical faults near the WT terminals.

  20. Wind simulation for extreme and fatigue loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Larsen, G.C.; Mann, J.; Ott, S.; Hansen, K.S.; Pedersen, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric turbulence have been studied and found to deviate from a Gaussian process, in particular regarding the velocity increments over small time steps, where the tails of the pdf are exponential rather than Gaussian. Principles for extreme event counting and the occurrence of cascading events are presented. Empirical extreme statistics agree with Rices exceedence theory, when it is assumed that the velocity and its time derivative are independent. Prediction based on the assumption that the velocity is a Gaussian process underpredicts the rate of occurrence of extreme events by many orders of magnitude, mainly because the measured pdf is non-Gaussian. Methods for simulation of turbulent signals have been developed and their computational efficiency are considered. The methods are applicable for multiple processes with individual spectra and probability distributions. Non-Gaussian processes are simulated by the correlation-distortion method. Non-stationary processes are obtained by Bezier interpolation between a set of stationary simulations with identical random seeds. Simulation of systems with some signals available is enabled by conditional statistics. A versatile method for simulation of extreme events has been developed. This will generate gusts, velocity jumps, extreme velocity shears, and sudden changes of wind direction. Gusts may be prescribed with a specified ensemble average shape, and it is possible to detect the critical gust shape for a given construction. The problem is formulated as the variational problem of finding the most probable adjustment of a standard simulation of a stationary Gaussian process subject to relevant event conditions, which are formulated as linear combination of points in the realization. The method is generalized for multiple correlated series, multiple simultaneous conditions, and 3D fields of all velocity components. Generalization are presented for a single non-Gaussian process subject to relatively

  1. On the estimation of wind comfort in a building environment by micro-scale simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Gross

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional micro-scale model is used to study some aspects of wind comfort in a built-up area. The equations for calculating the mean wind have been extended by a Markov approach for short-term wind fluctuations. The model components have been successfully verified against wind tunnel measurements and observations of a field experiment. The simulated time series are used to estimate wind comfort measures. It turns out that the frequency of exceedance of prescribed thresholds depends strongly on the specification of the gust duration time. It was also possible to calculate the spatial distribution of a gust factor g$g$ depending on local wind characteristics. The simulated range is much broader than a value of g=3–3.5$g=3\\text{--}3.5$ commonly used for wind comfort assessments. Again, the order of magnitude and the bandwidth of g$g$ depends strongly on the definition of a gust.

  2. European extra-tropical storm damage risk from a multi-model ensemble of dynamically-downscaled global climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylock, M. R.

    2011-10-01

    Uncertainty in the return levels of insured loss from European wind storms was quantified using storms derived from twenty-two 25 km regional climate model runs driven by either the ERA40 reanalyses or one of four coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models. Storms were identified using a model-dependent storm severity index based on daily maximum 10 m wind speed. The wind speed from each model was calibrated to a set of 7 km historical storm wind fields using the 70 storms with the highest severity index in the period 1961-2000, employing a two stage calibration methodology. First, the 25 km daily maximum wind speed was downscaled to the 7 km historical model grid using the 7 km surface roughness length and orography, also adopting an empirical gust parameterisation. Secondly, downscaled wind gusts were statistically scaled to the historical storms to match the geographically-dependent cumulative distribution function of wind gust speed. The calibrated wind fields were run through an operational catastrophe reinsurance risk model to determine the return level of loss to a European population density-derived property portfolio. The risk model produced a 50-yr return level of loss of between 0.025% and 0.056% of the total insured value of the portfolio.

  3. The Gustatory Signaling Pathway and Bitter Taste Receptors Affect the Development of Obesity and Adipocyte Metabolism in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Avau

    Full Text Available Intestinal chemosensory signaling pathways involving the gustatory G-protein, gustducin, and bitter taste receptors (TAS2R have been implicated in gut hormone release. Alterations in gut hormone profiles may contribute to the success of bariatric surgery. This study investigated the involvement of the gustatory signaling pathway in the development of diet-induced obesity and the therapeutic potential of targeting TAS2Rs to induce body weight loss. α-gustducin-deficient (α-gust-/- mice became less obese than wild type (WT mice when fed a high-fat diet (HFD. White adipose tissue (WAT mass was lower in α-gust-/- mice due to increased heat production as a result of increases in brown adipose tissue (BAT thermogenic activity, involving increased protein expression of uncoupling protein 1. Intra-gastric treatment of obese WT and α-gust-/- mice with the bitter agonists denatonium benzoate (DB or quinine (Q during 4 weeks resulted in an α-gustducin-dependent decrease in body weight gain associated with a decrease in food intake (DB, but not involving major changes in gut peptide release. Both WAT and 3T3-F442A pre-adipocytes express TAS2Rs. Treatment of pre-adipocytes with DB or Q decreased differentiation into mature adipocytes. In conclusion, interfering with the gustatory signaling pathway protects against the development of HFD-induced obesity presumably through promoting BAT activity. Intra-gastric bitter treatment inhibits weight gain, possibly by directly affecting adipocyte metabolism.

  4. Description of a Normal-Force In-Situ Turbulence Algorithm for Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    A normal-force in-situ turbulence algorithm for potential use on commercial airliners is described. The algorithm can produce information that can be used to predict hazardous accelerations of airplanes or to aid meteorologists in forecasting weather patterns. The algorithm uses normal acceleration and other measures of the airplane state to approximate the vertical gust velocity. That is, the fundamental, yet simple, relationship between normal acceleration and the change in normal force coefficient is exploited to produce an estimate of the vertical gust velocity. This simple approach is robust and produces a time history of the vertical gust velocity that would be intuitively useful to pilots. With proper processing, the time history can be transformed into the eddy dissipation rate that would be useful to meteorologists. Flight data for a simplified research implementation of the algorithm are presented for a severe turbulence encounter of the NASA ARIES Boeing 757 research airplane. The results indicate that the algorithm has potential for producing accurate in-situ turbulence measurements. However, more extensive tests and analysis are needed with an operational implementation of the algorithm to make comparisons with other algorithms or methods.

  5. Extension of analytical indicial aerodynamics to generic trapezoidal wings in subsonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea DA RONCH

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Analytical indicial aerodynamic functions are calculated for several trapezoidal wings in subsonic flow, with a Mach number 0.3 ≤ Ma ≤ 0.7. The formulation herein proposed extends well-known aerodynamic theories, which are limited to thin aerofoils in incompressible flow, to generic trapezoidal wing planforms. Firstly, a thorough study is executed to assess the accuracy and limitation of analytical predictions, using unsteady results from two state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics solvers as cross-validated benchmarks. Indicial functions are calculated for a step change in the angle of attack and for a sharp-edge gust, each for four wing configurations and three Mach numbers. Then, analytical and computational indicial responses are used to predict dynamic derivatives and the maximum lift coefficient following an encounter with a one-minus-cosine gust. It is found that the analytical results are in excellent agreement with the computational results for all test cases. In particular, the deviation of the analytical results from the computational results is within the scatter or uncertainty in the data arising from using two computational fluid dynamics solvers. This indicates the usefulness of the developed analytical theories. Keywords: Analytical approach, CFD, Compressible flow, Gust response, Indicial aerodynamics, Trapezoidal wing

  6. European extra-tropical storm damage risk from a multi-model ensemble of dynamically-downscaled global climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Haylock

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty in the return levels of insured loss from European wind storms was quantified using storms derived from twenty-two 25 km regional climate model runs driven by either the ERA40 reanalyses or one of four coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models. Storms were identified using a model-dependent storm severity index based on daily maximum 10 m wind speed. The wind speed from each model was calibrated to a set of 7 km historical storm wind fields using the 70 storms with the highest severity index in the period 1961–2000, employing a two stage calibration methodology. First, the 25 km daily maximum wind speed was downscaled to the 7 km historical model grid using the 7 km surface roughness length and orography, also adopting an empirical gust parameterisation. Secondly, downscaled wind gusts were statistically scaled to the historical storms to match the geographically-dependent cumulative distribution function of wind gust speed.

    The calibrated wind fields were run through an operational catastrophe reinsurance risk model to determine the return level of loss to a European population density-derived property portfolio. The risk model produced a 50-yr return level of loss of between 0.025% and 0.056% of the total insured value of the portfolio.

  7. Relevant Criteria for Testing the Quality of Models for Turbulent Wind Speed Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2008-01-01

    Seeking relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models, the scale of turbulence and the gust factor have been estimated from data and compared with predictions from first-order models of these two quantities. It is found that the mean of the measured length scales is approximately...... 10% smaller than the IEC model for wind turbine hub height levels. The mean is only marginally dependent on trends in time series. It is also found that the coefficient of variation of the measured length scales is about 50%. 3  s and 10  s preaveraging of wind speed data are relevant for megawatt......-size wind turbines when seeking wind characteristics that correspond to one blade and the entire rotor, respectively. For heights exceeding 50-60  m, the gust factor increases with wind speed. For heights larger than 60-80  m, present assumptions on the value of the gust factor are significantly...

  8. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  9. Observational study of surface wind along a sloping surface over mountainous terrain during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Gyuwon; Joo, Sangwon; Ahn, Kwang-Deuk

    2018-03-01

    The 2018 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held in Pyeongchang, Korea, during February and March. We examined the near surface winds and wind gusts along the sloping surface at two outdoor venues in Pyeongchang during February and March using surface wind data. The outdoor venues are located in a complex, mountainous terrain, and hence the near-surface winds form intricate patterns due to the interplay between large-scale and locally forced winds. During February and March, the dominant wind at the ridge level is westerly; however, a significant wind direction change is observed along the sloping surface at the venues. The winds on the sloping surface are also influenced by thermal forcing, showing increased upslope flow during daytime. When neutral air flows over the hill, the windward and leeward flows show a significantly different behavior. A higher correlation of the wind speed between upper- and lower-level stations is shown in the windward region compared with the leeward region. The strong synoptic wind, small width of the ridge, and steep leeward ridge slope angle provide favorable conditions for flow separation at the leeward foot of the ridge. The gust factor increases with decreasing surface elevation and is larger during daytime than nighttime. A significantly large gust factor is also observed in the leeward region.

  10. Uncertainty management for aerial vehicles: Coordination, deconfliction, and disturbance rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakeow, Prachya

    The presented dissertation aims to develop control algorithms that deal with three types of uncertainties managements. First, we examine the situation when unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) fly through uncertain environments that contain both stationary and moving obstacles. Moreover, a guarantee of collision avoidance is necessary when UAVs operate in close proximity of each other. Second, we look at the communication uncertainty among the network of cooperative UAVs and the efforts to establish and maintain the connectivity throughout their entire missions. Third, we explore the scenario when the aircraft flies through wind gust. The introduction of an appropriate control scheme to actively alleviate the gust loads can result into weight reduction and consequently lower the fuel cost. In the first part of this dissertation, we develop a deconfliction algorithm that guarantees collision avoidance between a pair of constant speed unicycle-type UAVs as well as convergence to the desired destination for each UAV in presence of static obstacles. We use a combination of navigation and swirling functions to direct the unicycle vehicles along the planned trajectories while avoiding inter-vehicle collisions. The main feature of our contribution is proposing means of designing a deconfliction algorithm for unicycle vehicles that more closely capture the dynamics of constant speed UAVs as opposed to double integrator models. Specifically, we consider the issue of UAV turn-rate constraints and proceed to explore the selection of key algorithmic parameters in order to minimize undesirable trajectories and overshoots induced by the avoidance algorithm. The avoidance and convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is then performed for two cooperative UAVs and simulation results are provided to support the viability of the proposed framework for more general mission scenarios. For the uncertainty of the UAV network, we provides two approaches to establish connectivity among a

  11. Compressible flows with periodic vortical disturbances around lifting airfoils. Ph.D. Thesis - Notre Dame Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving periodic, three-dimensional, vortical flows around lifting airfoils in subsonic flow. The first-order method that is presented fully accounts for the distortion effects of the nonuniform mean flow on the convected upstream vortical disturbances. The unsteady velocity is split into a vortical component which is a known function of the upstream flow conditions and the Lagrangian coordinates of the mean flow, and an irrotational field whose potential satisfies a nonconstant-coefficient, inhomogeneous, convective wave equation. Using an elliptic coordinate transformation, the unsteady boundary value problem is solved in the frequency domain on grids which are determined as a function of the Mach number and reduced frequency. The numerical scheme is validated through extensive comparisons with known solutions to unsteady vortical flow problems. In general, it is seen that the agreement between the numerical and analytical results is very good for reduced frequencies ranging from 0 to 4, and for Mach numbers ranging from .1 to .8. Numerical results are also presented for a wide variety of flow configurations for the purpose of determining the effects of airfoil thickness, angle of attack, camber, and Mach number on the unsteady lift and moment of airfoils subjected to periodic vortical gusts. It is seen that each of these parameters can have a significant effect on the unsteady airfoil response to the incident disturbances, and that the effect depends strongly upon the reduced frequency and the dimensionality of the gust. For a one-dimensional (transverse) or two-dimensional (transverse and longitudinal) gust, the results indicate that airfoil thickness increases the unsteady lift and moment at the low reduced frequencies but decreases it at the high reduced frequencies. The results show that an increase in airfoil Mach number leads to a significant increase in the unsteady lift and moment for the low reduced frequencies, but a

  12. Aerostructural optimization of a morphing wing for airborne wind energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasel, U.; Keidel, D.; Molinari, G.; Ermanni, P.

    2017-09-01

    Airborne wind energy (AWE) vehicles maximize energy production by constantly operating at extreme wing loading, permitted by high flight speeds. Additionally, the wide range of wind speeds and the presence of flow inhomogeneities and gusts create a complex and demanding flight environment for AWE systems. Adaptation to different flow conditions is normally achieved by conventional wing control surfaces and, in case of ground generator-based systems, by varying the reel-out speed. These control degrees of freedom enable to remain within the operational envelope, but cause significant penalties in terms of energy output. A significantly greater adaptability is offered by shape-morphing wings, which have the potential to achieve optimal performance at different flight conditions by tailoring their airfoil shape and lift distribution at different levels along the wingspan. Hence, the application of compliant structures for AWE wings is very promising. Furthermore, active gust load alleviation can be achieved through morphing, which leads to a lower weight and an expanded flight envelope, thus increasing the power production of the AWE system. This work presents a procedure to concurrently optimize the aerodynamic shape, compliant structure, and composite layup of a morphing wing for AWE applications. The morphing concept is based on distributed compliance ribs, actuated by electromechanical linear actuators, guiding the deformation of the flexible—yet load-carrying—composite skin. The goal of the aerostructural optimization is formulated as a high-level requirement, namely to maximize the average annual power production per wing area of an AWE system by tailoring the shape of the wing, and to extend the flight envelope of the wing by actively alleviating gust loads. The results of the concurrent multidisciplinary optimization show a 50.7% increase of extracted power with respect to a sequentially optimized design, highlighting the benefits of morphing and the

  13. Small UAS-Based Wind Feature Identification System Part 1: Integration and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Rodriguez Salazar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system for identification of wind features, such as gusts and wind shear. These are of particular interest in the context of energy-efficient navigation of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS. The proposed system generates real-time wind vector estimates and a novel algorithm to generate wind field predictions. Estimations are based on the integration of an off-the-shelf navigation system and airspeed readings in a so-called direct approach. Wind predictions use atmospheric models to characterize the wind field with different statistical analyses. During the prediction stage, the system is able to incorporate, in a big-data approach, wind measurements from previous flights in order to enhance the approximations. Wind estimates are classified and fitted into a Weibull probability density function. A Genetic Algorithm (GA is utilized to determine the shaping and scale parameters of the distribution, which are employed to determine the most probable wind speed at a certain position. The system uses this information to characterize a wind shear or a discrete gust and also utilizes a Gaussian Process regression to characterize continuous gusts. The knowledge of the wind features is crucial for computing energy-efficient trajectories with low cost and payload. Therefore, the system provides a solution that does not require any additional sensors. The system architecture presents a modular decentralized approach, in which the main parts of the system are separated in modules and the exchange of information is managed by a communication handler to enhance upgradeability and maintainability. Validation is done providing preliminary results of both simulations and Software-In-The-Loop testing. Telemetry data collected from real flights, performed in the Seville Metropolitan Area in Andalusia (Spain, was used for testing. Results show that wind estimation and predictions can be calculated at 1 Hz and a wind map can be updated at 0.4 Hz

  14. Turbulent Structure of a Simplified Urban Fluid Flow Studied Through Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Bruno; Goudarzi, Sepehr A.; Vinuesa, Ricardo; Wark, Candace

    2018-02-01

    Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was used to provide a three-dimensional characterization of the flow around a simplified urban model defined by a 5 by 7 array of blocks, forming four parallel streets, perpendicular to the incoming wind direction corresponding to a zero angle of incidence. Channeling of the flow through the array under consideration was observed, and its effect increased as the incoming wind direction, or angle of incidence ( AOI), was changed from 0° to 15°, 30°, and 45°. The flow between blocks can be divided into two regions: a region of low turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) levels close to the leeward side of the upstream block, and a high TKE area close to the downstream block. The centre of the arch vortex is located in the low TKE area, and two regions of large streamwise velocity fluctuation bound the vortex in the spanwise direction. Moreover, a region of large spanwise velocity fluctuation on the downstream block is found between the vortex legs. Our results indicate that the reorientation of the arch vortex at increasing AOI is produced by the displacement of the different TKE regions and their interaction with the shear layers on the sides and top of the upstream and downstream blocks, respectively. There is also a close connection between the turbulent structure between the blocks and the wind gusts. The correlations among gust components were also studied, and it was found that in the near-wall region of the street the correlations between the streamwise and spanwise gusts R_{uv} were dominant for all four AOI cases. At higher wall-normal positions in the array, the R_{uw} correlation decreased with increasing AOI, whereas the R_{uv} coefficient increased as AOI increased, and at {it{AOI}}=45° all three correlations exhibited relatively high values of around 0.4.

  15. Extreme pressure differences at 0900 NZST and winds across New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, M. James; Griffiths, Georgina M.; Gosai, Ashmita

    2005-07-01

    Trends in extremes in station daily sea-level pressure differences at 0900 NZST are examined, and extreme daily wind gusts, across New Zealand, since the 1960s. Annual time series were examined (with indices of magnitude and frequency over threshold percentiles) from the daily indices selected. These follow from earlier indices of normalized monthly mean sea-level pressure differences between station pairs, except the daily indices are not normalized. The frequency statistics quantify the number of extreme zonal (westerly and easterly), or extreme meridional (southerly or northerly), pressure gradient events. The frequency and magnitude of extreme westerly episodes has increased slightly over New Zealand, with a significant increase in the westerly extremes to the south of New Zealand. In contrast, the magnitude and frequency of easterly extremes has decreased over New Zealand, but increased to the south, with some trends weakly significant. The frequency and magnitude of daily southerly extremes has decreased significantly in the region.Extreme daily wind gust events at key climate stations in New Zealand and at Hobart, Australia, are highly likely to be associated with an extreme daily pressure difference. The converse was less likely to hold: extreme wind gusts were not always observed on days with extreme daily pressure difference, probably due to the strong influence that topography has on localized station winds. Significant correlations exist between the frequency indices and both annual-average mean sea-level pressures around the Australasian region and annual-average sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere. These correlations are generally stronger for indices of extreme westerly or extreme southerly airflows. Annual-average pressures in the Tasman Sea or Southern Ocean are highly correlated to zonal indices (frequency of extreme westerlies). SST anomalies in the NINO3 region or on either side of the South Island are

  16. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics (Sears, W. R.: 1941, Some aspects of non-stationary airfoil theory and its practical application; Goldstein, M. E. and Atassi, H. M.: 1976, A complete second-order theory for the unsteady flow about an airfoil due to a periodic gust...... (Sears, W. R.: 1941; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970). An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input (Amiet, R. K.: 1975, Acoustic radiation from an airfoil in a turbulent stream). The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models...

  17. Severe storm in Bavaria, the Czech Republic and Poland on 12–13 July 1984: A statistic- and model-based analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Marek; Müller, Miloslav; Kakos, Vilibald; Řezáčová, Daniela; Sokol, Zbyněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 93, 1-3 (2009), s. 99-110 ISSN 0169-8095. [European Conference on Severe Storms /4./. Miramare -Trieste, 10.09.2007-14.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/0905; GA AV ČR KJB300420701; GA AV ČR KJB300420802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : convective storm * synoptic anomaly * mesoscale condition * forecast verification * gust front Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.811, year: 2009 http://www. elsevier.com/locate/atmos

  18. Dynamics of human flight on skis: improvements in safety and fairness in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W; Platzer, D; Schmölzer, B

    1996-08-01

    This study of ski jumping includes three areas of research: Wind tunnel measurements with world class athletes in various flight positions, field measurements during the World Championships in Ski Flying 1994 in Planica (Slovenia) and a highly reliable mapping of ski jumping to a computable simulation model. The results explain the effects of equipment, flight style changes, the reason for the enhanced tumbling risk and high gust sensitivity observed. Consequences can be drawn for changes to the FIS regulations, the design of jumping hills and training methods. The internationally induced anorexia of the athletes could be prohibited by a new ski length regulation. Women jumpers could become a real competitive threat.

  19. Prospects for development of wind turbines with orthogonal rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelov, D. N.; Krivospitsky, V. P.

    2008-03-01

    The experimental data obtained previously on the investigation of power characteristics and the possibility of the self-start of the Darrieus rotor are anlysed. These results are used at the design of new two-tier wind turbines with straight blades. The full-scale tests of two design variants showed the prospects for the development of wind turbines with the Darrieus rotor. At a reasonable design, they do not need any devices for the rotor orientation and start-up, are little sensitive to wind gusts and can have a high level of power characteristics, which is not inferior to the best samples of the units of propeller type.

  20. War casualties on the home front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda J. Flinn

    2005-11-01

    On May 12, 1942, at Christopher coal mine No. 3 in Osage, West Virginia, a continent away from the frontlines of World War II, Superintendent Ed O'Neil saw the mine ventilation fan suddenly run backwards, propelled by a strong gust of air that tore the belt off the huge blower. The second shift mantrip of 115 coal miners, traversing the drift mouth for the 3:00 p.m. shift, ground to an uneasy halt. The article recounts the tragic consequences of this incident. It also tells of other events affecting coal miners during World War I and World War II.

  1. Stochastic Modeling of Empirical Storm Loss in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, B. F.; Rybski, D.; Kropp, J. P.; Burghoff, O.; Held, H.

    2012-04-01

    Based on German insurance loss data for residential property we derive storm damage functions that relate daily loss with maximum gust wind speed. Over a wide range of loss, steep power law relationships are found with spatially varying exponents ranging between approximately 8 and 12. Global correlations between parameters and socio-demographic data are employed to reduce the number of local parameters to 3. We apply a Monte Carlo approach to calculate German loss estimates including confidence bounds in daily and annual resolution. Our model reproduces the annual progression of winter storm losses and enables to estimate daily losses over a wide range of magnitude.

  2. Development of an Integrated Nonlinear Aeroservoelastic Flight Dynamic Model of the NASA Generic Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a recent development of an integrated fully coupled aeroservoelastic flight dynamic model of the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The integrated model couples nonlinear flight dynamics to a nonlinear aeroelastic model of the GTM. The nonlinearity includes the coupling of the rigid-body aircraft states in the partial derivatives of the aeroelastic angle of attack. Aeroservoelastic modeling of the control surfaces which are modeled by the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap is also conducted. The R.T. Jones' method is implemented to approximate unsteady aerodynamics. Simulations of the GTM are conducted with simulated continuous and discrete gust loads..

  3. Implementation of a Personal Computer Based Parameter Estimation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    if necessary and identify by biock nunrbet) FEILD GROUP SUBGROUP Il’arunietar uetinkatlUln 19 ABSTRACT (continue on reverse it necessary and identity...model constant ix L,M,N X,Y,Z moment components Lp: •sbc.’.• T’ = sb C . r, - 2 V C, , L, = _sb 2 C 2V C L8,=qsbC 1 , Lw Scale of the turbulence M Vector ...u,v,w X,Y,Z velocity components V Vector velocity V Magnitude of velocity vector w9 Z velocity due to gust X.. x-distance to normal acclerometer X.P x

  4. Reliability analysis of structures under periodic proof tests in service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1976-01-01

    A reliability analysis of structures subjected to random service loads and periodic proof tests treats gust loads and maneuver loads as random processes. Crack initiation, crack propagation, and strength degradation are treated as the fatigue process. The time to fatigue crack initiation and ultimate strength are random variables. Residual strength decreases during crack propagation, so that failure rate increases with time. When a structure fails under periodic proof testing, a new structure is built and proof-tested. The probability of structural failure in service is derived from treatment of all the random variables, strength degradations, service loads, proof tests, and the renewal of failed structures. Some numerical examples are worked out.

  5. QUIZ LIBRE: software de entretenimiento basado en un juego de preguntas y respuestas para la plataforma Nintendo DS

    OpenAIRE

    Llamas Ruiz, Agustín

    2012-01-01

    Este proyecto, aprovechando el empuje que supone actualmente en la red estos juegos, quiere proporcionar a los usuarios para la consola portátil de Nintendo, la Nintendo DS, un pequeño juego de preguntas y respuestas parecido al famoso juego del Trivial, donde cuatro jugadores en la misma consola podrán competir para saber, quien tiene más conocimientos sobre los temas que más les guste, ya que el juego será personalizable por y para los usuarios.

  6. Pilot dynamics for instrument approach tasks: Full panel multiloop and flight director operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. H.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements and interpretations of single and mutiloop pilot response properties during simulated instrument approach are presented. Pilot subjects flew Category 2-like ILS approaches in a fixed base DC-8 simulaton. A conventional instrument panel and controls were used, with simulated vertical gust and glide slope beam bend forcing functions. Reduced and interpreted pilot describing functions and remmant are given for pitch attitude, flight director, and multiloop (longitudinal) control tasks. The response data are correlated with simultaneously recorded eye scanning statistics, previously reported in NASA CR-1535. The resulting combined response and scanning data and their interpretations provide a basis for validating and extending the theory of manual control displays.

  7. Modifications to 25m2 target-aligned research Heliostat mirror panels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roos, TH

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available exciter, at the one free corner as indicated by the red arrow. The effect of storm wind loading was conservatively approximated, using the following assumptions: Figure 3: Expected mirror panel vibration mode ? A peak gust... distribution in Figure 4). This was done since an aerofoil near stall (worst load case) has a near-triangular lift distribution, with a peak lift coefficient of 1.8 at about ? to 1/3 chord length downstream of the leading edge (green distribution in Figure 4...

  8. Spherical tuned liquid damper for vibration control in wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun-Ling; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2015-01-01

    table. The experimental results indicated that the spherical TLD could effectively improve the damping capacity of the test model. The standard deviation of the dynamic response could be effectively reduced when the excitation frequency was approximately equal to its fundamental frequency. For overspeed...... and extreme operating gust load cases, the standard deviations of the dynamic responses were reduced more than 40% when the liquid mass was about 2% of the generalized mass; for parking load cases, the corresponding standard deviation was reduced more than 50% when the liquid mass was only 1...

  9. Elaboración de un plan de empresa para la puesta en marcha y posterior desarrollo de una empresa de radiodifusión en la comarca de L'Horta

    OpenAIRE

    GALLENT PÉREZ, JOSÉ MANUEL

    2013-01-01

    [ES] Elaborar un plan de empresa para presentarlo a inversores y socios para la puesta en marcha y posterior desarrollo de una empresa de medios a través de radio, ofreciendo el servicio de radio fórmula (música comercial) para las localidades de la comarca de L'Horta. Queremos ofrecer un servicio de entretenimiento a través de radio, orientándonos a un tipo de oyente con un perfil de edad joven y a los que les guste la música comercial que más suene en cada momento, principalmente del tip...

  10. Atmospheric flow over terrain using hybrid RANS/LES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    Due to years of growth in installed wind power, new sites for wind turbines are in constant demand. With increased use of ever more complex sites, local wind phenomena can be expected to greatly increase the load on wind turbines. This work describes how Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) can be used...... to estimate the wind in complex terrain. A newly developed LES-model is presented and is validated by predicting the wind over the Askervein hill. We believe, that the ability of LES to capture load generating turbulent structures like wind gusts, is crucial for further development of complex sites....

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Impact of Great Garuda Project on Wind and Thermal Environment over Built-Up Area in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, M.; Sueishi, T.; Inagaki, A.; Kanda, M.

    2017-12-01

    `Great Garuda' project is an eagle-shaped offshore structure with 17 artificial islands. This project has been designed for the coastal protection and land reclamation of Jakarta due to catastrophic flooding in the city. It offers an urban generation for 300.000 inhabitants and 600.000 workers in addition to its water safety goal. A broad coalition of Indonesian scientists has criticized the project for being negative impacts on the surrounding environment. Despite the vast research by Indonesian scientist on maritime environment, studies on wind and thermal environment over built-up area are still lacking. However, the construction of the various islands off the coast may result changes in wind patterns and thermal environment due to the alteration of the coastline and urbanization in the Jakarta Bay. Therefore, it is important to understand the airflow within the urban canopy in case of unpredictable gust events. These gust events may occur through the closely-packed high-rise buildings and pedestrians may be harmed from such gusts. Accordingly, we used numerical simulations to investigate the impact of the sea wall and the artificial islands over built-up area and, the intensity of wind gusts at the pedestrian level. Considering the fact that the size of turbulence organized structure sufficiently large computational domain is required. Therefore, a 19.2km×4.8km×1.0 km simulation domain with 2-m resolution in all directions was created to explicitly resolve the detailed shapes of buildings and the flow at the pedestrian level. This complex computation was accomplished by implementing a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Two case studies were conducted considering the effect of realistic surface roughness and upward heat flux. Case_1 was conducted based on the current built environment and Case_2 for investigating the effect of the project on the chosen coastal region of the city. Fig.1 illustrates the schematic of the large-eddy simulation domains of two cases

  12. Aerocrane: A hybrid LTA aircraft for aerial crane applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. G., Jr.; Doolittle, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Aerocrane, a hybrid aircraft, combines rotor lift with buoyant lift to offer VTOL load capability greatly in excess of helicopter technology while eliminating the airship problem of ballast transfer. In addition, the Aerocrane concept sharply reduces the mooring problem of airships and provides 360 deg vectorable thrust to supply a relatively large force component for control of gust loads. Designed for use in short range, ultra heavy lift missions, the Aerocrane operates in a performance envelope unsuitable for either helicopters or airships. Basic design considerations and potential problem areas of the concept are addressed.

  13. Computer simulation of a 20-kHz power system for advanced launch systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhoff, S. D.; Wasynczuk, O.; Krause, P. C.; Kenny, B. H.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of two 20-kHz actuator power systems being built for an advanced launch system are evaluated for typical launch senario using an end-to-end system simulation. Aspects of system performance ranging from the switching of the power electronic devices to the vehicle aerodynamics are represented in the simulation. It is shown that both systems adequately stabilize the vehicle against a wind gust during launch. However, it is also shown that in both cases there are bus voltage and current fluctuations which make system power quality a concern.

  14. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  15. Using C-Band Dual-Polarization Radar Signatures to Improve Convective Wind Forecasting at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and NASA Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Corey G.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Roeder, William P.; McNamara, Todd M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    The United States Air Force's 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) is the organization responsible for monitoring atmospheric conditions at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and NASA Kennedy Space Center (CCAFS/KSC) and issuing warnings for hazardous weather conditions when the need arises. One such warning is issued for convective wind events, for which lead times of 30 and 60 minutes are desired for events with peak wind gusts of 35 knots or greater (i.e., Threshold-1) and 50 knots or greater (i.e., Threshold-2), respectively (Roeder et al. 2014).

  16. TAILSIM Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltner, Dale W.

    2000-01-01

    The TAILSIM program uses a 4th order Runge-Kutta method to integrate the standard aircraft equations-of-motion (EOM). The EOM determine three translational and three rotational accelerations about the aircraft's body axis reference system. The forces and moments that drive the EOM are determined from aerodynamic coefficients, dynamic derivatives, and control inputs. Values for these terms are determined from linear interpolation of tables that are a function of parameters such as angle-of-attack and surface deflections. Buildup equations combine these terms and dimensionalize them to generate the driving total forces and moments. Features that make TAILSIM applicable to studies of tailplane stall include modeling of the reversible control System, modeling of the pilot performing a load factor and/or airspeed command task, and modeling of vertical gusts. The reversible control system dynamics can be described as two hinged masses connected by a spring. resulting in a fifth order system. The pilot model is a standard form of lead-lag with a time delay applied to an integrated pitch rate and/or airspeed error feedback. The time delay is implemented by a Pade approximation, while the commanded pitch rate is determined by a commanded load factor. Vertical gust inputs include a single 1-cosine gust and a continuous NASA Dryden gust model. These dynamic models. coupled with the use of a nonlinear database, allow the tailplane stall characteristics, elevator response, and resulting aircraft response, to be modeled. A useful output capability of the TAILSIM program is the ability to display multiple post-run plot pages to allow a quick assessment of the time history response. There are 16 plot pages currently available to the user. Each plot page displays 9 parameters. Each parameter can also be displayed individually. on a one plot-per-page format. For a more refined display of the results the program can also create files of tabulated data. which can then be used by other

  17. Evolution of wave turbulence under "gusty" forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, S Y; Shrira, V I

    2011-09-09

    We consider nonlinear evolution of a random wave field under gusty forcing, fluctuating around a constant mean. Here the classical wave turbulence theory that assumes a proximity to stationarity is not applicable. We show by direct numerical simulation that the self-similarity of wave field evolution survives under fluctuating forcing. The wave field statistical characteristics averaged over fluctuations of forcing evolve as if there were a certain constant "effective wind." The results justify the use of the kinetic equations with forcing averaged over gusts as a good first approximation.

  18. On the determination of the neutral drag coefficient in the convective boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grachev, A.A.; Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1998-01-01

    Based on the idea that free convection can be considered as a particular case of forced convection, where the gusts driven by the large-scale eddies are scaled with the Deardorff convective velocity scale, a new formulation for the neutral drag coefficient, C-Dn, in the convective boundary layer...... for mean wind speed less than about 2 m s(-1). The new approach also clarifies several contradictory results from earlier works. Some aspects related to an alternate definition of the neutral drag coefficient and the wind speed and the stress averaging procedure are considered....

  19. Maya Studio Projects Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Palamar, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The only hands-on book devoted to mastering Maya's dynamics tools for water, wind, and fire. In the world of animation, the ability to create realistic water, wind, and fire effects is key. Autodesk Maya software includes powerful dynamics tools that have been used to design breathtaking effects for movies, games, commercials, and short films. This professional guide teaches you the primary techniques you need to make the most of Maya's toolkit, so you'll soon be creating water that ripples, gusting winds and gentle breezes, and flickering fires the way Hollywood pros do. The one-of-a-kind boo

  20. Branding, packaging o sabor? Relació entre el reconeixement de la marca de les begudes, el packaging i la percepció del sabor.

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Ortega, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Els cinc sentits, presents a l'ésser humà des del naixement, tenen funcions úniques que altres sentits no poden suplir. La vista, el gust i l'olfacte, sentits estudiats en aquesta investigació, son fonamentals per la publicitat, i més pel sector dels aliments i les begudes. Es pot reconèixer a cegues una marca de begudes? I un envàs sense colors ni elements identificatius? Quin paper té la memòria en els consumidors i com influeix en els sentits? Per què hi ha gent que escolta colors? I per q...

  1. Oscar Wilde como artesano: la mediación de la identidad a través de los objetos en "The picture of Dorian Gray" y "The importance of being Earnest"

    OpenAIRE

    Zubieta Jarén, Bárbara

    2016-01-01

    Uno de los aspectos más documentados a la hora de estudiar las obras de Óscar Wilde en profundidad ha sido el concepto de máscara u ocultación. Este concepto fue tratado a su vez por el propio escritor en su ensayo titulado The Truth of Masks (1891), donde analiza, entre otras cosas, la puesta en escena y los objetos que aparecen a la hora de llevar a cabo la representación de las obras de teatro de Shakespeare. Por otra parte, no es necesario señalar que Wilde es harto reconocido por su gust...

  2. Optimal Vibration Control of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thesbjerg, Leo

    In designing large civil engineering structures, an important consideration is prospective dynamic loadings which may include earthquake ground motion, wind gusts, severe sea states and moving vehicles, rotating and reciprocating machinery and others. successful design of such structures requires...... providing for the safety and integrity of the structure, and in some cases also providing for a measure of comfort for the occupants during such loading which the structure and its occupants must endure. Due to these uncertainties, the civil engineering community has traditionally adopted a very...

  3. The nature of operating flight loads and their effect on propulsion system structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, K. H.; Martin, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Past diagnostics studies revealed the primary causes of performance deterioration of high by-pass turbofan engines to be flight loads, erosion, and thermal distortion. The various types of airplane loads that are imposed on the engine throughout the lifetime of an airplane are examined. These include flight loads from gusts and maneuvers and ground loads from takeoff, landing, and taxi conditions. Clarification is made in definitions of the airframer's limit and ultimate design loads and the engine manufacturer's operating design loads. Finally, the influence of these loads on the propulsion system structures is discussed.

  4. Advanced structural wind engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kareem, Ahsan

    2013-01-01

    This book serves as a textbook for advanced courses as it introduces state-of-the-art information and the latest research results on diverse problems in the structural wind engineering field. The topics include wind climates, design wind speed estimation, bluff body aerodynamics and applications, wind-induced building responses, wind, gust factor approach, wind loads on components and cladding, debris impacts, wind loading codes and standards, computational tools and computational fluid dynamics techniques, habitability to building vibrations, damping in buildings, and suppression of wind-induced vibrations. Graduate students and expert engineers will find the book especially interesting and relevant to their research and work.

  5. Plan de empresa: creación y desarrollo de un Estudio de Danza en Meliana (Valencia)

    OpenAIRE

    FERRER ORTS, MARÍA DOLORES

    2014-01-01

    [ES] El presente Trabajo Final de Carrera consiste en el desarrollo de un plan de empresa para ver la viabilidad de abrir un Estudio de Danza en el municipio de Meliana (Valencia). Hemos ideado una empresa de danza especialmente dirigida a ofrecer sus servicios a alumnos de corta edad pero también podrá recibir clases cualquier persona que le guste bailar, que sienta devoción por este arte o incluso porque quiera enfocar el baile como un deporte saludable y de una manera u o...

  6. Operating Cell Temperature Determination in Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules; Calculo de la Temperature de Operacion de Celulas Solares en un Panel Fotovoltaico Plano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenlo, F.

    2002-07-01

    Two procedures (simplified and complete) to determine the operating cell temperature in photovoltaic modules operating in real conditions assuming isothermal stationary modules are presented in this work. Some examples are included that show the dependence of this temperature on several environment (sky, ground and ambient temperatures, solar irradiance, wind speed, etc.) and structural (module geometry and size, encapsulating materials, antirreflexive optical coatings, etc) factors and also on electrical module performance. In a further step temperature profiles for non-isothermal modules are analysed besides transitory effects due to variable irradiance and wind gusts. (Author)

  7. ACCUWIND - Classification of five cup anemometers according to IEC 61400-12-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Dahlberg, J.-Å.; Busche, P.

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of five cup anemometers were investigated in detail, and data are presented in figures and tables. The characteristics include: normal wind tunnel calibrations; angular response measurements at 5, 8 and 11m/s; torque coefficient curvemeasurements from combined tilt and ramp......-gust tests, torque coefficient curve measurements for non-tilted conditions; rotor inertia measurements and measurements of friction of bearings at temperatures -10°C to 40°C. The characteristics are fitted to twodifferent time domain cup anemometer models, and simulations of the cup anemometers are made...

  8. Performance comparison of control schemes for variable-speed wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottasso, C. L.; Croce, A.; Savini, B.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the performance of different control schemes when applied to the regulation problem of a variable-speed representative wind turbine. In particular, we formulate and compare a wind-scheduled PID, a LQR controller and a novel adaptive non-linear model predictive controller, equipped with observers of the tower states and wind. The simulations include gusts and turbulent winds of varying intensity in nominal as well as off-design operating conditions. The experiments highlight the possible advantages of model-based non-linear control strategies.

  9. Performance comparison of control schemes for variable-speed wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottasso, C L; Croce, A; Savini, B

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the performance of different control schemes when applied to the regulation problem of a variable-speed representative wind turbine. In particular, we formulate and compare a wind-scheduled PID, a LQR controller and a novel adaptive non-linear model predictive controller, equipped with observers of the tower states and wind. The simulations include gusts and turbulent winds of varying intensity in nominal as well as off-design operating conditions. The experiments highlight the possible advantages of model-based non-linear control strategies

  10. A general theory for the Uranian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, J.

    1986-01-01

    A general analytical theory of the five main satellites of Uranus, including the secular and short period terms hereafter denoted by GUST, is presented. A comparison is made with an internal numerical integration with nominal masses of Veillet (1983). The precision of the theory goes from about 10 km for Miranda to 100 km for Oberon. The short period terms in the motions of Titania and Oberon are larger than 500 km. They should make possible the determination of the masses of the outer satellites through the optical data of Voyager encounter.

  11. Response of west Indian coastal regions and Kavaratti lagoon to the November-2009 tropical cyclone Phyan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Mehra, P.; SanilKumar, V.; Radhakrishnan, K.V.; VijayKumar, K.; AshokKumar, K.; Agarwadekar, Y.; Bhat, U.G.; Luis, R.; Rivankar, P.; Viegas, B.

    to be ~45 knots (~83 km/h) with gust up to 50 knots (92 km/h) for a temporary period during 11 th morning. The track of Phyan during its onward march from 9 th to 12 th November (Fig. 2) indicates its initial north-westerly motion from the south... in November 2009 illustrates the spatial structure and vortex motion of the wind field (Fig. 13). Because of limited in-situ measurement locations, sea-surface wind (U 10 ), sea-surface waves (significant wave height, wave direction, wave periods), and sea...

  12. Elemental magic, v.2 the technique of special effects animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gilland, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Design beautiful, professional-level animated effects with these detailed step-by-step tutorials from former Disney animator and animated effects expert Joseph Gilland. Filled with beautiful, full-color artwork, Elemental Magic, Volume II, breaks down the animated effect process from beginning to end-including booming explosions, gusting winds, magical incantations, and raging fires. He also breaks down the process of effects ""clean-up,"" as well as timing and frame rates. The companion website includes real-time footage of the author lecturing as he animates the drawings from the

  13. Algunos efectos de la precipitación del huracán Paulina en Acapulco, Guerrero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Guadalupe Matías Ramírez

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available During three days in October (6th-10th 1997, the hurricane Pauline affected the coastal areas of Chiapas, Oaxaca and Guerrero. The force of Shis hurricane graded 4 fn the Saffir-Simpson scale, thus reaching the category of extremely dangerous. Its winds were as strong as 210 kilometers per hour and gusts of 240 kilometers per hour. The associated rain registered the extraordinary amount of 400 mm in Acapulco, in only five hours. Among the major consequences of such rainfall worth mentioning are: runoffs, landslides, floods and 120 human losses. Total damage in this port was estimated at ca, 300 million pesos.

  14. Material matters: Controllable rubber trailing edge flap regulates load on wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    In wind farms, nearby wind turbines exert considerable influence and generate turbulence on turbine blades. Because the blades are so long, there can be considerable differences in localized loading from the gusts along the blade. The Risø DTU researchers has developed a controllable rubber trail...... in an open jet wind tunnel shows promising results. In the wind tunnel, it is possible to regulate the wind speed as well as turn the blade profile to simulate a change in wind direction in relation to the profile....

  15. Numerical simulation of aeroelastic response of an airfoil in flow with laminar-turbulence transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sváček, P.; Horáček, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 267, September (2015), s. 28-41 ISSN 0096-3003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207; GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : aeroelasticity * finite element method * 2D RANS equations * sudden gust Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0096300315008887/pdfft?md5=1329144b9cc04b57a05c506ae7f54b0a&pid=1-s2.0-S0096300315008887-main.pdf

  16. Operating Cell Temperature Determination in Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenlo, F.

    2002-01-01

    Two procedures (simplified and complete) to determine me operating cell temperature in photovoltaic modules operating in real conditions assuming isothermal stationary modules are presented in this work. Some examples are included that show me dependence of this temperature on several environmental (sky, ground and ambient temperatures, solar irradiance, wind speed, etc.) and structural (module geometry and size, encapsulating materials, anti reflexive optical coatings, etc.) factors and also on electrical module performance. In a further step temperature profiles for non-isothermal modules are analysed besides transitory effects due to variable irradiance and wind gusts. (Author) 27 refs

  17. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  18. CFD-based design load analysis of 5MW offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T. T.; Ryu, G. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    The structure and aerodynamic loads acting on NREL 5MW reference wind turbine blade are calculated and analyzed based on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and unsteady Blade Element Momentum (BEM). A detailed examination of the six force components has been carried out (three force components and three moment components). Structure load (gravity and inertia load) and aerodynamic load have been obtained by additional structural calculations (CFD or BEM, respectively,). In CFD method, the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach was applied to solve the continuity equation of mass conservation and momentum balance so that the complex flow around wind turbines was modeled. Written in C programming language, a User Defined Function (UDF) code which defines transient velocity profile according to the Extreme Operating Gust condition was compiled into commercial FLUENT package. Furthermore, the unsteady BEM with 3D stall model has also adopted to investigate load components on wind turbine rotor. The present study introduces a comparison between advanced CFD and unsteady BEM for determining load on wind turbine rotor. Results indicate that there are good agreements between both present methods. It is importantly shown that six load components on wind turbine rotor is significant effect under Extreme Operating Gust (EOG) condition. Using advanced CFD and additional structural calculations, this study has succeeded to construct accuracy numerical methodology to estimate total load of wind turbine that compose of aerodynamic load and structure load.

  19. Fixed Nadir Focus Concentrated Solar Power Applying Reflective Array Tracking Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, B.; DAMayanti, A. M.; Murdani, A.; Habibi, I. I. A.; Wakidah, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The Sun is one of the most potential renewable energy develoPMent to be utilized, one of its utilization is for solar thermal concentrators, CSP (Concentrated Solar Power). In CSP energy conversion, the concentrator is as moving the object by tracking the sunlight to reach the focus point. This method need quite energy consumption, because the unit of the concentrators has considerable weight, and use large CSP, means the existence of the usage unit will appear to be wider and heavier. The addition of weight and width of the unit will increase the torque to drive the concentrator and hold the wind gusts. One method to reduce energy consumption is direct the sunlight by the reflective array to nadir through CSP with Reflective Fresnel Lens concentrator. The focus will be below the nadir direction, and the position of concentrator will be fixed position even the angle of the sun’s elevation changes from morning to afternoon. So, the energy concentrated maximally, because it has been protected from wind gusts. And then, the possibility of dAMage and changes in focus construction will not occur. The research study and simulation of the reflective array (mechanical method) will show the reflective angle movement. The distance between reflectors and their angle are controlled by mechatronics. From the simulation using fresnel 1m2, and efficiency of solar energy is 60.88%. In restriction, the intensity of sunlight at the tropical circles 1KW/peak, from 6 AM until 6 PM.

  20. Transient Performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onol, Aykut; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2016-11-01

    A coupled CFD/rotor dynamics modeling approach is presented for the analysis of realistic transient behavior of a height-normalized, three-straight-bladed VAWT subject to inertial effects of the rotor and generator load which is manipulated by a feedback control under standardized wind gusts. The model employs the k- ɛ turbulence model to approximate unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and is validated with data from field measurements. As distinct from related studies, here, the angular velocity is calculated from the rotor's equation of motion; thus, the dynamic response of the rotor is taken into account. Results include the following: First, the rotor's inertia filters large amplitude oscillations in the wind torque owing to the first-order dynamics. Second, the generator and wind torques differ especially during wind transients subject to the conservation of angular momentum of the rotor. Third, oscillations of the power coefficient exceed the Betz limit temporarily due to the energy storage in the rotor, which acts as a temporary buffer that stores the kinetic energy like a flywheel in short durations. Last, average of transient power coefficients peaks at a smaller tip-speed ratio for wind gusts than steady winds. This work was supported by the Sabanci University Internal Research Grant Program (SU-IRG-985).

  1. Characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Chos Malal site (Province of Neuquen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassig, J; Palese, C

    2005-01-01

    The site of Chos Malal is located on the north of the Province of Neuquen (Argentina).Cordillera del Viento is a mountain located 30 km northward, it is 90 km long, with average heights of 2800 m and with intense winds.This region has the adequate characteristics to be one of the best zones of the Norpatagonia for the exploitation of wind resources.Nevertheless, the existing wind speed data of the place is disconcerting.The biggest amount of information proceeds from the old weather station of the 'Secretaria de Agricultura y Ganaderia de la Nacion Argentina' Office and from the National Weather Service 'Servicio Meteorologico Nacional de Argentina' (SMN). Results from this data (1941-1960 period) shows that the mean annual wind speed is only 2.8 m/s.This value is conservative, probably due to the method employed on the measurement, which consisted of the estimation through the Beaufort scale, or the over-estimation error of the calms, as the one detected by Barros for the South of Patagonia.Due to this discordance, it was decided to evaluate the resource with modern instrumental. Afterwards, automatic weather stations were installed (Davis model Monitor II and Wizard) at the airport of Chos Malal (S 37 26 49 ; W 70 13 53 ; 852 m msl) with sensors at 2.5m, 10m and 18m above ground level.With this data (period 2000-2004) this study was oriented to characterize some aspects of the atmospheric boundary layer, the air turbulence and the relation between average wind speed and gusts.The annual average velocity (2000-2004) was 3.78 m/s, 35% greater than meteorological statistics from SMN (1941-1950 and 1951-1960 decades). The maximum velocity was 7.35 m/s, almost twice the average wind speed. With the measured data at 10 m, the Weibull distribution was calculated, using the form factor K = 1.2; and the scale factor C = 3.95. Also the wind rose was calculated, where the maximum frequency was produced at WNW.During 5 days of November of 2001, simultaneous observations at 2

  2. Acute Low Back Pain? Do Not Blame the Weather-A Case-Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilken, Keira; Hancock, Mark J; Maher, Chris G; Li, Qiang; Steffens, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the influence of various weather parameters on the risk of developing a low back pain (LBP) episode. Case-crossover study. Primary care clinics in Sydney, Australia. 981 participants with a new episode of acute LBP. Weather parameters were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were derived comparing two exposure variables in the case window-(1) the average of the weather variable for the day prior to pain onset and (2) the change in the weather variable from 2 days prior to 1 day prior to pain onset-with exposures in two control windows (1 week and 1 month before the case window). The weather parameters of precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, and air pressure were not associated with the onset of acute LBP. For one of the four analyses, higher temperature slightly increased the odds of pain onset. Common weather parameters that had been previously linked to musculoskeletal pain, such as precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, and air pressure, do not increase the risk of onset for LBP. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Verification and implementation of microburst day potential index (MDPI) and wind INDEX (WINDEX) forecasting tools at Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Mark

    1996-01-01

    This report details the research, development, utility, verification and transition on wet microburst forecasting and detection the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) did in support of ground and launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The unforecasted wind event on 16 August 1994 of 33.5 ms-1 (65 knots) at the Shuttle Landing Facility raised the issue of wet microburst detection and forecasting. The AMU researched and analyzed the downburst wind event and determined it was a wet microburst event. A program was developed for operational use on the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) weather system to analyze, compute and display Theta(epsilon) profiles, the microburst day potential index (MDPI), and wind index (WINDEX) maximum wind gust value. Key microburst nowcasting signatures using the WSR-88D data were highlighted. Verification of the data sets indicated that the MDPI has good potential in alerting the duty forecaster to the potential of wet microburst and the WINDEX values computed from the hourly surface data do have potential in showing a trend for the maximum gust potential. WINDEX should help in filling in the temporal hole between the MDPI on the last Cape Canaveral rawinsonde and the nowcasting radar data tools.

  4. Gravo-Aeroelastic Scaling for Extreme-Scale Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingersh, Lee J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Loth, Eric [University of Virginia; Kaminski, Meghan [University of Virginia; Qin, Chao [University of Virginia; Griffith, D. Todd [Sandia National Laboratories

    2017-06-09

    A scaling methodology is described in the present paper for extreme-scale wind turbines (rated at 10 MW or more) that allow their sub-scale turbines to capture their key blade dynamics and aeroelastic deflections. For extreme-scale turbines, such deflections and dynamics can be substantial and are primarily driven by centrifugal, thrust and gravity forces as well as the net torque. Each of these are in turn a function of various wind conditions, including turbulence levels that cause shear, veer, and gust loads. The 13.2 MW rated SNL100-03 rotor design, having a blade length of 100-meters, is herein scaled to the CART3 wind turbine at NREL using 25% geometric scaling and blade mass and wind speed scaled by gravo-aeroelastic constraints. In order to mimic the ultralight structure on the advanced concept extreme-scale design the scaling results indicate that the gravo-aeroelastically scaled blades for the CART3 are be three times lighter and 25% longer than the current CART3 blades. A benefit of this scaling approach is that the scaled wind speeds needed for testing are reduced (in this case by a factor of two), allowing testing under extreme gust conditions to be much more easily achieved. Most importantly, this scaling approach can investigate extreme-scale concepts including dynamic behaviors and aeroelastic deflections (including flutter) at an extremely small fraction of the full-scale cost.

  5. Constraints on grand unified superstring theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Lopez, J.L.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Houston Advanced Research Center

    1990-01-01

    We evaluate some constraints on the construction of grand unified superstring theories (GUSTs) using higher level Kac-Moody algebras on the world-sheet. In the most general formulation of the heterotic string in four dimensions, an analysis of the basic GUST model-building constraints, including a realistic hidden gauge group, reveals that there are no E 6 models and any SO(10) models can only exist at level-5. Also, any such SU(5) models can exist only for levels 4≤k≤19. These SO(10) and SU(5) models risk having many large, massless, phenomenologically troublesome representations. We also show that with a suitable hidden sector gauge group, it is possible to avoid free light fractionally charged particles, which are endemic to string derived models. We list all such groups and their representations for the flipped SU(5)xU(1) model. We conclude that a sufficiently binding hidden sector gauge group becomes a basic model-building constraint. (orig.)

  6. Modified Adaptive Control for Region 3 Operation in the Presence of Wind Turbine Structural Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan Alane; Balas, Mark J.; Wright, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Many challenges exist for the operation of wind turbines in an efficient manner that is reliable and avoids component fatigue and failure. Turbines operate in highly turbulent environments resulting in aerodynamic loads that can easily excite turbine structural modes, possibly causing component fatigue and failure. Wind turbine manufacturers are highly motivated to reduce component fatigue and failure that can lead to loss of revenue due to turbine down time and maintenance costs. The trend in wind turbine design is toward larger, more flexible turbines that are ideally suited to adaptive control methods due to the complexity and expense required to create accurate models of their dynamic characteristics. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed, accommodate wind gusts, and reduce the excitation of structural modes in the wind turbine. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. The adaptive controller will demonstrate the ability to regulate generator speed in Region 3, while accommodating gusts, and reducing the excitation of certain structural modes in the wind turbine.

  7. The waviness of the extratropical jet and daily weather extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlisberger, Matthias; Martius, Olivia; Pfahl, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes have experienced a large number of weather extremes with substantial socio-economic impact, such as the European and Russian heat waves in 2003 and 2010, severe winter floods in the United Kingdom in 2013/2014 and devastating winter storms such as Lothar (1999) and Xynthia (2010) in Central Europe. These have triggered an engaged debate within the scientific community on the role of human induced climate change in the occurrence of such extremes. A key element of this debate is the hypothesis that the waviness of the extratropical jet is linked to the occurrence of weather extremes, with a wavier jet stream favouring more extremes. Previous work on this topic is expanded in this study by analyzing the linkage between a regional measure of jet waviness and daily temperature, precipitation and wind gust extremes. We show that indeed such a linkage exists in many regions of the world, however this waviness-extremes linkage varies spatially in strength and sign. Locally, it is strong only where the relevant weather systems, in which the extremes occur, are affected by the jet waviness. Its sign depends on how the frequency of occurrence of the relevant weather systems is correlated with the occurrence of high and low jet waviness. These results go beyond previous studies by noting that also a decrease in waviness could be associated with an enhanced number of some weather extremes, especially wind gust and precipitation extremes over western Europe.

  8. Revisiting the synoptic-scale predictability of severe European winter storms using ECMWF ensemble reforecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pantillon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available New insights into the synoptic-scale predictability of 25 severe European winter storms of the 1995–2015 period are obtained using the homogeneous ensemble reforecast dataset from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The predictability of the storms is assessed with different metrics including (a the track and intensity to investigate the storms' dynamics and (b the Storm Severity Index to estimate the impact of the associated wind gusts. The storms are well predicted by the whole ensemble up to 2–4 days ahead. At longer lead times, the number of members predicting the observed storms decreases and the ensemble average is not clearly defined for the track and intensity. The Extreme Forecast Index and Shift of Tails are therefore computed from the deviation of the ensemble from the model climate. Based on these indices, the model has some skill in forecasting the area covered by extreme wind gusts up to 10 days, which indicates a clear potential for early warnings. However, large variability is found between the individual storms. The poor predictability of outliers appears related to their physical characteristics such as explosive intensification or small size. Longer datasets with more cases would be needed to further substantiate these points.

  9. Three-Dimensional Storm Structure and Low-Level Boundaries at Different Stages of Cyclic Mesocyclone Evolution in a High-Precipitation Tornadic Supercell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Betten

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly continuous wind retrievals every three minutes for an unprecedented 90-minute period were constructed during multiple mesocyclone cycles in a tornadic high-precipitation supercell. Asymptotic contraction rate analysis revealed the relationship between the primary and secondary rear-flank gust fronts (RFGF and SRFGFs and the rear-flank downdraft (RFD and occlusion downdrafts. This is thought to be the first radar-based analysis where the relationship between the near-surface gust fronts and their parent downdrafts has been explored for sequential mesocyclones. Changes in the SRFGFs were associated with surges in the RFD. During part of the mesocyclone lifecycle, the SRFGF produced a band of low-level convergence and associated deep updraft along the southwestern side of the hook echo region that ingested the RFD outflow and limited both entrainment into the RFD and reinforcement of low-level convergence along the leading edge of the primary RFGF. The second mesocyclone intensified from stretching in an occlusion updraft rather than in the primary updraft. This low-level mesocyclone remained well separated from the updraft shear region vorticity that was associated with a more traditional midlevel mesocyclone. However, the third mesocyclone initiated in the vorticity-rich region of the primary updraft zone and was amplified by stretching in the primary updraft.

  10. Evaluation of total energy-rate feedback for glidescope tracking in wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, C. M.; Ostroff, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Low-altitude wind shear is recognized as an infrequent but significant hazard to all aircraft during take-off and landing. A total energy-rate sensor, which is potentially applicable to this problem, has been developed for measuring specific total energy-rate of an airplane with respect to the air mass. This paper presents control system designs, with and without energy-rate feedback, for the approach to landing of a transport airplane through severe wind shear and gusts to evaluate application of this sensor. A system model is developed which incorporates wind shear dynamics equations with the airplance equations of motion, thus allowing the control systems to be analyzed under various wind shears. The control systems are designed using optimal output feedback and are analyzed using frequency domain control theory techniques. Control system performance is evaluated using a complete nonlinear simulation of the airplane and a severe wind shear and gust data package. The analysis and simulation results indicate very similar stability and performance characteristics for the two designs. An implementation technique for distributing the velocity gains between airspeed and ground speed in the simulation is also presented, and this technique is shown to improve the performance characteristics of both designs.

  11. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  12. Explosive development of winter storm Xynthia over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. R. Liberato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In winter of 2009–2010 south-western Europe was hit by several destructive windstorms. The most important was Xynthia (26–28 February 2010, which caused 64 reported casualties and was classified as the 2nd most expensive natural hazard event for 2010 in terms of economic losses. In this work we assess the synoptic evolution, dynamical characteristics and the main impacts of storm Xynthia, whose genesis, development and path were very uncommon. Wind speed gusts observed at more than 500 stations across Europe are evaluated as well as the wind gust field obtained with a regional climate model simulation for the entire North Atlantic and European area. Storm Xynthia was first identified on 25 February around 30° N, 50° W over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. Its genesis occurred on a region characterized by warm and moist air under the influence of a strong upper level wave embedded in the westerlies. Xynthia followed an unusual SW–NE path towards Iberia, France and central Europe. The role of moist air masses on the explosive development of Xynthia is analysed by considering the evaporative sources. A lagrangian model is used to identify the moisture sources, sinks and moisture transport associated with the cyclone during its development phase. The main supply of moisture is located over an elongated region of the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean with anomalously high SST, confirming that the explosive development of storm Xynthia had a significant contribution from the subtropics.

  13. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  14. The Acoustic Emission in the Nest of the Honey Bee Depending on the Extreme Weather Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Tlačbaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibroacoustic signals are an important part of communication in the honey bees (Apis mellifera L.. The aim of this study was to observe the acoustic emission that varies in a bee colony during different weather phenomena (strong winds and hailstorms and to estimate the nature and the extent of the reactions of the colony by the analysis of the obtained data. Experiments were carried out in the volume-reduced hives. The specific weather phenomena were followed by significant (P < 0.0001 increasing of the intensity of the acoustic emission in the colony in comparison with acoustic emission before or after the phenomena. Close linear positive relationship was confirmed between the intensity of wind gusts and intensity of acoustic emission (r = 0.72; P < 0.001. With the increase in the maximum gust of 1 km·h−1, the intensity of acoustic emission increased by 0.1466 mV. The character and degree of reaction of the colony can be estimated with analysis of the measured data. Permeability of vibration signals directly induced weather phenomena through the construction of the experimental hive and the stress in the colony are discussed. Observation of the acoustic emission distributed within the colony is one of the methodical alternatives for research of the vibroacoustic communication in the colony.

  15. Modelling the economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Martius, Olivia; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Severe winter storms such as "Vivian" in February 1990 and "Lothar" in December 1999 are among the most destructive meteorological hazards in Switzerland. Disaster severity resulting from such windstorms is attributable, on the one hand, to hazardous weather conditions such as high wind gust speeds; and on the other hand to socio-economic factors such as population density, distribution of values at risk, and damage susceptibility. For present-day winter storms, the data basis is generally good to describe the meteorological development and wind forces as well as the associated socio-economic impacts. In contrast, the information on historic windstorms is overall sparse and the available historic weather and loss reports mostly do not provide quantitative information. This study illustrates a promising technique to simulate the economic impacts of both historic and present winter storms in Switzerland since end of the 19th century. Our approach makes use of the novel Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR) spanning 1871-present. The 2-degree spatial resolution of the global 20CR dataset is relatively coarse. Thus, the complex orography of Switzerland is not realistically represented, which has considerable ramifications for the representation of wind systems that are strongly influenced by the local orography, such as Föhn winds. Therefore, a dynamical downscaling of the 20CR to 3 km resolution using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was performed, for in total 40 high-impact winter storms in Switzerland since 1871. Based on the downscaled wind gust speeds and the climada loss model, the estimated economic losses were calculated at municipality level for current economic and social conditions. With this approach, we find an answer to the question what would be the economic losses of e.g. a hazardous Föhn storm - which occurred in northern Switzerland in February 1925 - today, i.e. under current socio-economic conditions. Encouragingly, the pattern of

  16. Raindrop fall velocities from an optical array probe and 2-D video disdrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringi, Viswanathan; Thurai, Merhala; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2018-03-01

    We report on fall speed measurements of raindrops in light-to-heavy rain events from two climatically different regimes (Greeley, Colorado, and Huntsville, Alabama) using the high-resolution (50 µm) Meteorological Particle Spectrometer (MPS) and a third-generation (170 µm resolution) 2-D video disdrometer (2DVD). To mitigate wind effects, especially for the small drops, both instruments were installed within a 2/3-scale Double Fence Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) enclosure. Two cases involved light-to-moderate wind speeds/gusts while the third case was a tornadic supercell and several squall lines that passed over the site with high wind speeds/gusts. As a proxy for turbulent intensity, maximum wind speeds from 10 m height at the instrumented site recorded every 3 s were differenced with the 5 min average wind speeds and then squared. The fall speeds vs. size from 0.1 to 2 and > 0.7 mm were derived from the MPS and the 2DVD, respectively. Consistency of fall speeds from the two instruments in the overlap region (0.7-2 mm) gave confidence in the data quality and processing methodologies. Our results indicate that under low turbulence, the mean fall speeds agree well with fits to the terminal velocity measured in the laboratory by Gunn and Kinzer from 100 µm up to precipitation sizes. The histograms of fall speeds for 0.5, 0.7, 1 and 1.5 mm sizes were examined in detail under the same conditions. The histogram shapes for the 1 and 1.5 mm sizes were symmetric and in good agreement between the two instruments with no evidence of skewness or of sub- or super-terminal fall speeds. The histograms of the smaller 0.5 and 0.7 mm drops from MPS, while generally symmetric, showed that occasional occurrences of sub- and super-terminal fall speeds could not be ruled out. In the supercell case, the very strong gusts and inferred high turbulence intensity caused a significant broadening of the fall speed distributions with negative skewness (for drops of 1.3, 2 and 3 mm). The

  17. Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of

  18. Multi-Objective Flight Control for Drag Minimization and Load Alleviation of High-Aspect Ratio Flexible Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Chaparro, Daniel; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean

    2017-01-01

    As aircraft wings become much more flexible due to the use of light-weight composites material, adverse aerodynamics at off-design performance can result from changes in wing shapes due to aeroelastic deflections. Increased drag, hence increased fuel burn, is a potential consequence. Without means for aeroelastic compensation, the benefit of weight reduction from the use of light-weight material could be offset by less optimal aerodynamic performance at off-design flight conditions. Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing (PAAW) technology can potentially address these technical challenges for future flexible wing transports. PAAW technology leverages multi-disciplinary solutions to maximize the aerodynamic performance payoff of future adaptive wing design, while addressing simultaneously operational constraints that can prevent the optimal aerodynamic performance from being realized. These operational constraints include reduced flutter margins, increased airframe responses to gust and maneuver loads, pilot handling qualities, and ride qualities. All of these constraints while seeking the optimal aerodynamic performance present themselves as a multi-objective flight control problem. The paper presents a multi-objective flight control approach based on a drag-cognizant optimal control method. A concept of virtual control, which was previously introduced, is implemented to address the pair-wise flap motion constraints imposed by the elastomer material. This method is shown to be able to satisfy the constraints. Real-time drag minimization control is considered to be an important consideration for PAAW technology. Drag minimization control has many technical challenges such as sensing and control. An initial outline of a real-time drag minimization control has already been developed and will be further investigated in the future. A simulation study of a multi-objective flight control for a flight path angle command with aeroelastic mode suppression and drag

  19. MiKlip-PRODEF: Probabilistic Decadal Forecast for Central and Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyers, Mark; Haas, Rabea; Ludwig, Patrick; Pinto, Joaquim

    2013-04-01

    The demand for skilful climate predictions on time-scales of several years to decades has increased in recent years, in particular for economic, societal and political terms. Within the BMBF MiKlip consortium, a decadal prediction system on the global to local scale is currently being developed. The subproject PRODEF is part of the MiKlip-Module C, which aims at the regionalisation of decadal predictability for Central and Western Europe. In PRODEF, a combined statistical-dynamical downscaling (SDD) and a probabilistic forecast tool are developed and applied to the new Earth system model of the Max-Planck Institute Hamburg (MPI-ESM), which is part of the CMIP5 experiment. Focus is given on the decadal predictability of windstorms, related wind gusts as well as wind energy potentials. SDD combines the benefits of both high resolution dynamical downscaling and purely statistical downscaling of GCM output. Hence, the SDD approach is used to obtain a very large ensemble of highly resolved decadal forecasts. With respect to the focal points of PRODEF, a clustering of temporal evolving atmospheric fields, a circulation weather type (CWT) analysis, and a storm damage indices analysis is applied to the full ensemble of the decadal hindcast experiments of the MPI-ESM in its lower resolution (MPI-ESM-LR). The ensemble consists of up to ten realisations per yearly initialised decadal hindcast experiments for the period 1960-2010 (altogether 287 realisations). Representatives of CWTs / clusters and single storm episodes are dynamical downscaled with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM with a horizontal resolution of 0.22°. For each model grid point, the distributions of the local climate parameters (e.g. surface wind gusts) are determined for different periods (e.g. each decades) by recombining dynamical downscaled episodes weighted with the respective weather type frequencies. The applicability of the SDD approach is illustrated with examples of decadal forecasts of the MPI

  20. Modelling derecho dynamics and the direct radiative effect of wildfire smoke upon it with NWP model HARMONIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Velle; Männik, Aarne

    2014-05-01

    Convection permitting numerical weather prediction model HARMONIE was used to simulate the dynamics of the derecho that swept over Eastern Europe on August 8, 2010. The storm moved over Belarus, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Finland and the strongest wind gusts (up to 36.5 m/s) were measured in Estonia. The storm path is recorded on the radar images where characteristic bow echo was observed. The model setup was similar to near-future operational, nearly kilometre-scale environments in European national weather services. Hindcast experiments show the ability of the HARMONIE model to predict the severe convective storm and forecast concurrent strong wind gusts. Wind gusts with very similar intensity to observed ones were simulated by the HARMONIE model and 2.5-km horizontal resolution appears sufficient for reliable forecast of the derecho event. The timing of the modelled storm was in good agreement with the observations. The simulated average storm propagation speed was 25 m/s, similar to the radar observations. Hindcast experiments suggest that more precise warning for the storm could have been issued if the HARMONIE model would have been utilised. The derecho event was accompanied by the remarkable smoke aerosol concentrations (maximum total aerosol optical depth more than 4 at 550 nm) originating from the wildfires from Russia. Smoke plume travelled clockwise around Moscow from August 5 to 9. On August 8, 2010, smoke plume was situated on the Eastern border of Estonia. The derecho occurred on the western side of the smoke plume path. HARMONIE experiments were performed to study the direct radiative effect of wildfire smoke on a severe convective storm. The impact of smoke aerosol on the derecho dynamics was investigated. Reduction in the shortwave radiation flux at the surface resulting from aerosol influence simulated by the HARMONIE model is up to 200 W/m2 in the area with the highest aerosol concentrations. This causes near surface cooling of up to 3 º

  1. A concentrated outbreak of tornadoes, downbursts and microbursts, and implications regarding vortex classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, G. S.; Wakimoto, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    A remarkable case of severe weather occurred near Springfield, Illinois on 6 August 1977. Aerial and ground surveys revealed that 17 cyclonic vortices, an anticyclonic vortex, 10 downbursts and 19 microbursts occurred in a limited (20 km x 40 km) area, associated with a bow-shaped radar echo. About half of the vortices appeared to have occurred along a gust front. Some of the others appear to have occurred within the circulation of a mesocyclone accompanying the bow echo, but these vortices seem to have developed specifically in response to localized boundary-layer vorticity generation associated with horizontal and vertical wind shears on the periphery of microbursts. Some of these vortices, and other destructive vortices in the literature, do not qualify as tornadoes as defined in the Glossary of Meteorology. A more pragmatic definition of a tornado is suggested.

  2. Experimental evaluation of a perspective tunnel display for three-dimensional helicopter approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, A. J.; Robertson, J. B.; Hatfield, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer-generated perspective tunnel display for a steep and strongly curved three-dimensional helicopter approach is studied. The necessary control variables for following a curved trajectory are analyzed, the effectiveness of superimposed predictor symbology is investigated, and a suitable predictor law is formulated. The theoretical considerations are validated by an extensive fixed-base simulator program. The tunnel display with a superimposed predictor symbol is shown to outperform conventional-type displays in its abilities to follow a curved trajectory in the presence of gust disturbances, to enter the trajectory from an unknown position outside this trajectory, as well as to monitor automatic approaches. The feasibility of the tunnel display for operation in actual flight has been demonstrated in an exploratory flight test.

  3. A note on the papers from the winter symposium of the Nordic Summer University held in Akureyri, Iceland, March, 1st-3rd 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Dahl Rendtorff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study group “Towards a New Ethical Imagination. Political and social values in a Cosmopolitan World Society” of the Nordic Summer University had its winter meeting at the University of Akureyri, Iceland, March 1-3, 2013.We discussed different topics in the fields of moral, political, economic, and social philosophy, with the addition of a special theme i.e. ethical, political and legal issues in the Arctic region. It was a very fruitful meeting and we would like to thank the organisers at the University of Akureyri, in particular Águst Thor Árnason, the Icelandic NSU Coordinator, for all the hard work done in Akureyri.

  4. Comprehensive study of endurance for IAR-99 Hawk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin LOZICI-BRINZEI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some methods of on-ground and in-flight calibration for strain gauges, intended to the development of complex programs which analyze the endurance phenomena for aerospace structures, with direct application to the IAR-99 Hawk. The strain gauges have the advantage of being sensitive to load and therefore to aerodynamic phenomena, thereby providing indications of the loads supported by the structure. The effects size of loads type phenomena caused by wind gusts or buffet can be measured only by strain gauges or accelerometres70 and they cannot be recorded by flight or fatigue parameters counters. The installation of a strain gauge is made using a pattern (its position and orientation are crucial and the strain gauge selected for installation should not be fragile or unstable. Routines should be established for periodic inspection of strain gauges and those which are defective should be replaced immediately.

  5. Data Mining of NASA Boeing 737 Flight Data: Frequency Analysis of In-Flight Recorded Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Ansel J.

    2001-01-01

    Data recorded during flights of the NASA Trailblazer Boeing 737 have been analyzed to ascertain the presence of aircraft structural responses from various excitations such as the engine, aerodynamic effects, wind gusts, and control system operations. The NASA Trailblazer Boeing 737 was chosen as a focus of the study because of a large quantity of its flight data records. The goal of this study was to determine if any aircraft structural characteristics could be identified from flight data collected for measuring non-structural phenomena. A number of such data were examined for spatial and frequency correlation as a means of discovering hidden knowledge of the dynamic behavior of the aircraft. Data recorded from on-board dynamic sensors over a range of flight conditions showed consistently appearing frequencies. Those frequencies were attributed to aircraft structural vibrations.

  6. Approach for Structurally Clearing an Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flap for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric J.; Lokos, William A.; Cruz, Josue; Crampton, Glen; Stephens, Craig A.; Kota, Sridhar; Ervin, Gregory; Flick, Pete

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) flap was flown on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Gulfstream GIII testbed at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. This smoothly curving flap replaced the existing Fowler flaps creating a seamless control surface. This compliant structure, developed by FlexSys Inc. in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory, supported NASA objectives for airframe structural noise reduction, aerodynamic efficiency, and wing weight reduction through gust load alleviation. A thorough structures airworthiness approach was developed to move this project safely to flight. A combination of industry and NASA standard practice require various structural analyses, ground testing, and health monitoring techniques for showing an airworthy structure. This paper provides an overview of compliant structures design, the structural ground testing leading up to flight, and the flight envelope expansion and monitoring strategy. Flight data will be presented, and lessons learned along the way will be highlighted.

  7. Study on Typhoon Characteristic Based on Bridge Health Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the wind velocity and direction monitoring system installed on Jiubao Bridge of Qiantang River, Hangzhou city, Zhejiang province, China, a full range of wind velocity and direction data was collected during typhoon HAIKUI in 2012. Based on these data, it was found that, at higher observed elevation, turbulence intensity is lower, and the variation tendency of longitudinal and lateral turbulence intensities with mean wind speeds is basically the same. Gust factor goes higher with increasing mean wind speed, and the change rate obviously decreases as wind speed goes down and an inconspicuous increase occurs when wind speed is high. The change of peak factor is inconspicuous with increasing time and mean wind speed. The probability density function (PDF of fluctuating wind speed follows Gaussian distribution. Turbulence integral scale increases with mean wind speed, and its PDF does not follow Gaussian distribution. The power spectrum of observation fluctuating velocity is in accordance with Von Karman spectrum.

  8. Application of the concept of dynamic trim control to automatic landing of carrier aircraft. [utilizing digital feedforeward control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. A.; Meyer, G.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a simulation study of an alternative design concept for an automatic landing control system are presented. The alternative design concept for an automatic landing control system is described. The design concept is the total aircraft flight control system (TAFCOS). TAFCOS is an open loop, feed forward system that commands the proper instantaneous thrust, angle of attack, and roll angle to achieve the forces required to follow the desired trajector. These dynamic trim conditions are determined by an inversion of the aircraft nonlinear force characteristics. The concept was applied to an A-7E aircraft approaching an aircraft carrier. The implementation details with an airborne digital computer are discussed. The automatic carrier landing situation is described. The simulation results are presented for a carrier approach with atmospheric disturbances, an approach with no disturbances, and for tailwind and headwind gusts.

  9. Probabilistic maximum-value wind prediction for offshore environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staid, Andrea; Pinson, Pierre; Guikema, Seth D.

    2015-01-01

    statistical models to predict the full distribution of the maximum-value wind speeds in a 3 h interval. We take a detailed look at the performance of linear models, generalized additive models and multivariate adaptive regression splines models using meteorological covariates such as gust speed, wind speed......, convective available potential energy, Charnock, mean sea-level pressure and temperature, as given by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts forecasts. The models are trained to predict the mean value of maximum wind speed, and the residuals from training the models are used to develop...... the full probabilistic distribution of maximum wind speed. Knowledge of the maximum wind speed for an offshore location within a given period can inform decision-making regarding turbine operations, planned maintenance operations and power grid scheduling in order to improve safety and reliability...

  10. Simulating the dynamic behavior of a vertical axis wind turbine operating in unsteady conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.; Soraperra, G.; Raciti Castelli, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims at assessing the reliability of a simulation tool capable of computing the unsteady rotational motion and the associated tower oscillations of a variable speed VAWT immersed in a coherent turbulent wind. As a matter of fact, since the dynamic behaviour of a variable speed turbine strongly depends on unsteady wind conditions (wind gusts), a steady state approach can't accurately catch transient correlated issues. The simulation platform proposed here is implemented using a lumped mass approach: the drive train is described by resorting to both the polar inertia and the angular position of rotating parts, also considering their speed and acceleration, while rotor aerodynamic is based on steady experimental curves. The ultimate objective of the presented numerical platform is the simulation of transient phenomena, driven by turbulence, occurring during rotor operation, with the aim of supporting the implementation of efficient and robust control algorithms.

  11. Fault Tolerant Flight Control Using Sliding Modes and Subspace Identification-Based Predictive Control

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Bilal A.; El-Ferik, Sami; Abdelkader, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a cascade structure of a time-scale separated integral sliding mode and model predictive control is proposed as a viable alternative for fault-tolerant control. A multi-variable sliding mode control law is designed as the inner loop of the flight control system. Subspace identification is carried out on the aircraft in closed loop. The identified plant is then used for model predictive controllers in the outer loop. The overall control law demonstrates improved robustness to measurement noise, modeling uncertainties, multiple faults and severe wind turbulence and gusts. In addition, the flight control system employs filters and dead-zone nonlinear elements to reduce chattering and improve handling quality. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed controller using conventional fighter aircraft without control redundancy.

  12. 2D numerical comparison of trailing edge flaps - UpWind WP1B3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.; Andersen, Peter B. (Risoe National Lab., DTU (DK)); Barlas, T.K. (DUWIND, Delft Technical Univ. (NL))

    2007-11-15

    This report covers the investigations and comparisons of trailing edge flaps carried out by Delft and Risoe. The work is a part of the W1B3 work package of the UpWind EU-project. This report covers only 2D test cases with simple control of the trailing edge flap with the objective of keeping CL constant. The 5MW UpWind reference turbine is used for the calculations. The section in 75% radius is investigated for three different cases; (1) a wind step from 10m/s to 11m/s, (2) a wind 'gust' from 10 m/s to 14m/s in 1 second and followed by 10m/s, (3) finally a turbulent wind series is simulated, and the performance of the flaps is investigated. The two different codes from Delft and Risoe are compared in the mentioned cases. (au)

  13. Bond graph modeling and LQG/LTR controller design of magnetically levitation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Shik; Park, Jeon Soo [Busan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-09-01

    A logical and systematic procedure to derive a mathematical model for magnetically levitation (MAGLEV) systems with a combined lift and guidance is developed by using bond graph modeling techniques. First, bond graph is contructed for the 1{sup st}-dimensional MAGLEV system in which three subsystems (energy feeding, track and vehicle) are considered. And, the 2{sup nd}-dimensional MAGLEV system in which lift and guidance dynamics are coupled is modeled by using the concept of multi-port field in bond graph languages. Finally, the LQG/LTR control system is designed for a multivariable MAGLEV system with stagger configuration type. In this paper, it has been shown that the bond graph is an excellent effective method for modeling multi-energy domain systems such as MAGLEV systems with uncertainties such as mass variations, track irregularities and wind gusts. (Author).

  14. Lewis Research Center studies of multiple large wind turbine generators on a utility network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, L. J.; Triezenberg, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-Lewis program to study the anticipated performance of a wind turbine generator farm on an electric utility network is surveyed. The paper describes the approach of the Lewis Wind Energy Project Office to developing analysis capabilities in the area of wind turbine generator-utility network computer simulations. Attention is given to areas such as, the Lewis Purdue hybrid simulation, an independent stability study, DOE multiunit plant study, and the WEST simulator. Also covered are the Lewis mod-2 simulation including analog simulation of a two wind turbine system and comparison with Boeing simulation results, and gust response of a two machine model. Finally future work to be done is noted and it is concluded that the study shows little interaction between the generators and between the generators and the bus.

  15. Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Ma, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long slim body aircraft with pronounced aero-servo-elastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics; leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics as well as the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

  16. Bond graph modeling and LQG/LTR controller design of magnetically levitation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Shik; Park, Jeon Soo

    1991-01-01

    A logical and systematic procedure to derive a mathematical model for magnetically levitation (MAGLEV) systems with a combined lift and guidance is developed by using bond graph modeling techniques. First, bond graph is contructed for the 1 st -dimensional MAGLEV system in which three subsystems (energy feeding, track and vehicle) are considered. And, the 2 nd -dimensional MAGLEV system in which lift and guidance dynamics are coupled is modeled by using the concept of multi-port field in bond graph languages. Finally, the LQG/LTR control system is designed for a multivariable MAGLEV system with stagger configuration type. In this paper, it has been shown that the bond graph is an excellent effective method for modeling multi-energy domain systems such as MAGLEV systems with uncertainties such as mass variations, track irregularities and wind gusts. (Author)

  17. Robust output feedback cruise control for high-speed train movement with uncertain parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shu-Kai; Yang Li-Xing; Li Ke-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the robust output feedback cruise control for high-speed train movement with uncertain parameters is investigated. The dynamic of a high-speed train is modeled by a cascade of cars connected by flexible couplers, which is subject to rolling mechanical resistance, aerodynamic drag and wind gust. Based on Lyapunov’s stability theory, the sufficient condition for the existence of the robust output feedback cruise control law is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), under which the high-speed train tracks the desired speed, the relative spring displacement between the two neighboring cars is stable at the equilibrium state, and meanwhile a small prescribed H ∞ disturbance attenuation level is guaranteed. One numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. (paper)

  18. Simulation for Grid Connected Wind Turbines with Fluctuating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ying; Fu, Yang; Wei, Shurong

    This paper establishes the whole dynamic model of wind turbine generator system which contains the wind speed model and DFIG wind turbines model .A simulation sample based on the mathematical models is built by using MATLAB in this paper. Research are did on the performance characteristics of doubly-fed wind generators (DFIG) which connected to power grid with three-phase ground fault and the disturbance by gust and mixed wind. The capacity of the wind farm is 9MW which consists of doubly-fed wind generators (DFIG). Simulation results demonstrate that the three-phase ground fault occurs on grid side runs less affected on the stability of doubly-fed wind generators. However, as a power source, fluctuations of the wind speed will run a large impact on stability of double-fed wind generators. The results also show that if the two disturbances occur in the meantime, the situation will be very serious.

  19. Effectiveness of basic display augmentation in vehicular control by visual field cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, A. J.; Merhav, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of different basic display augmentation concepts - fixed reticle, velocity vector, and predicted future vehicle path - for RPVs controlled by a vehicle-mounted TV camera. The task is lateral manual control of a low flying RPV along a straight reference line in the presence of random side gusts. The man-machine system and the visual interface are modeled as a linear time-invariant system. Minimization of a quadratic performance criterion is assumed to underlie the control strategy of a well-trained human operator. The solution for the optimal feedback matrix enables the explicit computation of the variances of lateral deviation and directional error of the vehicle and of the control force that are used as performance measures.

  20. Design Challenges Encountered in a Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft Flight Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Trindel; Burken, John; Burcham, Frank; Schaefer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center conducted flight tests of a propulsion-controlled aircraft system on an F-15 airplane. This system was designed to explore the feasibility of providing safe emergency landing capability using only the engines to provide flight control in the event of a catastrophic loss of conventional flight controls. Control laws were designed to control the flightpath and bank angle using only commands to the throttles. Although the program was highly successful, this paper highlights some of the challenges associated with using engine thrust as a control effector. These challenges include slow engine response time, poorly modeled nonlinear engine dynamics, unmodeled inlet-airframe interactions, and difficulties with ground effect and gust rejection. Flight and simulation data illustrate these difficulties.

  1. Influence of wind on aerodynamic drag for the second case of the arrangement of the equipment on the LE 060EA locomotive bodywork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin ARSENE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The electric power supply equipment of electric railways vehicles of surface is placed on the their body. The arrangement of the equipment on the vehicle body determines the variation of the aerodynamic drag. The gusts of wind occurring during the vehicle movement result in additional requests. The case of the locomotive of type LE 060 EA 5100kW moving with the second driving position is analyzed in this paper. For this particular case the components ensemble of the power supply system was geometric modelled in 3D format at 1:1 scale. The resulted model was placed in air flow simulation software to determine the aerodynamic resistance. The wind influence is analyzed for five point values of its speed. The wind direction is simulated by eight point values of the angle that it makes to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle.

  2. Closing Symposium of the German Research Initiative ComFliTe

    CERN Document Server

    Radespiel, Rolf; Burg, Jan; Sørensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    This book reports on the German research initiative ComFliTe (Computational Flight Testing), the main goal of which was to enhance the capabilities of and tools for numerical simulation in flight physics to support future aircraft design and development. The initiative was coordinated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and promoted collaboration between the aircraft industry and academia. Activities focused on improving physical modeling for separated flows, developing advanced numerical algorithms for series computations and sensitivity predictions, as well as surrogate and reduced order modeling for aero data production and developing robust fluid-, structure- and flight mechanics coupling procedures. Further topics included more efficient handling of aircraft control surfaces and improving simulation methods for maneuvers, such as gust encounter. The important results of this three-year initiative were presented during the ComFliTe closing symposium, which took place at the DLR in Braunschweig, Germany, ...

  3. Multivariate max-stable spatial processes

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.; Padoan, S. A.; Sang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Max-stable processes allow the spatial dependence of extremes to be modelled and quantified, so they are widely adopted in applications. For a better understanding of extremes, it may be useful to study several variables simultaneously. To this end, we study the maxima of independent replicates of multivariate processes, both in the Gaussian and Student-t cases. We define a Poisson process construction and introduce multivariate versions of the Smith Gaussian extreme-value, the Schlather extremal-Gaussian and extremal-t, and the Brown–Resnick models. We develop inference for the models based on composite likelihoods. We present results of Monte Carlo simulations and an application to daily maximum wind speed and wind gust.

  4. The genus Rubus (Rosaceae in South Africa. IV. Natural hybridiza­ tion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Spies

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available The genus  Rubus L. is represented in southern Africa by the subgenera  Eubatus Focke and  Idaeobatus Focke. A combination o f morphological data, data on the reproductive systems of some collections and meiotic chromosome behaviour indicates that a hybrid swarm in the eastern Transvaal was formed subsequent to the hybridization between R. cuneifolius Pursh. taxon B (subgenus Eubatus and R. longepedicellatus (C. E. Gust. C. H. Stirton (subgenus Idaeobatus. Other examples of intra- and intersubgeneric hybridization were found during this study of the South African material. These instances, with examples found in the literature, indicate that the subgeneric subdivisions of Rubus are artificial. Three different methods were used to analyse the meiotic chromosome configurations. The genome relationship system of Alonso & Kimber (1981 and Kimber & Alonso (1981 and the modification of the binomial system of Jackson & Casey (1980 by Spies (1984 proved to be the most sensitive for distinguishing between alio-, segmental alio- and autoploids.

  5. Skin-Spar Failure Detection of a Composite Winglet Using FBG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciminello Monica

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Winglets are introduced into modern aircraft to reduce wing aerodynamic drag and to consequently optimize the fuel burn per mission. In order to be aerodynamically effective, these devices are installed at the wing tip section; this wing region is generally characterized by relevant oscillations induced by flights maneuvers and gust. The present work is focused on the validation of a continuous monitoring system based on fiber Bragg grating sensors and frequency domain analysis to detect physical condition of a skin-spar bonding failure in a composite winglet for in-service purposes. Optical fibers are used as deformation sensors. Short Time Fast Fourier Transform (STFT analysis is applied to analyze the occurrence of structural response deviations on the base of strain data. Obtained results showed high accuracy in estimating static and dynamic deformations and great potentials in detecting structural failure occurrences.

  6. Automatic Flight Control System Design of Level Change Mode for a Large Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun Gong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The level change mode is an essential part of large civil aircraft automatic flight control systems. In cruise, with the decrease of the plane's weight caused by fuel consumption and the influence of bad weather, such as thunderstorms, the level change mode is required to solve this problem. This work establishes a nonlinear model of large aircraft, takes level changed from 9500m to 10100m as an example to design control laws for the level change mode in cruise. The classical engineering method is used to design longitudinal and lateral control laws synthetically. The flight qualities are considered in the design process. Simulation results indicate the control laws can meet design requirements and have a good anti-gust performance.

  7. Time series analysis of wind speed using VAR and the generalized impulse response technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Bradley T. [Area of Information Systems and Quantitative Sciences, Rawls College of Business and Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2101 (United States); Kruse, Jamie Brown [Center for Natural Hazard Research, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Schroeder, John L. [Department of Geosciences and Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States); Smith, Douglas A. [Department of Civil Engineering and Wind Science and Engineering Research Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2007-03-15

    This research examines the interdependence in time series wind speed data measured in the same location at four different heights. A multiple-equation system known as a vector autoregression is proposed for characterizing the time series dynamics of wind. Additionally, the recently developed method of generalized impulse response analysis provides insight into the cross-effects of the wind series and their responses to shocks. Findings are based on analysis of contemporaneous wind speed time histories taken at 13, 33, 70 and 160 ft above ground level with a sampling rate of 10 Hz. The results indicate that wind speeds measured at 70 ft was the most variable. Further, the turbulence persisted longer at the 70-ft measurement than at the other heights. The greatest interdependence is observed at 13 ft. Gusts at 160 ft led to the greatest persistence to an 'own' shock and led to greatest persistence in the responses of the other wind series. (author)

  8. A comparative study of behaviors of ventilated supercavities between experimental models with different mounting configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E A; Kawakami, Ellison

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale water tunnel experiments of the phenomenon of supercavitation can be carried out broadly using two different kinds of experimental models–in the first model (forward facing model, or FFM), the incoming flow first interacts with the cavitator at front, which is connected to the strut through a ventilation pipe. The second model could have the strut and the ventilation pipe preceding the cavitator (backward facing model, or BFM). This is the continuation of a water tunnel study of the effects of unsteady flows on axisymmetric supercavities. In this study, the unwanted effect of test model configuration on supercavity shape in periodic flows was explored through a comparison of FFM and BFM models. In our experiments, it was found that periodic gust flows have only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter and the cavity length can be shortened above a certain vertical velocity of periodic flows. These findings appear to be robust regardless of the model configuration. (paper)

  9. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  10. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  11. Fundamental limitations on V/STOL terminal guidance due to aircraft characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkovitch, J.; Lamont, C. W.; Lochtie, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    A review is given of limitations on approach flight paths of V/STOL aircraft, including limits on descent angle due to maximum drag/lift ratio. A method of calculating maximum drag/lift ratio of tilt-wing and deflected slipstream aircraft is presented. Derivatives and transfer functions for the CL-84 tilt-wing and X-22A tilt-duct aircraft are presented. For the unaugmented CL-84 in steep descents the transfer function relating descent angle to thrust contains a right-half plane zero. Using optimal control theory, it is shown that this zero causes a serious degradation in the accuracy with which steep flight paths can be followed in the presence of gusts.

  12. Early warnings of extreme winds using the ECMWF Extreme Forecast Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petroliagis, Thomas I.; Pinson, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European FP7 SafeWind Project aims at developing research towards a European vision of wind power forecasting, which requires advanced meteorological support concerning extreme wind events. This study is focused mainly on early warnings of extreme winds in the early medium-range. Three synoptic...... regimes. Overall, it becomes clear that the first indications of an extreme wind event might come from the ECMWF deterministic and/or probabilistic components capturing very intense weather systems (possible windstorms) in the medium term. For early warnings, all available EPS Extreme Forecast Index (EFI......) formulations were used, by linking daily maximum wind speeds to EFI values for different forecast horizons. From all possible EFI schemes deployed for issuing early warnings, the highest skill was found for the Gust Factor formulation (EFI-10FGI). Using EFI-10FGI, the corresponding 99% threshold could provide...

  13. Ten-Year Climatology of Summertime Diurnal Rainfall Rate Over the Conterminous U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Mocko, David; Lee, Myong-In; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Suarez, Max J.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.

    2010-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of summertime rainfall rates are examined over the conterminous United States, using radar-gauge assimilated hourly rainfall data. As in earlier studies, rainfall diurnal composites show a well-defined region of rainfall propagation over the Great Plains and an afternoon maximum area over the south and eastern portion of the United States. Zonal phase speeds of rainfall in three different small domains are estimated, and rainfall propagation speeds are compared with background zonal wind speeds. Unique rainfall propagation speeds in three different regions can be explained by the evolution of latent-heat theory linked to the convective available potential energy, than by gust-front induced or gravity wave propagation mechanisms.

  14. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, A.; Blaylock, M.; van Dam, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust.

  15. Characterisation and classification of RISOe P2546 cup anemometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friis Pedersen, T.

    2003-04-01

    The characteristics of the RISOe P2546 cup anemometer were investigated in detail by wind tunnel and laboratory tests. The characteristics include accredited calibration, tilt response measurements for tilt angles between -40 degC to 40 degC, gust response measurements at 8m/s and turbulence intensities of 10%, 16% and 23%, step response measurements at step wind speeds 3,7, 8, 11,9 and 15,2m/s, measurement of torque characteristics at 8m/s, rotor inertia measurements and measurements of friction of bearings at temperatures -20 degC to 40 degC. Characteristics were fitted to a time domain cup anemometer model. The characteristics were transformed into the CLASSCUP classification scheme, and were related to the cup anemometer requirements in the Danish certification system and in the IEC 61400-121 Committee Draft. (au)

  16. A program for calculating load coefficient matrices utilizing the force summation method, L218 (LOADS). Volume 1: Engineering and usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. D.; Anderson, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    The LOADS program L218, a digital computer program that calculates dynamic load coefficient matrices utilizing the force summation method, is described. The load equations are derived for a flight vehicle in straight and level flight and excited by gusts and/or control motions. In addition, sensor equations are calculated for use with an active control system. The load coefficient matrices are calculated for the following types of loads: translational and rotational accelerations, velocities, and displacements; panel aerodynamic forces; net panel forces; shears and moments. Program usage and a brief description of the analysis used are presented. A description of the design and structure of the program to aid those who will maintain and/or modify the program in the future is included.

  17. Structural optimization procedure of a composite wind turbine blade for reducing both material cost and blade weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weifei; Park, Dohyun; Choi, DongHoon

    2013-12-01

    A composite blade structure for a 2 MW horizontal axis wind turbine is optimally designed. Design requirements are simultaneously minimizing material cost and blade weight while satisfying the constraints on stress ratio, tip deflection, fatigue life and laminate layup requirements. The stress ratio and tip deflection under extreme gust loads and the fatigue life under a stochastic normal wind load are evaluated. A blade element wind load model is proposed to explain the wind pressure difference due to blade height change during rotor rotation. For fatigue life evaluation, the stress result of an implicit nonlinear dynamic analysis under a time-varying fluctuating wind is converted to the histograms of mean and amplitude of maximum stress ratio using the rainflow counting algorithm Miner's rule is employed to predict the fatigue life. After integrating and automating the whole analysis procedure an evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the discrete optimization problem.

  18. Superstorm Sweeps Over England

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A large, low-pressure system swept across the United Kingdom on Monday, spawning at least three tornadoes there before continuing on toward Scandanavia. This image, acquired on October 30, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), shows the storm after it brought torrential rain and hurricane-strength winds to Britain in perhaps the worst storm to hit the country since 1987. High seas nearing 23 feet (7 meters) and winds gusting up to 109 mph wreaked havoc on sea traffic, causing delays or cancelled ferries across the English Channel and necessitating the rescue of crews from stranded ships, including a Norwegian freighter and an Italian cargo ship. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  19. Characterisation and classification of RISØ P2546 cup anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of the RISØ P2546 cup anemometer were investigated in detail by wind tunnel and laboratory tests. The characteristics include accredited calibration, tilt response measurements for tilt angles between -40° to 40°, gust responsemeasurements at 8m/s and turbulence intensities...... of 10%, 16% and 23%, step response measurements at step wind speeds 3,7, 8, 11,9 and 15,2m/s, measurement of torque characteristics at 8m/s, rotor inertia measurements and measurements of friction ofbearings at temperatures -20°C to 40°C. Characteristics were fitted to a time domain cup anemometer model....... The characteristics were transformed into the CLASSCUP classification scheme, and were related to the cup anemometer requirements in the Danishcertification system and in the IEC 61400-121 Committee Draft....

  20. Characterisation and classification of RISØ P2546 cup anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of the RISØ P2546 cup anemometer were investigated in detail by wind tunnel and laboratory tests. The characteristics include accredited calibration, tilt response measurements for tilt angles between -40° to 40°, gust responsemeasurements at 8m/s and turbulence intensities...... of 10%, 16% and 23%, step response measurements at step wind speeds 3,7, 8, 11,9 and 15,2m/s, measurement of torque characteristics at 8m/s, rotor inertia measurements and measurements of friction ofbearings at temperatures -20°C to 40°C. Characteristics were fitted to a time domain cup anemometer model....... The characteristics were transformed into the CLASSCUP classification scheme, and were related to the cup anemometer requirements in the Danishcertification system and in the IEC 61400-121 Committee Draft....

  1. Dynamic subgrid scale model of large eddy simulation of cross bundle flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Barsamian, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid scale closure model of Germano et. al (1991) is used in the large eddy simulation code GUST for incompressible isothermal flows. Tube bundle geometries of staggered and non-staggered arrays are considered in deep bundle simulations. The advantage of the dynamic subgrid scale model is the exclusion of an input model coefficient. The model coefficient is evaluated dynamically for each nodal location in the flow domain. Dynamic subgrid scale results are obtained in the form of power spectral densities and flow visualization of turbulent characteristics. Comparisons are performed among the dynamic subgrid scale model, the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model (that is used as the base model for the dynamic subgrid scale model) and available experimental data. Spectral results of the dynamic subgrid scale model correlate better with experimental data. Satisfactory turbulence characteristics are observed through flow visualization

  2. Nonlinear flight dynamics and stability of hovering model insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Current analyses on insect dynamic flight stability are based on linear theory and limited to small disturbance motions. However, insects' aerial environment is filled with swirling eddies and wind gusts, and large disturbances are common. Here, we numerically solve the equations of motion coupled with the Navier–Stokes equations to simulate the large disturbance motions and analyse the nonlinear flight dynamics of hovering model insects. We consider two representative model insects, a model hawkmoth (large size, low wingbeat frequency) and a model dronefly (small size, high wingbeat frequency). For small and large initial disturbances, the disturbance motion grows with time, and the insects tumble and never return to the equilibrium state; the hovering flight is inherently (passively) unstable. The instability is caused by a pitch moment produced by forward/backward motion and/or a roll moment produced by side motion of the insect. PMID:23697714

  3. Fault Tolerant Flight Control Using Sliding Modes and Subspace Identification-Based Predictive Control

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Bilal A.

    2016-07-26

    In this work, a cascade structure of a time-scale separated integral sliding mode and model predictive control is proposed as a viable alternative for fault-tolerant control. A multi-variable sliding mode control law is designed as the inner loop of the flight control system. Subspace identification is carried out on the aircraft in closed loop. The identified plant is then used for model predictive controllers in the outer loop. The overall control law demonstrates improved robustness to measurement noise, modeling uncertainties, multiple faults and severe wind turbulence and gusts. In addition, the flight control system employs filters and dead-zone nonlinear elements to reduce chattering and improve handling quality. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed controller using conventional fighter aircraft without control redundancy.

  4. Multivariate max-stable spatial processes

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2015-02-11

    Max-stable processes allow the spatial dependence of extremes to be modelled and quantified, so they are widely adopted in applications. For a better understanding of extremes, it may be useful to study several variables simultaneously. To this end, we study the maxima of independent replicates of multivariate processes, both in the Gaussian and Student-t cases. We define a Poisson process construction and introduce multivariate versions of the Smith Gaussian extreme-value, the Schlather extremal-Gaussian and extremal-t, and the Brown–Resnick models. We develop inference for the models based on composite likelihoods. We present results of Monte Carlo simulations and an application to daily maximum wind speed and wind gust.

  5. Study on optimal design of wind turbine blade airfoil and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Min Young; Kim, Dong Yong; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out with two goals. One was the development of a model of a wind turbine blade airfoil and the other was the application of the folding blade. In general, in large sized (MW) wind turbines, damage is prevented in small wind turbines since equipment costs and maintenance costs are high, and therefore, the blade will cause serious damage. The wind turbine proposed in this study does not require maintenance, and the blades do not break during high winds because they are folded in accordance with changes in the wind speed. But generators are not cut out, while maintaining a constant angle will continue to produce. The focus of this study, the wind turbine is continued by folding blade system in strong winds and gusts without stopping production

  6. Sensitivity study of surface wind flow of a limited area model simulating the extratropical storm Delta affecting the Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Marrero

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In November 2005 an extratropical storm named Delta affected the Canary Islands (Spain. The high sustained wind and intense gusts experienced caused significant damage. A numerical sensitivity study of Delta was conducted using the Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW. A total of 27 simulations were performed. Non-hydrostatic and hydrostatic experiments were designed taking into account physical parameterizations and geometrical factors (size and position of the outer domain, definition or not of nested grids, horizontal resolution and number of vertical levels. The Factor Separation Method was applied in order to identify the major model sensitivity parameters under this unusual meteorological situation. Results associated to percentage changes relatives to a control run simulation demonstrated that boundary layer and surface layer schemes, horizontal resolutions, hydrostaticity option and nesting grid activation were the model configuration parameters with the greatest impact on the 48 h maximum 10 m horizontal wind speed solution.

  7. Ventilation of multi-entranced rodent burrows by boundary layer eddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickner-Braun, Inbal; Zucker-Milwerger, Daniel; Braun, Avi; Turner, J Scott; Pinshow, Berry; Berliner, Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Rodent burrows are often assumed to be environments wherein the air has a high concentration of CO₂. Although high burrow [CO₂] has been recorded, many studies report burrow [CO₂] that differs only slightly from atmospheric concentrations. Here, we advocate that one of the reasons for these differences is the penetration into burrows of air gusts (eddies), which originate in the turbulent boundary layer and prevent build-up of CO₂. We have characterized the means by which burrows of Sundevall's jird, which are representative of the burrows of many rodent species with more than one entrance, are ventilated. Our results demonstrate that, even at low wind speeds, the random penetration of eddies into a burrow through its openings is sufficient to keep the burrow [CO₂] low enough to be physiologically inconsequential, even in its deep and remote parts. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Lidar observations of marine boundary-layer winds and heights: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    the highest data availability (among the three sites) and a very good agreement with the observations of wind speed and direction from cup anemometers and vanes from the platform's tower. The wind lidar was also able to perform measurements under a winter storm where 10-s gusts were observed above 60 m s 1......Here we describe a nearly 1-yr meteorological campaign, which was carried out at the FINO3 marine research platform on the German North Sea, where a pulsed wind lidar and a ceilometer were installed besides the platform's 105-m tower and measured winds and the aerosol backscatter in the entire...... marine atmospheric boundary layer. The campaign was the last phase of a research project, in which the vertical wind profile in the atmospheric boundary layer was firstly investigated on a coastal and a semi-urban site. At FINO3 the wind lidar, which measures the wind speed up to 2000 m, shows...

  9. A comparative study of behaviors of ventilated supercavities between experimental models with different mounting configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E A [Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota (United States); Kawakami, Ellison, E-mail: hul94@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: ekawakami@mmm.com, E-mail: karn@umn.edu, E-mail: arndt001@umn.edu [3M Corporate Research Process Laboratory (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Small-scale water tunnel experiments of the phenomenon of supercavitation can be carried out broadly using two different kinds of experimental models–in the first model (forward facing model, or FFM), the incoming flow first interacts with the cavitator at front, which is connected to the strut through a ventilation pipe. The second model could have the strut and the ventilation pipe preceding the cavitator (backward facing model, or BFM). This is the continuation of a water tunnel study of the effects of unsteady flows on axisymmetric supercavities. In this study, the unwanted effect of test model configuration on supercavity shape in periodic flows was explored through a comparison of FFM and BFM models. In our experiments, it was found that periodic gust flows have only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter and the cavity length can be shortened above a certain vertical velocity of periodic flows. These findings appear to be robust regardless of the model configuration. (paper)

  10. Rates and causes of accidents for general aviation aircraft operating in a mountainous and high elevation terrain environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Marisa; Stolzer, Alan; Boyd, Douglas D

    2017-10-01

    Flying over mountainous and/or high elevation terrain is challenging due to rapidly changeable visibility, gusty/rotor winds and downdrafts and the necessity of terrain avoidance. Herein, general aviation accident rates and mishap cause/factors were determined (2001-2014) for a geographical region characterized by such terrain. Accidents in single piston engine-powered aircraft for states west of the US continental divide characterized by mountainous terrain and/or high elevation (MEHET) were identified from the NTSB database. MEHET-related-mishaps were defined as satisfying any one, or more, criteria (controlled flight into terrain/obstacles (CFIT), downdrafts, mountain obscuration, wind-shear, gusting winds, whiteout, instrument meteorological conditions; density altitude, dust-devil) cited as factors/causal in the NTSB report. Statistics employed Poisson distribution and contingency tables. Although the MEHET-related accident rate declined (pairplanes and flying under IFR to assure terrain clearance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Active In-Flight Load Redistribution Utilizing Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing and Multiple Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Francisco; Martins, Benjamin L.; Richards, W. Lance

    2018-01-01

    Morphing wing technologies have gained research interest in recent years as technological advancements pave the way for such innovations. A key benefit of such a morphing wing concept is the ability of the wing to transition into an optimal configuration at multiple flight conditions. Such a morphing wing will have applications not only in drag reduction but also in flutter suppression and gust alleviation. By manipulating the wing geometry to match a given flight profile it is likely that the wing will yield increases in not just aerodynamic efficiency but also structural efficiency. These structurally efficient designs will likely rely on some type of structural sensing system which will ensure the wing maintains positive margins throughout its flight profile.

  12. Controlled Wake of a Moving Axisymmetric Bluff Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2017-11-01

    The aerodynamic loads exerted on a wire-mounted axisymmetric bluff body in prescribed rigid motion are controlled by fluidic manipulation of its near wake. The body is supported by a six-degree of freedom eight-wire traverse and its motion is controlled using a dedicated servo actuator and inline load cell for each wire. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces and moments on the moving body are manipulated by controlled interactions of an azimuthal array of integrated synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow to induce localized flow attachment over the body's aft end and thereby alter the symmetry of the wake. The coupled interactions between the wake structure and the effected aerodynamic loads during prescribed time-periodic and transitory (gust like) motions are investigated with emphasis on enhancing or diminishing the loads for maneuver control, and decoupling the body's motion from its far wake.

  13. Wind Power Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Landberg, Lars

    Wind power meteorology has evolved as an applied science, firmly founded on boundary-layer meteorology, but with strong links to climatology and geography. It concerns itself with three main areas: siting of wind turbines, regional wind resource assessment, and short-term prediction of the wind...... resource. The history, status and perspectives of wind power meteorology are presented, with emphasis on physical considerations and on its practical application. Following a global view of the wind resource, the elements of boundary layer meteorology which are most important for wind energy are reviewed......: wind profiles and shear, turbulence and gust, and extreme winds. The data used in wind power meteorology stem mainly from three sources: onsite wind measurements, the synoptic networks, and the re-analysis projects. Wind climate analysis, wind resource estimation and siting further require a detailed...

  14. A Fault Tolerant Direct Control Allocation Scheme with Integral Sliding Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamayun Mirza Tariq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, integral sliding mode control ideas are combined with direct control allocation in order to create a fault tolerant control scheme. Traditional integral sliding mode control can directly handle actuator faults; however, it cannot do so with actuator failures. Therefore, a mechanism needs to be adopted to distribute the control effort amongst the remaining functioning actuators in cases of faults or failures, so that an acceptable level of closed-loop performance can be retained. This paper considers the possibility of introducing fault tolerance even if fault or failure information is not provided to the control strategy. To demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme, a high fidelity nonlinear model of a large civil aircraft is considered in the simulations in the presence of wind, gusts and sensor noise.

  15. Synthetic Jet Actuator-Based Aircraft Tracking Using a Continuous Robust Nonlinear Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramos-Pedroza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust nonlinear control law that achieves trajectory tracking control for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs equipped with synthetic jet actuators (SJAs is presented in this paper. A key challenge in the control design is that the dynamic characteristics of SJAs are nonlinear and contain parametric uncertainty. The challenge resulting from the uncertain SJA actuator parameters is mitigated via innovative algebraic manipulation in the tracking error system derivation along with a robust nonlinear control law employing constant SJA parameter estimates. A key contribution of the paper is a rigorous analysis of the range of SJA actuator parameter uncertainty within which asymptotic UAV trajectory tracking can be achieved. A rigorous stability analysis is carried out to prove semiglobal asymptotic trajectory tracking. Detailed simulation results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control law in the presence of wind gusts and varying levels of SJA actuator parameter uncertainty.

  16. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, Cameron [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Capps, Scott [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  17. Combustion Properties of Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Oils: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R. Shaddix; D. R. Hardesty

    1999-04-01

    Thermochemical pyrolysis of solid biomass feedstocks, with subsequent condensation of the pyrolysis vapors, has been investigated in the U.S. and internationally as a means of producing a liquid fuel for power production from biomass. This process produces a fuel with significantly different physical and chemical properties from traditional petroleum-based fuel oils. In addition to storage and handling difficulties with pyrolysis oils, concern exists over the ability to use this fuel effectively in different combustors. The report endeavors to place the results and conclusions from Sandia's research into the context of international efforts to utilize pyrolysis oils. As a special supplement to this report, Dr. Steven Gust, of Finland's Neste Oy, has provided a brief assessment of pyrolysis oil combustion research efforts and commercialization prospects in Europe.

  18. Study on optimal design of wind turbine blade airfoil and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Min Young; Kim, Dong Yong; Lim, Jae Kyoo [Chonbuk Nat' l Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    This study was carried out with two goals. One was the development of a model of a wind turbine blade airfoil and the other was the application of the folding blade. In general, in large sized (MW) wind turbines, damage is prevented in small wind turbines since equipment costs and maintenance costs are high, and therefore, the blade will cause serious damage. The wind turbine proposed in this study does not require maintenance, and the blades do not break during high winds because they are folded in accordance with changes in the wind speed. But generators are not cut out, while maintaining a constant angle will continue to produce. The focus of this study, the wind turbine is continued by folding blade system in strong winds and gusts without stopping production.

  19. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperman, A; Blaylock, M; Van Dam, C P

    2014-01-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust

  20. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  1. Wind and Wake Sensing with UAV Formation Flight: System Development and Flight Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabee, Trenton Jameson

    Wind turbulence including atmospheric turbulence and wake turbulence have been widely investigated; however, only recently it become possible to use Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) as a validation tool for research in this area. Wind can be a major contributing factor of adverse weather for aircraft. More importantly, it is an even greater risk towards UAVs because of their small size and weight. Being able to estimate wind fields and gusts can potentially provide substantial benefits for both unmanned and manned aviation. Possible applications include gust suppression for improving handling qualities, a better warning system for high wind encounters, and enhanced control for small UAVs during flight. On the other hand, the existence of wind can be advantageous since it can lead to fuel savings and longer duration flights through dynamic soaring or thermal soaring. Wakes are an effect of the lift distribution across an aircraft's wing or tail. Wakes can cause substantial disturbances when multiple aircraft are moving through the same airspace. In fact, the perils from an aircraft flying through the wake of another aircraft is a leading cause of the delay between takeoff times at airports. Similar to wind, though, wakes can be useful for energy harvesting and increasing an aircraft's endurance when flying in formation which can be a great advantage to UAVs because they are often limited in flight time due to small payload capacity. Formation flight can most often be seen in manned aircraft but can be adopted for use with unmanned systems. Autonomous flight is needed for flying in the "sweet spot" of the generated wakes for energy harvesting as well as for thermal soaring during long duration flights. For the research presented here formation flight was implemented for the study of wake sensing and gust alleviation. The major contributions of this research are in the areas of a novel technique to estimate wind using an Unscented Kalman filter and experimental wake

  2. Operation Design of Wind Turbines in Strong Wind Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Montes, Melissa Barroso; Odgaard, Peter Fogh

    2012-01-01

    and variable speed pitch regulated wind turbines. The variable speed design is more suitable for wind turbines to run at very high wind speeds which can help the turbine braking system to stop the turbine at the new "cut-out" wind speed. Reference power, rotational speed and pitch angle have been designed...... optimally. In order to reduce the possible increased loading, fatigue due to the wind gusts, control strategies have been considered for both constant sped and variable speed pitch regulated wind turbines. The control study shows that the designed controllers can reduce the standard deviations efficiently......In order to reduce the impact on the electrical grid from the shutdown of MW wind turbines at wind speeds higher than the cut-out wind speed of 25 m/s, we propose in this paper to run the turbines at high wind speeds up to 40 m/s. Two different operation designs are made for both constant speed...

  3. NASA's aviation safety research and technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    Aviation safety is challenged by the practical necessity of compromising inherent factors of design, environment, and operation. If accidents are to be avoided these factors must be controlled to a degree not often required by other transport modes. The operational problems which challenge safety seem to occur most often in the interfaces within and between the design, the environment, and operations where mismatches occur due to ignorance or lack of sufficient understanding of these interactions. Under this report the following topics are summarized: (1) The nature of operating problems, (2) NASA aviation safety research, (3) clear air turbulence characterization and prediction, (4) CAT detection, (5) Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence (MAT) Program, (6) Lightning, (7) Thunderstorm gust fronts, (8) Aircraft ground operating problems, (9) Aircraft fire technology, (10) Crashworthiness research, (11) Aircraft wake vortex hazard research, and (12) Aviation safety reporting system.

  4. Design and control of one precise tracking simulation bed for Chinese 20/30 meter optic/infrared telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changzhi; Li, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiaoli; Niu, Yong; Li, Aihua; Zhang, Zhenchao

    2012-09-01

    Direct drive technology is the key to solute future 30-m and larger telescope motion system to guarantee a very high tracking accuracy, in spite of unbalanced and sudden loads such as wind gusts and in spite of a structure that, because of its size, can not be infinitely stiff. However, this requires the design and realization of unusually large torque motor that the torque slew rate must be extremely steep too. A conventional torque motor design appears inadequate. This paper explores one redundant unit permanent magnet synchronous motor and its simulation bed for 30-m class telescope. Because its drive system is one high integrated electromechanical system, one complexly electromechanical design method is adopted to improve the efficiency, reliability and quality of the system during the design and manufacture circle. This paper discusses the design and control of the precise tracking simulation bed in detail.

  5. Neural Network Classifiers for Local Wind Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Ralf; Eckert, Pierre; Cattani, Daniel; Eggimann, Fritz

    2004-05-01

    This paper evaluates the quality of neural network classifiers for wind speed and wind gust prediction with prediction lead times between +1 and +24 h. The predictions were realized based on local time series and model data. The selection of appropriate input features was initiated by time series analysis and completed by empirical comparison of neural network classifiers trained on several choices of input features. The selected input features involved day time, yearday, features from a single wind observation device at the site of interest, and features derived from model data. The quality of the resulting classifiers was benchmarked against persistence for two different sites in Switzerland. The neural network classifiers exhibited superior quality when compared with persistence judged on a specific performance measure, hit and false-alarm rates.

  6. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar

  7. An Experimental Study on the Wind-Induced Response of Variable Message Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Meyer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Variable message sign (VMS systems are widely used in motorways to provide traffic information to motorists. Such systems are subjected to wind-induced structural vibration that can lead to damage due to fatigue. The limited information that is available on the safe wind design of VMS motivated a large scale testing that was conducted at the wall of wind (WOW Experimental Facility at Florida International University (FIU. One of the objectives of the present study was to experimentally assess the wind-induced force coefficients on VMS of different geometries and utilize these results to provide improved design guidelines. A comprehensive range of VMS geometries was tested, and mean normal and lateral force coefficients, in addition to the twisting moment coefficient and eccentricity ratio, were determined using the measured data for each model, for wind directions of 0° and 45°. The results confirmed that the mean drag coefficient on a prismatic VMS is smaller than the value of 1.7 suggested by American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO. An alternative to this value is presented in the form of a design matrix with coefficients ranging from 0.98 to 1.28, depending on the aspect and depth ratio of the VMS. Furthermore, results indicated that the corner modification on a VMS with chamfered edges demonstrated a reduction in the drag coefficient compared to sharper edges. Finally, the dynamic loading effects were considered by evaluating the gust effect factor, using the ASCE 7 formulations, for various VMS weights and geometries. The findings revealed a wide range of possible gust effect factors, both above and below the current AASHTO specification of 1.14. Future research may include different geometries of VMS and a wider range of wind directions.

  8. Evaluating the suitability of the SWAN/COSMO-2 model system to simulate short-crested surface waves for a narrow lake with complex bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Graf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectral wave model SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore was applied to Lake Zurich, a narrow pre-Alpine lake in Switzerland. The aim of the study is to investigate whether the model system consisting of SWAN and the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-2 is a suitable tool for wave forecasts for the pre-Alpine Lake Zurich. SWAN is able to simulate short-crested wind-generated surface waves. The model was forced with a time varying wind field taken from COSMO-2 with hourly outputs. Model simulations were compared with measured wave data at one near-shore site during a frontal passage associated with strong on-shore winds. The overall course of the measured wave height is well captured in the SWAN simulation: the wave amplitude significantly increases during the frontal passage followed by a transient drop in amplitude. The wave pattern on Lake Zurich is quite complex. It strongly depends on the inherent variability of the wind field and on the external forcing due to the surrounding complex topography. The influence of the temporal wind resolution is further studied with two sensitivity experiments. The first one considers a low-pass filtered wind field, based on a 2-h running mean of COSMO-2 output, and the second experiment uses simple synthetic gusts, which are implemented into the SWAN model and take into account short-term fluctuations of wind speed at 1-sec resolution. The wave field significantly differs for the 1-h and 2-h simulations, but is only negligibly affected by the gusts.

  9. Feasibility study for a microwave-powered ozone sniffer aircraft. B.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botros, David F.; Cody, Charlotte K.; Forden, Noah P.; Helsing, Martin A.; Jutras, Thomas H.; Kim, Dohoon; Labarre, Christopher; Odin, Ethan M.; Sandler, Scott B.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary design of a high-altitude, remotely-piloted, atmospheric-sampling aircraft powered by microwave energy beamed from ground-based antenna was completed. The vehicle has a gross weight of 6720 pounds and is sized to carry a 1000 pound payload at an altitude of 100,000 feet. The underside of the wing serves as the surface of a rectenna designed to receive microwave energy at a power density of 700 watts per square meter and the wing has a planform area of 3634 square feet to absorb the required power at an optimum Mach number M = 0.44. The aircraft utilizes a horizontal tail and a canard for longitudinal control and to enhance the structural rigidity of the twin fuselage configuration. The wing structure is designed to withstand a gust-induced load factor n = 3 at cruise altitude but the low-wing loading of the aircraft makes it very sensitive to gusts at low altitudes, which may induce load factors in excess of 20. A structural load alleviation system is therefore proposed to limit actual loads to the designed structural limit. Losses will require transmitted power on the order of megawatts to be radiated to the aircraft from the ground station, presenting environmental problems. Since the transmitting antenna would have a diameter of several hundred feet, it would not be readily transportable, so we propose that a single antenna be constructed at a site from which the aircraft is flown. The aircraft would be towed aloft to an initial altitude at which the microwave power would be utilized. The aircraft would climb to cruise altitude in a spiral flight path and orbit the transmitter in a gentle turn.

  10. A two-dimensional iterative panel method and boundary layer model for bio-inspired multi-body wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Christopher J.; Dhruv, Akash; Wickenheiser, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) has created a continuous demand for improved flight capabilities and range of use. During the last decade, engineers have turned to bio-inspiration for new and innovative flow control methods for gust alleviation, maneuverability, and stability improvement using morphing aircraft wings. The bio-inspired wing design considered in this study mimics the flow manipulation techniques performed by birds to extend the operating envelope of UAVs through the installation of an array of feather-like panels across the airfoil's upper and lower surfaces while replacing the trailing edge flap. Each flap has the ability to deflect into both the airfoil and the inbound airflow using hinge points with a single degree-of-freedom, situated at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the chord. The installation of the surface flaps offers configurations that enable advantageous maneuvers while alleviating gust disturbances. Due to the number of possible permutations available for the flap configurations, an iterative constant-strength doublet/source panel method has been developed with an integrated boundary layer model to calculate the pressure distribution and viscous drag over the wing's surface. As a result, the lift, drag and moment coefficients for each airfoil configuration can be calculated. The flight coefficients of this numerical method are validated using experimental data from a low speed suction wind tunnel operating at a Reynolds Number 300,000. This method enables the aerodynamic assessment of a morphing wing profile to be performed accurately and efficiently in comparison to Computational Fluid Dynamics methods and experiments as discussed herein.

  11. On vortex-airfoil interaction noise including span-end effects, with application to open-rotor aeroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Michel; Schram, Christophe; Moreau, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A linear analytical model is developed for the chopping of a cylindrical vortex by a flat-plate airfoil, with or without a span-end effect. The major interest is the contribution of the tip-vortex produced by an upstream rotating blade in the rotor-rotor interaction noise mechanism of counter-rotating open rotors. Therefore the interaction is primarily addressed in an annular strip of limited spanwise extent bounding the impinged blade segment, and the unwrapped strip is described in Cartesian coordinates. The study also addresses the interaction of a propeller wake with a downstream wing or empennage. Cylindrical vortices are considered, for which the velocity field is expanded in two-dimensional gusts in the reference frame of the airfoil. For each gust the response of the airfoil is derived, first ignoring the effect of the span end, assimilating the airfoil to a rigid flat plate, with or without sweep. The corresponding unsteady lift acts as a distribution of acoustic dipoles, and the radiated sound is obtained from a radiation integral over the actual extent of the airfoil. In the case of tip-vortex interaction noise in CRORs the acoustic signature is determined for vortex trajectories passing beyond, exactly at and below the tip radius of the impinged blade segment, in a reference frame attached to the segment. In a second step the same problem is readdressed accounting for the effect of span end on the aerodynamic response of a blade tip. This is achieved through a composite two-directional Schwarzschild's technique. The modifications of the distributed unsteady lift and of the radiated sound are discussed. The chained source and radiation models provide physical insight into the mechanism of vortex chopping by a blade tip in free field. They allow assessing the acoustic benefit of clipping the rear rotor in a counter-rotating open-rotor architecture.

  12. Disentangling factors that control the vulnerability of forests to catastrophic wind damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracup, E.; Taylor, A.; MacLean, D.; Boulanger, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Wind is an important driver of forest dynamics along North America's north-eastern coastal forests, but also damages many commercially managed forests which society relies as an important source of wood fiber. Although the influence of wind on north-eastern forests is well recognized, knowledge of factors predisposing trees to wind damage is less known, especially in the context of large, powerful wind storm events. This is of particular concern as climate change is expected to alter the frequency and severity of strong wind storms affecting this region. On 29 September 2003, Hurricane Juan made landfall over Nova Scotia, Canada as a Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 158 km/h, and gusts of up to 185 km/h. Hurricane Juan variously damaged a swath of over 600,000 ha of forest. The damaged forest area was surveyed using aerial photography and LandSAT imagery and categorized according to level of wind damage sustained (none, low, moderate, severe) at a resolution of 15 x 15 m square cells. We used Random Forest to analyze and compare level of wind damage in each cell with a myriad of abiotic (exposure, depth to water table, soil composition, etc.) and biotic (tree species composition, canopy closure, canopy height, etc.) factors known or expected to predispose trees to windthrow. From our analysis, we identified topographic exposure, precipitation, and maximum gust speed as the top predictors of windthrow during Hurricane Juan. To our surprise, forest stand factors, such as tree species composition and height, had minimal effects on level of windthrow. These results can be used to construct predictive risk maps which can help society to assess the vulnerability of forests to future wind storm events.

  13. Targeted taste cell-specific overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult taste buds elevates phosphorylated TrkB protein levels in taste cells, increases taste bud size, and promotes gustatory innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Irina V; Margolskee, Robert F; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2012-05-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system.

  14. A Mediterranean nocturnal heavy rainfall and tornadic event. Part I: Overview, damage survey and radar analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Joan; Pineda, Nicolau; Rigo, Tomeu; Aran, Montserrat; Amaro, Jéssica; Gayà, Miquel; Arús, Joan; Montanyà, Joan; der Velde, Oscar van

    2011-06-01

    This study presents an analysis of a severe weather case that took place during the early morning of the 2nd of November 2008, when intense convective activity associated with a rapidly evolving low pressure system affected the southern coast of Catalonia (NE Spain). The synoptic framework was dominated by an upper level trough and an associated cold front extending from Gibraltar along the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula to SE France, which moved north-eastward. South easterly winds in the north of the Balearic Islands and the coast of Catalonia favoured high values of 0-3 km storm relative helicity which combined with moderate MLCAPE values and high shear favoured the conditions for organized convection. A number of multicell storms and others exhibiting supercell features, as indicated by Doppler radar observations, clustered later in a mesoscale convective system, and moved north-eastwards across Catalonia. They produced ground-level strong damaging wind gusts, an F2 tornado, hail and heavy rainfall. Total lightning activity (intra-cloud and cloud to ground flashes) was also relevant, exhibiting several classical features such as a sudden increased rate before ground level severe damage, as discussed in a companion study. Remarkable surface observations of this event include 24 h precipitation accumulations exceeding 100 mm in four different observatories and 30 minute rainfall amounts up to 40 mm which caused local flash floods. As the convective system evolved northward later that day it also affected SE France causing large hail, ground level damaging wind gusts and heavy rainfall.

  15. TO THE QUESTION ABOUT THE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT THERMAL FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work was the simulation of turbulent thermal flows, which is aimed at improving the visualization and the modeling of the flow fields of wind flows, which are necessary for aviation. The physical-mathematical model of gas flow in thermal is proposed on the basis of thermodynamic model and dynamic model under the assumption that the condensation energy, when the movement of the thermal is upward, becomes the turbulent fluctuations. A thermal is an air mass, which goes up and is capable to intermix with ambient air. In the work the thermodynamic model of thermal is presented, the equations and the system of equations are derived, that describe the main characteristics of wind flow, which are required for the modeling of airflows. The generation of vertical turbulent gust with von Karman spectrum is shown. The basic assumption in the construction of the dynamic model of generation was that the energy, which is stood out in the thermal due to the condensation of steam, is converted into the energy of turbulent pulsations. Some examples of numerical simulation are given in the article. The visualizations of the generation of the vertical velocity of random wind gust are given depending on the size of the considered space and depending on the pitch of cell partition. The analysis and comparison of the obtained results of the calculation are presented. The conducted studies are aimed at the simulation of the atmospheric background and atmospheric processes and, in the final result, at the increasing of flight safety.

  16. Forecasting challenges during the severe weather outbreak in Central Europe on 25 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Púčik, Tomáš; Francová, Martina; Rýva, David; Kolář, Miroslav; Ronge, Lukáš

    2011-06-01

    On 25 June 2008, severe thunderstorms caused widespread damage and two fatalities in the Czech Republic. Significant features of the storms included numerous downbursts on a squall line that exhibited a bow echo reflectivity pattern, with sustained wind gusts over 32 m/s at several reporting stations. Moreover, a tornado and several downbursts of F2 intensity occurred within the convective system, collocated with the development of mesovortices within the larger scale bow echo. The extent of the event was sufficient to call it a derecho, as the windstorm had affected Eastern Germany, Southern Poland, Slovakia, Austria and Northern Hungary as well. Ahead of the squall line, several well-organized isolated cells occurred, exhibiting supercellular characteristics, both from a radar and visual perspective. These storms produced large hail and also isolated severe wind gusts. This paper deals mostly with the forecasting challenges that were experienced by the meteorologist on duty during the evolution of this convective scenario. The main challenge of the day was to identify the region that would be most affected by severe convection, especially as the numerical weather prediction failed to anticipate the extent and the progress of the derecho-producing mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Convective storms developed in an environment conducive to severe thunderstorms, with strong wind shear confined mostly to the lower half of the troposphere. These developments also were strongly influenced by mesoscale factors, especially a mesolow centered over Austria and its trough stretching to Eastern Bohemia. The paper demonstrates how careful mesoscale analysis could prove useful in dealing with such convective situations. Remote-sensing methods are also shown to be useful in such situations, especially when they can offer sufficient lead time to issue a warning, which is not always the case.

  17. Targeted Taste Cell-specific Overexpression of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adult Taste Buds Elevates Phosphorylated TrkB Protein Levels in Taste Cells, Increases Taste Bud Size, and Promotes Gustatory Innervation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Irina V.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Nosrat, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system. PMID:22442142

  18. Case study: A severe hailstorm and strong downbursts over northeastern Slovenia on June 16th 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosec, M.

    2009-09-01

    Introduction A strong isolated storm complex with bow echo feature crossed northeastern Slovenia in the late afternoon hours and caused extensive damage due to severe wind gusts near 30m/s, excessive rainfalls and large hail. Synoptic situation On June 16th 2009, an upper-level ridge persists over southern Europe while a positively tilted short-wave trough, connected to a complex deep trough over northern Europe, crosses central Europe. Accompanied by this trough, a cold front is extending southwestwards towards the Alps. A relatively strong jet steak wraps around the trough axis and creates strong shear environment which overlaps with a narrow band of unstable airmass present ahead of the coming frontal boundary. Behind this trough/front over central Europe, a high pressure area is developing with stable conditions. Over Slovenia, strong surface heating was on going through the day but lack of near-surface convergence zones, limited moisture and strong capping inversion surpressed any storm initiation in the afternoon. Presentation of research This case study will go through a research of damaging bow echo which caused extensive damage due to severe winds, excessive rainfalls and large hail over much of northeastern Slovenia. Numerous trees were down or uprooted and numerous roofs were blown off or were seriously damaged due to severe wind gusts near or exceeding 30m/s. At first stages, when an isolated severe storm entered Slovenia, it had classic high precipitation supercell features while it transformed into a powerful bow echo later on. Very large hail up to 6cm in diameter was first observed in southeast Austria and near the border with Slovenia, while later on the main threat was very strong wind gusts and intense rainfalls. This research paper will show a detailed analysis of the synoptic situation including analysis of satellite, radar and surface observations. Radar imagery clearly showed isolated storm trailing along the near-surface frontal boundary as

  19. An extensive evaluation of wind resource using new methods and strategies for development and utilizing wind power in Mah-shahr station in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedaei, Mojtaba; Assareh, Ehsanolah; Biglari, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In this research, results suggest that the Weibull distribution is the best function to model the wind data in Mah-shahr. • The compatibility of the wind data with three methods of estimating Weibull parameters was assessed. • An extreme analysis of wind in Mah-shahr was done to determine the maximum gust wind speeds over a 50-year return period. • An extensive economic evaluation of installing a wind park was performed on RETScreen® software. - Abstract: In this study, the 10-min period measured short-term wind speed data at 10 m and 40 m heights for Mah-shahr station in Iran was statistically analyzed to determine the potential of wind power generation. In addition in this paper different distribution functions are compared to each other in order to find the best distribution in Mah-shahr which is compatible with the wind data. It is found that the Weibull distribution is the best function to model the wind data in Mah-shahr. It should also be mentioned that the different methods for calculating Weibull parameters were used and compared to each other. Moreover an extreme analysis of wind data in Mah-shahr was carried out to determine the maximum gust wind speed over a 50-year return period (Ve50). Using the method of “periodic maxima” for analysis of extreme winds, it was revealed that the 50-year wind speed at 80 m in Mah-shahr which is 39.5 m/s is lower than usual values of Ve50 limits for different wind turbines. This means that the risk of extreme wind gusts in Mah-shahr might not be a problem for installation of wind turbines. From the primary evaluation of wind data in Mah-shahr it is found the studied site has an acceptable potential of wind power for electricity generation. Energy production of different wind turbines at different heights is determined. Then a simple economic evaluation carried out to determine whether studied site is suitable for development of commercial or small and residential wind turbines. It became clear

  20. WARM BREEZE FROM THE STARBOARD BOW: A NEW POPULATION OF NEUTRAL HELIUM IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Swaczyna, P.; Grzedzielski, S. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Alexashov, D. B.; Izmodenov, V. V. [Space Research Institute (IKI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Möbius, E.; Leonard, T. [Space Research Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wurz, P. [Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the signals from neutral helium atoms observed in situ from Earth orbit in 2010 by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The full helium signal observed during the 2010 observation season can be explained as a superposition of pristine neutral interstellar He gas and an additional population of neutral helium that we call the Warm Breeze. The Warm Breeze is approximately 2 times slower and 2.5 times warmer than the primary interstellar He population, and its density in front of the heliosphere is ∼7% that of the neutral interstellar helium. The inflow direction of the Warm Breeze differs by ∼19° from the inflow direction of interstellar gas. The Warm Breeze seems to be a long-term, perhaps permanent feature of the heliospheric environment. It has not been detected earlier because it is strongly ionized inside the heliosphere. This effect brings it below the threshold of detection via pickup ion and heliospheric backscatter glow observations, as well as by the direct sampling of GAS/Ulysses. We discuss possible sources for the Warm Breeze, including (1) the secondary population of interstellar helium, created via charge exchange and perhaps elastic scattering of neutral interstellar He atoms on interstellar He{sup +} ions in the outer heliosheath, or (2) a gust of interstellar He originating from a hypothetic wave train in the Local Interstellar Cloud. A secondary population is expected from models, but the characteristics of the Warm Breeze do not fully conform to modeling results. If, nevertheless, this is the explanation, IBEX-Lo observations of the Warm Breeze provide key insights into the physical state of plasma in the outer heliosheath. If the second hypothesis is true, the source is likely to be located within a few thousand AU from the Sun, which is the propagation range of possible gusts of interstellar neutral helium with the Warm Breeze characteristics against dissipation via elastic scattering in the Local Cloud. Whatever the

  1. Beyond Tree Throw: Wind, Water, Rock and the Mechanics of Tree-Driven Bedrock Physical Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Dawson, T. E.; Dietrich, W. E.; Minear, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Tree throw is often invoked as the dominant process in converting bedrock to soil and thus helping to build the Critical Zone (CZ). In addition, observations of tree roots lifting sidewalk slabs, occupying cracks, and prying slabs of rock from cliff faces have led to a general belief in the power of plant growth forces. These common observations have led to conceptual models with trees at the center of the soil genesis process. This is despite the observation that tree throw is rare in many forested settings, and a dearth of field measurements that quantify the magnitude of growth forces. While few trees blow down, every tree grows roots, inserting many tens of percent of its mass below ground. Yet we lack data quantifying the role of trees in both damaging bedrock and detaching it (and thus producing soil). By combing force measurements at the tree-bedrock interface with precipitation, solar radiation, wind speed, and wind-driven tree sway data we quantified the magnitude and frequency of tree-driven soil-production mechanisms from two contrasting climatic and lithologic regimes (Boulder and Eel Creek CZ Observatories). Preliminary data suggests that in settings with relatively thin soils, trees can damage and detach rock due to diurnal fluctuations, wind response and rainfall events. Surprisingly, our data suggests that forces from roots and trunks growing against bedrock are insufficient to pry rock apart or damage bedrock although much more work is needed in this area. The frequency, magnitude and style of wind-driven tree forces at the bedrock interface varies considerably from one to another species. This suggests that tree properties such as mass, elasticity, stiffness and branch structure determine whether trees respond to gusts big or small, move at the same frequency as large wind gusts, or are able to self-dampen near-ground sway response to extended wind forces. Our measurements of precipitation-driven and daily fluctuations in root pressures exerted on

  2. Sand dune tracking from satellite laser altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabboor, Mohammed

    Substantial problems arise from sand movement in arid and semi-arid countries. Sand poses a threat to infrastructure, agricultural and urban areas. These issues are caused by the encroachment of sand on roads and railway tracks, farmland, towns and villages, and airports, to name a few. Sand movement highly depends on geomorphology including vegetation cover, shape and height of the terrain, and grain size of the sand. However, wind direction and speed are the most important factors that affect efficient sand movement. The direction of the movement depends on the main direction of the wind, but it has been shown that a minimum wind speed is required, e.g. wind gusts, to initiate sand transport. This fact prevents a simple calculation of sand transport from conventional wind data as wind records rarely contain sub-minute intervals masking out any wind gusts. An alternative of predicting sand transport is the direct observation of sand advance by in situ measurements or via satellite. Until recently, satellite imagery was the only means to compare dune shape and position for predicting dune migration over several years. In 2003, the NASA laser altimetry mission ICESat became operational and monitors elevations over all surface types including sand dunes with an accuracy of about 10-20 cm. In this study, ICESat observations from repeat tracks (tracks overlapping eachother within 50 m) are used to derive sand dune advance and direction. The method employs a correlation of the elevation profiles over several dunes and was sucessfully validated with synthetic data. The accuracy of this method is 5 meters of dune advance. One of the most active areas exhibiting sand and dune movement is the area of the Arabian Peninsula. Approximately one-third of the Arabian Peninsula is covered by sand dunes. Different wind regimes (Shamal, Kaus) cause sand dune movement in the selected study area in the eastern part of the Arabian Peninsula between 20-25 degrees North and 45-55 degrees

  3. Cloud albedo increase from carbonaceous aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Leaitch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements from two consecutive days, analysed with the aid of an aerosol-adiabatic cloud parcel model, are used to study the effect of carbonaceous aerosol particles on the reflectivity of sunlight by water clouds. The measurements, including aerosol chemistry, aerosol microphysics, cloud microphysics, cloud gust velocities and cloud light extinction, were made below, in and above stratocumulus over the northwest Atlantic Ocean. On the first day, the history of the below-cloud fine particle aerosol was marine and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations measured at cloud base were 2.4 μg m−3 and 0.9 μg m−3 respectively. On the second day, the below-cloud aerosol was continentally influenced and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations were 2.3 μg m−3 and 2.6 μg m−3 respectively. Over the range 0.06–0.8 μm diameter, the shapes of the below-cloud size distributions were similar on both days and the number concentrations were approximately a factor of two higher on the second day. The cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC on the second day were approximately three times higher than the CDNC measured on the first day. Using the parcel model to separate the influence of the differences in gust velocities, we estimate from the vertically integrated cloud light scattering measurements a 6% increase in the cloud albedo principally due to the increase in the carbonaceous components on the second day. Assuming no additional absorption by this aerosol, a 6% albedo increase translates to a local daytime radiative cooling of ∼12 W m−2. This result provides observational evidence that the role of anthropogenic carbonaceous components in the cloud albedo effect can be much larger than that of anthropogenic sulphate, as some global simulations have indicated.

  4. Hanford Site Climatological Data Summary 2001 with Historical Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoitink, Dana J.; Ramsdell, James V.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 2001. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. This report contains updated historical information for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink (and others) (1999, 2000, 2001) and Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998); however, data from Appendix B--Wind Climatology (Hoitink (and others) 1994) are excluded. Calendar year 2001 was slightly warmer than normal at the Hanford Meteorology Station with an average temperature of 54.3 F, 0.7 F above normal (53.6 F). The hottest temperature was 106 F on July 4, while the coldest was 16 F on December 25. For the 12-month period, 8 months were warmer than normal, and 4 months were cooler than normal. Precipitation for 2001 totaled 6.66 inches, 95% of normal (6.98 inches); calendar year snowfall totaled 15.1 inches (compared to the normal of 15.4 inches). Calendar year 2001 had an average wind speed of 7.6 mph, which was normal (7.6 mph). There were 31 days with peak gusts (ge)40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 27 days. The peak gust during the year was 69 mph on December 16. November 2001 established new records for both days and hours with dense fog (visibility (le)1/4 mile). There were 14 days and 99.4 hours of dense fog reported, compared to an average of 5.5 days with 22.0 hours. The previous record was 13 days in 1965 and 71.4 hours in 1952. The heating-degree days for 2000-2001 were 5,516 (7% above the 5,160 normal). Cooling-degree days for 2001 were 1,092 (8% above the 1,014 normal)

  5. The Strong Wind event of 24th January 2009 in Catalonia: a social impact analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, J.; Aran, M.; Barberia, L.; Llasat, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    Although strong winds are frequent in Catalonia, one of the events with the strongest impact in recent years was on January 24th 2009. An explosive cyclogenesis process took place in the Atlantic: pressure fell 30 hPa in less than 24 hours. The strong wind storm pounded the northern of Spain and the south of France with some fatalities and important economic losses in these regions. Several automatic weather stations recorded wind gusts higher than 100 km/h in Catalonia. Emergency services received more than 20.000 calls in 24 hours and there were 497 interventions in only 12 hours. As a consequence of fallen and uprooted trees railway and road infrastructures got damages and more than 30.000 customers had no electricity during 24 hours. Unfortunately there were a total of 6 fatalities, two of them because of fallen trees and the other ones when a sports centre collapsed over a group of children. In Spain, insurance policies cover damages due to strong winds when fixed thresholds are overcome and, according to the Royal Decree 300/2004 of 20th February, extraordinary risk are assumed by the Consorcio de Compensación de Seguros. Subsequently, Public Weather Services (PWS) had an increased on the number of requests received from people affected by this event and from insurance companies, for the corresponding indemnity or not. As an example, during the first month after the event, in the Servei Meteorològic de Catalunya (SMC) more than 600 requests were received only related to these damages (as an average PWS of SMC received a total of 400 requests per month). Following the research started by the Social Impact Research Group of MEDEX project, a good vulnerability indicator of a meteorological risk can be the number of requests reported. This study uses the information received in the PWS of the SMC during the six months after the event, according the criteria and methodology established in Gayà et al (2008). The objective is to compare the vulnerability with the

  6. The European storm Kyrill in January 2007: synoptic evolution, meteorological impacts and some considerations with respect to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Fink

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The synoptic evolution and some meteorological impacts of the European winter storm Kyrill that swept across Western, Central, and Eastern Europe between 17 and 19 January 2007 are investigated. The intensity and large storm damage associated with Kyrill is explained based on synoptic and mesoscale environmental storm features, as well as on comparisons to previous storms. Kyrill appeared on weather maps over the US state of Arkansas about four days before it hit Europe. It underwent an explosive intensification over the Western North Atlantic Ocean while crossing a very intense zonal polar jet stream. A superposition of several favourable meteorological conditions west of the British Isles caused a further deepening of the storm when it started to affect Western Europe. Evidence is provided that a favourable alignment of three polar jet streaks and a dry air intrusion over the occlusion and cold fronts were causal factors in maintaining Kyrill's low pressure very far into Eastern Europe.

    Kyrill, like many other strong European winter storms, was embedded in a pre-existing, anomalously wide, north-south mean sea-level pressure (MSLP gradient field. In addition to the range of gusts that might be expected from the synoptic-scale pressure field, mesoscale features associated with convective overturning at the cold front are suggested as the likely causes for the extremely damaging peak gusts observed at many lowland stations during the passage of Kyrill's cold front. Compared to other storms, Kyrill was by far not the most intense system in terms of core pressure and circulation anomaly. However, the system moved into a pre-existing strong MSLP gradient located over Central Europe which extended into Eastern Europe. This fact is considered determinant for the anomalously large area affected by Kyrill.

    Additionally, considerations of windiness in climate change simulations using two state-of-the-art regional climate

  7. Research in aeroelasticity[Wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.

    2006-05-15

    In the Energy Research Project 'Program for Research in Applied Aeroelasticity' (EFP2005), Risoe National Laboratory (Risoe) and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have applied and further developed the tools in the aeroelastic design complex. The main results from the project are: 1) Adding a winglet to a wind turbine blade for minimizing the induced drag of the blade led to the biggest increase in power of 1.4%. 2) Transient wind loads during pitch motion are determined using CFD. Compared to the NREL/NASA Ames test, reasonably good agreement is seen. 3) A general method was developed for the determination of 3D angle of attack for rotating blades from either measurements or numerical computations using CFD. 4) A model of the far wake behind wind turbines was developed for stability studies of the tip vortices in the far wake. 5) Investigating the blade root region showed that the power efficiency, CP, locally can be increased significantly beyond the Betz limit, but that the global CP for the rotor cannot exceed the Betz limit. When including tip losses and a minimum blade drag coefficient, a maximum rotor CP in the range of 0.51-0.52 was obtained. 6) A new airfoil family was designed and a 3D airfoil design tool was developed. Compared to the Risoe-B1 family, the new airfoil family showed similar or improved aerodynamic and structural characteristics. 7) Four different airfoils were analyzed to reveal the differences between 2D and 3D CFD. The major conclusions are the dependency of computational results to transition modelling, and the ability of 3D DES calculations to realistically simulate the turbulent wake of an airfoil in stall. 8) The capability of a theory for simulation of Gaussian turbulence driven gust events was demonstrated by emulating a violent shear gust event from a complex site. An asymptotic model for the PDF of the largest excursion from the mean level, during an arbitrary recurrence period, has been derived for a stochastic

  8. Simulating damage for wind storms in the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (revision 4262)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ying; Gardiner, Barry; Pasztor, Ferenc; Blennow, Kristina; Ryder, James; Valade, Aude; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; McGrath, Matthew J.; Planque, Carole; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2018-03-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) are currently the most advanced tools with which to study the interactions among humans, ecosystem productivity, and the climate. The inclusion of storm damage in ESMs has long been hampered by their big-leaf approach, which ignores the canopy structure information that is required for process-based wind-throw modelling. Recently the big-leaf assumptions in the large-scale land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN were replaced by a three-dimensional description of the canopy structure. This opened the way to the integration of the processes from the small-scale wind damage risk model ForestGALES into ORCHIDEE-CAN. The integration of ForestGALES into ORCHIDEE-CAN required, however, developing numerically efficient solutions to deal with (1) landscape heterogeneity, i.e. account for newly established forest edges for the parameterization of gusts; (2) downscaling spatially and temporally aggregated wind fields to obtain more realistic wind speeds that would represents gusts; and (3) downscaling storm damage within the 2500 km2 pixels of ORCHIDEE-CAN. This new version of ORCHIDEE-CAN was parameterized over Sweden. Subsequently, the performance of the model was tested against data for historical storms in southern Sweden between 1951 and 2010 and south-western France in 2009. In years without big storms, here defined as a storm damaging less than 15 × 106 m3 of wood in Sweden, the model error is 1.62 × 106 m3, which is about 100 % of the observed damage. For years with big storms, such as Gudrun in 2005, the model error increased to 5.05 × 106 m3, which is between 10 and 50 % of the observed damage. When the same model parameters were used over France, the model reproduced a decrease in leaf area index and an increase in albedo, in accordance with SPOT-VGT and MODIS records following the passing of Cyclone Klaus in 2009. The current version of ORCHIDEE-CAN (revision 4262) is therefore expected to have the capability to capture the dynamics of

  9. Particulate Matter Concentration Levels in South Central Richmond, California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, B.; Byias, C.; Cuff, K. E.; Diaz, J.; Love, K.; Marks-Block, T.; McLane, F.; Mollique, Z.; Montes, E.; Ross, R.; Washington, B.

    2009-12-01

    South Central Richmond, California is the home of one of the nation’s most innovative green workforce training centers, Richmond BUILD - Green Jobs Training facility. A near constant stream of young people engaged in training activities, instructors, invited guests, and journalists of various ages can be seen moving in and out of the facility nearly every day of the week throughout a given year. Additionally, the comings and goings of young children and adults associated with a mid-sized elementary school just north of the facility contributes to the general area’s substantial human traffic. Unfortunately, however, a major highway, Interstate 580, a major thoroughfare, 23rd Street and a railway line operated by Burlington Northern Santa Fe, Union Pacific, and the Richmond Pacific Railroad frame the triangular area within which these two sites are situated. In addition, a major petrochemical complex and several shipping facilities are located less than three kilometers away north and west of this area. As part of a general assessment of air quality in this heavily human traveled area, we conducted a study of particulate matter (PM) concentrations over a five-month period beginning in August of 2009. Measurements were made at a variety of locations, and results were used to map the spatial distribution of PM of various sizes. Regions of high concentration levels were identified, and these particular areas then were monitored over time. Preliminary results of our study indicate that regions with high concentrations are consistent across the range of particle sizes measured, which suggests a common source for PM found in the study area. As these regions are located close to a major thoroughfare and railway line, we believe that diesel-burning vehicles are major contributors to the PM levels found in the study area. Time series results suggest a fairly strong correlation between higher than average PM concentrations and abnormally high wind gusts. On days when wind

  10. The importance of being light: aerodynamic forces and weight in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölzer, B; Müller, W

    2002-08-01

    Many contemporary world class ski jumpers are alarmingly underweight and several cases of anorexia nervosa have come to light. Athletes strive for low body weight because it gives them a major competitive advantage. In order to stop this hazardous development, changes to the regulations are being discussed, and the International Ski Federation and the International Olympic Committee wish to be proactive in safe guarding the interest of the athletes and their health. This study of ski jumping uses field studies conducted during World Cup competitions, large-scale wind tunnel measurements with 1:1 models of ski jumpers in current equipment and highly accurate computer simulations of the flight phase that include the effects due to the athlete's position changes. Particular attention has been directed to the design of a reference jump that mirrors current flight style and equipment regulations (2001), and to the investigation of effects associated with variation in body mass, air density, and wind gusts during the simulated flight. The detailed analysis of the physics of ski jumping described here can be used for the investigation of all initial value and parameter variations that determine the flight path of a ski jumper and will form a reliable basis for setting regulations that will make it less attractive or even disadvantageous for the athlete to be extremely light.

  11. YACHTING CLUB

    CERN Document Server

    YACHTING CLUB

    2010-01-01

    INTERNAL RAGATTE - BEST EVER ! If you missed Internal Regatta III on Sunday 11 July, you missed one of the best we can recall! The winds were about perfect, fairly stable Bf 2 with periodic gusts higher and the resulting capsizes to keep crews concentrating. It was extremely hot but we ran the usual three heats for keelboats and a record four for dinghies, catamarans - where there was another record, surely: a total of 11 boats in that class, of which three privately owned by members. And a final record: we calculate five boats were competing in their first-ever regatta. Results on the webpage. Surprisingly for those who remember regattas of a couple of years back, only three keelboats competed, so there would have been plenty of scope for less experienced members to come along regardless and probably find themselves a place. It is also noteworthy that the keelboat winner was Andrea Messina with an - ummm, may I say - less experienced crew himself! We hope this win bodes well for his forthcoming Transl&am...

  12. Yachting club

    CERN Multimedia

    Yachting club

    2011-01-01

    Regattas everywhere (bis)! A fornight ago, we reported on imminent Match-Racing of the Surprises as the highlight of the season: it has now happened of course, and been written up on the Website Blog - along with the results of the Semaine du Soir of Versoix, which happened a week later, with many YCC teams competing: it is nice to report that our dinghies (either club-owned or skippered) wiped up the opposition! Sanja’s photo herewith from the Bol d’Or implies that there were some Surprises (and others) actually ahead of our Mic Mac - truth be told, there were, at different stages, but the event June 18/19 was a good regatta, if a very hard one as the wind strengths were Bf 6 with Bf7 gusts. Sanja reports that this regatta was more impressive and much harder than the SdS: skipper Thierry, on Mic Mac, did a great job, from an excellent start which kept her among the first ten Surprises for 4 hours - not bad, when they finished the regatta after ~13 hours, with 26th position out of 109 Su...

  13. A Look Inside Hurricane Alma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hurricane season in the eastern Pacific started off with a whimper late last month as Alma, a Category 2 hurricane, slowly made its way up the coast of Baja California, packing sustained winds of 110 miles per hour and gusts of 135 miles per hour. The above image of the hurricane was acquired on May 29, 2002, and displays the rainfall rates occurring within the storm. Click the image above to see an animated data visualization (3.8 MB) of the interior of Hurricane Alma. The images of the clouds seen at the beginning of the movie were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association's (NOAA's) Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite (GOES) network. As the movie continues, the clouds are peeled away to reveal an image of rainfall levels in the hurricane. The rainfall data were obtained by the Precipitation Radar aboard NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The Precipitation Radar bounces radio waves off of clouds to retrieve a reading of the number of large, rain-sized droplets within the clouds. Using these data, scientists can tell how much precipitation is occurring within and beneath a hurricane. In the movie, yellow denotes areas where 0.5 inches of rain is falling per hour, green denotes 1 inch per hour, and red denotes over 2 inches per hour. (Please note that high resolution still images of Hurricane Alma are available in the NASA Visible Earth in TIFF format.) Image and animation courtesy Lori Perkins, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  14. Pervasive aeolian activity along Curiosity's traverse in Gale Crater on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D.; Ewing, R. C.; Rossi, A.; Flahaut, J.; Fenton, L. K.; Geissler, P. E.; Michaels, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has safely landed in Gale Crater (Mars). This crater has been severely modified by the action of the wind which has led to the development of several dark dune fields. One of these fields crosses the landing ellipse from the NE to the SW, and despite its fresh appearance, no evidence of sand movement has been detected until recently. Here we present evidence of current aeolian activity in the form of ripple and dune migration close to the expected traverse of the MSL rover, Curiosity. We calculate a minimum ripple displacement of 1.16 m and a dune migration rate of 0.4 meters/Earth year. Both ripples and dunes migrated toward the SW, suggesting winds above the saltation threshold from the NE. Such winds are predicted by the MRAMS atmospheric model (Fig. 1). The dunes are undergoing changes on a timescale of weeks to a few years that should be detectable by rover instruments. Using theoretical and experimental considerations, we calculate a wind gust velocity of 35 m/s at 1.5 m of height. In addition, we estimate that saltating grains would reach a distance of ~27 m and extend a maximum height of 2 m above the surface. Our constraints on the wind regime provide a unique opportunity to use ground measurements from MSL to test the accuracy of winds predicted from orbital data.RAMS modeled winds in the MSL landing site

  15. LES-based generation of high-frequency fluctuation in wind turbulence obtained by meteorological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tetsuro; Kawaguchi, Masaharu; Kawai, Hidenori; Tao, Tao

    2017-11-01

    The connection between a meso-scale model and a micro-scale large eddy simulation (LES) is significant to simulate the micro-scale meteorological problem such as strong convective events due to the typhoon or the tornado using LES. In these problems the mean velocity profiles and the mean wind directions change with time according to the movement of the typhoons or tornadoes. Although, a fine grid micro-scale LES could not be connected to a coarse grid meso-scale WRF directly. In LES when the grid is suddenly refined at the interface of nested grids which is normal to the mean advection the resolved shear stresses decrease due to the interpolation errors and the delay of the generation of smaller scale turbulence that can be resolved on the finer mesh. For the estimation of wind gust disaster the peak wind acting on buildings and structures has to be correctly predicted. In the case of meteorological model the velocity fluctuations have a tendency of diffusive variation without the high frequency component due to the numerically filtering effects. In order to predict the peak value of wind velocity with good accuracy, this paper proposes a LES-based method for generating the higher frequency components of velocity and temperature fields obtained by meteorological model.

  16. Extreme value analysis of meteorological parameters observed during the period 1994-2001 at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramkumar, S.; Dole, M.L.; Nankar, D.P.; Rajan, M.P.; Gurg, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    In the design of engineering structures, an understanding of extreme weather conditions that may occur at the site of interest is very essential, so that the structures can be designed to withstand such situations. In this report an analysis of extreme values of meteorological parameters observed at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station site for the period 1994 -2001 is described. The parameters considered are maximum and minimum air temperature, maximum wind speed and gust, and maximum rainfall in a month, in a day, in an hour and annual rainfall. The extreme value analysis reveals that annual rainfall, maximum monthly rainfall, minimum air temperature and maximum wind speed at 10 m obey Fisher-Tippet Type -1 distribution whereas maximum daily rainfall, maximum hourly rainfall, maxinlum air temperature and maximum wind speed at 30 m obey Fisher-Tippet Type -2 distribution function. There is no difference in correlation coefficients and fit both extreme value distribution function. Co-efficients of the distribution functions for each variable are established. Extreme values of parameters corresponding to return periods of 50 and 100 years are derived. These derived extreme values are particularly useful for arriving at suitable design basis values to ensure the safety of any civil structure in and around Kakrapar Atomic Power Station site with respect to stresses due to weather conditions. (author)

  17. Enhancing COSMO-DE ensemble forecasts by inexpensive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Ben Bouallègue

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available COSMO-DE-EPS, a convection-permitting ensemble prediction system based on the high-resolution numerical weather prediction model COSMO-DE, is pre-operational since December 2010, providing probabilistic forecasts which cover Germany. This ensemble system comprises 20 members based on variations of the lateral boundary conditions, the physics parameterizations and the initial conditions. In order to increase the sample size in a computationally inexpensive way, COSMO-DE-EPS is combined with alternative ensemble techniques: the neighborhood method and the time-lagged approach. Their impact on the quality of the resulting probabilistic forecasts is assessed. Objective verification is performed over a six months period, scores based on the Brier score and its decomposition are shown for June 2011. The combination of the ensemble system with the alternative approaches improves probabilistic forecasts of precipitation in particular for high precipitation thresholds. Moreover, combining COSMO-DE-EPS with only the time-lagged approach improves the skill of area probabilities for precipitation and does not deteriorate the skill of 2 m-temperature and wind gusts forecasts.

  18. Observational and numerical study of the Vardaris wind regime in northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsis, I.; Giannaros, T. M.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.

    2016-05-01

    The Axios Valley, located in central-northern Greece, is surrounded by complex topography that plays a significant role in the modification of wind flow, both in terms of speed and direction. The characteristic wind regime of this valley is Vardaris, a northwesterly wind that prevails in this region, especially during the cold period of the year. Vardaris is well known for its consistent direction and high intensity, as well as for the effective advection of cold and dry air, often resulting to significant damages in local infrastructures and agriculture. A field campaign under the name AXIOS took place during the period from November 2007 through May 2008 in order to examine this particular wind flow. The analysis of the in situ observational data, which was funded by the research program THESPIA-KRIPIS, showed that topography plays a key role in intensifying Vardaris, generating gusts that approximated 30 m s- 1 during the experimental period. The air temperature and humidity fields were also found to be significantly influenced. In addition to the observational study, an intense Vardaris episode was simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at high horizontal resolution. Results revealed that the model was able to reproduce the favorable environmental conditions that lead to Vardaris occurrence, providing a useful insight on the physical mechanisms explaining its structure.

  19. A Time-Slotted On-Demand Routing Protocol for Mobile Ad Hoc Unmanned Vehicle Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hope Forsmann; Robert Hiromoto; John Svoboda

    2007-04-01

    The popularity of UAVs has increased dramatically because of their successful deployment in military operations, their ability to preserve human life, and the continual improvements in wireless communication that serves to increase their capabilities. We believe the usefulness of UAVs would be dramatically increased if formation flight were added to the list of capabilities. Currently, sustained formation flight with a cluster of UAVs has only been achieved with two nodes by the Multi-UAV Testbed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Park, 2004) Formation flight is a complex operation requiring the ability to adjust the flight patterns on the fly and correct for wind gusts, terrain, and differences in node equipment. All of which increases the amount of inner node communication. Since one of the problems with MANET communication is network congestion, we believe a first step towards formation flight can be made through improved inner node communication. We have investigated current communication routing protocols and developed an altered hybrid routing protocol in order to provide communication with less network congestion.

  20. Nimfes al Vinalopó. La poesia renaixentista d’un alacantí oblidat, Josep Gosalbes de Cunedo (s. XVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Biosca i Bas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available L’obra del poeta alacantí del segle XVI Josep Gosalbes de Cunedo ha passat a l’oblit. Alguns aspectes de la seua vida i obra mereixen atenció, com a mínim, per haver tractat temes propis de la seua terra. Alguns dels seus poemes tracten l’antiga Governació d’Oriola, al sud del regne de València, i celebren la creació del bisbat d’Oriola, motiu pel qual l’autor descriu el territori amb gust renaixentista. La seua amistat amb l’humanista Just Lipsi marca la seua biografia, on guerres i presó també estan presents. The work of the 16th. century poet from Alicante Joseph Gosalbes of Cunedo has been forgotten. Some aspects of his life and work deserve attention, at least because he had written about topics of their own land. Some of his poems deal with the former Region of Orihuela, in the south of Valencia kingdom, and celebrate the creation of the diocese of Orihuela, so the author describes this territory in a Renaissance style. His friendship with the humanist Justus Lipsius mark his biography, where wars and prison are also present.

  1. Regional tendencies of extreme wind characteristics in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radics, Dr.; Bartholy, Dr.; Péliné

    2009-09-01

    Human activities have substantial effects on climate system. It has already accepted that change in the long-term climatic mean state will have significant consequences in the global economy and society, but the most important effects of climate change may come from changes in the intensity and frequency of climatic extremes. It is therefore of great interest to document the extremes of surface wind that could assist in estimating the regional effects of climate change. The research presented is based on 34-year-long (1975-2008) wind (speed, direction, and wind gust) data sets of 36 Hungarian synoptic meteorological stations. After processing (including digitalisation of old instrumental records, quality control and homogenisation of wind time series) the measured wind data sets, time series and complex wind climate analysis were carried out. Spatial and temporal distributions of mean and extreme wind climate characteristics were estimated, wind extremes and trends were interpolated and mapped over the country. Finally, measured and reanalysed (ERA40) wind data were compared over Hungary, in order to verify not only the validity of ERA40 reanalysed data sets, but the adaptability of climate simulation results in estimation of regional climate change effects.

  2. Dynamic subgrid scale model used in a deep bundle turbulence prediction using the large eddy simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsamian, H.R.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1996-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most commonly occurring phenomena of engineering interest in the field of fluid mechanics. Since most flows are turbulent, there is a significant payoff for improved predictive models of turbulence. One area of concern is the turbulent buffeting forces experienced by the tubes in steam generators of nuclear power plants. Although the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe turbulent flow fields, the large number of scales of turbulence limit practical flow field calculations with current computing power. The dynamic subgrid scale closure model of Germano et. al (1991) is used in the large eddy simulation code GUST for incompressible isothermal flows. Tube bundle geometries of staggered and non-staggered arrays are considered in deep bundle simulations. The advantage of the dynamic subgrid scale model is the exclusion of an input model coefficient. The model coefficient is evaluated dynamically for each nodal location in the flow domain. Dynamic subgrid scale results are obtained in the form of power spectral densities and flow visualization of turbulent characteristics. Comparisons are performed among the dynamic subgrid scale model, the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model (Smagorinsky, 1963) (that is used as the base model for the dynamic subgrid scale model) and available experimental data. Spectral results of the dynamic subgrid scale model correlate better with experimental data. Satisfactory turbulence characteristics are observed through flow visualization

  3. Influence of guideway flexibility on maglev vehicle/guideway dynamic forces. Final report, July 1991-July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, L E; Ahlbeck, D R; Stekly, Z J; Gregorek, G M

    1992-07-01

    The report presents the results of a study investigating the dynamic interaction between aerial structures and maglev vehicles. The study includes three dimensional responses for attractive (EMS) maglev vehicle and repulsive (EDS) maglev vehicles and six different guideway structures. The analysis is conducted using original time domain computer models which incorporate up to 52 degrees of freedom for EMS systems and 44 degrees of freedom for the EDS systems, including multiple span guideways, multiple-vehicle trains, aerodynamic inputs with the special relations and structural properties associated with each major system component, and with appropriate maglev suspension characteristics interconnecting vehicle to guideway. The various guideway structure and vehicle combinations are analyzed separately for two representative guideway lengths of 21m and 39m. Results are presented for vehicle accelerations in terms of ride comfort accelerations and for guideway accelerations and bending moments. Comparisons from the analysis include EMS vs. EDS system responses, effects of span length, effects of position in car, effects of multiple-vehicle trains, effects of multiple simple span guideways vs. continuous span guideways, effects of wind gusts, and effects of beam bearing pad stiffness. Costs of each guideway is estimated in 1992 dollars.

  4. Study of Model Predictive Control for Path-Following Autonomous Ground Vehicle Control under Crosswind Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Yakub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparative study of model predictive control approaches of two-wheel steering, four-wheel steering, and a combination of two-wheel steering with direct yaw moment control manoeuvres for path-following control in autonomous car vehicle dynamics systems. Single-track mode, based on a linearized vehicle and tire model, is used. Based on a given trajectory, we drove the vehicle at low and high forward speeds and on low and high road friction surfaces for a double-lane change scenario in order to follow the desired trajectory as close as possible while rejecting the effects of wind gusts. We compared the controller based on both simple and complex bicycle models without and with the roll vehicle dynamics for different types of model predictive control manoeuvres. The simulation result showed that the model predictive control gave a better performance in terms of robustness for both forward speeds and road surface variation in autonomous path-following control. It also demonstrated that model predictive control is useful to maintain vehicle stability along the desired path and has an ability to eliminate the crosswind effect.

  5. Observations of Building Performance under Combined Wind and Surge Loading from Hurricane Harvey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, F.; Roueche, D. B.; Krupar, R. J.; Smith, D. J.; Soto, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Harvey struck the Texas coastline on August 25, 2017, as a Category 4 hurricane - the first major hurricane to reach the US in twelve years. Wind gusts over 130 mph and storm surge as high as 12.5 ft caused widespread damage to buildings and critical infrastructure in coastal communities including Rockport, Fulton, Port Aransas and Aransas Pass. This study presents the methodology and preliminary observations of a coordinated response effort to document residential building performance under wind and storm surge loading. Over a twelve day survey period the study team assessed the performance of more than 1,000 individual, geo-located residential buildings. Assessments were logged via a smartphone application to facilitate rapid collection and collation of geotagged photographs, building attributes and structural details, and structural damage observations. Detailed assessments were also made of hazard intensity, specifically storm surge heights and both wind speed and direction indicators. Preliminary observations and findings will be presented, showing strong gradients in damage between inland and coastal regions of the affected areas that may be due in part to enhanced individual loading effects of wind and storm surge and potentially joint-hazard loading effects. Contributing factors to the many cases of disproportionate damage observed in close proximity will also be discussed. Ongoing efforts to relate building damage to near-surface hazard measurements (e.g., radar, anemometry) in close proximity will also be described.

  6. Monitoring of wind load and response for cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai-yuen; Chan, Wai-Yee K.; Man, King-Leung

    2001-08-01

    Structural health monitoring for the three cable-supported bridges located in the West of Hong Kong or the Tsing Ma Control Area has been carried out since the opening of these bridges to public traffic. The three cable-supported bridges are referred to as the Tsing Ma (suspension) Bridge, the Kap Shui Mun (cable-stayed) Bridge and the Ting Kau (cable-stayed) Bridge. The structural health monitoring works involved are classified as six monitoring categories, namely, wind load and response, temperature load and response, traffic load and response, geometrical configuration monitoring, strains and stresses/forces monitoring and global dynamic characteristics monitoring. As wind loads and responses had been a major concern in the design and construction stages, this paper therefore outlines the work of wind load and response monitoring on Tsing Ma, Kap Shui Mun and Ting Kau Bridges. The paper starts with a brief description of the sensory systems. The description includes the layout and performance requirements of sensory systems for wind load and responses monitoring. Typical results of wind load and response monitoring in graphical forms are then presented. These graphical forms include the plots of wind rose diagrams, wind incidences vs wind speeds, wind turbulence intensities, wind power spectra, gust wind factors, coefficient of terrain roughness, extreme wind analyses, deck deflections/rotations vs wind speeds, acceleration spectra, acceleration/displacement contours, and stress demand ratios. Finally conclusions on wind load and response monitoring on the three cable-supported bridges are drawn.

  7. Implementation and flight tests for the Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS). Part 1: Flight software equations, flight test description and selected flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueschen, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Five flight tests of the Digital Automated Landing System (DIALS) were conducted on the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Transportation Research Vehicle (TSRV) -- a modified Boeing 737 aircraft for advanced controls and displays research. These flight tests were conducted at NASA's Wallops Flight Center using the microwave landing system (MLS) installation on runway 22. This report describes the flight software equations of the DIALS which was designed using modern control theory direct-digital design methods and employed a constant gain Kalman filter. Selected flight test performance data is presented for localizer (runway centerline) capture and track at various intercept angles, for glideslope capture and track of 3, 4.5, and 5 degree glideslopes, for the decrab maneuver, and for the flare maneuver. Data is also presented to illustrate the system performance in the presence of cross, gust, and shear winds. The mean and standard deviation of the peak position errors for localizer capture were, respectively, 24 feet and 26 feet. For mild wind conditions, glideslope and localizer tracking position errors did not exceed, respectively, 5 and 20 feet. For gusty wind conditions (8 to 10 knots), these errors were, respectively, 10 and 30 feet. Ten hands off automatic lands were performed. The standard deviation of the touchdown position and velocity errors from the mean values were, respectively, 244 feet and 0.7 feet/sec.

  8. How prepared were the Puerto Rico Seismic Network sites for the arrival of Hurricane Maria? Lessons learned on communications, power and infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano, V.; Lugo, J.; Baez-Sanchez, G.

    2017-12-01

    For exactly 85 years the island of Puerto Rico in the northeastern Caribbean was spared from catastrophic category 4 hurricane winds. Then Hurricane Maria arrived on September 20, 2017 with maximum sustained winds of up to 155 mph. The eye of the hurricane crossed the island from southeast to northwest in eight hours leaving almost a meter of rainfall on its path. Sustained winds, gusts and precipitation were most certainly going to affect the seismic and geodetic equipment the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) use for locating earthquakes in the region. PRSN relies on 35 seismic stations (velocity and strong-motion) to characterize the seismic behavior of the island and 15 geodetic (GNSS) stations to determine crustal deformation of the Puerto Rico - Virgin Islands microplate. PRSN stations have been designed to withstand earthquakes. However, the equipment suffered considerable damage due to the strong winds especially station communication towers. This coupled with catastrophic damage to the telecommunication and power grids of the island had severe effects on the network. Additionally, the level of devastation was such that it hampered the ability of PRSN staff to visit the sites for assessment and repair. Here we present the effects of category 4 hurricane had on our seismic and geodetic sites, examine the susceptibility of the PRSN stations' power and communications, and discuss future plans to recuperate and improve station resiliency for future catastrophic events. These lessons learned hopefully will help harden sites of networks, agencies and/or institutions that rely on similar infrastructure.

  9. A Remotely Deployable Wind Sonic Anemometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Awais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication and computing shape up base for explosion of Internet of Things (IoT era. Humans can efficiently control the devices around their environment as per requirements because of IoT, the communication between different devices brings more flexibility in surrounding. Useful data is also gathered from some of these devices to create Big Data; where, further analysis assist in making life easier by developing good business models corresponding to user needs, enhance scientific research, formulating weather prediction or monitoring systems and contributing in other relative fields as well. Thus, in this research a remotely deployable IoT enabled Wind Sonic Anemometer has been designed and deployed to calculate average wind speed, direction, and gust. The proposed design is remotely deployable, user-friendly, power efficient and cost-effective because of opted modules i.e., ultrasonic sensors, GSM module, and solar panel. The testbed was also deployed at the roof of Computer & Information Systems Engineering (CIS department, NED UET. Further, its calibration has been carried out by using long short-term memory (LSTM, a deep learning technique; where ground truth data has been gathered from mechanical wind speed sensor (NRG-40 H deployed at top of Industrial & Manufacturing (IM department of NED UET. The obtained results are satisfactory and the performance of designed sensor is also good under various weather conditions.

  10. Effects of pressure angle and tip relief on the life of speed increasing gearbox: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Sankar; Kumaresan, Manivarma; Muthusamy, Nataraj

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines failure of helical gear in speed increasing gearbox used in the wind turbine generator (WTG). In addition, an attempt has been made to get suitable gear micro-geometry such as pressure angle and tip relief to minimize the gear failure in the wind turbines. As the gear trains in the wind turbine gearbox is prearranged with higher speed ratio and the gearboxes experience shock load due to atmospheric turbulence, gust wind speed, non-synchronization of pitching, frequent grid drops and failure of braking, the gear failure occurs either in the intermediate or high speed stage pinion. KISS soft gear calculation software was used to determine the gear specifications and analysis is carried out in ANSYS software version.11.0 for the existing and the proposed gear to evaluate the performance of bending stress tooth deflection and stiffness. The main objective of this research study is to propose suitable gear micro-geometry that is tip relief and pressure angle blend for increasing tooth strength of the helical gear used in the wind turbine for trouble free operation.

  11. Micro-Scale Properties of Different Bora Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Šoljan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use 20 Hz wind measurements on three levels (2, 5, and 10 m to investigate the differences in micro-scale properties of different bora types, i.e., deep and shallow bora with further subdivision to cyclonic and anticyclonic bora cases. Using Fourier spectral analysis, we investigate a suitable turbulence averaging scale and bora gust pulsations. The obtained data set is further used to test the Monin–Obukhov similarity theory, the surface layer stratification, the behavior of the terms in the prognostic turbulence kinetic energy equation, and the wind profiles. One of our main goals is to identify possible micro-scale differences between shallow and deep bora types because of the possible different mountain wave dynamics in those flows. We found that a turbulence averaging scale of 30 min is suitable for this location and is in agreement with previous bora studies. The wind speed power spectral densities of all selected bora episodes showed pulsations with periods of 2–8 min. This suggests that mountain wave breaking was present in all cases, regardless of flow depth and synoptic type. The stability parameter analysis confirmed the near-neutral thermal stratification of bora; a consequence of intensive mechanical mixing. No significant differences related to bora type were observed in other micro-scale parameters.

  12. Control and navigation system for a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyong Zhai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a flight control and navigation system for a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV with low-cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS sensors. The system is designed under the inner loop and outer loop strategy. The trajectory tracking navigation loop is the outer loop of the attitude loop, while the attitude control loop is the outer loop of the stabilization loop. The proportional-integral-derivative (PID control was adopted for stabilization and attitude control. The three-dimensional (3D trajectory tracking control of a UAV could be approximately divided into lateral control and longitudinal control. The longitudinal control employs traditional linear PID feedback to achieve the desired altitude of the UAV, while the lateral control uses a non-linear control method to complete the desired trajectory. The non-linear controller can automatically adapt to ground velocity change, which is usually caused by gust disturbance, thus the UAV has good wind resistance characteristics. Flight tests and survey missions were carried out with our self-developed delta fixed-wing UAV and MEMS-based autopilot to confirm the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed navigation method.

  13. Penultimate modeling of spatial extremes: statistical inference for max-infinitely divisible processes

    KAUST Repository

    Huser, Raphaël

    2018-01-09

    Extreme-value theory for stochastic processes has motivated the statistical use of max-stable models for spatial extremes. However, fitting such asymptotic models to maxima observed over finite blocks is problematic when the asymptotic stability of the dependence does not prevail in finite samples. This issue is particularly serious when data are asymptotically independent, such that the dependence strength weakens and eventually vanishes as events become more extreme. We here aim to provide flexible sub-asymptotic models for spatially indexed block maxima, which more realistically account for discrepancies between data and asymptotic theory. We develop models pertaining to the wider class of max-infinitely divisible processes, extending the class of max-stable processes while retaining dependence properties that are natural for maxima: max-id models are positively associated, and they yield a self-consistent family of models for block maxima defined over any time unit. We propose two parametric construction principles for max-id models, emphasizing a point process-based generalized spectral representation, that allows for asymptotic independence while keeping the max-stable extremal-$t$ model as a special case. Parameter estimation is efficiently performed by pairwise likelihood, and we illustrate our new modeling framework with an application to Dutch wind gust maxima calculated over different time units.

  14. SEEWIND - South-East European Wind Energy Exploitation. Wind energy research in South East Europe under the EC FP6 programme; SEEWIND - South-East European Wind Energy Exploitation. Windenergieforschung im 6. Rahmenprogramm der Europaeischen Union in Suedosteuropa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmeier, H. [Verein Energiewerkstatt (Austria)

    2008-08-15

    Large areas in South East Europe offer perfect conditions for the Utilisation of Wind Energy. Local wind systems like ''Bora'', which occurs along the Adriatic Sea, or ''Koshava'', which flows between the ridge of the Carpathian Mountains and the Balkan Mountains from Romania over to Serbia, are generated through differences in pressure and temperature between the adjacent regions. Those wind systems therefore can be described as 'home made' and have very individual characteristics. Despite the excellent wind conditions of those locations, the mainly cliffy and complex terrain and the extreme wind conditions with turbulences and strong gusts make great demands on the design and operation of the wind turbines. Exactly those problems the European Commission asked to be investigated and therefore defined 'Complex terrain and local wind systems' as one of the research topics in the last call of the 6th Framework Programme. Under the lead management of Verein Energiewerkstatt, a consortium of ten partners from seven middle- and southeast European countries took part in this call for proposals and received acceptance for the submitted Project ''SEEWIND - South-East European Wind Energy Exploitation''. (orig.)

  15. A wrinkle in flight: the role of elastin fibres in the mechanical behaviour of bat wing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jorn A; Konow, Nicolai; Bearnot, Andrew; Swartz, Sharon M

    2015-05-06

    Bats fly using a thin wing membrane composed of compliant, anisotropic skin. Wing membrane skin deforms dramatically as bats fly, and its three-dimensional configurations depend, in large part, on the mechanical behaviour of the tissue. Large, macroscopic elastin fibres are an unusual mechanical element found in the skin of bat wings. We characterize the fibre orientation and demonstrate that elastin fibres are responsible for the distinctive wrinkles in the surrounding membrane matrix. Uniaxial mechanical testing of the wing membrane, both parallel and perpendicular to elastin fibres, is used to distinguish the contribution of elastin and the surrounding matrix to the overall membrane mechanical behaviour. We find that the matrix is isotropic within the plane of the membrane and responsible for bearing load at high stress; elastin fibres are responsible for membrane anisotropy and only contribute substantially to load bearing at very low stress. The architecture of elastin fibres provides the extreme extensibility and self-folding/self-packing of the wing membrane skin. We relate these findings to flight with membrane wings and discuss the aeromechanical significance of elastin fibre pre-stress, membrane excess length, and how these parameters may aid bats in resisting gusts and preventing membrane flutter. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Turbulence and Mountain Wave Conditions Observed with an Airborne 2-Micron Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Ehernberger, Jack; Bogue, Rodney; Ashburn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Joint efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, and industry partners are enhancing the capability of airborne wind and turbulence detection. The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) was flown on three series of flights to assess its capability over a range of altitudes, air mass conditions, and gust phenomena. This paper describes the observation of mountain waves and turbulence induced by mountain waves over the Tehachapi and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges in southern California by lidar onboard the NASA Airborne Science DC-8 airplane. The examples in this paper compare lidar-predicted mountain waves and wave-induced turbulence to subsequent aircraft-measured true airspeed. Airplane acceleration data is presented describing the effects of the wave-induced turbulence on the DC-8 airplane. Highlights of the lidar-predicted airspeed from the two flights show increases of 12 m/s at the mountain wave interface and peak-to-peak airspeed changes of 10 m/s and 15 m/s in a span of 12 s in moderate turbulence.

  17. An analytical approach for predicting the energy capture and conversion by impulsively-excited bistable vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, R. L.; Zhang, Chunlin; Li, Bing; Wang, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive energies are abundant throughout the natural and built environments, for instance as stimulated by wind gusts, foot-steps, or vehicle-road interactions. In the interest of maximizing the sustainability of society's technological developments, one idea is to capture these high-amplitude and abrupt energies and convert them into usable electrical power such as for sensors which otherwise rely on less sustainable power supplies. In this spirit, the considerable sensitivity to impulse-type events previously uncovered for bistable oscillators has motivated recent experimental and numerical studies on the power generation performance of bistable vibration energy harvesters. To lead to an effective and efficient predictive tool and design guide, this research develops a new analytical approach to estimate the electroelastic response and power generation of a bistable energy harvester when excited by an impulse. Comparison with values determined by direct simulation of the governing equations shows that the analytically predicted net converted energies are very accurate for a wide range of impulse strengths. Extensive experimental investigations are undertaken to validate the analytical approach and it is seen that the predicted estimates of the impulsive energy conversion are in excellent agreement with the measurements, and the detailed structural dynamics are correctly reproduced. As a result, the analytical approach represents a significant leap forward in the understanding of how to effectively leverage bistable structures as energy harvesting devices and introduces new means to elucidate the transient and far-from-equilibrium dynamics of nonlinear systems more generally.

  18. Analysis of the wind influence on the aerodynamic drag in the case of a certain emplacement of the pantograph on the electric rail vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin ARSENE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wind gusts with high speed can negative affect the operation of the railway electric vehicles. These vehicles can achieve high performances, as long as the power supply is ensured, without discontinuities or interruptions in the process. This work aims at conducting an analysis regarding the wind influence with regard to the energy collector placed on the vehicle bodywork taking in account a certain positioning of the active pantograph. To this end, in a first step, the EP3 pantograph which was raised to its maximum working height was 3-D modeled. As regards the simulation, we consider the case in which the equipment is placed on the vehicle so that the angle formed by the articulation of the arms is pointing in the direction of the air flow. The simulation is carried out for different points of the angles ranging between [0o, 180o] at the relative velocity of the fluid of 0m / s, 10m / s, 20m / s and 30m / s.

  19. A concept of active mount for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souleille, A.; Lampert, T.; Lafarga, V.; Hellegouarch, S.; Rondineau, A.; Rodrigues, G.; Collette, C.

    2018-06-01

    Sensitive payloads mounted on top of launchers are subjected to many sources of disturbances during the flight. The most severe dynamic loads arise from the ignition of the motors, gusts, pressure fluctuations in the booster and from the separation of the boosters. The transmission of these dynamic forces can be reduced by mounting payloads on passive isolators, which comes at the expense of harmful amplifications of the motion at low frequency due to suspension resonances. To bypass this shortcoming, this paper presents a novel concept of active mount for aerospace payloads, which is easy to install, and meets two objectives. The first one is a high damping authority on both suspension resonances and flexible resonances without compromising the isolation and large stability margins of the closed loop system due to the collocation of the actuator and the sensor. The second one is a broadband reduction of the dynamic force transmitted to the payload, which was achieved in terms of 16 dB. The concept is presented in the first part of the paper and studied numerically and experimentally on a single degree of freedom isolator. A commercial isolator has been chosen for the purpose of the demonstration. The second part of the paper is dedicated to experimental validations on multi-degree of freedom scaled test benches. It is shown that the force feedback allows damping of both suspension and flexible modes (first and second modes, respectively), and significantly reducing the force transmitted in some broad frequency ranges.

  20. Regression Model to Predict Global Solar Irradiance in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairuniza Ahmed Kutty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel regression model is developed to estimate the monthly global solar irradiance in Malaysia. The model is developed based on different available meteorological parameters, including temperature, cloud cover, rain precipitate, relative humidity, wind speed, pressure, and gust speed, by implementing regression analysis. This paper reports on the details of the analysis of the effect of each prediction parameter to identify the parameters that are relevant to estimating global solar irradiance. In addition, the proposed model is compared in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE, mean bias error (MBE, and the coefficient of determination (R2 with other models available from literature studies. Seven models based on single parameters (PM1 to PM7 and five multiple-parameter models (PM7 to PM12 are proposed. The new models perform well, with RMSE ranging from 0.429% to 1.774%, R2 ranging from 0.942 to 0.992, and MBE ranging from −0.1571% to 0.6025%. In general, cloud cover significantly affects the estimation of global solar irradiance. However, cloud cover in Malaysia lacks sufficient influence when included into multiple-parameter models although it performs fairly well in single-parameter prediction models.

  1. Environmental policies to protect pollinators: attributes and actions needed to avert climate borne crisis of oil seed agriculture in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Burhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate change on oil seed crop is getting more and more pronounced with each passing day, resulting in reduced crop yields in Pakistan. Agriculture is the mainstay of Pakistan’s economy, however it is subjected to severe climatic vulnerabilities like floods, droughts, and changing rainfall patterns. Climate change has a marked influence on the population and distribution of pollinators. Extreme weather events can further aggravate the situation by causing high overwintering losses. Less roving pollinators, such as small beetles and ground nesting bees, may be among the most severely affected by flooding and gusts. Extreme conditions not only can disrupt the livelihoods of individual insects, but can also negatively impact entire colonies or local populations. It is recommended to take offensive measures to address these issues, otherwise the area under oil seed crops may decrease resulting in poor market stability index. Moreover, in this regard, there is desperate need to aggressively explore opportunities of capacity building and institutional strengthening to address the climate change issues in Pakistan. Through this review, it is hoped that a proactive risk assessment approach to climate change can assist the Government in making strategies against the losses of pollinator services in Pakistan.

  2. Journey in Aeronautical Research: A Career at NASA Langley Research Center. No. 12; Monographs in Aerospace History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. Hewitt

    1998-01-01

    An autobiography, of a noted aeronautical engineer, W. Hewitt Phillips, whose career spanned 58 years (1940-1998) at NASA Langley is presented. This work covers his early years to the Sputnik launch. His interests have been in research in aeronautics and in the related problems of spaceflight. After an introduction, his early life through the college years is reviewed, and his early interest in model airplanes is described. The first assignment for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), which would later become NASA, was with the Flight Research Division. His early work involved "Flying Qualities", i.e., the stability and control characteristics of an airplane. The next chapter describes his early analytical studies. His work during World War II in the design of military airplanes, and the other effects of the war on research activities, is covered in the next two chapters. This research was involved in such innovations and refinements as the swept wing, the flettner tabs, servo tabs, spring tabs and whirlerons. The rest of the work covers the research which Mr. Hewitt was involved in, after the war until the Sputnik launch. These areas include unsteady lift, measurements of turbulence in the atmosphere, gust alleviation, and lateral response to random turbulence. He was also involved in several investigations of airplane accidents. The last two chapters cover the administration of the Langley Research Center, and the dawn of the Space Age. A complete bibliography of reports written by Mr. Hewitt, is included.

  3. Wind tunnel investigation of a USB-STOL transport semi-span model. 2; CAD sekkei ni yoru USB-STOL ki hansai mokei no fudo shiken. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H; Okuyama, M; Fujieda, H; Fujita, T; Iwasaki, A [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-11-01

    The Quiet Short Take-Off and Landing (QSTOL) Experimental Aircraft `ASKA` has been researched and developed by the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL). The `ASKA` was based upon the airframe of the home produced C-1 tactical transport which was modified into the Upper Surface Blowing (USB) -powered high- lift STOL aircraft. The wing configuration, however, was not changed. Therefore, this Experimental Aircraft does not always have the optimum configuration of a USB-type aircraft. So the authors tried to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of the STOL Aircraft. This paper describes the investigations which have been conducted to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic jet transport semi-span model with an Upper Surface Blown Flap system which has been newly designed using the NAL STOL-CAD program. The model had an 8.2{degree} swept wing of aspect ratio 10.0 and four turbofan engines with short USB nozzles. The tests were conducted in the NAL 2{times}2m Gust Wind Tunnel with closed section and results were obtained for several flap and slat deflections at jet momentum coefficients from 0 to 1.85. Compared with the aerodynamic characteristics of the `ASKA` model, we determined that the airframe weight can be reduced and the aerodynamic characteristics can be improved significantly. 14 refs., 44 figs.

  4. A zero torsional stiffness twist morphing blade as a wind turbine load alleviation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachenal, X; Daynes, S; Weaver, P M

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design, analysis and realization of a zero stiffness twist morphing wind turbine blade. The morphing blade is designed to actively twist as a means of alleviating the gust loads which reduce the fatigue life of wind turbine blades. The morphing structure exploits an elastic strain energy balance within the blade to enable large twisting deformations with modest actuation requirements. While twist is introduced using the warping of the blade skin, internal pre-stressed members ensure that a constant strain energy balance is achieved throughout the deformation, resulting in a zero torsional stiffness structure. The torsional stability of the morphing blade is characterized by analysing the elastic strain energy in the device. Analytical models of the skin, the pre-stressed components and the complete blade are compared to their respective finite element models as well as experimental results. The load alleviation potential of the adaptive structure is quantified using a two-dimensional steady flow aerodynamic model which is experimentally validated with wind tunnel measurements. (paper)

  5. A zero torsional stiffness twist morphing blade as a wind turbine load alleviation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenal, X.; Daynes, S.; Weaver, P. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design, analysis and realization of a zero stiffness twist morphing wind turbine blade. The morphing blade is designed to actively twist as a means of alleviating the gust loads which reduce the fatigue life of wind turbine blades. The morphing structure exploits an elastic strain energy balance within the blade to enable large twisting deformations with modest actuation requirements. While twist is introduced using the warping of the blade skin, internal pre-stressed members ensure that a constant strain energy balance is achieved throughout the deformation, resulting in a zero torsional stiffness structure. The torsional stability of the morphing blade is characterized by analysing the elastic strain energy in the device. Analytical models of the skin, the pre-stressed components and the complete blade are compared to their respective finite element models as well as experimental results. The load alleviation potential of the adaptive structure is quantified using a two-dimensional steady flow aerodynamic model which is experimentally validated with wind tunnel measurements.

  6. Climatology at the Roque de LOS Muchachos Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Antonia M.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana

    2009-09-01

    The Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) at La Palma (Canary Islands) is one of the two top pre-selected sites for hosting the future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), the other ones are Ventarrones (Chile), Macon (Argentine) and Aklim (Maroc). Meteorological and seeing conditions are crucial both for the site selection and for telescope design and feasibility studies for adaptive optics. The ELTs shall be very sensitive to wind behavior when operating in open air, therefore ground level wind velocity and wind gust are also required for the feasibility of the telescope construction. Here we analyze the wind speed and wind direction, the air temperature, the relative humidity and the barometric pressure statistical results obtained from data recorded at different sites at the ORM by several Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) since 1985, day and night time separately. Ground wind speed regimes (775mbar) are compared with those provided by satellites from 200 to 700mbar. There exists also observational evidence of the correlation between the seeing and the wind speed and wind direction that will be discussed in this work.

  7. Cloud-resolving model intercomparison of an MC3E squall line case: Part I-Convective updrafts: CRM Intercomparison of a Squall Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Han, Bin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Varble, Adam [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Utah USA; Morrison, Hugh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; North, Kirk [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec USA; Kollias, Pavlos [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec USA; School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Chen, Baojun [School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Dong, Xiquan [Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson Arizona USA; Giangrande, Scott E. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Khain, Alexander [The Institute of the Earth Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem Israel; Lin, Yun [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station Texas USA; Mansell, Edward [NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman Oklahoma USA; Milbrandt, Jason A. [Meteorological Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Dorval Canada; Stenz, Ronald [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Thompson, Gregory [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Wang, Yuan [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA

    2017-09-06

    A constrained model intercomparison study of a mid-latitude mesoscale squall line is performed using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model at 1-km horizontal grid spacing with eight cloud microphysics schemes, to understand specific processes that lead to the large spread of simulated cloud and precipitation at cloud-resolving scales, with a focus of this paper on convective cores. Various observational data are employed to evaluate the baseline simulations. All simulations tend to produce a wider convective area than observed, but a much narrower stratiform area, with most bulk schemes overpredicting radar reflectivity. The magnitudes of the virtual potential temperature drop, pressure rise, and the peak wind speed associated with the passage of the gust front are significantly smaller compared with the observations, suggesting simulated cool pools are weaker. Simulations also overestimate the vertical velocity and Ze in convective cores as compared with observational retrievals. The modeled updraft velocity and precipitation have a significant spread across the eight schemes even in this strongly dynamically-driven system. The spread of updraft velocity is attributed to the combined effects of the low-level perturbation pressure gradient determined by cold pool intensity and buoyancy that is not necessarily well correlated to differences in latent heating among the simulations. Variability of updraft velocity between schemes is also related to differences in ice-related parameterizations, whereas precipitation variability increases in no-ice simulations because of scheme differences in collision-coalescence parameterizations.

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    An active controls technology (ACT) system architecture was selected based on current technology system elements and optimal control theory was evaluated for use in analyzing and synthesizing ACT multiple control laws. The system selected employs three redundant computers to implement all of the ACT functions, four redundant smaller computers to implement the crucial pitch-augmented stability function, and a separate maintenance and display computer. The reliability objective of probability of crucial function failure of less than 1 x 10 to the -9th power per flight of 1 hr can be met with current technology system components, if the software is assumed fault free and coverage approaching 1.0 can be provided. The optimal control theory approach to ACT control law synthesis yielded comparable control law performance much more systematically and directly than the classical s-domain approach. The ACT control law performance, although somewhat degraded by the inclusion of representative nonlinearities, remained quite effective. Certain high-frequency gust-load alleviation functions may require increased surface rate capability.

  9. Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Peak wind speed is important element in 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS). Forecasts issued for planning operations at KSC/CCAFS. 45 WS wind advisories issued for wind gusts greater than or equal to 25 kt. 35 kt and 50 kt from surface to 300 ft. AMU developed cool-season (Oct - Apr) tool to help 45 WS forecast: daily peak wind speed, 5-minute average speed at time of peak wind, and probability peak speed greater than or equal to 25 kt, 35 kt, 50 kt. AMU tool also forecasts daily average wind speed from 30 ft to 60 ft. Phase I and II tools delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). Phase II tool also delivered as Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) GUI. Phase I and II forecast methods were compared to climatology, 45 WS wind advisories and North American Mesoscale model (MesoNAM) forecasts in a verification data set.

  10. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird. Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust – two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc., and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  11. Dalt del tren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Subirana

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Ens consta que la saviesa popular hi toca més del que a aquest temps d’enquestes, telèfons mòbils i targetes de crèdit li ve de gust admetre, per això em fa gràcia, en veure la pausada però continuada intrusió de la cultura catalana a Internet, recordar les cançons de quan era petit: “Dalt del tren, tots anem-hi dalt del tren, hi ha lloc per tota la gent”, dèiem, i “El tren pinxo de Banyoles és el més bonic que hi ha, ple de llaunes i cassoles i barrets de capellà”. I resulta que per una vegada a la vida hem pujat, efectivament, dalt del tren que passava per l’estació de Catalunya i en cinc anys hem passat de gairebé res a prou pàgines amb un contingut, a més, apreciable i, sobretot, a un petit teixit de persones i institucions que han entès la importància de la revolució comunicativa que Internet representa i que hi teixeixen i projecten webs amb el convenciment dels conversos.

  12. V-stack piezoelectric actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; Clark, Robert L.

    2001-07-01

    Aeroelastic control of wings by means of a distributed, trailing-edge control surface is of interest with regards to maneuvers, gust alleviation, and flutter suppression. The use of high energy density, piezoelectric materials as motors provides an appealing solution to this problem. A comparative analysis of the state of the art actuators is currently being conducted. A new piezoelectric actuator design is presented. This actuator meets the requirements for trailing edge flap actuation in both stroke and force. It is compact, simple, sturdy, and leverages stroke geometrically with minimum force penalties while displaying linearity over a wide range of stroke. The V-Stack Piezoelectric Actuator, consists of a base, a lever, two piezoelectric stacks, and a pre-tensioning element. The work is performed alternately by the two stacks, placed on both sides of the lever. Pre-tensioning can be readily applied using a torque wrench, obviating the need for elastic elements and this is for the benefit of the stiffness of the actuator. The characteristics of the actuator are easily modified by changing the base or the stacks. A prototype was constructed and tested experimentally to validate the theoretical model.

  13. Linking nutrient enrichment, sediment erodibility and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, B.; Mahon, R.; Sojka, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment movement in coastal lagoons affects nutrient flux and primary producer growth. Previous research has shown that sediment erodibility is affected by biofilm concentration and that growth of benthic organisms, which produce biofilm, is affected by nutrient enrichment. However, researchers have not examined possible links between nutrient addition and sediment erodibility. We manipulated nutrient levels in the water column of 16 microcosms filled with homogenized sediment from a shallow coastal lagoon and artificial seawater to determine the effects on biofilm growth, measured through chlorophyll a and colloidal carbohydrate concentrations. Erosion tests using a Gust microcosm were conducted to determine the relationship between sediment erodibility and biofilm concentration. Results show that carbohydrate levels decreased with increasing nutrient enrichment and were unrelated to chlorophyll concentrations and erodibility. The nutrient levels did not predictably affect the chlorophyll levels, with lower chlorophyll concentrations in the control and medium enrichment treatments than the low and high enrichment treatments. Controls on biofilm growth are still unclear and the assumed relationship between carbohydrates and erodibility may be invalid. Understanding how biofilms respond to nutrient enrichment and subsequent effects on sediment erodibility is essential for protecting and restoring shallow coastal systems.

  14. Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study of a Squall Line Case from MC3E - Properties of Convective Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Varble, A.; Morrison, H.; North, K.; Kollias, P.; Chen, B.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Khain, A.; Lin, Y.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Stenz, R.; Thompson, G.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult to (1) further our understanding of deep convection and (2) define "benchmarks" and then limit their use in parameterization developments. A constrained model intercomparsion study on a mid-latitude mesoscale squall line is performed using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model at 1-km horizontal grid spacing with eight cloud microphysics schemes to understand specific processes that lead to the large spreads of simulated convection and precipitation. Various observational data are employed to evaluate the baseline simulations. All simulations tend to produce a wider convective area but a much narrower stratiform area. The magnitudes of virtual potential temperature drop, pressure rise, and wind speed peak associated with the passage of the gust front are significantly smaller compared with the observations, suggesting simulated cool pools are weaker. Simulations generally overestimate the vertical velocity and radar reflectivity in convective cores compared with the retrievals. The modeled updraft velocity and precipitation have a significant spread across eight schemes. The spread of updraft velocity is the combination of both low-level pressure perturbation gradient (PPG) and buoyancy. Both PPG and thermal buoyancy are small for simulations of weak convection but both are large for those of strong convection. Ice-related parameterizations contribute majorly to the spread of updraft velocity, while they are not the reason for the large spread of precipitation. The understandings gained in this study can help to focus future observations and parameterization development.

  15. A concept of active mount for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souleille, A.; Lampert, T.; Lafarga, V.; Hellegouarch, S.; Rondineau, A.; Rodrigues, G.; Collette, C.

    2017-10-01

    Sensitive payloads mounted on top of launchers are subjected to many sources of disturbances during the flight. The most severe dynamic loads arise from the ignition of the motors, gusts, pressure fluctuations in the booster and from the separation of the boosters. The transmission of these dynamic forces can be reduced by mounting payloads on passive isolators, which comes at the expense of harmful amplifications of the motion at low frequency due to suspension resonances. To bypass this shortcoming, this paper presents a novel concept of active mount for aerospace payloads, which is easy to install, and meets two objectives. The first one is a high damping authority on both suspension resonances and flexible resonances without compromising the isolation and large stability margins of the closed loop system due to the collocation of the actuator and the sensor. The second one is a broadband reduction of the dynamic force transmitted to the payload, which was achieved in terms of 16 dB. The concept is presented in the first part of the paper and studied numerically and experimentally on a single degree of freedom isolator. A commercial isolator has been chosen for the purpose of the demonstration. The second part of the paper is dedicated to experimental validations on multi-degree of freedom scaled test benches. It is shown that the force feedback allows damping of both suspension and flexible modes (first and second modes, respectively), and significantly reducing the force transmitted in some broad frequency ranges.

  16. A self-similar solution of a curved shock wave and its time-dependent force variation for a starting flat plate airfoil in supersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijun CHEN

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of aeroelasticity and maneuvering of command surface and gust wing interaction involves a starting flow period which can be seen as the flow of an airfoil attaining suddenly an angle of attack. In the linear or nonlinear case, compressive Mach or shock waves are generated on the windward side and expansive Mach or rarefaction waves are generated on the leeward side. On each side, these waves are composed of an oblique steady state wave, a vertically-moving one-dimensional unsteady wave, and a secondary wave resulting from the interaction between the steady and unsteady ones. An analytical solution in the secondary wave has been obtained by Heaslet and Lomax in the linear case, and this linear solution has been borrowed to give an approximate solution by Bai and Wu for the nonlinear case. The structure of the secondary shock wave and the appearance of various force stages are two issues not yet considered in previous studies and has been studied in the present paper. A self-similar solution is obtained for the secondary shock wave, and the reason to have an initial force plateau as observed numerically is identified. Moreover, six theoretical characteristic time scales for pressure load variation are determined which explain the slope changes of the time-dependent force curve. Keywords: Force, Self-similar solution, Shock-shock interaction, Shock waves, Unsteady flow

  17. Heat exchanger. [Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C; Brisseaux, A

    1976-01-19

    This invention concerns a heat exchanger between a fluid flowing through a tube and a gas. Such an exchanger can be used, inter alia, for removing calories that cannot be used for generating electricity in a thermal or nuclear power station. This exchanger can withstand any pressure surges in the system and even the use of a high vapour pressure coolant such as ammonia, since the fluid flows in a round tube with low pressure drops (both with respect to the fluid to be cooled and the cooling air). It is rigid enough to stand up to being moved and handled as well as to gusts of wind. It is formed of units that can be handled without difficulty and that are easily dismantable and interchangeable, even in service, and it is easily maintained. The exchange area is high for a minimum frontal area and this enables the size of the supporting frame to be reduced and makes it easy to hide it behind a screen of trees should this prove necessary. Finally, it is composed of a small number of standard units thus reducing the industrial production cost. These units are rectangular plates, each one being a flat tubular coil fitted between two flat parallel sheet metal plates having on their outer sides flat top raised bosses. These units are assembled together by the tops of the bosses so as to form an exchanger bank, each bank comprising two collectors to which the bank coils are tightly connected.

  18. Danos físicos em estufas plásticas causados pelo vento em Santa Maria, RS Plastic greenhouses damaged by wind in Santa Maria, RS. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereu Augusto Streck

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram observados danos físicos causados por rajadas de vento ocorridos na madrugada do dia 19/05/97 no plástico das estufas localizadas no Campus da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. Os valores de intensidade e direção das rajadas máximas do vento foram registradas em um anemográfo universal tipo IH 1023 a 10m de altura, instalado a aproximadamente 100m ao sul das estufas. Os danos ocorreram quando a velocidade das rajadas máximas ultrapassou 20m s-1 (72km h-1Plastic greenhouses located at the Federal University of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil were damaged by wind on May 19th, 1997. Wind speed and direction at 10m height were measured at the Climatological Station located approximatly 100m from the greenhouses. The damage in the greenhouses occured when the maximum gusts reached up speed higher than 20m s-1 (72km h-1.

  19. Multi-factor evaluation indicator method for the risk assessment of atmospheric and oceanic hazard group due to the attack of tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peng; Du, Mei

    2018-06-01

    China's southeast coastal areas frequently suffer from storm surge due to the attack of tropical cyclones (TCs) every year. Hazards induced by TCs are complex, such as strong wind, huge waves, storm surge, heavy rain, floods, and so on. The atmospheric and oceanic hazards cause serious disasters and substantial economic losses. This paper, from the perspective of hazard group, sets up a multi-factor evaluation method for the risk assessment of TC hazards using historical extreme data of concerned atmospheric and oceanic elements. Based on the natural hazard dynamic process, the multi-factor indicator system is composed of nine natural hazard factors representing intensity and frequency, respectively. Contributing to the indicator system, in order of importance, are maximum wind speed by TCs, attack frequency of TCs, maximum surge height, maximum wave height, frequency of gusts ≥ Scale 8, rainstorm intensity, maximum tidal range, rainstorm frequency, then sea-level rising rate. The first four factors are the most important, whose weights exceed 10% in the indicator system. With normalization processing, all the single-hazard factors are superposed by multiplying their weights to generate a superposed TC hazard. The multi-factor evaluation indicator method was applied to the risk assessment of typhoon-induced atmospheric and oceanic hazard group in typhoon-prone southeast coastal cities of China.

  20. Conceptual Design Optimization of an Augmented Stability Aircraft Incorporating Dynamic Response Performance Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welstead, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This research focused on incorporating stability and control into a multidisciplinary de- sign optimization on a Boeing 737-class advanced concept called the D8.2b. A new method of evaluating the aircraft handling performance using quantitative evaluation of the sys- tem to disturbances, including perturbations, continuous turbulence, and discrete gusts, is presented. A multidisciplinary design optimization was performed using the D8.2b transport air- craft concept. The con guration was optimized for minimum fuel burn using a design range of 3,000 nautical miles. Optimization cases were run using xed tail volume coecients, static trim constraints, and static trim and dynamic response constraints. A Cessna 182T model was used to test the various dynamic analysis components, ensuring the analysis was behaving as expected. Results of the optimizations show that including stability and con- trol in the design process drastically alters the optimal design, indicating that stability and control should be included in conceptual design to avoid system level penalties later in the design process.

  1. Validity of the assumption of Gaussian turbulence; Gyldighed af antagelsen om Gaussisk turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Hansen, K.S.; Juul Pedersen, B.

    2000-07-01

    Wind turbines are designed to withstand the impact of turbulent winds, which fluctuations usually are assumed of Gaussian probability distribution. Based on a large number of measurements from many sites, this seems a reasonable assumption in flat homogeneous terrain whereas it may fail in complex terrain. At these sites the wind speed often has a skew distribution with more frequent lulls than gusts. In order to simulate aerodynamic loads, a numerical turbulence simulation method was developed and implemented. This method may simulate multiple time series of variable not necessarily Gaussian distribution without distortion of the spectral distribution or spatial coherence. The simulated time series were used as input to the dynamic-response simulation program Vestas Turbine Simulator (VTS). In this way we simulated the dynamic response of systems exposed to turbulence of either Gaussian or extreme, yet realistic, non-Gaussian probability distribution. Certain loads on turbines with active pitch regulation were enhanced by up to 15% compared to pure Gaussian turbulence. It should, however, be said that the undesired effect depends on the dynamic system, and it might be mitigated by optimisation of the wind turbine regulation system after local turbulence characteristics. (au)

  2. Drones for aerodynamic and structural testing /DAST/ - A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, H. N.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A program for providing research data on aerodynamic loads and active control systems on wings with supercritical airfoils in the transonic speed range is described. Analytical development, wind tunnel tests, and flight tests are included. A Firebee II target drone vehicle has been modified for use as a flight test facility. The program currently includes flight experiments on two aeroelastic research wings. The primary purpose of the first flight experiment is to demonstrate an active control system for flutter suppression on a transport-type wing. Design and fabrication of the wing are complete and after installing research instrumentation and the flutter suppression system, flight testing is expected to begin in early 1979. The experiment on the second research wing - a fuel-conservative transport type - is to demonstrate multiple active control systems including flutter suppression, maneuver load alleviation, gust load alleviation, and reduce static stability. Of special importance for this second experiment is the development and validation of integrated design methods which include the benefits of active controls in the structural design.

  3. Flight Loads Prediction of High Aspect Ratio Wing Aircraft Using Multibody Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Castellani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A framework based on multibody dynamics has been developed for the static and dynamic aeroelastic analyses of flexible high aspect ratio wing aircraft subject to structural geometric nonlinearities. Multibody dynamics allows kinematic nonlinearities and nonlinear relationships in the forces definition and is an efficient and promising methodology to model high aspect ratio wings, which are known to be prone to structural nonlinear effects because of the high deflections in flight. The multibody dynamics framework developed employs quasi-steady aerodynamics strip theory and discretizes the wing as a series of rigid bodies interconnected by beam elements, representative of the stiffness distribution, which can undergo arbitrarily large displacements and rotations. The method is applied to a flexible high aspect ratio wing commercial aircraft and both trim and gust response analyses are performed in order to calculate flight loads. These results are then compared to those obtained with the standard linear aeroelastic approach provided by the Finite Element Solver Nastran. Nonlinear effects come into play mainly because of the need of taking into account the large deflections of the wing for flight loads computation and of considering the aerodynamic forces as follower forces.

  4. Genetic Algorithm-Guided, Adaptive Model Order Reduction of Flexible Aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil; Suh, Peter; Brenner, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for automated model order reduction (MOR) of flexible aircrafts to construct linear parameter-varying (LPV) reduced order models (ROM) for aeroservoelasticity (ASE) analysis and control synthesis in broad flight parameter space. The novelty includes utilization of genetic algorithms (GAs) to automatically determine the states for reduction while minimizing the trial-and-error process and heuristics requirement to perform MOR; balanced truncation for unstable systems to achieve locally optimal realization of the full model; congruence transformation for "weak" fulfillment of state consistency across the entire flight parameter space; and ROM interpolation based on adaptive grid refinement to generate a globally functional LPV ASE ROM. The methodology is applied to the X-56A MUTT model currently being tested at NASA/AFRC for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. Our studies indicate that X-56A ROM with less than one-seventh the number of states relative to the original model is able to accurately predict system response among all input-output channels for pitch, roll, and ASE control at various flight conditions. The GA-guided approach exceeds manual and empirical state selection in terms of efficiency and accuracy. The adaptive refinement allows selective addition of the grid points in the parameter space where flight dynamics varies dramatically to enhance interpolation accuracy without over-burdening controller synthesis and onboard memory efforts downstream. The present MOR framework can be used by control engineers for robust ASE controller synthesis and novel vehicle design.

  5. Celebrating 10 Years of Delivering EarthScope USArray Transportable Array Data from the Array Network Facility (ANF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, J. A.; Vernon, F.; Astiz, L.; Davis, G. A.; Reyes, J. C.; Martynov, V. G.; Tytell, J.; Cox, T. A.; Meyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2004, the Array Network Facility (ANF) has been responsible for generation and delivery of the metadata as well as collection and initial quality control and the transmission of the seismic, and more recently infrasound and meteorological data, for the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array. As of August 2013, we have managed data from over 1600 stations. Personnel at the ANF provide immediate eyes on the data to improve quality control as well as interact with the individual stations via calibrations, mass recentering, baler data retrieval and event analysis. Web-based tools have been developed, and rewritten over the years, to serve the needs of both station engineers and the public. Many lessons on the needs for scalability have been learned. Analysts continue to review all seismic events recorded on 7 or more TA stations making associations against externally available bulletins and/or generating ANF authored locations which are available at both the ANF and IRIS-DMC. The US Array pressure data have several unique characteristics that are allowing us to conduct a rigorous analysis of the spatio-temporal variations in the pressure field on time scales of less than an hour across the eastern United States. With the installation of the infrasound and atmospheric pressure sensors, starting in 2010, observations of gust fronts, near misses of tornados at individual stations, and of the mesoscale gravity waves showing the value and utility of the US Array pressure data will be presented.

  6. Characterisation and classification of RISOe P2546 cup anemometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friis Pedersen, T.

    2004-03-01

    The characteristics of the RISOe P2546 cup anemometer were investigated in detail, and all data presented in figures and tables. The characteristics include: wind tunnel calibrations, including an accredited calibration; tilt response meas-urements for tilt angles from -40 deg. C to 40 deg. C; gust response measurements at 8m/s, 10,5m/s and 13m/s and turbulence intensities of 10%, 16% and 23%; step response measurements at step wind speeds 4, 8, 12 and 15m/s; measurement of torque characteristics at 8m/s; rotor inertia measurements and measurements of friction of bearings at temperatures -20 deg. C to 40 deg. C. The characteristics are fitted to a time domain cup anemometer model, and the cup anemometer is put into the CLASSCUP classification scheme. The characteristics are also compared to the requirements to cup anemometers in the Danish wind turbine certification system and the CD and CDV of the revision of the standard IEC 61400-12. (au)

  7. Application of lightweight materials in structure concept design of large-scale solar energy unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Lv, Shengli; Guan, XiQi

    2017-09-01

    Carbon fiber composites and film materials can be effectively used in light aircraft structures, especially for solar unmanned aerial vehicles. The use of light materials can reduce the weight of the aircraft, but also can effectively improve the aircraft's strength and stiffness. The structure of the large aspect ratio solar energy UAV was analyzed in detail, taking Solar-impulse solar aircraft as an example. The solar energy UAV has a wing aspect ratio greater than 20, and the detailed digital model of the wing structure including beam, ribs and skin was built, also the Finite Element Method was applied to analyze the static and dynamic performance of the structure. The upper skin of the wing is covered with silicon solar cells, while the lower skin is light and transparent film. The single beam truss form of carbon fiber lightweight material is used in the wing structure. The wing beam is a box beam with rectangular cross sections. The box beam connected the front parts and after parts of the ribs together. The fuselage of the aircraft was built by space truss structure. According to the static and dynamic analysis with Finite Element method, it was found that the aircraft has a small wingtip deflection relative to the wingspan in the level flight state. The first natural frequency of the wing structure is pretty low, which is closed to the gust load.

  8. Impact assessment of tornado against nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    The impact assessment of tornado against nuclear power plants conforms to the 'Assessment guide for tornado effect on nuclear power plants' stipulated by the Nuclear Regulation Authority. In face of the assessment, important items are the setting of the maximum wind speed considered in design, and the setting of a flying object evaluation model, on the basis of observation results. The Japan Society of Maintenology summarized the verification results of the concept on the setting of tornado design and flying object valuation model, the contents of which are explained here. The following are explained: (1) validity of the setting of tornado design in the Assessment Guide, (2) analysis of synoptic field, (3) study on the regional characteristics of tornado occurrence environmental field by means of the analysis of synoptic field and gust associated index, and (4) setting of tornado design based on the above (1)-(3). Next, on the flying object evaluation model, the authors picked up the Rankine vortex model and Fujita model, and verified the reproducibility of the models using the features of each and the actual state of tornado damage. (A.O.)

  9. FY1999 technological development of wind power generation systems for islands. Development of wind power generation systems in islands; 1999 nendo ritoyo furyoku hatsuden system nado gijutsu kaihatsu. Rito ni okeru furyoku hatsuden system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    With an objective of developing wind power generation systems that suit small to medium size islands in Japan, conceptual design was made on a 100-kW class wind mill to satisfy such requirements as no need of large heavy machines, and gust resisting performance. Investigations were performed on sites suitable for demonstration tests thereof. This paper reports the achievements in fiscal 1999. In investigating the site location feasibilities, which took small to medium size islands in Okinawa Prefecture as the discussion objects, environmental investigation, wind condition forecast and investigation, and system linkage investigation were carried out, whereas one point each in three islands were extracted as the promising sites. The system discussion and design called for wind velocity resistance of 80 m/s, system linkage percentage of 40% at maximum, power generation cost of 20 yen per kWh, design life of 20 years, constructability of requiring no large heavy machines, and operation mode of diesel hybrid use. Along with these specifications, conceptual design was performed on the system constituting elements, such as wind mill blades, generators, electric power control devices, and towers. In the blade aerodynamic test, wind tunnel tests were executed by using three types of blade wings. Sample blades were fabricated for the preparation of blade material tests. (NEDO)

  10. Calibration of NASA Turbulent Air Motion Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, John D. W.; Ritter, John A.; Watson, Catherine E.; Wynkoop, Mark W.; Quinn, John K.; Norfolk, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbulent air motion measurement system (TAMMS) was integrated onboard the Lockheed 188 Electra airplane (designated NASA 429) based at the Wallops Flight Facility in support of the NASA role in global tropospheric research. The system provides air motion and turbulence measurements from an airborne platform which is capable of sampling tropospheric and planetary boundary-layer conditions. TAMMS consists of a gust probe with free-rotating vanes mounted on a 3.7-m epoxy-graphite composite nose boom, a high-resolution inertial navigation system (INS), and data acquisition system. A variation of the tower flyby method augmented with radar tracking was implemented for the calibration of static pressure position error and air temperature probe. Additional flight calibration maneuvers were performed remote from the tower in homogeneous atmospheric conditions. System hardware and instrumentation are described and the calibration procedures discussed. Calibration and flight results are presented to illustrate the overall ability of the system to determine the three-component ambient wind fields during straight and level flight conditions.

  11. A New Integrated Weighted Model in SNOW-V10: Verification of Categorical Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Laura X.; Isaac, George A.; Sheng, Grant

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the verification results for nowcasts of seven categorical variables from an integrated weighted model (INTW) and the underlying numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Nowcasting, or short range forecasting (0-6 h), over complex terrain with sufficient accuracy is highly desirable but a very challenging task. A weighting, evaluation, bias correction and integration system (WEBIS) for generating nowcasts by integrating NWP forecasts and high frequency observations was used during the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games as part of the Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010 (SNOW-V10) project. Forecast data from Canadian high-resolution deterministic NWP system with three nested grids (at 15-, 2.5- and 1-km horizontal grid-spacing) were selected as background gridded data for generating the integrated nowcasts. Seven forecast variables of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind gust, visibility, ceiling and precipitation rate are treated as categorical variables for verifying the integrated weighted forecasts. By analyzing the verification of forecasts from INTW and the NWP models among 15 sites, the integrated weighted model was found to produce more accurate forecasts for the 7 selected forecast variables, regardless of location. This is based on the multi-categorical Heidke skill scores for the test period 12 February to 21 March 2010.

  12. An Experimental High-Resolution Forecast System During the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhot, J.; Milbrandt, J. A.; Giguère, A.; McTaggart-Cowan, R.; Erfani, A.; Denis, B.; Glazer, A.; Vallée, M.

    2014-01-01

    Environment Canada ran an experimental numerical weather prediction (NWP) system during the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, consisting of nested high-resolution (down to 1-km horizontal grid-spacing) configurations of the GEM-LAM model, with improved geophysical fields, cloud microphysics and radiative transfer schemes, and several new diagnostic products such as density of falling snow, visibility, and peak wind gust strength. The performance of this experimental NWP system has been evaluated in these winter conditions over complex terrain using the enhanced mesoscale observing network in place during the Olympics. As compared to the forecasts from the operational regional 15-km GEM model, objective verification generally indicated significant added value of the higher-resolution models for near-surface meteorological variables (wind speed, air temperature, and dewpoint temperature) with the 1-km model providing the best forecast accuracy. Appreciable errors were noted in all models for the forecasts of wind direction and humidity near the surface. Subjective assessment of several cases also indicated that the experimental Olympic system was skillful at forecasting meteorological phenomena at high-resolution, both spatially and temporally, and provided enhanced guidance to the Olympic forecasters in terms of better timing of precipitation phase change, squall line passage, wind flow channeling, and visibility reduction due to fog and snow.

  13. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  14. Probabilistic analysis of extreme wind events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.K. [Center for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), Pikermi Attikis (Greece)

    1997-12-31

    A vital task in wind engineering and meterology is to understand, measure, analyse and forecast extreme wind conditions, due to their significant effects on human activities and installations like buildings, bridges or wind turbines. The latest version of the IEC standard (1996) pays particular attention to the extreme wind events that have to be taken into account when designing or certifying a wind generator. Actually, the extreme wind events within a 50 year period are those which determine the ``static`` design of most of the wind turbine components. The extremes which are important for the safety of wind generators are those associated with the so-called ``survival wind speed``, the extreme operating gusts and the extreme wind direction changes. A probabilistic approach for the analysis of these events is proposed in this paper. Emphasis is put on establishing the relation between extreme values and physically meaningful ``site calibration`` parameters, like probability distribution of the annual wind speed, turbulence intensity and power spectra properties. (Author)

  15. Miseria y grandeza de la Filosofía en la Enseñanza Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos DÍAZ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A nadie se le enseña nada (y esa es la misión del filósofo si se le dice que cada época tiene su filosofía, y cada filosofía su época; hoy no estamos para las bromas de Hegel o de Marx, y sí para las cosquillas de Nietzsche o de Gorgias. Nos guste o no, después de Augusto Comte hemos perdido la inocencia metafísica y las escuelas el candor antropológico. Hubo, en efecto, un primer estadio judeo-greco-cristiano —teónomo— que se quebró en su encanto para desencantarse I reencantar se en un segundo estadio o más autónomo que teónomo (desde el Renacimiento hasta el último maestro de la sospecha, y finalmente estamos más allá del desencanto y del reencanto, en un clima de manfutismo y de desprecio de los valores que pretendan presentarse como objetivos. En este estadio nada asusta. Ogros de ayer pasan por hermanitas de la caridad hoy: Marx por machista; Freud por conservador; los anarquistas por moralistas; el progreso por ingenuidad; la civilización industrial por barbarie; el proletariado por clase aburguesada; la ética por cosmética; el trabajo por noción calvinista; la politica por oficio lucrativo; la libertad por anomia.

  16. Dual curvature acoustically damped concentrating collector. Semiannual technical progress report, June 1-December 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    The project's first objective is to establish, analytically, the cost and performance of design choices within the boundaries of the basic proposed concept. With these cost and performance measures as a guide, the second project objective is to design a cost-effective Dual Curvature collector module and collector field array. The third objective is to establish technical and economic concept feasibility through prototype fabrication and test. The final objective is to define the Dual Curvature collector commercialization requirements. The Dual Curvature collector uses a unique reflector module consisting of a reflective film that is tensioned on a reflector support frame. The tensioned membrane (film) surface approximates a hyperbolic paraboloid that is capable of linear focusing when the surface tracks the sun's apparent motion in one axis. The reflective film can be backed by polystyrene foam with an air space between the film and the foam surfaces. This provides damping of the reflector surface to minimize the effect of wind gusts and physical impacts. The baseline collector is intended to operate at a concentration of ten (10) or greater with a nominal absorber temperature of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F). The Component Research and Analysis tasks which lead to the selection of a baseline collector configuration are discussed. Also, some preliminary results of the Collector Module Design task are presented.

  17. Control of Eolian soil erosion from waste site surface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1994-11-01

    Physical models were tested in a wind tunnel to determine optimum surface-ravel admixtures for protecting silt-loam soil from erosion by, wind and saltating, sand stresses. The tests were performed to support the development of a natural-material surface barrier for and waste sites. Plans call for a 2-m deep silt-loam soil reservoir to retain infiltrating water from rainfall and snowmelt. The objective of the study was to develop a gravel admixture that would produce an erosion-resistant surface layer during, periods of extended dry climatic stress. Thus, tests were performed using simulated surfaces representing dry, unvegetated conditions present just after construction, after a wildfire, or during an extended drought. Surfaces were prepared using silt-loam soil mixed with various grades of sand and Travel. Wind-induced surface shear stresses were controlled over the test surfaces, as were saltating, sand mass flow rates and intensities. Tests were performed at wind speeds that approximated and exceeded local 100-year peak gust intensities. Surface armors produced by pea gravel admixtures were shown to provide the best protection from wind and saltating sand stresses. Compared with unprotected silt-loam surfaces, armored surfaces reduced erosion rates by more than 96%. Based in part on wind tunnel results, a pea gravel admixture of 15% will be added to the top 1 in of soil in a prototype barrier under construction in 1994. Field tests are planned at the prototype site to provide data for comparison with wind tunnel results

  18. Temporal, seasonal and weather effects on cycle volume: an ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Tin Sandar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cycling has the potential to provide health, environmental and economic benefits but the level of cycling is very low in New Zealand and many other countries. Adverse weather is often cited as a reason why people do not cycle. This study investigated temporal and seasonal variability in cycle volume and its association with weather in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city. Methods Two datasets were used: automated cycle count data collected on Tamaki Drive in Auckland by using ZELT Inductive Loop Eco-counters and weather data (gust speed, rain, temperature, sunshine duration available online from the National Climate Database. Analyses were undertaken using data collected over one year (1 January to 31 December 2009. Normalised cycle volumes were used in correlation and regression analyses to accommodate differences by hour of the day and day of the week and holiday. Results In 2009, 220,043 bicycles were recorded at the site. There were significant differences in mean hourly cycle volumes by hour of the day, day type and month of the year (p p Conclusions There are temporal and seasonal variations in cycle volume in Auckland and weather significantly influences hour-to-hour and day-to-day variations in cycle volume. Our findings will help inform future cycling promotion activities in Auckland.

  19. Seeing things by Anna Margolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francuz Aleksandra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available If we recall the most important words for the poetry, we should begin the story with the stones, lily, hands and blood, which, if you look at them with the philological accuracy, are interrelated: situate themselves clearly on opposite banks of the creative process. They talk about the construction of the building consisting of perceptions about their own strength and weakness, ecstasy and congealing in what for centuries the classics poets have tried to fathom: the harmony and clarity, driven by the hope that in life they should above all stick to be beauty. And in addition, they ought to go further than discipline, practice eye and expand the field of view, should not shun from the gusts of the heart, because the heart grows more powerful due to great ideas, passions. Spacious becomes the vision of writing, it is the weave of contradictions - this is how one of the most important twentieth-century poets, who wrote in Yiddish, Anna Margolin sees it. Margolin’s poetry is a clear return towards neoclassicism, building up topics, theses, allusions, ideas taken from ideologically close to her artists of great individuality, Anna Akhmatova (from whom she took her name, Osip Mandelstam, Rainer Maria Rilke, Ezra Pound.

  20. Cabin fuselage structural design with engine installation and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Tanapaal; Bishop, Mike; Gumus, Ilker; Gussy, Joel; Triggs, Mike

    1994-01-01

    Design requirements for the cabin, cabin system, flight controls, engine installation, and wing-fuselage interface that provide adequate interior volume for occupant seating, cabin ingress and egress, and safety are presented. The fuselage structure must be sufficient to meet the loadings specified in the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23. The critical structure must provide a safe life of 10(exp 6) load cycles and 10,000 operational mission cycles. The cabin seating and controls must provide adjustment to account for various pilot physiques and to aid in maintenance and operation of the aircraft. Seats and doors shall not bind or lockup under normal operation. Cabin systems such as heating and ventilation, electrical, lighting, intercom, and avionics must be included in the design. The control system will consist of ailerons, elevator, and rudders. The system must provide required deflections with a combination of push rods, bell cranks, pulleys, and linkages. The system will be free from slack and provide smooth operation without binding. Environmental considerations include variations in temperature and atmospheric pressure, protection against sand, dust, rain, humidity, ice, snow, salt/fog atmosphere, wind and gusts, and shock and vibration. The following design goals were set to meet the requirements of the statement of work: safety, performance, manufacturing and cost. To prevent the engine from penetrating the passenger area in the event of a crash was the primary safety concern. Weight and the fuselage aerodynamics were the primary performance concerns. Commonality and ease of manufacturing were major considerations to reduce cost.

  1. Modeling the transient aerodynamic effects during the motion of a flexible trailing edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, T; Seume, J R

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine blades have been becoming longer and more slender during the last few decades. The longer lever arm results in higher stresses at the blade root. Hence, the unsteady loads induced by turbulence, gust, or wind shear increase. One promising way to control these loads is to use flexible trailing edges near the blade tip. The unsteady effects which appear during the motion of a flexible trailing edge must be considered for the load calculation during the design process because of their high influence on aeroelastic effects and hence on the fatigue loads. This is not yet possible in most of the wind turbine simulation environments. Consequently, an empirical model is developed in the present study which accounts for unsteady effects during the motion of the trailing edge. The model is based on Fourier analyses of results generated with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a typical thin airfoil with a deformable trailing edge. The validation showed that the model fits Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results simulated with a random time series of the deflection angle. (paper)

  2. High resolution modelling results of the wind flow over Canary Islands during the meteorological situation of the extratropical storm Delta (28–30 November 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Baldasano

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available On 28–29 November 2005 an extratropical storm affected the Canary Islands causing significant damage related to high average wind speeds and intense gusts over some islands of the archipelago. Delta was the twenty-sixth tropical or subtropical storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. It represents an unusual meteorological phenomenon for that region, and its impacts were underestimated by the different operational meteorological forecasts during the previous days of the arrival of the low near Canary Islands. The aim of this study is to reproduce the local effects of the flow that were observed over the Canary Islands during the travel of the Delta storm near the region using high-resolution mesoscale meteorological simulations. The Advanced Research Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW is applied at 9, 3 and 1 km horizontal resolution using ECMWF forecasts as initial and boundary conditions. The high-resolution simulation will outline the main features that contributed to the high wind speeds observed in the archipelago. Variations in vertical static stability, vertical windshear and the intense synoptic winds of the southwestern part of Delta with a warm core at 850 hPa were the main characteristics that contributed to the development and amplification of intense gravity waves while the large-scale flow interacted with the complex topography of the islands.

  3. An enhanced nonlinear damping approach accounting for system constraints in active mass dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzi, Ilaria; Ierimonti, Laura; Ubertini, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    Active mass dampers are a viable solution for mitigating wind-induced vibrations in high-rise buildings and improve occupants' comfort. Such devices suffer particularly when they reach force saturation of the actuators and maximum extension of their stroke, which may occur in case of severe loading conditions (e.g. wind gust and earthquake). Exceeding actuators' physical limits can impair the control performance of the system or even lead to devices damage, with consequent need for repair or substitution of part of the control system. Controllers for active mass dampers should account for their technological limits. Prior work of the authors was devoted to stroke issues and led to the definition of a nonlinear damping approach, very easy to implement in practice. It consisted of a modified skyhook algorithm complemented with a nonlinear braking force to reverse the direction of the mass before reaching the stroke limit. This paper presents an enhanced version of this approach, also accounting for force saturation of the actuator and keeping the simplicity of implementation. This is achieved by modulating the control force by a nonlinear smooth function depending on the ratio between actuator's force and saturation limit. Results of a numerical investigation show that the proposed approach provides similar results to the method of the State Dependent Riccati Equation, a well-established technique for designing optimal controllers for constrained systems, yet very difficult to apply in practice.

  4. Effect of the density of the electronic states at the valence orbital of the bridge redox molecule on the dependence of the tunnel current on the overvoltage in the case of fully adiabatic electron transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Igor G.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of the density of the electronic states at the valence orbital of the bridge redox molecule on the dependence of the tunnel current on the overvoltage and on the width at half maximum of the current-overvoltage curve is studied. A number of the approximate expressions for the density of states, the tunnel current and the width are obtained in the fully adiabatic limit for different particular cases. It is shown that at small values of the coupling of the electronic levels of the electrodes with the valence orbital of the redox molecule and the small values of the bias voltage two regions of the reorganization Gibbs energy exist with different dependence of the width on the reorganization Gibbs energy. The results of calculations of the density of states, the tunnel current and the width are presented and used for the interpretation of the experimental data [N.G. Tao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4066, I. Visoly-Fisher, K. Daie, Y. Terazono, C. Herrero, F. Fungo, L. Otero, E. Durantini, J.J. Silber, L. Sereno, D. Gust, T.A. Moore, A.L. Moore, S.M. Lindsay, PNAS 103 (2006) 8686

  5. RENDIMENTO E QUALIDADE DE FRUTOS DE MELANCIA EM DIFERENTES ÉPOCAS DE PLANTIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOAQUIM BRANCO DE OLIVEIRA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Watermelon is a cucurbit, grown in almost all regions of the world, and it is enjoyed by most of the population. In Rio Grande do Norte the cultivation of watermelon has been increasing, because of the good climatic conditions in the region that provides adequate light and temperature throughout the year. In this con-text, the present study aimed at evaluating the yield and quality of watermelon cultivars in different planting dates in Mossoró-RN. The experiment was conducted in the garden didactic Department of Plant Sciences, Federal Rural University of the Semi-Arid in the period between June and December 2010. The experimental design was a randomized complete block in a split plot design with four 3 x 3 repetitions. The plots consisted of three cultivars of watermelon (Crimson Sweet, Olympia and Denver and subplots were planting (June, Au-gust and October. It is concluded that the yield and fruit quality were influenced by planting dates. The water-melon sowing in August resulted in higher average fruit weight and commercial productivity, and the fruits of lower acidity and better palatability were collected in the June planting.

  6. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Digital Control Systems for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Christhilf, David; Perry, Boyd, III

    2012-01-01

    An important objective of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind tunnel model program was the demonstration of Flutter Suppression (FS), Gust Load Alleviation (GLA), and Ride Quality Enhancement (RQE). It was critical to evaluate the stability and robustness of these control laws analytically before testing them and experimentally while testing them to ensure safety of the model and the wind tunnel. MATLAB based software was applied to evaluate the performance of closed-loop systems in terms of stability and robustness. Existing software tools were extended to use analytical representations of the S4T and the control laws to analyze and evaluate the control laws prior to testing. Lessons were learned about the complex windtunnel model and experimental testing. The open-loop flutter boundary was determined from the closed-loop systems. A MATLAB/Simulink Simulation developed under the program is available for future work to improve the CPE process. This paper is one of a series of that comprise a special session, which summarizes the S4T wind-tunnel program.

  7. Spatial generalized linear mixed models of electric power outages due to hurricanes and ice storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haibin; Davidson, Rachel A.; Apanasovich, Tatiyana V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents new statistical models that predict the number of hurricane- and ice storm-related electric power outages likely to occur in each 3 kmx3 km grid cell in a region. The models are based on a large database of recent outages experienced by three major East Coast power companies in six hurricanes and eight ice storms. A spatial generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) approach was used in which spatial correlation is incorporated through random effects. Models were fitted using a composite likelihood approach and the covariance matrix was estimated empirically. A simulation study was conducted to test the model estimation procedure, and model training, validation, and testing were done to select the best models and assess their predictive power. The final hurricane model includes number of protective devices, maximum gust wind speed, hurricane indicator, and company indicator covariates. The final ice storm model includes number of protective devices, ice thickness, and ice storm indicator covariates. The models should be useful for power companies as they plan for future storms. The statistical modeling approach offers a new way to assess the reliability of electric power and other infrastructure systems in extreme events

  8. Characteristics of Control Laws Tested on the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.; Moulin, Boris; Ritz, Erich; Chen, P. C.; Roughen, Kevin M.; Perry, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Span Supersonic Transport (S4T) is an aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel model built to test active controls concepts for large flexible supersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. It is one of several models constructed in the 1990's as part of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. Control laws were developed for the S4T by M4 Engineering, Inc. and by Zona Technologies, Inc. under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts. The model was tested in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) four times from 2007 to 2010. The first two tests were primarily for plant identification. The third entry was used for testing control laws for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression. Whereas the third entry only tested FS subcritically, the fourth test demonstrated closed-loop operation above the open-loop flutter boundary. The results of the third entry are reported elsewhere. This paper reports on flutter suppression results from the fourth wind-tunnel test. Flutter suppression is seen as a way to provide stability margins while flying at transonic flight conditions without penalizing the primary supersonic cruise design condition. An account is given for how Controller Performance Evaluation (CPE) singular value plots were interpreted with regard to progressing open- or closed-loop to higher dynamic pressures during testing.

  9. DISCOURSE AWARENESS IN IMPROVING NON-NATIVE STUDENTS’ ABILITY IN GENERIC WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain AL SHAROUFI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the importance of teaching discourse patterns to non-native university students. I used particular discourse patterns in teaching generic writing to undergraduate students at the Gulf University for Science and Technology, GUST, in Kuwait. The assumption of this study was that undergraduate non-native students should be aware of the importance of discourse patterns in generic writing. This hidden tactic is not obvious unless consciously taught to them. To study the importance of generic patterns, I opted to teach discourse patterns that are used in newspaper editorials, the rationale of which was that students would grasp discourse patterns and apply them to their own writing. I chose two groups of students randomly, one of which was an experimental group and the second of which was a control group. I conducted a detailed analysis afterwards to examine the validity of my assumption. I taught the experimental group the chosen model of analysis, and instructed the control group to read sample editorials, and write their own editorials afterwards. The results of this experiment were substantial. Based on the level of compliance with the suggested format, triads, movements, and artifacts in newspaper editorials, students in the experimental group were evaluated on a scale of 0 to 10. The performance of the experimental group was above average, 75.3%, in comparison to the control group that complied quite poorly with the chosen model, < 30 %.

  10. An extreme wind erosion event of the fresh Eyjafjallajökull 2010 volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnalds, Olafur; Thorarinsdottir, Elin Fjola; Thorsson, Johann; Waldhauserova, Pavla Dagsson; Agustsdottir, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can generate widespread deposits of ash that are subsequently subjected to erosive forces which causes detrimental effects on ecosystems. We measured wind erosion of the freshly deposited Eyjafjallajökull ash at a field site the first summer after the 2010 eruption. Over 30 wind erosion events occurred (June-October) at wind speeds > 10 m s(-1) in each storm with gusts up to 38.7 m s(-1). Surface transport over one m wide transect (surface to 150 cm height) reached > 11,800 kg m(-1) during the most intense storm event with a rate of 1,440 kg m(-1) hr(-1) for about 6½ hrs. This storm is among the most extreme wind erosion events recorded on Earth. The Eyjafjallajökull wind erosion storms caused dust emissions extending several hundred km from the volcano affecting both air quality and ecosystems showing how wind erosion of freshly deposited ash prolongs impacts of volcanic eruptions.

  11. Meteorological and radiation measurements at Nabarlek, Northern Territory, June to July 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.H.; Davy, D.R.; Bendun, E.O.K.; O'Brien, B.

    1981-09-01

    A meteorological and radiation measurement program was conducted near the then developing uranium mine at Nabarlek in the Northern Territory. The two-filter tube radiation measuring technique was checked and compared with the continuous radon monitor and instant working level meter techniques. In general, the Nabarlek meteorology was characterised by weak stable layers and good ventilation conditions with winds rarely less than 1ms -1 . A comparison of wind measurements made near the open pit with those taken some 800 m away gave evidence of horizontal changes in the wind field over the site. Strong daytime winds gusting higher than 10 ms -1 caused a visible suspension of dust from the site. Dust deposition samples indicated that thorium-230 in air on site was a factor of twelve below the maximum permissible concentration for employees in Australia, but uranium was lower by several orders of magnitude. The concentrations of radioactivity in the aquatic food pathway, external radiation levels and radon daughter concentrations from deposited dust were likewise at least two orders of magnitude below the maximum concentrations permissible in Australia

  12. Time-varying linear control for tiltrotor aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing ZHANG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tiltrotor aircraft have three flight modes: helicopter mode, airplane mode, and transition mode. A tiltrotor has characteristics of highly nonlinear, time-varying flight dynamics and inertial/control couplings in its transition mode. It can transit from the helicopter mode to the airplane mode by tilting its nacelles, and an effective controller is crucial to accomplish tilting transition missions. Longitudinal dynamic characteristics of the tiltrotor are described by a nonlinear Lagrange-form model, which takes into account inertial/control couplings and aerodynamic interferences. Reference commands for airspeed velocity and attitude in the transition mode are calculated dynamically by visiting a command library which is founded in advance by analyzing the flight envelope of the tiltrotor. A Time-Varying Linear (TVL model is obtained using a Taylor-expansion based online linearization technique from the nonlinear model. Subsequently, based on an optimal control concept, an online optimization based control method with input constraints considered is proposed. To validate the proposed control method, three typical tilting transition missions are simulated using the nonlinear model of XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft. Simulation results show that the controller can be used to control the tiltrotor throughout its operating envelop which includes a transition flight, and can also deal with vertical gust disturbances. Keywords: Constrained optimal control, Inertia/control couplings, Tiltrotor aircraft, Time-varying control, Transition mode

  13. Robust fault detection for the dynamics of high-speed train with multi-source finite frequency interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Weiqi; Dong, Hairong; Yao, Xiuming; Ning, Bin

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a composite fault detection scheme for the dynamics of high-speed train (HST), using an unknown input observer-like (UIO-like) fault detection filter, in the presence of wind gust and operating noises which are modeled as disturbance generated by exogenous system and unknown multi-source disturbance within finite frequency domain. Using system input and system output measurements, the fault detection filter is designed to generate the needed residual signals. In order to decouple disturbance from residual signals without truncating the influence of faults, this paper proposes a method to partition the disturbance into two parts. One subset of the disturbance does not appear in residual dynamics, and the influence of the other subset is constrained by H ∞ performance index in a finite frequency domain. A set of detection subspaces are defined, and every different fault is assigned to its own detection subspace to guarantee the residual signals are diagonally affected promptly by the faults. Simulations are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and merits of the proposed method. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An Entry Flight Controls Analysis for a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Philip

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has been performing studies to address the feasibility of various single-stage to orbit concepts for use by NASA and the commercial launch industry to provide a lower cost access to space. Some work on the conceptual design of a typical lifting body concept vehicle, designated VentureStar(sup TM) has been conducted in cooperation with the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. This paper will address the results of a preliminary flight controls assessment of this vehicle concept during the atmospheric entry phase of flight. The work includes control analysis from hypersonic flight at the atmospheric entry through supersonic speeds to final approach and landing at subsonic conditions. The requirements of the flight control effectors are determined over the full range of entry vehicle Mach number conditions. The analysis was performed for a typical maximum crossrange entry trajectory utilizing angle of attack to limit entry heating and providing for energy management, and bank angle to modulation of the lift vector to provide downrange and crossrange capability to fly the vehicle to a specified landing site. Sensitivity of the vehicle open and closed loop characteristics to CG location, control surface mixing strategy and wind gusts are included in the results. An alternative control surface mixing strategy utilizing a reverse aileron technique demonstrated a significant reduction in RCS torque and fuel required to perform bank maneuvers during entry. The results of the control analysis revealed challenges for an early vehicle configuration in the areas of hypersonic pitch trim and subsonic longitudinal controllability.

  15. Aerodynamics, sensing and control of insect-scale flapping-wing flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Kang, Chang-kwon; Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ravi, Sridhar; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    There are nearly a million known species of flying insects and 13 000 species of flying warm-blooded vertebrates, including mammals, birds and bats. While in flight, their wings not only move forward relative to the air, they also flap up and down, plunge and sweep, so that both lift and thrust can be generated and balanced, accommodate uncertain surrounding environment, with superior flight stability and dynamics with highly varied speeds and missions. As the size of a flyer is reduced, the wing-to-body mass ratio tends to decrease as well. Furthermore, these flyers use integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic forces, muscles to move the wings, and sensing and control systems to guide and manoeuvre. In this article, recent advances in insect-scale flapping-wing aerodynamics, flexible wing structures, unsteady flight environment, sensing, stability and control are reviewed with perspective offered. In particular, the special features of the low Reynolds number flyers associated with small sizes, thin and light structures, slow flight with comparable wind gust speeds, bioinspired fabrication of wing structures, neuron-based sensing and adaptive control are highlighted. PMID:27118897

  16. Automated Blazar Light Curves Using Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Spencer James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-27

    Every night in a remote clearing called Fenton Hill high in the Jemez Mountains of central New Mexico, a bank of robotically controlled telescopes tilt their lenses to the sky for another round of observation through digital imaging. Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Thinking Telescopes project is watching for celestial transients including high-power cosmic flashes called, and like all science, it can be messy work. To keep the project clicking along, Los Alamos scientists routinely install equipment upgrades, maintain the site, and refine the sophisticated machinelearning computer programs that process those images and extract useful data from them. Each week the system amasses 100,000 digital images of the heavens, some of which are compromised by clouds, wind gusts, focus problems, and so on. For a graduate student at the Lab taking a year’s break between master’s and Ph.D. studies, working with state-of-the-art autonomous telescopes that can make fundamental discoveries feels light years beyond the classroom.

  17. Effects of low speed wind on the recognition/identification and pass-through communication tasks of auditory situation awareness afforded by military hearing protection/enhancement devices and tactical communication and protective systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kichol; Casali, John G

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of controlled low-speed wind-noise on the auditory situation awareness performance afforded by military hearing protection/enhancement devices (HPED) and tactical communication and protective systems (TCAPS). Recognition/identification and pass-through communications tasks were separately conducted under three wind conditions (0, 5, and 10 mph). Subjects wore two in-ear-type TCAPS, one earmuff-type TCAPS, a Combat Arms Earplug in its 'open' or pass-through setting, and an EB-15LE electronic earplug. Devices with electronic gain systems were tested under two gain settings: 'unity' and 'max'. Testing without any device (open ear) was conducted as a control. Ten subjects were recruited from the student population at Virginia Tech. Audiometric requirements were 25 dBHL or better at 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz in both ears. Performance on the interaction of communication task-by-device was significantly different only in 0 mph wind speed. The between-device performance differences varied with azimuthal speaker locations. It is evident from this study that stable (non-gusting) wind speeds up to 10 mph did not significantly degrade recognition/identification task performance and pass-through communication performance of the group of HPEDs and TCAPS tested. However, the various devices performed differently as the test sound signal speaker location was varied and it appears that physical as well as electronic features may have contributed to this directional result.

  18. Estimation of droughts indicators in the Veguita zone, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán Vega, Humberto; Tarquis, Ana Maria; Alcolea Naranjo, Osvaldo

    2016-04-01

    This work has as essential objective the evaluation and analysis of the main indicators of hydrometeorology drought in Veguita, using series of daily precipitations, daily temperature and intensity of the rain. These data were contributed by the Station Agrometeorológica of Veguitas. The estimated indexes were the concentration of precipitations (CP) and the standardized index of precipitation and evapotranspiration (SPEI). The CP was calculated by means of the calculation of the index of Gini, based on the curve of Lorentz using data from 1994 until 2013. The SPEI was calculated with the software of the same name using the data from 2001 up to 2013. The main result obtained was that the precipitations in the area are concentrating, in accordance with the index of Gini and the exponential adjustment of the curve of Lorentz. Beside it, gusts dry superiors to one month were detected and the SPEI pointed out 35 months with drought, 40 humid and 81 with normal levels of rain in the last 13 years.

  19. Summary of oceanographic and water-quality measurements in Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells, Maine, in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Ganju, Neil K.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Borden, Jonathan; Martini, Marinna A.; Brosnahan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Suspended-sediment transport is a critical element controlling the geomorphology of tidal wetland complexes. Wetlands rely on organic material and inorganic sediment deposition to maintain their elevation relative to sea level. The U.S. Geological Survey performed observational deployments to measure suspended-sediment concentration and water flow rates in the tidal channels of the wetlands in the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells, Maine. The objective was to characterize the sediment-transport mechanisms that contribute to the net sediment budget of the wetland complex. We deployed a meteorological tower, optical turbidity sensors, and acoustic velocity meters at sites on Stephens Brook and the Ogunquit River between March 27 and December 9, 2013. This report presents the time-series oceanographic and atmospheric data collected during those field studies. The oceanographic parameters include water velocity, depth, turbidity, salinity, temperature, and pH. The atmospheric parameters include wind direction, speed, and gust; air temperature; air pressure; relative humidity; short wave radiation; and photosynthetically active radiation.

  20. A Mediterranean derecho: Catalonia (Spain), 17th August 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J. Manuel

    2007-02-01

    At approximately 6:10 UTC in the morning of 17th August 2003, a squall line developed over south Catalonia (the northeast region of Spain). During the next 9 h, the squall moved rapidly northeast and crossed Catalonia and the French regions of Languedoc-Roussillon and Province, damaging and uprooting hundreds of trees and blocking trains in the region. Wind gusts reached were recoded up to 52 m/s with evidence of F2 intensity damage. This case study shows the characteristics of a derecho (widespread convectively induced windstorm). Radar observations of the evolving squall line show signatures often correlated with damaging surface winds, including: Bow echoes, Rear inflow notches, Rear inflow jets, Medium altitude radial convergence, Narrow gradient of very marked reflectivity, Development of isolated cells ahead of the convective line, A band of convection off the northern end of the line known as a "warm advection wing". When examining the different surface observations, satellite, radar imagery and cloud-to-ground lightning data, this case shows many similarities to those investigated in the United States. The derecho is a hybrid case, but has many characteristics of warm season derechoes. This emanates from a mesoscale convective complex (MCC) moving along a quasi-stationary, low-level thermal boundary in an environment characterized by high potential instability and relatively strong mid-tropospheric winds.

  1. Hindcast experiments of the derecho in Estonia on 08 August, 2010: Modelling derecho with NWP model HARMONIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Velle; Männik, Aarne; Luhamaa, Andres; Rõõm, Rein

    2015-05-01

    On August 8, 2010, a derecho swept over Northern Europe, causing widespread wind damage and more than 2 million Euros in economic loss in Estonia during its most destructive stage. This paper presents a modelling study of the derecho-producing storm utilising the Hirlam Aladin Research for Mesoscale Operational Numerical Weather Prediction in Europe (HARMONIE) model. The model setup is chosen to mimic near-future, nearly kilometre-scale, operational environments in European national weather services. The model simulations are compared to remote sensing and in situ observations. The HARMONIE model is capable of reproducing the wind gust severity and precipitation intensity. Moreover, 2.5-km grid spacing is shown to be sufficient for producing a reliable signal of the severe convective storm. Storm dynamics are well simulated, including the rear inflow jet. Although the model performance is promising, a strong dependence on the initial data, a weak trailing stratiform precipitation region and an incorrect timing of the storm are identified.

  2. Derecho-like event in Bulgaria on 20 July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodinov, Ilian; Dimitrova, Tsvetelina; Bocheva, Lilia; Simeonov, Petio; Dimitrov, Rumen

    2015-05-01

    In this work we analyze the development of a severe-convective-storm system in northwestern Bulgaria on 20 July 2011 which exhibited derecho-like characteristics. Prior to this event, a derecho had never been documented in Bulgaria. The convective system was associated with a cold front. We present a synoptic-scale analysis of the evolution of the cold front and an overview of the wind and the damage that has occurred in the region with the strongest impact. The convective system consisted of two multi-cell thunderstorms that are analyzed in some detail, based on radar data. The two storms merged and the convective system evolved into a bow-shape reflectivity structure with two rear inflow notches. The analysis of the radar data revealed cloud top heights of 17 km, with the formation of а bounded weak echo region, a maximum radar reflectivity factor of 63 dBZ, and wind speeds above 30 m/s. The field investigation revealed patterns in the damaged crops typical of strong wind gusts.

  3. Case study of a severe windstorm over Slovakia and Hungary on 25 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, André; Kaňák, Ján; Sokol, Alois; Putsay, Mária; Uhrínová, Lucia; Csirmaz, Kálmán; Okon, Ľuboslav; Habrovský, Richard

    2011-06-01

    A system of thunderstorms approached the Slovakia and Hungary in the late evening hours of 25 June 2008, causing extensive damage and peak wind gusts up to 40 m/s. This study examines the macro- and mesosynoptic conditions for the windstorm using soundings, analyses, and forecasts of numerical models (ALADIN, ECMWF). A derecho-like character of the event is discussed. Meteosat Second Generation imagery and convective indices inferred from satellite and model data are used to assess the humidity distribution and the conditional instability of the thunderstorm environment. An intrusion of the environmental dry air into the convective system and intensification of downdrafts is considered to be one of the reasons for the damaging winds observed at some areas. This is supported by the radar imagery showing a sudden drop of radar reflectivity and creation of line echo wave patterns and bow echoes. A numerical simulation provided by the non-hydrostatic MM5 model indicated the development of meso-γ scale vortices embedded in the convective system. The genesis and a possible role of such vortices in creating rear-inflow jets and intensifying the low level winds are investigated with the help of the vorticity equation and several other diagnostic parameters. In addition, the effect of various physical parameterisations on the forecast of the windstorm is evaluated.

  4. The design of a turboshaft speed governor using modern control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delosreyes, G.; Gouchoe, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this program were: to verify the model of off schedule compressor variable geometry in the T700 turboshaft engine nonlinear model; to evaluate the use of the pseudo-random binary noise (PRBN) technique for obtaining engine frequency response data; and to design a high performance power turbine speed governor using modern control methods. Reduction of T700 engine test data generated at NASA-Lewis indicated that the off schedule variable geometry effects were accurate as modeled. Analysis also showed that the PRBN technique combined with the maximum likelihood model identification method produced a Bode frequency response that was as accurate as the response obtained from standard sinewave testing methods. The frequency response verified the accuracy of linear models consisting of engine partial derivatives and used for design. A power turbine governor was designed using the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) method of full state feedback control. A Kalman filter observer was used to estimate helicopter main rotor blade velocity. Compared to the baseline T700 power turbine speed governor, the LQR governor reduced droop up to 25 percent for a 490 shaft horsepower transient in 0.1 sec simulating a wind gust, and up to 85 percent for a 700 shaft horsepower transient in 0.5 sec simulating a large collective pitch angle transient.

  5. Measurement of Non-Stationary Characteristics of a Landfall Typhoon at the Jiangyin Bridge Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhui He

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The wind-sensitive long-span suspension bridge is a vital element in land transportation. Understanding the wind characteristics at the bridge site is thus of great significance to the wind- resistant analysis of such a flexible structure. In this study, a strong wind event from a landfall typhoon called Soudelor recorded at the Jiangyin Bridge site with the anemometer is taken as the research object. As inherent time-varying trends are frequently captured in typhoon events, the wind characteristics of Soudelor are analyzed in a non-stationary perspective. The time-varying mean is first extracted with the wavelet-based self-adaptive method. Then, the non-stationary turbulent wind characteristics, e.g.; turbulence intensity, gust factor, turbulence integral scale, and power spectral density, are investigated and compared with the results from the stationary analysis. The comparison highlights the importance of non-stationary considerations of typhoon events, and a transition from stationarity to non-stationarity for the analysis of wind effects. The analytical results could help enrich the database of non-stationary wind characteristics, and are expected to provide references for the wind-resistant analysis of engineering structures in similar areas.

  6. Measurement of Non-Stationary Characteristics of a Landfall Typhoon at the Jiangyin Bridge Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuhui; Qin, Hongxi; Tao, Tianyou; Liu, Wenshuo; Wang, Hao

    2017-09-22

    The wind-sensitive long-span suspension bridge is a vital element in land transportation. Understanding the wind characteristics at the bridge site is thus of great significance to the wind- resistant analysis of such a flexible structure. In this study, a strong wind event from a landfall typhoon called Soudelor recorded at the Jiangyin Bridge site with the anemometer is taken as the research object. As inherent time-varying trends are frequently captured in typhoon events, the wind characteristics of Soudelor are analyzed in a non-stationary perspective. The time-varying mean is first extracted with the wavelet-based self-adaptive method. Then, the non-stationary turbulent wind characteristics, e.g.; turbulence intensity, gust factor, turbulence integral scale, and power spectral density, are investigated and compared with the results from the stationary analysis. The comparison highlights the importance of non-stationary considerations of typhoon events, and a transition from stationarity to non-stationarity for the analysis of wind effects. The analytical results could help enrich the database of non-stationary wind characteristics, and are expected to provide references for the wind-resistant analysis of engineering structures in similar areas.

  7. Investigation of aerodynamic stability by wind response observation during cantilever construction of the Ikara Ohashi bridge; Ikara Ohashi haridashi sekoji no kaze kansoku ni yoru taifu anteisei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K.; Mukai, H.; Takeda, T. [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-20

    In order to ensure aerodynamic stability during cantilever construction of the Ikara Ohashi Bridge, wind response observation was carried out and discussions were given on the result. The Ikara Ohashi Bridge is a 5-span continuous PC cable-stayed bridge with the central span being a concrete bridge having a length of 260 m, which is the longest in Japan. The bridge was constructed using a method that main girders are extended from the central tower to the right and left sides while the girders are stayed by bracing cables. The bridge construction site is in an area which is often subjected to typhoons and gusts like seasonal winds in winter, hence a discussion on aerodynamic stability of the bridge especially during extension work was viewed as an important matter. In addition, the construction used two small-capacity cables spaced and bundled as the bracing material, which required verification on their aerodynamic stability. In order to identify vibration characteristics of the main girders and the central tower, wind response observation has been performed as soon as the construction was begun. As a result, the vibration characteristics of the main girders and the central tower were identified, and it was verified that vibration shape and dominant frequency can be evaluated properly by an intrinsic value analysis that uses a multi-material point frame model. Furthermore, effects of different vibration absorbing measures were compared, and the effective methods were adopted as the result. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Semi-active vibration control in cable-stayed bridges under the condition of random wind load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, G; Joonryong, Jeon

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at an experimental study on the real-time vibration control of bridge structures using a semi-active vibration control method that has been in the spotlight recently. As structures are becoming larger and larger, structural harmful vibration caused by unspecified external forces such as earthquakes, gusts of wind, and collisions has been brought to attention as an important issue. These harmful vibrations can cause not only user anxiety but also severe structural damage or even complete failure of structures. Therefore, in view of structural safety and economical long-term maintenance, real-time control technology of the harmful structural vibration is urgently required. In this paper, a laboratory-scale model of a cable-stayed bridge was built, and a shear-type MR damper and a semi-active vibration control algorithm (Lyapunov and clipped optimal) were applied for the control of harmful vibration of the model bridge, in real time. On the basis of the test results, each semi-active control algorithm was verified quantitatively. (papers)

  9. Aeroelastic Modeling of Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept via Wing Shaping Control for Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; James Urnes, Sr.

    2012-01-01

    achieved. Moreover, some parts of the flap system can be made to have a high frequency response for roll control, gust load alleviation, and aeroservoelastic (ASE) modal suppression control. Abstract The aeroelastic model of the ESAC is based on one-dimensional structural dynamic theory that captures the aeroelastic deformation of a wing structure in a combined motion that involves flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsion. The model includes the effect of aircraft propulsion due to wing flexibility which causes the propulsive forces and moments to couple with the wing elastic motion. Engine mass is also accounted in the model. A fuel management model is developed to describe the wing mass change due to fuel usage in the main tank and wing tanks during cruise. Abstract The model computes both static and dynamic responses of the wing structures. The static aeroelastic deflections are used to estimate the effect of wing flexibility on induced drag and the potential drag reduction by the VCCTE flap system. A flutter analysis is conducted to estimate the flutter speed boundary. Gust load alleviation via adaptive control has been recently investigated to address flexibility of aircraft structures. A multi-objective flight control approach is presented for drag reduction control. The approach is based on an optimal control framework using a multi-objective cost function. Future studies will demonstrate the potential benefits of the approach.

  10. Analysis of a utility-interactive wind-photovoltaic hybrid system with battery storage using neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Francois

    1999-10-01

    This dissertation investigates the application of neural network theory to the analysis of a 4-kW Utility-interactive Wind-Photovoltaic System (WPS) with battery storage. The hybrid system comprises a 2.5-kW photovoltaic generator and a 1.5-kW wind turbine. The wind power generator produces power at variable speed and variable frequency (VSVF). The wind energy is converted into dc power by a controlled, tree-phase, full-wave, bridge rectifier. The PV power is maximized by a Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), a dc-to-dc chopper, switching at a frequency of 45 kHz. The whole dc power of both subsystems is stored in the battery bank or conditioned by a single-phase self-commutated inverter to be sold to the utility at a predetermined amount. First, the PV is modeled using Artificial Neural Network (ANN). To reduce model uncertainty, the open-circuit voltage VOC and the short-circuit current ISC of the PV are chosen as model input variables of the ANN. These input variables have the advantage of incorporating the effects of the quantifiable and non-quantifiable environmental variants affecting the PV power. Then, a simplified way to predict accurately the dynamic responses of the grid-linked WPS to gusty winds using a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) is investigated. The RNN is a single-output feedforward backpropagation network with external feedback, which allows past responses to be fed back to the network input. In the third step, a Radial Basis Functions (RBF) Network is used to analyze the effects of clouds on the Utility-Interactive WPS. Using the irradiance as input signal, the network models the effects of random cloud movement on the output current, the output voltage, the output power of the PV system, as well as the electrical output variables of the grid-linked inverter. Fourthly, using RNN, the combined effects of a random cloud and a wind gusts on the system are analyzed. For short period intervals, the wind speed and the solar radiation are considered as

  11. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    Unsteady flow phenomena are prevalent in a wide range of problems in nature and engineering. These include, but are not limited to, aerodynamics of insect flight, dynamic stall in rotorcraft and wind turbines, leading-edge vortices in delta wings, micro-air vehicle (MAV) design, gust handling and flow control. The most significant characteristics of unsteady flows are rapid changes in the circulation of the airfoil, apparent-mass effects, flow separation and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) phenomenon. Although experimental techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have enabled the detailed study of unsteady flows and their underlying features, a reliable and inexpensive loworder method for fast prediction and for use in control and design is still required. In this research, a low-order methodology based on physical principles rather than empirical fitting is proposed. The objective of such an approach is to enable insights into unsteady phenomena while developing approaches to model them. The basis of the low-order model developed here is unsteady thin-airfoil theory. A time-stepping approach is used to solve for the vorticity on an airfoil camberline, allowing for large amplitudes and nonplanar wakes. On comparing lift coefficients from this method against data from CFD and experiments for some unsteady test cases, it is seen that the method predicts well so long as LEV formation does not occur and flow over the airfoil is attached. The formation of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) in unsteady flows is initiated by flow separation and the formation of a shear layer at the airfoil's leading edge. This phenomenon has been observed to have both detrimental (dynamic stall in helicopters) and beneficial (high-lift flight in insects) effects. To predict the formation of LEVs in unsteady flows, a Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) is proposed. This parameter is calculated from inviscid theory and is a measure of the suction at the airfoil's leading edge. It

  12. Latest climate changes in Romania :tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Latest climate changes in Romania :tornadoes As climate change has been considered a research priority in the European Strategy for enduring development , I have done a detailed research with my students of the new climate change that has been going on in Romania for the past decade. More precisely I have studied together with my students the phenomenon of tornadoes that have seriously affected on some occasions some our our country's locations, such as Facaeni, in the county of Ialomita, in August 2002. A quite unusual phenomenon occurred on that location situated at 44.56 degrees northern latitude and at 27.89 degrees eastern longitude, that caused severe damage to the local environment and three persons lost their lives in the process, as well as other thirty people suffering from bad injuries. The magnitude of that strong phenomenon rose on the Fujita scale at level F3 which implied wing gusts between 252-300 km/ hour . A main cause of occurrence of such a severe weather was the difference in temperature of two huge air masses, one of Polar origin, and other coming from tropical latitudes . Their crossroads was on that precise territory of Romania. The duration of the worst part of the tornado path lasted only for two minutes, but the consequences of its passage were colossal : total destruction of 33 households, and other 395 were partially damaged, 1,000 people afflicted by the devastation and 100 acres of acacia tree forest ripped off the ground. The first ever recorded tornado phenomenon in Romania was around 1894-1896, considered at that time " a freak of nature" was seen as a cloud formation abnormality , an uncontrolled force of nature that had a huge impact , and at the same time, it vanished into "thin air " fast. The most affected areas in Romania by tornadoes are the south-eastern planes where the cloud formations can create fast columns of air rotating up to 500 km/hour. The local people compared the cloud funnels created on the planes to "serpents

  13. The effect of biological cohesion on current ripple development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Jonathan; Baas, Jaco H.; Hope, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from laboratory experiments examining the role of biological cohesion, associated with Extra Polymeric Substances, on the development of current ripples. The results demonstrate the importance of biological cohesion compared to the effect of physical cohesion associated with clays in an otherwise sandy bed. FURTHER INFORMATION In fluvial and marine environments sediment transport is mainly dependent on the nature of the bed surface (rippled or flat) and the nature of cohesion in the bed. Cohesion can be either physical, as a result of the presence of clays, or biological as a result of the presence of organisms. In the case of the latter, biological cohesion occurs as a result of the presence of Extra Polymeric Substances (EPS) secreted by microorganisms. While it is known that EPS can dramatically increase the threshold of motion (Grant and Gust, 1987), comparatively little is known about the effect of EPS on ripple formation and development. The experiments described here seek to fill this gap. They also allow the effect of biological cohesion to be compared with that of physical cohesion from previous experiments (Baas et al., 2013). The experiments, which were conducted in a 10m flume at Bangor University, involved a current over a bed made of fine sand, with a median diameter of 0.148mm, and various amounts of xanthan gum, a proxy for naturally occurring EPS (Vardy et al., 2007). The hydrodynamic experimental conditions were matched very closely to those of Baas et al. (2013). The ripple dimensions were recorded through the glass side wall of the tank using time lapse photography. In the physical cohesion experiments of Baas et al. (2013) for clay contents up to 12%, the clay was very quickly winnowed out of the bed, leaving essentially clay-free ripples that developed at more or less the same rate as clean sand ripples. The resulting equilibrium ripples were essentially the same length as the clean sand ripples but reduced in height. By

  14. Development of a Model Following Control Law for Inflight Simulation and Flight Controls Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mark; Fletcher, Jay; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Army and NASA are currently developing the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) at the Ames Research Center. RASCAL, shown in Figure 1, is a UH-60, which is being modified in a phased development program to have a research fly-by-wire flight control system, and an advanced navigation research platform. An important part of the flight controls and handling qualities research on RASCAL will be an FCS design for the aircraft to achieve high bandwidth control responses and disturbance rejection characteristics. Initially, body states will be used as feedbacks, but research into the use of rotor states will also be considered in later stages to maximize agility and maneuverability. In addition to supporting flight controls research, this FCS design will serve as the inflight simulation control law to support basic handling qualities, guidance, and displays research. Research in high bandwidth controls laws is motivated by the desire to improve the handling qualities in aggressive maneuvering and in severely degraded weather conditions. Naturally, these advantages will also improve the quality of the model following, thereby improving the inflight simulation capabilities of the research vehicle. High bandwidth in the control laws provides tighter tracking allowing for higher response bandwidths which can meet handling qualities requirements for aggressive maneuvering. System sensitivity is also reduced preventing variations in the response from the vehicle due to changing flight conditions. In addition, improved gust rejection will result from this reduced sensitivity. The gust rejection coupled with a highly stable system will make more precise maneuvering and pointing possible in severely degraded weather conditions. The difficulty in achieving higher bandwidths from the control laws in the feedback and in the responses arises from the complexity of the models that are needed to produce a satisfactory design. In this case, high

  15. Qing-Hua Granule induces GLP-1 secretion via bitter taste receptor in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Xu, Jie; Hou, Ruifang; Jin, Xin; Wang, Jingyi; Yang, Na; Yang, Li; Liu, Li; Tao, Feng; Lu, Hao

    2017-05-01

    Qing-Hua Granule (QHG), the modified formulation of a classical Chinese prescription named Gegen Qinlian Decoction, was clinically employed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through regulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). However, the potential mechanism is unknown. We investigate whether QHG induces GLP-1 secretion via activation of bitter taste receptor (TAS2R) pathway in the gastrointestinal tract of db/db mice. The db/db mice were intragastrically (i.g.) administered QHG (low/medium/high dose) once daily for 8 weeks. GLP-1 secretion was evaluated. The bitter receptor signaling pathway, which regulates GLP-1 secretion, including TAS2R5 (a subtype of TAS2R), α-gustducin (Gαgust), 1-phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate phosphodiesterase beta-2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5), was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The biochemical observations of ileum and pancreas tissue were detected histopathologically. Acquity Ultra Performance LCTM - Micromass ZQ 2000 (UPLC-MS) was used for the phytochemical analysis. QHG exhibited significant and dose-dependent effect on GLP-1 secretion in db/db mice, along with significant up-regulation of TAS2R5 mRNA level and activation of TAS2R pathway (p<0.05). In addition, QHG improved the histopathological structure of ileum and pancreatic tissue. Seventeen compounds were identified in QHG. In conclusion, QHG induces GLP-1 secretion in db/db mice, most likely through the bitter taste receptor pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical analysis of the slipstream development around a high-speed train in a double-track tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Min; Li, Peng; Liang, Xi-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the slipstream development around the high-speed trains in tunnels would provide references for assessing the transient gust loads on trackside workers and trackside furniture in tunnels. This paper focuses on the computational analysis of the slipstream caused by high-speed trains passing through double-track tunnels with a cross-sectional area of 100 m2. Three-dimensional unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and a realizable k-ε turbulence model were used to describe the airflow characteristics around a high-speed train in the tunnel. The moving boundary problem was treated using the sliding mesh technology. Three cases were simulated in this paper, including two tunnel lengths and two different configurations of the train. The train speed in these three cases was 250 km/h. The accuracy of the numerical method was validated by the experimental data from full-scale tests, and reasonable consistency was obtained. The results show that the flow field around the high-speed trains can be divided into three distinct regions: the region in front of the train nose, the annular region and the wake region. The slipstream development along the two sides of train is not in balance and offsets to the narrow side in the double-track tunnels. Due to the piston effect, the slipstream has a larger peak value in the tunnel than in open air. The tunnel length, train length and length ratio affect the slipstream velocities; in particular, the velocities increase with longer trains. Moreover, the propagation of pressure waves also induces the slipstream fluctuations: substantial velocity fluctuations mainly occur in front of the train, and weaken with the decrease in amplitude of the pressure wave.

  17. A Meteorological Supersite for Aviation and Cold Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Agelin-Chaab, M.; Komar, J.; Elfstrom, G.; Boudala, F.; Zhou, B.

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand atmospheric boundary layer processes and parameters, and to evaluate physical processes for aviation applications using data from a supersite observing site. Various meteorological sensors, including a weather and environmental unmanned aerial vehicle (WE-UAV), and a fog and snow tower (FSOS) observations are part of the project. The PanAm University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) Meteorological Supersite (PUMS) observations are being collected from April 2015 to date. The FSOS tower gathers observations related to rain, snow, fog, and visibility, aerosols, solar radiation, and wind and turbulence, as well as surface and sky temperature. The FSOSs are located at three locations at about 450-800 m away from the PUMS supersite. The WE-UAV measurements representing aerosol, wind speed and direction, as well as temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) are provided during clear weather conditions. Other measurements at the PUMS site include cloud backscattering profiles from CL51 ceilometer, MWR observations of liquid water content (LWC), T, and RH, and Microwave Rain Radar (MRR) reflectivity profile, as well as the present weather type, snow water depth, icing rate, 3D-ultrasonic wind and turbulence, and conventional meteorological observations from compact weather stations, e.g., WXTs. The results based on important weather event studies, representing fog, snow, rain, blowing snow, wind gust, planetary boundary layer (PBL) wind research for UAV, and icing conditions are given. The microphysical parameterizations and analysis processes for each event are provided, but the results should not be generalized for all weather events and be used cautiously. Results suggested that integrated observing systems based on data from a supersite as well as satellite sites can provide better information applicable to aviation meteorology, including PBL weather research, validation of numerical weather model predictions, and

  18. Aerodynamics of a bio-inspired flexible flapping-wing micro air vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, T; Liu, H; Nishihashi, N; Wang, X; Sato, A; Tanaka, Y

    2011-01-01

    MAVs (micro air vehicles) with a maximal dimension of 15 cm and nominal flight speeds of around 10 m s −1 , operate in a Reynolds number regime of 10 5 or lower, in which most natural flyers including insects, bats and birds fly. Furthermore, due to their light weight and low flight speed, the MAVs' flight characteristics are substantially affected by environmental factors such as wind gust. Like natural flyers, the wing structures of MAVs are often flexible and tend to deform during flight. Consequently, the aero/fluid and structural dynamics of these flyers are closely linked to each other, making the entire flight vehicle difficult to analyze. We have recently developed a hummingbird-inspired, flapping flexible wing MAV with a weight of 2.4–3.0 g and a wingspan of 10–12 cm. In this study, we carry out an integrated study of the flexible wing aerodynamics of this flapping MAV by combining an in-house computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method and wind tunnel experiments. A CFD model that has a realistic wing planform and can mimic realistic flexible wing kinematics is established, which provides a quantitative prediction of unsteady aerodynamics of the four-winged MAV in terms of vortex and wake structures and their relationship with aerodynamic force generation. Wind tunnel experiments further confirm the effectiveness of the clap and fling mechanism employed in this bio-inspired MAV as well as the importance of the wing flexibility in designing small flapping-wing MAVs.

  19. Effects of resolved boundary layer turbulence on near-ground rotation in simulated quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotarski, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Though most strong to violent tornadoes are associated with supercell thunderstorms, quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs) pose a risk of tornadoes, often at times and locations where supercell tornadoes are less common. Because QLCS low-level mesocyclones and tornado signatures tend to be less coherent, forecasting such tornadoes remains particularly difficult. The majority of simulations of such storms rely on horizontally homogeneous base states lacking resolved boundary layer turbulence and surface fluxes. Previous work has suggested that heterogeneities associated with boundary layer turbulence in the form of horizontal convective rolls can influence the evolution and characteristics of low-level mesocyclones in supercell thunderstorms. This study extends methods for generating boundary layer convection to idealized simulations of QLCSs. QLCS simulations with resolved boundary layer turbulence will be compared against a control simulation with a laminar boundary layer. Effects of turbulence, the resultant heterogeneity in the near-storm environment, and surface friction on bulk storm characteristics and the intensity, morphology, and evolution of low-level rotation will be presented. Although maximum surface vertical vorticity values are similar, when boundary layer turbulence is included, a greater number of miso- and meso-scale vortices develop along the QLCS gust front. The source of this vorticity is analyzed using Eulerian decomposition of vorticity tendency terms and trajectory analysis to delineate the relative importance of surface friction and baroclinicity in generating QLCS vortices. The role of anvil shading in suppressing boundary layer turbulence in the near-storm environment and subsequent effects on QLCS vortices will also be presented. Finally, implications of the results regarding inclusion of more realistic boundary layers in future idealized simulations of deep convection will be discussed.

  20. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard Jason; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this report is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the report. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  1. Hurricane Andrew causes major oil spill at Florida Power ampersand Light Company's Turkey Point Power Plant, Homestead, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.; Butts, R.L.; Lindsay, J.R.; McCully, B.S.; Pickering, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew slammed into South Florida with wind gusts in excess of 160 mph. At 4:00 a.m. that day, the eye of this category four storm passed over Florida Power ampersand Light Company's Turkey Point power plant, south of Miami. Although the plant's two nuclear units escaped any significant damage, the storm caused extensive destruction to buildings and transmission facilities, and damaged two 400 foot tall emission stacks associated with the site's two fossil fuel generating units. In addition, a 90,000 to 110,000 gallon spill of No. 6 fuel oil resulted when a piece of wind-blown debris punctured the steel of the unit One 12,000 barrel fuel oil metering tank approximately 30 feet up from the tank bottom. Despite the presence of a secondary containment structure around the tank, the intense wind blew oil throughout the plant site. The damage to the metering tank apparently occurred during the first half hour of the hurricane. As the tank's oil level fell due to the puncture, transfer pumps from the bulk oil storage tanks received a low level alarm which automatically began transferring oil to the damaged metering tank. To prevent the further discharge of oil, plant personnel entered the power block and secured the pumps during the passage of the hurricane eye. Immediately following the storm, facility personnel deployed booms across the barge canal and the Units 1 and 2 intake canal to contain the oil which had entered the water. The response strategy and implementation is described in detail. The remediation costs were approximately $14/gallon spilled, including 54,000 gallons recovered for electricity generation

  2. Damage assessment in CFRP laminates exposed to impact fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsigkourakos, George; Silberschmidt, Vadim V; Ashcroft, I A

    2011-01-01

    Demand for advanced engineering composites in the aerospace industry is increasing continuously. Lately, carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) became one of the most important structural materials in the industry due to a combination of characteristics such as: excellent stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratio, and ease of manufacture according to application. In service, aerospace composite components and structures are exposed to various transient loads, some of which can propagate in them as cyclic impacts. A typical example is an effect of the wind gusts during flight. This type of loading is known as impact fatigue (IF); it is a repetition of low-energy impacts. Such loads can cause various types of damage in composites: fibre breaking, transverse matrix cracking, de-bonding between fibres and matrix and delamination resulting in reduction of residual stiffness and loss of functionality. Furthermore, this damage is often sub-surface, which reinforces the need for more regular inspection. The effects of IF are of major importance due its detrimental effect on the structural integrity of components that can be generated after relatively few impacts at low force levels compared to those in a standard fatigue regime. This study utilises an innovative testing system with the capability of subjecting specimens to a series of repetitive impacts. The primary subject of this paper is to assess the damaging effect of IF on the behaviour of drilled CFRP specimens, exposed to such loading. A detailed damage analysis is implemented utilising an X-ray micro computed tomography system. The main findings suggested that at early stages of life damage is governed by o degree splits along the length of the specimens resulting in a 20% reduction of stiffness. The final failure damage scenario indicated that transverse crasks in the 90 degree plies are the main reason for complete delamination which can be translated to a 50% stiffness reduction.

  3. A composite stability index for dichotomous forecast of thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Middey, Anirban

    2012-12-01

    Thunderstorms are the perennial feature of Kolkata (22° 32' N, 88° 20' E), India during the premonsoon season (April-May). Precise forecast of these thunderstorms is essential to mitigate the associated catastrophe due to lightning flashes, strong wind gusts, torrential rain, and occasional hail and tornadoes. The present research provides a composite stability index for forecasting thunderstorms. The forecast quality detection parameters are computed with the available indices during the period from 1997 to 2006 to select the most relevant indices with threshold ranges for the prevalence of such thunderstorms. The analyses reveal that the lifted index (LI) within the range of -5 to -12 °C, convective inhibition energy (CIN) within the range of 0-150 J/kg and convective available potential energy (CAPE) within the ranges of 2,000 to 7,000 J/kg are the most pertinent indices for the prevalence thunderstorms over Kolkata during the premonsoon season. A composite stability index, thunderstorm prediction index (TPI) is formulated with LI, CIN, and CAPE. The statistical skill score analyses show that the accuracy in forecasting such thunderstorms with TPI is 99.67 % with lead time less than 12 h during training the index whereas the accuracies are 89.64 % with LI, 60 % with CIN and 49.8 % with CAPE. The performance diagram supports that TPI has better forecast skill than its individual components. The forecast with TPI is validated with the observation of the India Meteorological Department during the period from 2007 to 2009. The real-time forecast of thunderstorms with TPI is provided for the year 2010.

  4. Effects of mountain pine beetle on fuels and expected fire behavior in lodgepole pine forests, Colorado, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoennagel, Tania; Veblen, Thomas T; Negron, José F; Smith, Jeremy M

    2012-01-01

    In Colorado and southern Wyoming, mountain pine beetle (MPB) has affected over 1.6 million ha of predominantly lodgepole pine forests, raising concerns about effects of MPB-caused mortality on subsequent wildfire risk and behavior. Using empirical data we modeled potential fire behavior across a gradient of wind speeds and moisture scenarios in Green stands compared three stages since MPB attack (Red [1-3 yrs], Grey [4-10 yrs], and Old-MPB [∼30 yrs]). MPB killed 50% of the trees and 70% of the basal area in Red and Grey stages. Across moisture scenarios, canopy fuel moisture was one-third lower in Red and Grey stages compared to the Green stage, making active crown fire possible at lower wind speeds and less extreme moisture conditions. More-open canopies and high loads of large surface fuels due to treefall in Grey and Old-MPB stages significantly increased surface fireline intensities, facilitating active crown fire at lower wind speeds (>30-55 km/hr) across all moisture scenarios. Not accounting for low foliar moistures in Red and Grey stages, and large surface fuels in Grey and Old-MPB stages, underestimates the occurrence of active crown fire. Under extreme burning conditions, minimum wind speeds for active crown fire were 25-35 km/hr lower for Red, Grey and Old-MPB stands compared to Green. However, if transition to crown fire occurs (outside the stand, or within the stand via ladder fuels or wind gusts >65 km/hr), active crown fire would be sustained at similar wind speeds, suggesting observed fire behavior may not be qualitatively different among MPB stages under extreme burning conditions. Overall, the risk (probability) of active crown fire appears elevated in MPB-affected stands, but the predominant fire hazard (crown fire) is similar across MPB stages and is characteristic of lodgepole pine forests where extremely dry, gusty weather conditions are key factors in determining fire behavior.

  5. Extreme weather impacts on tropical mangrove forests in the Eastern Brazil Marine Ecoregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servino, Ricardo Nogueira; Gomes, Luiz Eduardo de Oliveira; Bernardino, Angelo Fraga

    2018-07-01

    Extreme weather events are likely to become more frequent in the 21st century bringing significant impacts to coastal ecosystems. However, the capacity to detect and measure those impacts are still limited, with effects largely unstudied. In June 2016, a hailstorm with wind gusts of over 100 km·h -1 caused an unprecedented mangrove dieback on Eastern Brazil. To quantify the scale of impact and short-term recovery of mangroves (15-mo), we used satellite imagery and field sampling to evaluate changes in forest structure in control and impacted areas after the hailstorm. Satellite imagery revealed mangrove dieback in over 500 ha, corresponding to 29.3% of the total forest area suddenly impacted after the hailstorm. Fifteen months after the hailstorm, some impacted areas show an initial recovery, while others continued to degrade. The El Niño years of 2014-2016 created mild drought conditions in Eastern Brazil. As observed in wetlands of semi-arid regions during the same period, mangrove recovery may have been impaired by continued physiological stress and climate change effects. Economic losses in the study site from typical mangrove ecosystem services including food provision, climate regulation, raw materials and nurseries are estimated to at least US$ 792,624 yr -1 . This is the first evidence of an extreme weather impact on mangroves in Brazil that typically provide unique ecological and economic subsistence to coastal populations. Our results reveal that there is a pressing need for long-term monitoring and climate change adaptation actions for coastal wetlands in Brazil, and to provide broad estimates of ecosystem values associated with these ecosystems given many areas are already experiencing chronic stress from local impacts, drought and high temperatures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-distance wind-dispersal of spores in a fungal plant pathogen: estimation of anisotropic dispersal kernels from an extensive field experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Rieux

    Full Text Available Given its biological significance, determining the dispersal kernel (i.e., the distribution of dispersal distances of spore-producing pathogens is essential. Here, we report two field experiments designed to measure disease gradients caused by sexually- and asexually-produced spores of the wind-dispersed banana plant fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis. Gradients were measured during a single generation and over 272 traps installed up to 1000 m along eight directions radiating from a traceable source of inoculum composed of fungicide-resistant strains. We adjusted several kernels differing in the shape of their tail and tested for two types of anisotropy. Contrasting dispersal kernels were observed between the two types of spores. For sexual spores (ascospores, we characterized both a steep gradient in the first few metres in all directions and rare long-distance dispersal (LDD events up to 1000 m from the source in two directions. A heavy-tailed kernel best fitted the disease gradient. Although ascospores distributed evenly in all directions, average dispersal distance was greater in two different directions without obvious correlation with wind patterns. For asexual spores (conidia, few dispersal events occurred outside of the source plot. A gradient up to 12.5 m from the source was observed in one direction only. Accordingly, a thin-tailed kernel best fitted the disease gradient, and anisotropy in both density and distance was correlated with averaged daily wind gust. We discuss the validity of our results as well as their implications in terms of disease diffusion and management strategy.

  7. Active and passive fatigue in simulated driving: discriminating styles of workload regulation and their safety impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxby, Dyani J; Matthews, Gerald; Warm, Joel S; Hitchcock, Edward M; Neubauer, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Despite the known dangers of driver fatigue, it is a difficult construct to study empirically. Different forms of task-induced fatigue may differ in their effects on driver performance and safety. Desmond and Hancock (2001) defined active and passive fatigue states that reflect different styles of workload regulation. In 2 driving simulator studies we investigated the multidimensional subjective states and safety outcomes associated with active and passive fatigue. Wind gusts were used to induce active fatigue, and full vehicle automation to induce passive fatigue. Drive duration was independently manipulated to track the development of fatigue states over time. Participants were undergraduate students. Study 1 (N = 108) focused on subjective response and associated cognitive stress processes, while Study 2 (N = 168) tested fatigue effects on vehicle control and alertness. In both studies the 2 fatigue manipulations produced different patterns of subjective response reflecting different styles of workload regulation, appraisal, and coping. Active fatigue was associated with distress, overload, and heightened coping efforts, whereas passive fatigue corresponded to large-magnitude declines in task engagement, cognitive underload, and reduced challenge appraisal. Study 2 showed that only passive fatigue reduced alertness, operationalized as speed of braking and steering responses to an emergency event. Passive fatigue also increased crash probability, but did not affect a measure of vehicle control. Findings support theories that see fatigue as an outcome of strategies for managing workload. The distinction between active and passive fatigue is important for assessment of fatigue and for evaluating automated driving systems which may induce dangerous levels of passive fatigue. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Energy harvesting by means of flow-induced vibrations on aerospace vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daochun; Wu, Yining; Da Ronch, Andrea; Xiang, Jinwu

    2016-10-01

    This paper reviews the design, implementation, and demonstration of energy harvesting devices that exploit flow-induced vibrations as the main source of energy. Starting with a presentation of various concepts of energy harvesters that are designed to benefit from a general class of flow-induced vibrations, specific attention is then given at those technologies that may offer, today or in the near future, a potential benefit to extend the operational capabilities and to monitor critical parameters of unmanned aerial vehicles. Various phenomena characterized by flow-induced vibrations are discussed, including limit cycle oscillations of plates and wing sections, vortex-induced and galloping oscillations of bluff bodies, vortex-induced vibrations of downstream structures, and atmospheric turbulence and gusts. It was found that linear or linearized modeling approaches are commonly employed to support the design phase of energy harvesters. As a result, highly nonlinear and coupled phenomena that characterize flow-induced vibrations are neglected in the design process. The Authors encourage a shift in the current design paradigm: considering coupled nonlinear phenomena, and adequate modeling tools to support their analysis, from a design limitation to a design opportunity. Special emphasis is placed on identifying designs and implementations applicable to aircraft configurations. Application fields of flow-induced vibrations-based energy harvesters are discussed including power supply for wireless sensor networks and simultaneous energy harvest and control. A large body of work on energy harvesters is included in this review journal. Whereas most of the references claim direct applications to unmanned aerial vehicles, it is apparent that, in most of the cases presented, the working principles and characteristics of the energy harvesters are incompatible with any aerospace applications. Finally, the challenges that hold back the integration of energy harvesting

  9. The physical demands of Olympic yacht racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, H; Sanders, R; Legg, S

    1999-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to quantify the up wards forces of the feet on the hiking strap and the forces in the mainsheet of four Olympic classes of racing dinghies (Europe, Laser. Finn and 470) during realistic on-water sailing in varying wind conditions. The secondary aim of the study was to measure the joint angles adopted by the sailors and boat heel angles. The tertiary aim was to identify events and sailing conditions associated with large or patterned force production. Forces in the hiking strap and mainsheet of four classes of Olympic sailing dinghies were measured on eleven New Zealand sailors during simulated on-water racing in a range of wind conditions. Up-wind hiking strap forces reached an average of 73-87% of predicted maximal voluntary contraction (pred MVC), with peak forces exceeding 100% pred MVC. Mainsheet forces reached 25-35% pred MVC, with peak forces reaching 40-50% pred MVC. Off-wind hiking strap and mainsheet forces were considerably lower than up-wind forces. Ankle and hip joint angles increased and knee joint angles decreased with increasing wind speed during up-wind sailing. Large forces occurred in the hiking strap and mainsheet when boats reached the tops of wave during up-wind sailing in high wind speeds and when a gust of wind hit the boat. During off-wind sailing large forces were observed in the mainsheet when surfing down waves. It is recommended that the intensities and joint angles found in this study be used as a basis for the development of class specific off-water physical conditioning programmes.

  10. SIMULATION OF INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM ERRORS AT AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FROM UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shults

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of accuracy determination of the UAV position using INS at aerial photography can be resolved in two different ways: modelling of measurement errors or in-field calibration for INS. The paper presents the results of INS errors research by mathematical modelling. In paper were considered the following steps: developing of INS computer model; carrying out INS simulation; using reference data without errors, estimation of errors and their influence on maps creation accuracy by UAV data. It must be remembered that the values of orientation angles and the coordinates of the projection centre may change abruptly due to the influence of the atmosphere (different air density, wind, etc.. Therefore, the mathematical model of the INS was constructed taking into account the use of different models of wind gusts. For simulation were used typical characteristics of micro electromechanical (MEMS INS and parameters of standard atmosphere. According to the simulation established domination of INS systematic errors that accumulate during the execution of photographing and require compensation mechanism, especially for orientation angles. MEMS INS have a high level of noise at the system input. Thanks to the developed model, we are able to investigate separately the impact of noise in the absence of systematic errors. According to the research was found that on the interval of observations in 5 seconds the impact of random and systematic component is almost the same. The developed model of INS errors studies was implemented in Matlab software environment and without problems can be improved and enhanced with new blocks.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Exopolysaccharide-Producing Lactobacillus plantarum SKT109 from Tibet Kefir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus plantarum SKT109 was isolated and identified from Tibet Kefir, and the exopolysaccharride (EPS-producing properties of the strain were evaluated. Growth of strain SKT109 in a semi-defined medium at 37°C increased the viscosity of the medium, corresponding to production of an EPS (58.66 mg/L. The EPS was isolated and purified, and it was shown to consist of fructose and glucose in an approximate molar ratio of 3:1, with an average molecular weight of 2.1×106 Da. The aqueous solution of EPS at 1% (w/v exhibited shear thinning behavior. Microstructural studies of the EPS demonstrated a highly compact structure with a smooth surface, facilitating formation of film by the polymer; the EPS was composed of many different sizes of spherical lumps with tendency to form molecular aggregates. Studies on the milk fermentation characteristics of L. plantarum SKT109 showed that the strain survived well in fermented milk with counts about 8.0 log cfu/g during 21 days of storage at 4°C. The use of the EPS-producing strain improved the rheology of the fermented milk without causing post-acidification during storage. Particularly, L. plantarum SKT109 improved the fermented milk flavor by increasing the concentration of characteristic flavor compounds and eliminating those with dis gusting flavors. The results of the present study indicated that EPS-producing L. plantarum SKT109 could serve as a promising candidate for further exploitation in fermented foods.

  12. Biomimetic FAA-certifiable, artificial muscle structures for commercial aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Barrett, Cassandra M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is centered on a new form of adaptive material which functions much in the same way as skeletal muscle tissue, is structurally modeled on plant actuator cells and capable of rapidly expanding or shrinking by as much as an order of magnitude in prescribed directions. Rapid changes of plant cell shape and sizes are often initiated via ion-transport driven fluid migration and resulting turgor pressure variation. Certain plant cellular structures like those in Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant), Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree), or Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) all exhibit actuation physiology which employs such turgor pressure manipulation. The paper begins with dynamic micrographs of a sectioned basal articulation joint from A. julibrissin. These figures show large cellular dimensional changes as the structure undergoes foliage articulation. By mimicking such structures in aircraft flight control mechanisms, extremely lightweight pneumatic control surface actuators can be designed. This paper shows several fundamental layouts of such surfaces with actuator elements made exclusively from FAA-certifiable materials, summarizes their structural mechanics and shows actuator power and energy densities that are higher than nearly all classes of conventional adaptive materials available today. A sample flap structure is shown to possess the ability to change its shape and structural stiffness as its cell pressures are manipulated, which in turn changes the surface lift-curve slope when exposed to airflows. Because the structural stiffness can be altered, it is also shown that the commanded section lift-curve slope can be similarly controlled between 1.2 and 6.2 rad-1. Several aircraft weight reduction principles are also shown to come into play as the need to concentrate loads to pass through point actuators is eliminated. The paper concludes with a summary of interrelated performance and airframe-level improvements including enhanced gust rejection, load

  13. Extending wind turbine operational conditions; a comparison of set point adaptation and LQG individual pitch control for highly turbulent wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, W P; Subhani, S; Zafar, H; Savenije, F

    2014-01-01

    Extreme wind conditions can cause excessive loading on the turbine. This not only results in higher design loads, but when these conditions occur in practice, will also result in higher maintenance cost. Although there are already effective methods of dealing with gusts, other extreme conditions should also be examined. More specifically, extreme turbulence conditions (e.g. those specified by design load case 1.3 in IEC61400-1 ed. 3) require special attention as they can lead to design-driving extreme loads on blades, tower and other wind turbine components. This paper examines two methods to deal with extreme loads in a case of extreme turbulent wind. One method is derating the turbine, the other method is an individual pitch control (IPC) algorithm. Derating of the turbine can be achieved in two ways, one is changing the rated torque, the other is changing the rated rotor speed. The effect of these methods on fatigue loads and extreme loads is examined. Non-linear aero-elastic simulations using Phatas, show that reducing the rated rotor speed is far more effective at reducing the loads than reducing torque. Then, the IPC algorithm is proposed. This algorithm is a linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller based on a time invariant model, defined in the fixed reference frame that includes the first tower and blade modes. Because this method takes the dynamics of the system into account more than conventional IPC control, it is expected that these loads dealt with more effectively, when they are particularly relevant. It is expected that in extreme turbulent the blade and tower dynamics are indeed more relevant. The effect of this algorithm on fatigue loads and pitch effort is examined and compared with the fatigue loads and pitch effort of reference IPC. Finally, the methods are compared in non-linear aero-elastic simulations with extreme turbulent wind

  14. Pollen flow of wheat under natural conditions in the Huanghuai River Wheat Region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Qing; Zhang, Chun-Qing; Wu, Cheng-Lai; Gao, Qing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    abstract The transgenic pollen spread is the main pathway of transgenic plant gene flow. The maximum distance of pollen dispersal (horizontal), the spatial dynamics of pollen movement (vertical), and the patterns of pollen dispersal are important considerations in biosafety assessments of genetically modified crops. To evaluate wheat (Triticum aestivum) pollen dispersal, we measured the pollen suspension velocity and analyzed pollen dispersal patterns under natural conditions in the Huanghuai River wheat-growing region in 2009. The pollen suspension velocity was 0.3–0.4 m/s. The highest pollen densities were detected in the north, northwest, and south of the pollen source. Pollen was dispersed over distances greater than 245 m in the northwest and northeast directions. At the pollen source center, pollen density decreased with increasing vertical height. In the north of the pollen source, the pollen density from 65 m to 225 m showed a wave-mode decrease with increasing height. The horizontal transport of pollen over longer distances fitted polynomial equations. In the north, the pollen density was highest at 45 m from the pollen source, and decreased with increasing distance. In the northwest, the pollen density showed a double-peak trend. In the northeast, pollen density was highest from 45 m to 125 m from the source. Wind speeds greater than the pollen suspension velocity and the duration of continuous gusts were the main factors affecting pollen dispersal. This information will be useful for determining the spatial isolation distances for hybrid seed production and for the commercial production of transgenic wheat. PMID:25658025

  15. The First Saildrone Scientific Mission: The Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelet, E. D.; Meinig, C.; Jenkins, R.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.; Mordy, C. W.; Tabisola, H. M.; Stabeno, P. J.; Cross, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    Unmanned surface vehicles (USV) are a rapidly advancing technology that has the potential to meet the requirement for long duration and economical scientific data collection with the ability for real-time data and adaptive sampling. In 2015, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Washington and Saildrone Inc. explored the use of a novel USV technology in the Bering Sea. Two Saildrones, wind- and solar-powered autonomous surface vehicles that can be used for extended research missions in challenging environments, were equipped with a suite of meteorological and oceanographic sensors. Each Saildrone measured position, vehicle attitude, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, PAR, air temperature, relative humidity, magnetic field strength, ocean skin temperature, water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen concentration, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence. Diagnostic data were transmitted ashore every 10 minutes via Iridium satellite and updated on a web site. Command and control information was sent to the Saildrones for setting waypoints, etc. One-minute data were transmitted ashore four times per day allowing measurements to be analyzed and plotted for scientific insight and mission guidance. During this first-ever scientific mission, lasting 97 days and covering over 7600 km each, the Saildrones successfully completed several scientific survey assignments. They encountered below-freezing temperatures and winds in excess of 20 kn several times with gusts of over 46 kn. Measurements were validated against shipboard and mooring observations. Saildrone sampling strategies were modified on the fly, first to measure the effects of sea-ice melt on surface cooling and freshening, and then to study the Yukon River plume. This mission demonstrated the capability of the Saildrone vehicle to be launched from a dock to conduct autonomous and adaptive oceanographic research in a harsh, high-latitude environment.

  16. Inspection of Pole-Like Structures Using a Visual-Inertial Aided VTOL Platform with Shared Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Inkyu; Hrabar, Stefan; Corke, Peter

    2015-09-02

    This paper presents an algorithm and a system for vertical infrastructure inspection using a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle and shared autonomy. Inspecting vertical structures such as light and power distribution poles is a difficult task that is time-consuming, dangerous and expensive. Recently, micro VTOL platforms (i.e., quad-, hexa- and octa-rotors) have been rapidly gaining interest in research, military and even public domains. The unmanned, low-cost and VTOL properties of these platforms make them ideal for situations where inspection would otherwise be time-consuming and/or hazardous to humans. There are, however, challenges involved with developing such an inspection system, for example flying in close proximity to a target while maintaining a fixed stand-off distance from it, being immune to wind gusts and exchanging useful information with the remote user. To overcome these challenges, we require accurate and high-update rate state estimation and high performance controllers to be implemented onboard the vehicle. Ease of control and a live video feed are required for the human operator. We demonstrate a VTOL platform that can operate at close-quarters, whilst maintaining a safe stand-off distance and rejecting environmental disturbances. Two approaches are presented: Position-Based Visual Servoing (PBVS) using an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and estimator-free Image-Based Visual Servoing (IBVS). Both use monocular visual, inertia, and sonar data, allowing the approaches to be applied for indoor or GPS-impaired environments. We extensively compare the performances of PBVS and IBVS in terms of accuracy, robustness and computational costs. Results from simulations Sensors 2015, 15 22004 and indoor/outdoor (day and night) flight experiments demonstrate the system is able to successfully inspect and circumnavigate a vertical pole.

  17. Atmospheric aerosol sampling campaign in Budapest and K-puszta. Part 1. Elemental concentrations and size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, E.; Borbely-Kiss, I.; Kertesz, Zs.; Szabo, Gy.; Salma, I.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected in a sampling campaign from 24 July to 1 Au- gust, 2003 in Hungary. The sampling were performed in two places simultaneously: in Budapest (urban site) and K-puszta (remote area). Two PIXE International 7-stage cascade impactors were used for aerosol sampling with 24 hours duration. These impactors separate the aerosol into 7 size ranges. The elemental concentrations of the samples were obtained by proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis. Size distributions of S, Si, Ca, W, Zn, Pb and Fe elements were investigated in K-puszta and in Budapest. Average rates (shown in Table 1) of the elemental concentrations was calculated for each stage (in %) from the obtained distributions. The elements can be grouped into two parts on the basis of these data. The majority of the particle containing Fe, Si, Ca, (Ti) are in the 2-8 μm size range (first group). These soil origin elements were found usually in higher concentration in Budapest than in K-puszta (Fig.1.). The second group consisted of S, Pb and (W). The majority of these elements was found in the 0.25-1 μm size range and was much higher in Budapest than in K-puszta. W was measured only in samples collected in Budapest. Zn has uniform distribution in Budapest and does not belong to the above mentioned groups. This work was supported by the National Research and Development Program (NRDP 3/005/2001). (author)

  18. Comparación del comportamiento en la red eléctrica del aerogenerador asincrónico de jaula de ardilla y el doblemente alimentado; Comparison of the Behavior in the Electric Network of the Squirrel Cage Wind Turbine Generator and the Doubly Fed Wind Turbin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariely Francisco Fernández

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, se lleva a cabo un análisis comparativo entre estos dos tipos de aerogeneradores. Labase para la comparación es el comportamiento del generador en el sistema sujeto a diferentes tiposperturbaciones tales como: valles de tensión, cortocircuitos, rachas de viento y cambios de carga.Para lasimulación se utiliza el SimPowerSystem del MATLAB. Sus últimas versiones tienen entre sus herramientasmodelos de turbinas y generadores eólicos que facilitan mucho el trabajo.En el caso de los GeneradoresAsincrónicos con Rotor Jaula de ardilla se analizaron tanto el caso de Condensadores Variables enParalelo como la utilización de Compensadores Estáticos de Reactivo. Ésta última permite la regulación dela tensión en el punto de conexión del Aerogenerador. Finalmente, queda demostrada y bien argumentadaen el trabajo la superioridad del generador doblemente alimentado. In this paper, a comparative analysis of these two types of wind turbine generators is made. The base forthe comparison is the behaviour of the generator and the system submitted to different disturbances suchas voltage dips, short-circuits, winds gusts and load changes. The MATLAB SimPowerSystem toolbox isused for doing these analyses. Its last version has a Wind Turbine Generator tool that facilitates the work.In the case of the Cage Induction Generator, a changing paralleled capacitor bank and a static varcompensator are supposed and analyzed. It is demonstrated that the last one is capable of supportnetwork voltage. Finally, the superiority of the Doubly Fed Induction Generator is clearly demonstrated andwell argument. 

  19. NASA Tech Briefs, September 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    opics covered include: Filtering Water by Use of Ultrasonically Vibrated Nanotubes; Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation; Functionalizing CNTs for Making Epoxy/CNT Composites; Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes; Progress Toward Sequestering Carbon Nanotubes in PmPV; Two-Stage Variable Sample-Rate Conversion System; Estimating Transmitted-Signal Phase Variations for Uplink Array Antennas; Board Saver for Use with Developmental FPGAs; Circuit for Driving Piezoelectric Transducers; Digital Synchronizer without Metastability; Compact, Low-Overhead, MIL-STD-1553B Controller; Parallel-Processing CMOS Circuitry for M-QAM and 8PSK TCM; Differential InP HEMT MMIC Amplifiers Embedded in Waveguides; Improved Aerogel Vacuum Thermal Insulation; Fluoroester Co-Solvents for Low-Temperature Li+ Cells; Using Volcanic Ash to Remove Dissolved Uranium and Lead; High-Efficiency Artificial Photosynthesis Using a Novel Alkaline Membrane Cell; Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays; Micro-Horn Arrays for Ultrasonic Impedance Matching; Improved Controller for a Three-Axis Piezoelectric Stage; Nano-Pervaporation Membrane with Heat Exchanger Generates Medical-Grade Water; Micro-Organ Devices; Nonlinear Thermal Compensators for WGM Resonators; Dynamic Self-Locking of an OEO Containing a VCSEL; Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration; Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings; Improving the Visible and Infrared Contrast Ratio of Microshutter Arrays; Improved Scanners for Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging; Rate-Compatible LDPC Codes with Linear Minimum Distance; PrimeSupplier Cross-Program Impact Analysis and Supplier Stability Indicator Simulation Model; Integrated Planning for Telepresence With Time Delays; Minimizing Input-to-Output Latency in Virtual Environment; Battery Cell Voltage Sensing and Balancing Using Addressable Transformers; Gaussian and Lognormal Models of Hurricane Gust Factors; Simulation

  20. Dynamic behavior and identification of failure modes of cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serhan, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The major thrust of this paper is to provide an engineering assessment of two hyperboloidal 540-foot high reinforced concrete cooling towers at a nuclear power plant relative to the proposed construction of a new safety-related facility in the shadow of these cooling towers. A three-dimensional full 360-degree finite-element model that is capable of realistically representing the response of the two cooling towers subjected to the plant design-basis safe shutdown earthquake, 90 mph wind, and 300 mph tornado is used to create a data pool which supports the proposed construction of the new facility. Dynamic time history analyses are performed to represent the complex interplay of the dynamic characteristics of the cooling towers and the input wind-pressure excitation in terms of gust factors. This study resulted in the confirmation and enhancement of many of the important aspects in the design/analysis methodologies for cooling towers reported in literature. In summary, this study provides a high confidence that no significant damage will be caused to the two cooling towers when subjected to the plant design-basis safe shutdown earthquake and the 90 mph basic wind velocity. However, the two cooling towers are expected to collapse if subjected in a direct hit to a 300 mph tornado. The nonlinear finite element analyses including base uplift performed for this study and the literature research on past failures of cooling towers due to severe wind storms confirm that the mode of failure will not be the overturning cantilever tree-type and the towers will collapse inwardly with the exception of few isolated debris

  1. Permeability and flammability study of composite sandwich structures for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubacz, Monika

    Fiber reinforced plastics offer advantageous specific strength and stiffness compared to metals and has been identified as candidates for the reusable space transportation systems primary structures including cryogenic tanks. A number of carbon and aramid fiber reinforced plastics have been considered for the liquid hydrogen tanks. Materials selection is based upon mechanical properties and containment performance (long and short term) and upon manufacturing considerations. The liquid hydrogen tank carries shear, torque, end load, and bending moment due to gusts, maneuver, take-off, landing, lift, drag, and fuel sloshing. The tank is pressurized to about 1.5 atmosphere (14.6psi or 0.1 MPa) differential pressure and on ascent maintains the liquid hydrogen at a temperature of 20K. The objective of the research effort into lay the foundation for developing the technology required for reliable prediction of the effects of various design, manufacturing, and service parameters on the susceptibility of composite tanks to develop excessive permeability to cryogenic fuels. Efforts will be expended on developing the materials and structural concepts for the cryogenic tanks that can meet the functional requirements. This will include consideration for double wall composite sandwich structures, with inner wall to meet the cryogenic requirements. The structure will incorporate nanoparticles for properties modifications and developing barriers. The main effort will be extended to tank wall's internal skin design. The main requirements for internal composite stack are: (1) introduction of barrier film (e.g. honeycomb material paper sheet) to reduce the wall permeability to hydrogen, (2) introduction of nanoparticles into laminate resin to prevent micro-cracking or crack propagation. There is a need to characterize and analyze composite sandwich structural damage due to burning and explosion. Better understanding of the flammability and blast resistance of the composite structures

  2. Early Detection of Rapidly Developing Cumulus Area using HIMAWARI-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y.; Kadosaki, G.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, many disasters have been occured by influence of meteorological change in Japan. So, it becomes more important to inform rapid weather change caused by cumulus which brings concentrated heavy rain/hail, wind gust, lightning in a short period. These severe events should inclease in the future by global warming. Therefore we are developping the alert system for Rapidly Developing Cumulus Area (RDCA) detection using Japanese new satellite. At July 2015, Japan Meteorological Agency started operation of new geostationary meteorological satellite "Himawari-8". This satellite has optical imager named Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI). It can observe Japan area every 2.5 minutes. The frequently infrared image with high resolution (2km) is the key of our alert system. We took some special functions in the algorithm of this system. One of the points is cloud location which shifts to north from true location around Japan by viewing angle from the satellite above the equator. We moved clouds to the correct position using geometric correction method according to its height and latitude. This algorithm also follows a movement of cloud every 2.5 minutes during several observations. It derives the information about degree of the development of cumulus. The prototype system gives the alert before 30 to 60 minutes in advance to the first lightning in typical cumulus case. However, we understand that there are some difficult cases to alert. For example, winter low cloud over the Japan Sea which brings a winter lightning, and tornado (although it is not cumulus). Now, we are adjusting some parameters of the algorithm. In the near future, our algorithm will be used in weather information delivery service to the customer.

  3. Analysis and modeling of tropical convection observed by CYGNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, T. J.; Li, X.; Roberts, J. B.; Mecikalski, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a multi-satellite constellation that utilizes Global Positioning System (GPS) reflectometry to retrieve near-surface wind speeds over the ocean. While CYGNSS is primarily aimed at measuring wind speeds in tropical cyclones, our research has established that the mission may also provide valuable insight into the relationships between wind-driven surface fluxes and general tropical oceanic convection. Currently, we are examining organized tropical convection using a mixture of CYGNSS level 1 through level 3 data, IMERG (Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement), and other ancillary datasets (including buoys, GPM level 1 and 2 data, as well as ground-based radar). In addition, observing system experiments (OSEs) are being performed using hybrid three-dimensional variational assimilation to ingest CYGNSS observations into a limited-domain, convection-resolving model. Our focus for now is on case studies of convective evolution, but we will also report on progress toward statistical analysis of convection sampled by CYGNSS. Our working hypothesis is that the typical mature phase of organized tropical convection is marked by the development of a sharp gust-front boundary from an originally spatially broader but weaker wind speed change associated with precipitation. This increase in the wind gradient, which we demonstrate is observable by CYGNSS, likely helps to focus enhanced turbulent fluxes of convection-sustaining heat and moisture near the leading edge of the convective system where they are more easily ingested by the updraft. Progress on the testing and refinement of this hypothesis, using a mixture of observations and modeling, will be reported.

  4. Robust post-stall perching with a simple fixed-wing glider using LQR-Trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Joseph; Cory, Rick; Tedrake, Russ

    2014-01-01

    Birds routinely execute post-stall maneuvers with a speed and precision far beyond the capabilities of our best aircraft control systems. One remarkable example is a bird exploiting post-stall pressure drag in order to rapidly decelerate to land on a perch. Stall is typically associated with a loss of control authority, and it is tempting to attribute this agility of birds to the intricate morphology of the wings and tail, to their precision sensing apparatus, or their ability to perform thrust vectoring. Here we ask whether an extremely simple fixed-wing glider (no propeller) with only a single actuator in the tail is capable of landing precisely on a perch from a large range of initial conditions. To answer this question, we focus on the design of the flight control system; building upon previous work which used linear feedback control design based on quadratic regulators (LQR), we develop nonlinear feedback control based on nonlinear model-predictive control and ‘LQR-Trees’. Through simulation using a flat-plate model of the glider, we find that both nonlinear methods are capable of achieving an accurate bird-like perching maneuver from a large range of initial conditions; the ‘LQR-Trees’ algorithm is particularly useful due to its low computational burden at runtime and its inherent performance guarantees. With this in mind, we then implement the ‘LQR-Trees’ algorithm on real hardware and demonstrate a 95 percent perching success rate over 147 flights for a wide range of initial speeds. These results suggest that, at least in the absence of significant disturbances like wind gusts, complex wing morphology and sensing are not strictly required to achieve accurate and robust perching even in the post-stall flow regime. (papers)

  5. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S814 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the design of new rotor airfoils. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can also be used to validate analytical computer codes. An S814 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 X 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 X 5) under steady flow with both stationary model conditions and pitch oscillations. To study the extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. While the model underwent pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions {+-}5.5{degrees} and {+-}10{degrees}, were used; at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation.

  6. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the LS(1)-0417MOD airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculations of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation caused by surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. An LS(l)-0417MOD airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used, {plus_minus} 5.5%{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions foil model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  7. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S801 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculation of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. A S801 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3x5 subsonic wind tunnel (3x5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers used for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used, {plus_minus} 5.5 {degrees}and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees} 14{degrees} and 20{degrees} For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means that the airfoil model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  8. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S815 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss Ramsay, R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculation of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are cause by the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. A S815 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 x 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 x 5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers used for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20{degree} to +40{degree}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {+-}5.5{degree} and {+-}10{degree}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degree}, 14{degree}, and 20{degree}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means that the model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  9. Preliminary tests of a high speed vertical axis windmill model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, P; Rangi, R S

    1971-01-01

    This report discusses a fixed-pitch vertical axis windmill that combines the inherent simplicity of this type of machine with a high aerodynamic efficiency and a high relative velocity. A three-bladed rotor was selected as the basic design, having constant chord symmetric airfoil blades configured in a catenary curve such that the rotor diameter is equal to the rotor height. In wind tunnel tests using a 30 inch scale model, it was found that once this rotor was given a very low rotational speed, it picked up speed and ran at a rotor tip velocity/wind speed ratio greater than 1. The number of blades was varied in the testing. A maximum power coefficient of 0.67 was achieved at 17 ft/s wind speed at a tip speed/wind speed ratio of 7.25 for a 2-bladed rotor. Increasing the number of blades above 3 did not result in higher power. The rotor could operate in gusts which double the mean wind velocity. Examination of Reynolds number effects, and taking into account the scale of the model, it was concluded that a full-scale windmill could run at lower velocity ratios than those predicted by the model tests, and that it could self-start under no-load conditions if the cut-in rpm are at least half the rpm for maximum power at the prevailing wind speed. Preliminary estimates show that a 15 ft diameter windmill of this design, designed to operate with a safety factor of 2.5 up to a maximum wind speed of 60 ft/s, would weigh ca 150 lb and could be marketed for ca $60.00, excluding the driven unit, if sufficient quantities were produced to make tooling costs negligible. Similarly, a 30 ft windmill would weigh ca 1000 lb and cost ca $400.00. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Inspection of Pole-Like Structures Using a Visual-Inertial Aided VTOL Platform with Shared Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inkyu Sa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm and a system for vertical infrastructure inspection using a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL unmanned aerial vehicle and shared autonomy. Inspecting vertical structures such as light and power distribution poles is a difficult task that is time-consuming, dangerous and expensive. Recently, micro VTOL platforms (i.e., quad-, hexa- and octa-rotors have been rapidly gaining interest in research, military and even public domains. The unmanned, low-cost and VTOL properties of these platforms make them ideal for situations where inspection would otherwise be time-consuming and/or hazardous to humans. There are, however, challenges involved with developing such an inspection system, for example flying in close proximity to a target while maintaining a fixed stand-off distance from it, being immune to wind gusts and exchanging useful information with the remote user. To overcome these challenges, we require accurate and high-update rate state estimation and high performance controllers to be implemented onboard the vehicle. Ease of control and a live video feed are required for the human operator. We demonstrate a VTOL platform that can operate at close-quarters, whilst maintaining a safe stand-off distance and rejecting environmental disturbances. Two approaches are presented: Position-Based Visual Servoing (PBVS using an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF and estimator-free Image-Based Visual Servoing (IBVS. Both use monocular visual, inertia, and sonar data, allowing the approaches to be applied for indoor or GPS-impaired environments. We extensively compare the performances of PBVS and IBVS in terms of accuracy, robustness and computational costs. Results from simulations Sensors 2015, 15 22004 and indoor/outdoor (day and night flight experiments demonstrate the system is able to successfully inspect and circumnavigate a vertical pole.

  11. Investigation of a robust tendon-sheath mechanism for flexible membrane wing application in mini-UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shian; Tjahjowidodo, Tegoeh; Lee, Hsuchew; Lai, Benedict

    2017-02-01

    Two inherent issues manifest themselves in flying mini-unmanned aerial vehicles (mini-UAV) in the dense area at tropical climate regions, namely disturbances from gusty winds and limited space for deployment tasks. Flexible membrane wing (FMW) UAVs are seen to be potentials to mitigate these problems. FMWs are adaptable to gusty airflow as the wings are able to flex according to the gust load to reduce the effective angle-of-attack, thus, reducing the aerodynamic loads on the wing. On the other hand, the flexible structure is allowing the UAV to fold in a compact package, and later on, the mini-UAV can be deployed instantly from the storage tube, e.g. through a catapult mechanism. This paper discusses the development of an FMW UAV actuated by a tendon-sheath mechanism (TSM). This approach allows the wing to morph to generate a rolling moment, while still allowing the wing to fold. Dynamic characteristics of the mechanism that exhibits the strong nonlinear phenomenon of friction on TSM are modeled and compensated for. A feed-forward controller was implemented based on the identified nonlinear behavior to control the warping position of the wing. The proposed strategy is validated experimentally in a wind tunnel facility by creating a gusty environment that is imitating a realistic gusty condition based upon the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results demonstrate a stable and robust wing-warping actuation, even in gusty conditions. Accurate wing-warping can be achieved via the TSM, while also allowing the wings to fold.

  12. Biomimetic FAA-certifiable, artificial muscle structures for commercial aircraft wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Ronald M; Barrett, Cassandra M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is centered on a new form of adaptive material which functions much in the same way as skeletal muscle tissue, is structurally modeled on plant actuator cells and capable of rapidly expanding or shrinking by as much as an order of magnitude in prescribed directions. Rapid changes of plant cell shape and sizes are often initiated via ion-transport driven fluid migration and resulting turgor pressure variation. Certain plant cellular structures like those in Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant), Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree), or Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) all exhibit actuation physiology which employs such turgor pressure manipulation. The paper begins with dynamic micrographs of a sectioned basal articulation joint from A. julibrissin. These figures show large cellular dimensional changes as the structure undergoes foliage articulation. By mimicking such structures in aircraft flight control mechanisms, extremely lightweight pneumatic control surface actuators can be designed. This paper shows several fundamental layouts of such surfaces with actuator elements made exclusively from FAA-certifiable materials, summarizes their structural mechanics and shows actuator power and energy densities that are higher than nearly all classes of conventional adaptive materials available today. A sample flap structure is shown to possess the ability to change its shape and structural stiffness as its cell pressures are manipulated, which in turn changes the surface lift-curve slope when exposed to airflows. Because the structural stiffness can be altered, it is also shown that the commanded section lift-curve slope can be similarly controlled between 1.2 and 6.2 rad −1 . Several aircraft weight reduction principles are also shown to come into play as the need to concentrate loads to pass through point actuators is eliminated. The paper concludes with a summary of interrelated performance and airframe-level improvements including enhanced gust rejection, load

  13. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-01-01

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model

  14. Genetic Algorithm-Based Model Order Reduction of Aeroservoelastic Systems with Consistant States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil; Suh, Peter M.; Brenner, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model order reduction framework to construct linear parameter-varying reduced-order models of flexible aircraft for aeroservoelasticity analysis and control synthesis in broad two-dimensional flight parameter space. Genetic algorithms are used to automatically determine physical states for reduction and to generate reduced-order models at grid points within parameter space while minimizing the trial-and-error process. In addition, balanced truncation for unstable systems is used in conjunction with the congruence transformation technique to achieve locally optimal realization and weak fulfillment of state consistency across the entire parameter space. Therefore, aeroservoelasticity reduced-order models at any flight condition can be obtained simply through model interpolation. The methodology is applied to the pitch-plant model of the X-56A Multi-Use Technology Testbed currently being tested at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. The present studies indicate that the reduced-order model with more than 12× reduction in the number of states relative to the original model is able to accurately predict system response among all input-output channels. The genetic-algorithm-guided approach exceeds manual and empirical state selection in terms of efficiency and accuracy. The interpolated aeroservoelasticity reduced order models exhibit smooth pole transition and continuously varying gains along a set of prescribed flight conditions, which verifies consistent state representation obtained by congruence transformation. The present model order reduction framework can be used by control engineers for robust aeroservoelasticity controller synthesis and novel vehicle design.

  15. Aerodynamic behavior of an airfoil with morphing trailing edge for wind turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, T.; Ernst, B.; Seume, J. R.

    2014-06-01

    The length of wind turbine rotor blades has been increased during the last decades. Higher stresses arise especially at the blade root because of the longer lever arm. One way to reduce unsteady blade-root stresses caused by turbulence, gusts, or wind shear is to actively control the lift in the blade tip region. One promising method involves airfoils with morphing trailing edges to control the lift and consequently the loads acting on the blade. In the present study, the steady and unsteady behavior of an airfoil with a morphing trailing edge is investigated. Two-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are performed for a typical thin wind turbine airfoil with a morphing trailing edge. Steady-state simulations are used to design optimal geometry, size, and deflection angles of the morphing trailing edge. The resulting steady aerodynamic coefficients are then analyzed at different angles of attack in order to determine the effectiveness of the morphing trailing edge. In order to investigate the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of the optimal morphing trailing edge, time- resolved RANS-simulations are performed using a deformable grid. In order to analyze the phase shift between the variable trailing edge deflection and the dynamic lift coefficient, the trailing edge is deflected at four different reduced frequencies for each different angle of attack. As expected, a phase shift between the deflection and the lift occurs. While deflecting the trailing edge at angles of attack near stall, additionally an overshoot above and beyond the steady lift coefficient is observed and evaluated.

  16. A generalized sound extrapolation method for turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Siyang; Zhang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Sound extrapolation methods are often used to compute acoustic far-field directivities using near-field flow data in aeroacoustics applications. The results may be erroneous if the volume integrals are neglected (to save computational cost), while non-acoustic fluctuations are collected on the integration surfaces. In this work, we develop a new sound extrapolation method based on an acoustic analogy using Taylor's hypothesis (Taylor 1938 Proc. R. Soc. Lon. A 164, 476-490. (doi:10.1098/rspa.1938.0032)). Typically, a convection operator is used to filter out the acoustically inefficient components in the turbulent flows, and an acoustics dominant indirect variable Dcp‧ is solved. The sound pressure p' at the far field is computed from Dcp‧ based on the asymptotic properties of the Green's function. Validations results for benchmark problems with well-defined sources match well with the exact solutions. For aeroacoustics applications: the sound predictions by the aerofoil-gust interaction are close to those by an earlier method specially developed to remove the effect of vortical fluctuations (Zhong & Zhang 2017 J. Fluid Mech. 820, 424-450. (doi:10.1017/jfm.2017.219)); for the case of vortex shedding noise from a cylinder, the off-body predictions by the proposed method match well with the on-body Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings result; different integration surfaces yield close predictions (of both spectra and far-field directivities) for a co-flowing jet case using an established direct numerical simulation database. The results suggest that the method may be a potential candidate for sound projection in aeroacoustics applications.

  17. Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010 (SNOW-V10): a World Weather Research Programme Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, G. A.; Joe, P. I.; Mailhot, J.; Bailey, M.; Bélair, S.; Boudala, F. S.; Brugman, M.; Campos, E.; Carpenter, R. L.; Crawford, R. W.; Cober, S. G.; Denis, B.; Doyle, C.; Reeves, H. D.; Gultepe, I.; Haiden, T.; Heckman, I.; Huang, L. X.; Milbrandt, J. A.; Mo, R.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Smith, T.; Stewart, R. E.; Wang, D.; Wilson, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    A World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) project entitled the Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010 (SNOW-V10) was developed to be associated with the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games conducted between 12 February and 21 March 2010. The SNOW-V10 international team augmented the instrumentation associated with the Winter Games and several new numerical weather forecasting and nowcasting models were added. Both the additional observational and model data were available to the forecasters in real time. This was an excellent opportunity to demonstrate existing capability in nowcasting and to develop better techniques for short term (0-6 h) nowcasts of winter weather in complex terrain. Better techniques to forecast visibility, low cloud, wind gusts, precipitation rate and type were evaluated. The weather during the games was exceptionally variable with many periods of low visibility, low ceilings and precipitation in the form of both snow and rain. The data collected should improve our understanding of many physical phenomena such as the diabatic effects due to melting snow, wind flow around and over terrain, diurnal flow reversal in valleys associated with daytime heating, and precipitation reductions and increases due to local terrain. Many studies related to these phenomena are described in the Special Issue on SNOW-V10 for which this paper was written. Numerical weather prediction and nowcast models have been evaluated against the unique observational data set now available. It is anticipated that the data set and the knowledge learned as a result of SNOW-V10 will become a resource for other World Meteorological Organization member states who are interested in improving forecasts of winter weather.

  18. Dust devil track survey at Elysium Planitia, Mars: Implications for the InSight landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2016-03-01

    The InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) robotic lander is scheduled to land in Elysium Planitia on Mars in September 2016. InSight will perform the first comprehensive surface-based geophysical investigation including seismic measurements. Knowledge about encounter rates of dust devils with the InSight lander are important for two main reasons: (1) dust devils will affect the scientific measurements, i.e., wind-induced seismic noise, and (2) the power-supply of the InSight lander and instruments is provided by solar arrays and previous landers and rovers on Mars were affected by a steady decline in electrical power output due to atmospheric dust deposition on the solar panels. Long term science operations were only made possible by dust clearing events of the solar arrays caused by wind gusts and dust devils. In this study we analyzed dust devil tracks (DDTs) at the final InSight landing site region in Elysium Planitia. Formation of DDTs is caused by the removal of a layer of dust by passing dust devils, hence in principle the same process as clearing of dust from solar panels. We mapped the number, size (width and length), and orientation of DDTs in repeat observations using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images covering the exact same surface area acquired within a relatively short time span (solar panel clearing recurrence interval estimate of ∼11 Mars years using the mean annual DDT formation rate, and the mean DDT width and length from all measured DDTs. Due to several uncertainties this solar panel clearing recurrence interval for the InSight landing should be seen as an upper limit estimate.

  19. Greedy Sampling and Incremental Surrogate Model-Based Tailoring of Aeroservoelastic Model Database for Flexible Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil; Brenner, Martin J.; Ouellette, Jeffrey A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a data analysis and modeling framework to tailor and develop linear parameter-varying (LPV) aeroservoelastic (ASE) model database for flexible aircrafts in broad 2D flight parameter space. The Kriging surrogate model is constructed using ASE models at a fraction of grid points within the original model database, and then the ASE model at any flight condition can be obtained simply through surrogate model interpolation. The greedy sampling algorithm is developed to select the next sample point that carries the worst relative error between the surrogate model prediction and the benchmark model in the frequency domain among all input-output channels. The process is iterated to incrementally improve surrogate model accuracy till a pre-determined tolerance or iteration budget is met. The methodology is applied to the ASE model database of a flexible aircraft currently being tested at NASA/AFRC for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. Our studies indicate that the proposed method can reduce the number of models in the original database by 67%. Even so the ASE models obtained through Kriging interpolation match the model in the original database constructed directly from the physics-based tool with the worst relative error far below 1%. The interpolated ASE model exhibits continuously-varying gains along a set of prescribed flight conditions. More importantly, the selected grid points are distributed non-uniformly in the parameter space, a) capturing the distinctly different dynamic behavior and its dependence on flight parameters, and b) reiterating the need and utility for adaptive space sampling techniques for ASE model database compaction. The present framework is directly extendible to high-dimensional flight parameter space, and can be used to guide the ASE model development, model order reduction, robust control synthesis and novel vehicle design of flexible aircraft.

  20. Do Weather Phenomena Have Any Influence on the Occurrence of Spontaneous Pneumothorax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodička, Josef; Vejvodová, Šárka; Šmíd, David; Fichtl, Jakub; Špidlen, Vladimír; Kormunda, Stanislav; Hostýnek, Jiří; Moláček, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of weather phenomena on the occurrence of spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) in the Plzeň region (Czech Republic). A retrospective analysis of 450 cases of SP in 394 patients between 1991 and 2013. We observed changes in average daily values of atmospheric pressure, air temperature and daily maximum wind gust for each day of that period and their effect on the development of SP. The risk of developing SP is 1.41 times higher (P=.0017) with air pressure changes of more than±6.1hPa. When the absolute value of the air temperature changes by more than±0.9°C, the risk of developing SP is 1.55 times higher (P=.0002). When the wind speed difference over the 5 days prior to onset of SP is less than 13m/sec, then the risk of SP is 2.16 times higher (P=.0004). If the pressure difference is greater than±6.1hPa and the temperature difference is greater than±0.9°C or the wind speed difference during the 5 days prior to onset of SP is less than 10.7m/s, the risk of SP is 2.04 times higher (P≤.0001). Changes in atmospheric pressure, air temperature and wind speed are undoubtedly involved in the development of SP, but don't seem to be the only factors causing rupture of blebs or emphysematous bullae. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of time and weather effects on crash types using full Bayesian multivariate Poisson lognormal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Barua, Sudip; Islam, Md Tazul

    2014-12-01

    Previous research shows that various weather elements have significant effects on crash occurrence and risk; however, little is known about how these elements affect different crash types. Consequently, this study investigates the impact of weather elements and sudden extreme snow or rain weather changes on crash type. Multivariate models were used for seven crash types using five years of daily weather and crash data collected for the entire City of Edmonton. In addition, the yearly trend and random variation of parameters across the years were analyzed by using four different modeling formulations. The proposed models were estimated in a full Bayesian context via Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The multivariate Poisson lognormal model with yearly varying coefficients provided the best fit for the data according to Deviance Information Criteria. Overall, results showed that temperature and snowfall were statistically significant with intuitive signs (crashes decrease with increasing temperature; crashes increase as snowfall intensity increases) for all crash types, while rainfall was mostly insignificant. Previous snow showed mixed results, being statistically significant and positively related to certain crash types, while negatively related or insignificant in other cases. Maximum wind gust speed was found mostly insignificant with a few exceptions that were positively related to crash type. Major snow or rain events following a dry weather condition were highly significant and positively related to three crash types: Follow-Too-Close, Stop-Sign-Violation, and Ran-Off-Road crashes. The day-of-the-week dummy variables were statistically significant, indicating a possible weekly variation in exposure. Transportation authorities might use the above results to improve road safety by providing drivers with information regarding the risk of certain crash types for a particular weather condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A continuous hyperspatial monitoring system of evapotranspiration and gross primary productivity from Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Bandini, Filippo; Jakobsen, Jakob; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo J.; Köppl, Christian Josef; Haugård Olesen, Daniel; Ibrom, Andreas; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Garcia, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) can collect optical and thermal hyperspatial (challenges for an operational monitoring using UAS compared to satellites: the payload capacity of most commercial UAS is less than 2 kg, but miniaturized sensors have low signal to noise ratios and small field of view requires mosaicking hundreds of images and accurate orthorectification. In addition, wind gusts and lower platform stability require appropriate geometric and radiometric corrections. Finally, modeling fluxes on days without images is still an issue for both satellite and UAS applications. This study focuses on designing an operational UAS-based monitoring system including payload design, sensor calibration, based on routine collection of optical and thermal images in a Danish willow field to perform a joint monitoring of ET and GPP dynamics over continuous time at daily time steps. The payload (approach (Potter et al., 1993). Both models estimate ET and GPP under optimum potential conditions down-regulated by the same biophysical constraints dependent on remote sensing and atmospheric data to reflect multiple stresses. Vegetation indices were calculated from the multispectral data to assess vegetation conditions, while thermal infrared imagery was used to compute a thermal inertia index to infer soil moisture constraints. To interpolate radiometric temperature between flights, a prognostic Surface Energy Balance model (Margulis et al., 2001) based on the force-restore method was applied in a data assimilation scheme to obtain continuous ET and GPP fluxes. With this operational system, regular flight campaigns with a hexacopter (DJI S900) have been conducted in a Danish willow flux site (Risø) over the 2016 growing season. The observed energy, water and carbon fluxes from the Risø eddy covariance flux tower were used to validate the model simulation. This UAS monitoring system is suitable for agricultural management and land-atmosphere interaction studies.

  3. Multi-hazard risk assessment of coastal vulnerability from tropical cyclones - A GIS based approach for the Odisha coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bishnupriya; Bhaskaran, Prasad K

    2018-01-15

    The coastal region bordering the East coast of India is a thickly populated belt exposed to high risk and vulnerability from natural hazards such as tropical cyclones. Tropical cyclone frequencies that develop over the Bay of Bengal (average of 5-6 per year) region are much higher as compared to the Arabian Sea thereby posing a high risk factor associated with storm surge, inland inundation, wind gust, intense rainfall, etc. The Odisha State in the East coast of India experiences the highest number of cyclone strikes as compared to West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu. To express the destructive potential resulting from tropical cyclones the Power Dissipation Index (PDI) is a widely used metric globally. A recent study indicates that PDI for cyclones in the present decade have increased about six times as compared to the past. Hence there is a need to precisely ascertain the coastal vulnerability and risk factors associated with high intense cyclones expected in a changing climate. As such there are no comprehensive studies attempted so far on the determination of Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Odisha coast that is highly prone to cyclone strikes. With this motivation, the present study makes an attempt to investigate the physical, environmental, social, and economic impacts on coastal vulnerability associated with tropical cyclones for the Odisha coast. The study also investigates the futuristic projection of coastal vulnerability over this region expected in a changing climate scenario. Eight fair weather parameters along with storm surge height and onshore inundation were used to estimate the Physical Vulnerability Index (PVI). Thereafter, the PVI along with social, economic, and environmental vulnerability was used to determine the overall CVI using the GIS based approach. The authors believe that the comprehensive nature of this study is expected to benefit coastal zone management authorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A new forecast presentation tool for offshore contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, M.

    2009-09-01

    Contractors working off shore are often very sensitive to both sea and weather conditions, and it's essential that they have easy access to reliable information on coming conditions to enable planning of when to start or shut down offshore operations to avoid loss of life and materials. Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, recently, in cooperation with business partners in the field, developed a new application to accommodate that need. The "Marine Forecast Service” is a browser based forecast presentation tool. It provides an interface for the user to enable easy and quick access to all relevant meteorological and oceanographic forecasts and observations for a given area of interest. Each customer gains access to the application via a standard login/password procedure. Once logged in, the user can inspect animated forecast maps of parameters like wind, gust, wave height, swell and current among others. Supplementing the general maps, the user can choose to look at forecast graphs for each of the locations where the user is running operations. These forecast graphs can also be overlaid with the user's own in situ observations, if such exist. Furthermore, the data from the graphs can be exported as data files that the customer can use in his own applications as he desires. As part of the application, a forecaster's view on the current and near future weather situation is presented to the user as well, adding further value to the information presented through maps and graphs. Among other features of the product, animated radar and satellite images could be mentioned. And finally the application provides the possibility of a "second opinion” through traditional weather charts from another recognized provider of weather forecasts. The presentation will provide more detailed insights into the contents of the applications as well as some of the experiences with the product.

  5. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  6. Mineral dust transport toward Hurricane Helene (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendike, Juliane; Jones, Sarah C.; Vogel, Bernhard; Vogel, Heike

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the transport of mineral dust from its source regions in West Africa toward the developing tropical cyclone Helene (2006) and diagnoses the resulting properties of the air influencing the tropical cyclonegenesis. The model system COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) in which the emission and transport of mineral dust as well as the radiation feedback are taken into account, was used. The emission of mineral dust between 9 and 14 September 2006 occurred in association with the relatively strong monsoon flow and northeasterly trade winds, with gust fronts of convective systems over land, and with the Atlantic inflow. Additionally, increased surface wind speed was linked to orographical effects at the Algerian Mountains, Atlas Mountains, and the Hoggar. The dust, as part of the Saharan air layer, is transported at low levels by the monsoon flow, the Harmattan, the northeasterly trade winds, and the monsoon trough, and is transported upward in the convergence zone between Harmattan and monsoon flow, in the baroclinic zone along the West African coastline, and by convection. At around 700 hPa the dust is transported by the African easterly jet. Dry and dust-free air is found to the north-northwest of the developing tropical depression due to descent in an anticyclone. Based on the model data, it was possible to distinguish between dry (from the anticyclone), dry and dusty (from the Harmattan and northeasterly trade winds), and dusty and moist air (from the monsoon flow and in the tropical depression due to convection).

  7. Investigation into the behaviors of ventilated supercavities in unsteady flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Siyao; Wu, Yue; Haynes, Joseph; Arndt, Roger E. A.; Hong, Jiarong

    2018-05-01

    A systematic investigation of ventilated supercavitation behaviors in an unsteady flow is conducted using a high-speed water tunnel at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. The cavity is generated with a forward facing model under varying ventilation rates and cavitator sizes. The unsteady flow is produced by a gust generator consisting of two hydrofoils flapping in unison with a varying angle of attack (AoA) and frequency (fg). The current experiment reveals five distinct cavity states, namely, the stable state, wavy state, pulsating state I, pulsating state II, and collapsing state, based on the variation of cavity geometry and pressure signatures inside the cavity. The distribution of cavity states over a broad range of unsteady conditions is summarized in a cavity state map. It shows that the transition of the supercavity from the stable state to pulsating and collapsing states is primarily induced by increasing AoA while the transition to the wavy state triggers largely by increasing fg. Remarkably, the state map over the non-dimensionalized half wavelength and wave amplitude of the perturbation indicates that the supercavity loses its stability and transitions to pulsating or collapsing states when the level of its distortion induced by the flow unsteadiness exceeds the cavity dimension under a steady condition. The state maps under different ventilation rates and cavitator sizes yield similar distribution but show that the occurrence of the cavity collapse can be suppressed with increasing ventilation coefficient or cavitator size. Such knowledge can be integrated into designing control strategies for the supercavitating devices operating under different unsteady conditions.

  8. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF THE HANFORD WINDSTORMS OF JANUARY 11, 1972 AND JANUARY 21, 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, C. H.; Fuquay, J. J.

    1972-06-01

    The windstorm of January 11 caused a minor amount of damage to the Hanford Reservation and Hanford vicinity. Damage sustained to Hanford Reservation structures (roofing, flashing, fences, windows) was approximately $20,000. One building did receive structural damage to roof members. Evidence that wind pressures did not reach 30 lb/ft{sup 2} during the January 11 windstorm was provided in the fact that specially designed exterior wall panels did not fail. These panels were designed and carefully proof-tested to insure that they would fail at a loading of 30 lb/ft{sup 2} as a requirement of structural safety in the original design-construction program in 1952-1954. There was one power outage on the Hanford Reservation due to the January 11 windstorm (Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory). Damage to power lines and electrical facilities amounted to about $1600. Damage to structures in the Hanford vicinity (excluding the Hanford Reservation) from the January 11 windstorm was estimated to cost $13,000. This does not include damage to private residences, etc., which has been estimated by others to be near $250,000. Power line damage in the Hanford vicinity amounted to about $80,000, of which $60,000 was accounted for in the loss of four transmission towers in the tie-line between Priest Rapids and Wanapum Dams. The January 21 windstorm, which struck Toppenish, Washington, was a straight-wind of the catabatic foehn type and not a tornado-type wind as described in newspaper accounts. No funnel cloud was associated with this windstorm. The maximum gust was about 85 mph at 30 ft above the ground. Cost estimates of damage in Toppenish were not available. There were no power outages or structural damage on the Hanford Reservation from the January 21 windstorm. Total damage to the Hanford Reservation from the two windstorms was estimated to be about $22,500.

  9. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a “proof of principle” for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C ·+ PF ·− radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical

  10. Comparison of Predictive Modeling Methods of Aircraft Landing Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Ousmane H.

    2012-01-01

    Expected increases in air traffic demand have stimulated the development of air traffic control tools intended to assist the air traffic controller in accurately and precisely spacing aircraft landing at congested airports. Such tools will require an accurate landing-speed prediction to increase throughput while decreasing necessary controller interventions for avoiding separation violations. There are many practical challenges to developing an accurate landing-speed model that has acceptable prediction errors. This paper discusses the development of a near-term implementation, using readily available information, to estimate/model final approach speed from the top of the descent phase of flight to the landing runway. As a first approach, all variables found to contribute directly to the landing-speed prediction model are used to build a multi-regression technique of the response surface equation (RSE). Data obtained from operations of a major airlines for a passenger transport aircraft type to the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are used to predict the landing speed. The approach was promising because it decreased the standard deviation of the landing-speed error prediction by at least 18% from the standard deviation of the baseline error, depending on the gust condition at the airport. However, when the number of variables is reduced to the most likely obtainable at other major airports, the RSE model shows little improvement over the existing methods. Consequently, a neural network that relies on a nonlinear regression technique is utilized as an alternative modeling approach. For the reduced number of variables cases, the standard deviation of the neural network models errors represent over 5% reduction compared to the RSE model errors, and at least 10% reduction over the baseline predicted landing-speed error standard deviation. Overall, the constructed models predict the landing-speed more accurately and precisely than the current state-of-the-art.

  11. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-06-19

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

  12. Effects of Mountain Pine Beetle on Fuels and Expected Fire Behavior in Lodgepole Pine Forests, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoennagel, Tania; Veblen, Thomas T.; Negron, José F.; Smith, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    In Colorado and southern Wyoming, mountain pine beetle (MPB) has affected over 1.6 million ha of predominantly lodgepole pine forests, raising concerns about effects of MPB-caused mortality on subsequent wildfire risk and behavior. Using empirical data we modeled potential fire behavior across a gradient of wind speeds and moisture scenarios in Green stands compared three stages since MPB attack (Red [1–3 yrs], Grey [4–10 yrs], and Old-MPB [∼30 yrs]). MPB killed 50% of the trees and 70% of the basal area in Red and Grey stages. Across moisture scenarios, canopy fuel moisture was one-third lower in Red and Grey stages compared to the Green stage, making active crown fire possible at lower wind speeds and less extreme moisture conditions. More-open canopies and high loads of large surface fuels due to treefall in Grey and Old-MPB stages significantly increased surface fireline intensities, facilitating active crown fire at lower wind speeds (>30–55 km/hr) across all moisture scenarios. Not accounting for low foliar moistures in Red and Grey stages, and large surface fuels in Grey and Old-MPB stages, underestimates the occurrence of active crown fire. Under extreme burning conditions, minimum wind speeds for active crown fire were 25–35 km/hr lower for Red, Grey and Old-MPB stands compared to Green. However, if transition to crown fire occurs (outside the stand, or within the stand via ladder fuels or wind gusts >65 km/hr), active crown fire would be sustained at similar wind speeds, suggesting observed fire behavior may not be qualitatively different among MPB stages under extreme burning conditions. Overall, the risk (probability) of active crown fire appears elevated in MPB-affected stands, but the predominant fire hazard (crown fire) is similar across MPB stages and is characteristic of lodgepole pine forests where extremely dry, gusty weather conditions are key factors in determining fire behavior. PMID:22272268

  13. Memorias de alemanes en España durante la Guerra de la Independencia : la estancia de Philipp Schwein en la isla Cabrera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiltrud Friederrich-Stegmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene tres objetivos principales. Primero, da una información general de las memorias de alemanes participantes en la Guerra de la Independencia, junto con una relación bibliográfica, añadida como apéndice. En segundo lugar, da a conocer el autor alemán Johann Christian Mámpel que en seis libros, publicados anónimamente, cuenta las guerras napoleónicas desde el punto de vista del soldado raso, del Feldjáger. A Goetfie le gustó tanto esta obra que escribió el prólogo. Finalmente, el estudio incluye dos traducciones, la de un episodio del tercer tomo, que Mámpel dedica a la estancia de un compañero de guerra como prisionero en la desierta isla de Cabrera, y también la de la introducción de Goethe al mismo tomo con sus reflexiones sobre este asunto.The present article has three main objects. Firstly, it gives a general view of the memoirs written by Germán participants in the Spanish War of Independence, including an appendix with a related bibliography. Secondly, it introduces the German author Johann Christian Mámpel, who wrote six books, anonimously published, about the Napoleonic Wars from the point of view of the prívate soldier, the Feldjáger. Goethe was so impressed by it, that he wrote the prologue. Finally, the study includes two translations: an episode of the third volume, which Mámpel dedicates to a fellow soldier, who was a prisoner of war on the desert island of Cabrera, and also Goethe's introduction to the same volume with his reflections about this event.

  14. Thermodynamic Profiles of the Destructive June 2012 Derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Novakovskaia, E.; Bosse, J.; Ware, R.; Stillman, D.; Sloop, C.; Blanchette, L.; Demoz, B.; Nelson, M.; Cooper, L.; Czarnetzki, A.; Reehorst, A.

    2012-12-01

    The June 2012 mid-Atlantic and Midwest Derecho was one of the most destructive and deadly fast-moving severe thunderstorm events in North American history. The derecho produced wind gusts approaching 100 miles per hour as it traveled more than 600 miles across large sections of the Midwestern United States, the central Appalachians and the Mid-Atlantic States on the afternoon and evening of June 29, 2012 and into the early morning of June 30, 2012. It produced hurricane-like impacts with little warning, resulting in more than 20 deaths, widespread damage and millions of power outages across the entire affected region. We present continuous temperature and moisture profiles observed by microwave radiometers, and derived forecast indices, along the storm path at locations in Iowa, Ohio and Maryland, providing unique perspective on the evolution of this historic storm. For example, an extreme CAPE value of 5,000 J/kg was derived from radiometer observations at Germantown, Maryland ten hours before storm passage, and 80 knot Wind Index (WINDEX) was derived seven hours before passage. The Germantown radiometer is operated as part of the Earth Networks Boundary Layer Network (BLN) for continuous thermodynamic monitoring of the planetary boundary layer up to 30,000 feet. The BLN uses Radiometrics microwave profilers providing continuous temperature and humidity soundings with radiosonde-equivalent observation accuracy, and unique liquid soundings. This case study illustrates the promise for severe storm forecast improvement based on continuous monitoring of temperature and moisture in the boundary layer and above.

  15. Infrasonic Signals from the 29 June 2012 Derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, N.; Howard, W. B.; Pulli, J. J.; Kofford, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Common weather events such as pressure fronts, tornados, and hurricanes generate infrasonic signals (sub-audible acoustic signals with an oscillatory frequency below 20 Hz). These signals can provide a distal (>10km) analysis of weather events because: (1) the attenuation of an infrasonic signal with distance is less than that of a similar audible signal, and (2) the propagation velocities of typical weather events are much slower than the speed of sound. The 29 June, 2012 Derecho (a widespread, long-lived, rapidly moving linear band of storms extending more than 240 miles and including wind gusts in excess of 58 mph) that stretched from Chicago, IL to Washington, DC generated infrasonic signals in addition to causing over $100 million in damage to the power systems of Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland alone. The infrasonic (and seismic) signals from this event were recorded on the NCPA micro barometers along the northeastern edge of the current configuration of the USArray. These instruments, which sample at 40 Hz, exhibit a flat frequency response from around 0.1 Hz to above 20 Hz and show a sensitivity of 1.57 x 104 Volts/Pascal at 0.8 Hz. An analysis of the recordings observed at multiple stations identified several infrasonic signatures from the Derecho. The signal's duration was approximately 40 minutes and exhibited a large peak pressure fluctuation. A characteristic ramp up occurred before the peak pressure fluctuation, and the majority of the infrasonic energy occurred below 1 Hz. These signatures are analyzed within the context of the Derecho as an infrasonic source, and the propagation of infrasound in the atmosphere.

  16. Convective Mode and Mesoscale Heavy Rainfall Forecast Challenges during a High-Impact Weather Period along the Gulf Coast and Florida from 17-20 May 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosart, L. F.; Wallace, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    Two high-impact convective storm forecast challenges occurred between 17-20 May 2016 during NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Forecast Experiment (SFE) at the Storm Prediction Center. The first forecast challenge was 286 mm of unexpected record-breaking rain that fell on Vero Beach (VRB), Florida, between 1500 UTC 17 May and 0600 UTC 18 May, more than doubling the previous May daily rainfall record. The record rains in VRB occurred subsequent to the formation of a massive MCS over the central Gulf of Mexico between 0900-1000 UTC 17 May. This MCS, linked to the earlier convection associated with an anomalously strong subtropical jet (STJ) over the Gulf of Mexico, moved east-northeastward toward Florida. The second forecast challenge was a large MCS that formed over the Mexican mountains near the Texas-Mexican border, moved eastward and grew upscale prior to 1200 UTC 19 May. This MCS further strengthened offshore after 1800 UTC 19 May beneath the STJ. SPC SFE participants expected this MCS to move east-northeastward and bring heavy rain due to training echoes along the Gulf coast as far eastward as the Florida panhandle. Instead, this MCS transitioned into a bowing MCS that resembled a low-end derecho and produced a 4-6 hPa cold pool with widespread surface wind gusts between 35-50 kt. Both MCS events occurred in a large-scale baroclinic environment along the northern Gulf coast. Both MCS events responded to antecedent convection within this favorable large-scale environment. Rainfall amounts with the first heavy rain-producing MCS were severely underestimated by models and forecasters alike. The second MCS produced the greatest forecaster angst because rainfall totals were forecast too high (MCS propagated too fast) and severe wind reports were much more widespread than anticipated (because of cold pool formation). This presentation will attempt to untangle what happened and why it happened.

  17. Inspection of Pole-Like Structures Using a Visual-Inertial Aided VTOL Platform with Shared Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Inkyu; Hrabar, Stefan; Corke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm and a system for vertical infrastructure inspection using a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle and shared autonomy. Inspecting vertical structures such as light and power distribution poles is a difficult task that is time-consuming, dangerous and expensive. Recently, micro VTOL platforms (i.e., quad-, hexa- and octa-rotors) have been rapidly gaining interest in research, military and even public domains. The unmanned, low-cost and VTOL properties of these platforms make them ideal for situations where inspection would otherwise be time-consuming and/or hazardous to humans. There are, however, challenges involved with developing such an inspection system, for example flying in close proximity to a target while maintaining a fixed stand-off distance from it, being immune to wind gusts and exchanging useful information with the remote user. To overcome these challenges, we require accurate and high-update rate state estimation and high performance controllers to be implemented onboard the vehicle. Ease of control and a live video feed are required for the human operator. We demonstrate a VTOL platform that can operate at close-quarters, whilst maintaining a safe stand-off distance and rejecting environmental disturbances. Two approaches are presented: Position-Based Visual Servoing (PBVS) using an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and estimator-free Image-Based Visual Servoing (IBVS). Both use monocular visual, inertia, and sonar data, allowing the approaches to be applied for indoor or GPS-impaired environments. We extensively compare the performances of PBVS and IBVS in terms of accuracy, robustness and computational costs. Results from simulations and indoor/outdoor (day and night) flight experiments demonstrate the system is able to successfully inspect and circumnavigate a vertical pole. PMID:26340631

  18. Supersonic flutter suppression of electrorheological fluid-based adaptive panels resting on elastic foundations using sliding mode control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M; Nezami, M; Aryaee Panah, M E

    2012-01-01

    Brief reviews on suppressing panel flutter vibrations by various active control strategies as well as utilization tunable electrorheological fluids (ERFs) for vibration control of structural systems are presented. Active suppression of the supersonic flutter motion of a simply supported sandwich panel with a tunable ERF interlayer, and coupled to an elastic foundation, is subsequently investigated. The structural formulation is based on the classical beam theory along with the Winkler–Pasternak foundation model, the ER fluid core is modeled as a first-order Kelvin–Voigt material, and the quasi-steady first-order supersonic piston theory is employed to describe the aerodynamic loading. Hamilton’s principle is used to derive a set of fully coupled dynamic equations of motion. The generalized Fourier expansions in conjunction with the Galerkin method are then employed to formulate the governing equations in the state space domain. The critical dynamic pressures at which unstable panel oscillations (coalescence of eigenvalues) occur are obtained via the p-method for selected applied electric field strengths (E = 0,2,4 kV mm −1 ). The classical Runge–Kutta time integration algorithm is subsequently used to calculate the open-loop aeroelastic response of the system in various basic loading configurations (i.e. uniformly distributed blast, gust, sonic boom, and step loads), with or without an interacting soft/stiff elastic foundation. Finally, a sliding mode control synthesis (SMC) involving the first six natural modes of the structural system is set up to actively suppress the closed-loop system response in supersonic flight conditions and under the imposed excitations. Simulation results demonstrate performance, effectiveness, and insensitivity with respect to the spillover of the proposed SMC-based control system. Limiting cases are considered and good agreements with the data available in the literature as well as with the computations made by using the

  19. Aerodynamic behavior of an airfoil with morphing trailing edge for wind turbine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, T; Ernst, B; Seume, J R

    2014-01-01

    The length of wind turbine rotor blades has been increased during the last decades. Higher stresses arise especially at the blade root because of the longer lever arm. One way to reduce unsteady blade-root stresses caused by turbulence, gusts, or wind shear is to actively control the lift in the blade tip region. One promising method involves airfoils with morphing trailing edges to control the lift and consequently the loads acting on the blade. In the present study, the steady and unsteady behavior of an airfoil with a morphing trailing edge is investigated. Two-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are performed for a typical thin wind turbine airfoil with a morphing trailing edge. Steady-state simulations are used to design optimal geometry, size, and deflection angles of the morphing trailing edge. The resulting steady aerodynamic coefficients are then analyzed at different angles of attack in order to determine the effectiveness of the morphing trailing edge. In order to investigate the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of the optimal morphing trailing edge, time- resolved RANS-simulations are performed using a deformable grid. In order to analyze the phase shift between the variable trailing edge deflection and the dynamic lift coefficient, the trailing edge is deflected at four different reduced frequencies for each different angle of attack. As expected, a phase shift between the deflection and the lift occurs. While deflecting the trailing edge at angles of attack near stall, additionally an overshoot above and beyond the steady lift coefficient is observed and evaluated

  20. A case of extreme particulate matter concentrations over Central Europe caused by dust emitted over the southern Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Birmili

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available On 24 March 2007, an extraordinary dust plume was observed in the Central European troposphere. Satellite observations revealed its origins in a dust storm in Southern Ukraine, where large amounts of soil were resuspended from dried-out farmlands at wind gusts up to 30 m s−1. Along the pathway of the plume, maximum particulate matter (PM10 mass concentrations between 200 and 1400 μg m−3 occurred in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, and Germany. Over Germany, the dust plume was characterised by a volume extinction coefficient up to 400 Mm−1 and a particle optical depth of 0.71 at wavelength 0.532 μm. In-situ size distribution measurements as well as the wavelength dependence of light extinction from lidar and Sun photometer measurements confirmed the presence of a coarse particle mode with diameters around 2–3 μm. Chemical particle analyses suggested a fraction of 75% crustal material in daily average PM10 and up to 85% in the coarser fraction PM10–2.5. Based on the particle characteristics as well as a lack of increased CO and CO2 levels, a significant impact of biomass burning was ruled out. The reasons for the high particle concentrations in the dust plume were twofold: First, dust was transported very rapidly into Central Europe in a boundary layer jet under dry conditions. Second, the dust plume was confined to a relatively stable boundary layer of 1.4–1.8 km height, and could therefore neither expand nor dilute efficiently. Our findings illustrate the capacity of combined in situ and remote sensing measurements to characterise large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters. Although such plumes from Southern Eurasia seem to occur rather infrequently in Central Europe, its unexpected features highlights the need to improve the description of dust emission, transport and transformation processes needs, particularly when facing the