WorldWideScience

Sample records for guide star laser

  1. Dynamical refocusing laser guide stars with membrane mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabien, S.; Ziegleder, J.

    2012-07-01

    Laser guide stars created in the earth's sodium layer are the choice for all ELTs as adaptive optics reference. With the thickness of the sodium layer spanning up to 10km, the apparent image of the guide stars on the adaptive optics wavefront sensors is elongated. The further away sub-apertures of the WFS are from the guide star launch location, the more elongated the guide star appears on the sensor. To counteract the decreased signal from the elongation, usually an increased laser power is demanded or special format radial CCDs are proposed. Another known possibility is to utilize pulsed lasers and follow dynamically the propagating pulse on its way through the sodium layer, creating a sharp spot at the wavefront sensor location. Similar processes have been used for laser guide stars created with Rayleigh scattering in the lower atmosphere, increasing greatly the number of photons that can be received from the guide star. We present here the design and first laboratory tests of such a dynamically refocus device, based on membrane mirrors. Driven acoustically at high frequencies the stroke and phase of the mirror can be controlled. With a compact appearance the system seems to be easy to use and could enable precise wavefront control with lower power pulsed lasers at ELTs and other telescopes.

  2. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  3. Keck II Laser Guide Star AO System and Performance with the TOPTICA/MPBC Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Jason C. Y.; Wizinowich, Peter; Wetherell, Ed; Lilley, Scott; Cetre, Sylvain; Ragland, Sam; Medeiros, Drew; Tsubota, Kevin; Doppmann, Greg; Otarola, Angel; Wei, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The Keck II Laser Guide Star (LGS) Adaptive Optics (AO) System was upgraded from a dye laser to a TOPTICA/MPBC Raman-Fibre Amplification (RFA) laser in December 2015. The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) has been operating its AO system with a LGS for science since 2004 using a first generation 15 W dye laser. Using the latest diode pump laser technology, Raman amplification, and a well-tuned second harmonic generator (SHG), this Next Generation Laser (NGL) is able to produce a highly stable 589...

  4. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis.

  5. Unconventional Laser Guide Stars and Wavefront Correction of Blue Starlight

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hellwarth, Robert

    2002-01-01

    ...) a return signal to the transmitting telescope that would appear, for 20 ns, to have a brightness temperature of millions of degrees, and thus serve as a guide star for high-order corrections of blue starlight, (2...

  6. Keck II laser guide star AO system and performance with the TOPTICA/MPBC laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason C. Y.; Wizinowich, Peter; Wetherell, Ed; Lilley, Scott; Cetre, Sylvain; Ragland, Sam; Medeiros, Drew; Tsubota, Kevin; Doppmann, Greg; Otarola, Angel; Wei, Kai

    2016-07-01

    The Keck II Laser Guide Star (LGS) Adaptive Optics (AO) System was upgraded from a dye laser to a TOPTICA/MPBC Raman-Fibre Amplification (RFA) laser in December 2015. The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) has been operating its AO system with a LGS for science since 2004 using a first generation 15 W dye laser. Using the latest diode pump laser technology, Raman amplification, and a well-tuned second harmonic generator (SHG), this Next Generation Laser (NGL) is able to produce a highly stable 589 nm laser beam with the required power, wavelength and mode quality. The beam's linear polarization and continuous wave format along with optical back pumping are designed to improve the sodium atom coupling efficiency over previously operated sodium-wavelength lasers. The efficiency and operability of the new laser has also been improved by reducing its required input power and cooling, size, and the manpower to operate and maintain it. The new laser has been implemented on the telescope's elevation ring with its electronics installed on a new Nasmyth sub-platform, with the capacity to support up to three laser systems for future upgrades. The laser is projected from behind the telescope's secondary mirror using the recently implemented center launch system (CLS) to reduce LGS spot size. We will present the new laser system and its performance with respect to power, stability, wavelength, spot size, optical repumping, polarization, efficiency, and its return with respect to pointing alignment to the magnetic field. Preliminary LGSAO performance is presented with the system returning to science operations. We will also provide an update on current and future upgrades at the WMKO.

  7. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  8. Status of ARGOS - The Laser Guide Star System for the LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Barl, Lothar; Beckmann, Udo; Bonaglia, Marco; Borelli, Jose; Brynnel, Joar; Buschkamp, Peter; Busoni, Lorenzo; Carbonaro, Luca; Christou, Julian; Connot, Claus; Davies, Richard; Deysenroth, Matthias; Durney, Olivier; Green, Richard; Gemperlein, Hans; Gasho, Victor; Haug, Marcus; Hubbard, Pete; Ihle, Sebastian; Kulas, Martin; Loose, Christina; Lehmitz, Michael; Noenickx, Jamison; Nussbaum, Edmund; Orban De Xivry, Gilles; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Peter, Diethard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Rademacher, Matt; Storm, Jesper; Schwab, Christian; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Ziegleder, Julian

    2013-12-01

    ARGOS is an innovative multiple laser guide star adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), designed to perform effective GLAO correction over a very wide field of view. The system is using high powered pulsed green (532 nm) lasers to generate a set of three guide stars above each of the LBT mirrors. The laser beams are launched through a 40 cm telescope and focused at an altitude of 12 km, creating laser beacons by means of Rayleigh scattering. The returning scattered light, primarily sensitive to the turbulences close to the ground, is detected by a gated wavefront sensor system. The derived ground layer correction signals are directly driving the adaptive secondary mirror of the LBT. ARGOS is especially designed for operation with the multiple object spectrograph Luci, which will benefit from both, the improved spatial resolution, as well as the strongly enhanced flux. In addition to the GLAO Rayleigh beacon system, ARGOS was also designed for a possible future upgrade with a hybrid sodium laser - Rayleigh beacon combination, enabling diffraction limited operation. The ARGOS laser system has undergone extensive tests during Summer 2012 and is scheduled for installation at the LBT in Spring 2013. The remaining sub-systems will be installed during the course of 2013. We report on the overall status of the ARGOS system and the results of the sub-system characterizations carried out so far.

  9. Design of pre-optics for laser guide star wavefront sensor for the ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimov, Eduard; Dohlen, Kjetil; Neichel, Benoit; Hugot, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we consider the optical design of a zoom system for the active refocusing in laser guide star wavefront sensors. The system is designed according to the specifications coming from the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT)-HARMONI instrument, the first-light, integral field spectrograph for the European (E)-ELT. The system must provide a refocusing of the laser guide as a function of telescope pointing and large decentring of the incoming beam. The system considers four moving lens groups, each of them being a doublet with one aspherical surface. The advantages and shortcomings of such a solution in terms of the component displacements and complexity of the surfaces are described in detail. It is shown that the system can provide the median value of the residual wavefront error of 13.8-94.3 nm and the maximum value <206 nm, while the exit pupil distortion is 0.26-0.36% for each of the telescope pointing directions.

  10. Capabilities of a Laser Guide Star for a Large Segmented Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James R.; Carlton, Ashley; Douglas, Ewan S.; Males, Jared R.; Lumbres, Jennifer; Feinberg, Lee; Guyon, Olivier; Marlow, Weston; Cahoy, Kerri L.

    2018-01-01

    Large segmented mirror telescopes are planned for future space telescope missions such as LUVOIR (Large UV Optical Infrared Surveyor) to enable the improvement in resolution and contrast necessary to directly image Earth-like exoplanets, in addition to making contributions to general astrophysics. The precision surface control of these complex, large optical systems, which may have over a hundred meter-sized segments, is a challenge. Our initial simulations show that imaging a star of 2nd magnitude or brighter with a Zernike wavefront sensor should relax the segment stability requirements by factors between 10 and 50 depending on the wavefront control strategy. Fewer than fifty stars brighter than magnitude 2 can be found in the sky. A laser guide star (LGS) on a companion spacecraft will allow the telescope to target a dimmer science star and achieve wavefront control to the required stability without requiring slew or repointing maneuvers.We present initial results for one possible mission architecture, with a LGS flying at 100,000 km range from the large telescope in an L2 halo orbit, using a laser transmit power of vector can be held anywhere on the sky for extended durations (>8 days) for an expenditure of <10 m/s of delta-V per day, or an average thrust <1 mN for a satellite of mass <47 kg. If the LGS uses a low-thrust electric propulsion system, it can be accommodated in a 6U CubeSat bus, but may require an extended period of time to transition between targets and match velocities with the telescope (e.g. 6 days to transit 10 degrees). If the LGS uses monopropellant propulsion, it must use at least a 27U bus to achieve the the same delta-V capability, but can transition between targets much more rapidly (<1 day to transit 10 degrees).Architecture trades on formation flying distance, laser wavelength and power are ongoing. The models of the segments and their disturbances and of the formation flight are being refined. A low-cost prototype mission (e

  11. Integration and laboratory characterization of the ARGOS laser guide star wavefront sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busoni, Lorenzo; Bonaglia, Marco; Carbonaro, Luca; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Antichi, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Orban De Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    The integration status of the ARGOS wavefront sensors is presented. ARGOS is the laser guide star AO program for the LBT. It will implement a Ground Layer AO correction for the instruments LUCI, an infrared imaging and spectrograph camera, using 3 pulsed low-altitudes Rayleigh beacons for each LBT's eye. It profits of the LBT's adaptive secondary mirrors and of FLAO's pyramid unit for NGS sensing. Each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and range-gated using custom Pockels cells and then sensed by a 15x15 SH sensor. The 3 pupil images are reimaged on a single lenslet array and a single detector. In the WFS are also installed 3 patrol cameras for the acquisition of the laser beacons, a system for the stabilization of the pupil images on the lenslet array and an internal source for calibration purposes. The two units are now completing the integration phase in Arcetri premises. We describe the characterization of the units and the closed-loop test realized using a deformable MEMS mirror.

  12. Pre-shipment test of the ARGOS laser guide star wavefront sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaglia, Marco; Busoni, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Puglisi, Alfio; Antichi, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of the laboratory characterization of the ARGOS LGS wavefront sensor (LGSW) and dichroic units. ARGOS is the laser guide star adaptive optics system of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). It implements a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) correction for LUCI, an infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph (MOS), using 3 pulsed Rayleigh beacons focused at 12km altitude. The LGSW is a Shack-Hartman sensor having 15 × 15 subaspertures over the telescope pupil. Each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and gated to reduce spot elongation. The 3 LGS pupils are stabilized to compensate mechanical flexure and are arranged on a single detector. Two units of LGSW have been produced and tested at Arcetri Observatory. We report on the results obtained in the pre-shipment laboratory test: internal active flexure compensation loop performance, optomechanical stability under different gravity conditions, thermal cycling, Pockels cells performance. We also update on the upcoming installation and commissioning campaign at LBT.

  13. The Performance of the Robo-AO Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Duev, Dmitry A.; Riddle, Reed; Salama, Maïssa; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ramprakash, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Robo-AO is an autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics (AO) system recently commissioned at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. With the ability to observe every clear night, Robo-AO at the 2.1 m telescope is the first dedicated AO observatory. This paper presents the imaging performance of the AO system in its first 18 months of operations. For a median seeing value of 1.″44, the average Strehl ratio is 4% in the i\\prime band. After post processing, the contrast ratio under sub-arcsecond seeing for a 2≤slant i\\prime ≤slant 16 primary star is five and seven magnitudes at radial offsets of 0.″5 and 1.″0, respectively. The data processing and archiving pipelines run automatically at the end of each night. The first stage of the processing pipeline shifts and adds the rapid frame rate data using techniques optimized for different signal-to-noise ratios. The second “high-contrast” stage of the pipeline is eponymously well suited to finding faint stellar companions. Currently, a range of scientific programs, including the synthetic tracking of near-Earth asteroids, the binarity of stars in young clusters, and weather on solar system planets are being undertaken with Robo-AO.

  14. RFA-based 589-nm guide star lasers for ESO VLT: a paradigm shift in performance, operational simplicity, reliability, and maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenauer, Axel; Karpov, Vladimir; Wei, Daoping; Hager, Manfred; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Clements, Wallace R. L.; Kaenders, Wilhelm G.

    2012-07-01

    Large telescopes equipped with adaptive optics require 20-25W CW 589-nm sources with emission linewidths of ~5 MHz. These Guide Star (GS) lasers should also be highly reliable and simple to operate and maintain for many years at the top of a mountain facility. Under contract from ESO, industrial partners TOPTICA and MPBC are nearing completion of the development of GS lasers for the ESO VLT, with delivery of the first of four units scheduled for December 2012. We report on the design and performance of the fully-engineered Pre-Production Unit (PPU), including system reliability/availability analysis, the successfully-concluded qualification testing, long-term component and system level tests and long-term maintenance and support planning. The chosen approach is based on ESO's patented narrow-band Raman Fiber Amplifier (EFRA) technology. A master oscillator signal from a linearly-polarized TOPTICA 20-mW, 1178-nm CW diode laser, with stabilized emission frequency and controllable linewidth up to a few MHz, is amplified in an MPBC polarization-maintaining (PM) RFA pumped by a high-power 1120-nm PM fiber laser. With efficient stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression, an unprecedented 40W of narrow-band RFA output has been obtained. This is then mode-matched into a resonant-cavity doubler with a free-spectral-range matching the sodium D2a to D2b separation, allowing simultaneous generation of an additional frequency component (D2b line) to re-pump the sodium atom electronic population. With this technique, the return flux can be increased without having to resort to electro-optical modulators and without the risk of introducing optical wave front distortions. The demonstrated output powers with doubling efficiencies >80% at 589 nm easily exceed the 20W design goal and require less than 700 W of electrical power. In summary, the fiber-based guide star lasers provide excellent beam quality and are modular, turn-key, maintenance-free, reliable, efficient, and ruggedized

  15. THE CHANDRA VARIABLE GUIDE STAR CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Lauer, Jennifer L.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Henden, Arne A.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Martin, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Variable stars have been identified among the optical-wavelength light curves of guide stars used for pointing control of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We present a catalog of these variable stars along with their light curves and ancillary data. Variability was detected to a lower limit of 0.02 mag amplitude in the 4000-10000 A range using the photometrically stable Aspect Camera on board the Chandra spacecraft. The Chandra Variable Guide Star Catalog (VGUIDE) contains 827 stars, of which 586 are classified as definitely variable and 241 are identified as possibly variable. Of the 586 definite variable stars, we believe 319 are new variable star identifications. Types of variables in the catalog include eclipsing binaries, pulsating stars, and rotating stars. The variability was detected during the course of normal verification of each Chandra pointing and results from analysis of over 75,000 guide star light curves from the Chandra mission. The VGUIDE catalog represents data from only about 9 years of the Chandra mission. Future releases of VGUIDE will include newly identified variable guide stars as the mission proceeds. An important advantage of the use of space data to identify and analyze variable stars is the relatively long observations that are available. The Chandra orbit allows for observations up to 2 days in length. Also, guide stars were often used multiple times for Chandra observations, so many of the stars in the VGUIDE catalog have multiple light curves available from various times in the mission. The catalog is presented as both online data associated with this paper and as a public Web interface. Light curves with data at the instrumental time resolution of about 2 s, overplotted with the data binned at 1 ks, can be viewed on the public Web interface and downloaded for further analysis. VGUIDE is a unique project using data collected during the mission that would otherwise be ignored. The stars available for use as Chandra guide stars are

  16. Guide to the universe stars and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Lauren V

    2009-01-01

    This volume in the Greenwood Guides to the Universe series provides the most up-to-date understanding available of the current knowledge about stars. Scientifically sound, but written with the student in mind, Stars is an excellent first step for young people researching the exciting scientific discoveries that continue to extend our knowledge of the universe. Stars is organized thematically to help students better understand these most interesting heavenly bodies.||Stars discusses all areas of what is known about the subject. It will help student understand things such as white dwarfs, neutro

  17. Waterjet-guided laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richerzhagen, Bernold; Kutsuna, Muneharu; Okada, Haruhiku; Ikeda, Takeshi

    2003-02-01

    The waterjet-guided laser processing is a thermal cutting process in which the laser beam is used as the machine tool for cutting and the fine waterjet plays a role as an optical waveguide. The laser beam is guided in the waterjet stream with the full reflection that takes place at the boundary between water and air, in a manner similar to glass fibers. The waterjet also has the function of waveguiding and removing the cut products. The diameter of the waterjet can be controled between 50 and 200 μm. The diameter of laser beam is completely utilised. The useful length of waterjet is usually approximately 50 to 100 mm. The type of laser used is a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The advantages of waterjet-guided laser processing are (1) no Z-axis control, (2) narrower cut widths down to 50 μm, (3) very small heat affected zone, (4) a little oxidation of the cut edges, and (5) no assist gas for cutting. A reseach was carried out for the new industrial application which is unsuitable by conventional laser cutting.

  18. Discovery of a Highly Unequal-mass Binary T Dwarf with Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics: A Coevality Test of Substellar Theoretical Models and Effective Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Leggett, S. K.

    2010-10-01

    Highly unequal-mass ratio binaries are rare among field brown dwarfs, with the mass ratio distribution of the known census described by q (4.9±0.7). However, such systems enable a unique test of the joint accuracy of evolutionary and atmospheric models, under the constraint of coevality for the individual components (the "isochrone test"). We carry out this test using two of the most extreme field substellar binaries currently known, the T1 + T6 epsilon Ind Bab binary and a newly discovered 0farcs14 T2.0 + T7.5 binary, 2MASS J12095613-1004008AB, identified with Keck laser guide star adaptive optics. The latter is the most extreme tight binary resolved to date (q ≈ 0.5). Based on the locations of the binary components on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, current models successfully indicate that these two systems are coeval, with internal age differences of log(age) = -0.8 ± 1.3(-1.0+1.2 -1.3) dex and 0.5+0.4 -0.3(0.3+0.3 -0.4) dex for 2MASS J1209-1004AB and epsilon Ind Bab, respectively, as inferred from the Lyon (Tucson) models. However, the total mass of epsilon Ind Bab derived from the H-R diagram (≈ 80 M Jup using the Lyon models) is strongly discrepant with the reported dynamical mass. This problem, which is independent of the assumed age of the epsilon Ind Bab system, can be explained by a ≈ 50-100 K systematic error in the model atmosphere fitting, indicating slightly warmer temperatures for both components; bringing the mass determinations from the H-R diagram and the visual orbit into consistency leads to an inferred age of ≈ 6 Gyr for epsilon Ind Bab, older than previously assumed. Overall, the two T dwarf binaries studied here, along with recent results from T dwarfs in age and mass benchmark systems, yield evidence for small (≈100 K) errors in the evolutionary models and/or model atmospheres, but not significantly larger. Future parallax, resolved spectroscopy, and dynamical mass measurements for 2MASS J1209-1004AB will enable a more

  19. MR-guided laser interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettag, Martin; Ulrich, Frank; Bock, Wolfgang J.; Kahn, Thomas; Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Hessel, Stefan F. F.

    1992-06-01

    Low-power interstitial thermal therapy using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser and a newly designed fiberoptic transmission system, the ITT laser fiber, is a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of cerebral tumors. After CT-guided stereotactic implantation of an applicator probe, we performed laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy in a patient with an astrocytomas WHO grade II under simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) control. In order to assess the effects of the treatment a 2D-Flash sequence with an acquisition time of 15 sec was used. It could be demonstrated that laser-tissue interactions progressed with duration of irradiation depending on laser powers applied. There was a well-defined area of tissue necrosis with a maximum size of 17 mm in diameter in the center of the tumor and a small zone of transient perifocal edema. With regard to experimental studies, it seems to be possible to define between reversible and irreversible laser-tissue effects.

  20. Study on guided waves in semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudensi, M.A.A.

    1980-01-01

    In This work we studied the guided waves in semiconductor lasers. In the first part we carried on the experimental measurements on lasers with stripe nonorthogonal to the mirrors. In the second part we developed a matrix method for the study of propagation and reflection of guided waves in lasers. (author) [pt

  1. Consistency analysis on laser signal in laser guided weapon simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Zhang, Wenpan; Guo, Hao; Gan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation is widely used in laser semi-active guidance weapon experiments, the authenticity of the laser guidance signal is the key problem of reliability. In order to evaluate the consistency of the laser guidance signal, this paper analyzes the angle of sight, laser energy density, laser spot size, atmospheric back scattering, sun radiation and SNR by comparing the different working state between actual condition and hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Based on measured data, mathematical simulation and optical simulation result, laser guidance signal effects on laser seeker are determined. By using Monte Carlo method, the laser guided weapon trajectory and impact point distribution are obtained, the influence of the systematic error are analyzed. In conclusion it is pointed out that the difference between simulation system and actual system has little influence in normal guidance, has great effect on laser jamming. The research is helpful to design and evaluation of laser guided weapon simulation.

  2. A Large-Telescope Natural Guide Star AO System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, David; Milman, Mark; Needels, Laura

    1994-01-01

    None given. From overview and conclusion:Keck Telescope case study. Objectives-low cost, good sky coverage. Approach--natural guide star at 0.8um, correcting at 2.2um.Concl- Good performance is possible for Keck with natural guide star AO system (SR>0.2 to mag 17+).AO-optimized CCD should b every effective. Optimizing td is very effective.Spatial Coadding is not effective except perhaps at extreme low light levels.

  3. Topography-guided laser refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Theodore; Krueger, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Topography-guided laser refractive surgery seeks to correct vision by altering the major refractive surface of the eye. Whereas results are not significantly different from current treatment options for primary surgery, topography-guided treatment is uniquely effective in eyes with corneal irregularity. This review highlights topography-guided ablations, emphasizing recent advances in treating highly aberrated eyes, including treatment for corneal ectasia in conjunction with collagen cross-linking (CXL). Studies continue to document similar outcomes between topography-guided and wavefront-guided customized corneal ablations while exploring the indications for each modality. Topography-guided ablations demonstrate good outcomes for the correction of astigmatism after penetrating keratoplasty, laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flap or interface complications, post-radial keratotomy eyes, and other highly aberrated corneas, many of which are poor candidates for wavefront-guided therapy. The use of topography-guided ablations with CXL seeks to address both the refractive and structural abnormalities of corneal ectasias. This combination therapy has shown promising results for keratoconus, post-LASIK ectasia, and pellucid marginal degeneration. Topography-guided customized corneal ablation is well tolerated and effective. Recent attention has been focused on the unique therapeutic benefits of this treatment for highly irregular and ectatic corneas with encouraging results.

  4. The vulnerability of laser warning systems against guided weapons based on low power lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jaberi, Mubarak

    2006-01-01

    Laser assisted weapons, such as laser guided bombs, laser guided missiles and laser beam-riding missiles pose a significant threat to military assets in the modern battlefield. Laser beam-riding missiles are particularly hard to detect because they use low power lasers. Most laser warning systems produced so far can not detect laser beam-riding missiles because of their weak emissions which have signals less than 1% of laser range finder power . They are even harder to defeat because current ...

  5. Laser-guided AGV system; Laser yudo AGV system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-29

    Development was made on the laser-guided AGV detecting its position and attitude by laser radar. The developed AGV detects features of walls and columns in running environment from the distance information obtained by laser radar scanning, and calculates its position from the distance and slant of matched features through matching of the obtained features with previously known features. For improvement of its precision and reliability, the AGV also adopts the dead reckoning which calculates its position from moved distances and steering angles based on a vehicle model. Based on these calculated results, the AGV travels along previously set courses. The developed AGV is excellent in installation cost reduction and flexible course modification by using walls and columns in running environment for position detection. Laser radar also allows detection and avoidance of obstacles in front. (translated by NEDO)

  6. CT Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Kachare

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To present our experience of Computed Tomography (CT guided laser ablation of radiologically proven osteoid osteoma in the inter trochantric region of the femur. A19 year old female presented with severe pain in left upper thigh region since 6-7 months, which was exaggerated during nights and was relived on taking oral Non Steroid Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs. On CT scan hypodense lesion with surrounding dense sclerosis noted in intertrochanteric region in left femur. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed small focal predominantly cortical, oval lytic lesion in the intertrochanteric region which appeared hypointense on T1 Weighted Image (T1WI and hyperintense on T2 Weighted Image (T2WI and Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR image. Diffuse extensive sclerosis and hyperostosis of bone was noted surrounding the lesion appearing hypointense on T1W and T2W images. Under local anesthesia the laser fibre was inserted in the nidus under CT guidance through bone biopsy needle and 1800 joules energy delivered in the lesion continuous mode. Complete relief of pain noted after 24 hours after the treatment. CT guided LASER ablation is a safe, simple and effective method of treatment for osteoid osteoma.

  7. Super-virtual interferometric diffractions as guide stars

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2011-01-01

    A significant problem in seismic imaging is seismically seeing below salt structures: large velocity contrasts and the irregular geometry of the salt-sediment interface strongly defocus both the downgoing and upgoing seismic wavefields. This can result in severely defocused migration images so as to seismically render some subsalt reserves invisible. The potential cure is a good estimate of the subsalt and salt velocity distributions, but that is also the problem: severe velocity contrasts prevent the appearance of coherent subsalt reflections in the surface records so that MVA or tomographic methods can become ineffective. We now present an interferometric method for extracting the diffraction signals that emanate from diffractors, also denoted as seismic guide stars. The signal-to-noise ratio of these interferometric diffractions is enhanced by N, where N is the number of source points coincident with the receiver points. Thus, diffractions from subsalt guide stars can then be rendered visible and so can be used for velocity analysis, migration, and focusing of subsalt reflections. Both synthetic and field data records are used to demonstrate the benefits and limitations of this method. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  8. Laser beam riding guided system principle and design research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhou; Jin, Yi; Xu, Zhou; Xing, Hao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of science and technology, precision-strike weapons has been considered to be important for winning victory in military field. Laser guidance is a major method to execute precision-strike in modern warfare. At present, the problems of primary stage of Laser guidance has been solved with endeavors of countries. Several technical aspects of laser-beam riding guided system have been mature, such as atmosphere penetration of laser beam, clutter inhibition on ground, laser irradiator, encoding and decoding of laser beam. Further, laser beam quality, equal output power and atmospheric transmission properties are qualified for warfare situation. Riding guidance instrument is a crucial element of Laser-beam riding guided system, and is also a vital element of airborne, vehicle-mounted and individual weapon. The optical system mainly consist of sighting module and laser-beam guided module. Photoelectric detector is the most important sensing device of seeker, and also the key to acquire the coordinate information of target space. Currently, in consideration of the 1.06 u m of wavelength applied in all the semi-active laser guided weapons systems, lithium drifting silicon photodiode which is sensitive to 1.06 u m of wavelength is used in photoelectric detector. Compared to Solid and gas laser, diode laser has many merits such as small volume, simple construction, light weight, long life, low lost and easy modulation. This article introduced the composition and operating principle of Laser-beam riding guided system based on 980 nm diode laser, and made a analysis of key technology; for instance, laser irradiator, modulating disk of component, laser zooming system. Through the use of laser diode, Laser-beam riding guided system is likely to have smaller shape and very light.

  9. Performance evaluation of laser guided leveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hoque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI farm on clay loam soil during Rabi season of 2010-2011. The treatments consisted of laser land leveling (T1 and control (non-leveled (T2. A preliminary field survey was done using staff gage. Initially a base station was established to dispense laser ray uniformly. The laser ray erected from base station guided the sensor of the stuff gage and the leveler. Elevation data was collected from the different points of the field and made an average. The maximum gage reading were 247.0 cm and the minimum gage reading was 219.2 cm. Average gage readings of the laser leveled plot was 235.66 cm that was settled for auto adjustment. Therefore, huge amount of soils (16.46 cm high was cut from the highest point and subsequently had to fill to the low points. Finally, an equal gage reading of 235.66 cm was observed after leveling the plot. The laser leveler (Leica MLS700 was used hitching with a TAFE tractor. The field was leveled with manual control initially and finally it was operated with auto adjustment. Two operators, 25 litter diesels and total 6 hours time were required during this leveling. Wheat was cultivated in leveled land (T1 and non-leveled land (T2. Laser leveling was insured for improvement in nutrient use efficiencies, option for precision farming, reduces weed problems, and improves uniformity of crop maturity. There was better distribution of water in leveled plot, which helped to reduce irrigation application time 1 hour. Due to uniformity of moisture content improved germination and crop establishment was found which reflected in higher plant population (239 m-2. Maximum yield (3.41 t ha-1 was obtained in T1 due to longer panicle (10.89 cm, more grain per plant (27.47 and 1000 grain weight (47.38 g compared to yield of T2 (2.62 t ha-1.

  10. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  11. Topography-guided treatment of decentered laser ablation using LaserSight's excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L; Zhou, X; Ouyang, Z; Weng, C; Chu, R

    2008-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of topography-guided laser ablation for correction of previously decentered laser ablation using LaserSight's excimer laser. Re-treatment was performed to correct decentered ablation using LaserSight's excimer laser for 18 patients who previously underwent LASIK surgery for myopia correction in both eyes. For each patient, only the decentered eye was re-treated while the other asymptomatic eye forms a control group for this study. Measurements were conducted on ablation center, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), contrast sensitivity and corneal aberrations pre- and post-operatively. For the retreated 18 eyes, the mean decentration was significantly reduced from 1.32+/-0.28mm to 0.61+/-0.23mm post-operatively (t=16.24, pTopography-guided ablation with LaserSight excimer laser is effective to correct decentered ablation. However, the re-treated eye is still inferior to the eye with originally centered ablation in corneal optical quality or visual performance.

  12. The study of laser beam riding guided system based on 980nm diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhou; Xu, Haifeng; Sui, Xin; Yang, Kun

    2015-10-01

    With the development of science and technology, precision-strike weapons has been considered to be important for winning victory in military field. Laser guidance is a major method to execute precision-strike in modern warfare. At present, the problems of primary stage of Laser guidance has been solved with endeavors of countries. Several technical aspects of laser-beam riding guided system have been mature, such as atmosphere penetration of laser beam, clutter inhibition on ground, laser irradiator, encoding and decoding of laser beam. Further, laser beam quality, equal output power and atmospheric transmission properties are qualified for warfare situation. Riding guidance instrument is a crucial element of Laser-beam riding guided system, and is also a vital element of airborne, vehicle-mounted and individual weapon. The optical system mainly consist of sighting module and laser-beam guided module. Photoelectric detector is the most important sensing device of seeker, and also the key to acquire the coordinate information of target space. Currently, in consideration of the 1.06 u m of wavelength applied in all the semi-active laser guided weapons systems, lithium drifting silicon photodiode which is sensitive to 1.06 u m of wavelength is used in photoelectric detector. Compared to Solid and gas laser, diode laser has many merits such as small volume, simple construction, light weight, long life, low lost and easy modulation. This article introduced the composition and operating principle of Laser-beam riding guided system based on 980 nm diode laser, and made a analysis of key technology; for instance, laser irradiator, modulating disk of component, laser zooming system. Through the use of laser diode, Laser-beam riding guided system is likely to have smaller shape and very light.

  13. Combined guiding effect in the end-pumped laser resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xingpeng; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Dongsheng; Gong, Mali

    2011-03-28

    A theoretical model as well as the experimental verification of the combined guiding mechanism for the transverse mode formation in the end-pumped laser resonator are investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger-type wave equation in the gain medium is derived, in which the combined guiding mechanism: the thermal induced refractive index guiding effect as well as the gain guiding effect, is taken into account. The gain saturation and spatial hole burning are considered. The split step Fourier method is used to solve the nonlinear wave equation. A high power end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser resonator is built up. After establishing the pump absorption model of our laser resonator, the temperature distribution in the gain medium is obtained by the numerical solving of the heat diffusion equation. The combined guiding effect is first observed in the end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser resonator, and the experimental transverse mode profiles well agree with the theoretical prediction from the derived nonlinear Schrödinger-type wave equation. The geometric design criterion of the TEM00 mode laser is compared with our wave theory. The experimental- and theoretical- results show that our wave theory with the combined guiding mechanism dominates the transverse mode formation in high power end-pumped laser resonator.

  14. A Road Map for the Generation of a Near-Infrared Guide Star ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methodology is applicable for the generation of a guide star catalog for any existing/upcoming near-infrared ... the computation of H and Ks band magnitudes is essential for the generation of the catalog. The stars are not perfect black ...... The photometric observations are in g, r, i, z and y filters. The limiting magnitude of.

  15. Guiding effect of quantum wells in semiconductor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleshkin, V Ya; Dikareva, Natalia V; Dubinov, A A; Zvonkov, B N; Karzanova, Maria V; Kudryavtsev, K E; Nekorkin, S M; Yablonskii, A N

    2013-05-31

    The guiding effect of InGaAs quantum wells in GaAs- and InP-based semiconductor lasers has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The results demonstrate that such waveguides can be effectively used in laser structures with a large refractive index difference between the quantum well material and semiconductor matrix and a large number of quantum wells (e.g. in InP-based structures). (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  16. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Laser Guiding of a 100 TW Laser Beam in a Capillary Discharge Waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Nagler, Bob; Esarey, Eric; Filip, Catalin; Geddes, Cameron G R; Gonsalves, Anthony J; Hooker, Simon; Leemans, Wim; Spence, D; Toth, Csaba

    2005-01-01

    Experiments are underway at LBNL on guiding high peak power (up to 100 TW), ultra-short (<50 fs) laser pulses using a preformed plasma channel created by an electrical discharge in a capillary. The laser beam is produced by the multi-beam l'OASIS Ti:sapphire laser system and is focused onto the entrance of the capillary using a 2 meter focal length off-axis parabola. The capillary has been developed at Oxford University and creates a fully ionized plasma channel with a radial density profile that is suitable for guiding over a length ranging from 30 to 70 mm. The laser beam is monitored using a CCD camera based mode profile diagnostic, an optical spectrometer and a pulse length diagnostic. Experimental results will be presented on the plasma channel characteristics and on laser guiding and its dependenceo n laser and channel parameters.

  18. Sensor-guided robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    Robotic laserwelding is a promising joining technique for welding of continuous seams in 3D products. High quality joints can be realised provided that the manipulation of the laser beam and the product tolerances meet strict criteria. The requirements for the positioning accuracy of the laser

  19. Guiding of short, intense laser pulses through solid guides and preformed plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghesi, M.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Gaillard, R.; Malka, G.; Vickers, C.; Willi, O.; Blanchot, N.; Miquel, J.L.; Canaud, B.; Davies, J.R.; Malka, G.; Offenberger, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    In a series of experiments carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (UK) and at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Limeil (France), various techniques of guiding ultra-intense laser pulses over distances exceeding the natural diffraction length were investigated. Efficient guiding was demonstrated both through density channels formed in an underdense plasma by an intense prepulse and through solid guides (hollow capillary tubes). Indication of collimated fast electron propagation though solid targets has also been obtained. (authors)

  20. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Abe, Toshiaki

    1998-03-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  1. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko; Abe, Toshiaki.

    1998-01-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  2. The Vixen Star Book user guide how to use the star book ten and the original star book

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, James

    2016-01-01

    This book is for anyone who owns, or is thinking of owning, a Vixen Star Book Ten telescope mount or its predecessor. A revolution in amateur astronomy has occurred in the past decade with the wide availability of high tech, computer-driven, Go-To telescopes. Vixen Optics is leading the way by offering the Star Book Ten system, with its unique star map graphics software. The Star Book Ten is the latest version of computer telescope control using star map graphics as a user interface, first introduced in the original Star Book first offered in 2003. The increasingly complicated nature of this software means that learning to optimize this program is not straightforward, and yet the resulting views when all features are correctly deployed can be phenomenal. After a short history of computerized Go-To telescopes for the consumer amateur astronomer market, Chen offers a treasury of technical information. His advice, tips, and solutions aid the user in getting the most out of the Star Book Ten system in observing s...

  3. A practical guide to handling laser diode beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Haiyin

    2015-01-01

    This book offers the reader a practical guide to the control and characterization of laser diode beams.  Laser diodes are the most widely used lasers, accounting for 50% of the global laser market.  Correct handling of laser diode beams is the key to the successful use of laser diodes, and this requires an in-depth understanding of their unique properties. Following a short introduction to the working principles of laser diodes, the book describes the basics of laser diode beams and beam propagation, including Zemax modeling of a Gaussian beam propagating through a lens.  The core of the book is concerned with laser diode beam manipulations: collimating and focusing, circularization and astigmatism correction, coupling into a single mode optical fiber, diffractive optics and beam shaping, and manipulation of multi transverse mode beams.  The final chapter of the book covers beam characterization methods, describing the measurement of spatial and spectral properties, including wavelength and linewidth meas...

  4. Adaptive optics microscopy with direct wavefront sensing using fluorescent protein guide stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi; Chen, Diana C; Kubby, Joel

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a direct wavefront sensing method using structures labeled with fluorescent proteins in tissues as guide stars. An adaptive optics confocal microscope using this method is demonstrated for imaging of mouse brain tissue. A dendrite and a cell body of a neuron labeled with yellow fluorescent protein are tested as guide stars without injection of other fluorescent labels. Photobleaching effects are also analyzed. The results shows increased image contrast and 3× improvement in the signal intensity for fixed mouse tissues at depths of 70 μm.

  5. Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    OpenAIRE

    Brelet, Yohann; Houard, Aurélien; Arantchouk, Leonid; Forestier, Benjamin; Liu, Yi; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 kHz synchronisable with a nanosecond temporal jitter. Using this compact high voltage generator, we demonstrate reproducible meter long discharges in air at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Triggering and guiding of the discharges are performed in air by femtosecond laser filaments.

  6. Generation of a Near Infra-Red Guide Star Catalog for Thirty-Meter ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Abstract. The requirements for the production of a near Infra-Red Guide Star Catalog (IRGSC) for Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) observations are identified and presented. A methodology to compute the expected J band magnitude of stellar sources from their optical (, , ) magnitudes is developed.

  7. Generation of a Near Infra-Red Guide Star Catalog for Thirty-Meter ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The requirements for the production of a near Infra-Red. Guide Star Catalog (IRGSC) for Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) obser- vations are identified and presented. A methodology to compute the expected J band magnitude of stellar sources from their optical (g, r, i) magnitudes is developed. The computed and ...

  8. Generation of a Near Infra-Red Guide Star Catalog for Thirty-Meter ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the MCAO-LGS system: IRIS, a near infra-red instrument with parallel imaging and ... The WFS algorithm requires point sources as guide stars. Point ... image. Thus there is an u-selected, g-selected, r-selected, i-selected and z-selected catalog for each survey, each suiting to different science goals (for e.g. i-selected.

  9. A Road Map for the Generation of a Near-Infrared Guide Star ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Road Map for the Generation of a Near-Infrared Guide Star. Catalog for Thirty Meter Telescope Observations. Smitha Subramanian1,2,∗, Annapurni Subramaniam1, T. Sivarani1,. Luc Simard3, G. C. Anupama1, Kim Gillies4, A. N. Ramaprakash5. & B. Eswar Reddy1. 1Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, ...

  10. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  11. Esophageal-guided biopsy with volumetric laser endomicroscopy and laser cautery marking: a pilot clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa J; Gora, Michalina J; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Arnason, Thomas; Sauk, Jenny; Gallagher, Kevin A; Kava, Lauren; Tan, Khay M; Soomro, Amna R; Gallagher, Timothy P; Gardecki, Joseph A; Bouma, Brett E; Rosenberg, Mireille; Nishioka, Norman S; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2014-06-01

    Biopsy surveillance protocols for the assessment of Barrett's esophagus can be subject to sampling errors, resulting in diagnostic uncertainty. Optical coherence tomography is a cross-sectional imaging technique that can be used to conduct volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) of the entire distal esophagus. We have developed a biopsy guidance platform that places endoscopically visible marks at VLE-determined biopsy sites. The objective of this study was to demonstrate in human participants the safety and feasibility of VLE-guided biopsy in vivo. A pilot feasibility study. Massachusetts General Hospital. A total of 22 participants were enrolled from January 2011 to June 2012 with a prior diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus. Twelve participants were used to optimize the laser marking parameters and the system platform. A total of 30 target sites were selected and marked in real-time by using the VLE-guided biopsy platform in the remaining 10 participants. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy. Endoscopic and VLE visibility, and accuracy of VLE diagnosis of the tissue between the laser cautery marks. There were no adverse events of VLE and laser marking. The optimal laser marking parameters were determined to be 2 seconds at 410 mW, with a mark separation of 6 mm. All marks made with these parameters were visible on endoscopy and VLE. The accuracies for diagnosing tissue in between the laser cautery marks by independent blinded readers for endoscopy were 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47%-83%), for VLE intent-to-biopsy images 93% (95% CI, 78%-99%), and for corrected VLE post-marking images 100% when compared with histopathology interpretations. This is a single-center feasibility study with a limited number of patients. Our results demonstrate that VLE-guided biopsy of the esophagus is safe and can be used to guide biopsy site selection based on the acquired volumetric optical coherence tomography imaging data. ( NCT01439633.). Copyright © 2014 American Society for

  12. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  13. Endoscopic laser ablation of clival chordoma with magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Barrese

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The endoscopic endonasal approach to MRI-guided laser ablation is both technically feasible and safe. As a result, this therapy may be a useful alternative in hard-to-reach chordomas, or in recurrent cases that have failed other conventional treatment modalities.

  14. Corneal topograph-guided laser subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) corrects decentered ablation after laser in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke Ming; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hui Hui

    2012-12-01

    Corneal topograph-guided laser subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) can effectively correct decentered ablation occurring post laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and to enhance our understanding and diagnosis of decentered ablation following LASIK. Previous studies in the relevant literature are reviewed, and a case report is provided. A patient with high myopia undergoing LASIK in both eyes presented with distorted vision in the left eye, which interfered with the vision in the right eye and caused blurred vision in both eyes. The patient was unable to see objects with both eyes. After receiving corneal topography-guided LASEK, the signs of distorted vision in the left eye and bilateral blurred vision were significantly alleviated, and the patient could see objects with both eyes simultaneously. Clinical ophthalmologists should be aware of the occurrence of decentered ablation after LASIK. Corneal topography-guided LASEK is an efficacious tool for correcting decentered ablation.

  15. Live imaging using adaptive optics with fluorescent protein guide-stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Crest, Justin; Kotadia, Shaila; Azucena, Oscar; Chen, Diana C; Sullivan, William; Kubby, Joel

    2012-07-02

    Spatially and temporally dependent optical aberrations induced by the inhomogeneous refractive index of live samples limit the resolution of live dynamic imaging. We introduce an adaptive optical microscope with a direct wavefront sensing method using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and fluorescent protein guide-stars for live imaging. The results of imaging Drosophila embryos demonstrate its ability to correct aberrations and achieve near diffraction limited images of medial sections of large Drosophila embryos. GFP-polo labeled centrosomes can be observed clearly after correction but cannot be observed before correction. Four dimensional time lapse images are achieved with the correction of dynamic aberrations. These studies also demonstrate that the GFP-tagged centrosome proteins, Polo and Cnn, serve as excellent biological guide-stars for adaptive optics based microscopy.

  16. EUS-Guided Needle-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    the gut, providing further diagnostic and staging information. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a novel endoscopic method that enables imaging at a subcellular level of resolution during endoscopy, allowing up to 1000-fold magnification of tissue and providing an optical biopsy. A new procedure...... that has been developed in the past few years is needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), which involves a mini-CLE probe that can be passed through a 1 9-gauge needle during EUS-FNA. This enables the real-time visualization of tissue at a microscopic level, with the potential to further improve....... The aim of this article is to review the role of EUS-guided nCLE in modern endoscopy and its implications in molecular imaging....

  17. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Th?berge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-Fran?ois; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Fran?ois; Ch?teauneuf?, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electr...

  18. Self-guiding of high-intensity laser pulses for laser wake field acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umstader, D.; Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    A means of self-guiding an ultrashort and high-intensity laser pulse is demonstrated both experimentally and numerically. Its relevance to the laser wake field accelerator concept is discussed. Self-focusing and multiple foci formation are observed when a high peak power (P>100 GW), 1 μm, subpicosecond laser is focused onto various gases (air or hydrogen). It appears to result from the combined effects of self-focusing by the gas, and de-focusing both by diffraction and the plasma formed in the central high-intensity region. Quasi-stationary computer simulations show the same multiple foci behavior as the experiments. The results suggest much larger nonlinear electronic susceptibilities of a gas near or undergoing ionization in the high field of the laser pulse. Although self-guiding of a laser beam by this mechanism appears to significantly extend its high-intensity focal region, small-scale self-focusing due to beam non-uniformity is currently a limitation

  19. Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Grace

    2017-01-01

    This title will cover how stars form, different types of stars, their lifecycle, and the most important star to us--the Sun! Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Kids Jumbo is an imprint of Abdo Kids, a division of ABDO.

  20. Large scale Tesla coil guided discharges initiated by femtosecond laser filamentation in air

    OpenAIRE

    Arantchouk, Leonid; Point, Guillaume; Brelet, Yohann; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The guiding of meter scale electric discharges produced in air by a Tesla coil is realized in laboratory using a focused terawatt laser pulse undergoing filamentation. The influence of the focus position, the laser arrival time or the gap length is studied to determine the best conditions for efficient laser guiding. Discharge parameters such as delay, jitter and resistance are characterized. An increase of the discharge length by a factor 5 has been achieved with the ...

  1. Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kukla, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Climb Aboard! Explore planets and how they are formed! Meet key astronomers! Examine the history of mapping the stars! Investigate red giants, black and white dwarfs, neutron stars, supernovas, and black holes! See an infographic showing our solar system's statistics! Did You Know? facts and a Guidebook of the brightest stars complete your journey. Aligned to Common Core standards and correlated to state standards. Checkerboard Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  2. Wavefront-Guided and Wavefront-Optimised Laser Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Aslı Utine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical aberrations of the eye are the errors of the optical system that limit the resolution, contrast and amount of detail in the image formed on the retina. Wavefront technology allows us to measure these optical aberrations, calculate mathematically, and transfer this information into excimer laser system to perform customized treatment on the cornea. Two treatment algorithms developed to create low aberration-corneal profile are wavefront-optimised (WF-O and wavefront-guided (WF-G treatments. WF-O treatment, aims not to increase the existing spherical aberration while treatment is based on manifest refractive error as in conventional laser treatments. By increasing the number of laser spots applied peripherally in order to optimize the corneal asphericity, the preoperative central:peripheral keratometry ratio is preserved and optic zone shrinkage is prevented. On the other hand, WF-G treatment is based on aberrometry measurements and aims to correct the existing high-order aberrations in the eye. Thus, retinal image with high spatial details can be achieved. However, presence of postoperative defocus can abolish the successful results obtained with WF-G treatment. Clinical randomized controlled trials showed that in patients with preoperative RMS value of <0.3 μm, higher order aberration outcomes are similar after WF-G and WF-O treatments, but WF-G treatment yields better results when it is ≥0.4 μm. In normal eyes, very limited visual advantage can be achieved with WF-G treatment and preservation of asphericity value with WF-O treatment carries greater importance. On the other hand, in case of high astigmatism or higher order aberrations other than spherical aberration, decreasing aberrations with WF-G treatment becomes more important. In this study, we aimed to make a comparative analysis of characteristics and outcomes of the two treatment algorithms. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 474-8

  3. Finding a million-star hotel an astro-tourist’s guide to dark sky places

    CERN Document Server

    Mizon, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Finding a Million-Star Hotel explores the modern phenomenon of astro-tourism, the efforts by increasing numbers of people to find nearby and distant locations where they can see the real night sky so often hidden by light pollution. Astronomer Bob Mizon directs readers to dark sky sites in the United Kingdom, the United States, and a few further afield. This is more than just a hotel guide with links for accommodation at or near the locations. There are chapters on choosing telescopes and binoculars, on celestial objects astro-tourists can look for in the night sky, and an investigation into the causes of the skyglow that veils our view of the stars. Most of those who go seeking the stars are not professional astronomers. This book is aimed at those observers with limited knowledge of the night sky who are eager to explore and enjoy it. Even those contemplating setting up astro-themed hotels, campsites, or astronomy events can benefit from reading this book and from the advice included on how to equip such pl...

  4. Designing an ultrafast laser virtual laboratory using MATLAB GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambronero-López, F.; Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Bao-Varela, C.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we present a virtual simulator developed using the MATLAB GUIDE environment based on the numerical resolution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) and using the split step method for the study of the spatial-temporal propagation of nonlinear ultrashort laser pulses. This allows us to study the spatial-temporal propagation of ultrafast pulses as well as the influence of high-order spectral phases such as group delay dispersion and third-order dispersion on pulse compression in time. The NLS can describe several nonlinear effects, in particular in this paper we consider the Kerr effect, cross-polarized wave generation and cubic-quintic propagation in order to highlight the potential of this equation combined with the GUIDE environment. Graphical user interfaces are commonly used in science and engineering teaching due to their educational value, and have proven to be an effective way to engage and motivate students. Specifically, the interactive graphical interfaces presented provide the visualization of some of the most important nonlinear optics phenomena and allows users to vary the values of the main parameters involved.

  5. Airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy to map forest trait diversity and guide conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, G P; Martin, R E; Knapp, D E; Tupayachi, R; Anderson, C B; Sinca, F; Vaughn, N R; Llactayo, W

    2017-01-27

    Functional biogeography may bridge a gap between field-based biodiversity information and satellite-based Earth system studies, thereby supporting conservation plans to protect more species and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. We used airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy with environmental modeling to derive large-scale, multivariate forest canopy functional trait maps of the Peruvian Andes-to-Amazon biodiversity hotspot. Seven mapped canopy traits revealed functional variation in a geospatial pattern explained by geology, topography, hydrology, and climate. Clustering of canopy traits yielded a map of forest beta functional diversity for land-use analysis. Up to 53% of each mapped, functionally distinct forest presents an opportunity for new conservation action. Mapping functional diversity advances our understanding of the biosphere to conserve more biodiversity in the face of land use and climate change. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Star Ware: The Amateur Astronomer's Guide to Choosing, Buying, and Using Telescopes and Accessories, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Philip S.

    2002-05-01

    Praise for the Second Edition of Star Ware "Star Ware is still a tour de force that any experienced amateur will find invaluable, and which hardware-minded beginners will thoroughly enjoy." -Robert Burnham, Sky & Telescope magazine "Star Ware condenses between two covers what would normally take a telescope buyer many months to accumulate." -John Shibley, Astronomy magazine Now more than ever, the backyard astronomer has a dazzling array of choices when it comes to telescope shopping-which can make choosing just the right sky-watching equipment a formidable challenge. In this revised and updated edition of Star Ware, the essential guide to buying astronomical equipment, award-winning astronomy writer Philip Harrington does the work for you, analyzing and exploring today's astronomy market and offering point-by-point comparisons of everything you need. Whether you're an experienced amateur astronomer or just getting started, Star Ware, Third Edition will prepare you to explore the farthest reaches of space with: Extensive, expanded reviews of leading models and accessories, including dozens of new products, to help you buy smart A clear, step-by-step guide to all aspects of purchasing everything from telescopes and binoculars to filters, mounts, lenses, cameras, film, star charts, guides and references, and much more Eleven new do-it-yourself projects for making unique astronomical equipment at home Easy tips on maintenance, photography, and star-mapping to help you get the most out of your telescope Lists of where to find everything astronomical, including Internet sites and Web resources; distributors, dealers, and conventions; and corporate listings for products and services

  7. Athermal laser launch telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphues, F.G.; Henselmans, R.; Rijnveld, N.; Lemmen, M.H.J.; Doelman, N.J.; Nijkerk, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    ESO has developed a concept for a compact laser guide star unit for use in future Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. A small powerful laser is combined with a telescope that launches the beam, creating a single modular unit that can be mounted directly on a large telescope. This approach solves several

  8. First measurement of radioisotopes by collinear laser spectroscopy at an ion-guide separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooke, JL; Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Griffith, JAR; Grant, IS; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    The first successful application of an ion-guide separator (IGISOL) for collinear laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes has achieved an efficiency comparable with the best obtained with catcher-ionizer facilities. The ion beam energy spread was determined to be less than 6 eV, allowing laser

  9. Narrow line width operation of a 980 nm gain guided tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Barrientos-Barria, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate two different schemes for the spectral narrowing of a 12 emitter 980 nm gain guided tapered diode laser bar. In the first scheme, a reflective grating has been used in a Littman Metcalf configuration and the wavelength of the laser emission could be narrowed down from more than 5.5...

  10. How to read the solar system a guide to the stars and planets

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A fresh and essential guide to understanding and interpreting the wonders of our solar system, from two intrepid young astronomers who are the hosts of the popular BBC television series, "The Sky at Night." What exactly is the solar system? We've all learned the basics at school but do we really understand what we are seeing in the night sky? Expert astronomers Chris North and Paul Abel, provide a fascinating guided tour of our Solar System and explain its many wonders. They look at all the major players, including our more familiar cosmic neighbors―the Sun, the planets and their moons―as well as the occasional visitors to our planet―asteroids, meteors and comets―in addition to distant stars and what might lie beyond our Solar System, including the mysterious Earth Mark II? North and Abel recount the history of how our Solar System came to be, and the myths that once shaped astronomy. Through their cogent explanations of the latest scientific discoveries, they reveal how any amateur astronomer can v...

  11. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf, Marc

    2017-01-05

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning.

  12. Numerical Study of Waterjet Guided Laser Drilling of Silicon based on FVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Cai-Juan; Li, Chang-Feng; Wang, Yu-Li; Liu, Tao; Pan, Yong-Chen

    2010-05-01

    Waterjet guided laser processing is a new technique. The process combines the advantages of laser processing with those of waterjet cutting. The technique based on guiding a laser beam inside a thin, highspeed waterjet. It is very suitable in processing thin and sensitive material with a high degree of precision required. A heat transfer model and simulation based on the finite volume method (FVM) for waterjet guided laser drilling on a silicon substrate are presented in this study. The model treats the continuous process as three stages. The model represents the heat transfer, state changing and moving boundary in detail. The results illustrate that a high-temperature region exists just below the surface; the high cooling effect performs by waterjet can reduces heat affect zone. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data and other studies.

  13. Guided-wave tomographic imaging of plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  14. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr; Lim, Juyoung, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr [Graduate school, School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Younho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Krishnaswamy, Sridhar [Center for Quality Engineering and Failure Prevention, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  15. Guided-wave tomography imaging plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Pil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  16. Nonlinear guiding of picosecond CO2 laser pulses in atmosphere(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Sergei

    2017-05-01

    During the last 20 years much attention has been given to the study of propagation of short intense laser pulses for which the peak power exceeds the critical power of self-focusing, Pcr. For a laser power P laser-ionized plasma result in the production of a high intensity laser filament in air within which a variety of nonlinear optical phenomena are observed. However, research in the 0.8-1 μm range so far has shown a fundamental limitation of guided energy to a few mJ transported within an 100 μm single channel. A long-wavelength, 0 10 μm CO2 laser is a promising candidate for nonlinear guiding because expected high Pcr values according to the modeling should allow for the increase of energy (and therefore power) in a self-guided beam from mJ (GW) to few Joules (TW). During the last decade a significant progress has been achieved in amplification of picosecond pulses to terawatt and recently to lasers open possibility for nonlinear propagation studies in an atmospheric window with high transmission. As a natural first step in a our program on picosecond CO2 laser filamentation, we have made first measurements of Kerr coefficients of air and air constituents around 10 μm. We also undertook direct measurements of n2 of air by analyzing nonlinear self-focusing in air using a 3 ps, 600 GW pulses of the BNL CO2 laser.

  17. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    Full Text Available The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  18. MED101: a laser-plasma simulation code. User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.A.; Rose, S.J.; Rogoyski, A.M.

    1989-12-01

    Complete details for running the 1-D laser-plasma simulation code MED101 are given including: an explanation of the input parameters, instructions for running on the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory IBM, Atlas Centre Cray X-MP and DEC VAX, and information on three new graphics packages. The code, based on the existing MEDUSA code, is capable of simulating a wide range of laser-produced plasma experiments including the calculation of X-ray laser gain. (author)

  19. Self-Guiding of Ultrashort Relativistically Intense Laser Pulses to the Limit of Nonlinear Pump Depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph, J. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Pak, A. E.; Lu, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Fang, F.; Joshi, C.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-01-01

    A study of self-guiding of ultra short, relativistically intense laser pulses is presented. Here, the laser pulse length is on the order of the nonlinear plasma wavelength and the normalized vector potential is greater than one. Self-guiding of ultrashort laser pulses over tens of Rayliegh lengths is possible when driving a highly nonlinear wake. In this case, self-guiding is limited by nonlinear pump depletion. Erosion of the pulse due to diffraction at the head of the laser pulse is minimized for spot sizes close to the blow-out radius. This is due to the slowing of the group velocity of the photons at the head of the laser pulse. Using an approximately 10 TW Ti:Sapphire laser with a pulse length of approximately 50 fs, experimental results are presented showing self-guiding over lengths exceeding 30 Rayliegh lengths in various length Helium gas jets. Fully explicit 3D PIC simulations supporting the experimental results are also presented.

  20. Fiber optically guided CO2 laser myringotomy through an otoscope: animal experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRowe, Ari; Ophir, Dov; Katzir, Abraham

    1992-08-01

    We have developed an otoscope which contains an optical fiber capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. Such a hand-held unit may prove useful in the treatment of acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. We used crystalline fibers (0.9 mm diameter) capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. Four guinea pigs were anaesthetized. In one ear a laser myringotomy was performed using 7.5 watts for 0.1 seconds. The diameter of the myringotomy was 1.5 mm. In the other ear a similar conventional myringotomy was performed. After three weeks three laser and three conventional myringotomies were closed. On the average conventional myringotomies closed 50% sooner than laser myringotomies. Temporal bones from three guinea pigs were removed and sectioned according to accepted methods. No histological differences were found between ears. This experiment has proven the feasibility of using an otoscope for fiberoptically guided CO2 laser myringotomy.

  1. A selection of hot subluminous stars in the GALEX survey - I. Correlation with the Guide Star Catalog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vennes, Stephane; Kawka, Adela; Németh, Péter

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 410, č. 3 (2011), s. 2095-2112 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300030908; GA AV ČR IAA301630901; GA ČR GAP209/10/0967 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : stars * fundamental parameters * subdwarfs Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2011

  2. Positive-Index Guiding in CDH-LOC Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, D.

    1986-01-01

    Nonabsorbing passive region has beam-guiding capability. Convex-lensshaped layer has refractive index higher than surrounding material so serves as optical waveguide. Four times more power achieved for devices of this type not incorporating the passive region.

  3. Application of a Complex Lead Compensator for a Laser Guided Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhila, M. R.; Gopika, S.; Abraham, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of a lead compensator with complex pole and complex zero for a missile. It is compared with a lead compensator with real pole and real zero. A typical laser guided missile control system is considered for the performance comparison of both the compensators. Simulation studies carried out with MATLAB brings out the scope of using complex compensator in missile guided systems.

  4. Semiconductor laser having a non-absorbing passive region with beam guiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, Dan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A laser comprises a semiconductor body having a pair of end faces and including an active region comprising adjacent active and guide layers which is spaced a distance from the end face and a passive region comprising adjacent non-absorbing guide and mode control layers which extends between the active region and the end face. The combination of the guide and mode control layers provides a weak positive index waveguide in the lateral direction thereby providing lateral mode control in the passive region between the active region and the end face.

  5. Livermore Lab's giant laser system will bring star power to Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.

    2010-01-01

    In the 50 years since the laser was first demonstrated in Malibu, California, on May 16, 1960, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a world leader in laser technology and the home for many of the world's most advanced laser systems. That tradition continues today at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system. NIF's completion in March 2009 not only marked the dawn of a new era of scientific research - it could also prove to be the next big step in the quest for a sustainable, carbon-free energy source for the world. NIF consists of 192 laser beams that will focus up to 1.8 million joules of energy on a bb-sized target filled with isotopes of hydrogen - forcing the hydrogen nuclei to collide and fuse in a controlled thermonuclear reaction similar to what happens in the sun and the stars. More energy will be produced by this 'ignition' reaction than the amount of laser energy required to start it. This is the long-sought goal of 'energy gain' that has eluded fusion researchers for more than half a century. Success will be a scientific breakthrough - the first demonstration of fusion ignition in a laboratory setting, duplicating on Earth the processes that power the stars. This impending success could not be achieved without the valuable partnerships forged with other national and international laboratories, private industry and universities. One of the most crucial has been between LLNL and the community in which it resides. Over 155 businesses in the local Tri-Valley area have contributed to the NIF, from industrial technology and engineering firms to tool manufacturing, electrical, storage and supply companies. More than $2.3B has been spent locally between contracts with nearby merchants and employee salaries. The Tri-Valley community has enabled the Laboratory to complete a complex and far-reaching project that will have national and global impact in the future. The first experiments were conducted on NIF

  6. Optical ray tracing-guided myopic laser in situ keratomileusis: 1-year clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Arthur B; Kelly, Gabrielle E

    2013-01-01

    To compare the safety, efficacy, and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis treatments at 1 year postprocedure using a novel geometric ray tracing algorithm with outcomes of treatments using wavefront-optimized, wavefront-guided, and topography-guided ablation profiles of an excimer laser (WaveLight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany; Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX, USA). Wellington Eye Clinic, Dublin, Ireland. Retrospective comparative case series. Eyes having a preoperative myopic spherical equivalent refractive error >4.00 D and/or astigmatism between 2.00-6.00 D resulting in a spherical equivalent power greater than -4.00 D received laser in situ keratomileusis treatments using a ray tracing algorithm. Refractive outcomes were analyzed postoperatively at 6 and 12 months and were compared to outcomes of wavefront-optimized, wavefront-guided, and topography-guided treatments in eyes with the same pretreatment refractive range. Forty-seven eyes of 26 patients were treated using the ray tracing algorithm. At 12 months postprocedure, uncorrected visual acuity was better than the preoperative best-corrected visual acuity in this group. The percentage of eyes achieving an uncorrected visual acuity or best-corrected visual acuity ≥20/20 significantly exceeded the rates achieved in the wavefront-optimized and topography-guided groups. A greater percentage of eyes achieved an uncorrected visual acuity ≥20/20 and ≥20/16 in the wavefront-guided group, but no eyes in the wavefront-guided group had an uncorrected visual acuity ≥20/12.5 in comparison to 9.5% of eyes in the ray tracing group. This study provides further evidence of the safety, efficacy, and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis outcomes using an optical ray tracing algorithm to treat moderate to high myopic astigmatism and shows that good results are sustained through 1 year.

  7. Application of a laser-heater for advanced guiding of PetaWatt laser pulses in capillary plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Daniels, Joost; Benedetti, Carlo; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Pieronek, Christopher; Schroeder, Carl; Steinke, Sven; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) form an attractive scheme for developing compact accelerators, due to their high acceleration gradients. In the push to higher electron beam energies, one of the main challenges is to increase the dephasing length Ld over which energy can be transferred to the electrons, while keeping the laser confined to provide the required accelerating fields. Currently, the highest energy electron beams from an LPA have been achieved by using pre-formed density channels from capillary discharge plasmas. Confinement of laser pulses with higher order mode content required higher density than optimum for reaching higher energies. Improved laser confinement at lower density, extending Ld, has been proposed through use of a ns-scale heater pulse before the ultrashort, high-powered pulse arrives. Here, we present experimental results of applying this technique to channels of up to 20 cm in length to enhance guiding of PetaWatt pulses from the BELLA laser, including electron and laser properties from the accelerator. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Scanning laser vibrometer measurement of guided waves in rails

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available from the measured frequency responses by using a pseudo-inverse technique and mode shape information computed from a semi-analytical finite element model. Scanning laser measurements were performed in the field at distances of 10m and 500m from a...

  9. Relativistic nonlinearity and wave-guide propagation of rippled laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we have investigated the self-focusing behaviour of radially symmetrical rippled Gaussian laser beam propagating in a plasma. Considering the nonlinearity to arise ... ripple as well as on the beam width. Values of critical power has been calculated for different values of the position parameter of ripple.

  10. Laser Guided Automated Calibrating System for Accurate Bracket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appliance. When bands were used originally, Angle[1] thought the best position to place the bracket was at the center of the tooth. Later Ricketts[2] used ... In orthodontic literature, the advantages and disadvantages of ... Keywords: Hough transforms, Indirect bonding technique, Laser, Orthodontic bracket placement.

  11. Laser guided automated calibrating system for accurate bracket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is widely recognized that accurate bracket placement is of critical importance in the efficient application of biomechanics and in realizing the full potential of a preadjusted edgewise appliance. Aim: The purpose of ... placement. Keywords: Hough transforms, Indirect bonding technique, Laser, Orthodontic bracket placement ...

  12. Relativistic nonlinearity and wave-guide propagation of rippled laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the present paper we have investigated the self-focusing behaviour of radially sym- metrical rippled Gaussian laser beam propagating in a plasma. Considering the nonlinearity to arise from relativistic phenomena and following the approach of Akhmanov et al, which is based on the. WKB and paraxial-ray ...

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of the Laser Beam Waist on Cold Atom Guiding Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Hu, Di; Xu, Xiaobin; Li, Wei; Lu, Xiangxiang; Song, Yitong

    2018-02-28

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the vertical guiding laser beam waist on cold atom guiding efficiency. In this study, a double magneto-optical trap (MOT) apparatus is used. With an unbalanced force in the horizontal direction, a cold atomic beam is generated by the first MOT. The cold atoms enter the second chamber and are then re-trapped and cooled by the second MOT. By releasing a second atom cloud, the process of transferring the cold atoms from MOT to the dipole trap, which is formed by a red-detuned converged 1064-nm laser, is experimentally demonstrated. And after releasing for 20 ms, the atom cloud is guided to a distance of approximately 3 mm. As indicated by the results, the guiding efficiency depends strongly on the laser beam waist; the efficiency reaches a maximum when the waist radius ( w ₀) of the laser is in the range of 15 to 25 μm, while the initial atom cloud has a radius of 133 μm. Additionally, the properties of the atoms inside the dipole potential trap, such as the distribution profile and lifetime, are deduced from the fluorescence images.

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of the Laser Beam Waist on Cold Atom Guiding Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningfang Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the vertical guiding laser beam waist on cold atom guiding efficiency. In this study, a double magneto-optical trap (MOT apparatus is used. With an unbalanced force in the horizontal direction, a cold atomic beam is generated by the first MOT. The cold atoms enter the second chamber and are then re-trapped and cooled by the second MOT. By releasing a second atom cloud, the process of transferring the cold atoms from MOT to the dipole trap, which is formed by a red-detuned converged 1064-nm laser, is experimentally demonstrated. And after releasing for 20 ms, the atom cloud is guided to a distance of approximately 3 mm. As indicated by the results, the guiding efficiency depends strongly on the laser beam waist; the efficiency reaches a maximum when the waist radius (w0 of the laser is in the range of 15 to 25 μm, while the initial atom cloud has a radius of 133 μm. Additionally, the properties of the atoms inside the dipole potential trap, such as the distribution profile and lifetime, are deduced from the fluorescence images.

  15. Coherent and incoherent radiation from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is calculated based on the Lienard–Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically

  16. Optical guiding of laser beam in nonuniform plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have solved the nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation governing the propagation charac- teristics for an .... the form of this equation, the first two terms on the right hand side respectively representing diffraction .... the course of its guided propagation two minima and two maxima are observed as shown in figure 2.

  17. Star wars: space-age laser weapons show potential as drilling tools in new U.S. research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvie, W.

    1998-08-03

    Research into the use of lasers, developed under the U.S. star wars strategic defence program, for drilling oil and gas wells is being reported. Although still in the conceptual stage, laboratory research suggests that if penetration rates achieved in the laboratory could be duplicated under field conditions, drilling speeds could be increased 100-fold. The trick appears to be making the laser broad enough in diameter to allow the insertion of testing, stimulation and other tools into the bore. The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL), invented in 1977 to track and destroy missiles, which also works with fibre optic tubing, appears to be well suited for power projection over long distances, such as oil-well drilling. Another variety of laser, the mid-infrared advanced chemical laser (MIRACL), first developed in 1980 as a shipboard defence system, also has the demonstrated power to burn through solid materials such as `soft rock`. At least two other laser types, the electric discharge coaxial laser I, and the laser device demonstration have been tested extensively, and are considered to have suitable operating characteristics. A modest two-year research program is currently underway at the Colorado School of Mines. Many U.S. firms, including some drilling companies, have expressed interest in providing funding to continue the project. The final bill might be as high as $ 50 to 100 million before a field version becomes available.

  18. Fairbanks North Star borough rural roads upgrade inventory and cost estimation software user guide : version I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The Rural Road Upgrade Inventory and Cost Estimation Software is designed by the AUTC : research team to help the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB) estimate the cost of upgrading : rural roads located in the Borough's Service Areas. The Software pe...

  19. A Road Map for the Generation of a Near-Infrared Guide Star ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/joaa/037/03/0024. Keywords. Stars--near-infrared magnitudes--adaptive optics. Abstract. The near-infrared instruments in the upcoming Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be assisted by a multi conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) system.

  20. Image-guided macular laser therapy: design considerations and progress toward implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey W.; Shin, David S.

    1999-06-01

    Laser therapy is currently the only treatment of proven benefit for exudative age related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. To guide treatment for macular diseases, investigations were initiated to permit overlay of previously-stored angiographic images and image sequences superimposed onto the real-time biomicroscopic fundus image. Prior to treatment, a set of partially overlapping fundus images is acquired and montaged in order to provide a map for subsequent tracking operations. A binocular slit-lamp biomicroscope interfaced to a CCD camera, framegrabber board, and PC permits acquisition and rendering of retinal images. Computer-vision algorithms facilitate robust tracking, registration, and near-video-rate image overlay of previously-stored retinal photographic and angiographic images onto the real-time fundus image. Laser treatment is guided in this augmented reality environment where the borders of the treatment target--for example, the boundaries of a choroidal neovascularization complex--are easily identified through overlay of angiographic information superimposed on, and registered with, the real-time fundus image. During periods of misregistration as judged by the amplitude of the tracking similarity metric, laser function is disabled, affording additional safety. Image-guided macular laser therapy should facilitate accurate targeting of treatable lesions and less unintentional retinal injury when compared with standard techniques.

  1. Optical ray tracing-guided myopic laser in situ keratomileusis: 1-year clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings AB

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthur B Cummings,1 Gabrielle E Kelly21Wellington Eye Clinic, Dublin, Ireland; 2School of Mathematical Sciences, University College Dublin, Dublin, IrelandPurpose: To compare the safety, efficacy, and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis treatments at 1 year postprocedure using a novel geometric ray tracing algorithm with outcomes of treatments using wavefront-optimized, wavefront-guided, and topography-guided ablation profiles of an excimer laser (WaveLight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany; Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX, USA.Setting: Wellington Eye Clinic, Dublin, Ireland.Design: Retrospective comparative case series.Methods: Eyes having a preoperative myopic spherical equivalent refractive error >4.00 D and/or astigmatism between 2.00–6.00 D resulting in a spherical equivalent power greater than −4.00 D received laser in situ keratomileusis treatments using a ray tracing algorithm. Refractive outcomes were analyzed postoperatively at 6 and 12 months and were compared to outcomes of wavefront-optimized, wavefront-guided, and topography-guided treatments in eyes with the same pretreatment refractive range.Results: Forty-seven eyes of 26 patients were treated using the ray tracing algorithm. At 12 months postprocedure, uncorrected visual acuity was better than the preoperative best-corrected visual acuity in this group. The percentage of eyes achieving an uncorrected visual acuity or best-corrected visual acuity ≥20/20 significantly exceeded the rates achieved in the wavefront-optimized and topography-guided groups. A greater percentage of eyes achieved an uncorrected visual acuity ≥20/20 and ≥20/16 in the wavefront-guided group, but no eyes in the wavefront-guided group had an uncorrected visual acuity ≥20/12.5 in comparison to 9.5% of eyes in the ray tracing group.Conclusion: This study provides further evidence of the safety, efficacy, and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis outcomes using an optical ray tracing

  2. Study on propagation properties of laser guiding EMP in a finite magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xinren; Yin Chengyou

    2009-01-01

    The geometric model of laser plasma channel (LPC) guiding electromagnetic pulse (EMP) in a finite electromagnetic field is created; when LPC is in lossy gas the propagation properties of the normal modes of LPC guiding EMP are studied; and then the wave equation of longitudinal electormagnetic field and the relationship between transverse and longitudinal electromagnetic field in anisotropic medium are derived under the generalized cylindrical coordinate system. By applying the boundary conditions of electromagnetic fields, the strict characteristic equation of mode propagation for LPC guiding EMP is deduced, and the effects of plasma parameters, surrounding material and external magnetic field on propagation are discussed. The results show that the propagation properties of magnetized LPC guiding EMP are easy to be controlled compared with those without external magnetic field or an infinite external magnetic field applied. (authors)

  3. Multi-pulse scheme for laser-guided electrical breakdown of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polynkin, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    Channeling an extended electrical breakdown of air by a laser beam is a long-standing challenge in applied laser science. Virtually all previously reported experiments on discharge channeling by femtosecond laser beams relied on the application of a single laser pulse and have been conducted with discharge gaps of less than one meter, in which case the direct ohmic heating of the laser-generated plasma by the applied DC electric field is the dominant channeling mechanism. We report a laboratory-scale demonstration of a channeling approach that makes use of concatenated plasma filaments produced by a sequence of multiple ultrashort laser pulses. Direct ohmic heating of the guiding channel is eliminated through the introduction of large temporal delays between the individual laser pulses in the pulse sequence. We propose an extension of this scheme to channeling kilometer-scale discharges, including natural lightning. Our proposed approach alleviates the fundamental range limitations inherent to the single-pulse schemes reported previously. It can channel discharges propagating in either direction and along curved paths.

  4. Adrenal metastases: CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Lehnert, Thomas; Eichler, Katrin; Proschek, Dirk; Floeter, Julius; Mack, Martin G. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) in adrenal metastases. Nine patients (seven male, two female; average age 65.0 years; range 58.7-75.0 years) with nine unilateral adrenal metastases (mean diameter 4.3 cm) from primaries comprising colorectal carcinoma (n = 5), renal cell carcinoma (n = 1), oesophageal carcinoma (n = 1), carcinoid (n = 1), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1) underwent CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT using a 0.5 T MR unit. LITT was performed with an internally irrigated power laser application system with an Nd:YAG laser. A thermosensitive, fast low-angle shot 2D sequence was used for real-time monitoring. Follow-up studies were performed at 24 h and 3 months and, thereafter, at 6-month intervals (median 14 months). All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anaesthesia. No complications occurred. Average number of laser applicators per tumour: 1.9 (range 1-4); mean applied laser energy 33 kJ (range 15.3-94.6 kJ), mean diameter of the laser-induced coagulation necrosis 4.5 cm (range 2.5-7.5 cm). Complete ablation was achieved in seven lesions, verified by MR imaging; progression was detected in two lesions in the follow-up. The preliminary results suggest that CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT is a safe, minimally invasive and promising procedure for treating adrenal metastases. (orig.)

  5. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  6. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  7. Proof-of-principle of surface detection with air-guided quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Virginie; Colombelli, Raffaele; Perahia, Raviv; Painter, Oskar; Wilson, Luke R; Krysa, Andrey B

    2008-04-28

    We report a proof-of-principle of surface detection with air-guided quantum cascade lasers. Laser ridges were designed to exhibit an evanescent electromagnetic field on their top surface that can interact with material or liquids deposited on the device. We employ photoresist and common solvents to provide a demonstration of the sensor setup. We observed spectral as well as threshold currents changes as a function of the deposited material absorption curve. A simple model, supplemented by 2D numerical finite element method simulations, allows one to explain and correctly predict the experimental results.

  8. Effects of the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams on the implosion of a cone-guided target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagawa, T; Sakagami, H; Nagatomo, H; Sunahara, A

    2016-01-01

    In direct drive laser fusion, the non-uniformity of the laser absorption on the target surface caused by the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams is a sever problem. GekkoXII laser at Osaka University has twelve laser beams and is irradiated to the target with a dodecahedron orientation, in which the distribution of the laser absorption on the target surface becomes non-uniform. Furthermore, in the case of a cone-guided target, the laser irradiation orientation is more limited. In this paper, we conducted implosion simulations of the cone- guided target based on GekkoXII irradiation orientation and compared the case of using the twelve beams and nine beams where the three beams irradiating the cone region are cut. The implosion simulations were conducted by a three-dimensional pure hydro code. (paper)

  9. Detection of superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasia by chromoendoscopy-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Shuang-Fang; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jing

    2015-06-14

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of Lugol's chromoendoscopy-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) in detecting superficial esophageal squamous cell neoplasia (ESCN). Between December 2008 and September 2010, a total of 52 patients were enrolled at the Chinese PLA General Hospital in Beijing, China. First, Lugol's chromoendoscopy-guided CLE was performed in these patients and the CLE in vivo histological diagnosis was recorded. Then, chromoendoscopy-guided biopsy was performed in the same patients by another endoscopist who was blinded to the CLE findings. Based on the biopsy and CLE diagnosis, en bloc endoscopic resection was performed. The CLE in vivo diagnosis and the histological diagnosis of biopsy of ESCN were compared, using a histological examination of the endoscopic resection specimens as the standard reference. A total of 152 chromoendoscopy-guided biopsies were obtained from 56 lesions. In the 56 lesions of 52 patients, a total of 679 CLE images were obtained vs 152 corresponding biopsies. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of chromoendoscopy-guided CLE compared with biopsy were 95.7% vs 82% (P 0.05), respectively. There was a significant improvement in sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and accuracy when comparing chromoendoscopy-guided CLE with biopsy. Lugol's chromoendoscopy-guided CLE is a real-time, non-invasive endoscopic diagnostic technology; the accuracy of the detection of superficial ESCN is equivalent to or may be superior to biopsy histology.

  10. The Use of Laser Guidance Reduces Fluoroscopy Time for C-Arm Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroes, Maarten W., E-mail: Maarten.Kroes@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Strijen, Marco J. L. van, E-mail: m.van.strijen@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Braak, Sicco J., E-mail: sjbraak@gmail.com [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L., E-mail: Yvonne.Hoogeveen@radboudumc.nl; Lange, Frank de, E-mail: Frank.deLange@radboudumc.nl; Schultze Kool, Leo J., E-mail: Leo.SchultzeKool@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    PurposeWhen using laser guidance for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided needle interventions, planned needle paths are visualized to the operator without the need to switch between entry- and progress-view during needle placement. The current study assesses the effect of laser guidance during CBCT-guided biopsies on fluoroscopy and procedure times.Materials and MethodsProspective data from 15 CBCT-guided biopsies of 8–65 mm thoracic and abdominal lesions assisted by a ceiling-mounted laser guidance technique were compared to retrospective data of 36 performed CBCT-guided biopsies of lesions >20 mm using the freehand technique. Fluoroscopy time, procedure time, and number of CBCT-scans were recorded. All data are presented as median (ranges).ResultsFor biopsies using the freehand technique, more fluoroscopy time was necessary to guide the needle onto the target, 165 s (83–333 s) compared to 87 s (44–190 s) for laser guidance (p < 0.001). Procedure times were shorter for freehand-guided biopsies, 24 min versus 30 min for laser guidance (p < 0.001).ConclusionThe use of laser guidance during CBCT-guided biopsies significantly reduces fluoroscopy time.

  11. Use of the carbon dioxide laser in guided tissue regeneration wound healing in the beagle dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Jeffrey A.; Parlar, Ates; Abdel-Ghaffar, Khaled A.; El-Khouli, Amr M.; Israel, Michael

    1996-04-01

    The concept of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) allowing cells from the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone to repopulate the treated root surface has shown the ability to obtain periodontal new attachment. Healing studies have also shown that conventional GTR therapy still does not exclude all the epithelium. This epithelial proliferation apically interferes with the establishment of the new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. The objective of this research study was to examine whether controlled de-epithelialization with the carbon dioxide laser during the healing phase after periodontal surgery, would retard the apical migration of the epithelium and thereby enhance the results obtained through guided tissue regeneration. Eight beagle dogs were used, the experimental side received de-epithelialization with the CO2 laser in conjunction with flap reflection and surgically created buccal osseous defects. Selected defects on each side were treated with ePTFE periodontal membranes. The laser de-epithelialization was repeated every 10 days until removal of the membranes. The control side received the same surgical treatment without laser application. This experimental design allowed histologic study of the new attachment obtained in defects treated with flap debridement with or without laser de-epithelialization and with or without ePTFE membranes. A statistical analysis was performed on the histometric data from 48 teeth in the 8 dogs after 4 months of healing. The results showed significant amounts of new attachment obtained from all four treatment modalities with no statistically significant differences for any one treatment. However, the trend towards enhanced regeneration with the combined treatment of laser and membrane vs. membrane alone or debridement alone was evident. The histologic analysis revealed a significant amount of newly formed `fat cementum' seen only on the laser treated teeth. This feature was the most remarkable finding of the

  12. Laser Wakefield Acceleration at Reduced Density in the Self-Guided Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, J E; Albert, F; Glenzer, S H; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Shaw, J L; Till, A; Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Pak, A E; Joshi, C; Martin, S; Silva, L O

    2009-11-18

    Experiments conducted using a 200TW 60 fs laser have demonstrated up to 720 MeV electrons in the self-guided laser wakefield regime using pure Helium gas jet targets. Charge and energy of the accelerated electrons was measured using an electron spectrometer with a 0.5T magnet and charge callibrated image plates. The self-trapped charge in a helium plasma was shown to fall off with decreasing electron density with a threshold at 2.5 x 10{sup 18} (cm{sup -3}) below which no charge is trapped. Self-guiding however is shown to continue below this density limitation over distances of 14 mm with an exit spot size of 25{micro}m. Simulations show that injection of electrons at these densities can be assisted through ionization induced trapping in a mix of Helium with 3% Oxygen.

  13. A walk through the heavens a guide to stars and constellations and their legends

    CERN Document Server

    Heifetz, Milton D

    2004-01-01

    A Walk through the Heavens is a beautiful and easy-to-use guide to the constellations of the northern hemisphere. Written for the complete beginner, this practical guide introduces the patterns of the starry skies in a memorable way. No equipment is needed, apart from normal sight and clear skies.

  14. Intelligent Image Analysis for Image-Guided Laser Hair Removal and Skin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brian; Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    We present the development of advanced automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms for the hair follicles identification in digital skin images to accurately direct the laser beam to remove the hair. The ATR system first performs a wavelet filtering to enhance the contrast of the hair features in the image. The system then extracts the unique features of the targets and sends the features to an Adaboost based classifier for training and recognition operations. The ATR system automatically classifies the hair, moles, or other skin lesion and provides the accurate coordinates of the intended hair follicle locations. The coordinates can be used to guide a scanning laser to focus energy only on the hair follicles. The intended benefit would be to protect the skin from unwanted laser exposure and to provide more effective skin therapy.

  15. Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries.

  16. Image-guided smart laser system for precision implantation of cells in cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Nitesh; Rector, John A.; Gardner, Michael R.; McElroy, Austin B.; Choy, Kevin C.; Crosby, Cody; Zoldan, Janet; Milner, Thomas E.

    2017-03-01

    State-of-the-art treatment for joint diseases like osteoarthritis focus on articular cartilage repair/regeneration by stem cell implantation therapy. However, the technique is limited by a lack of precision in the physician's imaging and cell deposition toolkit. We describe a novel combination of high-resolution, rapid scan-rate optical coherence tomography (OCT) alongside a short-pulsed nanosecond thulium (Tm) laser for precise cell seeding in cartilage. The superior beam quality of thulium lasers and wavelength of operation 1940 nm offers high volumetric tissue removal rates and minimizes the residual thermal footprint. OCT imaging enables targeted micro-well placement, precise cell deposition, and feature contrast. A bench-top system is constructed using a 15 W, 1940 nm, nanosecond-pulsed Tm fiber laser (500 μJ pulse energy, 100 ns pulse duration, 30kHz repetition rate) for removing tissue, and a swept source laser (1310 ± 70 nm, 100 kHz sweep rate) for OCT imaging, forming a combined Tm/OCT system - a "smart laser knife". OCT assists the smart laser knife user in characterizing cartilage to inform micro-well placement. The Tm laser creates micro-wells (2.35 mm diameter length, 1.5 mm width, 300 μm deep) and micro-incisions (1 mm wide, 200 μm deep) while OCT image-guidance assists and demonstrates this precision cutting and cell deposition with real-time feedback. To test micro-well creation and cell deposition protocol, gelatin phantoms are constructed mimicking cartilage optical properties and physiological structure. Cell viability is then assessed to illustrate the efficacy of the hydrogel deposition. Automated OCT feedback is demonstrated for cutting procedures to avoid important surface/subsurface structures. This bench-top smart laser knife system described here offers a new image-guided approach to precise stem cell seeding that can enhance the efficacy of articular cartilage repair.

  17. The Use of Laser Guidance Reduces Fluoroscopy Time for C-Arm Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, M.W.; Strijen, M.J. van; Braak, S.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Lange, F. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: When using laser guidance for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided needle interventions, planned needle paths are visualized to the operator without the need to switch between entry- and progress-view during needle placement. The current study assesses the effect of laser guidance

  18. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Technology, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Thermometry, and Technical Considerations for Proper Catheter Placement During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitesh V; Mian, Matthew; Stafford, R Jason; Nahed, Brian V; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced thermal therapy has become a powerful tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium. The physics of laser therapy are complex, but a sound understanding of this topic is clinically relevant, as many centers have incorporated it into their treatment algorithm, and educated patients are demanding consideration of its use for their disease. Laser ablation has been used for a wide array of intracranial lesions. Laser catheter placement is guided by stereotactic planning; however, as the procedure has popularized, the number of ways in which the catheter can be inserted has also increased. There are many technical nuances for laser placement, and, to date, there is not a clear understanding of whether any one technique is better than the other. In this review, we describe the basic physics of magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy and describe the several common techniques for accurate Visualase laser catheter placement in a stepwise fashion. MRg-LITT, magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapyPAD, precision aiming device.

  19. User's guide for vectorized code EQUIL for calculating equilibrium chemistry on Control Data STAR-100 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A vectorized code, EQUIL, was developed for calculating the equilibrium chemistry of a reacting gas mixture on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. The code provides species mole fractions, mass fractions, and thermodynamic and transport properties of the mixture for given temperature, pressure, and elemental mass fractions. The code is set up for the electrons H, He, C, O, N system of elements. In all, 24 chemical species are included.

  20. Analysis of laser energy characteristics of laser guided weapons based on the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yawen; Cui, Xiaohong; Wang, Qianqian; Tong, Qiujie; Cui, Xutai; Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Le; Peng, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation system, which provides a precise, controllable and repeatable test conditions, is an important part of the development of the semi-active laser (SAL) guided weapons. In this paper, laser energy chain characteristics were studied, which provides a theoretical foundation for the SAL guidance technology and the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. Firstly, a simplified equation was proposed to adjust the radar equation according to the principles of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. Secondly, a theoretical model and calculation method were given about the energy chain characteristics based on the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. We then studied the reflection characteristics of target and the distance between the missile and target with major factors such as the weather factors. Finally, the accuracy of modeling was verified by experiment as the values measured experimentally generally follow the theoretical results from the model. And experimental results revealed that ratio of attenuation of the laser energy exhibited a non-linear change vs. pulse number, which were in accord with the actual condition.

  1. A Helical Undulator Wave-guide Inverse Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.; Bodzin, N.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Travish, G.; Joshi, C.; Tochitsky, S.

    2004-01-01

    With recent success in high gradient, high-energy gain IFEL experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory, future experiments are now being contemplated. The Neptune IFEL was designed to use a tightly focused, highly diffracting, near-TW peak power 10 micron laser. This choice of laser focusing, driven by power-handling limitations of the optics near the interaction region, led to design and use of a very complex undulator, and to sensitivity to both laser misalignment and focusing errors. As these effects limited the performance of the IFEL experiment, a next generation experiment at Neptune has been studied which avoids the use of a highly diffractive laser beam through use of a waveguide. We discuss here the choice of low-loss waveguide, guided mode characteristics and likely power limitations. We also examine a preferred undulator design, which is chosen to be helical in order to maximize the acceleration achieved for a given power. With the limitations of these laser and undulator choices in mind, we show the expected performance of the IFEL using 1D simulations. Three-dimensional effects are examined, in the context of use of a solenoid for focusing and acceleration enhancement

  2. Reflectance confocal microscopy-guided laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas: initial clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Heidy; Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-08-01

    Laser ablation offers a procedure for precise, fast, and minimally invasive removal of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). However, the lack of histopathological confirmation has been a limitation toward widespread use in the clinic. A reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging-guided approach offers cellular-level histopathology-like feedback directly on the patient, which may then guide and help improve the efficacy of the ablation procedure. Following an ex vivo benchtop study (reported in our earlier papers), we performed an initial study on 44 BCCs on 21 patients in vivo, using a pulsed erbium:ytterbium aluminum garnet laser and a contrast agent (aluminum chloride). In 10 lesions on six patients, the RCM imaging-guided detection of either presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was immediately confirmed with histopathology. Additionally, 34 BCCs on 15 patients were treated with RCM imaging-guided laser ablation, with immediate confirmation for clearance of tumor (no histopathology), followed by longer-term monitoring, currently in progress, with follow-up imaging (again, no histopathology) at 3, 6, and 18 months. Thus far, the imaging resolution appears to be sufficient and consistent for monitoring efficacy of ablation in the wound, both immediately postablation and subsequently during recovery. The efficacy results appear to be promising, with observed clearance in 19 cases of 22 cases with follow-ups ranging from 6 to 21 months. An additional 12 cases with 1 to 3 months of follow-ups has shown clearance of tumor but a longer follow-up time is required to establish conclusive results. Further instrumentation development will be necessary to cover larger areas with a more automatically controlled instrument for more uniform, faster, and deeper imaging of margins.

  3. Visual outcomes of topography-guided excimer laser surgery for treatment of patients with irregular astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreishi, Mohammad; Naderi Beni, Afsaneh; Naderi Beni, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and predictability of topography-guided treatments to enhance refractive status following other corneal surgical procedures. In a prospective case series study, 28 consecutive eyes of 26 patients with irregular astigmatism after radial keratotomy, corneal transplant, small hyperopic and myopic excimer laser optical zones, and corneal scars were operated. Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (n = 8) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) (n = 20) were performed using the ALLEGRETTO WAVE excimer laser and topography-guided customized ablation treatment software. Preoperative and postoperative uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), manifest and cycloplegic refraction, and corneal topography with asphericity were analyzed in 12 months follow-up. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) changed from 0.2 ± 0.2 or (20/100 ± 20/100) to 0.51 ± 0.31 or (20/40 ± 20/60) in the LASIK group (P = 0.01) and from 0.34 ± 0.16 or (20/60 ± 20/120) to 0.5 ± 0.23 or (20/40 ± 20/80) in the PRK group (P = 0.01). Refractive cylinder decreased from -3.2 ± 0.84 diopters (D) to -2.06 ± 0.42 D in the LASIK group (P = 0.07) and from -2.25 ± 0.39 D to -1.5 ± 0.23 D in the PRK group (P = 0.008). Best corrected visual acuity did not change significantly in either group. Topography-guided treatment is effective in correcting the irregular astigmatism after refractive surgery. Topography-guided PRK can significantly reduce irregular astigmatism and increase the UCVA and BCVA.

  4. Aberration-sensing and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis: management of decentered ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, Michael; Krueger, Ronald R; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the feasibility of aberration-sensing and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to manage grossly decentered ablation and to discuss the limitations of the technology. Three patients with previous decentrations of the ablation zone between 1.5 to 2.0 mm were scheduled for wavefront-guided LASIK. All patients reported monocular diplopia and halos. Wavefront aberrations were measured with a Tscherning-type aberrometer. Laser ablation was done with a WaveLight Allegretto in a one-step procedure with ablation profiles calculated only from the individual wavefront map. Decentrations were determined from corneal topography. Three months after surgery, patient WM and patient SU had gained uncorrected and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. The root mean square-wavefront error decreased up to 61% and 33%, respectively, for total and higher order aberrations (Zernike modes of 3rd order and higher). There was significant enlargement of the optical zone determined by corneal topography, and both patients no longer reported diplopia and halos at 3 months postoperatively. The optical aberration of the third patient (RE), after a 5.00-D overcorrection with a 2-mm decentration, was too high for aberration-sensing; retinal images obtained from the wavefront device were too smeared and not of sufficient contrast. In addition, this patient had a residual corneal thickness of 416 microm and thus wavefront-guided LASIK was not done. Wavefront-guided LASIK offers a new way of managing grossly decentered laser ablations. Unfortunately, there are still patients who have aberrations too large for wavefront sensing or with other clinical limitations such as a residual corneal thickness too thin for further treatment.

  5. MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy in recurrent extrahepatic abdominal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Eichler, K.; Boettger, M.; Woitaschek, D.; Vogl, T.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Roggan, A. [LMTB GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for treatment of recurrent extrahepatic abdominal tumors. In 11 patients (6 women and 5 men; mean age 53 years, age range 29-67 years) with 14 lesions the following tumors were treated in this study: paravertebral recurrence of hypernephroma (n=1); recurrence of uterus carcinoma (n=1); recurrence of chondrosarcoma of the pubic bone (n=1); presacral recurrence of rectal carcinoma (n=1); recurrent anal cancer (n=1); metastases in the abdominal wall (n=1); and lymph node metastases from colorectal cancer (n=8). A total of 27 laser applications were performed. A fast low-angle shot 2D sequence (TR/TE/flip angle=102 ms/8 ms/70 ) was used for nearly real-time monitoring during treatment. All patients had no other treatment option. Seventeen LITT sessions were performed using a conventional laser system with a mean laser power of 5.2 W (range 4.5-5.7 W), and 10 LITT session were performed using a power laser system with a mean laser power of 28.0 W. In 10 lesions total destruction could be achieved. In the remaining recurrent tumors, significant reduction of tumor volume by 60-80% was obtained. All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anesthesia. No complications occurred during treatment. Laser-induced thermotherapy is a practicable, minimally invasive, well-tolerated technique that can produce large areas of necrosis within recurrent tumors, substantially reducing active tumor volume if not resulting in outright destruction of tumor. (orig.)

  6. Results of topography-guided laser in situ keratomileusis custom ablation treatment with a refractive excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulting, R Doyle; Fant, Barbara S; Bond, William; Chotiner, Ben; Durrie, Daniel; Gordon, Michael; Milauskas, Albert; Moore, Charles; Slade, Stephen; Randleman, J. Bradley; Stonecipher, Karl

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of topography-guided custom ablation treatment (T-CAT) to correct myopia and myopic astigmatism with laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Nine clinical sites in the USA. Prospective observational nonrandomized unmasked study. The study comprised patients aged 18 to 65 years old with myopia or myopic astigmatism with a manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) up to -9.0 diopters (D) and astigmatism of 6.0 D or less. Patients with previous refractive surgery or abnormal topography were excluded. Corneal topographies were obtained using the Allegro Topolyzer, and laser treatment was delivered with the Allegretto Wave Eye-Q excimer laser system. Visual outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at 1 day, 1 week, and 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The clinical trial enrolled 212 patients (249 eyes). The T-CAT procedure significantly reduced the MRSE and cylinder, with stability of outcomes evident from 3 to 12 months after surgery. Compared with the preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), the postoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) improved by 1 line or more in 30% of eyes and the postoperative UDVA was at least as good as the preoperative CDVA in 90% of eyes. Most visual symptoms improved after T-CAT. There were no significant treatment-related adverse events or loss of vision. The T-CAT procedure performed with the diagnostic device and the refractive excimer laser system safely and effectively achieved predictable refractive outcomes and reduced visual symptoms with stable results through 12 months. Dr. Stulting is a paid consultant to Alcon Laboratories, Inc., and was a medical monitor for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clinical trial. Dr. Fant is president of Clinical Research Consultants, Inc. (CRC), the clinical and regulatory consulting group that sponsored the FDA clinical trial. Dr. Fant and CRC were supported by Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS

  7. Accuracy of computer-guided implant surgery by a CAD/CAM and laser scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue Zhu; Xu, Wei Hua; Tang, Zhi Hui; Wu, Min Jie; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Si

    2014-01-01

    To explore the method of manufacturing an implant surgery template with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique and evaluate its precision in clinical cases. Patients referred to the 2nd Dental Center of Peking University who were partially edentulous, were enrolled and scanned with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Diagnostic casts were laser scanned to record the configuration of the patients' dentition and mucosae. CBCT and laser scanning data were subsequently loaded into Simplant software. Implant positions were planned in the software with a computer-aided design technique, and surgical templates were fabricated with a rapid prototyping technique. These templates were used to guide implant placement surgery. The mean value of linear deviation was 1.00 mm (range 0 to 2.16 mm) for implant shoulder and 1.26 mm (range 0.51 to 2.86 mm) for the implant apex. The mean angular deviation was 4.74 degress (0.37 to 10.28 degrees). Deviations were higher in the posterior region than anterior. The tooth-supported template provided higher precision than did the tooth/ mucosa-supported template, but no statistically significant difference was found. Computer-guided implant surgery with the CAD/CAM technique provides dentists with a good platform for preoperative planning, precise implant insertion, and ideal rehabilitation. The protocol of this three-dimensional laser scanning technique can provide precision comparable to that of double-scanning.

  8. Guided Wave Sensing In a Carbon Steel Pipe Using a Laser Vibrometer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz Toledo, Abelardo; Salazar Soler, Jordi; Chávez Domínguez, Juan Antonio; García Hernández, Miguel Jesús; Turó Peroy, Antoni

    2010-05-01

    Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques have achieved a great development during the last decades as a valuable tool for material characterization, manufacturing control and structural integrity tests. Among these tools, the guided wave technology has been rapidly extended because it reduces inspection time and costs compared to the ordinary point by point testing in large structures, as well as because of the possibility of inspecting under insulation and coating conditions. This fast development has motivated the creation of several inspection and material characterization systems including different technologies which can be combined with this technique. Different measurements systems based on laser techniques have been presented in order to inspect pipes, plates and diverse structures. Many of them are experimental systems of high cost and complexity which combine the employment of a laser for generation of waves in the structure and an interferometer for detection. Some of them employ air-coupled ultrasound generation transducers, with high losses in air and which demand high energy for exciting waves in materials of high stiffness. The combined employment of a commercial vibrometer system for Lamb wave sensing in plates has been successfully shown in the literature. In this paper we present a measurement system based on the combined employment of a piezoelectric wedge transducer and a laser vibrometer to sense guided acoustic waves in carbon steel pipes. The measurement system here presented is mainly compounded of an angular wedge transducer, employed to generate the guided wave and a commercial laser vibrometer used in the detection process. The wedge transducer is excited by means of a signal function generator whose output signal has been amplified with a power signal amplifier. A high precision positioning system is employed to place the laser beam at different points through the pipe surface. The signal detected by the laser vibrometer system is

  9. Design of a sensorized guiding catheter for in situ laser fenestration of endovascular stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Roberta; Condino, Sara; Alberti, Aldo; Berchiolli, Raffaella Nice; Coppi, Gioachino; Gesi, Marco; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Ferrari, Mauro

    2017-12-01

    The in situ fenestration of a standard endograft is currently limited by difficulties in targeting the fenestration site under fluoroscopic control and by the lack of a safe method to perforate the graft. Evidence in the literature suggests the use of a 3 D electromagnetic navigator to accurately guide the endovascular instruments to the target and a laser to selectively perforate the graft. The aim of this work is to provide design guidelines to develop a sensorized catheter to guide the laser tool to the fenestration site and conduct preliminary testing of the feasibility of the proposed solution. Matherials and methods: Different catheter designs were delineated starting from engineering considerations, then prototypes were preliminarily tested to collect surgeon opinions and to steer the design process toward the preferred solution reported by the user. Finally, mechanical simulations were performed with CathCAD, a design software system for the development of composite tubing for endovascular catheters. Based on surgeon feedback, a 9-French steerable catheter with a stabilization system was designed. CathCAD simulations allowed us to define the construction parameters (e.g., materials and geometric constrains) for the fabrication of composite tubes with mechanical properties (flexural, axial, and torsional rigidities) compatible with target values in the literature for guiding catheters. The presented results preliminarily demonstrate the clinical reasonability and feasibility of the designed tool in terms of mechanical properties. Further mechanical tests and extensive in vitro clinical trials are required prior to animal testing.

  10. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

    2010-07-27

    In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  11. MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy with a cooled power laser system: a case report of a patient with a recurrent carcinoid metastasis in the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Mack, Martin G.; Straub, Ralf; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan; Engelmann, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Kathrin; Ballenberger, Sabine; Jacobi, Volkmar; Diebold, Thomas [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We report a case of a 52-year-old woman with a palpable recurrent metastasis of a neuroendocrine carcinoma to the upper outer quadrant of the right breast. For the treatment of this lesion, MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy was performed with a cooled power laser system (Nd:YAG-Laser). An open 0.2-T MR unit was used for the monitoring of the laser energy delivery to the breast; thus, a thermosensitive fast low-angle shot 2D sequence for MR thermometry was used, so the ablation of the tumor and the increase of laser-induced necrosis could be interactively visualized with the repetitive use of this sequence. The postinterventional MR control exams 1 day and 4 months after laser-induced thermotherapy at the 1.5-T MR unit (Magnetom Symphony Quantum, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) verified the complete ablation of the tumor without any signs of residual or relapsing tumor. (orig.)

  12. Markerless laser registration in image-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmulla, Rüdiger; Lüth, Tim; Mühling, Joachim; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The use of registration markers in computer-assisted surgery is combined with high logistic costs and efforts. Markerless patient registration using laser scan surface registration techniques is a new challenging method. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical accuracy in finding defined target points within the surgical site after markerless patient registration in image-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery. Twenty consecutive patients with different cranial diseases were scheduled for computer-assisted surgery. Data set alignment between the surgical site and the computed tomography (CT) data set was performed by markerless laser scan surface registration of the patient's face. Intraoral rigidly attached registration markers were used as target points, which had to be detected by an infrared pointer. The Surgical Segment Navigator SSN++ has been used for all procedures. SSN++ is an investigative product based on the SSN system that had previously been developed by the presenting authors with the support of Carl Zeiss (Oberkochen, Germany). SSN++ is connected to a Polaris infrared camera (Northern Digital, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada) and to a Minolta VI 900 3D digitizer (Tokyo, Japan) for high-resolution laser scanning. Minimal differences in shape between the laser scan surface and the surface generated from the CT data set could be detected. Nevertheless, high-resolution laser scan of the skin surface allows for a precise patient registration (mean deviation 1.1 mm, maximum deviation 1.8 mm). Radiation load, logistic costs, and efforts arising from the planning of computer-assisted surgery of the head can be reduced because native (markerless) CT data sets can be used for laser scan-based surface registration.

  13. Fabrication of multifaceted, micropatterned surfaces and image-guided patterning using laser scanning lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John H; West, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes the implementation of laser scanning lithography (LSL) for the fabrication of multifaceted, patterned surfaces and for image-guided patterning. This photothermal-based patterning technique allows for selective removal of desired regions of an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer on a metal film through raster scanning a focused 532 nm laser using a commercially available laser scanning confocal microscope. Unlike traditional photolithography methods, this technique does not require the use of a physical master and instead utilizes digital "virtual masks" that can be modified "on the fly" allowing for quick pattern modifications. The process to create multifaceted, micropatterned surfaces, surfaces that display pattern arrays of multiple biomolecules with each molecule confined to its own array, is described in detail. The generation of pattern configurations from user-chosen images, image-guided LSL is also described. This protocol outlines LSL in four basic sections. The first section details substrate preparation and includes cleaning of glass coverslips, metal deposition, and alkanethiol functionalization. The second section describes two ways to define pattern configurations, the first through manual input of pattern coordinates and dimensions using Zeiss AIM software and the second via image-guided pattern generation using a custom-written MATLAB script. The third section describes the details of the patterning procedure and postpatterning functionalization with an alkanethiol, protein, and both, and the fourth section covers cell seeding and culture. We end with a general discussion concerning the pitfalls of LSL and present potential improvements that can be made to the technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of roll-stamped light guide plate fabricated with laser-ablated stamper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyunjun; Hong, Seokkwan; Kim, Jongsun; Hwang, Jeongho; Joo, Byungyun; Yoon, Kyunghwan; Kang, Jeongjin

    2017-12-01

    LGP (light guide plate) is one of the major components of LCD (liquid crystal display), and it makes surface illumination for LCD backlit. LGP is a transparent plastic plate usually produced by injection molding process. On the back of LGP there are micron size patterns for extraction of light. Recently a roll-stamping process has achieved the high mass productivity of thinner LGPs. In order to fabricate optical patterns on LGPs, a fabricating tool called as a stamper is used. Micro patterns on metallic stampers are made by several micro machining processes such as chemical etching, LIGA-reflow, and laser ablation. In this study, a roll-stamping process by using a laser ablated metallic stamper was dealt with in consideration of the compatibility with the roll-stamping process. LGP fabricating tests were performed using a roll-stamping process with four different roll pressures. Pattern shapes on the stamper fabricated by laser ablation and transcription ratios of the roll-stamping process were analyzed, and LGP luminance was evaluated. Based on the evaluation, optical simulation model for LGP was made and simulation accuracy was evaluated. Simulation results showed good agreements with optical performance of LGPs in the brightness and uniformity. It was also shown that the roll-stamped LGP has the possibility of better optical performance than the conventional injection molded LGP. It was also shown that the roll-stamped LGP with the laser ablated stamper is potential to have better optical performance than the conventional injection molded LGP.

  15. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Saim, E-mail: ysaim@akdeniz.edu.tr; Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur [Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  16. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Saim; Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-01-01

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1–10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  17. Ultrasound-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation of an autonomous thyroid nodule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Radioiodine ((131)I) and surgery are the standard therapeutic options for the solitary autonomous thyroid nodule (AFTN). Percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) has proven to be an effective technique and possible alternative to the conventional treatment options. However, PEI is not devoid of side...... effects and often necessitates multiple treatment sessions. We present a case of a 17-year-old female successfully treated with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) for an AFTN. Initially, she had a serum thyrotropin (TSH) of 0.01 mU/L and normal peripheral thyroid...

  18. Corneal perforation by an astigmatic keratotomy performed with an optical coherence tomography-guided femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherfan, Daniel G; Melki, Samir A

    2014-07-01

    We present a case of corneal perforation secondary to an intrastromal astigmatic keratotomy performed with an optical coherence tomography-guided femtosecond laser. The keratotomy was concomitant with cataract surgery and resulted in a flat anterior chamber prior to the start of lens extraction. Interrupted nylon sutures were placed to seal the keratotomy prior to phacoemulsification. Escape of cavitation bubbles into the anterior chamber or the liquid interface can alert the surgeon to the possibility of unintended perforation of the endothelium or the epithelium, respectively. Neither author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alcon CustomCornea wavefront-guided retreatments after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalita, Maria Regina; Xu, Meng; Krueger, Ronald R

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of wavefront-guided ablations for the correction of residual myopia and astigmatism after standard laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Twenty nine eyes of 26 patients who underwent wavefront-guided LASIK retreatment with Alcon CustomCornea (Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Tex) were evaluated. Complete ophthalmologic examination, corneal topography, and wavefront measurements were performed. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), manifest refraction, and wavefront analysis were evaluated preoperatively, 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Wavefront measurements were assessed using the LADARWave device. Statistical analysis was performed using the McNemar test and percentages of success. One week postoperatively, UCVA was > or =20/40 in 100% of eyes (> or =20/20 in 31%) and BSCVA was > or =20/40 in 100% (> or =20/20 in 73%). Wavefront analysis showed a decrease in total aberrations, high order aberrations, defocus, coma, spherical aberration, and other terms of higher order aberrations at 1-week follow-up. Three months postoperatively, UCVA was > or =20/40 in 100% of eyes (> or =20/20 in 38%) and BSCVA was > or =20/40 in 100% (> or =20/20 in 81%). Six months postoperatively, UCVA was > or =20/40 in 100% of eyes (> or =20/20 in 60%) and BSCVA was > or =20/40 in 100% (> or =20/20 in 90%). Wavefront analysis showed decrease in total aberration, high order aberration, defocus, coma, and spherical aberration. Wavefront-guided LASIK retreatment in post-LASIK eyes represents a good option for laser vision correction. All eyes showed reduction in pre-existing total aberrations. Some high order aberration components decreased in this initial series. Further follow-up is necessary to assess the initial predictability of wavefront-guided LASIK upgrade.

  20. Stars Above, Earth Below A Guide to Astronomy in the National Parks

    CERN Document Server

    Nordgren, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    In Stars Above, Earth Below, Tyler Nordgren examines a range of astronomical topics and makes the connection between them and the landscapes, processes, and cultures which can be seen and experienced within specific U.S. National Parks. For each park and topic the story unfolds in three steps: what does the reader see for him - or herself? What is the scientific cause or explanation of what is seen? And finally, what is the big picture about ourselves, our world, and our Universe? The author takes us the length and breadth of the U.S., from the coast of Maine to the Yellowstone volcano, from the depths of the Grand Canyon to the heights of the Rocky Mountains, exploring the natural links between the features of the parks and those of our Universe.

  1. Wavefront-guided enhancements using the wavelight excimer laser in symptomatic eyes previously treated with LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, A John; Pe, Lawrence H

    2006-04-01

    To describe our clinical experience in wavefront-guided LASIK enhancements using the WaveLight ALLEGRETTO system (WaveLight Technologie AG, Erlangen, Germany) for symptomatic eyes previously treated with standard LASIK. Twenty-six eyes of 20 patients with residual myopia, hyperopia, or mixed astigmatism and/or night vision symptoms after primary standard LASIK were considered for wavefront-guided customized retreatment using the WaveLight ALLEGRETTO WAVE 200 Hz excimer laser system (model 106). Preoperative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), uncorrected visual acuity, topography with the ALLEGRETTO Topolyzer, wavefront analysis using the ALLEGRETTO WAVE Tscherning Analyzer, and contrast sensitivity were compared to postoperative (enhancement) measurements. Twenty-two of the original 26 eyes underwent wavefront-guided enhancement, 4 were excluded because they did not meet wavefront-guided treatment inclusion guidelines of this study. Mean follow-up was 8 months (range: 6 to 13 months, standard deviation [SD] 2). All patients were within +/- 0.50 diopters (manifest refraction) of intended postoperative refraction. The mean preoperative BSCVA improved from 20/25 (SD +/- 0.12) to 20/18 (SD +/- 0.1) postoperatively. All patients gained at least one line of BSCVA, and a maximum of three lines. There was no loss of BSCVA in any patient. The total amount of high order aberrations (RMSH) decreased from an average of 1.04 (SD +/- 0.22) to 0.46 (SD +/- 0.14) microm. Patients also had a mean improvement in low contrast sensitivity of 59%. Based on this small series, customized wavefront-guided enhancements using the WaveLight ALLEGRETTO system in patients who underwent previous LASIK appear to be safe and effective in correcting residual refractive error, reducing high order aberrations, and improving visual symptoms when reliable and reproducible measurements are achieved.

  2. Investigation of the free electron laser with a guide magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The free electron laser with a static guide magnetic field has been investigated theoretically and by computer simulation using a fully relativistic electromagnetic particle code which has one spatial and three velocity dimensions. By passing a relativistic electron beam through a helical magnetic field, high frequency electromagnetic radiation is generated by its coupling to the negative energy electrostatic beam modes through the helical magnetic field. In the regime of strong guide field where Ω/sub c/e/γ>>k 0 v/sub 0z/, the dispersion relation is obtained by using a fluid model for the electron beam and the growth rates are solved for numerically. Reasonable agreement between the theory and the simulations has been obtained. It was found that the growth rate increases linearly with magnetic ripple strength but decreases with the strength of the guide field. In addition, the growth rates also increase slightly with the beam energy. For a reasonably strong guide field (e.g., Ω/sub c/e=6.0ω/sub p/e), the growth rate can be on the order of 0.1ω/sub p/e and the efficiency of radiation production has been found to be as high as 16%. However, the efficiency decreases with the strength of the guide field. A theory for the saturation level is developed which relates the efficiency to the continued growth of the electromagnetic wave after the onset of trapping by the electrostatic field. It is found that the growth continues for about one bounce time and the observed saturation levels are reasonably well explained

  3. Self-compression of spatially limited laser pulses in a system of coupled light-guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, A. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    The self-action features of wave packets propagating in a 2D system of equidistantly arranged fibers are studied analytically and numerically on the basis of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Self-consistent equations for the characteristic scales of a Gaussian wave packet are derived on the basis of the variational approach, which are proved numerically for powers P self-focusing. At higher powers, the wave beams become filamented, and their amplitude is limited due to the nonlinear breaking of the interaction between neighboring light-guides. This makes it impossible to collect a powerful wave beam in a single light-guide. Variational analysis shows the possibility of the adiabatic self-compression of soliton-like laser pulses in the process of 3D self-focusing on the central light-guide. However, further increase of the field amplitude during self-compression leads to the development of longitudinal modulation instability and the formation of a set of light bullets in the central fiber. In the regime of hollow wave beams, filamentation instability becomes predominant. As a result, it becomes possible to form a set of light bullets in optical fibers located on the ring.

  4. A heterogeneous tissue model for treatment planning for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Drew; Fahrenholtz, Samuel; MacLellan, Christopher; Bastos, Dhiego; Rao, Ganesh; Prabhu, Sujit; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Hazle, John; Stafford, Jason; Fuentes, David

    2018-02-05

    We evaluated a physics-based model for planning for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy for focal brain lesions. Linear superposition of analytical point source solutions to the steady-state Pennes bioheat transfer equation simulates laser-induced heating in brain tissue. The line integral of the photon attenuation from the laser source enables computation of the laser interaction with heterogeneous tissue. Magnetic resonance thermometry data sets (n = 31) were used to calibrate and retrospectively validate the model's thermal ablation prediction accuracy, which was quantified by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between model-predicted and measured ablation regions (T > 57 °C). A Gaussian mixture model was used to identify independent tissue labels on pre-treatment anatomical magnetic resonance images. The tissue-dependent optical attenuation coefficients within these labels were calibrated using an interior point method that maximises DSC agreement with thermometry. The distribution of calibrated tissue properties formed a population model for our patient cohort. Model prediction accuracy was cross-validated using the population mean of the calibrated tissue properties. A homogeneous tissue model was used as a reference control. The median DSC values in cross-validation were 0.829 for the homogeneous model and 0.840 for the heterogeneous model. In cross-validation, the heterogeneous model produced a DSC higher than that produced by the homogeneous model in 23 of the 31 brain lesion ablations. Results of a paired, two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicated that the performance improvement of the heterogeneous model over that of the homogeneous model was statistically significant (p < 0.01).

  5. THE PROPERTIES OF GUIDED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MODES ON THE GaAs-BASED FIBER GLASS AND LASERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa TEMİZ

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available On the lasers or fiber optic communication electromagnetic waves are transmitted by confining and guiding between special layer's or fiber glass respectively. It is desired that electric and magnetic waves are in the active region of the lasers and in the core of the fiber glass. It is obtained by making more larger the of refractive index of the regions. On this work, the behavior and varying of the electric and magnetic waves and the effects on the electromagnetic waves in the fiber glass and lasers are investigated.

  6. The NexStar evolution and SkyPortal user's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, James L

    2016-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive guide for using a Nexstar Evolution mount with WiFi SkyPortal control, walking the reader through the process for aligning and operating the system from a tablet or smartphone. The next generation Go-To mount from Celestron, this is compatible not only with the Nextstar Evolution but also with older mounts. It is the ideal resource for anyone who owns, or is thinking of owning, a Nexstar Evolution telescope, or adapting their existing Celestron mount. Pros and cons of the system are thoroughly covered with a critical depth that addresses any possible question by users. Beginning with a brief history of Go-To telescopes and the genesis of this still new technology, the author covers every aspect of the newly expanding capability in observing. This includes the associated Sky Portal smartphone and tablet application, the transition from the original Nexstar GoTo system to the new SkyPortal system, the use of the Sky Portal application with its Sky Safari 4 basic software and ...

  7. Topography-guided treatment of irregular astigmatism with the wavelight excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, Mirko R; Panagopoulou, Sophia I; Tsiklis, Nikolaos S; Hajitanasis, Georgos C; Aslanides, loannis M; Pallikaris, loannis G

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and predictability of correcting high irregular astigmatism in symptomatic eyes with the use of topography-guided photoablation. In a prospective, non-comparative case series, 16 consecutive symptomatic eyes of 11 patients with small hyperopic and myopic excimer laser optical zones, decentered and irregular ablation after corneal graft, and corneal scars were operated. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), manifest and cycloplegic refraction, and corneal topography, with asphericity and regularity, were analyzed. LASIK (n = 10) and photorefractive keratectomy (n = 6) were performed using the ALLEGRETTO WAVE excimer laser and T-CAT software (Topography-guided Customized Ablation Treatment; WaveLight Laser Technologie AG, Erlangen, Germany). In the LASIK group, UCVA improved from 0.81 +/- 0.68 IogMAR (20/130) (range: 0.2 to 2.0) to 0.29 +/- 0.21 logMAR (20/39) (range: 0.1 to 0.7) at 6 months. In the PRK group, mean UCVA improved from 0.89 +/- 0.87 IogMAR (20/157) (range: 0.1 to 2.0) to 0.42 +/- 0.35 logMAR (20/53) (range: 0.1 to 1.0) at 6 months. Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity did not change significantly in either group. One PRK patient lost one line of BSCVA. Refractive cylinder for the LASIK group improved from -2.53 +/- 1.71 diopters (D) (range: -0.75 to -5.75 D) to -1.28 +/- 0.99 D (range: 0 to -2.50 D) at 6 months. Refractive cylinder in the PRK group improved from -2.21 +/- 2.11 D (range: -0.25 to -5.50 D) to -1.10 +/- 0.42 D (range: -0.50 to -1.50 D). Index of surface irregularity showed a decrease from 60 +/- 12 (range: 46 to 89) to 50 +/- 9 (range: 32 to 63) at 6 months in the LASIK group whereas no significant change was noted in the PRK group. Subjective symptoms, such as glare, halos, ghost images, starbursts, and monocular diplopia, were not present postoperatively. Topography-guided LASIK and PRK resulted in a significant reduction of refractive cylinder and

  8. Guiding of Long-Distance Electric Discharges by Combined Femtosecond and Nanosecond Pulses Emitted by Hybrid KrF Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-30

    laser pulse initiated HV discharge with a time delay of tens nanoseconds – evidently it is developing due to an avalanche -like growth of electron...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0040 Guiding of long-distance electric discharges by combined femtosecond and nanosecond pulses emitted by...and guiding electric discharge , KrF laser, femtosecond pulse , nanosecond pulse , filamentation, plasma channel, lightning control, laser control of

  9. Guiding and focusing of fast electron beams produced by ultra-intense laser pulse using a double cone funnel target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wen-shuai; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2015-01-01

    A novel double cone funnel target design aiming at efficiently guiding and focusing fast electron beams produced in high intensity (>10 19  W/cm 2 ) laser-solid interactions is investigated via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The forward-going fast electron beams are shown to be directed and focused to a smaller size in comparison with the incident laser spot size. This plasma funnel attached on the cone target guides and focuses electrons in a manner akin to the control of liquid by a plastic funnel. Such device has the potential to add substantial design flexibility and prevent inefficiencies for important applications such as fast ignition. Two reasons account for the collimation of fast electron beams. First, the sheath electric fields and quasistatic magnetic fields inside the vacuum gap of the double cone provide confinement of the fast electrons in the laser-plasma interaction region. Second, the interface magnetic fields inside the beam collimator further guide and focus the fast electrons during the transport. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition is considered, and it is shown that it can enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma by a factor of 2 in comparison with the single cone target case

  10. Laser Guidance in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma Reduces Fluoroscopy Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, M.W.; Busser, W.M.H.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Lange, F. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether laser guidance can reduce fluoroscopy and procedure time of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablations of osteoid osteoma compared to freehand CBCT guidance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 32 RF ablations were retrospectively analyzed, 17

  11. Topographically guided laser in situ keratomileusis for myopia using a customized aspherical treatment zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Paul J; Waring, George; Chayet, Arturo; Fischer, Jeffery; Fant, Barbara; Bains, Harkaran S

    2008-11-01

    To assess the efficacy, predictability, safety, and quality-of-life effects of topography-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the correction of myopia with astigmatism using the EC-5000 CXII excimer laser equipped with a customized aspheric treatment zone algorithm. Ophthalmology clinics in the United States and Mexico. In a multicenter United States Food and Drug Administration study of topography-guided LASIK, 4 centers enrolled 135 eyes with a spherical manifest refraction error ranging from -0.50 to -7.00 diopters (D) and astigmatism ranging from 0.50 to 4.00 D. All eyes were targeted for emmetropia. Refractive outcomes, higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and contrast sensitivity were analyzed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patient satisfaction was assessed using 2 questionnaires. Six months postoperatively, the mean manifest refraction spherical equivalent in all eyes was -0.09 D +/- 0.31 (SD); of the 131 eyes, 116 (88.55%) had an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better and 122 (93.13%) had an MRSE within +/-0.50 D. The best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) increased by 2 or more lines in 21 (16.03%) of 131 eyes; no eye lost 2 lines or more of BSCVA. The total ocular HOA increased by 0.04 microm. Patients reported significantly fewer night driving and glare/halo symptoms postoperatively than preoperatively. Use of a customized aspherical treatment zone in eyes with myopia and astigmatism was safe, effective, and predictable and reduced symptoms associated with night driving, glare, and halos.

  12. Wear resistance of machine tools' bionic linear rolling guides by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqiang; Liu, Botao; Guo, Zhengcai

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve the rolling wear resistance (RWR) of linear rolling guides (LRG) as well as prolong the life of machine tools, various shape samples with different units spaces ranged from 1 to 5 mm are designed through the observation of animals in the desert and manufactured by laser cladding. Wear resistance tests reproducing closely the real operational condition are conducted by using a homemade linear reciprocating wear test machine, and wear resistance is evaluated by means of weight loss measurement. Results indicate that the samples with bionic units have better RWR than the untreated one, of which the reticulate treated sample with unit space 3 mm present the best RWR. More specifically, among the punctuate treated samples, the mass loss increases with the increase of unit space; among the striate treated samples, the mass loss changes slightly with the increase of unit space, attaining a minimum at the unit space of 4 mm; among the reticulate treated samples, with the increase of unit space, the mass loss initially decreases, but turns to increase after reaching a minimum at the unit space of 3 mm. Additionally, the samples with striate shape perform better wear resistance than the other shape groups on the whole. From the ratio value of laser treated area to contacted area perspective, that the samples with ratio value between 0.15 and 0.3 possess better wear resistance is concluded.

  13. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H.; Tsuji, Grant H.; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental handpiece.

  14. Automatic Measurement in Large-Scale Space with the Laser Theodolite and Vision Guiding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multitheodolite intersection measurement is a traditional approach to the coordinate measurement in large-scale space. However, the procedure of manual labeling and aiming results in the low automation level and the low measuring efficiency, and the measurement accuracy is affected easily by the manual aiming error. Based on the traditional theodolite measuring methods, this paper introduces the mechanism of vision measurement principle and presents a novel automatic measurement method for large-scale space and large workpieces (equipment combined with the laser theodolite measuring and vision guiding technologies. The measuring mark is established on the surface of the measured workpiece by the collimating laser which is coaxial with the sight-axis of theodolite, so the cooperation targets or manual marks are no longer needed. With the theoretical model data and the multiresolution visual imaging and tracking technology, it can realize the automatic, quick, and accurate measurement of large workpieces in large-scale space. Meanwhile, the impact of artificial error is reduced and the measuring efficiency is improved. Therefore, this method has significant ramification for the measurement of large workpieces, such as the geometry appearance characteristics measuring of ships, large aircraft, and spacecraft, and deformation monitoring for large building, dams.

  15. Utility of intracardiac ultrasound imaging to guide pulmonary vein ablation using laser balloon catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Luiz; Su, Wilber; Johnson, Susan B; Milton, Mark; Henz, Benhur; Sarabanda, Alvaro; Santos, Simone N; Packer, Douglas L

    2009-12-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with balloon catheter has been used as the endpoint for AF ablation. To determine the usefulness of intracardiac ultrasound (ICUS) to guide PVI using laser balloon catheter. 59 PVs were ablated in 27 dogs. Doppler imaging was used to identify blood flow leaks between PV and balloon. After each energy delivery, the circular mapping catheter was repositioned to check if isolation had been achieved. The leak position was then correlated with the gap position at the pathological study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken. 59 PV were ablated. Mean burn time was 279+/-177 sec, mean balloon diameter was 23+/-3 mm, and mean balloon length was 25+/-4 mm. Complete isolation was achieved in 38/59 (64%) cases, and it was significantly more common when there was no leak: [30/38 (79%) versus 8/23 (35%), p<0.001]. This occurred regardless of time of laser application (302+/-223 sec. vs. 266+/-148 sec., p=ns), laser power (3.5 W/cm, 4.5 W/cm, and 5.5 W/cm), balloon diameter (24+/- 3 mm vs. 22+/- 3 mm, p=ns) and length (27+/-4 mm vs. 24+/-4mm, p=ns). The positive predictive value for predicting incomplete isolation was 65% and the negative predictive value was 83%. An identifiable leak between PV and the LBA device seen at the ICUS is predictive of lower PV isolation rates. ICUS may be useful for leak detection to avoid ineffective energy application during circumferential PV ablation. This could also be helpful when other types of energy are used.

  16. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  17. The NexStar user’s guide II for the LCM, SLT, SE, CPC, SkyProdigy, and Astro Fi

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    As with the first edition, this book is a thorough reference for the telescope models covered. The original NexStar User's Guide has remained very popular among the NexStar owner community. This updated edition has been completely rewritten to cover all current Celestron altitude-azimuth computerized telescopes (German EQ mounts are not discussed). Detailed information on the alignment and operation of these ‘scopes provides a complete reference that expands greatly upon the manuals provided by Celestron. It also serves as a guide to buying the most suitable model for a variety of budgets and interests. Connecting and controlling the telescope with PCs, Macs, tablets, and smartphones is covered in great detail. A chapter is dedicated to updating the firmware in the hand control, mount, and StarSense camera (an optional accessory). Chapters on accessories, collimation, maintenance, and troubleshooting tips round out the book’s extensive coverage of the subject matter. Additionally, the book offers a brief,...

  18. Formation of tungsten oxide nanostructures by laser pyrolysis: stars, fibres and spheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available , dissociated bonds which led to the formation of tetragonal phase WO and 0.33, depending on the laser parameters. It was also observed that the morphology of the samples became more random and of a disordered arrangement as the wavelength increased, and we... photochemical reaction is activated [10]. The photochemical reaction enables an otherwise inaccessible reaction pathway toward a specific product, either by dissociation, ionization or isomerisation of the precursor compound. It was shown [8, 11] that low...

  19. Laser Cutting of CFRP with a Fibre Guided High Power Nanosecond Laser Source - Influence of the Optical Fibre Diameter on Quality and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, S.; Bastick, S.; Staehr, R.; Jaeschke, P.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    For the development of a robot based laser cutting process of automotive 3D parts consisting of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), investigations with a newly developed fibre guided nanosecond pulsed laser with an average power of PL = 1.5 kW were conducted. In order to investigate the best combination of quality and process time 2 different optical fibres were used, with diameters of df = 400 μm and df = 600 μm. The main differences between the two setups are the resulting focal diameter and the maximum available pulse energy up to EP = 80 mJ. In a first instance, a comparable investigation was performed with both fibres for a constant pulse overlap. For each fibre the minimum required line energy was investigated and cuts were performed, distributed over the complete parameter range of the laser source. The influences of the fibre diameter on the quality and efficiency of the cutting process are summarized and discussed.

  20. CT-guided percutaneous laser disc decompression with Ceralas D, a diode laser with 980-nm wavelength and 200-{mu}m fiber optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevargez, A. [Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University Witten/Herdecke, Bochum (Germany); Groenemeyer, D.W.H. [Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University Witten/Herdecke, Bochum (Germany); Entwicklungs- und Forschungszentrum fuer Mikrotherapie, Bochum (Germany); Czerwinski, F. [Entwicklungs- und Forschungszentrum fuer Mikrotherapie, Bochum (Germany)

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compact, portable Ceralas-D diode laser (CeramOptec; 980+30 nm wavelength, 200-{mu}m optical fiber) concerning clinical usefulness, handling, and clinical results in the CT-guided treatment of herniated lumbar discs. The positioning of the canula in intradiscal space, the placement of the laser fiber into the disc through the lying canula, and the vaporization itself were carried out under CT-guidance. Due to the thin fiber optic, it was possible to use a thin 23-gauge canula. The laser procedure was performed in 0.1- to 1-s shots with 1-s pulse pause and 4-W power output. A total of 1650-2300 J was applied on each percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Results in 26 patients were established with a visual-analogue scale (VAS). On the follow-up examinations, 46% of the patients were absolutely pain free (>85% VAS) and fully active in everyday life after 4 postoperative weeks. Thirty-one percent of patients were relieved of the leg pain but had occasional back pain without sensorimotor impairment. Fifteen percent sensed a slight alleviation (>50% VAS) of the radiate pain. Eight percent did not experience radicular or pseudo-radicular pain alleviation (<25% VAS). Cerales-D proves to be an efficient tool for CT-guided PLDD on non-sequestered herniated lumbar discs. (orig.)

  1. Management of post laser in situ keratomileusis ectasia with simultaneous topography guided photorefractive keratectomy and collagen cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Portaliou, Dimitra M; Diakonis, Vasilios F; Karavitaki, Alexandra E; Panagopoulou, Sophia I; Jankov Ii, Mirko R; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2011-02-11

    A thirty-nine year old man was referred to our institute due to progressive decreased visual acuity five years after bilateral Laser in situ Keratomileusis (LASIK). Topography revealed signs of post - LASIK ectasia. Patients' left eye was treated with simultaneous Topography Guided Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) followed by Corneal Collagen Cross Linking (CXL). Twelve months after the combined procedure both uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) showed significant improvement while topographic findings revealed an improvement of the astigmatic pattern. All higher order aberrations showed a significant decrease twelve months postoperatively. Combined topography guided PRK and corneal cross linking could represent an alternative treatment for post - LASIK ectasia.

  2. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy in neuro-oncology: a review of its current clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Barnett, Gene H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive treatment modality with recent increasing use to ablate brain tumors. When originally introduced in the late 1980s, the inability to precisely monitor and control the thermal ablation limited the adoption of LITT in neuro-oncology. Popularized as a means of destroying malignant hepatic and renal metastatic lesions percutaneously, its selective thermal tumor destruction and preservation of adjacent normal tissues have since been optimized for use in neuro-oncology. The progress made in real-time thermal imaging with MRI, laser probe design, and computer algorithms predictive of tissue kill has led to the resurgence of interest in LITT as a means to ablate brain tumors. Current LITT systems offer a surgical option for some inoperable brain tumors. We discuss the origins, principles, current indications, and future directions of MRI-guided LITT in neuro-oncology. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Optos-guided pattern scan laser (Pascal)-targeted retinal photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqit, Mahiul M K; Marcellino, George R; Henson, David B; Young, Lorna B; Patton, Niall; Charles, Stephen J; Turner, George S; Stanga, Paulo E

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the clinical effects and safety of targeted pattern scan laser (Pascal) retinal photocoagulation (TRP) in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Prospective and non-randomized study of 28 eyes with treatment-naive proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Single-session 20-ms-Pascal TRP strategy applied 1500 burns to zones of retinal capillary non-perfusion and intermediate retinal ischaemia guided by wide-field fluorescein angiography (Optos). Main outcome measures at 12 and 24 weeks included; PDR grade (assessed by two masked retina specialists); central retinal thickness (CRT); mean deviation (MD) using 24-2 Swedish interactive threshold algorithm (SITA)-standard visual fields (VF); and ETDRS visual acuity (VA). Following primary TRP, there was PDR regression in 76% of patients at 12 weeks (κ = 0.70; p Pascal 20-ms TRP using 1500 burns for treatment-naive PDR is a promising procedure with favourable safety profile. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  4. Serial removal of caries lesions from tooth occlusal surfaces using near-IR image-guided IR laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Tom, Henry; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have established that caries lesions can be imaged with high contrast without the interference of stains at near-IR wavelengths greater than 1300-nm. It has been demonstrated that computer controlled laser scanning systems utilizing IR lasers operating at high pulse repetition rates can be used for serial imaging and selective removal of caries lesions. In this study, we report our progress towards the development of algorithms for generating rasterized ablation maps from near-IR reflectance images for the removal of natural lesions from tooth occlusal surfaces. An InGaAs camera and a filtered tungsten-halogen lamp producing near-IR light in the range of 1500-1700-nm were used to collect crosspolarization reflectance images of tooth occlusal surfaces. A CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 9.3- μm with a pulse duration of 10-15-μs was used for image-guided ablation.

  5. InGaAs/GaAs frequency tunable twin-guide quantum-well laser designed for steerable surface emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Matthias; Koeck, Anton; Gmachl, Claire F.; Gornik, Erich; Riechert, Henning; Bernklau, D.

    1993-11-01

    Based on a frequency tunable twin-guide (TTG) InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) laser structure, we developed a novel design concept for a surface emitting laser device enabling spatial beam steering. Utilizing a change in the refractive index of the parallel monolithically integrated modulator diode due to carrier injection, we observe a continuous emission frequency (wavelength) shift up to (Delta) f equals 85 GHz ((Delta) (lambda) equals -0.35 nm). For this preliminary structure the experimental results are consistent with our model calculations. Based on the theoretical model, for an optimized device a tuning range of (Delta) f equals 1600 GHz ((Delta) (lambda) >= 5 nm) is expected. For the novel surface emitting device design, we make use of an additional structure on top of the TTG laser including a second waveguide and a grating. This will enable a wavelength dependent surface emission angle, i.e., continuous beam steering, by coupling the laser and the surface mode. A calculational model was developed to estimate the steering characteristics in dependence on the dielectric device structure including mode guiding and the surface grating shape.

  6. Topographically-guided laser in situ keratomileusis to treat corneal irregularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorz, M C; Jendritza, B

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the predictability and safety of topographically guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to treat corneal irregularities. Prospective, noncomparative interventional case series. Twenty-seven patients (29 eyes) with postsurgical corneal irregularities, divided into four subgroups (postkeratoplasty, 6 eyes; posttrauma, 6 eyes; postphotorefractive keratectomy (PRK)/LASIK with decentered or small ablations, 11 eyes; post-PRK/LASIK with central islands, 6 eyes). LASIK was performed using the Automatic Corneal Shaper and the Keracor 117 C spot-scanning excimer laser (Bausch & Lomb Surgical Technolas, Munich, Germany). Individual ablation patterns were calculated on the basis of axial radii of curvature data obtained with the Corneal Analysis System (EyeSys Premier, Irvine, CA). Change of corneal topography pattern, patient satisfaction, manifest spectacle refraction, and visual acuity at 12 months after surgery. Corneal topography showed improved corneal regularity in 66% of eyes in the postkeratoplasty group, whereas 34% remained irregular. In the posttrauma group, 83% improved and 17% remained irregular. In the decentered/small optical zone group, 91 % improved and 9% remained irregular. In the central islands group, 50% improved and 50% remained irregular. Refractive cylinder decreased from 5.83 +/- 1.25 diopters (D) to 2.96 +/- 1.23 D in the postkeratoplasty group (P = 0.01), from 2.21 +/- 1.35 D to 0.50 +/- 0.84 D in the posttrauma group (P = 0.001), from 0.73 +/- 0.71 D to 0.36 +/- 1.05 D in the decentered/small optical zone group (NS), and from 1.42 +/- 1.13 D to 0.50 +/- 0.84 D in the central island group (P = 0.01). Uncorrected visual acuity improved from 20/200 +/- 0.07 to 20/50 +/- 0.17 in the postkeratoplasty group (P = 0.01), from 20/83 +/- 0.12 to 20/50 +/- 0.28 in the posttrauma group (P = 0.01), from 20/60 +/- 0.16 to 20/50 +/- 0.29 in the decentered/small optical zone group (NS), and from 20/71 +/- 0.12 to 20/60 +/- 0.24 in the central

  7. Laser range scanning for image-guided neurosurgery: investigation of image-to-physical space registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aize; Thompson, R C; Dumpuri, P; Dawant, B M; Galloway, R L; Ding, S; Miga, M I

    2008-04-01

    In this article a comprehensive set of registration methods is utilized to provide image-to-physical space registration for image-guided neurosurgery in a clinical study. Central to all methods is the use of textured point clouds as provided by laser range scanning technology. The objective is to perform a systematic comparison of registration methods that include both extracranial (skin marker point-based registration (PBR), and face-based surface registration) and intracranial methods (feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, a combined geometry/intensity surface registration method, and a constrained form of that method to improve robustness). The platform facilitates the selection of discrete soft-tissue landmarks that appear on the patient's intraoperative cortical surface and the preoperative gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) image volume, i.e., true corresponding novel targets. In an 11 patient study, data were taken to allow statistical comparison among registration methods within the context of registration error. The results indicate that intraoperative face-based surface registration is statistically equivalent to traditional skin marker registration. The four intracranial registration methods were investigated and the results demonstrated a target registration error of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm, 3.9 +/- 3.4 mm, and 2.0 +/- 0.9 mm, for feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, unconstrained geometric/intensity registration, and constrained geometric/intensity registration, respectively. When analyzing the results on a per case basis, the constrained geometric/intensity registration performed best, followed by feature PBR, and finally cortical vessel-contour registration. Interestingly, the best target registration errors are similar to targeting errors reported using bone-implanted markers within the context of rigid targets. The experience in this study as with others is that brain shift can compromise extracranial

  8. Outcomes of topography-guided versus wavefront-optimized laser in situ keratomileusis for myopia in virgin eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Arun Kumar; Malhotra, Chintan; Pasari, Anand; Kumar, Pawan; Moshirfar, Majid

    2016-09-01

    To compare the outcomes of topography-guided and wavefront-optimized treatment in patients having laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. Prospective contralateral-eye case study. Patients had topography-guided LASIK in 1 eye and wavefront-optimized LASIK in the contralateral eye using the Customized Refractive Surgery Master software and Mel 80 excimer laser. Refractive (residual manifest refraction spherical equivalent [MRSE], higher-order aberrations [HOAs]), and visual (uncorrected distance visual acuity [UDVA] and photopic and mesopic contrast sensitivity) outcomes were prospectively analyzed 6 months postoperatively. The study comprised 35 patients. The UDVA was 0.0 logMAR or better and the postoperative residual MRSE was ±0.50 diopter in 94.29% of eyes in the topography-guided group and 85.71% of eyes in the wavefront-optimized group (P = .09). More eyes in the topography-guided group than in the wavefront-optimized group had a UDVA of -0.1 logMAR or better (P = .04). Topography-guided LASIK was associated with less deterioration of mesopic contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequencies (12 cycles per degree [cpd] and 18 cpd) and lower amounts of induced coma (P = .04) and spherical aberration (P = .04). Less stromal tissue was ablated in the topography-guided group (mean 61.57 μm ± 16.23 [SD]) than in the wavefront-optimized group (mean 79.71 ± 14.81 μm) (P topography-guided LASIK and wavefront-optimized LASIK gave excellent results, topography-guided LASIK was associated with better contrast sensitivity, lower induction of HOAs, and a smaller amount of tissue ablation. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gain-guided soliton fiber laser with high-quality rectangle spectrum for ultrafast time-stretch microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Song; Yao, Jian; Liu, Meng; Luo, Ai-Ping; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2016-05-16

    The ultrafast time-stretch microscopy has been proposed to enhance the temporal resolution of a microscopy system. The optical source is a key component for ultrafast time-stretch microscopy system. Herein, we reported on the gain-guided soliton fiber laser with high-quality rectangle spectrum for ultrafast time-stretch microscopy. By virtue of the excellent characteristics of the gain-guided soliton, the output power and the 3-dB bandwidth of the stable mode-locked soliton could be up to 3 mW and 33.7 nm with a high-quality rectangle shape, respectively. With the proposed robust optical source, the ultrafast time-stretch microscopy with the 49.6 μm resolution and a scan rate of 11 MHz was achieved without the external optical amplification. The obtained results demonstrated that the gain-guided soliton fiber laser could be used as an alternative high-quality optical source for ultrafast time-stretch microscopy and will introduce some applications in fields such as biology, chemical, and optical sensing.

  10. Using LaserSight Astrapro Planner 2.2 Z software in corneal topography-guided laser in situ keratomileusis for myopia with asymmetric corneal shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Chen, Wei; Shao, De-Wang; Wang, Hua; Ru, Hai-Xia; Zhang, Min; Wang, Ying; Yang, Chun-Yan

    2014-01-01

    To determine the clinical outcomes of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) treatments using LaserSight AstraPro Planner 2.2 Z software for myopia with asymmetric corneal shape. Four hundred and eighty-five eyes [243 patients; spherical equivalent (SE), -5.93±1.88 diopters (D)] were treated with asymmetric ablations using LaserSight SLX laser (version 5.3, 300Hz) were retrospectively analyzed and LaserSight AstraPro Planner 2.2 Z software. Preoperative and postoperative uncorrected visual acuities (UCVA), spherical equivalent (SE) refraction, pachymetry, and corneal asphericity (Q value) and decentration were evaluated. At 12mo postoperatively, the decimal UCVA was 1.0 or better in 449 (92.6%) eyes. Two eyes (0.4%) lost 1 line of the decimal best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), 316 (65.2%) did not change, 149 (30.7%) gained 1 line, and 18 (3.7%) gained 2 lines or more after surgery. Three hundred and thirty-two eyes (68.5%) were within 0.5 D in SE. The mean tissue saving ablation depth was 4.28±2.86 (0-16) µm (median, 4 µm). The mean attempted remaining central corneal thickness was 435.79±29.56 µm, the mean postoperative pachymetry was 444.94±28.93 µm. The mean preoperative Q value was -0.19±0.18, the postoperative was 0.30±0.48 (P=0.000). The mean postoperative decentration was 0.39±0.19 mm. Topography-guided LASIK with AstraPro Planner 2.2 Z custom ablation planning software in an asymmetric ablation mode was an effective, safe, predictable, and stable refractive procedure for the myopia with asymmetric corneal topography.

  11. Artemis very high-frequency digital ultrasound-guided repositioning of a free cap after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Rothman, Richard C; Couch, Darren G; Archer, Timothy J

    2006-11-01

    We present a patient in whom a symmetrically round free cap occurred during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), and flap repositioning was performed without laser ablation. A loss of 3 lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), monocular diplopia, and topographic irregular astigmatism confirmed that the free cap orientation was incorrect. Two subsequent free cap rotations based on refraction failed to realign the free cap into its original position. Artemis 3-dimensional very high-frequency digital ultrasound analysis found the thickness profiles of the free cap and bed to be irregular and mismatched. The rotation required for anatomic realignment was determined by digitally generating a "lock and key" superimposition of the free cap and stromal bed thickness profiles. After Artemis-guided free cap rotation, the eye regained preoperative BSCVA and symmetrical corneal topography with a +0.50 diopter change in spherical equivalent.

  12. Dispersion relation and growth in a two-stream free electron laser with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, Hassan; Abbasi, Negar

    2008-01-01

    A linear theory of two-stream free electron laser (FEL) with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding is presented. The dispersion relation is obtained with the help of fluid theory and the growth rate is analyzed through the numerical solutions. The considerable enhancement of the growth rate is demonstrated due to the two-stream instability and continuous tuning of peak growth rate ratio, two-stream FEL compared to single-stream FEL, in terms of varying the ion channel frequency is illustrated

  13. Modeling of complex melting and solidification behavior in laser-irradiated materials [a description and users guide to the LASER8 computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, G.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1985-11-01

    The conceptual foundation of a computational model and a computer program based on it have been developed for treating various aspects of the complex melting and solidification behavior observed in pulsed laser-irradiated materials. A particularly important feature of the modeling is the capability of allowing melting and solidification to occur at temperatures other than the thermodynamic phase change temperatures. As a result, interfacial undercooling and overheating can be introduced and various types of nucleation events can be simulated. Calculations on silicon with the model have shown a wide variety of behavior, including the formation and propagation of multiple phase fronts. Although originally developed as a tool for studying certain problems arising in the field of laser annealing of semiconductors, the program should be useful in treating many types of systems in which phase changes and nucleation phenomena play important roles. This report describes the underlying physical and mathematical ideas and the basic relations used in LASER8. It also provides enough specific and detailed information on the program to serve as a guide for its use; a listing of one version of the program is given

  14. Phased laser diode array permits selective excitation of ultrasonic guided waves in coated bone-mimicking tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Petro; Salmi, Ari; Kilappa, Vantte; Zhao, Zuomin; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2017-10-01

    This paper validates simulation predictions, which state that specific modes could be enhanced in quantitative ultrasonic bone testing. Tunable selection of ultrasonic guided wave excitation is useful in non-destructive testing since it permits the mediation of energy into diagnostically useful modes while reducing the energy mediated into disturbing contributions. For instance, it is often challenging to distinguish and extract the useful modes from ultrasound signals measured in bone covered by a soft tissue. We show that a laser diode array can selectively excite ultrasound in bone mimicking phantoms. A fiber-coupled diode array (4 elements) illuminated two solid tubes (2-3 mm wall thickness) embraced by an opaque soft-tissue mimicking elastomer coating (5 mm thick). A predetermined time delay matching the selected mode and frequency was employed between the outputs of the elements. The generated ultrasound was detected by a 215 kHz piezo receiver. Our results suggest that this array reduces the disturbances caused by the elastomer cover and so pave way to permit non-contacting in vivo guided wave ultrasound assessment of human bones. The implementation is small, inexpensive, and robust in comparison with the conventional pulsed lasers.

  15. The ARGOS laser system: green light for ground layer adaptive optics at the LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Gässler, Wolfgang; Esposito, Simone; Barl, Lothar; Borelli, Jose; Daysenroth, Matthias; Gemperlein, Hans; Kulas, Martin; Ziegleder, Julian

    2014-07-01

    We report on the development of the laser system of ARGOS, the multiple laser guide star adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system uses a total of six high powered, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers frequency-doubled to a wavelength of 532 nm to generate a set of three guide stars above each of the LBT telescopes. The position of each of the LGS constellations on sky as well as the relative position of the individual laser guide stars within this constellation is controlled by a set of steerable mirrors and a fast tip-tilt mirror within the laser system. The entire opto-mechanical system is housed in two hermetically sealed and thermally controlled enclosures on the SX and DX side of the LBT telescope. The laser beams are propagated through two refractive launch telescopes which focus the beams at an altitude of 12 km, creating a constellation of laser guide stars around a 4 arcminute diameter circle by means of Rayleigh scattering. In addition to the GLAO Rayleigh beacon system, ARGOS has also been designed for a possible future upgrade with a hybrid sodium laser - Rayleigh beacon combination, enabling diffraction limited operation. The ARGOS laser system was successfully installed at the LBT in April 2013. Extensive functional tests have been carried out and have verified the operation of the systems according to specifications. The alignment of the laser system with respect to the launch telescope was carried out during two more runs in June and October 2013, followed by the first propagation of laser light on sky in November 2013.

  16. Bilateral comparison of wavefront-guided versus conventional laser in situ keratomileusis with Bausch and Lomb Zyoptix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-im; Yang, Seung-jae; Tchah, Hungwon

    2004-01-01

    One aim of corneal refractive surgery is to correct defocus and astigmatism. In the process of correcting lower order aberrations, higher order ocular aberrations increase. To evaluate the effectiveness of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in reducing the increase of higher order aberration, we compared aberrational change after LASIK with conventional and wavefront-guided customized ablation. Our study included 48 eyes of 24 patients. We performed conventional LASIK in one eye (Group 1) and wavefront-guided customized ablation in the other eye (Group 2). Ocular aberration was measured with the Zywave, a type of Shack-Hartmann aberrometer. We then compared low and high order aberrations, contrast sensitivity, visual acuity, corneal topography, and manifest refraction preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 and 3 months. Uncorrected visual acuity improved to more than 20/20 in two eyes in the conventional ablation group and in five eyes in the customized ablation group. In the conventional ablation group, Root-mean-square for higher order (RMS(H)) was 0.215 preoperatively, 0.465 (216.3%) at 1 month, and 0.418 (194.4%) at 3 months. In the customized ablation group, RMS(H) was 0.207 preoperatively, 0.380 (183.6%) at 1 month, and 0.371 (179.2%) at 3 months after LASIK. Mesopic contrast sensitivity in the customized ablation group was higher than that in the conventional ablation group, but this change was not statistically significant. Wavefront-guided customized ablation reduced the increase of high order aberrations resulting from LASIK. In terms of visual acuity, patient preference, and mesopic contrast sensitivity, wavefront-guided customized ablation produced slightly-but not statistically significant-better results.

  17. Water-jet guided laser: possibilities and potential for singulation of electronic packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Spiegel, Akos; Vago, Nandor; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2002-06-01

    Singulation of packages is an important step in the manufacturing of IC devices. Presently, the most widely used technique is abrasive sawing. Due to the combination of different materials used in packages such as copper and mold compound, the saw rapidly blunts and also conventional laser cutting by a water-jet with the high precision and speed of a laser cut and is now applied into electronic package singulation.

  18. Ultrasound-guided laser ablation of incidental papillary thyroid microcarcinoma: a potential therapeutic approach in patients at surgical risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Enrico; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Gharib, Hossein; Hosseim, Gharib; Misischi, Irene; Graziano, Filomena; Chianelli, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna; Bianchini, Antonio; Valle, Dario; Bizzarri, Giancarlo

    2011-08-01

    Incidental papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC), a frequent clinical problem, is usually associated with a favorable outcome. During long-term follow-up, only a minority of cases show aggressive behavior with either lymph node or distant metastases. Recently, we had an opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of nonsurgical, ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) for local treatment of PTMC in an otherwise inoperable patient. Neck US examination revealed an incidental, solitary, 8 × 7 × 7 mm hypoechoic nodule with microcalcifications of the right thyroid lobe. The patient suffered from decompensated liver cirrhosis, renal failure, and recent surgery followed by external beam radiation therapy for breast cancer. Cytologic diagnosis showed papillary thyroid carcinoma, but the patient declined surgery because of high risk of thyroid surgery. After local anesthesia with 2% xylocaine, PLA was performed according to the previously reported procedure with an Nd:YAG laser. The procedure was well tolerated, without side effects, and the patient required no analgesics. US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy were performed at 1 and 12 months after PLA, which demonstrated necrotic material and inflammatory cells with no viable neoplastic cell. At the 24 months US follow-up examination, the area of necrosis further decreased, demonstrating a 4 × 4 mm hypoechoic zone and a small hyperechoic area due to fibrotic changes. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy confirmed the absence of malignant cells. Laser-induced thermal ablation was a safe and effective ablative treatment for a patient with PTMC confined to the thyroid gland who was at high surgical risk. This approach should be considered only in elderly patients and/or in those with comorbidities that might expose the patients to an undue high surgical risk and only after the evaluation by neck US, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography

  19. Topography-guided LASIK with the wavelight laser after penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosar, C Banu; Acar, Suphi

    2006-09-01

    To report a case of topography-guided LASIK in a patient after previous penetrating keratoplasty. A 20-year-old man who had previous penetrating keratoplasty in his right eye for keratoconus and was intolerant to spectacles and contact lenses underwent topography-guided LASIK. Three months postoperatively, the patient's uncorrected visual acuity in the right eye was 20/25(+2). Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity was 20/20, with a manifest refraction of +0.25 -0.75 x 40 degree. Topography-guided LASIK is a useful therapeutic modality to address corneal irregularity after penetrating keratoplasty.

  20. Bone Repair on Fractures Treated with Osteosynthesis, ir Laser, Bone Graft and Guided Bone Regeneration: Histomorfometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Aciole, Jouber Mateus; dos Santos Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through the analysis of histomorfometric, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with osteosynthesis, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ780 nm, 50 mW, CW) associated or not to the use of hydroxyapatite and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Surgical fractures were created, under general anesthesia (Ketamina 0,4 ml/Kg IP and Xilazina 0,2 ml/Kg IP), on the dorsum of 15 Oryctolagus rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with wire osteosynthesis. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite and GBR technique used. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16 J/cm2, 4×4 J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death (overdose of general anesthetics) the specimes were routinely processed to wax and underwent histological analysis by light microscopy. The histomorfometric analysis showed an increased bone neoformation, increased collagen deposition, less reabsorption and inflammation when laser was associated to the HATCP. It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of CHA.

  1. In vivo evaluation of a MR-guided 980nm laser interstitial thermal therapy system for ablations in porcine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Medina, Oscar; Gorny, Krzysztof; McNichols, Roger; Friese, Jeremy; Misra, Sanjay; Amrami, Kimberly; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Callstrom, Matthew; Woodrum, David

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the use of a 980-nm diode laser for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MR-guided LITT) ablations in liver tissue in an in vivo porcine model. MR-guided guided LITT was performed on nine juvenile pigs placed under general anesthesia. Target ablation sites were selected in the left and right lobes of the liver. Laser applicators were placed in the liver using intermittent MR guidance. Up to four separate ablations were performed in each animal using a 15 or 30 W laser generator using one or two applicators. During the ablations, continuous MR-based temperature mapping (MR-thermal mapping), using a proton resonance frequency technique, was performed to monitor the size of the ablation in real-time. Extent of thermal tissue damage was continuously estimated based on Arrhenius model. Two-minute ablations were performed at each site. MR-thermal mapping of ablations within the posteroinferior liver were accomplished with continuous breathing at low tidal volume. In the mid right lobe of the liver, due to motion artefacts, MR-thermometry was performed intermittently during breath hold periods. In the left lobe of the liver, ablations were performed with ventilation using positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 10 cm of water. Upon completion, MR imaging with gadolinium contrast was performed to assess the extent of treatment. Thermal lesions were subsequently measured using both, MR-thermal dose and MR gadolinium images, for comparison. Following the animal euthanasia, the liver was harvested and subjected to formalin fixation and paraffin embedding for histological examination. Between one and four focal liver ablations (total 24 ablations) were successfully performed in nine animals with either a 15 or 30 W laser generator. For the 15-W laser generator, the average single applicator ablation size was (2.0 ± 0.5) × (2.6 ± 0.4) cm(2) , as measured by magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry, or (1.7 ± 0.4)

  2. Three-dimensional micropatterning of bioactive hydrogels via two-photon laser scanning photolithography for guided 3D cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Hong; Moon, James J; West, Jennifer L

    2008-07-01

    Micropatterning techniques that control three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of biomolecules and cells at the microscale will allow development of clinically relevant tissues composed of multiple cell types in complex architecture. Although there have been significant developments to regulate spatial and temporal distribution of biomolecules in various materials, most micropatterning techniques are applicable only to two-dimensional patterning. We report here the use of two-photon laser scanning (TPLS) photolithographic technique to micropattern cell adhesive ligand (RGDS) in hydrogels to guide cell migration along pre-defined 3D pathways. The TPLS photolithographic technique regulates photo-reactive processes in microscale focal volumes to generate complex, free from microscale patterns with control over spatial presentation and concentration of biomolecules within hydrogel scaffolds. The TPLS photolithographic technique was used to dictate the precise location of RGDS in collagenase-sensitive poly(ethylene glycol-co-peptide) diacrylate hydrogels, and the amount of immobilized RGDS was evaluated using fluorescein-tagged RGDS. When human dermal fibroblasts cultured in fibrin clusters were encapsulated within the micropatterned collagenase-sensitive hydrogels, the cells underwent guided 3D migration only into the RGDS-patterned regions of the hydrogels. These results demonstrate the prospect of guiding tissue regeneration at the microscale in 3D scaffolds by providing appropriate bioactive cues in highly defined geometries.

  3. Method for optimizing topography-guided ablation of highly aberrated eyes with the ALLEGRETTO WAVE excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, David T C; Holland, Simon R; Rocha, Karolinne Maia; Krueger, Ronald R

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of custom topographic neutralizing technique in treating highly aberrated eyes using the WaveLight ALLEGRETTO WAVE Excimer Laser. A retrospective consecutive case series of 67 eyes with decentered ablations and 48 eyes with symptomatic small optical zones after previous LASIK underwent topography-guided retreatment with the ALLEGRETTO WAVE. Sixteen keratoconus eyes underwent topographic neutralizing technique photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). The study assessed preoperative and 6-month and 1-year postoperative results regarding best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), topography, and predictability. Sixty-seven eyes with previously decentered optical zones had an improvement of centration from 0.92 mm preoperatively to 0.30 mm postoperatively relative to pupil center (Ptopography-guided ablation using the WaveLight ALLEGRETTO platform and custom topographic neutralizing technique. Safety was acceptable for small optical zone and decentered ablation retreatments. The topography-guided ablation could be an alternative treatment for keratoconus patients if keratoplasty is otherwise indicated. The algorithms for custom topographic neutralizing technique need further refinement.

  4. Image guided interstitial laser thermotherapy: a canine model evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muacevic, A; Peller, M; Ruprecht, L; Berg, D; Fend, L; Sroka, R; Reulen, H J; Reiser, M; Tonn, J Ch; Kreth, F W

    2005-02-01

    To determine the applicability and safety of a new canine model suitable for correlative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and morphological/pathophysiological examination over time after interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT) in brain tissue. A laser fibre (Diode Laser 830 nm) with an integrated temperature feedback system was inserted into the right frontal white matter in 18 dogs using frameless navigation technique. MRI thermometry (phase mapping i.e. chemical shift of the proton resonance frequency) during interstitial heating was compared to simultaneously recorded interstitial fiberoptic temperature readings on the border of the lesion. To study brain capillary function in response to ILTT over time quantitative autoradiography was performed investigating the unidirectional blood-to-tissue transport of carbon-14-labelled alpha amino-isobutyric acid (transfer constant K of AIB) 12, 36 hours, 7, 14 days, 4 weeks and 3 months after ILTT. All laser procedures were well tolerated, laser and temperature fibres could be adequately placed in the right frontal lobe in all animals. In 5 animals MRI-based temperature quantification correlated strongly to invasive temperature measurements. In the remaining animals the temperature fibre was located in the area of susceptibility artifacts, therefore, no temperature correlation was possible. The laser lesions consisted of a central area of calcified necrosis which was surrounded by an area of reactive brain tissue with increased permeability. Quantitative autoradiography indicated a thin and spherical blood brain barrier lesion. The magnitude of K of AIB increased from 12 hours to 14 days after ILTT and decreased thereafter. The mean value of K of AIB was 19 times (2 times) that of normal white matter (cortex), respectively. ILTT causes transient, highly localised areas of increased capillary permeability surrounding the laser lesion. Phase contrast imaging for MRI thermomonitoring can currently not be used for

  5. Laser Guidance in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma Reduces Fluoroscopy Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Maarten W; Busser, Wendy M H; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L; de Lange, Frank; Schultze Kool, Leo J

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether laser guidance can reduce fluoroscopy and procedure time of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablations of osteoid osteoma compared to freehand CBCT guidance. 32 RF ablations were retrospectively analyzed, 17 laser-guided and 15 procedures using the freehand technique. Subgroup selection of 18 ablations in the hip-pelvic region with a similar degree of difficulty was used for a direct comparison. Data are presented as median (ranges). Comparison of all 32 ablations resulted in fluoroscopy times of 365 s (193-878 s) for freehand and 186 s (75-587 s) for laser-guided procedures (p = 0.004). Corresponding procedure times were 56 min (35-97 min) and 52 min (30-85 min) (p = 0.355). The subgroup showed comparable target sizes, needle path lengths, and number of scans between groups. Fluoroscopy times were lower for laser-guided procedures, 215 s (75-413 s), compared to 384 s (193-878 s) for freehand (p = 0.012). Procedure times were comparable between groups, 51 min (30-72 min) for laser guidance and 58 min (35-79 min) for freehand (p = 0.172). Adding laser guidance to CBCT-guided osteoid osteoma RF ablations significantly reduced fluoroscopy time without increasing procedure time. Level 4, case series.

  6. Laser Guidance in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma Reduces Fluoroscopy Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroes, Maarten W., E-mail: Maarten.Kroes@radboudumc.nl; Busser, Wendy M. H.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo assess whether laser guidance can reduce fluoroscopy and procedure time of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablations of osteoid osteoma compared to freehand CBCT guidance.Materials and Methods32 RF ablations were retrospectively analyzed, 17 laser-guided and 15 procedures using the freehand technique. Subgroup selection of 18 ablations in the hip–pelvic region with a similar degree of difficulty was used for a direct comparison. Data are presented as median (ranges).ResultsComparison of all 32 ablations resulted in fluoroscopy times of 365 s (193–878 s) for freehand and 186 s (75–587 s) for laser-guided procedures (p = 0.004). Corresponding procedure times were 56 min (35–97 min) and 52 min (30–85 min) (p = 0.355). The subgroup showed comparable target sizes, needle path lengths, and number of scans between groups. Fluoroscopy times were lower for laser-guided procedures, 215 s (75–413 s), compared to 384 s (193–878 s) for freehand (p = 0.012). Procedure times were comparable between groups, 51 min (30–72 min) for laser guidance and 58 min (35–79 min) for freehand (p = 0.172).ConclusionAdding laser guidance to CBCT-guided osteoid osteoma RF ablations significantly reduced fluoroscopy time without increasing procedure time.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, case series.

  7. Nonlinear theory of a free electron laser with a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Ginzburg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 1D nonlinear theory of a free electron laser (FEL with a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field is developed based on averaged equations of the electron motion. By averaging we separated two different cases of the e-beam/rf-wave interaction. The first one corresponds to the traditional wiggler synchronism (resonance of rf wave with the electrons moving along stationary helical trajectories. The second one corresponds to combination resonances distinguishing by excitation of oscillation of the electrons near the stationary helical trajectory. Comparative analysis of the FEL operation in different regimes has been studied under the traditional wiggler synchronism condition. It was shown that FELs operated far from cyclotron resonance (including a reversed guide field orientation possess low sensitivity to the initial velocity spread in the driving beam resulting in high electron efficiency. In contrast, under the weak guide field (the gyrofrequency is less than the bounce frequency of a conventional orientation, the FEL efficiency is restricted by a significant increase in the transverse velocity of the electrons during the interaction with the rf wave that results in violation of the synchronism conditions and is accompanied by electron current losses. An additional mechanism of FEL efficiency enhancement under the conventional guide field orientation in the conditions when the gyrofrequency is higher than the bounce frequency, based on the dependence of the effective mass of the oscillating electrons on their energy, was demonstrated. Results of the theoretical analysis are compared with the results of experimental studies of FEL oscillators. The specific features of energy extraction from the electron beam under condition of an abnormal Doppler effect in the case of the combination resonance are described. This regime is beneficial to increase radiation frequency keeping wiggler period and electron energies.

  8. Lasers collisionnels à 41.8 nm en régime guidé

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bettaibi, I.; Sebban, S.; Mocek, Tomáš; McKenna, C.M.; Cros, B.; Butler, A.; Spence, D.J.; Maynard, G.; Gonsavles, A.J.; Hooker, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 127, - (2005), s. 33-37 ISSN 1155-4339. [Colloque sur les Sources cohérentes et incohérentes UV, VUV et X - Applications et développements récents /7./. Saint-Etienne, 07.06.04-11.06.04] Grant - others:EU(XE) HPMF-CT-2002-01554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : capillary discharge waveguide * X-ray laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.389, year: 2005

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  10. Industrial processes control with He-Ne laser devices for aligning and guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Ivascu, M.; Vasiliu, V.; Ristici, M.; Gradisteanu, I.; Vilcu, G.; Pelle, V.; Botezatu, I.; Vasnea, V.; Orac, N.; Fernea, V.

    1988-03-01

    A brief presentation of the He-Ne laser devices main application fields in the national economy is given. The utilization of the devices we did in: industrial constructions, metalurgy, hydroelectric arrangements, wood industry, ship's construction, and other is presented. (authors)

  11. On-the-fly cross flow laser guided separation of aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, A. A.; Terray, A.; Hart, S. J.

    2010-08-01

    Laser separation of particles is achieved using forces resulting from the momentum exchange between particles and photons constituting the laser radiation. Particles can experience different optical forces depending on their size and/or optical properties, such as refractive index. Thus, particles can move at different speeds in the presence of an optical force, leading to spatial separations. Several studies for aqueous suspension of particles have been reported in the past. In this paper, we present extensive analysis for optical forces on non-absorbing aerosol particles. We used a loosely focused Gaussian 1064 nm laser to simultaneously hold and deflect particles entrained in flow perpendicular to their direction of travel. The gradient force is used to hold the particles against the viscous drag for a short period of time. The scattering force simultaneously pushes the particles during this period. Theoretical calculations are used to simulate particle trajectories and to determine the net deflection: a measure of the ability to separate. We invented a novel method for aerosol generation and delivery to the flow cell. Particle motion was imaged using a high speed camera working at 3000+ frames per second with a viewing area up to a few millimeters. An 8W near-infrared 1064 nm laser was used to provide the optical force to the particles. Theoretical predictions were corroborated with measurements using polystyrene latex particles of 20 micron diameter. We measured particle deflections up to about 1500 microns. Such large deflections represent a new milestone for optical chromatography in the gas phase.

  12. Real-time trajectory generation for sensor-guided robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, M.W.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.

    2005-01-01

    Robotic laser welding imposes high demands on the used manipulator as high accuracies (down to 0.1 mm) have to be reached at high velocities (up to 250 mm/s). To meet these specifications with industrial robots, a sensor measuring at the robot tip needs to be applied.

  13. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  15. Detailed analysis of the Canary on-sky results at the WHT using Rayleigh laser guide stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, O.; Gendron, É.; Morris, T.; Basden, A.; Hubert, Z.; Gratadour, D.; Osborn, J.; Vidal, F.; Chemla, F.; Rousset, G.; Myers, R.

    2014-07-01

    CANARY is the multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) on-sky demonstrator developed by Durham University and LESIA Observatoire de Paris, in the perspective of the E-ELT. Since 2013, CANARY has been operating with 3 off-axis NGS and 4 off-axis Rayleigh LGS and compensating for one on-axis NGS observed with a near IR camera and the Truth Sensor (TS) for diagnostic purpose. In this paper, we present the tomographic performance of CANARY during the runs in 2013. We propose a detailed analysis of the tomographic error leading to the establishment of the CANARY wave-front error budget. In particular we are able to evaluate the tomographic error for each altitude in the atmosphere for a given reconstructor by modelling a set of one-layer covariance matrices. This tool allows us to understand the tradeoffs to be made in the building of the tomographic reconstructor. We present two methods for the wavefront error budget computation. The DTI one uses input system parameters and open loop WFS slopes to estimate the error in a number of independent terms. The DMTS method directly uses the Truth Sensor measurements to estimate the error. We show a good agreement between the two approaches making us confident in our modelling of the instrument. We derive estimations of the Strehl ratio from the error variance and compare them to the recorded IR image Strehl ratio. We find a good agreement between the two, hence validating our wavefront error analysis. Finally we present an on-sky validation of the tomographic reconstruction using LGS based on GLAO and MOAO data. We also quantify the gain brought by the LGS, comparing results obtained in MOAO with 3 NGS and with or without LGS in the wavefront measurements.

  16. Debris reduction for copper and diamond-like carbon thin films produced by magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, Y Y; Vick, D; Fedosejevs, R

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of debris reduction using magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition (MGPLD) is reported here. KrF laser pulses (248 nm) of 100 mJ energy were focused to intensities of 6x10 sup 9 W/cm sup 2 onto the surface of a copper or a carbon source target and a magnetic field of 0.3 T as used to steer the plasma around a curved arc of 0.5 m length to the deposition substrate. Debris counts were compared for films produced by the MGPLD and conventional PLD (nonguided) techniques. A significant reduction in particulates of size greater than 0.1 mu m was achieved using MGPLD. For the copper films, particulate count was reduced from 150 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 50 particulates/cm sup 2 /nm and for diamond-like carbon thin films particulate count was reduced from 25 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 1200 particles/cm sup 2 /nm.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused laser interstitial thermal therapy for subinsular metastatic adenocarcinoma: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Murphy, Rory K J; Dacey, Ralph G; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2012-06-01

    To describe the novel use of the AutoLITT System (Monteris Medical, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) for focused laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stereotactic image guidance for the treatment of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the left insula. The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed man with a history of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon. He had previously undergone resection of multiple lesions, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and whole-brain radiation. Despite treatment of a left insular tumor, serial imaging revealed that the lesion continued to enlarge. Given the refractory nature of this tumor to radiation and the deep-seated location, the patient elected to undergo LITT treatment. The center of the lesion and entry point on the scalp were identified with STEALTH (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee) image-guided navigation. The AXiiiS Stereotactic Miniframe (Monteris Medical) for the LITT system was secured onto the skull, and a trajectory was defined to achieve access to the centroid of the tumor. After a burr hole was made, a gadolinium template probe was inserted into the AXiiiS base. The trajectory was confirmed via an intraoperative MRI, and the LITT probe driver was attached to the base and CO2-cooled, side-firing laser LITT probe. The laser was activated and thermometry images were obtained. Two trajectories, posteromedial and anterolateral, produced satisfactory tumor ablation. LITT with intraoperative MRI and stereotactic image guidance is a newly available, minimally invasive, and therapeutically viable technique for the treatment of deep seated brain tumors.

  18. Self-injection threshold in self-guided laser wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. D. Mangles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser pulse traveling through a plasma can excite large amplitude plasma waves that can be used to accelerate relativistic electron beams in a very short distance—a technique called laser wakefield acceleration. Many wakefield acceleration experiments rely on the process of wave breaking, or self-injection, to inject electrons into the wave, while other injection techniques rely on operation without self-injection. We present an experimental study into the parameters, including the pulse energy, focal spot quality, and pulse power, that determine whether or not a wakefield accelerator will self-inject. By taking into account the processes of self-focusing and pulse compression we are able to extend a previously described theoretical model, where the minimum bubble size k_{p}r_{b} required for trapping is not constant but varies slowly with density and find excellent agreement with this model.

  19. Coherent and incoherent radiation from free-electron lasers with an axial guide field

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Henry P.; Sprangle, P.; Dillenburg, Darcy; Jornada, Eda Homrich da; Liberman, Bernardo; Schneider, Ruth de Souza

    1981-01-01

    The spontaneous and induced emission from a free-electron laser is treated for the case in which an axial magnetic field is imposed in addition to the helical, axially periodic wiggler magnetic field. The classes of possible single-particle trajectories in this configuration are discussed, and the results are applied to a calculation of the incoherent radiation from a beam of relativistic electrons in the system. The coherent radiation is treated by solving the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for th...

  20. Optimized laser cutting on light guide plates using grey relational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Fei; Ho, Yu-Sen; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Wu, Tse-Hung; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2011-02-01

    This paper present the optimum conditions for direct CO 2 laser cutting of 6-mm-thick polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for backlit module applications. The influence of the major processing parameters on the optical transmittance ratio and surface roughness of cut samples material have been discussed. In order to assess the effects of several operational parameters on multiple-performance characteristics, we applied the grey relational analysis method. In this paper, we studied the effects of several laser direct cut parameters, such as assisted gas-flow rate, pulse repetition frequency, cutting speed, and focus position to achieve optimum characteristics for two product characteristics, optical transmittance ratio and work-piece surface roughness. The study involved nine experiments based on an orthogonal array, and results indicate the optimal process parameters as 20 NL/min for assisted-gas flow rate, 5 kHz for pulse repetition frequency, 2 mm/s for cutting speed, and 0 mm for laser focusing position. Additionally, by analyzing the grey relational grade, we found that the assisted-gas flow rate has more influence than any other single parameter.

  1. How to guide lubricants - Tailored laser surface patterns on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützmacher, Philipp G.; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Gachot, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental study, periodic line-like structures with different periodicities (5, 10, 19, and 300 μm) and structural depths (approximately 1 and 4 μm) were fabricated on stainless steel samples (AISI-304) by short-pulse laser interference and ultrashort-pulse laser patterning. A detailed characterization of the resulting surface topography was performed by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy. The spreading dynamics of additive-free synthetic polyalphaolefine oil on a polished reference sample are compared to laser patterned surfaces. These studies are conducted using a newly developed test rig, which allowed for controlled temperature gradients and a precise recording of the spreading dynamics of lubricants on sample surfaces. It could be demonstrated that the spreading velocity parallel to the surface pattern is higher for all samples which can be explained by increased capillary forces and liquid pinning induced by the surface patterning. Furthermore, a decline of the spreading velocity over time for all samples and orientations is clearly visible which can be traced back to a viscosity increase induced by the temperature gradient and a reduced droplet volume. For parallel orientation, the experimental findings are in good agreement with the Lucas-Washburn equation and established models.

  2. Mechanics guided design of hybrid laser/waterjet system for machining hard and brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    The two main objectives of this work is (1) to develop a mathematical model to efficiently capture the fracture behavior of materials undergoing thermal shock and (2) to design and develop a mechanics based hybrid laser/waterjet manufacturing process that will be able to machine hard and brittle materials at higher speeds and with better cut quality. The mathematical model relates the temperature generated during the machining process to the fracture behavior observed during machining. The hybrid manufacturing processes produces a synergetic effect of both laser and waterjet processes and overcomes the disadvantages of both of them. The temperature distribution is obtained from the Green's solution of the Fourier Heat Conduction equation. Uncoupled thermoelastic stresses are obtained from the temperature distribution which in-turn is related to the stress intensity factor/Griffith Energy for Mode I crack growth by Bueckner's weight function approach. This model can also be used to predict fracture behavior for given laser processing conditions. This model can also be used to manipulate transformational stresses that occur during machining of high conductive materials. This model can be easily extended to many multi-physics problems involving thermo-elastic behavior.

  3. Consistent comparison of angle Kappa adjustment between Oculyzer and Topolyzer Vario topography guided LASIK for myopia by EX500 excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Shen; Zhang, Li; Guo, Ning; Song, Yan-Zheng; Zhang, Feng-Ju

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the uniformity of angle Kappa adjustment between Oculyzer and Topolyzer Vario topography guided ablation of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) by EX500 excimer laser for myopia. Totally 145 cases (290 consecutive eyes )with myopia received LASIK with a target of emmetropia. The ablation for 86 cases (172 eyes) was guided manually based on Oculyzer topography (study group), while the ablation for 59 cases (118 eyes) was guided automatically by Topolyzer Vario topography (control group). Measurement of adjustment values included data respectively in horizontal and vertical direction of cornea. Horizontally, synclastic adjustment between manually actual values (dx manu ) and Oculyzer topography guided data (dx ocu ) accounts 35.5% in study group, with mean dx manu /dx ocu of 0.78±0.48; while in control group, synclastic adjustment between automatically actual values (dx auto ) and Oculyzer topography data (dx ocu ) accounts 54.2%, with mean dx auto /dx ocu of 0.79±0.66. Vertically, synclastic adjustment between dy manu and dy ocu accounts 55.2% in study group, with mean dy manu /dy ocu of 0.61±0.42; while in control group, synclastic adjustment between dy auto and dy ocu accounts 66.1%, with mean dy auto /dy ocu of 0.66±0.65. There was no statistically significant difference in ratio of actual values/Oculyzer topography guided data in horizontal and vertical direction between two groups ( P =0.951, 0.621). There is high consistency in angle Kappa adjustment guided manually by Oculyzer and guided automatically by Topolyzer Vario topography during corneal refractive surgery by WaveLight EX500 excimer laser.

  4. Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Passeron, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be succesfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-aulait macules should not b...

  5. Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Du, K.; Loosen, P.; Herziger, G.

    1991-01-01

    Laser, consisting of a beam path multiple-folded by means of two cavity end mirrors and having at least one reflector folding the laser beam retroreflectively, the axis of which is arranged offset in parallel to the axis of a further reflector. So that the laser exhibits an improved beam quality while retaining its comparatively low adjustment sensitivity, the beam path is folded at least twice by means of the retoreflective reflector.

  6. Changes in disc herniation after CT-guided Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD): MR findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, Hugues G.; Bouziane, Tarik; Lambert, Jean; Divano, Luisa

    2004-09-01

    The aim of Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus. Clinical efficacy of this technique is largely proven. However, time-evolution of intervertebral disc and its hernia after PLDD is not known. This study analyses changes in disc herniation and its native intervertebral disc at a mean follow-up of 7.5 months after PLDD in asymptomatic patients. Main observations at MRI are appearance of a high signal on T2WI in the hernia in 59%, shrinking of the hernia in 66% and overall stability of disc height.

  7. Effect of ultrasound-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation on benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    power of 2.5-3.5 W. Thyroid nodule volume was assessed by US. Pressure and cosmetic complaints were evaluated on a visual analogue scale. MAIN OUTCOME: In the ILP- 1 group, thyroid nodule volume decreased from 10.1 +/- 4.3 mL (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]) to 5.7 +/- 3.2 mL (p = 0......OBJECTIVE: Interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) is a safe and effective procedure when inducing thyroid nodule necrosis. In this prospective randomized study, we evaluated a possible dose-response relationship as well as patient satisfaction. DESIGN: Thirty euthyroid outpatients...

  8. A quantum dynamics study of the benzopyran ring opening guided by laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saab, Mohamad, E-mail: mohamad.saab@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Doriol, Loïc Joubert, E-mail: Loic.Joubert-Doriol@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Lasorne, Benjamin, E-mail: lasorne@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Guérin, Stéphane, E-mail: sguerin@u-bourgogne.fr [Département Optique, Interaction Matière-Rayonnement (OMR) (UMR 6303), Université de Bourgogne, F-21078 Dijon (France); Gatti, Fabien, E-mail: gatti@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • We perform quantum mechanical simulations for the ring-opening of benzopyran. • We develop strategies of control with laser pulses. • We focus on the physics involving the conical intersection. - Abstract: The ring-opening photoisomerization of benzopyran, which occurs via a photochemical route involving a conical intersection, has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method (MCTDH). We introduce a mechanistic strategy to control the conversion of benzopyran to merocyanine with laser pulses. We use a six-dimensional model developed in a previous work for the potential energy surfaces (PES) based on an extension of the vibronic-coupling Hamiltonian model (diabatization method by ansatz), which depends on the most active degrees of freedom. The main objective of these quantum dynamics simulations is to provide a set of strategies that could help experimentalists to control the photoreactivity vs. photostability ratio (selectivity). In this work we present: (i) a pump–dump technique used to control the photostability, (ii) a two-step strategy to enhance the reactivity of the system: first, a pure vibrational excitation in the electronic ground state that prepares the system and, second, an ultraviolet excitation that brings the system to the first adiabatic electronic state; (iii) finally the effect of a non-resonant pulse (Stark effect) on the dynamics.

  9. Treatment of atrophic facial scars with combined use of high-energy pulsed CO2 laser and Er:YAG laser: a practical guide of the laser techniques for the Er:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S I; Kim, Y C

    1999-12-01

    Although CO2 laser resurfacing provides substantial clinical improvement for atrophic facial scars, the CO2 laser often results in excessive thermal damage to the skin. It increases complications postoperatively. The Er:YAG laser ablates thinner layers of tissue than the CO2 laser with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding skin. To determine the efficacy of combined treatment of atrophic facial scars with high-energy pulsed CO2 laser and Er:YAG laser. One hundred fifty-eight patients were treated with a combination of high-energy pulsed CO2 laser and Er:YAG laser for atrophic facial scars. All patients were evaluated after 3 months of treatment. The scars improved 80-89% in 65 patients, 70-79% in 56 patients, more than 90% in 32 patients, 60-69% in 2 patients, and less than 60% in 3 patients after laser treatment. Treatment of atrophic facial scars with combined use of high-energy pulsed CO2 laser and Er:YAG laser is a very effective and useful method.

  10. Practitioner's guide to laser pulse propagation models and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Brambilla, E.; Corti, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Insubria, via Vallegio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Majus, D. [Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Avenue 9, Bldg. 3, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ramirez-Congora, O. de [Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Matematicas, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Cali, Avenida Canas Gordas no 118-250 Cali (Colombia); Kolesik, M. [College of Optical Sciences, Tucson 85721 AZ (United States); Department of Physics, Constantine the Philosopher Uninversity, Nitra (Slovakia)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this article is to provide practical introduction into numerical modeling of ultrashort optical pulses in extreme nonlinear regimes. The theoretic background section covers derivation of modern pulse propagation models starting from Maxwell's equations, and includes both envelope-based models and carrier-resolving propagation equations. We then continue with a detailed description of implementation in software of Nonlinear Envelope Equations as an example of a mixed approach which combines finite-difference and spectral techniques. Fully spectral numerical solution methods for the Unidirectional Pulse Propagation Equation are discussed next. The modeling part of this guide concludes with a brief introduction into efficient implementations of nonlinear medium responses. Finally, we include several worked-out simulation examples. These are mini-projects designed to highlight numerical and modeling issues, and to teach numerical-experiment practices. They are also meant to illustrate, first and foremost for a non-specialist, how tools discussed in this guide can be applied in practical numerical modeling. (authors)

  11. Laser Guidestar Satellite for Ground-based Adaptive Optics Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites and Astronomical Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, W. A.; Cahoy, K.; Males, J.; Carlton, A.; Yoon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time observation and monitoring of geostationary (GEO) satellites with ground-based imaging systems would be an attractive alternative to fielding high cost, long lead, space-based imagers, but ground-based observations are inherently limited by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to help ground telescopes achieve diffraction-limited seeing. AO systems have historically relied on the use of bright natural guide stars or laser guide stars projected on a layer of the upper atmosphere by ground laser systems. There are several challenges with this approach such as the sidereal motion of GEO objects relative to natural guide stars and limitations of ground-based laser guide stars; they cannot be used to correct tip-tilt, they are not point sources, and have finite angular sizes when detected at the receiver. There is a difference between the wavefront error measured using the guide star compared with the target due to cone effect, which also makes it difficult to use a distributed aperture system with a larger baseline to improve resolution. Inspired by previous concepts proposed by A.H. Greenaway, we present using a space-based laser guide starprojected from a satellite orbiting the Earth. We show that a nanosatellite-based guide star system meets the needs for imaging GEO objects using a low power laser even from 36,000 km altitude. Satellite guide star (SGS) systemswould be well above atmospheric turbulence and could provide a small angular size reference source. CubeSatsoffer inexpensive, frequent access to space at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems, and are now being deployed to geostationary orbits and on interplanetary trajectories. The fundamental CubeSat bus unit of 10 cm cubed can be combined in multiple units and offers a common form factor allowing for easy integration as secondary payloads on traditional launches and rapid testing of new technologies on-orbit. We describe a 6U CubeSat SGS measuring 10 cm x 20 cm x

  12. Topography-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (TOPOLINK) to correct irregular astigmatism after previous refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Belda, Jose I; Osman, Amr A; Shalaby, Ahmad M M

    2003-01-01

    To assess whether topography-driven laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can correct induced corneal irregular astigmatism. A prospective non-comparative case series of 41 eyes (38 patients) with irregular astigmatism following corneal refractive surgery, included two groups: Group 1 (26 eyes) with a defined topographic pattern and Group 2 (15 eyes) with no pattern. Ablation was performed using the Technolas 217C excimer laser with a software ablation program (TOPOLINK) based on corneal topography. Uncorrected and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, manifest and cycloplegic refraction, corneal topography, superficial corneal surface quality, and image distortion were measured. At 6 months follow-up in Group 1 eyes (defined topographic pattern) mean preoperative BSCVA improved from 0.16 +/- 0.11 LogMAR (0.4 to 0) to 0.09 +/- 0.10 LogMAR (0.2 to 0) (P = .001) (safety index of 1.1). In Group 2 eyes (no pattern), mean preoperative BSCVA was 0.18 +/- 0.11 LogMAR (0.4 to 0), similar to the postoperative BSCVA of 0.17 +/- 0.10 LogMAR (0.3 to 0) (safety index of 0.98). Mean postoperative UCVA was > or = 0.3 LogMAR in 25 eyes (96.2%) in Group 1 (efficacy index of 0.8) and 7 eyes (46.6%) in Group 2 (efficacy index of 0.5). Both superficial corneal surface quality and image distortion significantly improved in Group 1; there were no significant changes in Group 2. We reoperated nine eyes (21.9%). Topographic-assisted LASIK was helpful in selected cases where irregular astigmatism showed a pattern. It was ineffective in undefined irregular astigmatism. Partial correction of the irregularity and regression of the obtained effect was common.

  13. Focusing peculiarities of ion-channel guiding on a relativistic electron beam in a free-electron laser with a three-dimensional wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Shi-Chang

    2014-01-01

    In a free-electron laser the ‘natural focusing’ effect of a three-dimensional wiggler is too weak to confine the transport of a relativistic electron beam when the beam has a high current and consequently an external focusing system is often needed. In this paper we study the focusing peculiarities of an ion-channel guide field on an electron beam. Nonlinear simulations of an electron beam transport show that, compared to an axial guide magnetic field, the ion-channel guide field results in smaller velocity–space and configuration–space spreads. The intrinsic mechanism of this physical phenomenon is that the ion-channel guide field confines the trajectory of the electron motion resulting in a smaller instantaneous curvature radius and a slighter curvature-center excursion than an axial guide magnetic field does. It is also found that, unlike with an axial guide magnetic field, over-focusing may occur if the ion-channel guide field is too strong. (paper)

  14. Light microscopic description of the effects of laser phototherapy on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and guided bone regeneration in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Soares, Luiz G P; Aciole, Gilberth T S; Correia, Neandder A; Barbosa, Artur F S; Ramalho, Luciana M P; Dos Santos, Jean N

    2011-08-01

    We carried out a histological analysis on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) treated or not with laser, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Benefits of the use of MTA, laser, BMPs, and GBR on bone repair are well known, but there is no report on their association with laser light. Ninety rats were divided into 10 groups each subdivided into 3. Defects on G II and I were filled with the blood clot. G II was further irradiated with LED. G III and IV were filled with MTA; G IV was further irradiated with laser. G V and VI, the defects filled with MTA and covered with a membrane (GBR). G VI was further irradiated with laser. G VII and VIII, BMPs were added to the MTA and group VIII further irradiated with laser. G IX and X, the MTA + BMP graft was covered with a membrane (GBR). G X was further irradiated with laser. Laser light (λ = 850 nm, 150 mW, 4 J/cm(2) ) was applied over the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 15 days. Specimens were processed, cut and stained with H&E and Sirius red and underwent histological analysis. Subjects on group X were irradiated. The results showed different tissue response on all groups during the experimental time. Major changes were seen on irradiated subjects and included marked deposition of new bone in advanced maturation. It is concluded that near infrared laser phototherapy improved the results of the use of the MTA on bone defects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Laser-Guided Autonomous Landing of a Quadrotor UAV on an Inclined Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, John A.

    This thesis presents measurement, estimation, and control schemes to aid a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in landing on a flat, inclined surface without prior knowledge of the surface's inclination. The system uses a single CMOS camera and several inexpensive laser modules for onboard sensing to measure the distance to and orientation of a landing surface. A nonlinear least squares estimation scheme yields the altitude of the quadrotor and the normal vector defining the ground plane. This information is used to design a hybrid landing trajectory composed of a position tracking phase and an attitude tracking phase. A geometric nonlinear control system is used during each phase and ensures that the quadrotor's attitude is aligned to the inclination of the ground surface at touchdown. A quadrotor is developed from the ground up to test the in-flight measurement process and to execute landing trajectories on an inclined surface. Experimental results demonstrate the quadrotor's ability to accurately estimate altitude and ground plane orientation during flight, and numerical simulations of landing trajectories for various surface inclinations are validated by experimental results up to a maximum inclination of thirty degrees.

  16. Effect of ultrasound-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation on benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules - a randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    and thyroid function was determined by routine assays before and during follow-up. Pressure and cosmetic complaints before and at 6 months were evaluated on a visual analogue scale. ILP was performed under US guidance and with an output power of 2.5-3.5 W. RESULTS: In the ILP group, the nodule volume......AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) on thyroid function, nodule size and patient satisfaction in benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules by comparing one ILP session with no treatment in a prospective randomised study. MATERIALS...... decreased from 8.2 ml (6.1; 11.9) (median; quartiles) to 4.8 ml (3.0; 6.6) after 6 months (P = 0.001). The overall median reduction was 44% (37; 52), which correlated with a significant decrease in pressure symptoms as well as cosmetic complaints. In the control group, a non-significant increase in median...

  17. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative Volumetric Analysis Following Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Ablation of Cerebellar Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichberg, Daniel G; VanDenBerg, Ryan; Komotar, Ricardo J; Ivan, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Treating recurrent posterior fossa metastases after previous radiation therapy and surgical resection remains challenging. Magnetic resonance laser-induced thermal therapy (MR-LITT) is a promising treatment for recurrent lesions, but data on safety, efficacy, and postablation volume change in the posterior fossa are lacking. All patients with recurrent posterior fossa metastatic lesions treated with MR-LITT by the senior neurosurgeon were included in the study. Preoperative and postoperative follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were used to measure lesional and perilesional edema volume. These measurements were compared to calculate percent ablation volume. All patients' clinical examinations were followed closely. Four patients with recurrent cerebellar metastases were treated with MR-LITT. The average percent lesion ablated was 97.1% (range, 88.2%-100%). The average preoperative lesion volume was 3.3 cm 3 (range, 1.1-7.2 cm 3 ), and the average final postoperative volume was 3.8 cm 3 (range, 0.5-7.6 cm 3 ). Lesion volume increased to maximum volume on postoperative day 1, with an average increase of 486.9%. The extrapolated average time for the lesion to shrink to below the initial size was 294.5 days. There was a trend toward a decrease in average edema volume from the preoperative MRI of 17.8 cm 3 to final postoperative follow-up MRI of 3.4 cm 3 (P = 0.0952). No postoperative hydrocephalus or complications occurred. This pilot study shows that LITT appears to be a safe and promising treatment for recurrent posterior fossa metastatic lesions up to 7.2 cm 3 . Further randomized controlled studies are warranted to further characterize the long-term efficacy of this therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Glioblastoma of the Corpus Callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Thomas L; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Kim, Albert H; Barnett, Gene H; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2018-02-08

    Glioblastoma of the corpus callosum is particularly difficult to treat, as the morbidity of surgical resection generally outweighs the potential survival benefit. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a safe and effective treatment option for difficult to access malignant gliomas of the thalamus and insula. To assess the safety and efficacy of LITT for the treatment of glioblastoma of the corpus callosum. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The primary endpoint was the safety and efficacy of LITT as a treatment for glioblastoma of the corpus callosum. Secondary endpoints included tumor coverage at thermal damage thresholds, median survival, and change in Karnofsky Performance Scale score 1 mo after treatment. The study included patients with de novo or recurrent glioblastoma of the corpus callosum (n = 15). Mean patient age was 54.7 yr. Mean pretreatment Karnofsky Performance Scale score was 80.7 and there was no significant difference between subgroups. Mean tumor volume was 18.7 cm3. Hemiparesis occurred in 26.6% of patients. Complications were more frequent in patients with tumors >15 cm3 (RR 6.1, P = .009) and were associated with a 32% decrease in survival postLITT. Median progression-free survival, survival postLITT, and overall survival were 3.4, 7.2, and 18.2 mo, respectively. LITT is a safe and effective treatment for glioblastoma of the corpus callosum and provides survival benefit comparable to subtotal surgical resection with adjuvant chemoradiation. LITT-associated complications are related to tumor volume and can be nearly eliminated by limiting the procedure to tumors of 15 cm3 or less. Copyright © 2018 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  1. Visual Outcomes After LASIK Using Topography-Guided vs Wavefront-Guided Customized Ablation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Ikuko; Ide, Takeshi; Fukumoto, Teruki; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the visual performance of two customized ablation systems (wavefront-guided ablation and topography-guided ablation) in LASIK. In this prospective, randomized clinical study, 68 eyes of 35 patients undergoing LASIK were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to wavefront-guided ablation using the iDesign aberrometer and STAR S4 IR Excimer Laser system (Abbott Medical Optics, Inc., Santa Ana, CA) (wavefront-guided group; 32 eyes of 16 patients; age: 29.0 ± 7.3 years) or topography-guided ablation using the OPD-Scan aberrometer and EC-5000 CXII excimer laser system (NIDEK, Tokyo, Japan) (topography-guided group; 36 eyes of 19 patients; age: 36.1 ± 9.6 years). Preoperative manifest refraction was -4.92 ± 1.95 diopters (D) in the wavefront-guided group and -4.44 ± 1.98 D in the topography-guided group. Visual function and subjective symptoms were compared between groups before and 1 and 3 months after LASIK. Of seven subjective symptoms evaluated, four were significantly milder in the wavefront-guided group at 3 months. Contrast sensitivity with glare off at low spatial frequencies (6.3° and 4°) was significantly higher in the wavefront-guided group. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction, and higher order aberrations measured by OPD-Scan and iDesign were not significantly different between the two groups at 1 and 3 months after LASIK. Both customized ablation systems used in LASIK achieved excellent results in predictability and visual function. The wavefront-guided ablation system may have some advantages in the quality of vision. It may be important to select the appropriate system depending on eye conditions such as the pattern of total and corneal higher order aberrations. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(11):727-732.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Large-sized hepotocellular carcinoma (HCC): a neoadjuvant treatment protocol with repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) before percutaneous MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangos, Stephan; Eichler, Katrin; Balzer, Joern O.; Straub, Ralf; Hammerstingl, Renate; Herzog, Christopher; Lehnert, Thomas; Heller, Mathias; Thalhammer, Axel; Mack, Martin G.; Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a neoadjuvant treatment protocol with repeated transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) before MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for large-sized hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Repeated TACE (mean, 3.5 treatments per patient) was performed in 48 patients with neoadjuvant intention (the largest lesion was between 50 and 80 mm in diameter, and there were no more than five lesions). For the TACE treatment, we used 10 mg/m{sup 2} mitomycin, 10 ml/m{sup 2} Lipiodol and microspheres. The tumor volume was measured by MRI. Lipiodol retention of the tumors was evaluated with CT. After the diameter of the tumors had decreased to less than 50 mm, the patients were treated with MR-guided LITT 4 to 6 weeks after embolization. Repeated TACE reduced the tumor size in 32 patients (66.7%), forming the basis for performing MR-guided LITT procedures. These patients received one to four laser treatments (mean, 1.9 per patient) for tumor ablation, resulting in a median survival of 36.0 months after the first treatment. For the remaining patients, no reduction in tumor size was achieved in 12 patients and disease progression in 4 patients. Neoadjuvant TACE appears to be an effective treatment of large-sized HCC, which extends the indication for MR-guided LITT. (orig.)

  3. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  4. Interventional MR-guided laser induced thermotherapy in oncologic indications; Interventionelle MR-gesteuerte laserinduzierte Thermotherapie bei onkologischen Fragestellungen. Stand und Ausblick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Engelmann, K.; Zangos, S.; Eichler, K. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    1999-09-01

    MR-guided LITT (laser-induced thermotherapy) is currently being evaluated for its effectiveness in clinical oncology. MR-guided LITT is defined as a minimally invasive technology based on the effects of the applied Nd-YAG laser on tumorous tissue. Due to specific characteristics of the laser-induced coagulative effect, online monitoring via MR thermometry is possible and extremely precise. In a period of 6 years 335 patients suffering from malignant soft tissue tumors were prospectively treated via MR-guided LITT. We evaluated the local tumor control rate, the rate of complications and the survival data from the clinical and MRI follow-up. Our results prove that MR-guided LITT results in an extremely low rate of side effects and an effective tumor control rate higher than 95%, depending on the size of the lesion. It is concluded that this therapeutic concept is of clinical value for patients with primary and secondary liver cancer, malignant lymph node involvement, abdominal recurrent tumors and tumors of the head and neck. (orig.) [German] Die interventionelle MR-gesteuerte laserinduzierte Thermotherapie (LITT) wird derzeit klinisch und im Rahmen prospektiver Studien bei unterschiedlichen onkologischen Fragestellungen eingesetzt und evaluiert. Per definitionem stellt die MR-gesteuerte laserinduzierte Thermotherapie ein minimalinvasives Therapieverfahren dar, das auf der Laserwirkung mit resultierendem koagulativen Effekt beruht. Der thermoablative Effekt wird dabei 'online' ueberwacht und dokumentiert durch den Einsatz spezieller MR-Sequenzprotokolle. Innerhalb eines Zeitraums von 6 Jahren wurden dabei prospektiv 335 Patienten mit malignen Weichteiltumoren therapiert und die Tumorortskontrollrate, die Komplikationsrate sowie die Ueberlebensdaten evaluiert. Die gewonnenen Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die MR-gesteuerte LITT ein nebenwirkungsarmes Therapieverfahren darstellt, mit einer enorm hohen Praezison und einer Tumorortskontrollrate bei optimierter Technik

  5. An Approach for High-Resolution Mapping of Hawaiian Metrosideros Forest Mortality Using Laser-Guided Imaging Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R. Vaughn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death (ROD is a disease aggressively killing large numbers of Metrosideros polymorpha (‘ōhi‘a, a native keystone tree species on Hawaii Island. This loss threatens to deeply alter the biological make-up of this unique island ecosystem. Spatially explicit information about the present and past advancement of the disease is essential for its containment; yet, currently such data are severely lacking. To this end, we used the Carnegie Airborne Observatory to collect Laser-Guided Imaging Spectroscopy data and high-resolution digital imagery across >500,000 ha of Hawaii Island in June–July 2017. We then developed a method to map individual tree crowns matching the symptoms of both active (brown; desiccated ‘ōhi‘a crowns and past (leafless tree crowns ROD infection using an ensemble of two distinct machine learning approaches. Employing a very conservative classification scheme for minimizing false-positives, model sensitivity rates were 86.9 and 82.5, and precision rates were 97.4 and 95.3 for browning and leafless crowns, respectively. Across the island of Hawaii, we found 43,134 individual crowns suspected of exhibiting the active (browning stage of ROD infection. Hotspots of potential ROD infection are apparent in the maps. The peninsula on the eastern side of Hawaii known as the Puna district, where the ROD outbreak likely originated, contained a particularly high density of brown crown detections. In comparison, leafless crown detections were much more numerous (547,666 detected leafless crowns in total and more dispersed across the island. Mapped hotspots of likely ROD incidence across the island will enable scientists, administrators, and land managers to better understand both where and how ROD spreads and how to apply limited resources to limiting this spread.

  6. Joint Laser Interoperability, Tomorrow's Answer to Precision Engagement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neuenswander, David

    2001-01-01

    .... This includes a brief discussion of how a laser works and what constitutes the basic parts of a laser system, laser range finders, laser designators, laser spot trackers, and laser guided weapons...

  7. Research on the compensation of laser launch optics to improve the performance of the LGS spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Yuning; Tian, Donghe; Zheng, Quan; Lin, Xudong; Wang, Liang; Yang, Qingyun

    2018-02-01

    To improve the beam quality of the uplink laser, a 37 channel piezo-ceramic deformable mirror was inserted into the laser launch optics to compensate the static aberrations. An interferometer was used as the calibration light source as well as the wavefront sensor to perform closed-loop correction for the moment. About 0.38λ root mean square (rms) aberrations, including the deformable mirror's initial figure error, were compensated, and the residual error was less than 0.07λ rms. Field observations with a 2 m optical telescope demonstrated that the peak intensity value of the laser guide star (LGS) spot increased from 5650 to 7658, and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) size reduced from 4.07 arcseconds to 3.52 arcseconds. With the compensation, an improved guide star spot can be obtained, which is crucial for the adaptive optics systems of ground-based large telescopes.

  8. An Auto-Fluorescence guided surgical approach performed with Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG Low Level Laser Therapy for Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Giovannacci

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (MRONJ therapy remains an unresolved problem. The proposed conservative and surgical treatment regimens are associated to contradictory success rates. Surgical approach with Er:YAG laser is associated to significant better results compared to medical treatment and traditional surgical approaches. Objective: To describe a new surgical approach that couples the advantages of the Er:YAG laser and the usefulness of the AF in highlighting surgical margins. One of the difficulties encountered during surgical removal of a MRONJ is the precise individuation of necrotic bone margins. Case Report: A case of Stage III mandibular osteonecrosis treated with a new surgical approach is presented. The aim is to describe an auto-fluorescence (AF guided surgical approach performed with Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT. After one month of follow-up, the complete mucosal healing was evident and symptoms was unobserved. Such a technique allowed a highly accurate and minimally invasive approach through the selective ablation of the non-/hypofluorescent areas. Conclusion: Taking into account the advantages of laser therapy and the possible effectiveness of the AF in highlighting surgical margins, this approach would probably achieve excellent outcomes.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.486

  9. Topography-guided hyperopic and hyperopic astigmatism femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK: long-term experience with the 400 Hz eye-Q excimer platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John KanellopoulosDepartment of Ophthalmology, New York University Medical School, New York, NY, and LaserVision.gr Eye Institute, Athens, GreeceBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of topography-guided ablation using the WaveLight 400 Hz excimer laser in laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK for hyperopia and/or hyperopic astigmatism.Methods: We prospectively evaluated 208 consecutive LASIK cases for hyperopia with or without astigmatism using the topography-guided platform of the 400 Hz Eye-Q excimer system. The mean preoperative sphere value was +3.04 ± 1.75 (range 0.75–7.25 diopters (D and the mean cylinder value was –1.24 ± 1.41 (–4.75–0 D. Flaps were created either with Intralase FS60 (AMO, Irvine, CA or FS200 (Alcon, Fort Worth, TX femtosecond lasers. Parameters evaluated included age, preoperative and postoperative refractive error, uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, flap diameter and thickness, topographic changes, higher order aberration changes, and low contrast sensitivity. These measurements were repeated postoperatively at regular intervals for at least 24 months.Results: Two hundred and two eyes were available for follow-up at 24 months. Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved from 5.5/10 to 9.2/10. At 24 (8–37 months, 75.5% of the eyes were in the ±0.50 D range and 94.4% were in the ±1.00 D range of the refractive goal. Postoperatively, the mean sphere value was –0.39 ± 0.3 and the cylinder value was –0.35 ± 0.25. Topographic evidence showed that ablation was made in the visual axis and not in the center of the cornea, thus correlating with the angle kappa. No significant complications were encountered in this small group of patients.Conclusion: Hyperopic LASIK utilizing the topography-guided platform of the 400 Hz Eye-Q Allegretto excimer and a femtosecond laser flap appears to be safe and effective for

  10. Image-guided removal of occlusal caries lesions with a λ= 9.3-μm CO2 laser using near-IR transillumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Leon C.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Fried, Daniel; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-IR transillumination is well suited for imaging deep occlusal lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine if near-IR images can be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural occlusal lesions on extracted teeth. Near-IR occlusal transillumination images of extracted human teeth with natural occlusal caries lesions were acquired using an InGaAs camera and near-IR light at wavelengths from 1290 to 1470-nm from a filtered tungsten halogen source. A CO2 laser operating at 9.3-μm with a pulse duration of 10-15-μs and a pulse repetition rate of 100-300-Hz was used for caries removal. Optical Coherence tomography was used to confirm lesion presence and serial scans were used to assess selective removal. Teeth were also sectioned for histological examination using polarized light microscopy. This study suggests that near-infrared transillumination is a promising method for the image guided laser ablation of occlusal caries lesions but the use of serial near-IR transillumination imaging for monitoring lesion removal was limited.

  11. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  12. Numerical modelling of a 10-cm-long multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerator driven by a self-guided petawatt pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, S Y; Yi, S A; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Reed, S A; Dong, P; Wang, X; Du, D; Bedacht, S; Zgadzaj, R; Henderson, W; Bernstein, A; Dyer, G; Martinez, M; Gaul, E; Beck, A; Davoine, X; Lefebvre, E; Lifschitz, A F; Pukhov, A

    2010-01-01

    The use of a short-pulse petawatt (PW) laser (τ L 17 cm -3 and is stable against relativistic filamentation. A fully broken electromagnetic wake (electron density 'bubble') is excited over the entire interaction length. Variations of bubble size and shape associated with nonlinear evolution of the driving pulse result in self-injection of background plasma electrons. Self-injection begins immediately after the first nonlinear laser focus, where pulse de-focusing forces the bubble to grow. Injection continues without interruption while the bubble expands, and ceases when the laser becomes self-guided and bubble evolution stabilizes. Self-injected electrons are accelerated to ∼7 GeV with less than 10% energy spread and ∼1.3 nC charge. Numerical modelling of the laser pulse dynamics over the entire plasma length is carried out using a time-averaged, fully relativistic, quasi-static three-dimensional (3D) axi-symmetric particle-in-cell (PIC) code, WAKE. The process of electron self-injection is explored by means of both test-particle modelling (WAKE) and 3D PIC simulations using the recently developed CALDER-Circ code in quasi-cylindrical geometry.

  13. Effects of laser photherapy on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and guided bone regeneration: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Aciole, Gilberth T S; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T; Pacheco, Marcos T T; Silveira, Landulfo

    2010-12-15

    We have used Raman analysis to assess bone healing on different models. Benefits on the isolated or combined use of mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, guided bone regeneration and laser on bone repair have been reported, but not their combination. We studied peaks of hydroxyapatite and CH groups on defects grafted with MTA, treated or not with laser, BMPs, and GBR. Ninety rats were divided in 10 groups each, subdivided into three subgroups. Laser (λ850 nm) was applied at every other day for 2 weeks. Raman readings were taken at the surface of the defect. Statistical analysis (CHA) showed significant differences between all groups (p = 0.001) and between Group II and all other (p bone is because of increased secretion of calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA) that is indicative of greater calcification and resistance of the bone. We conclude that the association of the MTA with laser phototherapy (LPT) and/or not with GBR resulted in a better bone repair. The use of the MTA associated to IR LPT resulted in a more advanced and quality bone repair. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  15. Comparison of optical quality after implantable collamer lens implantation and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the optical quality after implantation of implantable collamer lens (ICL and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (WG-LASIK. METHODS: The study included 40 eyes of 22 patients with myopia who accepted ICL implantation and 40 eyes of 20 patients with myopia who received WG-LASIK. Before surgery and three months after surgery, the objective scattering index (OSI, the values of modulation transfer function (MTF cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, and the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS values (OVs were accessed. The higher order aberrations (HOAs data including coma, trefoil, spherical, 2nd astigmatism and tetrafoil were also obtained. For patients with pupil size <6 mm, HOAs data were analyzed for 4 mm-pupil diameter. For patients with pupil size ≥6 mm, HOAs data were calculated for 6 mm-pupil diameter. Visual acuity, refraction, pupil size and intraocular pressures were also recorded. RESULTS: In both ICL and WG-LASIK group, significant improvements in visual acuities were found postoperatively, with a significant reduction in spherical equivalent (P< 0.001. After the ICL implantation, the OSI decreased slightly from 2.34±1.92 to 2.24±1.18 with no statistical significance (P=0.62. While in WG-LASIK group, the OSI significantly increased from 0.68±0.43 preoperatively to 0.91±0.53 postoperatively (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, P=0.000. None of the mean MTF cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, OVs showed statistically significant changes in both ICL and WG-LASIK groups. In the ICL group, there were no statistical differences in the total HOAs for either 4 mm-pupil or 6 mm-pupil. In the WG-LASIK group, the HOA parameters increased significantly at 4 mm-pupil. The total ocular HOAs, coma, spherical and 2nd astigmatism were 0.12±0.06, 0.06±0.03, 0.00±0.03, 0.02±0.01, respectively. After the operation, these values were increased into 0.16±0.07, 0.08±0.05, -0.04±0.04, 0.03±0.01 respectively (Wilcoxon signed ranks test

  16. SU-F-BRCD-08: Uncertainty Quantification by Generalized Polynomial Chaos for MR-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenholtz, S; Fuentes, D; Stafford, R; Hazle, J

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive thermal treatment for metastatic brain lesions, offering an alternative to conventional surgery. The purpose of this investigation is to incorporate uncertainty quantification (UQ) into the biothermal parameters used in the Pennes bioheat transfer equation (BHT), in order to account for imprecise values available in the literature. The BHT is a partial differential equation commonly used in thermal therapy models. MRgLITT was performed on an in vivo canine brain in a previous investigation. The canine MRgLITT was modeled using the BHT. The BHT has four parameters'" microperfusion, conductivity, optical absorption, and optical scattering'"which lack precise measurements in living brain and tumor. The uncertainties in the parameters were expressed as probability distribution functions derived from literature values. A univariate generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion was applied to the stochastic BHT. The gPC approach to UQ provides a novel methodology to calculate spatio-temporal voxel-wise means and variances of the predicted temperature distributions. The performance of the gPC predictions were evaluated retrospectively by comparison with MR thermal imaging (MRTI) acquired during the MRgLITT procedure in the canine model. The comparison was evaluated with root mean square difference (RMSD), isotherm contours, spatial profiles, and z-tests. The peak RMSD was ∼1.5 standard deviations for microperfusion, conductivity, and optical absorption, while optical scattering was ∼2.2 standard deviations. Isotherm contours and spatial profiles of the simulation's predicted mean plus or minus two standard deviations demonstrate the MRTI temperature was enclosed by the model's isotherm confidence interval predictions. An a = 0.01 z-test demonstrates agreement. The application of gPC for UQ is a potentially powerful means for providing predictive simulations despite poorly known

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy as treatment for intractable insular epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M Scott; Donahue, David J; Malik, Saleem I; Keator, Cynthia G; Hernandez, Angel; Reddy, Rohit K; Perkins, Freedom F; Lee, Mark R; Clarke, Dave F

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Seizure onset within the insula is increasingly recognized as a cause of intractable epilepsy. Surgery within the insula is difficult, with considerable risks, given the rich vascular supply and location near critical cortex. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT) provides an attractive treatment option for insular epilepsy, allowing direct ablation of abnormal tissue while sparing nearby normal cortex. Herein, the authors describe their experience using this technique in a large cohort of children undergoing treatment of intractable localization-related epilepsy of insular onset. METHODS The combined epilepsy surgery database of Cook Children's Medical Center and Dell Children's Hospital was queried for all cases of insular onset epilepsy treated with LiTT. Patients without at least 6 months of follow-up data and cases preoperatively designated as palliative were excluded. Patient demographics, presurgical evaluation, surgical plan, and outcome were collected from patient charts and described. RESULTS Twenty patients (mean age 12.8 years, range 6.1-18.6 years) underwent a total of 24 LiTT procedures; 70% of these patients had normal findings on MRI. Patients underwent a mean follow-up of 20.4 months after their last surgery (range 7-39 months), with 10 (50%) in Engel Class I, 1 (5%) in Engel Class II, 5 (25%) in Engel Class III, and 4 (20%) in Engel Class IV at last follow-up. Patients were discharged within 24 hours of the procedure in 15 (63%) cases, in 48 hours in 6 (24%) cases, and in more than 48 hours in the remaining cases. Adverse functional effects were experienced following 7 (29%) of the procedures: mild hemiparesis after 6 procedures (all patients experienced complete resolution or had minimal residual dysfunction by 6 months), and expressive language dysfunction after 1 procedure (resolved by 3 months). CONCLUSIONS To their knowledge, the authors present the largest cohort of pediatric patients undergoing insular surgery for

  18. Molecular Star

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This report describes the making of a self-assembled coordination architecture that is named as a 'molecular star' since it resembles the shape of a star; more specifically a five-pointed star. This work has been already published in Chemistry- A European Jour- nal in the September 2017 issue and was featured in the cover.

  19. Safety and efficacy of wavefront-guided myopic laser in situ keratomileusis using a new wavefront sensor technology: first 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, David; Santhiago, Marcony R; Tellouck, Joy; De Castro, Tania; Lecomte, Fanny; Mello, Glauco R; Touboul, David

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for the correction of low to high myopia and myopic astigmatism using data derived from a new-generation Hartmann-Shack aberrometer. Refractive Surgery Unit, Bordeaux Hospital University, France. Retrospective case series. This retrospective study analyzed the initial group of eyes treated with wavefront-guided LASIK for myopia and myopic astigmatism using the Visx S4IR excimer laser and wavefront data derived from a new Hartmann-Shack aberrometer (iDesign Advanced Wavescan aberrometer). Refractive (refraction and refractive accuracy) and visual outcomes (uncorrected [UDVA] and corrected [CDVA] distance visual acuities) were recorded 3 months postoperatively. The study included 100 eyes of 50 consecutively treated patients. The mean decimal UDVA improved from 0.1 ± 0.1 (SD) preoperatively to 1.1 ± 0.15 postoperatively (P myopia and myopic astigmatism. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Topography-guided hyperopic and hyperopic astigmatism femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK: long-term experience with the 400 Hz eye-Q excimer platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of topography-guided ablation using the WaveLight 400 Hz excimer laser in laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia and/or hyperopic astigmatism. We prospectively evaluated 208 consecutive LASIK cases for hyperopia with or without astigmatism using the topography-guided platform of the 400 Hz Eye-Q excimer system. The mean preoperative sphere value was +3.04 ± 1.75 (range 0.75-7.25) diopters (D) and the mean cylinder value was -1.24 ± 1.41 (-4.75-0) D. Flaps were created either with Intralase FS60 (AMO, Irvine, CA) or FS200 (Alcon, Fort Worth, TX) femtosecond lasers. Parameters evaluated included age, preoperative and postoperative refractive error, uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, flap diameter and thickness, topographic changes, higher order aberration changes, and low contrast sensitivity. These measurements were repeated postoperatively at regular intervals for at least 24 months. Two hundred and two eyes were available for follow-up at 24 months. Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved from 5.5/10 to 9.2/10. At 24 (8-37) months, 75.5% of the eyes were in the ±0.50 D range and 94.4% were in the ±1.00 D range of the refractive goal. Postoperatively, the mean sphere value was -0.39 ± 0.3 and the cylinder value was -0.35 ± 0.25. Topographic evidence showed that ablation was made in the visual axis and not in the center of the cornea, thus correlating with the angle kappa. No significant complications were encountered in this small group of patients. Hyperopic LASIK utilizing the topography-guided platform of the 400 Hz Eye-Q Allegretto excimer and a femtosecond laser flap appears to be safe and effective for correction of hyperopia and/or hyperopic astigmatism. The results are impressive for refractive error correction and stability and for improvement of both uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity.

  1. MR-guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: Preliminary results in 16 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim [Center for Medical Research, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany)]. E-mail: schwarzmaier@klinikum-krefeld.de; Eickmeyer, Frank [Department of Radiology, Coordination Center for Clinical Studies, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Tempelhoff, Wernholt von [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Fiedler, Volkhard Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Coordination Center for Clinical Studies, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Niehoff, Hendrik [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Ulrich, Slif Dagobert [Department of Radiology, Coordination Center for Clinical Studies, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Yang Qin [University of Duesseldorf (Germany); Ulrich, Frank [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    We investigated the survival after laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in 16 patients suffering from recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. The concept underlying the intervention is the cytoreduction of the tumor tissue by local thermocoagulation. All patients received standard chemotherapy (temozolomide). The median overall survival time after the first relapse was 9.4 months, corresponding to a median overall survival time after laser irradiation of 6.9 months. During the study, however, the median survival after laser coagulation increased to 11.2 months. This survival time is substantially longer than those reported for the natural history (<5 months) or after chemotherapy (temozolomide: 5.4-7.1 months). We conclude that cytoreduction by laser irradiation might be a promising option for patients suffering from recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. In addition, the data indicate the presence of a substantial learning curve. Future work should optimize the therapeutic regimen and evaluate this treatment approach in controlled clinical trials.

  2. Image-guided resection of glioblastoma in eloquent brain areas facilitated by laser surface thermal therapy: clinical outcomes and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozumenko, Artem; Kliuchka, Valentyn; Rozumenko, Volodymir; Semenova, Vera; Kolesnyk, Sergii; Fedorenko, Zoja

    2018-01-22

    The increased interest in the application of lasers in neuro-oncology prompted us to present our experience of using the laser technologies in the treatment of cerebral gliomas. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of image-guided laser surface thermal therapy (LSTT) and its influence on survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM).Data of 91 patients (49 males, 42 females, mean age 51.4 years, range 23-70 years) with supratentorial GBMs located in close vicinity to or within the eloquent brain areas were retrospectively analyzed.All patients were divided into two groups: LSTT group (n = 28) and control group (n = 63). There were no significant differences by gender, age, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, and tumor location between groups. Total removal in the LSTT group was performed in 67.9%, in the control group-31.7% (p rates (p rate of complete resection and improved overall survival without the negative effect on the functional status after surgery.

  3. Laser-only Adaptive Optics Achieves Significant Image Quality Gains Compared to Seeing-limited Observations over the Entire Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ward S.; Law, Nicholas M.; Ziegler, Carl A.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed

    2018-02-01

    Adaptive optics laser guide-star systems perform atmospheric correction of stellar wavefronts in two parts: stellar tip-tilt and high-spatial-order laser correction. The requirement of a sufficiently bright guide star in the field-of-view to correct tip-tilt limits sky coverage. In this paper, we show an improvement to effective seeing without the need for nearby bright stars, enabling full sky coverage by performing only laser-assisted wavefront correction. We used Robo-AO, the first robotic AO system, to comprehensively demonstrate this laser-only correction. We analyze observations from four years of efficient robotic operation covering 15000 targets and 42000 observations, each realizing different seeing conditions. Using an autoguider (or a post-processing software equivalent) and the laser to improve effective seeing independent of the brightness of a target, Robo-AO observations show a 39% ± 19% improvement to effective FWHM, without any tip-tilt correction. We also demonstrate that 50% encircled energy performance without tip-tilt correction remains comparable to diffraction-limited, standard Robo-AO performance. Faint-target science programs primarily limited by 50% encircled energy (e.g., those employing integral field spectrographs placed behind the AO system) may see significant benefits to sky coverage from employing laser-only AO.

  4. 11C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Biologic Activity of a Recurrent Glioblastoma Treated with Stereotaxy-Guided Laser-Induced Interstitial Thermotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Galldiks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, local minimally invasive treatment modalities have gained increasing interest recently because they are associated with fewer side effects than open surgery. For example, local tumor coagulation by laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT is such a minimally invasive technique. We monitored the metabolic effects of stereotaxy-guided LITT in a patient with a recurrent GBM using amino acid positron emission tomography (PET. Serial 11C-methyl-L-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT were performed using a hybrid PET/CT system in a patient with recurrent GBM before and after LITT. To monitor the biologic activity of the effects of stereotaxy-guided LITT, a threshold-based volume of interest analysis of the metabolically active tumor volume (MET uptake index of ≥ 1.3 was performed. A continuous decline in metabolically active tumor volume after LITT could be observed. MET-PET seems to be useful for monitoring the short-term therapeutic effects of LITT, especially when patients have been pretreated with a multistep therapeutic regimen. MET-PET seems to be an appropriate tool to monitor and guide experimental LITT regimens and should be studied in a larger patient group to confirm its clinical value.

  5. Star Wreck

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A; Tinyakov, Peter G; Tkachev, Igor I; Kusenko, Alexander; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Tkachev, Igor I.

    1998-01-01

    Electroweak models with low-energy supersymmetry breaking predict the existence of stable non-topological solitons, Q-balls, that can be produced in the early universe. The relic Q-balls can accumulate inside a neutron star and gradually absorb the baryons into the scalar condensate. This causes a slow reduction in the mass of the star. When the mass reaches a critical value, the neutron star becomes unstable and explodes. The cataclysmic destruction of the distant neutron stars may be the origin of the gamma-ray bursts.

  6. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  7. Oligonodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT); Oligonodulaeres hepatozellulaeres Karzinom (HCC): MR-gesteuerte laserinduzierte Thermotherapie (LITT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, K.; Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Engelmann, K.; Zangos, S.; Woitaschek, D.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2001-10-01

    Purpose. To prospectively evaluate the therapeutic potential of MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in patients with oligonodular hepatocellular carcinoma. Material and methods. 39 patients with 61 intrahepatic lesions were treated with LITT. The Nd:YAG laser fiber was introduced with a percutaneously positioned irrigated laser application system. Qualitative and quantitative MR parameters and clinical data were evaluated. Results. All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anesthesia. All observed complications were minor and no further treatment was necessary. Online MR thermometry allowed exact visualization. Lesions p to 2 cm in diameter could be efficiently treated with a single laser application, larger lesions were treated simultaneous multiapplication. In 97.5% we achieved a complete necrosis of the tumor and a 5 mm safety margin, resulting in a complete destruction of the tumor without local recurrences. Mean survival was 4.4 years (95% Cl: 3.6-5.2 years) after the time of diagnoses of the HCC (Kaplan-Meier-method). Conclusion. In intrahepatic oligonodular involvement of hepatocellular carcinoma LITT appears to be an effective therapeutic procedure with a high tumor contol rate and better survival data. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung. Evaluierung des therapeutischen Potenzials der MR-gesteuerten Thermotherapie (LITT) bei Patienten mit oligonodulaerem hepatozellulaerem Karzinom. Material und Methoden. 39 Patienten mit 61 intrahepatischen Laesionen wurden mittels der LITT therapiert. Dabei wurden ein Nd:YAG-Laser (1064 nm) und spezielle Power-Laser-Applikationssysteme perkutan eingesetzt. Qualitative und quantitative Parameter und klinische Daten wurden evaluiert. Ergebnisse. Alle 39 Patienten tolerierten die Therapie unter Lokalanaesthesie, ohne dass klinisch relevante Komplikationen beobachtet wurden. Unter Einsatz spezieller Thermosequenzen konnte die MR-Tomographie als Onlinemonitoring eingesetzt werden. Bei Laesionen bis zu 2 cm wird

  8. Star Tracker Performance Estimate with IMU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Swank, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    A software tool for estimating cross-boresight error of a star tracker combined with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) was developed to support trade studies for the Integrated Radio and Optical Communication project (iROC) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center. Typical laser communication systems, such as the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) and the Laser Communication Relay Demonstration (LCRD), use a beacon to locate ground stations. iROC is investigating the use of beaconless precision laser pointing to enable laser communication at Mars orbits and beyond. Precision attitude knowledge is essential to the iROC mission to enable high-speed steering of the optical link. The preliminary concept to achieve this precision attitude knowledge is to use star trackers combined with an IMU. The Star Tracker Accuracy (STAcc) software was developed to rapidly assess the capabilities of star tracker and IMU configurations. STAcc determines the overall cross-boresight error of a star tracker with an IMU given the characteristic parameters: quantum efficiency, aperture, apparent star magnitude, exposure time, field of view, photon spread, detector pixels, spacecraft slew rate, maximum stars used for quaternion estimation, and IMU angular random walk. This paper discusses the supporting theory used to construct STAcc, verification of the program and sample results.

  9. Star Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  10. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  11. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  12. Two-years results of small-incision lenticule extraction and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis for Myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Hidenaga; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Igarashi, Akihito; Takahashi, Masahide; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2018-03-01

    To compare the 2-years visual and refractive outcomes between small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in eyes with myopia and myopic astigmatism. Our retrospective case-control study examined 30 eyes of 30 patients with the manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) of -3.71 ± 1.83 dioptres (D) who underwent SMILE and 30 eyes of 30 patients with MRSE of -3.81 ± 1.40 D who underwent wavefront-guided LASIK. We assessed the 2-years clinical outcomes. Logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (LogMAR)-corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was -0.23 ± 0.07 in the SMILE group and -0.24 ± 0.07 in the wavefront-guided LASIK group 2 years postoperatively (p = 0.82). Logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution-uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was -0.18 ± 0.09 and -0.15 ± 0.11 (p = 0.30, respectively). In the SMILE and wavefront-guided LASIK groups 2 years postoperatively, 100% and 73% of eyes, respectively, were within 0.5 D of the prompted MRSE correction (p = 0.005). Changes in the MRSE of -0.10 ± 0.30 D and -0.23 ± 0.51 D occurred from 3 months to 2 years (p = 0.40, respectively). We found a significant correlation between myopic regression and the changes in the keratometric readings from 3 months to 2 years after wavefront-guided LASIK (r = -0.48, p = 0.002), but not after SMILE (r = -0.004, p = 0.90). Small-incision lenticule extraction offers better refractive outcomes than wavefront-guided LASIK during a 2-years follow-up for the correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Three-year results of small incision lenticule extraction and wavefront-guided femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis for correction of high myopia and myopic astigmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Kun Xia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare and calculate the 3-year refractive results, higher-order aberrations (HOAs, contrast sensitivity (CS and dry eye parameters after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE and wavefront-guided femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK for correction of high myopia and myopic astigmatism. METHODS: In this prospective, non-randomized comparative study, 78 eyes with spherical equivalent (SE of -8.11±1.09 diopters (D received a SMILE surgery, and 65 eyes with SE of -8.05±1.12 D received a wavefront-guided FS-LASIK surgery with the VisuMax femtosecond laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany for flap cutting. Visual acuity, manifest refraction, CS, HOAs, ocular surface disease index (OSDI and tear break-up time (TBUT were evaluated during a 3-year follow-up. RESULTS: The difference of uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA postoperatively was achieved at 1mo and at 3mo, whereas the difference of the mean UDVA between two groups at 3y were not statistically significant (t=-1.59, P=0.13. The postoperative change of SE was 0.89 D in the FS-LASIK group (t=5.76, P=0.00, and 0.14 D in the SMILE group (t=0.54, P=0.59 from 1mo to 3y after surgery. At 3-year postoperatively, both HOAs and spherical aberrations in the SMILE group were obviously less than those in the FS-LASIK group (P=0.00, but the coma root mean square (RMS was higher in the SMILE group (0.59±0.26 than in the FS-LASIK group (0.29±0.14, P=0.00. The mesopic CS values between two groups were not statistically significant at 3y postoperatively. Compared with the FS-LASIK group, lower OSDI scores and longer TBUT values were found in the SMILE group at 1mo and 3mo postoperatively. With regard to safety, no eye lost any line of CDVA in both groups at 3y after surgery. CONCLUSION: Both SMILE and wavefront-guided FS-LASIK procedures provide good visual outcomes. Both procedures are effective and safe, but SMILE surgery achieve more stable long

  14. Air-guided photonic-crystal-fiber pulse-compression delivery of multimegawatt femtosecond laser output for nonlinear-optical imaging and neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitrii A.; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Ömer Ilday, F.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-03-01

    Large-core hollow photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are shown to enable a fiber-format air-guided delivery of ultrashort infrared laser pulses for neurosurgery and nonlinear-optical imaging. With an appropriate dispersion precompensation, an anomalously dispersive 15-μm-core hollow PCF compresses 510-fs, 1070-nm light pulses to a pulse width of about 110 fs, providing a peak power in excess of 5 MW. The compressed PCF output is employed to induce a local photodisruption of corpus callosum tissues in mouse brain and is used to generate the third harmonic in brain tissues, which is captured by the PCF and delivered to a detector through the PCF cladding.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry: An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Plant and Energy Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Therkelsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Worrell, Ernst [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2012-12-28

    The U.S. baking industry—defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the manufacture of commercial bakery products such as breads, rolls, frozen cakes, pies, pastries, and cookies and crackers—consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in food processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. A summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency is also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. baking industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures—as well as on their applicability to different production practices—is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  16. The efficacy of the use of IR laser phototherapy associated to biphasic ceramic graft and guided bone regeneration on surgical fractures treated with wire osteosynthesis: a comparative laser fluorescence and Raman spectral study on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Santos, Nicole Ribeiro Silva; Oliveira, Priscila Chagas; Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu Santos; Ramos, Thais Andrade; Gonzalez, Tayná Assunção; da Silva, Laís Nogueira; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Silveira, Landulfo

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess, by Raman spectroscopy and laser fluorescence, the repair of surgical fractures fixed with wire osteosynthesis treated or not with infrared laser (λ780 nm, 50 mW, 4 × 4 J/cm(2) =16 J/cm(2), ϕ=0.5 cm(2), CW) associated or not to the use of hydroxyapatite and guided bone regeneration. Surgical tibial fractures were created under general anesthesia on 15 rabbits that were divided into five groups, maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet, and had water ad libitum. The fractures in groups II, III, IV, and V were fixed with wires. Animals in groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite (HA) and guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique used. Animals in groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during 2 weeks (4 × 4 J/cm(2), 16 J/cm(2) =112 J/cm(2)). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death, specimens were taken and kept in liquid nitrogen and used for Raman spectroscopy. The Raman results showed basal readings of 1,234.38 ± 220. Groups WO+B+L showed higher readings (1,680.22 ± 822) and group WO+B the lowest (501.425 ± 328). Fluorescence data showed basal readings of 5.83333 ± 0.7. Groups WO showed higher readings (6.91667 ± 0.9) and group WO+B+L the lowest (1.66667 ± 0.5). There were significant differences between groups on both cases (pbone healing on fractured bones as a result of the increasing deposition of CHA measured by Raman spectroscopy and decrease of the organic components as shown by the fluorescence readings.

  17. Modeling the response of mesospheric sodium to pulsed-laser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellemeier, Joschua A; Hickson, Paul; Labadie, Lucas

    2017-08-01

    A simulation modeling excitation of the sodium D 2 line by nanosecond time scale pulsed lasers is described. By numerically integrating transition rates in the sodium hyperfine structure, the return flux per sodium atom is predicted as a function of laser power. The simulation should be useful for studies of mesospheric sodium and adaptive optics. Applications include the estimation of sodium column density from lidar return flux, and of laser guide star brightness for different pulsed laser formats. The simulation assumes that the pulse repetition frequency is sufficiently low (smaller than a few kilohertz) that atomic collisions restore local thermodynamic equilibrium between pulses. It is also assumed that the pulse length is short compared to the Larmor precession time scale. The numerical results are well-approximated by a simple analytic model for a three-level atom. The number of emitted photons is found to be primarily dependent on the product of the length of the laser pulse and the energy density.

  18. Dark stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maselli, Andrea; Pnigouras, Pantelis; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2017-01-01

    to the formation of compact objects predominantly made of dark matter. Considering both fermionic and bosonic (scalar φ4) equations of state, we construct the equilibrium structure of rotating dark stars, focusing on their bulk properties and comparing them with baryonic neutron stars. We also show that these dark...... objects admit the I-Love-Q universal relations, which link their moments of inertia, tidal deformabilities, and quadrupole moments. Finally, we prove that stars built with a dark matter equation of state are not compact enough to mimic black holes in general relativity, thus making them distinguishable...

  19. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  20. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  1. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Adrian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Worrell, Ernst [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. dairy processing industry—defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the conversion of raw milk to consumable dairy products—consumes around $1.5 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. dairy processing industry to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. dairy processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to dairy processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in dairy processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in dairy processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. dairy processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures—as well as on their applicability to different production practices—is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  5. An onboard star catalog for satellite angular attitude estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruzhilov, Ivan; Chernetsov, Andrey; Zakharov, Andrei; Kruzhilov, Svyatoslav

    2017-09-01

    Accuracy assessment of the satellite remote sensing depends on the angular attitude estimation precision. The 1 arc second error in attitude estimation causes 2.5-meter error in the accuracy derived from remote sensing data for the 500 km orbit. Different kind of momentum wheels, propulsions and sensors help correct spacecraft torque moment to stabilize it in the orbit. Star tracker is the most precise optical sensor for spacecraft angular attitude estimation. An onboard guide star catalog containing data for star pattern identification is essential for star tracker operating. The total number of stars, the faintest stellar magnitude, completeness and uniformity are the key specifications of a star catalog influencing many characteristic of a star tracker. The steps of creating guide star catalog are: instrumental stellar magnitude estimation with respect to the star tracker spectral response, clusterization of nearby stars, removing of unreliable stars and final star selection. An iterative algorithm for thinning down the catalog allows reducing appreciably the number of stars in the catalog and improving its uniformity. The key point of the algorithm is the lower bound evaluation of star number in the FOV (field of view) for every boresight position within a triangle area. The algorithm uses recursive quaternary division of the icosahedron for the celestial sphere tessellation. The correction methods of stellar aberration and star proper motion are discussed as well.

  6. Accelerating and guiding of C6 + by an intense laser irradiating on a foil target with a tapered channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Hou, Ya-Juan; Hong, Xue-Ren; Jia, Mo-Ran; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2017-08-01

    A novel scheme with a tapered channel attached to an ultra-thin carbon foil is proposed to accelerate and guide carbon ions via breakout afterburner mechanism. Also, the problems involved are investigated by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that the tapered channel can efficiently accelerate and guide carbon ions and result in a much better quality beam with an order of magnitude higher in density and 22% larger in cut-off energy than that without the tapered channel. The enhanced reasons are analyzed in detail, which are mainly attributed to the guidance of the longitudinal electric field and the focus of the transverse electric field, as well as the convergence effect of the tapered channel. All of them are certified to guide greatly carbon ions to move along the longitudinal direction. Besides, during the simulation time, the ion beam with a tapered channel can remain eight times smaller in divergence angle than that without the tapered channel. Such a target may be beneficial to many applications such as ion fast ignition in inertial fusion, high-energy physics, and proton therapy.

  7. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  8. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  10. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric P. A. Vogt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT, we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å–9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N_{2}, O_{2}, CO_{2}, H_{2}O, and (tentatively CH_{4} molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT. At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam

  11. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Opitom, Cyrielle; Comin, Mauro; Schmidtobreik, Linda; Smoker, Jonathan; Blanchard, Israel; Espinoza Contreras, Marcela; Aranda, Ivan; Milli, Julien; Jaffe, Yara L.; Selman, Fernando; Kolb, Johann; Hibon, Pascale; Kuntschner, Harald; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2017-04-01

    Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part) the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4) of the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R ≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å-9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N2 , O2 , CO2 , H2O , and (tentatively) CH4 molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS) system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam(s) to avoid the unintentional

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas, Amanda B.; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  13. Statistically Guided Development of Laser-Assisted Cold Spray for Microstructural Control of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Aaron M.; Champagne, Victor K.; Sisson, Richard D.; Apelian, Diran

    2017-04-01

    Laser-assisted cold spray (LACS) was used to deposit Ti-6Al-4V powders onto Ti-6Al-4V substrates using nitrogen as a carrier gas. An L25 orthogonal array was created with three parameters independent of particle velocity considered thus to be the independent thermal parameters (ITPs) of LACS: powder feed rate, raster speed, and laser power. A signal-to-noise analysis of the influence of the ITPs on porosity, microhardness, and expected thickness was performed revealing that optimum parameter selection is highly dependent on the targeted property, with the ITPs having the largest influence on porosity. Additional bulk trials (>2.5 mm thick) were deposited using parameters of interest from the orthogonal study. These scaled trials demonstrate that it is possible to produce deposits of Ti-6Al-4V via LACS using nitrogen as a carrier gas with porosity less than 1 pct, which is comparable with values described in literature for more expensive helium-based cold spray of Ti-6Al-4V. Additionally, variation of the ITPs indicates that secondary phases and morphologies can be produced and controlled through the thermomechanical treatment caused in situ to LACS.

  14. MO-FG-BRA-09: Quantification of Nanoparticle Heating and Concentration for MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLellan, CJ; Melancon, M; Fuentes, D; Stafford, RJ [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston (United States); Salatan, F; Yang, Q [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hwang, KP [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy (npLITT) is a technique that utilizes tumor localized optically activated nanoparticles to increase the conformality of laser ablation procedures. Temperatures in these procedures are dependent on the particle concentration which generally cannot be measured noninvasively prior to therapy. In this work we attempt to quantify particle concentration in vivo by estimating the increase in R2* relaxation induced by bifunctional magnetic resonance (MR)-visible gold-based nanoparticles (SPIO@Au) and relate it to the temperature increase observed during real time MR temperature imaging (MRTI) of laser ablation. Methods: SPIO@Au nanoparticles (90nm) were synthesized containing a silica-iron core (for MR visibility via R2*) and gold shell (for near-infrared absorption). High resolution R2* maps were acquired before and after injecting four different particle concentrations (saline,1e10, 5e10, and 10e10 particles/mL) into HN5 flank xenografts. Tumors were monitored using MRTI during treatment with an interstitial fiber. (1 watt, 808 nm, 3 minutes) Results: The maximum temperature within the tumors increased linearly with concentration of injected particles, reaching 34.0, 37.6, 45.8, and 55.4 {sup 0}C for saline, 1e10, 5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively (R2=.994). The highest temperatures occur at the injection site rather than the fiber, confirming that SPIO@Au nanoparticles are the primary absorber. The differences between the median R2* measured at the injection site and the rest of the tumor were −6, 134, 111, 156 s-1 for the saline,1e10,5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively. This R2* change is consistent with the measured relaxivity for the 1e10 particles/mL injection but does not maintain linearity at higher concentrations. Conclusion: Bifunctional SPIO@Au nanoparticles are a promising technology for providing noninvasive estimates of particle concentration via MRI and

  15. Success potential of automated star pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bezooijen, R. W. H.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-analytical model is presented for calculating the success probability of automated star pattern recognition systems for attitude control of spacecraft. The star data is gathered by an imaging star tracker (STR) with a circular FOV capable of detecting 20 stars. The success potential is evaluated in terms of the equivalent diameters of the FOV and the target star area ('uniqueness area'). Recognition is carried out as a function of the position and brightness of selected stars in an area around each guide star. The success of the system is dependent on the resultant pointing error, and is calculated by generating a probability distribution of reaching a threshold probability of an unacceptable pointing error. The method yields data which are equivalent to data available with Monte Carlo simulatins. When applied to the recognition system intended for use on the Space IR Telescope Facility it is shown that acceptable pointing, to a level of nearly 100 percent certainty, can be obtained using a single star tracker and about 4000 guide stars.

  16. Comparison of Placido disc and Scheimpflug image-derived topography-guided excimer laser surface normalization combined with higher fluence CXL: the Athens Protocol, in progressive keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos,1,2 George Asimellis11Laservision.gr Eye Institute, Athens, Greece; 2New York University School of Medicine, Department of Opthalmology, NY, NY, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of two alternative corneal topography data sources used in topography-guided excimer laser normalization, combined with corneal collagen cross-linking in the management of keratoconus using the Athens protocol, ie, a Placido disc imaging device and a Scheimpflug imaging device.Methods: A total of 181 consecutive patients with keratoconus who underwent the Athens protocol between 2008 and 2011 were studied preoperatively and at months 1, 3, 6, and 12 postoperatively for visual acuity, keratometry, and anterior surface corneal irregularity indices. Two groups were formed, depending on the primary source used for topoguided photoablation, ie, group A (Placido disc and group B (Scheimpflug rotating camera. One-year changes in visual acuity, keratometry, and seven anterior surface corneal irregularity indices were studied in each group.Results: Changes in visual acuity, expressed as the difference between postoperative and preoperative corrected distance visual acuity were +0.12 ± 0.20 (range +0.60 to -0.45 for group A and +0.19 ± 0.20 (range +0.75 to -0.30 for group B. In group A, K1 (flat keratometry changed from 45.202 ± 3.782 D to 43.022 ± 3.819 D, indicating a flattening of -2.18 D, and K2 (steep keratometry changed from 48.670 ± 4.066 D to 45.865 ± 4.794 D, indicating a flattening of -2.805 D. In group B, K1 (flat keratometry changed from 46.213 ± 4.082 D to 43.190 ± 4.398 D, indicating a flattening of -3.023 D, and K2 (steep keratometry changed from 50.774 ± 5.210 D to 46.380 ± 5.006 D, indicating a flattening of -4.394 D. For group A, the index of surface variance decreased to -5.07% and the index of height decentration to -26.81%. In group B, the index of surface variance

  17. Effects of variable power on tissue ablation dynamics during magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy with the Visualase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Sean M; Hargreaves, Eric L; Patel, Nitesh V; Danish, Shabbar F

    2017-09-18

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat various intracranial pathologies. This study investigated the effects of variable power on maximal estimated thermal damage during ablation and duration required to reach maximal ablation. All ablations were performed using the Visualase Thermal Therapy System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota), which uses a 980 nm diffusing tip diode laser. Cases were stratified into low, medium and high power. Maximal thermal damage estimate (TDE max ) achieved in a single plane and time to reach maximal damage (t tdemax ) were measured and compared between groups using a 2×3 Fixed Factor Analysis of Covariance. Ablation area change for cases in which an initial thermal dose was followed by a subsequent dose, with increased power, was also assessed. We used real-time ablation data from 93 patients across various intracranial pathologies. t tdemax (mean ± SEM) decreased linearly as power increased (low: 139.2 ± 10.4 s, medium: 127.5 ± 4.3 s, high: 103.7 ± 5.8 s). In cases where a second thermal dose was delivered at higher power, the TDE expanded an average of 51.4 mm 2 beyond the initial TDE generated by the first ablation, with the second ablation approaching TDE max at a higher rate than the initial ablation. Increased power results in a larger TDE max and an increased ablation rate. In cases where an initial thermal dose does not fully ablate the target lesion, a second ablation at higher power can increase the area of ablation with an increased ablation rate.

  18. A magnified view of high redshift star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Eva

    This work takes advantage of the magnified view of the z = 1-3 Universe provided by cluster-scale strong gravitational lensing to advance our understanding of the physical mechanisms driving the assembly of galaxies at this epoch of peak star formation. In the first chapter, high signal-to-noise multi-wavelength photometry and long-slit rest-frame optical spectroscopy for four of the brightest lensed galaxies known at z = 1-3 is combined for a detailed study of their stellar populations and the physical conditions of their ionized gas. I find these systems to be young starbursts without much dust content which have only recently started the build-up of their stellar mass. A comparison of SFR indicators from the dust-corrected UV light, the Hα and [O II] 3727 nebular emission lines, and the dust-reprocessed 24 µm emission suggests that the Calzetti dust extinction law is too flat to accurately correct dust extinction in young star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2. In a second chapter, the observed relation between stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity for star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2 is extended to lower stellar masses than previously studied, with a sample of 10 lensed galaxies. I find less redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation in this mass range. There is a general agreement with the local fundamental relation between metallicity, stellar mass and SFR from Mannucci et al., though the scatter becomes large for specific star formation rates > 10-9 yr-1 . Using the Kennicutt-Schmidt law to infer gas fractions, I investigate the importance of gas inflows and outflows on the shape of the mass-metallicity relation with simple analytical models. The last chapter presents a combined analysis of HST/WFC3 optical/near-IR imaging and Keck/OSIRIS near-IR IFU spectroscopy aided by laser-guide star adaptive optics for RCSGA0327, the brightest distant lensed galaxy currently known in the Universe. Due to the high lensing magnification of the system, these

  19. Hybrid stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 753-756. Hybrid stars. AsHOK GOYAL. Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Abstract. Recently there have been important developments in the determination of neutron ... be composed of normal nuclear matter with hyperons and/or condensed mesons. The matter at ...

  20. Star Conquest

    OpenAIRE

    Porrino Serrano, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Star Conquest es un juego de mesa "print n play" de estrategia por turnos para dos o tres jugadores. Éste proyecto consiste en tomar el juego de mesa original y desarrollar una adaptación en forma de videojuego para distintas plataformas

  1. Hybrid stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hybrid stars. AsHOK GOYAL. Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Abstract. Recently there have been important developments in the determination of neutron ... number and the electric charge. ... available to the system to rearrange concentration of charges for a given fraction of.

  2. Pulsating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Catelan, M?rcio

    2014-01-01

    The most recent and comprehensive book on pulsating stars which ties the observations to our present understanding of stellar pulsation and evolution theory.  Written by experienced researchers and authors in the field, this book includes the latest observational results and is valuable reading for astronomers, graduate students, nuclear physicists and high energy physicists.

  3. Carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzopardi, M.; Lequeux, J.; Rebeirot, E.

    1985-01-01

    Several stars of this type have just been detected in galaxies where they were not suspected and where they reveal a recent activity not really corresponding to current ideas. Data given by these observations allow the astrophysicists to improve the galaxy evolution models, in particular the evolution model of our galaxy [fr

  4. Computer-designed selective laser sintering surgical guide and immediate loading dental implants with definitive prosthesis in edentulous patient: A preliminary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomo, Giovanni Di; Silva, Jorge; Martines, Rodrigo; Ajzen, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze a preliminary method of immediately loading dental implants and a definitive prosthesis based on the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing systems, after 2 years of clinical follow-up. The study comprised one patient in good general health with edentulous maxilla. Cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) was performed using a radiographic template. The surgical plan was made using the digital imaging and communications in medicine protocol with ImplantViewer (version 1.9, Anne Solutions, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil), the surgical planning software. These data were used to produce a selective laser sintering surgical template. A maxilla prototype was used to guide the prosthesis technician in producing the prosthesis. Eight dental implants and a definitive prosthesis were installed on the same day. A post-operative CBCT image was fused with the image of the surgical planning to calculate the deviation between the planned and the placed implants positions. Patient was followed for 2 years. On average, the match between the planned and placed angular deviation was within 6.0 ± 3.4° and the difference in coronal deviation was 0.7 ± 0.3 mm. At the end of the follow-up, neither the implant nor the prosthesis was lost. Considering the limited samples number, it was possible to install the dental implants and a definitive prosthesis on the same day with success.

  5. Accuracy and complications of computer-designed selective laser sintering surgical guides for flapless dental implant placement and immediate definitive prosthesis installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni A; da Silva, Jorge V; da Silva, Airton M; Paschoal, Gustavo H; Cury, Patricia R; Szarf, Gilberto

    2012-04-01

    Computer-aided dental implant placement seems to be useful for placing implants by using a flapless approach. However, evidence supporting such applications is scarce. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of and complications that arise from the use of selective laser sintering surgical guides for flapless dental implant placement and immediate definitive prosthesis installation. Sixty implants and 12 prostheses were installed in 12 patients (four males and eight females; age range: 41 to 71 years). Lateral (coronal and apical) and angular deviations between virtually planned and placed implants were measured. The patients were followed up for 30 months, and surgical and prosthetic complications were documented. The mean ± SD angular, coronal, and apical deviations were 6.53° ± 4.31°, 1.35 ± 0.65 mm, and 1.79 ± 1.01 mm, respectively. Coronal and apical deviations of prosthesis, and prosthesis fracture. The cumulative survival rates for implants and prostheses were 98.33% and 91.66%, respectively. The mean lateral deviation was 2 mm. The complication rate was 34.4%. Hence, computer-aided dental implant surgery still requires improvement and should be considered as in the developmental stage.

  6. Star Products and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, Mari; Yoshioka, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Star products parametrized by complex matrices are defined. Especially commutative associative star products are treated, and star exponentials with respect to these star products are considered. Jacobi's theta functions are given as infinite sums of star exponentials. As application, several concrete identities are obtained by properties of the star exponentials.

  7. Laser cutting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  8. 2015 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide has been providing star gazers with everything they need to know about the southern night sky for the past 25 years. The 2015 guide will celebrate this landmark with highlights from the past as well as monthly astronomy maps, viewing tips and highlights, and details of the year's exciting celestial events.Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to estimate local rise and set times for the Sun, Moon and planets. The 2015 Australasian Sky Guide also provides information on the solar system, updated with the l

  9. Nuclear processing during star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary survey was conducted of the thermonuclear energy release expected during star formation. The destruction of primordial deuterium provides substantial amounts of energy at surprisingly low temperatures, and must be considered in any meaningful treatment of star formation carried to stages in which the internal temperature exceeds a few hundred thousand degrees. Significant energy generation from consumption of initial lithium requires higher temperatures, of the order of a few million degrees. Depletion of primordial beryllium and boron may never provide an important energy source. The approach to equilibrium of the carbon--nitrogen cycle is dominant at temperatures approaching those characteristic of the central regions of main sequence stars. The present calculation should serve as a useful guide in choosing those nuclear processes to be included in a more detailed study. 8 figures, 2 tables

  10. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  11. Strangeon Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiguang; Xu, Renxin

    Stable micro-nucleus is 2-flavored (u and d), whereas stable macro-nucleus could be 3-flavored (u, d, and s) if the light flavor symmetry restores there. Nucleons are the constituent of a nucleus, while strangeons are named as the constituent of 3-flavored baryonic matter. Gravity-compressed baryonic object created after core-collapse supernova could be strangeon star if the energy scale (˜0.5 GeV) cannot be high enough for quark deconfinement and if there occurs 3-flavor symmetry restoration. Strangeon stars are explained here, including their formation and manifestation/identification. Much work, coupled with effective micro-model of strangeon matter, is needed to take advantage of the unique opportunities advanced facilities will provide.

  12. The monthly sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Ridpath, Ian

    2006-01-01

    In full colour throughout, the seventh edition of Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion's famous guide to the night sky is fully revised and updated for planet positions and forthcoming eclipses up to the end of the year 2011. The book contains a chapter on the main sights visible in each month of the year, and is an easy-to-use companion to the night sky. It will help you to identify prominent stars, constellations, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies, to watch out for meteor showers, and to follow the movement of the four brightest planets. Most of the sights described are visible to the naked eye and

  13. Vanguard Preparatory School Observations of the Double Star STF 1692

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Serenity; Buccola, Breck; Garcia, Karen; Gosney, Matthew; Housatchenko, Jonathan; Martinez, Lilian; Myskow, Wyatt; Renteria, Noah; Schlosser, Ruth; Thompson, Leone; Estrada, Reed; Estrada, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Using a 22-inch Newtonian Alt/Az telescope and a Celestron Micro Guide eyepiece, students from Vanguard Preparatory observed the binary star Cor Caroli (STF 1692) and found a position angle of 228 degrees as well as an average separation of 21.10". This project was a part of the Vanguard Preparatory Double Star Workshop 2015 in Apple Valley, California.

  14. Contralateral comparison of wavefront-guided LASIK surgery with iris recognition versus without iris recognition using the MEL80 Excimer laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Yang, Yabo; Dougherty, Paul J

    2009-05-01

    To compare outcomes in wavefront-guided LASIK performed with iris recognition software versus without iris recognition software in different eyes of the same patient. A randomised, prospective study of 104 myopic eyes of 52 patients undergoing LASIK surgery with the MEL80 excimer laser system was performed. Iris recognition software was used in one eye of each patient (study group) and not used in the other eye (control group). Higher order aberrations (HOAs), contrast sensitivity, uncorrected vision (UCV), visual acuity (VA) and corneal topography were measured and recorded pre-operatively and at one month and three months post-operatively for each eye. The mean post-operative sphere and cylinder between groups was similar, however the post-operative angles of error (AE) by refraction were significantly smaller in the study group compared to the control group both in arithmetic and absolute means (p = 0.03, p = 0.01). The mean logMAR UCV was significantly better in the study group than in the control group at one month (p = 0.01). The mean logMAR VA was significantly better in the study group than in control group at both one and three months (p = 0.01, p = 0.03). In addition, mean trefoil, total third-order aberration, total fourth-order aberration and the total scotopic root-mean-square (RMS) HOAs were significantly less in the study group than those in the control group at the third (p = 0.01, p = 0.05, p = 0.04, p = 0.02). By three months, the contrast sensitivity had recovered in both groups but the study group performed better at 2.6, 4.2 and 6.6 cpd (cycles per degree) than the control group (p = 0.01, p LASIK performed with iris recognition results in better VA, lower mean higher-order aberrations, lower refractive post-operative angles of error and better contrast sensitivity at three months post-operatively than LASIK performed without iris recognition.

  15. ERUPTIVE VARIABLE STARS AND OUTFLOWS IN SERPENS NW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodapp, Klaus W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Chini, Rolf; Watermann, Ramon; Lemke, Roland, E-mail: hodapp@ifa.hawaii.edu [Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Astronomisches Institut, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    We study the outflow activity, photometric variability, and morphology of three very young stellar objects in the Serpens NW star-forming region: OO Serpentis, EC 37 (V370 Ser), and EC 53 (V371 Ser). High spatial resolution Keck/NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics images obtained in 2007 and 2009 in broadband K and in a narrowband filter centered on the 1-0 S(1) emission line of H{sub 2} allow us to identify the outflows from all three objects. We also present new, seeing-limited data on the photometric evolution of the OO Ser reflection nebula and re-analyze previously published data. We find that OO Ser declined in brightness from its outburst peak in 1995 to about 2003, but that this decline has recently stopped and actually reversed itself in some areas of the reflection nebula. The morphology and proper motions of the shock fronts MHO 2218 near EC 37 suggest that they all originate in EC 37 and that this is an outflow seen nearly along its axis. We identify an H{sub 2} jet emerging from the cometary nebula EC 53. The star illuminating EC 53 is periodically variable with a period of 543 days and has a close-by, non-variable companion at a projected distance of 92 AU. We argue that the periodic variability is the result of accretion instabilities triggered by another very close, not directly observable, binary companion and that EC 53 can be understood in the model of a multiple system developing into a hierarchical configuration.

  16. Vibration control for the ARGOS laser launch path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Diethard; Gässler, Wolfgang; Borelli, Jose; Barl, Lothar; Rabien, S.

    2012-07-01

    Present and future adaptive optics systems aim for the correction of the atmospheric turbulence over a large field of view combined with large sky coverage. To achieve this goal the telescope is equipped with multiple laser beacons. Still, to measure tip-tilt aberrations a natural guide star is used. For some fields such a tilt-star is not available and a correction on the laser beacons alone is applied. For this method to work well the laser beacons must not be affected by telescope vibrations on their up-link path. For the ARGOS system the jitter of the beacons is specified to be below 0.05. To achieve this goal a vibration compensation system is necessary to mitigate the mechanical disturbances. The ARGOS vibration compensation system is an accelerometer based feed forward system. The accelerometer measurements are fed into a real time controller. To achieve high performance the controller of the system is model based. The output is applied to a fast steering mirror. This paper presents the concept of the ARGOS vibration compensation, the hardware, and laboratory results.

  17. 2013 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide contains everything you need to know about the southern night sky with monthly star maps, diagrams and details of all the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to determine when the Sun, Moon and planets will rise and set throughout the year. Also included is information on the latest astronomical findings from space probes and telescopes around the world. The Sky guide has been published annually by the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, since 1991. It is recommended for photogr

  18. 2012 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide contains everything you need to know about the southern night sky with monthly star maps, diagrams and details of all the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to determine when the Sun, Moon and planets will rise and set throughout the year. Also included is information on the latest astronomical findings from space probes and telescopes around the world.

  19. A selective laser sintering prototype guide used to fabricate immediate interim fixed complete arch prostheses in flapless dental implant surgery: Technique description and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni de A P; Cury, Patricia R; da Silva, Airton M; da Silva, Jorge V L; Ajzen, Sergio A

    2016-12-01

    Extensive occlusal adjustments and misfit of the prosthesis to prosthetic components are frequent problems related to fixed interim prosthesis fabrication with immediate dental implant loading. The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate a prosthetic guide made with a rapid prototype model based on virtual surgical planning. This prosthetic guide was used to fabricate fixed interim prostheses that would allow immediate implant loading after computer-guided implant installation. Nine interim prostheses were made for 9 participants with complete maxillary or mandibular edentulism. The virtual prosthetic guide was planned using computer-assisted design (CAD) software and was fabricated with rapid prototyping equipment (selective laser sintering). The prosthetic guide had 3 portions: the occlusal portion, which had occlusal registration; the connection portion, which had the information of the position and angulation of the abutment/implant projection; and the mucosa portion, which had the registration of the alveolar mucosa architecture. The prosthetic guide was used by a dental technician to fabricate prostheses. A single trained examiner evaluated the passive fit of the interim prostheses, the average time required for installing the interim prosthesis and for occlusal adjustments, the satisfaction of the patient with the prosthesis; and the screws, torque, occlusion, and prosthesis status. Passive fit was achieved between the prosthetic components and prostheses in 7 participants. The average time required for installing the fixed interim prostheses was 64.44 minutes. All participants reported being more pleased with the fixed interim prosthesis than with the prosthesis worn before implant placement. Prosthesis fractures were observed in 3 participants (2 in the maxilla and 1 in the mandible); all fractures occurred 3 months or more after delivery. No further complication was observed during 6 months of follow-up. The prosthetic guide enabled fabrication of

  20. Lasers in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, M W

    1996-01-01

    Since their introduction, great enthusiasm has greeted the application of lasers to medicine and dentistry. The future is exciting. Research will someday take us to the days of the "Star Trek" laser-scan tooth or bone repair procedures. Lasers are very specific in their application. Choose this new technology carefully, making choices and purchases based on quality scientific research and ongoing analysis and review.

  1. Lightweight Double Neutron Star Found

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    More than forty years after the first discovery of a double neutron star, we still havent found many others but a new survey is working to change that.The Hunt for PairsThe observed shift in the Hulse-Taylor binarys orbital period over time as it loses energy to gravitational-wave emission. [Weisberg Taylor, 2004]In 1974, Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor discovered the first double neutron star: two compact objects locked in a close orbit about each other. Hulse and Taylors measurements of this binarys decaying orbit over subsequent years led to a Nobel prize and the first clear evidence of gravitational waves carrying energy and angular momentum away from massive binaries.Forty years later, we have since confirmed the existence of gravitational waves directly with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Nonetheless, finding and studying pre-merger neutron-star binaries remains a top priority. Observing such systems before they merge reveals crucial information about late-stage stellar evolution, binary interactions, and the types of gravitational-wave signals we expect to find with current and future observatories.Since the Hulse-Taylor binary, weve found a total of 16 additional double neutron-star systems which represents only a tiny fraction of the more than 2,600 pulsars currently known. Recently, however, a large number of pulsar surveys are turning their eyes toward the sky, with a focus on finding more double neutron stars and at least one of them has had success.The pulse profile for PSR J1411+2551 at 327 MHz. [Martinez et al. 2017]A Low-Mass DoubleConducted with the 1,000-foot Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey has enabled the recent discovery of dozens of pulsars and transients. Among them, as reported by Jose Martinez (Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy) and coauthors in a recent publication, is PSR J1411+2551: a new double neutron star with one of the lowest masses ever measured

  2. Quantitative characterization of the reliability of simplex buses and stars to compare their benefits in fieldbuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, Manuel; Proenza, Julián; Almeida, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Fieldbuses targeted to highly dependable distributed embedded systems are shifting from bus to star topologies. Surprisingly, despite the efforts into this direction, engineers lack of analyses that quantitatively characterize the system reliability achievable by buses and stars. Thus, to guide engineers in developing adequate bus and star fieldbuses, this work models, quantifies and compares the system reliability provided by simplex buses and stars for the case of the Controller Area Network (CAN). It clarifies how relevant dependability-related aspects affect reliability, refuting some intuitive ideas, and revealing some previously unknown bus and star benefits. - Highlights: • SANs models that quantify the reliability of simplex buses/stars in fieldbuses. • Models cover system relevant dependability-related features abstracted in the literature. • Results refute intuitive ideas about buses and stars and show some unexpected effects. • Models and results can guide the design of reliable simplex bus/stars fieldbuses

  3. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  4. Energy production in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, Hans.

    1977-01-01

    Energy in stars is released partly by gravitation, partly by nuclear reactions. For ordinary stars like our sun, nuclear reactions predominate. However, at the end of the life of a star very large amounts of energy are released by gravitational collapse; this can amount to as much as 10 times the total energy released nuclear reactions. The rotational energy of pulsars is a small remnant of the energy of gravitation. The end stage of small stars is generally a white dwarf, of heavy stars a neutron star of possibly a black hole

  5. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  6. Regular Generalized Star Star closed sets in Bitopological Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    K. Kannan; D. Narasimhan; K. Chandrasekhara Rao; R. Ravikumar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the concepts of τ1τ2-regular generalized star star closed sets , τ1τ2-regular generalized star star open sets and study their basic properties in bitopological spaces.

  7. Quark core stars, quark stars and strange stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A recent one flavor quark matter equation of state is generalized to several flavors. It is shown that quarks undergo a first order phase transition. In addition, this equation of state depends on just one parameter in the two flavor case, two parameters in the three flavor case, and these parameters are constrained by phenomenology. This equation of state is then applied to the hadron-quark transition in neutron stars and the determination of quark star stability, the investigation of strange matter stability and possible strange star existence. 43 refs., 6 figs

  8. Instrument control software development process for the multi-star AO system ARGOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulas, M.; Barl, L.; Borelli, J. L.; Gässler, W.; Rabien, S.

    2012-09-01

    The ARGOS project (Advanced Rayleigh guided Ground layer adaptive Optics System) will upgrade the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with an AO System consisting of six Rayleigh laser guide stars. This adaptive optics system integrates several control loops and many different components like lasers, calibration swing arms and slope computers that are dispersed throughout the telescope. The purpose of the instrument control software (ICS) is running this AO system and providing convenient client interfaces to the instruments and the control loops. The challenges for the ARGOS ICS are the development of a distributed and safety-critical software system with no defects in a short time, the creation of huge and complex software programs with a maintainable code base, the delivery of software components with the desired functionality and the support of geographically distributed project partners. To tackle these difficult tasks, the ARGOS software engineers reuse existing software like the novel middleware from LINC-NIRVANA, an instrument for the LBT, provide many tests at different functional levels like unit tests and regression tests, agree about code and architecture style and deliver software incrementally while closely collaborating with the project partners. Many ARGOS ICS components are already successfully in use in the laboratories for testing ARGOS control loops.

  9. Elaboration by epitaxy in liquid phase and monocrystalline layers of doped Yag. Realisation of wave guides lasers neodymium and ytterbium at low thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelenc, D.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis reports on the prototype development of a new laser waveguide fabrication technique, Liquid Phase Epitaxy, as part of the research on diode-pumped compact laser devices. This technique has been applied to the growth of single crystal thin layers of neodymium and ytterbium doped YAG on pure YAG substrates. In order to obtain good quality waveguides, we have defined the growth conditions, and demonstrated the advantage of the growth of an undoped YAG cladding layer. Two extra dopings have been studied: gallium, in order to control the refractive index of the layer, and lutetium, in order to control their lattice mismatch. The determination of the segregation coefficient of these four dopants has required the development of a model that takes into account the evolution of the melt with time. We have measured the refractive index increase for each dopant and proposed a mechanism that explains this increase. The spectroscopic characterisation of the layers has shown that the neodymium and ytterbium ions have the same properties as in the bulk material of the same composition. The laser characterisation has shown very low propagation losses (around 0.1 dB/cm), comparable to those of bulk. For the neodymium laser transition at 1064 nm, we have demonstrated the laser effect for an absorbed power threshold of 700μW and measured a slope efficiency of 40% for a threshold of 14 mW in diode pumping. For quasi 3 level transitions, a significant reduction in threshold with respect to unguided lasers has been obtained: at 946 nm in a neodymium doped waveguide, at 1029 nm in an ytterbium doped waveguide, with a 1W diode bar pump. A slope efficiency of 80% has also been measured in an ytterbium doped waveguided emitting at 1048nm

  10. Laser acupuncture and probiotics in school age children with asthma: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of therapy guided by principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockert, Karin; Schneider, Barbara; Porenta, Gerold; Rath, Regina; Nissel, Helmut; Eichler, Irmgard

    2007-03-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) postulates an interaction between the lung as a Yin-organ and the large intestine as a Yang-organ. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate in asthmatic school age children whether treatment with laser acupuncture and probiotics according to TCM portends a clinical benefit to standard medical treatment performed according to pediatric guidelines. Seventeen children aged 6-12 yr with intermittent or mild persistent asthma were enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot study. Eight patients received laser acupuncture for 10 wk and probiotic treatment in the form of oral drops (living non-pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis) for 7 wk. Nine patients in the control group were treated with a laser pen which did not emit laser light and were given placebo drops. Peak flow variability (PFV) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) were measured and Quality of Life was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. Laser acupuncture and probiotics significantly decreased mean (standard deviation) weekly PFV as a measurement of bronchial hyperreactivity by -17.4% (14.2) in the TCM group vs. 2.2% (22.5) in the control group (p = 0.034). No significant effect was detected for FEV(1), Quality of Life criteria and additional medication. As an exploratory result, patients in the TCM group had fewer days of acute febrile infections when compared with the control group [1.14 (1.4) vs. 2.66 (2.5), p = 0.18]. In conclusion, this pilot study generates the hypothesis that the interactive treatment of lung and large intestine according to TCM by laser acupuncture and probiotics has a beneficial clinical effect on bronchial hyperreactivity in school age children with intermittent or mild persistent asthma and might be helpful in the prevention of acute respiratory exacerbations. These results should be confirmed by further studies.

  11. ENERGY STAR Certified Televisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Televisions that are effective as of October 30,...

  12. mSTAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mini-STAR (mSTAR) is a small satellite mission concept to test the hypothesis that the velocity of light is independent of the velocity and orientation of the...

  13. ENERGY STAR Certified Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Boilers that are effective as of October 1,...

  14. Observations of central stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Difficulties occurring in the observation of central stars of planetary nebulae are reviewed with emphasis on spectral classifications and population types, and temperature determination. Binary and peculiar central stars are discussed. (U.M.G.)

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Computers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 6.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Computers that are effective as of June 2, 2014....

  16. ENERGY STAR Certified Furnaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Furnaces that are effective as of February 1,...

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Telephones

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Telephony (cordless telephones and VoIP...

  18. ENERGY STAR Certified Dehumidifiers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Dehumidifiers that are effective as of October...

  19. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  20. Airborne Tactical Laser (ATL) Feasibility for Gunship Operations (Briefing charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-08

    might limit laser weapons employment  Assess tactical laser effectiveness against offensive and defensive gunship targets  Identify potential effects...missions Laser Weapons More Effective (Lower Collateral Effects) Kinetic Weapons More Effective (Larger Explosive Effects) Public Release Public...are needed to guide laser weapon system development Bigger Optics or More Laser Power? Public Release Public Release 12 System Considerations  Weapon

  1. Testing and integrating the laser system of ARGOS: the ground layer adaptive optics for LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, C.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Borelli, J.; Deysenroth, M.; Gaessler, W.; Gemperlein, H.; Honsberg, M.; Kulas, M.; Lederer, R.; Raab, W.; Rahmer, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Laser Guide Star facility ARGOS will provide Ground Layer Adaptive Optics to the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system operates three pulsed laser beacons above each of the two primary mirrors, which are Rayleigh scattered in 12km height. This enables correction over a wide field of view, using the adaptive secondary mirror of the LBT. The ARGOS laser system is designed around commercially available, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers working at 532 nm. In preparation for a successful commissioning, it is important to ascertain that the specifications are met for every component of the laser system. The testing of assembled, optical subsystems is likewise necessary. In particular it is required to confirm a high output power, beam quality and pulse stability of the beacons. In a second step, the integrated laser system along with its electronic cabinets are installed on a telescope simulator. This unit is capable of carrying the whole assembly and can be tilted to imitate working conditions at the LBT. It allows alignment and functionality testing of the entire system, ensuring that flexure compensation and system diagnosis work properly in different orientations.

  2. Laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, E.; Ting, A.; Sprangle, P.

    1989-01-01

    The laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is a novel plasma based electron acceleration scheme which utilizes a relativistic optical guiding mechanism for laser pulse propagation. In the LWFA, a short, high power, single frequency laser pulse is propagated through a plasma. As the laser pulse propagates, its radial and axial ponderomotive forces nonresonantly generate large amplitude plasma waves (wakefields) with a phase velocity equal to the group velocity of the pulse. A properly phased electron bunch may then be accelerated by the axial wakefield and focused by the transverse wakefield. Optical guiding of the laser pulse in the plasma is necessary in order to achieve high energies in a single stage of acceleration. At sufficiently high laser powers, optical guiding may be achieved through relativistic effects associated with the plasma electrons. Preliminary analysis indicates that this scheme may overcome some of the difficulties present in the plasma beat wave accelerator and in the plasma wakefield accelerator. Analytical and numerical calculations are presented which study both laser pulse propagation within a plasma as well as the subsequent generation of large amplitude plasma waves. In addition, the generation of large amplitude plasma waves in regimes where the plasma waves become highly nonlinear is examined

  3. Development of stereotactically guided laser interstitial thermotherapy of breast cancer: in situ measurement and analysis of the temperature field in ex vivo and in vivo adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, P J; Parel, J M; Manns, F; Denham, D B; Gonzalez-Cirre, X; Robinson, D S

    2000-01-01

    The size (0.5-1.0 cm) of early nonpalpable breast tumors currently detected by mammography and confirmed by stereotactic core biopsy is of the order of the penetration depth of near infrared photons in breast tissue. In principle, stereotactically biopsied tumors, therefore, could be safely and efficiently treated with laser thermotherapy. The aim of the current study is to confirm the controlled heating produced by clinically relevant power levels delivered with an interstitial laser fiber optic probe adapted for use with stereotactic mammography and biopsy procedures. Temperature increases and the resultant thermal field produced by the irradiation of ex vivo (porcine and human) and in vivo (porcine) tissue models appropriate to the treatment of human breast tissue by using cw Nd:YAG laser radiation delivered with a interstitial fiber optic probe with a quartz diffusing tip, were recorded with an array of fifteen 23-gauge needle thermocouple probes connected to a laboratory computer-based data acquisition system. By using a stepwise decreasing power cycle to avoid tissue charring, acceptably symmetric thermal fields of repeatable volumetric dimensions were obtained. Reproducible thermal gradients and predictable tissue necrosis without carbonization could be induced in a 3-cm-diameter region around the fiber probe during a single treatment lasting only 3 minutes. The time-dependences of the temperature rise of the thermocouples surrounding the LITT probe were quantitatively modeled with simple linear functions during the applied laser heating cycles. Analysis of our experimental results show that reproducible, symmetric and predictable volumetric temperature increases in time can be reliably produced by interstitial laser thermotherapy. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  5. Magnetism of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.

    2018-01-01

    Strong, stable, and organised magnetic fields are present at the surfaces of a small fraction of OBA stars. These "fossil fields" exhibit uniform characteristics in stars over a tremendous range of stellar mass, age, temperature, and rotation rate. In hot O- and B-type stars, these magnetic fields couple efficiently to the stellar radiatively driven winds, strongly influencing stellar mass loss and rotation. In this article we review the characteristics of the known magnetic hot stars, discuss recent discoveries and insights, and describe recent theoretical progress toward understanding basic field properties and the influence of magnetic fields on hot star evolution.

  6. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most elements are synthesized, or ""cooked"", by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The newly formed elements are released into the interstellar medium during a star's lifetime, and are subsequently incorporated into a new generation of stars, into the planets that form around the stars, and into the life forms that originate on the planets. Moreover, the energy we depend on for life originates from nuclear reactions that occur at the center of the Sun. Synthesis of the elements and nuclear energy production in stars are the topics of nuclear astrophysics, which is the subject of this book

  7. THE FIRST STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Whalen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pop III stars are the key to the character of primeval galaxies, the first heavy elements, the onset of cosmological reionization, and the seeds of supermassive black holes. Unfortunately, in spite of their increasing sophistication, numerical models of Pop III star formation cannot yet predict the masses of the first stars. Because they also lie at the edge of the observable universe, individual Pop III stars will remain beyond the reach of observatories for decades to come, and so their properties are unknown. However, it will soon be possible to constrain their masses by direct detection of their supernovae, and by reconciling their nucleosynthetic yields to the chemical abundances measured in ancient metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo, some of which may bear the ashes of the first stars. Here, I review the state of the art in numerical simulations of primordial stars and attempts to directly and indirectly constrain their properties.

  8. Ponderable soliton stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  9. Astronomy a visual guide

    CERN Document Server

    Garlick, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    Space has fascinated man and challenged scientists for centuries and astronomy is the oldest and one of the most dynamic of the sciences. Here is a book that will stimulate your curiosity and feed your imagination. Detailed and fascinating text is clearly and richly illustrated with fabulous, vibrant photographs and diagrams. This is a comprehensive guide to understanding and observing the night sky, from distant stars and galaxies to our neighbouring planets; from comets to shooting stars; from eclipses to black holes. With details of the latest space probes, a series of monthly sky maps to provide guidance for the amateur observer and the latest photos from space, this book brings the beauty and wonder of our universe into your living room and will have you reaching for the telescope!

  10. The star book an introduction to stargazing and the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Grego, Peter

    2012-01-01

    An Introduction to Stargazing and the Solar System is an introductory section taken from The Star Book that guides you through the night skies, from the history and lives of the stars, to deep-sky objects beyond the Milky Way, and the Celestial Sphere. Followed by an introductory guide to the solar system with high quality images and observational drawings of the planets, covering the Sun, Moon, Inferior and Superior planets. Everyone is interested in the stars and on a clear night astonished by them. The Star Book will answer any questions you may have whe

  11. UPPER LIMITS ON THE RATES OF BINARY NEUTRON STAR AND NEUTRON STAR-BLACK HOLE MERGERS FROM ADVANCED LIGO'S FIRST OBSERVING RUN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, E.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, E.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Chen, Y; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, E.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -E; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garunfi, E.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, E.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kusunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzar, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, E.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, E.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Deill, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, E.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passahieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Proxhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, E. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbecx, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltevi, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Toxmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. E. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heuningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, E.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablong, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave

  12. The Use of Flexible Ultrasound Transducers for the Detection of Laser-Induced Guided Waves on Curved Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Chieh Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT was applied in a laser ultrasonic technique (LUT for non-destructive characterization of metallic pipes at high temperatures of up to 176 °C. Compared with normal ultrasound transducers, a FUT is a piezoelectric film made of a PZT/PZT sol-gel composite which has advantages due to its high sensitivity, curved surface adaptability and high temperature durability. By operating a pulsed laser in B-scan mode along with the integration of FUT and LUT, a multi-mode dispersion spectrum of a stainless steel pipe at high temperature can be measured. In addition, dynamic wave propagation behaviors are experimentally visualized with two dimensional scanning. The images directly interpret the reflections from the interior defects and also can locate their positions. This hybrid technique shows great potential for non-destructive evaluation of structures with complex geometry, especially in high temperature environments.

  13. The Use of Flexible Ultrasound Transducers for the Detection of Laser-Induced Guided Waves on Curved Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai Chieh; Kobayashi, Makiko; Tanabe, Masayuki; Yang, Che Hua

    2017-06-04

    In this study, a flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) was applied in a laser ultrasonic technique (LUT) for non-destructive characterization of metallic pipes at high temperatures of up to 176 °C. Compared with normal ultrasound transducers, a FUT is a piezoelectric film made of a PZT/PZT sol-gel composite which has advantages due to its high sensitivity, curved surface adaptability and high temperature durability. By operating a pulsed laser in B-scan mode along with the integration of FUT and LUT, a multi-mode dispersion spectrum of a stainless steel pipe at high temperature can be measured. In addition, dynamic wave propagation behaviors are experimentally visualized with two dimensional scanning. The images directly interpret the reflections from the interior defects and also can locate their positions. This hybrid technique shows great potential for non-destructive evaluation of structures with complex geometry, especially in high temperature environments.

  14. Star-Branched Polymers (Star Polymers)

    KAUST Repository

    Hirao, Akira

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis of well-defined regular and asymmetric mixed arm (hereinafter miktoarm) star-branched polymers by the living anionic polymerization is reviewed in this chapter. In particular, much attention is being devoted to the synthetic development of miktoarm star polymers since 2000. At the present time, the almost all types of multiarmed and multicomponent miktoarm star polymers have become feasible by using recently developed iterative strategy. For example, the following well-defined stars have been successfully synthesized: 3-arm ABC, 4-arm ABCD, 5-arm ABCDE, 6-arm ABCDEF, 7-arm ABCDEFG, 6-arm ABC, 9-arm ABC, 12-arm ABC, 13-arm ABCD, 9-arm AB, 17-arm AB, 33-arm AB, 7-arm ABC, 15-arm ABCD, and 31-arm ABCDE miktoarm star polymers, most of which are quite new and difficult to synthesize by the end of the 1990s. Several new specialty functional star polymers composed of vinyl polymer segments and rigid rodlike poly(acetylene) arms, helical polypeptide, or helical poly(hexyl isocyanate) arms are introduced.

  15. Dark stars: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  16. Robo-AO: autonomous and replicable laser-adaptive-optics and science system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Davis, J.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Hildebrandt, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2012-07-01

    We have created a new autonomous laser-guide-star adaptive-optics (AO) instrument on the 60-inch (1.5-m) telescope at Palomar Observatory called Robo-AO. The instrument enables diffraction-limited resolution observing in the visible and near-infrared with the ability to observe well over one-hundred targets per night due to its fully robotic operation. Robo-AO is being used for AO surveys of targets numbering in the thousands, rapid AO imaging of transient events and long-term AO monitoring not feasible on large diameter telescope systems. We have taken advantage of cost-effective advances in deformable mirror and laser technology while engineering Robo-AO with the intention of cloning the system for other few-meter class telescopes around the world.

  17. Research on the laser angle deception jamming technology of laser countermeasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-wei; Chen, Wen-jian; Gao, Wei; Duan, Yuan-yuan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years , laser guided weapons behave very well at destroying the military goals in the local wars, the single-shot probability, effective range and hitting precision getting better. And the semi-active laser guided weapons are the most widely used laser guided weapons. In order to improve the viability and protect important military goals, it's necessary to study the technology to against the semi-active guided weapons. This paper studies the working principle, the advantages and disadvantages of the semi-active guided weapons at first, and analyze the possibility of laser angle deception jamming system working. Then it analyzes the working principle and process of laser angle deception jamming technology. Finally it designs a half-real simulation system of laser angle deception jamming, which consists of semi-active laser guided weapons simulation system and laser angle deception jamming system. The simulation system demonstrates the working process of the laser angle deception jamming system. This paper provides fundamental base for the research on the countermeasure technology of semi-active laser guided weapons.

  18. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars. Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation. The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  19. Slowly pulsating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelkens, C.

    1991-06-01

    Photometric data obtained during several years of observations of seven B-type stars are analyzed, including HD 74195 (Omicron Velorum), HD 74560 (HD 3467), HD 123515 (HR 5296), HD 143309, HD 160124, HD 177863 (HR 7241), and HD 181558 (HR 7339). Results indicate that all seven stars are multiperiodic variables with periods of the order of days. Two periods were identified for HD 177863, three periods for HD 74560 and HD 181558, four periods for HD 123515, five periods for HD 74195, six periods for HD 143309, and eight periods for HD 160124. The multiperiodicity and the amplitude behavior of these stars point toward pulsation in high-radial-order g-modes in the stars. It is suggested that these stars form a distinct group of early-type variables, which are named here 'slowly pulsating B stars'.

  20. Nagyszombat and the stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  1. Evolution of massive stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loore, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of stars with masses larger than 15 sun masses is reviewed. These stars have large convective cores and lose a substantial fraction of their matter by stellar wind. The treatment of convection and the parameterisation of the stellar wind mass loss are analysed within the context of existing disagreements between theory and observation. The evolution of massive close binaries and the origin of Wolf-Rayet Stars and X-ray binaries is also sketched. (author)

  2. Laser-driven accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Several devices for using laser fields have been proposed and they can be classified in three broad categories - 'far-field' accelerators (such as the principle of inverse free electron lasers), 'media' accelerators (which, for example, use the inverse Cherenkov effect or laser-controlled plasma waves), and 'near-field' accelerators (using a loaded guiding structure such as cavities or gratings). These different approaches come from the fact that a particle cannot be accelerated by the absorption of single photons (because of momentum conservation) and thus some other element has to intervene. (orig./HSI).

  3. Observing and Measuring Visual Double Stars

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In these days of high-precision astrometric satellites, tremendous contributions to the science of astrometry are being made by amateur astronomers around the globe. This second edition of Observing and Measuring Visual Double Stars contains a significant amount of completely new material inspired by the work done by observers - particularly in the USA - since the first edition was published. Fifteen skilled and experienced astronomers have contributed chapters on their own specialization in the various fields. These include how to use the Internet to carry out precise astronomical measurement, an excellent guide to sketching double stars, and information on how to image double stars of unequal brightness. This new edition is the definitive book for those who are serious about this fascinating aspect of astronomy! Author Bob Argyle has been observing visual double stars for more than 40 years, some with the help of the world's biggest refractors, and has been director of the Webb Society Double Star Se...

  4. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  5. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  6. Massive soliton stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  7. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  8. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  9. Hybrid fiber-rod laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2012-12-18

    Single, or near single transverse mode waveguide definition is produced using a single homogeneous medium to transport both the pump excitation light and generated laser light. By properly configuring the pump deposition and resulting thermal power generation in the waveguide device, a thermal focusing power is established that supports perturbation-stable guided wave propagation of an appropriately configured single or near single transverse mode laser beam and/or laser pulse.

  10. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  11. Horizontal Branch stars as AmFm/HgMn stars

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, G.; Richer, J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations and models for horizontal branch stars are briefly described and compared to models for AmFm stars. The limitations of those models are emphasized by a comparison to observations and models for HgMn stars.

  12. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  13. Laser Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  14. The stargazer's guide to the night sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lisle, Jason, Dr

    2012-01-01

    Explore the night sky, identify stars, constellations, and even planets. Stargaze with a telescope, binoculars, or even your naked eye. Allow Dr. Jason Lisle, a research scientist with a masters and PhD in astrophysics, to guide you in examining the beauty of God's Creation with 150 full color star-charts. Learn the best ways and optimal times to observe planets and stars with easy to use illustrations. Create or expand the hobby of stargazing; an outdoor, educational hobby to enjoy with friends or family.

  15. Merging strangeon stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Yun-Wei; Zhou, En-Ping; Li, Yun-Yang; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2018-02-01

    The state of supranuclear matter in compact stars remains puzzling, and it is argued that pulsars could be strangeon stars. What would happen if binary strangeon stars merge? This kind of merger could result in the formation of a hyper-massive strangeon star, accompanied by bursts of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation (and even a strangeon kilonova explained in the paper). The tidal polarizability of binary strangeon stars is different from that of binary neutron stars, because a strangeon star is self-bound on the surface by the fundamental strong force while a neutron star by the gravity, and their equations of state are different. Our calculation shows that the tidal polarizability of merging binary strangeon stars is favored by GW170817. Three kinds of kilonovae (i.e., of neutron, quark and strangeon) are discussed, and the light curve of the kilonova AT 2017 gfo following GW170817 could be explained by considering the decaying strangeon nuggets and remnant star spin-down. Additionally, the energy ejected to the fireball around the nascent remnant strangeon star, being manifested as a gamma-ray burst, is calculated. It is found that, after a prompt burst, an X-ray plateau could follow in a timescale of 102 ‑ 103 s. Certainly, the results could be tested also by further observational synergies between gravitational wave detectors (e.g., Advanced LIGO) and X-ray telescopes (e.g., the Chinese HXMT satellite and eXTP mission), and especially if the detected gravitational wave form is checked by peculiar equations of state provided by the numerical relativistical simulation.

  16. Neutron guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  17. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  18. Laser welding of 3 mm thick laser-cut AISI 304 stainless steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Harish; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, Rakesh; Rao, B. Tirumala; Tiwari, Pragya; Nath, A. K.; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet; Chaudhari, S. M.

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the laser weldability of laser-cut 3 mm thick AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (using oxygen as an assist gas). For minimizing heat input during laser cutting, which is an important factor influencing the thickness of the oxide layer on the cut surface, laser cutting was performed in pulsed mode. The results of the study demonstrated that although the laser welding of laser-cut specimens did not result in the formation of weld defects, the resultant laser weldments exhibited reduced ductility with respect to base metal and bead-on-plate laser weldments. Laser-cut and laser-welded specimens also displayed higher notch sensitivity than the base metal. However, laser-cut and laser-welded specimens still possessed enough ductility to pass guided bend tests.

  19. Limited applicability of chromoendoscopy-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy as daily-practice surveillance strategy in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanders, Linda K; Kuiper, Teaco; Kiesslich, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    's disease with dysplasia who are undergoing surveillance and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of chromoendoscopy (CE) combined with integrated confocal laser endomicroscopy (iCLE) for differentiating dysplastic versus nondysplastic lesions. METHODS: Patients with longstanding Crohn's colitis undergoing...... surveillance colonoscopy were included in this multicenter, prospective, cohort study. Surveillance was performed with CE, and lesions were assessed with iCLE for differentiation. All lesions were removed and sent for pathology as the reference standard. RESULTS: Between 2010 and 2014, a total of 61 patients...... with Crohn's colitis were included in 5 centers. Seventy-two lesions, of which 7 were dysplastic, were detected in 6 patients (dysplasia detection rate 9.8%); none included high-grade dysplasia or cancer. Combined CE with iCLE for differentiating neoplastic from nonneoplastic lesions had accuracy of 86...

  20. Laser-assisted in situ synthesis of graphene-based magnetic-responsive hybrids for multimodal imaging-guided chemo/photothermal synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Gao, Zhi-Wen; Chen, Xue-Min; Pang, Shu-Chao; Zhang, Yi

    2018-05-15

    Magnetic graphene-based hybrids are being increasing recognized as an effective nanotheranostic agent in biomedicine. Conventional technologies for their synthesis have drawbacks not only from a synthetic standpoint, mainly requiring high temperatures and multi-step processes, but also from a biological perspective, chemical precursors or surfactants involved in the chemical process are toxic to cells. Herein, we report a novel approach for one-step fabricating magnetic graphene hybrid nanocomposites based on laser irradiation of an Fe target in GO-PEG aqueous solution at room temperature without using any other chemical reagent. TEM, XPS, FT-IR, XRD, Mossbauer spectrum and VSM observation reveal that γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles were directly grown on the surface of GO-PEG with uniform morphology and superior dispersibility. These GO-PEG-γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanocomposites (labeled as GPF) showed low cytotoxicity in vitro compared to chemically synthesized nanoparticles since the pulsed-laser-ablation-in-liquid (PLAL) process is free of toxic agents. After tail vein injection of the nanotheranostics, the tumor was clearly mapped by T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance of γ-Fe 2 O 3 , photothermal imaging of graphene and fluorescence imaging of loaded antitumor DOX. Meanwhile the tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo achieved highly superior inhibition by the synergistic chemo/photothermal therapeutic effect which provided an intense heating effect and enhanced DOX release upon 808 nm NIR light exposure. The results revealed that the magnetic graphene-based hybrids prepared by PLAL is competent for future multi-modal imaging assisted tumor targeted chemo/photothermal synergistic therapy of cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Convective overshooting in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrássy, R.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous observations provide evidence that the standard picture, in which convective mixing is limited to the unstable layers of a star, is incomplete. The mixing layers in real stars are significantly more extended than what the standard models predict. Some of the observations require changing

  2. Hyperons in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1986-04-01

    Generalized beta equilibrium involving nucleons, hyperons, and isobars is examined for neutron star matter. The hyperons produce a considerable softening of the equation of state. It is shown that the observed masses of neutron stars can be used to settle a recent controversy concerning the nuclear compressibility. Compressibilities less than 200 MeV are incompatible with observed masses. 7 refs., 9 figs

  3. PAHs and star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Peeters, E; Bakes, ELO; Spoon, HWW; Hony, S; Johnstone, D; Adams, FC; Lin, DNC; Neufeld, DA; Ostriker, EC

    2004-01-01

    Strong IR emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 mum are a common characteristic of regions of massive star formation. These features are carried by large (similar to 50 C-atom) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules which are pumped by the strong FUV photon flux from these stars.

  4. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  5. Strengths and limitations of the transport category in the green star South Africa rating system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathetha, Mokonyama T

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The chapter evaluates the strenghts and limitations of the Green Star South Africa's rating scheme in respect of its transport environment category. The evaluation is necessary, among other things, to guide decision makers on the interpretation...

  6. ARGOS laser system mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deysenroth, M.; Honsberg, M.; Gemperlein, H.; Ziegleder, J.; Raab, W.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Gässler, W.; Borelli, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    ARGOS, a multi-star adaptive optics system is designed for the wide-field imager and multi-object spectrograph LUCI on the LBT (Large Binocular Telescope). Based on Rayleigh scattering the laser constellation images 3 artificial stars (at 532 nm) per each of the 2 eyes of the LBT, focused at a height of 12 km (Ground Layer Adaptive Optics). The stars are nominally positioned on a circle 2' in radius, but each star can be moved by up to 0.5' in any direction. For all of these needs are following main subsystems necessary: 1. A laser system with its 3 Lasers (Nd:YAG ~18W each) for delivering strong collimated light as for LGS indispensable. 2. The Launch system to project 3 beams per main mirror as a 40 cm telescope to the sky. 3. The Wave Front Sensor with a dichroic mirror. 4. The dichroic mirror unit to grab and interpret the data. 5. A Calibration Unit to adjust the system independently also during day time. 6. Racks + platforms for the WFS units. 7. Platforms and ladders for a secure access. This paper should mainly demonstrate how the ARGOS Laser System is configured and designed to support all other systems.

  7. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  8. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  9. Observations of the star Cor Caroli at the Apple Valley Workshop 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Reed; Boyd, Sidney; Estrada, Chris; Evans, Cody; Rhoades, Hannah; Rhoades, Mark; Rhoades, Trevor

    2017-06-01

    Using a 22-inch Newtonian Alt/Az telescope and Celestron Micro Guide eyepiece, students participating in a workshop observed the binary star Cor Caroli (STF 1692) and found a position angle of 231.0 degrees as well as an average separation of 18.7" This observation compared favorably with the 2015 Washington Double Star published position. This project was part of Mark Brewer's Apple Valley Double Star Workshop. The results were analyzed using bias and circle error probability calculations.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, P E [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Facultad de Ciencias, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kosmas, M [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vlahos, C [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-11-21

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  11. CHAPTER 1. Miktoarm Star (µ-Star) Polymers: A Successful Story

    KAUST Repository

    Iatrou, Hermis

    2017-04-13

    The term miktoarm stars (coming from the Greek word μιτσ meaning mixed) was adopted in 1992 by our group for star polymers with either chemical (e.g., AB), molecular weight (e.g., AA′), topological (e.g., (AB)-junction-(BA)), or functional group (e.g., AA) asymmetry. The first μ-stars synthesized by anionic polymerization, on the one hand, guided polymer chemists working with other types of polymerization techniques towards this direction and, on the other hand, helped polymer physicists to carry out experiments and develop theories on the influence of the architecture on the morphology of block copolymers. Synthetic strategies based on anionic polymerization, as well as a few examples showing the influence of the miktoarm structure on the morphology of block copolymers, are reviewed in this chapter.

  12. Star Cluster Structure from Hierarchical Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudic, Michael; Hopkins, Philip; Murray, Norman; Lamberts, Astrid; Guszejnov, David; Schmitz, Denise; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Young massive star clusters (YMCs) spanning 104-108 M⊙ in mass generally have similar radial surface density profiles, with an outer power-law index typically between -2 and -3. This similarity suggests that they are shaped by scale-free physics at formation. Recent multi-physics MHD simulations of YMC formation have also produced populations of YMCs with this type of surface density profile, allowing us to narrow down the physics necessary to form a YMC with properties as observed. We show that the shallow density profiles of YMCs are a natural result of phase-space mixing that occurs as they assemble from the clumpy, hierarchically-clustered configuration imprinted by the star formation process. We develop physical intuition for this process via analytic arguments and collisionless N-body experiments, elucidating the connection between star formation physics and star cluster structure. This has implications for the early-time structure and evolution of proto-globular clusters, and prospects for simulating their formation in the FIRE cosmological zoom-in simulations.

  13. Collaborative Research: Tomographic imaging of laser-plasma structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [University of Texas at Austin

    2018-01-18

    The interaction of intense short laser pulses with ionized gases, or plasmas, underlies many applications such as acceleration of elementary particles, production of energy by laser fusion, generation of x-ray and far-infrared “terahertz” pulses for medical and materials probing, remote sensing of explosives and pollutants, and generation of guide stars. Such laser-plasma interactions create tiny electron density structures (analogous to the wake behind a boat) inside the plasma in the shape of waves, bubbles and filaments that move at the speed of light, and evolve as they propagate. Prior to recent work by the PI of this proposal, detailed knowledge of such structures came exclusively from intensive computer simulations. Now “snapshots” of these elusive, light-velocity structures can be taken in the laboratory using dynamic variant of holography, the technique used to produce ID cards and DVDs, and dynamic variant of tomography, the technique used in medicine to image internal bodily organs. These fast visualization techniques are important for understanding, improving and scaling the above-mentioned applications of laser-plasma interactions. In this project, we accomplished three things: 1) We took holographic pictures of a laser-driven plasma-wave in the act of accelerating electrons to high energy, and used computer simulations to understand the pictures. 2) Using results from this experiment to optimize the performance of the accelerator, and the brightness of x-rays that it emits. These x-rays will be useful for medical and materials science applications. 3) We made technical improvements to the holographic technique that enables us to see finer details in the recorded pictures. Four refereed journal papers were published, and two students earned PhDs and moved on to scientific careers in US National Laboratories based on their work under this project.

  14. FEROS Finds a Strange Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    New Spectrograph Explores the Skies from La Silla While a major effort is now spent on the Very Large Telescope and its advanced instruments at Paranal, ESO is also continuing to operate and upgrade the extensive research facilities at La Silla, its other observatory site. ESO PR Photo 03a/99 ESO PR Photo 03a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 1212 pix - 606k] [High-Res - JPEG: 1981 x 3000 pix - 3.6M] Caption to PR Photo 03a/99 : This photo shows the ESO 1.52-m telescope, installed since almost 30 years in its dome at the La Silla observatory in the southern Atacama desert. The new FEROS spectrograph is placed in an adjacent, thermally and humidity controlled room in the telescope building (where a classical coudé spectrograph was formerly located). The light is guided from the telescope to the spectrograph by 14-m long optical fibres. Within this programme, a new and powerful spectrograph, known as the Fibre-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS) , has recently been built by a consortium of European institutes. It was commissioned in late 1998 at the ESO 1.52-m telescope by a small team of astronomers and engineers and has already produced the first, interesting scientific results. FEROS is able to record spectra of comparatively faint stars. For instance, it may be used to measure the chemical composition of stars similar to our Sun at distances of up to about 2,500 light-years, or to study motions in the atmospheres of supergiant stars in the Magellanic Clouds. These satellite galaxies to the Milky Way are more than 150,000 light-years away and can only be observed with telescopes located in the southern hemisphere. First FEROS observations uncover an unusual star ESO PR Photo 03b/99 ESO PR Photo 03b/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 958 pix - 390k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3594 pix - 1.7M] Caption to PR Photo 03b/99 : This diagramme shows the spectrum of the Lithium rich giant star S50 in the open stellar cluster Be21 , compared to that of a normal giant star ( S156

  15. Laser Microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Andra R; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Siegal, Gene P; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Tangrea, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Laser microdissection (LM) offers a relatively rapid and precise method of isolating and removing specified cells from complex tissues for subsequent analysis of their RNA, DNA, protein or metabolite content, thereby allowing assessment of the role of different cell types in the normal physiological or disease processes being studied. In this unit, protocols for the preparation of mammalian frozen tissues, fixed tissues, and cytologic specimens for LM, including tissue freezing, tissue processing and paraffin embedding, histologic sectioning, cell processing, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, and image-guided cell targeting are presented. Also provided are recipes for generating lysis buffers for the recovery of nucleic acids and proteins. The Commentary section addresses the types of specimens that can be utilized for LM and approaches to staining of specimens for cell visualization. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of tissue or cytologic specimens as this is critical to effective LM. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Recent progress on laser acceleration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Dewa, Hideki; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Kando, Masaki; Kondoh, Shuji; Kotaki, Hideyuki

    2000-01-01

    Recently there has been a tremendous experimental progress in ultrahigh field particle acceleration driven by ultraintense laser pulses in plasmas. A design of the laser wakefield accelerators aiming at GeV energy gains is discussed by presenting our recent progress on the laser wakefield acceleration experiments, the developments of high quality electron beam injectors and the capillary plasma waveguide for optical guiding of ultrashort intense laser pulses. (author)

  17. Wiggler Effects on the Growth Rate of a Raman Free-electron Laser with Axial Magnetic Field or Ion-Channel Guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Maraghechi, Behrouz

    2004-01-01

    A relativistic theory for Raman backscattering in the beam frame of electrons is presented and is used to find the growth rate of a free-electron laser (FEL), in the Raman regime. A one dimensional helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field are considered. The effects of static self-electric and self-magnetic fields, induced by the steady-state charge density and currents of the non-neutral electron beam, are taken into account to find the steady-state trajectories. The wiggler effects on the linear dispersion relations of the space-charge wave and radiation are included in the analysis. A numerical computation is conducted to compare the growth rate of the excited waves with nonrelativistic treatment. It was found that self-field effects increase the growth rate in the group II orbits and decrease it in the group I orbits. However, the wiggler effects on growth rate are stronger and increase the growth rate on both group I and group II orbits. The discontinuity, due to the cyclotron resonance with the radia...

  18. Dense Axion Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  19. Coherent Polariton Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghoon; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zhaorong; Fischer, Julian; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Deng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The semiconductor polariton laser promises a new source of coherent light, which, compared to conventional semiconductor photon lasers, has input-energy threshold orders of magnitude lower. However, intensity stability, a defining feature of a coherent state, has remained poor. Intensity noise many times the shot noise of a coherent state has persisted, attributed to multiple mechanisms that are difficult to separate in conventional polariton systems. The large intensity noise, in turn, limits the phase coherence. Thus, the capability of the polariton laser as a source of coherence light is limited. Here, we demonstrate a polariton laser with shot-noise-limited intensity stability, as expected from a fully coherent state. This stability is achieved by using an optical cavity with high mode selectivity to enforce single-mode lasing, suppress condensate depletion, and establish gain saturation. Moreover, the absence of spurious intensity fluctuations enables the measurement of a transition from exponential to Gaussian decay of the phase coherence of the polariton laser. It suggests large self-interaction energies in the polariton condensate, exceeding the laser bandwidth. Such strong interactions are unique to matter-wave lasers and important for nonlinear polariton devices. The results will guide future development of polariton lasers and nonlinear polariton devices.

  20. Coherent Polariton Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghoon Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The semiconductor polariton laser promises a new source of coherent light, which, compared to conventional semiconductor photon lasers, has input-energy threshold orders of magnitude lower. However, intensity stability, a defining feature of a coherent state, has remained poor. Intensity noise many times the shot noise of a coherent state has persisted, attributed to multiple mechanisms that are difficult to separate in conventional polariton systems. The large intensity noise, in turn, limits the phase coherence. Thus, the capability of the polariton laser as a source of coherence light is limited. Here, we demonstrate a polariton laser with shot-noise-limited intensity stability, as expected from a fully coherent state. This stability is achieved by using an optical cavity with high mode selectivity to enforce single-mode lasing, suppress condensate depletion, and establish gain saturation. Moreover, the absence of spurious intensity fluctuations enables the measurement of a transition from exponential to Gaussian decay of the phase coherence of the polariton laser. It suggests large self-interaction energies in the polariton condensate, exceeding the laser bandwidth. Such strong interactions are unique to matter-wave lasers and important for nonlinear polariton devices. The results will guide future development of polariton lasers and nonlinear polariton devices.

  1. Entropy Production of Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M. Martyushev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The entropy production (inside the volume bounded by a photosphere of main-sequence stars, subgiants, giants, and supergiants is calculated based on B–V photometry data. A non-linear inverse relationship of thermodynamic fluxes and forces as well as an almost constant specific (per volume entropy production of main-sequence stars (for 95% of stars, this quantity lies within 0.5 to 2.2 of the corresponding solar magnitude is found. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of known extreme principles related to entropy production.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  3. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Thermonuclear reactions in stars is a major topic in the field of nuclear astrophysics, and deals with the topics of how precisely stars generate their energy through nuclear reactions, and how these nuclear reactions create the elements the stars, planets and - ultimately - we humans consist of. The present book treats these topics in detail. It also presents the nuclear reaction and structure theory, thermonuclear reaction rate formalism and stellar nucleosynthesis. The topics are discussed in a coherent way, enabling the reader to grasp their interconnections intuitively. The book serves bo

  4. Biology Students Building Computer Simulations Using StarLogo TNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V. Anne; Duncan, Ishbel

    2011-01-01

    Confidence is an important issue for biology students in handling computational concepts. This paper describes a practical in which honours-level bioscience students simulate complex animal behaviour using StarLogo TNG, a freely-available graphical programming environment. The practical consists of two sessions, the first of which guides students…

  5. Carbon Stars T. Lloyd Evans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the features used in estimating luminosities of ordinary giant stars are just those whose abundance ... This difference between the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of CH stars and the. J stars, which belong to .... that the first group was binaries, as for the CH stars of the solar vicinity, while those of the second group ...

  6. Neutron Stars : Magnetism vs Gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Neutron Stars : Magnetism vs Gravity. WHY do neutron stars have such strong magnetic fields? Conservation of magnetic flux of the collapsing stellar core. ∫ B.ds (over surface of the star) = constant; Radius of the star collapses from ~ 5x108 to 1x104 metres; Hence, ...

  7. Observational Effects of Strange Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this talk, after briefly reviewing some historical remarks concerning strange stars, the achievements in physics and dynamical behavior of strange stars are discussed. Especially, various observational effects in distinguishing strange stars from neutron stars such as mechanical effects, cooling effects, phase transition and related interesting phenomena are stressed.

  8. Northern star js plaskett

    CERN Document Server

    Broughton, R Peter

    2018-01-01

    Northern Star explores Plaskett's unorthodox and fascinating life from his rural roots near Woodstock through his days as a technician at the University of Toronto to his initiation in astronomy at the Dominion Observatory in Ottawa.

  9. SX Phoenicis stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, J.; Mateo, M.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the basic observational information concerning SX Phe stars, including recent findings such as the discovery of about 40 low-luminosity variable stars in the Carina dwarf galaxy and identification of at least one SX Phe star in the metal-rich globular cluster M71. Direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that at least some BSs are binary systems comes from the discovery of two contact binaries and a semidetached binary among the 50 BSs in the globular cluster NGC 5466. Since these systems will coalesce on a time scale 500 Myr, it stands to reason that many (if not most) BSs are coalesced binaries. The merger hypothesis also explains the relatively-large masses (1.0-1.2 solar masses) that have been derived for SX Phe stars and halo BSs, and may also account for the nonvariable BSs in the 'SX Phe instability strip'. 132 refs

  10. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  11. Principles of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bodenheimer, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding star formation is one of the key fields in present-day astrophysics. This book treats a wide variety of the physical processes involved, as well as the main observational discoveries, with key points being discussed in detail. The current star formation in our galaxy is emphasized, because the most detailed observations are available for this case. The book presents a comparison of the various scenarios for star formation, discusses the basic physics underlying each one, and follows in detail the history of a star from its initial state in the interstellar gas to its becoming a condensed object in equilibrium. Both theoretical and observational evidence to support the validity of the general evolutionary path are presented, and methods for comparing the two are emphasized. The author is a recognized expert in calculations of the evolution of protostars, the structure and evolution of disks, and stellar evolution in general. This book will be of value to graduate students in astronomy and astroph...

  12. Recent highlights from STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Wangmei

    2018-02-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment takes advantage of its excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities at mid-rapidity to explore the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter created in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. The STAR collaboration presented 7 parallel and 2 plenary talks at Strangeness in Quark Matter 2017 and covered various topics including heavy flavor measurements, bulk observables, electro-magnetic probes and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  13. Star of Bethlehem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The biblical Star of Bethlehem, which heralded the birth of Jesus Christ, is only mentioned in the Gospel of St Matthew 2. The astrologically significant 7 bc triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces is the most likely candidate, although a comet/nova in 5 bc and a comet in 4 bc cannot be ruled out. There is also the possibility that the star was simply fictitious....

  14. Young Stars with SALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, Adric R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L. [Department of Astrophysics, The American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Henry, Todd J., E-mail: arr@caltech.edu [RECONS Institute, Chambersburg, PA (United States)

    2017-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups.

  15. Young Stars with SALT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Adric R.; Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Henry, Todd J.

    2017-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  16. Massive star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshavskij, V.I.; Tutukov, A.V.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Astronomicheskij Sovet)

    1975-01-01

    The structure and evolution of 16 (Sun mass), 32 (Sun mass), and 64 (Sun mass) stars with the initial chemical composition X=0.602, Y=0.354, and Z=0.044 (X 12 = 0.00619 and X 16 = 0.01847) are analyzed from the initial main sequence to a complete burnup of oxygen in the nucleus of a red supergiant. At the stage of helium buring in the nucleus the evolutionary track of the star is determined by the equilibrium condition in the zone of varying chemical composition, and at later stages by energy losses due to neutrino emission. In the absence of neutrino emission the external convective zone propagates into regions occupied by the former hydrogen and helium layer sources. This may lead to considerable anomalies in the chemical composition at the star surface and to the decrease of the carbon-oxygen nucleus mass. With regard to neutrino energy losses the structure of layer sources and of the star itself becomes more complicated, thereby increasing the evolution time. Estimation is made of the change in heli.um, carbon, and oxygen contents in the interstellar space over the Galaxy's lifetime as a result of the evolution of massive stars. Some consequences of rotation and meridional circulations are discussed. A study of the structure and evolution of hydrogen-helium massive stars before firing of carbon in the nucleus is made

  17. Eclipsing binary stars modeling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kallrath, Josef

    1999-01-01

    This book focuses on the formulation of mathematical models for the light curves of eclipsing binary stars, and on the algorithms for generating such models Since information gained from binary systems provides much of what we know of the masses, luminosities, and radii of stars, such models are acquiring increasing importance in studies of stellar structure and evolution As in other areas of science, the computer revolution has given many astronomers tools that previously only specialists could use; anyone with access to a set of data can now expect to be able to model it This book will provide astronomers, both amateur and professional, with a guide for - specifying an astrophysical model for a set of observations - selecting an algorithm to determine the parameters of the model - estimating the errors of the parameters It is written for readers with knowledge of basic calculus and linear algebra; appendices cover mathematical details on such matters as optimization, coordinate systems, and specific models ...

  18. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  19. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  20. OSETI with STACEE: a search for nanosecond optical transients from nearby stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, D S; Ball, J; Covault, C E; Carson, J E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Mueller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

    2009-05-01

    We have used the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) high-energy gamma-ray detector to look for fast blue-green laser pulses from the vicinity of 187 stars. The STACEE detector offers unprecedented light-collecting capability for the detection of nanosecond pulses from such lasers. We estimate STACEE's sensitivity to be approximately 10 photons/m(2) at a wavelength of 420 nm. The stars have been chosen because their characteristics are such that they may harbor habitable planets, and they are relatively close to Earth. Each star was observed for 10 minutes, and we found no evidence for laser pulses in any of the data sets. Key Words: Search for extraterrestrial intelligence-Optical search for extraterrestrial intelligence-Interstellar communication-Laser.

  1. Binary neutron star merger simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruegmann, Bernd [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Our research focuses on the numerical tools necessary to solve Einstein's equations. In recent years we have been particularly interested in spacetimes consisting of two neutron stars in the final stages of their evolution. Because of the emission of gravitational radiation, the objects are driven together to merge; the emitted gravitational wave signal is visualized. This emitted gravitational radiation carries energy and momentum away from the system and contains information about the system. Late last year the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) began searches for these gravitational wave signals at a sensitivity at which detections are expected. Although such systems can radiate a significant amount of their total mass-energy in gravitational waves, the gravitational wave signals one expects to receive on Earth are not strong, since sources of gravitational waves are often many millions of light years away. Therefore one needs accurate templates for the radiation one expects from such systems in order to be able to extract them out of the detector's noise. Although analytical models exist for compact binary systems when the constituents are well separated, we need numerical simulation to investigate the last orbits before merger to obtain accurate templates and validate analytical approximations. Due to the strong nonlinearity of the equations and the large separation of length scales, these simulations are computationally demanding and need to be run on large supercomputers. When matter is present the computational cost as compared to pure black hole (vacuum) simulations increases even more due to the additional matter fields. But also more interesting astrophysical phenomena can happen. In fact, there is the possibility for a strong electromagnetic signal from the merger (e.g., a short gamma-ray burst or lower-energy electromagnetic signatures from the ejecta) and significant neutrino emission. Additionally, we can expect that

  2. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  3. Colorectal cancer liver metastases: long-term survival and progression-free survival after thermal ablation using magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in 594 patients: analysis of prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Dommermuth, Alena; Heinle, Britta; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A; Lehnert, Thomas; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan; Bechstein, Wolf O; Naguib, Nagy N N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of prognostic factors for long-term survival and progression-free survival (PFS) after treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases with magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced interstital thermotherapy (LITT). We included 594 patients (mean age, 61.2 years) with CRC liver metastases who were treated with LITT. The statistical analysis of the long-term survival and PFS were based on the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression model tested different parameters that could be of prognostic value. The tested prognostic factors were the following: sex, age, the location of primary tumor, the number of metastases, the maximal diameter and total volume of metastases and necroses, the quotient of total volumes of metastases and necroses, the time of appearance of liver metastases and location in the liver, the TNM classification of CRC, extrahepatic metastases, and neoadjuvant treatments. The median survival was 25 months starting from the date of the first LITT. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival rates were 78%, 50.1%, 28%, 16.4%, and 7.8%, respectively. The median PFS was 13 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year PFS rates were 51.3%, 35.4%, 30.7%, 25.4%, and 22.3%, respectively. The number of metastases and their maximal diameter were the most important prognostic factors for both long-term survival and PFS. Long-term survival was also highly influenced by the initial involvement of the lymph nodes. For patients treated with LITT for CRC liver metastases, the number and size of metastases, together with the initial lymph node status, are significant prognostic factors for long-term survival.

  4. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  5. Stars a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    King, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Stars: A Very Short Introduction looks at how stars live, producing all the chemical elements beyond helium, and how they die, leaving remnants such as black holes. Every atom of our bodies has been part of a star. Our very own star, the Sun, is crucial to the development and sustainability of life on Earth. Understanding stars is key to understanding the galaxies they inhabit, the existence of planets, and the history of our entire Universe. This VSI explores the science of stars, the mechanisms that allow them to form, the processes that allow them to shine, and the results of their death.

  6. Lithium in LMC carbon stars

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzidimitriou, D.; Morgan, D. H.; Cannon, R. D.; Croke, B. F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen carbon stars that show lithium enrichment in their atmospheres have been discovered among a sample of 674 carbon stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Six of the Li-rich carbon stars are of J-type, i.e. with strong 13C isotopic features. No super-Li-rich carbon stars were found. The incidence of lithium enrichment among carbon stars in the LMC is much rarer than in the Galaxy, and about five times more frequent among J-type than among N-type carbon stars. The bolometric magnitudes of ...

  7. Dynamical Boson Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Liebling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  8. Instability and star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    The observational data are discussed which testify that the phenomena of dynamical instability of stars and stellar systems are definite manifestations of their evolution. The study of these phenomena has shown that the instability is a regular phase of stellar evolution. It has resulted in the recognition of the most important regularities of the process of star formation concerning its nature. This became possible due to the discovery in 1947 of stellar associations in our Galaxy. The results of the study of the dynamical instability of stellar associations contradict the predictions of classical hypothesis of stellar condensation. These data supplied a basis for a new hypothesis on the formation of stars and nebulae by the decay of superdense protostars [ru

  9. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  10. The twinkling of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakeman, E.; Parry, G.; Pike, E.R.; Pusey, P.N.

    1978-01-01

    This article collects together some of the main ideas and experimental results on the twinkling of stars. Statistical methods are used to characterise the features of the scintillation and to investigate the ways in which these depend on the zenith angle of the star, the bandwidth of the light and various other parameters. Some new results are included which demonstrate the advantages of using photon counting methods in experiments on stellar scintillation. Since the twinkling of stars is a consequence of the turbulence in the Earth's magnetic atmosphere then measurements can be used to deduce some features of the structure of the turbulence. Some of the experiments designed to do this are discussed and the results reported. (author)

  11. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  12. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  13. General Relativity and Compact Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-01-01

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10 14 times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed

  14. Star sensors for autonomous attitude control and navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bezooijen, Roelof W. H.

    1992-11-01

    The attitude control and navigation systems of future advanced spacecraft will be characterized by a high degree of autonomy, very high accuracy, efficient commandability, and fast fault recovery. These characteristics are incompatible with the constraints of conventional star sensors which mandate a-priori definition of all onboard attitude fixes and work only if attitude uncertainties remain small. With the availability of accurate, anti-blooming capable CCDs, fast microprocessors, high density memory chips, and star pattern recognition algorithms, it is now feasible to fabricate miniature Autonomous Star Trackers (ASTs) capable of (1) determining their attitude rapidly and reliably while having no a-priori attitude knowledge, (2) autonomous attitude updating, and (3) providing their attitude at rates up to typically 40 Hz. In addition to providing the functionality needed for future missions, ASTs can also be exploited to improve the reliability, mass, power, and cost of spacecraft and reduce the cost of operating them. This paper describes star identification schemes used in the past, it discusses a number of star pattern recognition algorithms, and provides the main characteristics of current CCD star trackers. A number of specific functions enabled or enhanced by an AST are described including fast attitude acquisition, rapid fault recovery, attitude safing, gyroless/cheap-gyro attitude control, autonomous target acquisition by astronomy telescopes, autonomous optical navigation, and precision pointing to terrestrial targets. The AST being developed at Lockheed uses a fast, memory-efficient, and highly robust star pattern recognition algorithm based on matching groups of stars. The algorithm, which is also applicable to star scanners, is described along with a realistic simulation program for testing its performance. It is shown that an AST with an 11.3 degree FOV diameter, a database of 4100 guide stars, a 25 MHz MC68030 class microprocessor, and 800 Kbytes

  15. Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  16. Chaplygin dark star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.

    2005-01-01

    We study the general properties of a spherically symmetric body described through the generalized Chaplygin equation of state. We conclude that such an object, dubbed generalized Chaplygin dark star, should exist within the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model of unification of dark energy and dark matter, and derive expressions for its size and expansion velocity. A criteria for the survival of the perturbations in the GCG background that give origin to the dark star are developed, and its main features are analyzed

  17. The physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, A C

    1999-01-01

    The Physics of Stars, Second Edition, is a concise introduction to the properties of stellar interiors and consequently the structure and evolution of stars. Strongly emphasising the basic physics, simple and uncomplicated theoretical models are used to illustrate clearly the connections between fundamental physics and stellar properties. This text does not intend to be encyclopaedic, rather it tends to focus on the most interesting and important aspects of stellar structure, evolution and nucleosynthesis. In the Second Edition, a new chapter on Helioseismology has been added, along with a list

  18. Atmospheres of central stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummer, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents a brief summary of atmospheric models that are of possible relevance to the central stars of planetary nebulae, and then discusses the extent to which these models accord with the observations of both nebulae and central stars. Particular attention is given to the significance of the very high Zanstra temperature implied by the nebulae He II lambda 4686 A line, and to the discrepancy between the Zanstra He II temperature and the considerably lower temperatures suggested by the appearance of the visual spectrum for some of these objects. (Auth.)

  19. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  20. Probing neutron star physics using accreting neutron stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patruno, A.

    2010-01-01

    We give an obervational overview of the accreting neutron stars systems as probes of neutron star physics. In particular we focus on the results obtained from the periodic timing of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars in outburst and from the measurement of X-ray spectra of accreting neutron stars

  1. [Star anise poisoning in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minodier, P; Pommier, P; Moulène, E; Retornaz, K; Prost, N; Deharo, L

    2003-07-01

    Star anise is used as herbal tea, for the treatment of colicky pain in infants. It may cause neurological troubles. We report 2 cases of star anise poisoning in infants before 6 months of age. Star anise herbal tea was given by parents. Tremors or spasms, hypertonia, hyperexcitability with crying, nystagmus, and vomiting were observed. Contamination or adulteration of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum Hook), with Japanese star anise (Illicium religiosum) was proved in one child. Confusion or blending between Chinese and Japanese star anise may cause poisoning. Japanese star anise is a neurotoxic plant indeed, because it contains sesquiterpenic lactones. From November 2001, star anise products are theoretically prohibited in France, but they may be still available in some small groceries, or imported by families themselves.

  2. Kepler observations of Am stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Ripepi, V.; Cantanzaro, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of high-resolution spectra for two pulsating Am stars in the Kepler field. The stellar parameters derived in this way are important because parameters derived from narrow-band photometry may be affected by the strong metal lines in these stars. We analyse the Kepler time...... series of ten known Am stars and find that six of them clearly show δ Scuti pulsations. The other four appear to be non-pulsating. We derive fundamental parameters for all known pulsating Am stars from ground-based observations and also for the Kepler Am stars to investigate the location...... of the instability strip for pulsating Am stars. We find that there is not much difference between the Am-star instability strip and the δ Scuti instability strip. We find that the observed location of pulsating Am stars in the HR diagram does not agree with the location predicted from diffusion calculations. Based...

  3. ENERGY STAR Certified Imaging Equipment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Imaging Equipment that are effective as of...

  4. Photometry of faint blue stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Hill, P.W.; Brown, A.

    1977-01-01

    Photometry on the uvby system is given for 61 faint blue stars. The stars are classified by means of the Stromgren indices, using criteria described in a previous paper (Kilkenny and Hill (1975)). (author)

  5. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Boilers that are effective as of...

  6. ENERGY STAR Certified Ceiling Fans

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Ceiling Fans that are effective as of April 1,...

  7. ENERGY STAR Certified Ventilating Fans

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Ventilating Fans that are effective as of...

  8. ENERGY STAR Certified Water Heaters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.2 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Water Heaters that are effective April 16, 2015....

  9. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  10. ENERGY STAR Certified Pool Pumps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Pool Pumps that are effective as of February 15,...

  11. ENERGY STAR Certified Roof Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Roof Products that are effective as of July 1,...

  12. ENERGY STAR Certified Vending Machines

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines that are...

  13. UX Ori-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinin, V.

    2017-06-01

    The brief review of the properties of the UX Ori type stars is presented. A special attention is given to the results of the Crimean program of the multi-year photometric and polarimetric observations of these stars.

  14. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Dishwashers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Dishwashers that are effective as of...

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Enterprise Servers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Enterprise Servers that are effective as of...

  16. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Griddles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.2 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Griddles that are effective as of May...

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Audio Video

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Audio Video Equipment that are effective as of...

  18. Overview Michelin Star Reputation Restaurant in Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Gita Subakti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For most chefs and Restaurateur, having his restaurant being awarded one or more stars in the famous Michelin Guide Rouge represents a major achievement, recognition of their work, and also important publicity generating increased notoriety. In this specific industry, experts play a decisive role, and reputation of restaurants and chefs are basically established according to their opinions. The aim of this paper is to overview some of the Restaurants achieving the Michelin Star Reputation and able to sustain it for years. Moreover, how these reputations are made and to understand better the development of gaining such a high reputation.

  19. Exploring the origins of the young stars in the central parsec of the Galaxy with stellar dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jessica Ryan

    . The detected disk contains 50% of the young stars and is inclined by ˜115° from the plane of the sky and oriented at a position angle of ˜100° East of North. Additionally, the on-disk and off-disk populations have similar K-band luminosity functions and radial distributions that decrease at larger radii as r-2 . The disk has a finite thickness as expressed by an out-of-the-disk velocity dispersion of 28 +/- 6 km/s, and several candidate disk members have eccentricities greater than 0.2. The comoving group, IRS 16SW, makes up the South-Eastern component of the disk as stars on the other side of the disk are less apparent due to higher extinction. Our findings suggest that the young stars may have formed in situ but in a more complex geometry than a simple thin circular disk. Finally, future astrometric studies of the young stars in the Galactic Center will take advantage of the factor of 5 improvement in astrometric precision that is possible with new laser guide star adaptive optics imaging techniques. We show that careful data calibration and analysis, including correcting for differential atmospheric refraction, results in a relative astrometric accuracy of ˜0.2 mas over multi-year time scales. To achieve this level of accuracy, we find that many individual images of the Galactic Center should be combined to produce a long integration time (˜25--50 minutes) in order to average down the short time scale, high-order astrometric fluctations that are apparent in individual 30 second exposures. These improvements in astrometric precision and accuracy not only offers the opportunity to measure the accelerations for more young stars at larger radii than has previously been possible, but is also applicable to a much broader range of scientific experiments beyond the Galactic Center.

  20. The Newest Laser Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baek Yeon

    2007-01-01

    This book mentions laser processing with laser principle, laser history, laser beam property, laser kinds, foundation of laser processing such as laser oscillation, characteristic of laser processing, laser for processing and its characteristic, processing of laser hole including conception of processing of laser hole and each material, and hole processing of metal material, cut of laser, reality of cut, laser welding, laser surface hardening, application case of special processing and safety measurement of laser.

  1. Comparing P-stars with Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Cea, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    P-stars are compact stars made of up and down quarks in $\\beta$-equilibrium with electrons in a chromomagnetic condensate. P-stars are able to account for compact stars as well as stars with radius comparable with canonical neutron stars. We compare p-stars with different available observations. Our results indicate that p-stars are able to reproduce in a natural manner several observations from isolated and binary pulsars.

  2. Asteroseismology of Scuti Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We briefly outline the state-of-the-art seismology of Scuti stars from a theoretical point of view: why is it so difficult a task? The recent theoretical advances in the field that these difficulties have influenced are also discussed.

  3. Hadrons in compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 817–825. Hadrons in compact stars. DEBADES BANDYOPADHYAY. Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India ... There is a growing interplay between the physics of dense matter in relativistic .... Kaplan and Nelson [7] first showed in a chiral SU(3)L × SU(3)R model that.

  4. Millet's Shooting Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, M.

    1988-12-01

    In this essay two paintings by the French artist Jean-Francois Millet are described. These paintings, Les Etoiles Filantes and Nuit Etoilée are particularly interesting since they demonstrate the rare artistic employment of the shooting-star image and metaphor.

  5. Reaching for the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  6. Interacting binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pringle, J.E.; Wade, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews the theoretical and observational knowledge of interacting binary stars. The topics discussed embrace the following features of these objects: their orbits, evolution, mass transfer, angular momentum losses, X-ray emission, eclipses, variability, and other related phenomena. (U.K.)

  7. THE STAR OFFLINE FRAMEWORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FINE, V.; FISYAK, Y.; PEREVOZTCHIKOV, V.; WENAUS, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is a-large acceptance collider detector, commissioned at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1999. STAR has developed a software framework supporting simulation, reconstruction and analysis in offline production, interactive physics analysis and online monitoring environments that is well matched both to STAR's present status of transition between Fortran and C++ based software and to STAR's evolution to a fully OO software base. This paper presents the results of two years effort developing a modular C++ framework based on the ROOT package that encompasses both wrapped Fortran components (legacy simulation and reconstruction code) served by IDL-defined data structures, and fully OO components (all physics analysis code) served by a recently developed object model for event data. The framework supports chained components, which can themselves be composite subchains, with components (''makers'') managing ''data sets'' they have created and are responsible for. An St-DataSet class from which data sets and makers inherit allows the construction of hierarchical organizations of components and data, and centralizes almost all system tasks such as data set navigation, I/O, database access, and inter-component communication. This paper will present an overview of this system, now deployed and well exercised in production environments with real and simulated data, and in an active physics analysis development program

  8. Hadrons in compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At normal nuclear matter density, neutron star matter mainly consists of neutrons, protons and electrons. The particle population is so arranged as to attain a min- imum energy configuration maintaining electrical charge neutrality and chemical equilibrium. At higher baryon density, hyperon formation becomes energetically.

  9. Alignement experience in STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Margetis, S; Lauret, J; Perevozchikov, V; Van Buren, G; Bouchef, J

    2007-01-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC uses four layers of silicon strip and silicon drift detectors for secondary vertex reconstruction. An attempt for a direct charm meson measurement put stringent requirements on alignment and calibration. We report on recent alignment and drift velocity calibration work performed on the inner silicon tracking system.

  10. Seismology of active stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekker, S.; García, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we will discuss the current standing and open questions of seismology in active stars. With the longer photometric time series data that are, and will become, available from space-missions such as Kepler we foresee significant progress in our understanding of stellar internal

  11. Triggered star formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 35-36 ISSN 1405-2059 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003705; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : interstellar medium * star formation * HI shells Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  12. I see falling stars

    CERN Document Server

    Orr, Tamra B

    2015-01-01

    "Young children are naturally curious about the world around them. I See Falling Stars offers answers to their most compelling questions about meteors. Age-appropriate explanations and appealing photos encourage readers to continue their quest for knowledge. Additional text features and search tools, including a glossary and an index, help students locate information and learn new words."-- Provided by publisher.

  13. Astrometric microlensing of stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominik, M; Sahu, KC

    2000-01-01

    Because of dramatic improvements in the precision of astrometric measurements, the observation of light centroid shifts in observed stars due to intervening massive compact objects ("astrometric microlensing") will become possible in the near future. Upcoming space missions, such as SIM and GAIA,

  14. Gas Between the Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    backstage. Keywords. Thermal equilibrium, interstellar gas, galaxies. The discovery of the interstellar gas itself was serendipitous. In. RESONANCE | November 2016. 985 ... ment, the electron is usually knocked down from the aligned case ..... it was asserted that explosions that some stars end their nuclear burning phase ...

  15. High p physics at STAR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sub sub

    physics pp. 933–944. High p. T physics at STAR. SUBHASIS CHATTOPADHYAY, for the STAR Collaboration. Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India. Abstract. We discuss the capabilities of STAR in exploring the physics at high pT in ultrarelativis- tic heavy-ion colisions from RHIC at.

  16. Carbon Stars T. Lloyd Evans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Carbon stars have been reviewed on several previous occasions, most recently by. Wallerstein & Knapp (1998). A conference devoted to this topic was held in 1996. (Wing 2000) and two meetings on AGB stars (Le Bertre et al. 1999; Kerschbaum et al. 2007) also contain much on carbon stars. This review ...

  17. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  18. Janus neodymium glass laser operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Trainor, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A manual, prepared to guide personnel in operating and maintaining the Janus glass laser system, is presented. System components are described in detail. Step-by-step procedures are presented for firing the laser and for performing routine maintenance and calibration procedures

  19. Simulating Radio Emission from Low-mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Joe; Jardine, Moira M.; Wood, Kenneth; Hallinan, Gregg; Morin, Julien

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the origins of stellar radio emission can provide invaluable insight into the strength and geometry of stellar magnetic fields and the resultant space weather environment experienced by exoplanets. Here, we present the first model capable of predicting radio emission through the electron cyclotron maser instability using observed stellar magnetic maps of low-mass stars. We determine the structure of the coronal magnetic field and plasma using spectropolarimetric observations of the surface magnetic fields and the X-ray emission measure. We then model the emission of photons from the locations within the corona that satisfy the conditions for electron cyclotron maser emission. Our model predicts the frequency and intensity of radio photons from within the stellar corona. We have benchmarked our model against the low-mass star V374 Peg. This star has both radio observations from the Very Large Array and a nearly simultaneous magnetic map. Using our model we are able to fit the radio observations of V374 Peg, providing additional evidence that the radio emission observed from low-mass stars may originate from the electron cyclotron maser instability. Our model can now be extended to all stars with observed magnetic maps to predict the expected frequency and variability of stellar radio emission in an effort to understand and guide future radio observations of low-mass stars.

  20. Laser beam riding artillery missiles guidance device is designed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingliang; Huo, Zhicheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Laser driving gun missile guidance type beam of laser information field formed by any link failure or reduced stability will directly lead to ballistic or miss out of control, and based on this, this paper designed the driving beam of laser guided missile guidance beam type forming device modulation and zoom mechanism, in order to make the missile can recognize its position in the laser beam, laser beam gun missile, by means of spatial encoding of the laser beam laser beam into information after forming device, a surface to achieve the purpose of precision guidance.

  1. Guide device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  2. Double neutron stars: merger rates revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Klencki, Jakub; Benacquista, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    We revisit double neutron star (DNS) formation in the classical binary evolution scenario in light of the recent Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo DNS detection (GW170817). The observationally estimated Galactic DNS merger rate of R_MW = 21^{+28}_{-14} Myr-1, based on three Galactic DNS systems, fully supports our standard input physics model with RMW = 24 Myr-1. This estimate for the Galaxy translates in a non-trivial way (due to cosmological evolution of progenitor stars in chemically evolving Universe) into a local (z ≈ 0) DNS merger rate density of Rlocal = 48 Gpc-3 yr-1, which is not consistent with the current LIGO/Virgo DNS merger rate estimate (1540^{+3200}_{-1220} Gpc-3 yr-1). Within our study of the parameter space, we find solutions that allow for DNS merger rates as high as R_local ≈ 600^{+600}_{-300} Gpc-3 yr-1 which are thus consistent with the LIGO/Virgo estimate. However, our corresponding BH-BH merger rates for the models with high DNS merger rates exceed the current LIGO/Virgo estimate of local BH-BH merger rate (12-213 Gpc-3 yr-1). Apart from being particularly sensitive to the common envelope treatment, DNS merger rates are rather robust against variations of several of the key factors probed in our study (e.g. mass transfer, angular momentum loss, and natal kicks). This might suggest that either common envelope development/survival works differently for DNS (˜10-20 M⊙ stars) than for BH-BH (˜40-100 M⊙ stars) progenitors, or high black hole (BH) natal kicks are needed to meet observational constraints for both types of binaries. Our conclusion is based on a limited number of (21) evolutionary models and is valid within this particular DNS and BH-BH isolated binary formation scenario.

  3. Synchronization and a secure communication scheme using optical star network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeva Sathya Theesar, S.; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Banerjee, Santo

    2013-12-01

    This work aims to show the effect of synchronization phenomena in multi-nodal star optical network topology as well as to develop an efficient symmetric cryptosystem utilizing available parameters. The optical network is based on chaotic semiconductor laser (SL) systems described by dimensionless modified Lang-Kobayashi's (L-K) delay differential equations. The network nodes are mutually connected with a central semiconductor laser hub with bidirectional linear optical feedback. It has been observed that the laser output can be modulated using a star network setup. The laser intensity increases with the number of nodes and its much more higher than the same for solitary laser, keeping all other inputs as constant. So the network topology is an effective way to optimize the output power. The process by each nodes into the network is illustrated graphically for three, five and seven SLs, respectively. Also the whole network can be implemented as an optical communication system for transmission of signals. Each SL can act as a transceiver during communication. The communication process is examined using a chaotic signal as a plaintext connected with the SL hub and successfully provided a symmetrically secure mechanism upon the communication protocol. The result shows the optimization of output power with the increment of the number of nodes. Also the communication scheme can successfully decode the encrypted signal from SL Hub, at each other nodes.

  4. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    VLT Observations of an Unusual Stellar System Reinhold Häfner of the Munich University Observatory (Germany) is a happy astronomer. In 1988, when he was working at a telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory, he came across a strange star that suddenly vanished off the computer screen. He had to wait for more than a decade to get the full explanation of this unusual event. On June 10-11, 1999, he observed the same star with the first VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope (ANTU) and the FORS1 astronomical instrument at Paranal [1]. With the vast power of this new research facility, he was now able to determine the physical properties of a very strange stellar system in which two planet-size stars orbit each other. One is an exceedingly hot white dwarf star , weighing half as much as the Sun, but only twice as big as the Earth. The other is a much cooler and less massive red dwarf star , one-and-a-half times the size of planet Jupiter. Once every three hours, the hot star disappears behind the other, as seen from the Earth. For a few minutes, the brightness of the system drops by a factor of more than 250 and it "vanishes" from view in telescopes smaller than the VLT. A variable star named NN Serpentis ESO PR Photo 30a/99 ESO PR Photo 30a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 468 pix - 152k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 936 pix - 576k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2304 x 2695 pix - 4.4M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30a/99 : The sky field around the 17-mag variable stellar system NN Serpentis , as seen in a 5 sec exposure through a V(isual) filter with VLT ANTU and FORS1. It was obtained just before the observation of an eclipse of this unsual object and served to centre the telescope on the corresponding sky position. The field shown here measures 4.5 x 4.5 armin 2 (1365 x 1365 pix 2 ; 0.20 arcsec/pix). The field is somewhat larger than that shown in Photo 30b/99 and has the same orientation to allow comparison: North is about 20° anticlockwise from the top and East is 90° clockwise from that direction. The

  5. Star identification methods, techniques and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guangjun

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the research advances in star identification that the author’s team has made over the past 10 years, systematically introducing the principles of star identification, general methods, key techniques and practicable algorithms. It also offers examples of hardware implementation and performance evaluation for the star identification algorithms. Star identification is the key step for celestial navigation and greatly improves the performance of star sensors, and as such the book include the fundamentals of star sensors and celestial navigation, the processing of the star catalog and star images, star identification using modified triangle algorithms, star identification using star patterns and using neural networks, rapid star tracking using star matching between adjacent frames, as well as implementation hardware and using performance tests for star identification. It is not only valuable as a reference book for star sensor designers and researchers working in pattern recognition and othe...

  6. Neutron stars and quark stars: Two coexisting families of compact stars?

    OpenAIRE

    Schaffner-Bielich, J.

    2006-01-01

    The mass-radius relation of compact stars is discussed with relation to the presence of quark matter in the core. The existence of a new family of compact stars with quark matter besides white dwarfs and ordinary neutron stars is outlined.

  7. Sensor-guided threat countermeasure system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Armstrong, James P.

    2012-12-25

    A countermeasure system for use by a target to protect against an incoming sensor-guided threat. The system includes a laser system for producing a broadband beam and means for directing the broadband beam from the target to the threat. The countermeasure system comprises the steps of producing a broadband beam and directing the broad band beam from the target to blind or confuse the incoming sensor-guided threat.

  8. Ecology of blue straggler stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Beccari, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The existence of blue straggler stars, which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution. Such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. They are found to exist in globular clusters, open clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, OB associations and as field stars. This book summarises the many advances in observational and theoretical work dedicated to blue straggler stars. Carefully edited extended contributions by well-known experts in the field cover all the relevant aspects of blue straggler stars research: Observations of blue straggler stars in their various environments; Binary stars and formation channels; Dynamics of globular clusters; Interpretation of observational data and comparison with models. The book also offers an introductory chapter on stellar evolution written by the editors of the book.

  9. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  10. Laser Plasmas: Optical guiding of laser beam in nonuniform plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have solved the nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation governing the propagation characteristics for an approximate analytical solution using variational approach. Results are compared with the theoretical model of Liu and Tripathi (Phys. Plasmas 1, 3100 (1994)) based on paraxial ray approximation.

  11. Neutron Star Science with the NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-16

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, helped scientists obtain for the first time a sensitive high-­energy X-­ray map of the sky with extraordinary resolution. This pioneering telescope has aided in the understanding of how stars explode and neutron stars are born. LLNL is a founding member of the NuSTAR project, with key personnel on its optics and science team. We used NuSTAR to observe and analyze the observations of different neutron star classes identified in the last decade that are still poorly understood. These studies not only help to comprehend newly discovered astrophysical phenomena and emission processes for members of the neutron star family, but also expand the utility of such observations for addressing broader questions in astrophysics and other physics disciplines. For example, neutron stars provide an excellent laboratory to study exotic and extreme phenomena, such as the equation of state of the densest matter known, the behavior of matter in extreme magnetic fields, and the effects of general relativity. At the same time, knowing their accurate populations has profound implications for understanding the life cycle of massive stars, star collapse, and overall galactic evolution.

  12. Robo-AO Kepler Survey. IV. The Effect of Nearby Stars on 3857 Planetary Candidate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Duev, Dmitry A.; Howard, Ward; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Kulkarni, S. R.; Morton, Tim; Salama, Maïssa

    2018-04-01

    We present the overall statistical results from the Robo-AO Kepler planetary candidate survey, comprising of 3857 high-angular resolution observations of planetary candidate systems with Robo-AO, an automated laser adaptive optics system. These observations reveal previously unknown nearby stars blended with the planetary candidate host stars that alter the derived planetary radii or may be the source of an astrophysical false positive transit signal. In the first three papers in the survey, we detected 440 nearby stars around 3313 planetary candidate host stars. In this paper, we present observations of 532 planetary candidate host stars, detecting 94 companions around 88 stars; 84 of these companions have not previously been observed in high resolution. We also report 50 more-widely separated companions near 715 targets previously observed by Robo-AO. We derive corrected planetary radius estimates for the 814 planetary candidates in systems with a detected nearby star. If planetary candidates are equally likely to orbit the primary or secondary star, the radius estimates for planetary candidates in systems with likely bound nearby stars increase by a factor of 1.54, on average. We find that 35 previously believed rocky planet candidates are likely not rocky due to the presence of nearby stars. From the combined data sets from the complete Robo-AO KOI survey, we find that 14.5 ± 0.5% of planetary candidate hosts have a nearby star with 4″, while 1.2% have two nearby stars, and 0.08% have three. We find that 16% of Earth-sized, 13% of Neptune-sized, 14% of Saturn-sized, and 19% of Jupiter-sized planet candidates have detected nearby stars.

  13. Exciting Message from a Dying Monster Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    SEST Discovers First Extra-galactic SiO Maser With the help of a new and more sensitive receiver, recently installed on the 15-metre Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) at the European Southern Observatory on the La Silla mountain in Chile, a team of European astronomers [1] has succeeded in discovering the first extra-galactic silicon-monoxide (SiO) maser . It is located in the atmosphere of the largest known star in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way. This observational feat now opens new, exciting possibilities for the study of individual stars in other galaxies in the Local Group. The continued search for extra-galactic SiO masers is a joint project of European and Australian astronomers, to be carried on with even more advanced instruments that will become available in the near future. What is a maser ? The fact that masers exist in the Universe is one of the most unexpected discoveries made by astronomers in this century. They function according to the same principles as the better known lasers . Lasers (Light Amplified Stimulated Emission Radiators) are becoming more and more common in our daily life, for instance to read discs in CD players and to cut steel plates. Inside a laser, molecules act as an enormously powerful amplifier for light of a specific wavelength (`colour') [2]. However, this only happens when we subject the molecules to special conditions, much unlike those they would normally experience in nature. Nevertheless, exotic places do exist in the Universe where conditions are similar to those in lasers. In the 1960s, astronomers discovered that some celestial objects emit abnormally strong radio waves at a particular wavelength. In the beginning, they thought that this emission was coming from an unknown molecule they called `Mysterium'. Later it turned out that it originated in already known, and rather ordinary, OH-molecules of oxygen and hydrogen. In some places in space, these molecules experience the

  14. A star pattern recognition algorithm for autonomous attitude determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bezooijen, R. W. H.

    1990-01-01

    The star-pattern recognition algorithm presented allows the advanced Full-sky Autonomous Star Tracker (FAST) device, such as the projected ASTROS II system of the Mariner Mark II planetary spacecraft, to reliably ascertain attitude about all three axes. An ASTROS II-based FAST, possessing an 11.5 x 11.5 deg field of view and 8-arcsec accuracy, can when integrated with an all-sky data base of 4100 guide stars determine its attitude in about 1 sec, with a success rate close to 100 percent. The present recognition algorithm can also be used for automating the acquisition of celestial targets by astronomy telescopes, autonomously updating the attitude of gyro-based attitude control systems, and automating ground-based attitude reconstruction.

  15. From stars to planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzano, Jean-Christophe; Deleuil, Magali; De Laverny, Patrick; Blanco, Alejandra Recio; Bouchy, François; Gandolfi, Davide; Loeillet, Benoît

    2009-02-01

    A large program of multi-fibre (FLAMES) spectroscopic observations of the stellar population in two CoRoT/Exoplanet field with the GIRAFFE/VLT, took place in spring 2008. It aims at characterizing the brightest dwarf population and providing the ground for statistical analysis of the planetary population found by CoRoT. To perform such an ambitious analysis, we use an automated software based on the MATISSE algorithm, originally designed for the GAIA/RVS spectral analysis. This software derives the atmospheric stellar parameters: effective temperature, surface gravity and the overall metallicity. Further improvements are foreseen in order to measure also individual abundances. By comparing the main physical and chemical properties of the host stars to those of the stellar population they belong to, this will bring new insights into the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems and the star-planet connection.

  16. White Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe. Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old. The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope. The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars. Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the oldest stars puts astronomers within

  17. Pulsating stars harbouring planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Why bother with asteroseismology while studying exoplanets? There are several answers to this question. Asteroseismology and exoplanetary sciences have much in common and the synergy between the two opens up new aspects in both fields. These fields and stellar activity, when taken together, allow maximum extraction of information from exoplanet space missions. Asteroseismology of the host star has already proved its value in a number of exoplanet systems by its unprecedented precision in determining stellar parameters. In addition, asteroseismology allows the possibility of discovering new exoplanets through time delay studies. The study of the interaction between exoplanets and their host stars opens new windows on various physical processes. In this review I will summarize past and current research in exoplanet asteroseismology and explore some guidelines for the future.

  18. Structure of neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, C.K.

    1974-01-01

    Structure of neutron stars consisting of a cold and catalyzed superdense matter were investigated by integrating the equations for hydrostatic equilibrium based on the General Relativity theory. The equations of state were obtained with the help of semiempirical nuclear mass formulae. A large phase transition was found between the nuclear and subnuclear density regions. The density phase transition points were calculated as 6.2 x 10 11 and 3.8 x 10 13 g/cm 3 . Due to such a large phase transition, the equation of state practically consists of two parts: The nuclear and subnuclear phases wich are in contact under the thermodynamical equilibrium at the corresponding pressure. Some macroscopic properties of neutron stars are discussed. (Author) [pt

  19. Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    Slides from my talk during one of the Historical Astronomy Division sessions at AAS 225 in Seattle, WA (January 2015). A brief history of the variable star catalogs Henrietta Swan Leavitt and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin assembled at Harvard, and the update to them that some of our students at AMNH have done.(Figshare only previews the first few slides. Download the PDF to see all of them!)

  20. Oscillations in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-07-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l (>{sub )} 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II{sub l+1} from II{sub l} and II{sub l-1} to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n{sub c}, while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  1. Detector limitations, STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  2. Stars of strange matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, H.A.; Brown, G.E.; Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    We investigate suggestions that quark matter with strangeness per baryon of order unity may be stable. We model this matter at nuclear matter densities as a gas of close packed Λ-particles. From the known mass of the Λ-particle we obtain an estimate of the energy and chemical potential of strange matter at nuclear densities. These are sufficiently high to preclude any phase transition from neutron matter to strange matter in the region near nucleon matter density. Including effects from gluon exchange phenomenologically, we investigate higher densities, consistently making approximations which underestimate the density of transition. In this way we find a transition density ρ tr > or approx.7ρ 0 , where ρ 0 is nuclear matter density. This is not far from the maximum density in the center of the most massive neutron stars that can be constructed. Since we have underestimated ρ tr and still find it to be ∝7ρ 0 , we do not believe that the transition from neutron to quark matter is likely in neutron stars. Moreover, measured masses of observed neutron stars are ≅1.4 M sun , where M sun is the solar mass. For such masses, the central (maximum) density is ρ c 0 . Transition to quark matter is certainly excluded for these densities. (orig.)

  3. What are the stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, Ganesan

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding question in astronomy at the turn of the twentieth century was: What are the stars and why are they as they are? In this volume, the story of how the answer to this fundamental question was unravelled is narrated in an informal style, with emphasis on the underlying physics. Although the foundations of astrophysics were laid down by 1870, and the edifice was sufficiently built up by 1920, the definitive proof of many of the prescient conjectures made in the 1920s and 1930s came to be established less than ten years ago. This book discusses these recent developments in the context of discussing the nature of the stars, their stability and the source of the energy they radiate.  Reading this book will get young students excited about the presently unfolding revolution in astronomy and the challenges that await them in the world of physics, engineering and technology. General readers will also find the book appealing for its highly accessible narrative of the physics of stars.  “... The reade...

  4. Small caliber guided projectile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James F [Albuquerque, NM; Kast, Brian A [Albuquerque, NM; Kniskern, Marc W [Albuquerque, NM; Rose, Scott E [Albuquerque, NM; Rohrer, Brandon R [Albuquerque, NM; Woods, James W [Albuquerque, NM; Greene, Ronald W [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-08-24

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  5. A new family of magnetic stars: the Am stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Petit, P.; Lignières, F.

    2016-12-01

    We presented the discovery of an ultra-weak field in three Am stars, β UMa, θ Leo, and Alhena, thanks to ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations. Two of the three stars of this study shown peculiar magnetic signatures with prominent positive lobes like the one of Sirius A that are not expected in the standard theory of the Zeeman effect. Alhena, contrary to Sirius A, β UMa and θ Leo, show normal signatures. These detections of ultra-weak fields in Am stars suggest the existence of a new family of magnetic intermediate-mass stars: the Am stars. However the various shapes of the signatures required further observation to identify the physical processes at work in these stars. A preliminary explanation is based on microturbulence.

  6. HySTAR: the hydrogen safety training and risk workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows the output of the software package HySTAR, the Hydrogen Safety, Training and Risk Workplace. This is the software output of the CTFA, Canadian Hydrogen Safety Program projects. It shows the Hydrogen Virtual Interactive Expert Workplace, a guide for permitting and code enforcement for officials and other parties involved in approving hydrogen energy facilities. It also shows the Hydrogen Codes and Standards Report (Site Level) as well as Hydrogen Distances and Clearances Report

  7. Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders From Novice to Master Observer

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of inexpensive, high-power telescopes priced at under 250, amateur astronomy is now within the reach of anyone, and this is the ideal book to get you started. The Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders offers you a guide to the equipment you need, and shows you how and where to find hundreds of spectacular objects in the deep sky -- double and multiple stars as well as spectacular star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies. You get a solid grounding in the fundamental concepts and terminology of astronomy, and specific advice about choosing, buying, using, and maintaining the eq

  8. Feedback Regulated Star Formation: From Star Clusters to Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Dib, Sami

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarises results from semi-analytical modelling of star formation in protocluster clumps of different metallicities. In this model, gravitationally bound cores form uniformly in the clump following a prescribed core formation efficiency per unit time. After a contraction timescale which is equal to a few times their free-fall times, the cores collapse into stars and populate the IMF. Feedback from the newly formed OB stars is taken into account in the form of stellar winds. When ...

  9. First stars X. The nature of three unevolved carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivarani, T.; Beers, T.C.; Bonifacio, P.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: abundances, stars: population II, Galaxy: abundances, stars: AGB and post-AGB Udgivelsesdato: Nov.......Stars: abundances, stars: population II, Galaxy: abundances, stars: AGB and post-AGB Udgivelsesdato: Nov....

  10. StarDOM: From STAR format to XML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linge, Jens P.; Nilges, Michael; Ehrlich, Lutz

    1999-01-01

    StarDOM is a software package for the representation of STAR files as document object models and the conversion of STAR files into XML. This allows interactive navigation by using the Document Object Model representation of the data as well as easy access by XML query languages. As an example application, the entire BioMagResBank has been transformed into XML format. Using an XML query language, statistical queries on the collected NMR data sets can be constructed with very little effort. The BioMagResBank/XML data and the software can be obtained at http://www.nmr.embl-heidelberg.de/nmr/StarDOM/

  11. Night sky a falcon field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nigro, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Night Sky: A Falcon Field Guide covers both summer and winter constellations, planets, and stars found in the northern hemisphere. Conveniently sized to fit in a pocket and featuring detailed photographs, this informative guide makes it easy to identify objects in the night sky even from one's own backyard. From information on optimal weather conditions, preferred viewing locations, and how to use key tools of the trade, this handbook will help you adeptly navigate to and fro the vast and dynamic nighttime skies, and you'll fast recognize that the night sky's the limit.

  12. Laser Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Laser Resurfacing Uses for Laser Resurfacing Learn more ...

  13. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners

  14. IFR channel-guiding of spinning beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.J.

    1986-06-01

    A simple model is adopted to study the Ion Focussed Regime (IFR) laser channel-guiding of a spinning relativistic electron beam. It is discovered that spinning beams precess about the IFR axis as they damp; whereas, nonspinning beams remain planarly polarized

  15. Laser Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    treatments, including port-wine stain and tattoo removal, diag- nostic measurements, lithotripsy, activation of photosensitive drugs for photodynamic therapy, etc. In the field of medical applications, dye lasers have potential advantages over other lasers. Dye lasers are unique sources of tunable coherent radiation, from the ...

  16. HF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Matae

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of the research and development of HF chemical laser and its related work. Many gaseous compounds are used as laser media successfully; reaction kinetics and technological problems are described. The hybrid chemical laser of HF-CO 2 system and the topics related to the isotope separation are also included. (auth.)

  17. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wavelength of operation thereby tuning the laser. Another way of ... of operation. Considering the crucial role of mirrors in a laser, the phrase 'mirrorless lasers' seems to be a paradoxical one. However, in what follows, we will see how one can indeed ..... A possible military application is to have a small area in a person's.

  18. Lasers (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1969-01-01

    A laser is an instrument that produces an enormously intense pencil-thin beam of light. In this booklet we shall learn what there is about the laser that gives it so much promise. We shall investigate what it is, how it works, and the different kinds of lasers there are.

  19. Microchip Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    USA E-mail: zayhowski@ll.mit.edu Abstract Microchip lasers are a rich family of solid-state lasers defined by their small size, robust integration...reliability, and potential for low-cost mass production. Continuous-wave microchip lasers cover a wide range of wavelengths, often operate single

  20. First stars evolution and nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahena, D. [Institute of Astronomy of the Academy of Sciences, Bocni II 1401, 14131 Praha 4, (Czech Republic); Klapp, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Dehnen, H. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)]. e-mail: bahen@hotmail.com

    2007-12-15

    The first stars in the universe were massive and luminous with typical masses M {>=} 100M. Metal-free stars have unique physical characteristics and exhibit high effective temperatures and small radii. These so called Population III stars were responsible for the initial enrichment of the intergalactic medium with heavy elements. In this work, we study the structure, evolution and nucleosynthesis of 100, 200, 250 and 300M galactic and pregalactic Population III mass losing stars with metallicities Z 10{sup -6} and Z = 10{sup -9}, during the hydrogen and helium burning phases. Using a stellar evolution code, a system of 10 structure and evolution equations together with boundary conditions, and a set of 30 nuclear reactions, are solved simultaneously, obtaining the star's structure, evolution, isotopic abundances and their ratios. Motivated by recent stability analysis, almost all very massive star (VMS) calculations during the past few years have been performed with no mass loss. However, it has recently been claimed that VMS should have strong mass loss. We present in this work new VMS calculations that includes mass loss. The main difference between zero-metal and metal-enriched stars lies in the nuclear energy generation mechanism. For the first stars, nuclear burning proceeds in a non-standard way. Since Population III stars can reach high central temperatures, this leads to the first synthesis of primary carbon through the 3 {alpha} reaction activating the CNO-cycles. Zero-metal stars produce light elements, such as He, C, N and O. Thus, very massive pregalactic Population III stars experienced self-production of C, either at the zero-age main sequence or in later phases of central hydrogen burning. In advanced evolutionary phases, these stars contribute to the chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium through supernova explosions. (Author)