WorldWideScience

Sample records for guests selective hydrogen

  1. Guest expectations and experiences within selected hotels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest expectations and experiences within selected hotels in Nelspruit, Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. ... The results of the study could help hoteliers identify areas of improvement and increase customer satisfaction. Keywords: Hotel guests, customers, expectations, experiences, HOLSERV, hoteliers ...

  2. Effect of small cage guests on hydrogen bonding of tetrahydrofuran in binary structure II clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the pure structure II tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate and binary structure II tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate with CO(2), CH(4), H(2)S, and Xe small cage guests are performed to study the effect of the shape, size, and intermolecular forces of the small cages guests on the structure and dynamics of the hydrate. The simulations show that the number and nature of the guest in the small cage affects the probability of hydrogen bonding of the tetrahydrofuran guest with the large cage water molecules. The effect on hydrogen bonding of tetrahydrofuran occurs despite the fact that the guests in the small cage do not themselves form hydrogen bonds with water. These results indicate that nearest neighbour guest-guest interactions (mediated through the water lattice framework) can affect the clathrate structure and stability. The implications of these subtle small guest effects on clathrate hydrate stability are discussed.

  3. Dynamics of hydrogen guests in ice XVII nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Colognesi, Daniele; Rudić, Svemir; English, Niall J.; Burnham, Christian J.; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2017-11-01

    The present high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiment on ice XVII, containing molecular hydrogen with a different ortho/para ratio, allows one to assign the H2 motion spectral bands to rotational and center-of-mass translational transitions of either para- or ortho-H2. Due to its structure, ice XVII confines H2 molecules to move in spiral channels of molecular size. Reported data demonstrate that H2 molecules rotate almost freely in these nanometric channels, though showing larger perturbation than in clathrate hydrates, and perform a translational motion exhibiting two low-frequency excitations. The agreement between the experimental spectra and the corresponding molecular dynamics results clearly enables one to portray a picture of the confined motions of a hydrophobic guest within a metastable ice framework, i.e., ice XVII.

  4. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  5. Triple Guest Occupancy and Negative Compressibility in Hydrogen-Loaded β-Hydroquinone Clathrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, Viktor F; Strobel, Timothy A

    2014-06-05

    The molecular interactions and structural behavior of a previously unexplored clathrate system, hydrogen-loaded β-hydroquinone (β-HQ+H2), were investigated under high pressure with synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman/infrared spectroscopies. The β-HQ+H2 system exhibits coupling of two independently rare phenomena: multiple occupancy and negative compressibility. The number of H2 molecules per cavity increases from one to three, causing unit cell volume increase by way of unique crystallographic interstitial guest positioning. We anticipate these occupancy-derived trends may be general to a range of inclusion compounds and may aid the chemical and crystallographic design of both high-occupancy hydrogen storage clathrates and novel, variable-composition materials with tunable mechanical properties.

  6. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Dylan K.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  7. A Tunable Cyclic Container: Guest-Induced Conformational Switching, Efficient Guest Exchange, and Selective Isolation of C70 from a Fullerene Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pritam; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2017-07-18

    An adaptable cyclic porphyrin dimer with highly flexible linkers has been used as an artificial molecular container that can efficiently encapsulate various aromatic guests (TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 ) through strong π-π interactions by adjusting its cavity size and conformation. The planar aromatic guest (TCNQ) can be easily and selectively exchanged with larger aromatic guests (C 60 /C 70 ). During the guest-exchange process, the two porphyrin rings switch their relative orientation according to the size and shape of the guests. This behavior of the cyclic container has been thoroughly investigated by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystal structure determination of the host-guest assemblies. The electrochemical and photophysical studies demonstrated the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from bisporphyrin to TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 in the respective host-guest assemblies. The cyclic host can form complexes with C 60 and C 70 with association constants of (2.8±0.2)×10 5 and (1.9±0.3)×10 8  m -1 , respectively; the latter value represents the highest binding affinity for C 70 reported so far for zinc(II) bisporphyrinic receptors. This high selectivity for the binding of C 70 versus C 60 allows the easy extraction and efficient isolation of C 70 from a C 60 /C 70 fullerene mixture. Experimental evidence was substantiated by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host-guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Ibarra, Borja; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host-guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor-cyanuric acid host-guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host-guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1-2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry.

  9. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-cyclodextrin conjugates: selective encapsulations of guests within dendrimer or cyclodextrin cavities revealed by NOE NMR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shao, Naimin; Qiao, Shengnan; Cheng, Yiyun

    2012-09-13

    In this study, G5 PAMAM dendrimer and α-, β-, γ-cyclodextrin (CD) conjugates were synthesized. Host-guest behaviors of the conjugates toward five guest molecules including sodium methotrexate (MTX), amantadine hydrochloride (ADH), sulfamethoxazole (SMZ), sodium deoxycholate (SDC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were analyzed by NOE NMR techniques. Among the five guest molecules, ADH only binds with β-CD in G5-β-CD, SDC shows higher priority to localize within the cavity of γ-CD in G5-γ-CD, while MTX exhibits selective encapsulation within the cavities of G5 dendrimer in G5-α-CD. SDS has high binding affinity with α-CD in G5-α-CD but forms a precipitate in the complex solution. SMZ shows simultaneous encapsulation within CDs (α-, β-, and γ-CD) or G5 in the presence of the three conjugates. The host behavior of G5-CD conjugates depends on CD cavity size, guest size, and hydrophobicity. The results obtained in this study are helpful in the optimization of dendrimer-CD conjugate-based drug delivery systems.

  10. Guest Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guest Editorial. In 1974, the Russian physicist Vitaly Ginzburg wrote a book entitled 'Key. Problems of Physics and Astrophysics' in which he presented a selection of ... fellow physicists, which would constitute part of a special volume on Current. Trends in Science being brought out on this occasion. We were fortunate that.

  11. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  12. MIS-based sensors with hydrogen selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li,; Dongmei, [Boulder, CO; Medlin, J William [Boulder, CO; McDaniel, Anthony H [Livermore, CA; Bastasz, Robert J [Livermore, CA

    2008-03-11

    The invention provides hydrogen selective metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors which include a layer of hydrogen selective material. The hydrogen selective material can be polyimide layer having a thickness between 200 and 800 nm. Suitable polyimide materials include reaction products of benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride 4,4-oxydianiline m-phenylene diamine and other structurally similar materials.

  13. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  14. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  15. Site-selective guest inclusion in molecular networks of butadiyne-bridged pyridino and benzeno square macrocycles on a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Kazukuni; Lei, Shengbin; Mamdouh, Wael; Yamaguchi, Yui; Ichikawa, Tomoyuki; Uji-I, Hiroshi; Sonoda, Motohiro; Hirose, Keiji; De Schryver, Frans C; De Feyter, Steven; Tobe, Yoshito

    2008-05-28

    We present here the formation of a modular 2D molecular network composed of two different types of square-shaped butadiyne-bridged macrocycles, having intrinsic molecular voids, aligned alternately at the solid-liquid interface. Site-selective inclusion of a guest cation took place at every other molecular void in the molecular network with two different recognition sites.

  16. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  17. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapatsis, Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Daoutidis, Prodromos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Elyassi, Bahman [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Lima, Fernando [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Iyer, Aparna [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Agrawal, Kumar [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Sabnis, Sanket [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants

  18. Study of hydrogen-molecule guests in type II clathrate hydrates using a force-matched potential model parameterised from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J.; Futera, Zdenek; English, Niall J.

    2018-03-01

    The force-matching method has been applied to parameterise an empirical potential model for water-water and water-hydrogen intermolecular interactions for use in clathrate-hydrate simulations containing hydrogen guest molecules. The underlying reference simulations constituted ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) of clathrate hydrates with various occupations of hydrogen-molecule guests. It is shown that the resultant model is able to reproduce AIMD-derived free-energy curves for the movement of a tagged hydrogen molecule between the water cages that make up the clathrate, thus giving us confidence in the model. Furthermore, with the aid of an umbrella-sampling algorithm, we calculate barrier heights for the force-matched model, yielding the free-energy barrier for a tagged molecule to move between cages. The barrier heights are reasonably large, being on the order of 30 kJ/mol, and are consistent with our previous studies with empirical models [C. J. Burnham and N. J. English, J. Phys. Chem. C 120, 16561 (2016) and C. J. Burnham et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 19, 717 (2017)]. Our results are in opposition to the literature, which claims that this system may have very low barrier heights. We also compare results to that using the more ad hoc empirical model of Alavi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 024507 (2005)] and find that this model does very well when judged against the force-matched and ab initio simulation data.

  19. Interstitial modification of palladium nanoparticles with boron atoms as a green catalyst for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chun Wong Aaron; Mahadi, Abdul Hanif; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Corbos, Elena Cristina; Tang, Chiu; Jones, Glenn; Kuo, Winson Chun Hsin; Cookson, James; Brown, Christopher Michael; Bishop, Peter Trenton; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2014-12-01

    Lindlar catalysts comprising of palladium/calcium carbonate modified with lead acetate and quinoline are widely employed industrially for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes. However, their use is restricted, particularly for food, cosmetic and drug manufacture, due to the extremely toxic nature of lead, and the risk of its leaching from catalyst surface. In addition, the catalysts also exhibit poor selectivities in a number of cases. Here we report that a non-surface modification of palladium gives rise to the formation of an ultra-selective nanocatalyst. Boron atoms are found to take residence in palladium interstitial lattice sites with good chemical and thermal stability. This is favoured due to a strong host-guest electronic interaction when supported palladium nanoparticles are treated with a borane tetrahydrofuran solution. The adsorptive properties of palladium are modified by the subsurface boron atoms and display ultra-selectivity in a number of challenging alkyne hydrogenation reactions, which outclass the performance of Lindlar catalysts.

  20. Systems and methods for selective hydrogen transport and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C

    2013-10-29

    Systems and methods for selectively removing hydrogen gas from a hydrogen-containing fluid volume are disclosed. An exemplary system includes a proton exchange membrane (PEM) selectively permeable to hydrogen by exclusively conducting hydrogen ions. The system also includes metal deposited as layers onto opposite sides or faces of the PEM to form a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA), each layer functioning as an electrode so that the MEA functions as an electrochemical cell in which the ionic conductors are hydrogen ions, and the MEA functioning as a hydrogen selective membrane (HSM) when located at the boundary between a hydrogen-containing fluid volume and a second fluid.

  1. Selectivity and stoichiometry boosting of beta-cyclodextrin in cationic/anionic surfactant systems: when host-guest equilibrium meets biased aggregation equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yu, Caifang; Deng, Manli; Jin, Changwen; Wang, Yilin; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2010-02-18

    Cationic surfactant/anionic surfactant/beta-CD ternary aqueous systems provide a platform for the coexistence of the host-guest (beta-CD/surfactant) equilibrium and the biased aggregation (monomeric/aggregated surfactants) equilibrium. We report here that the interplay between the two equilibria dominates the systems as follows. (1) The biased aggregation equilibrium imposes an apparent selectivity on the host-guest equilibrium, namely, beta-CD has to always selectively bind the major surfactant (molar fraction > 0.5) even if binding constants of beta-CD to the pair of surfactants are quite similar. (2) In return, the host-guest equilibrium amplifies the bias of the aggregation equilibrium, that is, the selective binding partly removes the major surfactant from the aggregates and leaves the aggregate composition approaching the electroneutral mixing stoichiometry. (3) This composition variation enhances electrostatic attractions between oppositely charged surfactant head groups, thus resulting in less-curved aggregates. In particular, the present apparent host-guest selectivity is of remarkably high values, and the selectivity stems from the bias of the aggregation equilibrium rather than the difference in binding constants. Moreover, beta-CD is defined as a "stoichiometry booster" for the whole class of cationic/anionic surfactant systems, which provides an additional degree of freedom to directly adjust aggregate compositions of the systems. The stoichiometry boosting of the compositions can in turn affect or even determine microstructures and macroproperties of the systems.

  2. Optimization of a synthetic receptor for dimethyllysine using a biphenyl-2,6-dicarboxylic acid scaffold: insights into selective recognition of hydrophilic guests in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gober, Isaiah N; Waters, Marcey L

    2017-09-26

    In the design of small molecule receptors for polar guests, much inspiration has been taken from proteins that have adapted effective ways to selectively bind polar molecules in aqueous environments. Nonetheless, molecular recognition of hydrophilic guests in water by synthetic receptors remains a challenging task. Here we report a new synthetic receptor, A2I, with improved affinity and selectivity for a biologically important polar guest, dimethyllysine (Kme2). A2I was prepared via redesign of a small molecule receptor (A2B) that preferentially binds trimethyllysine (Kme3) using dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC). We designed a new biphenyl-2,6-dicarboxylate monomer, I, with the goal of creating a buried salt bridge with Kme2 inside a synthetic receptor. Indeed, incorporation of I into the receptor A2I resulted in a receptor with 32-fold enhancement in binding affinity, which represents the highest affinity receptor for Kme2 in the context of a peptide to date and is tighter than most Kme2 reader proteins. It also exhibits a ∼2.5-fold increase in preference for Kme2 vs. Kme3 relative to the parent receptor, A2B. This work provides insight into effective strategies for binding hydrophilic, cationic guests in water and is an encouraging result toward a synthetic receptor that selectively binds Kme2 over other methylation states of lysine.

  3. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Yixian Yang; Xiaojun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Frontier research of networks communication technology has been envisioned as an important topic in researches, where many emerging open problems still be solicited to answer. The ongoing research and development efforts in this extremely innovative field are reflected in this Special Issue on Frontier Research of Networks Communication Technology. After peer review, the guest editors accepted 25 final accepted papers from 96 online submissions for the special issue to reflect the current dev...

  4. Guest Editorial: Special issue: Selected papers from NorCAS 2016, the 2nd Nordic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    complex digital systems to advanced analog and mixed-mode circuits. For this Special Issue, the papers are selected among those dealing with analog and mixed-mode circuits and systems. More than 25 papers were presented in this field, and from these, 8 papers have been selected for the Special Issue...

  5. A host-guest approach to fabricate metallic cobalt nanoparticles embedded in silk-derived N-doped carbon fibers for efficient hydrogen evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglei Lyu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER plays a key role in generating clean and renewable energy. As the most effective HER electrocatalysts, Pt group catalysts suffer from severe problems such as high price and scarcity. It is highly desirable to design and synthesize sustainable HER electrocatalysts to replace the Pt group catalysts. Due to their low cost, high abundance and high activities, cobalt-incorporated N-doped nanocarbon hybrids are promising candidate electrocatalysts for HER. In this report, we demonstrated a robust and eco-friendly host-guest approach to fabricate metallic cobalt nanoparticles embedded in N-doped carbon fibers derived from natural silk fibers. Benefiting from the one-dimensional nanostructure, the well-dispersed metallic cobalt nanoparticles and the N-doped thin graphitized carbon layer coating, the best Co-based electrocatalyst manifests low overpotential (61 mV@10 mA/cm2 HER activity that is comparable with commercial 20% Pt/C, and good stability in acid. Our findings provide a novel and unique route to explore high-performance noble-metal-free HER electrocatalysts. Keywords: Silk, Carbon fibers, Cobalt nanoparticles, Hydrogen evolution, Nitrogen doping

  6. Selecting appropriate technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamhankar, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Technologies for the production of synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a precursor to hydrogen, from a variety of fossil fuels are well known in industrial applications at relatively large scale. These include Steam Reforming (SR), Auto-Thermal Reforming (ATR) and Partial Oxidation (POX). A particular technology is selected based on the feed type and the desired products. Steam reforming is a mature technology, and is most prevalent for hydrogen production because of its high efficiency. However, at the smaller scale, the capital cost becomes a more significant factor, and a substantial reduction in this cost is necessary to meet the overall H2 gas cost targets, such as that stated by DOE ($1.50/kg). In developing small-scale H2 technologies, often, incremental improvements are incorporated. While useful, these are not adequate for the desired cost reduction. Also, for effective cost reduction, the whole system, including production, purification and associated equipment needs to be evaluated; cost reduction in just one of the units is not sufficient. This paper provides a critical assessment of the existing as well as novel technology options, specifically targeted at small scale H2 production. The technology options are evaluated to clearly point out which may or may not work and why. (author)

  7. Aromatic amide and hydrazide foldamer-based responsive host-guest systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhao, Xin; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: In host-guest chemistry, a larger host molecule selectively and noncovalently binds to a smaller guest molecule or ion. Early studies of host-guest chemistry focused on the recognition of spherical metal or ammonium ions by macrocyclic hosts, such as cyclic crown ethers. In these systems, preorganization enables their binding sites to cooperatively contact and attract a guest. Although some open-chain crown ether analogues possess similar, but generally lower, binding affinities, the design of acyclic molecular recognition hosts has remained challenging. One of the most successful examples was rigid molecular tweezers, acyclic covalently bonded preorganized host molecules with open cavities that bind tightly as they stiffen. Depending on the length of the atomic backbones, hydrogen bonding-driven aromatic amide foldamers can form open or closed cavities. Through rational design of the backbones and the introduction of added functional groups, researchers can regulate the shape and size of the cavity. The directionality of hydrogen bonding and the inherent rigidity of aromatic amide units allow researchers to predict both the shape and size of the cavity of an aromatic amide foldamer. Therefore, researchers can then design guest molecules with structure that matches the cavity shape, size, and binding sites of the foldamer host. In addition, because hydrogen bonds are dynamic, researchers can design structures that can adapt to outside stimuli to produce responsive supramolecular architectures. In this Account, we discuss how aromatic amide and hydrazide foldamers induced by hydrogen bonding can produce responsive host-guest systems, based on research by our group and others. First we highlight the helical chirality induced as binding occurs in solution, which includes the induction of helicity by chiral guests in oligomeric and polymeric foldamers, the formation of diastereomeric complexes between chiral foldamer hosts and guests, and the induction of

  8. Guest editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982

  9. Guest Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interstellar clouds of molecular hydrogen to neutron stars and quasars, in order to determine the chemical composition of stellar atmospheres and even obtain informa- tion on thermonuclear processes in stellar interiors. Moreover, Doppler broadening can give us information about the kinematical properties of emission gas ...

  10. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3...

  11. Selectivity control in Pt-catalyzed cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durndell, Lee J.; Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoselectivity is a cornerstone of catalysis, permitting the targeted modification of specific functional groups within complex starting materials. Here we elucidate key structural and electronic factors controlling the liquid phase hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde and related benzylic aldehydes over Pt nanoparticles. Mechanistic insight from kinetic mapping reveals cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation is structure-insensitive over metallic platinum, proceeding with a common Turnover Frequency independent of precursor, particle size or support architecture. In contrast, selectivity to the desired cinnamyl alcohol product is highly structure sensitive, with large nanoparticles and high hydrogen pressures favoring C = O over C = C hydrogenation, attributed to molecular surface crowding and suppression of sterically-demanding adsorption modes. In situ vibrational spectroscopies highlight the role of support polarity in enhancing C = O hydrogenation (through cinnamaldehyde reorientation), a general phenomenon extending to alkyl-substituted benzaldehydes. Tuning nanoparticle size and support polarity affords a flexible means to control the chemoselective hydrogenation of aromatic aldehydes. PMID:25800551

  12. The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeb, Ann M. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-17

    The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde has been investigated over a monometallic Pt/SiO2 catalyst and platinum bimetallic catalysts where the second metal was either silver, copper, or tin. The effects of addition of a second metal to the Pt/SiO2 system on the selectivity to crotyl alcohol were investigated. The Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption, 1H NMR and microcalorimetry. The Pt-Ag/SiO2 and Pt-Cu/SiO2 catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption. Pt-Sn/SiO2 catalysts selectively hydrogenated crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol and the method of preparation of these catalysts affected the selectivity. The most selective Pt-Sn/SiO2 catalysts for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol were those in which the Sn precursor was dissolved in a HCl solution. Sn increased both the rate of formation of butyraldehyde and the rate of formation of crotyl alcohol. The Pt/SiO2, Pt-Ag/SiO2 and Pt-Cu/SiO2 catalysts produced only butyraldehyde. Initial heats of adsorption (~90 kJ/mol) measured using microcalorimetry were not affected by the presence of Sn on Pt. We can conclude that there is no through metal electronic interaction between Pt and Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn had similar initial heats of adsorption coupled with the invariance of the 1H NMR Knight shift.

  13. Arene guest selectivity and pore flexibility in a metal-organic framework with semi-fluorinated channel walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Hill, Adrian; Brammer, Lee

    2017-01-01

    A metal-organic framework (MOF) with one-dimensional channels of approximately hexagonal cross-section [Ag2(O2CCF2CF2CO2)(TMP)] 1 (TMP =2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine) has been synthesized with MeOH filling the channels in its as-synthesized form as [Ag2(O2CCF2CF2CO2)(TMP)]·n(MeOH) 1-MeOH (n = 1.625 by X-ray crystallography). The two types of ligand connect columns of Ag(I) centres in an alternating manner, both around the channels and along their length, leading to an alternating arrangement of hydrocarbon (C-H) and fluorocarbon (C-F) groups lining the channel walls, with the former groups projecting further into the channel than the latter. MeOH solvent in the channels can be exchanged for a variety of arene guests, ranging from xylenes to tetrafluorobenzene, as confirmed by gas chromatography, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. Alkane and perfluoroalkane guests, however, do not enter the channels. Although exhibiting some stability under a nitrogen atmosphere, sufficient to enable crystal structure determination, the evacuated MOF 1 is unstable for periods of more than minutes under ambient conditions or upon heating, whereupon it undergoes an irreversible solid-state transformation to a non-porous polymorph 2, which comprises Ag2(O2CCF2CF2CO2) coordination layers that are pillared by TMP ligands. This transformation has been followed in situ by powder X-ray diffraction and shown to proceed via a crystalline intermediate. This article is part of the themed issue 'Coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks: materials by design'.

  14. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Samson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is an honor and a pleasure to have the December 2013 issue of Higher Learning Research Communications dedicate its issue to selected papers from the 4th International Conference on Teaching and Learning, held in Bangkok in November, 2013. The conference theme, Higher Learning in the ASEAN Context, highlights the emerging community of ten Southeast Asian nations and the upcoming launch of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC in 2015. The AEC will affect higher education systems in Southeast Asia in terms of harmonization of higher education and student mobility. This emerging regional demographic gives us a glimpse of the future of transnational education. The papers selected for this issue represent research both within and outside of ASEAN, all touching on aspects of transnational education. Jeannin reports on how diversity affects students’ learning in an international classroom in Thailand. Billingham, Gragg, and Bentley (Australia highlight technology integration as an internationalizing practice. Ling considers challenges and outcomes of bilingual teaching and learning at the graduate level in Vietnam, contributing to the postgraduate educational field, which has not been amply explored in this matter. Stetz and Bauman (US ask us to rethink the efficacy of recording our lectures for online viewing. Hartfield (Australia, Beltram-Cruz (Philippines, and Cruz (Philippines review new pedagogical paradigms utilizing technology. Al-Masum and Chowdhury report on problems and progress at Bangladesh Open University in bringing higher education to an underserved population. Throughout this issue, the authors bring a sense of internationality and the transnational transformation of higher education, along with the ubiquity of technology in the hands of the students and its impact on our teaching and learning styles. This issue of the HLRC Journal highlights some impacts that ASEAN and the AEC can and will have on higher education everywhere.

  15. Controlling hydrogenation activity and selectivity of bimetallic surfaces and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Luis E.

    also discussed. Chemisorption, TPD, FTIR using a batch reactor for the self-hydrogenation of cyclohexene and CO adsorbed on the bimetallic surfaces were carried out to correlate surface science findings with experiments on supported bimetallic catalysts. To expand the studies on the effect of bimetallic structures on hydrogenation reactions, molecules with multiple functional groups such as alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes were also investigated. Studies of selective hydrogenation of a,ss-unsaturated aldehydes toward the desired unsaturated alcohols are of interest for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. In these compounds, competitive hydrogenation of the C=C and C=O bonds occurs. TPD and HREELS experiments of acrolein (CH2=CH-CH=O) on Pt-based bimetallic surfaces are performed to investigate their effects on the hydrogenation activity of the C-O bond. The production of the desired unsaturated alcohol, allyl alcohol, has been observed for the first time on Pt-Ni-Pt(111) under UHV conditions. However, the propionaldehyde yield is five times higher than the allyl alcohol yield. Thus, a preferential isomerization reaction of allyl alcohol to propionaldehyde is very likely to occur on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface as observed on the desorption studies of allyl alcohol on this surface. The hydrogenation of acrolein is also carried out under UHV conditions on other 3d-transition metal/Pt(111) surfaces such as Co/Pt(111), Fe/Pt(111), and Cu/Pt(111). So far, the highest activity and allyl alcohol yield are found on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface with pre-adsorbed hydrogen.

  16. Lead-containing solid "oxygen reservoirs" for selective hydrogen combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Rothenberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Lead-containing catalysts can be applied as solid "oxygen reservoirs" in a novel process for propane oxidative dehydrogenation. The catalyst lattice oxygen selectively burns hydrogen from the dehydrogenation mixture at 550 degrees C. This shifts the dehydrogenation equilibrium to the desired

  17. Polycatenated 2D Hydrogen-Bonded Binary Supramolecular Organic Frameworks (SOFs) with Enhanced Gas Adsorption and Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Controlled assembly of two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular organic frameworks (SOFs) has been demonstrated through a binary strategy in which 1,4-bis-(4-(3,5-dicyano-2,6-dipyridyl)pyridyl)naphthalene (2), generated in situ by oxidative dehydrogenation of 1,4-bis-(4-(3,5-dicyano-2,6-dipyridyl)dihydropyridyl)naphthalene (1), is coupled in a 1:1 ratio with terphenyl-3,3′,4,4′-tetracarboxylic acid (3; to form SOF-8), 5,5′-(anthracene-9,10-diyl)diisophthalic acid (4; to form SOF-9), or 5,5′-bis-(azanediyl)-oxalyl-diisophthalic acid (5; to form SOF-10). Complementary O–H···N hydrogen bonds assemble 2D 63-hcb (honeycomb) subunits that pack as layers in SOF-8 to give a three-dimensional (3D) supramolecular network with parallel channels hosting guest DMF (DMF = N,N′-dimethylformamide) molecules. SOF-9 and SOF-10 feature supramolecular networks of 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation of similar hcb layers as those in SOF-8. Although SOF-8 suffers framework collapse upon guest removal, the polycatenated frameworks of SOF-9 and SOF-10 exhibit excellent chemical and thermal stability, solvent/moisture durability, and permanent porosity. Moreover, their corresponding desolvated (activated) samples SOF-9a and SOF-10a display enhanced adsorption and selectivity for CO2 over N2 and CH4. The structures of these activated compounds are well described by quantum chemistry calculations, which have allowed us to determine their mechanical properties, as well as identify their soft deformation modes and a large number of low-energy vibration modes. These results not only demonstrate an effective synthetic platform for porous organic molecular materials stabilized solely by primary hydrogen bonds but also suggest a viable means to build robust SOF materials with enhanced gas uptake capacity and selectivity. PMID:29651229

  18. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A., E-mail: John.Ripmeester@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO{sub 2} and isobutane-CO{sub 2}, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest–host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO{sub 2} hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO{sub 2} sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and {sup 13}C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO{sub 2} dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO{sub 2} hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO{sub 2} molecules in the THF-CO{sub 2} hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A–host water–guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10

  19. Biomass-Derived Catalysts for Selective Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Basudev; Formenti, Dario; Topf, Christoph; Bachmann, Stephan; Scalone, Michelangelo; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2017-08-10

    Development of catalytically active materials from biowaste represents an important aspect of sustainable chemical research. Three heterogeneous materials were synthesized from inexpensive biomass-based chitosan and abundant Co(OAc) 2 using complexation followed by pyrolysis at various temperatures. These materials were applied in the catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes using molecular hydrogen. A variety of diversely functionalized nitroarenes including some pharmaceutically active compounds were converted into aromatic amines in high yields, with high selectivity, and with excellent functional group tolerance. This green protocol has also been implemented for the synthesis of a biologically important TRPC3 inhibitor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Metal-organic frameworks as selectivity regulators for hydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meiting; Yuan, Kuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Guodong; Guo, Jun; Gu, Lin; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-11-03

    Owing to the limited availability of natural sources, the widespread demand of the flavouring, perfume and pharmaceutical industries for unsaturated alcohols is met by producing them from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, through the selective hydrogenation of the carbon-oxygen group (in preference to the carbon-carbon group). However, developing effective catalysts for this transformation is challenging, because hydrogenation of the carbon-carbon group is thermodynamically favoured. This difficulty is particularly relevant for one major category of heterogeneous catalyst: metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides. These systems are generally incapable of significantly enhancing the selectivity towards thermodynamically unfavoured reactions, because only the edges of nanoparticles that are in direct contact with the metal-oxide support possess selective catalytic properties; most of the exposed nanoparticle surfaces do not. This has inspired the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to encapsulate metal nanoparticles within their layers or inside their channels, to influence the activity of the entire nanoparticle surface while maintaining efficient reactant and product transport owing to the porous nature of the material. Here we show that MOFs can also serve as effective selectivity regulators for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Sandwiching platinum nanoparticles between an inner core and an outer shell composed of an MOF with metal nodes of Fe 3+ , Cr 3+ or both (known as MIL-101; refs 19, 20, 21) results in stable catalysts that convert a range of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with high efficiency and with significantly enhanced selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols. Calculations reveal that preferential interaction of MOF metal sites with the carbon-oxygen rather than the carbon-carbon group renders hydrogenation of the former by the embedded platinum nanoparticles a thermodynamically favoured reaction. We anticipate that our basic design

  1. Selective hydrogen purification through graphdiyne under ambient temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Steven W.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-07-01

    Graphdiyne, a recently synthesized one-atom-thick carbon allotrope, is atomistically porous - characterized by a regular ``nanomesh'' - and suggests application as a separation membrane for hydrogen purification. Here we report a full atomistic reactive molecular dynamics investigation to determine the selective diffusion properties of hydrogen (H2) amongst carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4), a mixture otherwise known as syngas, a product of the gasification of renewable biomass (such as animal wastes). Under constant temperature simulations, we find the mass flux of hydrogen molecules through a graphdiyne membrane to be on the order of 7 to 10 g cm-2 s-1 (between 300 K and 500 K), with carbon monoxide and methane remaining isolated. Using a simple Arrhenius relation, we determine the energy required for permeation on the order of 0.11 +/- 0.03 eV for single H2 molecules. We find that addition of marginal applied force (approximately 1 to 2 pN per molecule, representing a controlled pressure gradient, ΔP, on the order of 100 to 500 kPa) can successfully enhance the separation of hydrogen gas. Addition of larger driving forces (50 to 100 pN per molecule) is required to selectively filter carbon monoxide or methane, suggesting that, under near-atmospheric conditions, only hydrogen gas will pass such a membrane. Graphdiyne provides a unique, chemically inert and mechanically stable platform facilitating selective gas separation at nominal pressures using a homogeneous material system, without a need for chemical functionalization or the explicit introduction of molecular pores.

  2. Analysis of guest binary mixtures by tert-butylcalix[6]arene using host memory of previously bound guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, Goulnaz D; Ziganshin, Marat A; Gubaidullin, Aidar T; Gorbatchuk, Valery V

    2013-02-28

    A new principle of quantitative and qualitative analysis of binary organic mixtures is offered, which is based on an ability of calixarene receptor for specific polymorphic transitions related to the composition of the analyzed guest mixture. The ability of tert-butylcalix[6]arene to remember selectively some guests bound from headspace both of pure liquids and their binary mixtures is used. The image of guest mixture remains written in metastable polymorphs of host after partial or complete guest elimination from clathrates. The memory was read using differential scanning calorimetry as the enthalpy of exothermic polymorphic transition of host collapse. This enthalpy monotonously changes with the variation of guests' ratio in mixture, unlike the enthalpies of endothermic pseudopolymorphic transitions of guest release. So, the composition of volatile binary mixture can be estimated using only one receptor and only one its parameter even in absence of preferential binding from a binary mixture of guests. This is an example of a genuine molecular recognition.

  3. Development of Pd Alloy Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Dense/Porous Hybrid Structure for High Hydrogen Perm-Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yun Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the commercial applications of hydrogen separation membranes, both high hydrogen selectivity and permeability (i.e., perm-selectivity are required. However, it has been difficult to fabricate thin, dense Pd alloy composite membranes on porous metal support that have a pore-free surface and an open structure at the interface between the Pd alloy films and the metal support in order to obtain the required properties simultaneously. In this study, we fabricated Pd alloy hydrogen separation membranes with dense/porous hybrid structure for high hydrogen perm-selectivity. The hydrogen selectivity of this membrane increased owing to the dense and pore-free microstructure of the membrane surface. The hydrogen permeation flux also was remarkably improved by the formation of an open microstructure with numerous open voids at the interface and by an effective reduction in the membrane thickness as a result of the porous structure formed within the Pd alloy films.

  4. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  5. Potential application of palladium nanoparticles as selective recyclable hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, DebKumar

    2008-01-01

    The search for more efficient catalytic systems that might combine the advantages of both homogeneous (catalyst modulation) and heterogeneous (catalyst recycling) catalysis is one of the most exciting challenges of modern chemistry. More recently with the advances of nanochemistry, it has been possible to prepare soluble analogues of heterogeneous catalysts. These nanoparticles are generally stabilized against aggregation into larger particles by electrostatic or steric protection. Herein we demonstrate the use of room temperature ionic liquid for the stabilization of palladium nanoparticles that are recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon-carbon double bonds and application of these catalysts to the selective hydrogenation of internal or terminal C=C bonds in unsaturated primary alcohols. The particles suspended in room temperature ionic liquid show no metal aggregation or loss of catalytic activity even on prolonged use

  6. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  7. Special Section Guest Editorial:Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Photoacoustic Tomography and Fiber-Based Lasers and Supercontinuum Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The present special section entitled “Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Photoacoustic Tomography and Fiber-Based Lasers and Supercontinuum Sources” comprises two invited papers and several contributed papers from the summer school Biophotonics ’15, as well as contributed papers within this general...

  8. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...

  9. Polarization response of clathrate hydrates capsulated with guest molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Qun; Li, Jinshan, E-mail: ljs915@263.net, E-mail: myang@scu.edu.cn; Huang, Hui [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP), Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, Xinqin; Yang, Mingli, E-mail: ljs915@263.net, E-mail: myang@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2016-05-28

    Clathrate hydrates are characterized by their water cages encapsulating various guest atoms or molecules. The polarization effect of these guest-cage complexes was studied with combined density functional theory and finite-field calculations. An addition rule was noted for these systems whose total polarizability is approximately equal to the polarizability sum of the guest and the cage. However, their distributional polarizability computed with Hirshfeld partitioning scheme indicates that the guest–cage interaction has considerable influence on their polarization response. The polarization of encapsulated guest is reduced while the polarization of water cage is enhanced. The counteraction of these two opposite effects leads to the almost unchanged total polarizability. Further analysis reveals that the reduced polarizability of encapsulated guest results from the shielding effect of water cage against the external field and the enhanced polarizability of water cage from the enhanced bonding of hydrogen bonds among water molecules. Although the charge transfer through the hydrogen bonds is rather small in the water cage, the polarization response of clathrate hydrates is sensitive to the changes of hydrogen bonding strength. The guest encapsulation strengthens the hydrogen bonding network and leads to enhanced polarizability.

  10. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  11. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-23

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  12. Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL). A concept to improve the selectivity of selective hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess, A.; Korth, W. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Chair of Chemical Engineering

    2011-07-01

    Catalytic hydrogenations are important for refinery processes, petrochemical applications as well as for numerous processes of the fine chemicals industry. In some cases, hydrogenations consist of a sequence of consecutive reactions, and the desired product is the intermediate. An important goal is then a high yield and selectivity to the intermediate, if possible at a high conversion degree. The selectivity to an intermediate primarily depends on the chemical nature of the catalyst, but may also be influenced by diffusion processes. Ionic liquids (ILs) are low melting salts (< 100 C) and represent a promising solvent class. This paper focuses on the concept of a Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL), where the solid catalyst is coated with a thin IL layer to improve the selectivity. (orig.)

  13. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Introduction The USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems (COOTS) is held annually in the late spring. The conference evolved from a set of C++ workshops that were held under the auspices of USENIX, the first of which met in 1989. Given the growing diverse interest in object-oriented technologies, the C++ focus of the workshop eventually became too narrow, with the result that the scope was widened in 1995 to include object-oriented technologies and systems. COOTS is intended to showcase advanced R&D efforts in object-oriented technologies and software systems. The conference emphasizes experimental research and experience gained by using object-oriented techniques and languages to build complex software systems that meet real-world needs. COOTS solicits papers in the following general areas: application of, and experiences with, object-oriented technologies in particular domains (e.g. financial, medical, telecommunication); the architecture and implementation of distributed object systems (e.g. CORBA, DCOM, RMI); object-oriented programming and specification languages; object-oriented design and analysis. The 4th meeting of COOTS was held 27 - 30 April 1998 at the El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Several tutorials were given. The technical program proper consisted of a single track of six sessions, with three paper presentations per session. A keynote address and a provocative panel session rounded out the technical program. The program committee reviewed 56 papers, selecting the best 18 for presentation in the technical sessions. While we solicit papers across the spectrum of applications of object-oriented technologies, this year there was a predominance of distributed, object-oriented papers. The accepted papers reflected this asymmetry, with 15 papers on distributed objects and 3 papers on object-oriented languages. The papers in this special issue are

  14. Heterometallic modular metal-organic 3D frameworks assembled via new tris-β-diketonate metalloligands: nanoporous materials for anion exchange and scaffolding of selected anionic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Lucia; Ciani, Gianfranco; Maggini, Simona; Proserpio, Davide M; Visconti, Marco

    2010-11-02

    -48% of the cell volume and include the anions and many guest solvent molecules. The guest solvent molecules can be reversibly removed by thermal activation with retention of the framework structure, which proved to be stable up to about 270°C, as confirmed by TGA and powder XRD monitoring. The anions could be easily exchanged in single-crystal to single-crystal processes, thereby allowing the insertion of selected anions into the framework channels.

  15. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host–guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic and theoretical details as well as figures are available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc03044d Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host–guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor–cyanuric acid host–guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host–guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1–2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry. PMID:28989633

  16. Identification of non-precious metal alloy catalysts for selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The removal of trace acetylene from ethylene is performed industrially by palladium hydrogenation catalysts ( often modified with silver) that avoid the hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane. In an effort to identify catalysts based on less expensive and more available metals, density functional...... dispersed on an oxide support were selective for acetylene hydrogenation at low pressures....

  17. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Technical report describing DOE's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence investigation into various adsorbent and chemisorption materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as related to DOE hydrogen storage targets and explains the basis for the down select decisions.

  18. From the Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Salmon

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available From a Distance... Welcome to a few words from your Guest Editor, fellow inhabitants of the third planet from the sun. We offer you a little treat for your computer sore eyes and your typing and texting fingers. We want to share, across cyberspace, not our differences, oh no, but a few of our similarities and understandings as aspirational educators.

  19. Determination of hydrogen abundance in selected lunar soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen was implanted in lunar soil through solar wind activity. In order to determine the feasibility of utilizing this solar wind hydrogen, it is necessary to know not only hydrogen abundances in bulk soils from a variety of locations but also the distribution of hydrogen within a given soil. Hydrogen distribution in bulk soils, grain size separates, mineral types, and core samples was investigated. Hydrogen was found in all samples studied. The amount varied considerably, depending on soil maturity, mineral types present, grain size distribution, and depth. Hydrogen implantation is definitely a surface phenomenon. However, as constructional particles are formed, previously exposed surfaces become embedded within particles, causing an enrichment of hydrogen in these species. In view of possibly extracting the hydrogen for use on the lunar surface, it is encouraging to know that hydrogen is present to a considerable depth and not only in the upper few millimeters. Based on these preliminary studies, extraction of solar wind hydrogen from lunar soil appears feasible, particulary if some kind of grain size separation is possible.

  20. Platinum nanoparticle shape effects on benzene hydrogenation selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Lee, Hyunjoo; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2007-10-01

    Benzene hydrogenation was investigated in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of Pt nanoparticles of different shapes (cubic and cuboctahedral) and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB). Infrared spectroscopy indicated that TTAB binds to the Pt surface through a weak C-H...Pt bond of the alkyl chain. The catalytic selectivity was found to be strongly affected by the nanoparticle shape. Both cyclohexane and cyclohexene product molecules were formed on cuboctahedral nanoparticles, whereas only cyclohexane was produced on cubic nanoparticles. These results are the same as the product selectivities obtained on Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals in earlier studies. The apparent activation energy for cyclohexane production on cubic nanoparticles is 10.9 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, while for cuboctahedral nanoparticles, the apparent activation energies for cyclohexane and cyclohexene production are 8.3 +/- 0.2 and 12.2 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, respectively. These activation energies are lower, and corresponding turnover rates are three times higher than those obtained with single-crystal Pt surfaces.

  1. The behaviour of a single catalyst pellet for the selective hydrogenation of ethyne in ethene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.N.R.; Bos, A.N.R.; Hof, E.; Kuper, W.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The steady-state and dynamic behaviour of a single Pd---Al2O3 catalyst particle is studied for the selective hydrogenation of ethyne in the presence of ethene, without addition of carbon monoxide. The particle-to-gas heat transfer in the reactor is characterized. During selective hydrogenation, not

  2. Heterogeneous selective hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate to methanol and ethylene glycol over a copper chromite nanocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Chao; Ren, Fumin; Liu, Yuxi; Zhao, Guofeng; Ji, Yongjun; Rong, Hongpan; Jia, Wei; Ma, Lei; Lu, Haiyuan; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-25

    Heterogeneous selective hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate (EC), a key step in indirect conversion of CO2, was realized over a copper chromite nanocatalyst prepared via a hydrothermal method followed by calcination. The selectivities towards methanol (60%) and ethylene glycol (93%) were higher than those achieved over other usual hydrogenation catalysts.

  3. Selective hydrogen atom abstraction by hydrogen atoms in photolysis and radiolysis of alkane mixtures at 770 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Kinugawa, K.; Eguchi, M.; Guedes, S.M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms, has been found in Isobutane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane(TMB), cyclopropane matrices besides neopentane matrix. The selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction in neopentane-isobutane mixture is affected by the difference of kinetic energies of H atoms. The reaction occurs more favorably with decreasing the kinetic energy of H atoms. Competitive reaction between c-C 6 H 12 and Hi for H atoms has been studied in the radiolysis and photolysis of neo-C 5 H 12 HI mixture at 77 K. The rate constants of these reactions in neopentane matrix are quite different from these of thermal H atom reaction, but similar to those of hot H atom reaction. Importance of the selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms is pointed out in the radical formation in the radiolysis of pure TMB at 77 K [pt

  4. Characterisation of hydrocarbonaceous overlayers important in metal-catalysed selective hydrogenation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, David; Warringham, Robbie; Guidi, Tatiana; Parker, Stewart F.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes over supported metal catalysts is an important industrial process and it has been shown that hydrocarbonaceous overlayers are important in controlling selectivity profiles of metal-catalysed hydrogenation reactions. As a model system, we have selected propyne hydrogenation over a commercial Pd(5%)/Al2O3 catalyst. Inelastic neutron scattering studies show that the C-H stretching mode ranges from 2850 to 3063 cm-1, indicating the mostly aliphatic nature of the overlayer and this is supported by the quantification of the carbon and hydrogen on the surface. There is also a population of strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls, their presence would indicate that the overlayer probably contains some oxygen functionality. There is little evidence for any olefinic or aromatic species. This is distinctly different from the hydrogen-poor overlayers that are deposited on Ni/Al2O3 catalysts during methane reforming.

  5. Stimuli-responsive host-guest systems based on the recognition of cryptands by organic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Xuzhou; Huang, Feihe; Niu, Zhenbin; Gibson, Harry W

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: As the star compounds in host-guest chemistry, the syntheses of crown ethers proclaimed the birth of supramolecular chemistry. Crown ether-based host-guest systems have attracted great attention in self-assembly processes because of their good selectivity, high efficiency, and convenient responsiveness, enabling their facile application to the "bottom-up" approach for construction of functional molecular aggregates, such as artificial molecular machines, drug delivery materials, and supramolecular polymers. Cryptands, as preorganized derivatives of crown ethers, not only possess the above-mentioned properties but also have three-dimensional spatial structures and higher association constants compared with crown ethers. More importantly, the introduction of the additional arms makes cryptand-based host-guest systems responsive to more stimuli, which is crucial for the construction of adaptive or smart materials. In the past decade, we designed and synthesized crown ether-based cryptands as a new type of host for small organic guests with the purpose of greatly increasing the stabilities of the host-guest complexes and preparing mechanically interlocked structures and large supramolecular systems more efficiently while retaining or increasing their stimuli-responsiveness. Organic molecules such as paraquat derivatives and secondary ammonium salts have been widely used in the fabrication of functional supramolecular aggregates. Many host molecules including crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils, pillararenes, and cryptands have been used in the preparation of self-assembled structures with these guest molecules, but among them cryptands exhibit the best stabilities with paraquat derivatives in organic solvents due to their preorganization and additional and optimized binding sites. They enable the construction of sophisticated molecules or supramolecules in high yields, affording a very efficient way to fabricate stimuli

  6. Experimental and theoretical charge density distribution in a host-guest system: synthetic terephthaloyl receptor complexed to adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Ha; Howard, Sian T; Hanrahan, Jane R; Groundwater, Paul W; Platts, James A; Hibbs, David E

    2012-06-14

    The experimental charge density distributions in a host-guest complex have been determined. The host, 1,4-bis[[(6-methylpyrid-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]benzene (1) and guest, adipic acid (2). The molecular geometries of 1 and 2 are controlled by the presence in the complex of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions and the presence in the host 1 of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. This system therefore serves as an excellent model for studying noncovalent interactions and their effects on structure and electron density, and the transferability of electron distribution properties between closely related molecules. For the complex, high resolution X-ray diffraction data created the basis for a charge density refinement using a pseudoatomic multipolar expansion (Hansen-Coppens formalism) against extensive low-temperature (T = 100 K) single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and compared with a selection of theoretical DFT calculations on the same complex. The molecules crystallize in the noncentrosymmetric space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. A topological analysis of the resulting density distribution using the atoms in molecules methodology is presented along with multipole populations, showing that the host and guest structures are relatively unaltered by the geometry changes on complexation. Three separate refinement protocols were adopted to determine the effects of the inclusion of calculated hydrogen atom anisotropic displacement parameters on hydrogen bond strengths. For the isotropic model, the total hydrogen bond energy differs from the DFT calculated value by ca. 70 kJ mol(-1), whereas the inclusion of higher multipole expansion levels on anisotropic hydrogen atoms this difference is reduced to ca. 20 kJ mol(-l), highlighting the usefulness of this protocol when describing H-bond energetics.

  7. An outstanding guest

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The person celebrating CERN's 25th anniversary whose photograph we published last week was not just any guest. Readers have pointed out that it was Wim Klein, whose remarkable abilities are part of CERN's history. Well known as one of the best "human calculators", Wim was recruited by CERN in 1957 to verify computer programs, which at the time were still stumbling. Moreover, he regularly beat their speed in calculating and gave breath-taking demonstrations. During one such demonstration in September 1973, he calculated the 19th root of a 133-digit number in less than 2 minutes !

  8. Host-guest complexation of pillar[6]arenes towards neutral nitrile guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mao-Sen; Chen, Huanqing; Du, Xianchao; Li, Jian; Wang, Jinyi; Jia, Xueshun; Li, Chunju

    2015-11-25

    The selective binding behavior of a series of nitrile derivatives by ethylated pillar[6]arene (EtP6A) is described. This work represents the first example of complexation of neutral guests by pillar[6]arenes, although those for pillar[5]arenes have been well documented.

  9. Catalysts for selective oxidation of ammonia in a gas containing hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention contributes to a cost effective way to solve the problem of trace ammonia removal from hydrogen containing gas. The set of catalysts of the invention selectively oxidised ammonia in ppm concentration even in gas mixture containing hydrogen gas in concentration of three orders...

  10. Catalysts for selective oxidation of ammonia in a gas containing hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention contributes to a cost effective way to solve the problem of trace ammonia removal from a hydrogen and nitrogen containing gas. The set of catalysts of the invention selectively oxidised ammonia in ppm concentration even in gas mixtures containing hydrogen gas in concentrations...

  11. Mechanism of the fast exchange between bound and free guests in cucurbit[7]uril-guest systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Sheng; Wu, Fu-Gen; Tao, Le-Fu; Luo, Jun-Jie; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2011-03-07

    The fast exchange is found to be due to the mismatch between the hydrophobic interaction inside the CB[7] cavity and the ion-dipole/hydrogen-bonding interactions in the port region of the CB[7]. This mismatch also induces the multi-step separation process between guest and CB[7] molecules, as elucidated by molecular dynamics simulation.

  12. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S

    2018-03-20

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  13. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-08-02

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  14. Astrobee Guest Science Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jose; Smith, Marion F; Wheeler, Dawn; Fluckiger, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The Astrobee Research Facility will maintain three identical free-flying Astrobee robots on the ISS. After the Astrobees are launched and commissioned in 2018, they will replace the SPHERES robots that have been operating on the ISS since 2006 (Fig. 2). Over the years, the SPHERES have been among the most-used payloads on the ISS, supporting dozens of experiments from a variety of guest scientists. In the next section, we'll talk about past SPHERES experiments as possible inspiration for your future research on Astrobee. Compared to SPHERES, the Astrobee robots will offer many new capabilities and will require less astronaut time to support, so we hope the new facility will be able to fly experiments much more often.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic and quantum theoretical study of host-guest interactions in clathrates: I. Hofmann type clathrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR M. PETRUSEVSKI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Hofmann type clatharates are host-guest compounds with the general formula M(NH32M'(CN4·2G, in which M(NH32M'(CN4 is the host lattice and G is benzene, the guest molecule. In previous studies, host-guest interactions have been investigated by analyzing the RT and LNT vibrational (infrared, far infrared and Raman spectra of these clathrates. All the observed changes in the vibrational spectra of these clathrates are referred to a host-guest interaction originating from weak hydrogen bonding between the ammonia hydrogen atoms from the host lattice and the p electron cloud of the guest (benzene molecules. In order to obtain an insight into the relative importance of the local crystalline field vs. the anharmonicity effects on the spectroscopic properties of the guest species upon enclathration, as well as to explain the observed band shifts and splittings, several quantum theoretical approaches are proposed.

  16. Catalysts Supported on Carbon Materials for the Selective Hydrogenation of Citral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín F. Pérez-Cadenas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneously catalyzed selective-hydrogenation of citral is one of the more feasible ways for obtaining its appreciated unsaturated-alcohols, nerol and geraniol, which are present in over 250 essential oils. Thus, citral has very recently come to be produced petro-chemically in very large quantities, and so partial hydrogenation of citral has become a very economical route for the production of these compounds. However, the selective hydrogenation of citral is not easy, because citral is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde which possesses three double bonds that can be hydrogenated: an isolated C=C bond and the conjugated C=O and C=C bonds. For this reason, in catalyst selection there are several important issues which affect the product selectivity, for example, the active metal and metal particle size which are factors related to the catalyst preparation method, catalyst precursor, or support surface area, as well as other factors such as porosity, the addition of a second catalytic metal, and, of course, the type of catalyst support. About this last one, carbon materials are very interesting supports for this type of hydrogenation reaction due to their unique chemical and textural properties. This review collects and analyzes the results obtained in the selective hydrogenation of citral catalyzed by carbon material supported metals.

  17. Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang (Kevin); Shang, Jin; Gu, Qinfen; Awati, Rohan V.; Jensen, Nathan; Grant, Andrew; Zhang, Xueying; Sholl, David S.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Webley, Paul A.; May, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group's thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is crucial to systematic engineering of new functional materials such as tunable molecular sieves, gated membranes and controlled-release nanocontainers. The model was validated experimentally with H2, N2, Ar and CH4 on three classes of microporous materials: trapdoor zeolites, supramolecular host calixarenes and metal-organic frameworks. We demonstrate how temperature can be exploited to achieve appreciable hydrogen and methane storage in such materials without sustained pressure. These findings also open new avenues for gas sensing and isotope separation.

  18. Mechanism and kinetics of the selective hydrogenation of ethyne and ethene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.N.R.; Bos, A.N.R.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the kinetics and mechanism for the selective hydrogenation of ethyne and ethene on palladium catalysts is presented. The progress made in the last fifteen years is mainly discussed. It has become clear that the classical view, where the selectivity of the reaction was believed to be due

  19. Carbon nano-fiber based membrane reactor for selective nitrite hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunet Espinosa, Roger; Rafieian, D.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of nitrite in drinking water demands control over the selectivity towards nitrogen, minimizing the formation of ammonia. This selectivity is strongly influenced by the H/N ratio of reaction intermediates at the catalyst surface. Therefore, we fabricated a membrane reactor

  20. An exceptionally rapid and selective hydrogenation of 2-cyclohexen-1-one in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Maya; Yokoyama, Toshirou; Kawanami, Hajime; Sato, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshishige

    2009-02-14

    Selective hydrogenation of 2-cyclohexen-1-one over Pt-MCM-41 proceeds at a very high rate and produces cyclohexanone with selectivity of 100% in a batch reactor; a marked increase in the reaction rate (TOF) from 2283 min(-1) to 5051 min(-1) is observed on increasing the pressure from 7 MPa to 14 MPa at 40 degrees C.

  1. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoichi Tezuka; Tatsuhiko Taguchi; Saman Alavi; Amadeu K. Sum; Ryo Ohmura

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  2. Selective Hydrogenation of Nitriles to Primary Amines by using a Cobalt Phosphine Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosa; Bheeter, Charles Beromeo; Cabrero-Antonino, Jose R; Junge, Kathrin; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2017-03-09

    A general procedure for the catalytic hydrogenation of nitriles to primary amines by using a non-noble metal-based system is presented. Co(acac) 3 in combination with tris[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine efficiently catalyzes the selective hydrogenation of a wide range of (hetero)aromatic and aliphatic nitriles to give the corresponding amines. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Highly selective hydrogenation of arenes using nanostructured ruthenium catalysts modified with a carbon–nitrogen matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xinjiang; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Junge, Kathrin; Topf, Christoph; Radnik, Jörg; Kreyenschulte, Carsten; Beller, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Selective hydrogenations of (hetero)arenes represent essential processes in the chemical industry, especially for the production of polymer intermediates and a multitude of fine chemicals. Herein, we describe a new type of well-dispersed Ru nanoparticles supported on a nitrogen-doped carbon material obtained from ruthenium chloride and dicyanamide in a facile and scalable method. These novel catalysts are stable and display both excellent activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of aromatic ethers, phenols as well as other functionalized substrates to the corresponding alicyclic reaction products. Furthermore, reduction of the aromatic core is preferred over hydrogenolysis of the C–O bond in the case of ether substrates. The selective hydrogenation of biomass-derived arenes, such as lignin building blocks, plays a pivotal role in the exploitation of novel sustainable feedstocks for chemical production and represents a notoriously difficult transformation up to now. PMID:27113087

  4. Selective Hydrogenation of Acrolein Over Pd Model Catalysts: Temperature and Particle-Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Casey P; Dostert, Karl-Heinz; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-24

    The selectivity in the hydrogenation of acrolein over Fe 3 O 4 -supported Pd nanoparticles has been investigated as a function of nanoparticle size in the 220-270 K temperature range. While Pd(111) shows nearly 100 % selectivity towards the desired hydrogenation of the C=O bond to produce propenol, Pd nanoparticles were found to be much less selective towards this product. In situ detection of surface species by using IR-reflection absorption spectroscopy shows that the selectivity towards propenol critically depends on the formation of an oxopropyl spectator species. While an overlayer of oxopropyl species is effectively formed on Pd(111) turning the surface highly selective for propenol formation, this process is strongly hindered on Pd nanoparticles by acrolein decomposition resulting in CO formation. We show that the extent of acrolein decomposition can be tuned by varying the particle size and the reaction temperature. As a result, significant production of propenol is observed over 12 nm Pd nanoparticles at 250 K, while smaller (4 and 7 nm) nanoparticles did not produce propenol at any of the temperatures investigated. The possible origin of particle-size dependence of propenol formation is discussed. This work demonstrates that the selectivity in the hydrogenation of acrolein is controlled by the relative rates of acrolein partial hydrogenation to oxopropyl surface species and of acrolein decomposition, which has significant implications for rational catalyst design. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation

  6. Using a Multi-Shelled Hollow Metal-Organic Framework as a Host to Switch the Guest-to-Host and Guest-to-Guest Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Furui; Goh, Tian-Wei; Li, Yang; Shao, Yu-Cai; Luo, Lianshun; Huang, Wenyu; Long, Yi-Tao; Chou, Lien-Yang; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2018-02-19

    A bio-inspired design of using metal-organic framework (MOF) microcrystals with well-defined multi-shelled hollow structures was used as a matrix to host multiple guests including molecules and nanoparticles at separated locations to form a hierarchical material, mimicking biological structures. The interactions such as energy transfer (ET) between different guests are regulated by precisely fixing them in the MOF shells or encapsulating them in the cavities between the MOF shells. The proof-of-concept design is demonstrated by hosting chromophore molecules including rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (C-151), as well as metal nanoparticles (Pd NPs) into the multi-shelled hollow zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8). We could selectively establish or diminish the guest-to-framework and guest-to-guest ET. This work provides a platform to construct complex multifunctional materials, especially those need precise separation control of multi-components. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Gold Supported on Graphene Oxide: An Active and Selective Catalyst for Phenylacetylene Hydrogenations at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Lidong; Huang, Xing; Teschner, Detre

    2014-01-01

    A constraint to industrial implementation of gold-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation is that the catalytic activity was always inferior to those of other noble metals. In this work, gold was supported on graphene oxide (Au/GO) and used in a hydrogenation application. A 99% selectivity toward styrene...... with a 99% conversion in the hydrogenation of phenylacetylene was obtained at 60 °C, which is 100 to 200 °C lower than optimal temperatures in most previous reports on Au catalysts. A series of gold- and palladium-based reference catalysts were tested under the same conditions for phenylacetylene...... hydrogenation, and the performance of Au/GO was substantiated by studying the role of functionalized GO in governing the geometrical structure and thermal stability of supported Au nanoparticles under reaction conditions....

  8. In tandem or alone: a remarkably selective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes catalyzed by ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Grzegorz Krzysztof; Samojłowicz, Cezary; Wdowik, Tomasz; Grela, Karol

    2015-03-07

    A system for transfer hydrogenation of alkenes, composed of a ruthenium metathesis catalyst and HCOOH, is presented. This operationally simple system can be formed directly after a metathesis reaction to effect hydrogenation of the metathesis product in a single-pot. These hydrogenation conditions are applicable to a wide range of alkenes and offer remarkable selectivity.

  9. Hydrogen as energy carrier. Energy and discharge accounting for selected energy chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanger, Einar; Moeller-Holst, Steffen; Maurstad, Ola; Brevik, Dag A.

    2002-10-01

    Hydrogen is viewed by many as a central energy carrier in the future energy system. Hydrogen does not give any discharges for the end user. Hydrogen may be obtained from different sources and may be used for various purposes both stationary and within communication. Central groups may have different opinions on the energy efficiency and the environmental profits of hydrogen use. This disagreement may be due to that not all the sections of the energy chain are clarified. There are also difference in opinions on when to introduce hydrogen in the energy system. The aim of this study was to make an energy and discharge account for hydrogen in some selected energy chains and compare them to alternative chains. The results of the study may contribute to helping the authorities in the work of making sensible measure employments regarding introduction of hydrogen into the Norwegian energy system. Even if the energy efficiency and discharges are two of the main factors which has to be evaluated when various energy chains are compared. It has to be emphasised that other important aspects such as costs, other environmental consequences, availability of energy sources and personal safety have not been considered. The results show that the energy efficiency and discharges vary considerably for different energy chains depending of which energy source is chosen. The energy efficiency and discharges are influenced by where in the enrage chain the conversion occurs as well. Central versus local conversion of hydrogen decides primarily how realistic the CO2 handling is (costs) and how much of the disused heat may be utilised. For stationary consumption it is shown that the energy chains with hydrogen give lower energy efficiency compared to the relevant reference chains (same energy source). For the discharges it is more determining which energy source and conversion technology is chosen than whether hydrogen is the source. For communication hydrogen has the advantage as energy

  10. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S

  11. Selective sensitization of C-fiber nociceptors by hydrogen sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Aoki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of intraplantar (i.pl. administration of NaHS, an H2S donor, known to cause T-type Ca2+ channel (T-channel-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia, on responsiveness to electric stimulation with 5, 250 and 2000 Hz sine waves (SW that selectively excites C, Aδ and Aβ fibers, respectively. NaHS, given i.pl., caused behavioral hypersensitivity to SW stimulation at 5 Hz, but not 250 or 2000 Hz, in rats. NaHS also enhanced phosphorylation of spinal ERK following 5 Hz SW stimulation. Three distinct T-channel blockers abolished the NaHS-induced behavioral hypersensitivity to 5 Hz SW stimulation. Thus, H2S selectively sensitizes C-fiber nociceptors via T-channels.

  12. Highly Active and Selective Hydrogenation of CO2to Ethanol by Ordered Pd-Cu Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shuxing; Shao, Qi; Wang, Pengtang; Dai, Qiguang; Wang, Xingyi; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2017-05-24

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) hydrogenation to ethanol (C 2 H 5 OH) is considered a promising way for CO 2 conversion and utilization, whereas desirable conversion efficiency remains a challenge. Herein, highly active, selective and stable CO 2 hydrogenation to C 2 H 5 OH was enabled by highly ordered Pd-Cu nanoparticles (NPs). By tuning the composition of the Pd-Cu NPs and catalyst supports, the efficiency of CO 2 hydrogenation to C 2 H 5 OH was well optimized with Pd 2 Cu NPs/P25 exhibiting high selectivity to C 2 H 5 OH of up to 92.0% and the highest turnover frequency of 359.0 h -1 . Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy results revealed the high C 2 H 5 OH production and selectivity of Pd 2 Cu NPs/P25 can be ascribed to boosting *CO (adsorption CO) hydrogenation to *HCO, the rate-determining step for the CO 2 hydrogenation to C 2 H 5 OH.

  13. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagić Snježana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers and thus enable businesses to uphold a guest's base. By recognizing loyalty guests' importance, the global hospitality industry created monetary and non-monetary rewards for loyal visitors, delayed gratification (points collection and immediate rewards, as well as numerous other reward systems that try to keep them. To win customer loyalty, together with all benefits arising from it, caterers need to become familiar with factors, which determine guests' loyalty. The paper will show the results of research regarding the impact of the service quality and guests' satisfaction to their loyalty. Many authors have confirmed that employees' satisfaction affected customers' satisfaction, so this paper will give an answer does it influence on customers' loyalty as well.

  14. PHENANTHROLINE-STABILIZED PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES IN POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL—AN ACTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST SYSTEM FOR THE SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF OLEFINS USING MOLECULAR HYDROGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1,10-Phenanthroline-stabilized palladium nanoparticles dispersed in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix is synthesized which is found to be a stable and active catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of olefins using molecular hydrogen under mild reaction conditions. A variety of...

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  16. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  17. On the Role of Surface Modifications of Palladium Catalysts in the Selective Hydrogenation of Acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Summing Me up: DFT calculations have shown that alloying, subsurface carbon, and hydride formation, all increase the selectivity of Pd catalysts for acetylene hydrogenation by weakening the surface–adsorbate bond. A simple descriptor—the adsorption energy of a methyl group—has been used to quantify...

  18. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ANHYDRIDES TO LACTONES UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE MEDIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selective Hydrogenation of Anhydrides to Lactones Under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide MediumEndalkachew Sahle-Demessie Unnikrishnan R PillaiU.S. EPA , 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45268 Phone: 513-569-7739Fax: 513-569-7677Abstract:Hydrogenat...

  19. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  20. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in liquid phase under nitrogen atmosphere over vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of a variet...

  1. Guest Editor's introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    pleasure to be Guest Editor and I look forward to future developments in this growing research area and expositions in Distributed Systems Engineering. Peter G Harrison Imperial College, London

  2. Supramolecular polymers constructed from macrocycle-based host-guest molecular recognition motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengyi; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Feng; Huang, Feihe

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular polymers, fabricated via the combination of supramolecular chemistry and polymer science, are polymeric arrays of repeating units held together by reversible, relatively weak noncovalent interactions. The introduction of noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking interactions, metal coordination, and host-guest interactions, endows supramolecular polymers with unique stimuli responsiveness and self-adjusting abilities. As a result, diverse monomer structures have been designed and synthesized to construct various types of supramolecular polymers. By changing the noncovalent interaction types, numbers, or chemical structures of functional groups in these monomers, supramolecular polymeric materials can be prepared with tailored chemical and physical properties. In recent years, the interest in supramolecular polymers has been extended from the preparation of intriguing topological structures to the discoveries of potential applications as functional materials. Compared with traditional polymers, supramolecular polymers show some advantages in the fabrication of reversible or responsive materials. The development of supramolecular polymers also offers a platform to construct complex and sophisticated materials with a bottom-up approach. Macrocylic hosts, including crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils, and pillararenes, are the most commonly used building blocks in the fabrication of host-guest interaction-based supramolecular polymers. With the introduction of complementary guest molecules, macrocylic hosts demonstrate selective and stimuli-responsive host-guest complexation behaviors. By elaborate molecular design, the resultant supramolecular polymers can exhibit diverse structures based on the self-selectivity of host-guest interactions. The introduction of reversible host-guest interactions can further endow these supramolecular polymers with interesting and fascinating chemical

  3. Hydrogen purification by selective methanation of CO in CO/CO2/H2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Mette; Johannessen, Tue; Livbjerg, Hans

    Normally, the hydrogen-rich feed gas to PEM Fuel Cells has a relatively high concentration of CO, which is poisonous to the anode catalyst. CO can be removed by selective oxidation or by methanation. For methanation, it is desired to minimize the use of hydrogen by selectively removing the CO...... without “loosing” hydrogen by methanating CO2. Studies have shown that CO has an inhibiting effect on the methanation of CO2. This inhibiting effect is thought to influence the selective methanation of CO. The aim of this project has been to remove CO from a process gas containing H2, CO and CO2......: Methanation of CO and the reverse water gas shift reaction: (1) CO + 3H2 -> CH4 + H2O (2) CO2 + H2 -> CO + H2O In experiments with only CO2 and hydrogen in the feed gas there is a significant production of CO and methane. The concentration of CO in the reactor rapidly reaches a level, where it inhibits (or...

  4. Influence of nonionic surfactants on the potentiometric response of hydrogen ion-selective polymeric membrane electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadas-Torre, C; Bakker, E; Barker, S; Meyerhoff, M E

    1996-05-01

    The influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based nonionic surfactants (i.e., Triton X-100 and Brij 35) in the sample phase on the response properties of hydrogen ion-selective polymeric membrane electrodes containing mobile (lipophilic amines) or covalently bound (aminated-poly-(vinyl chloride)) hydrogen ion carriers is reported. In the presence of these nonionic surfactants, membrane electrode response toward interfering cation activity (e.g., Na+) in the sample phase is increased substantially and the pH measuring range shortened. The degree of cation interference for pH measurements is shown to correlate with the basicity of the hydrogen ion carrier doped within the membrane phase. The observed deterioration in selectivity arises from the partitioning of the surfactant into the membrane and concomitant extraction of metal cations by the surfactants in the organic phase. The effect of nonionic surfactants on pH electrodes prepared with aminated-PVC membranes is shown to be more complex, with additional large shifts in EMF values apparently arising from multidentate interactions between the surfactant molecules and the polymeric amine in the membrane, leading to a change in the apparent pKa values for the amine sites. The effects induced by nonionic surfactants on the EMF response function of hydrogen ion-selective polymeric membrane electrodes are modeled, and experimental results are shown to correlate well with theoretical predictions.

  5. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  6. The GLAST Guest Investigator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the GLAST Guest Investigator (GI) program, which will support basic research relevant to the GLAST mission in yearly cycles beginning approximately two months after launch. Current details about the GLAST GI program will always be posted on the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) website: http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/.

  7. Redox kinetics of ceria-based mixed oxides in selective hydrogen combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jan Hendrik; Beckers, Jurriaan; Collignon, Paul F; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2007-12-03

    Ceria-based mixed oxides, in which about 10 mol % of the cerium is replaced by another metal, catalyze the selective combustion of hydrogen from a mixture of hydrogen, propane, and propene at 550 degrees C. This makes them attractive catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. Hydrogen combustion shifts the equilibrium to the products side, supplies energy for the endothermic dehydrogenation, and simplifies product separation. The type of metal added has an important effect on the catalytic properties. To gain insight into the process, a set consisting of six mixed oxides was synthesized and the catalytic properties and redox behavior were tested. The mixed oxides generally release more oxygen than plain ceria. Mixed oxides containing Bi, Cu, Fe, Pd or Ca release between 1.6 and 2.0 mg of oxygen per 100 mg sample (compared to only 1.2 mg for plain ceria). This result is important for reactions in which the catalyst acts as an oxygen reservoir, such as selective hydrogen combustion. The temperature at which oxygen is released is generally lower for the mixed oxides, and varies from 110 degrees C (for Cu-CeO2) to 550 degrees C (for Ca-CeO2), which enables catalytic applications over a wide temperature range. The reduction rate at 550 degrees C is related to the reduction onset of the catalysts. Those catalysts with a relatively low reduction temperature, such as Cu-, Mn-, Bi-, and Pb-CeO2, show a high reduction rate, whereas those with a high reduction temperature, such as Ca-CeO2, Fe-CeO2, and plain ceria, reduce at a slower rate. The latter catalysts also have a low selectivity towards hydrogen combustion. The influence of the catalyst composition and crystallite size on the activity and selectivity is discussed.

  8. A New Concept for the Fabrication of Hydrogen Selective Silica Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Tsapatsis

    2009-01-07

    It was proposed to investigate a new concept for the synthesis of molecular sieve hydrogen selective membranes. This concept is based on the use of exfoliated layered zeolite precursors in coating processes to make nanocomposite films with inorganic or polymeric matrices. We discovered that creating exfoliated zeolite layers was much more difficult than anticipated because the methods originally proposed (based on existing literature reports) were not successful in providing exfoliated layers while preserving their porous structure. Although the original goals of fabricating high-selectivity-high-flux membranes that are stable under conditions present in a water-gas-shift reactor and that are able to selectively permeate hydrogen over all other components of the mixtures present in these reactors were not accomplished fully, significant progress has been made as follows: (1) Proof-of-concept hydrogen-selective nanocomposite membranes have been fabricated; (2) Methods to exfoliate layered zeolite precursors preserving the layer structure were identified; and (3) Unexpectedly, membranes exhibiting high ideal selectivity for carbon dioxide over nitrogen at room temperature were produced. The findings listed above provide confidence that the proposed novel concept can eventually be realized.

  9. Contributions to reversed-phase column selectivity: III. Column hydrogen-bond basicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, P W; Dolan, J W; Dorsey, J G; Snyder, L R; Kirkland, J J

    2015-05-22

    Column selectivity in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) can be described in terms of the hydrophobic-subtraction model, which recognizes five solute-column interactions that together determine solute retention and column selectivity: hydrophobic, steric, hydrogen bonding of an acceptor solute (i.e., a hydrogen-bond base) by a stationary-phase donor group (i.e., a silanol), hydrogen bonding of a donor solute (e.g., a carboxylic acid) by a stationary-phase acceptor group, and ionic. Of these five interactions, hydrogen bonding between donor solutes (acids) and stationary-phase acceptor groups is the least well understood; the present study aims at resolving this uncertainty, so far as possible. Previous work suggests that there are three distinct stationary-phase sites for hydrogen-bond interaction with carboxylic acids, which we will refer to as column basicity I, II, and III. All RPC columns exhibit a selective retention of carboxylic acids (column basicity I) in varying degree. This now appears to involve an interaction of the solute with a pair of vicinal silanols in the stationary phase. For some type-A columns, an additional basic site (column basicity II) is similar to that for column basicity I in primarily affecting the retention of carboxylic acids. The latter site appears to be associated with metal contamination of the silica. Finally, for embedded-polar-group (EPG) columns, the polar group can serve as a proton acceptor (column basicity III) for acids, phenols, and other donor solutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MOF-Derived Cobalt Phosphide/Carbon Nanocubes for Selective Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes to Anilines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuliang; Peng, Li; Oveisi, Emad; Bulut, Safak; Sun, Daniel T; Asgari, Mehrdad; Trukhina, Olga; Queen, Wendy L

    2017-12-19

    Transition-metal phosphides have received tremendous attention during the past few years because they are earth-abundant, cost-effective, and show outstanding catalytic performance in several electrochemically driven conversions including hydrogen evolution, oxygen evolution, and water splitting. As one member of the transition-metal phosphides, Co x P-based materials have been widely explored as electrocatalyts; however, their application in the traditional thermal catalysis are rarely reported. In this work, cobalt phosphide/carbon nanocubes are designed and their catalytic activity for the selective hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines is studied. A high surface area metal-organic framework (MOF), ZIF-67, is infused with red phosphorous, and then pyrolysis promotes the facile production of the phosphide-based catalysts. The resulting composite, consisting of Co 2 P/CN x nanocubes, is shown to exhibit excellent catalytic performance in the selective hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing catalytic activity of a cobalt phosphide in nitroarenes hydrogenation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Frof Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available GUEST EDITORIALThis special issue of TOJDE is centred around the theme of ‘Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education’. The Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005 movement, epitomised by such nascent technologies as blogs, wikis, RSS, podcasting, as well as tag-based folksonomies, social networking, collaborative editing and peer-to-peer (P2P media sharing applications, is purported to be redefining the way we conceive and make use of the Internet, and is enjoying considerable attention and popularity in both mainstream society and education. A major aim of this issue is to encourage ongoing discussion on the question of whether, and if so, in what ways, the advent and continued growth of Web 2.0 and social software has specific implications for the field of online and web-based distance education. The special issue opens with an article by P. Clint Rogers, Stephen W. Liddle, Peter Chan, Aaron Doxey and Brady Isom (all from the USA argue that the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, and the possibilities and the realities they represent, are fuelling profound changes to theoretical views of learning and teaching. According to the authors, in contrast to earlier e-learning efforts that simply replicated traditional models of learning and teaching in online environments, ‘E-Learning 2.0’ offers opportunities to move away from the highly centralised industrial model of learning of the past era, towards achieving individual empowerment within a global learning community. They also argue that as the personal, social and flexible technologies of Web 2.0 proliferate, the importance of re-usability and interoperability will also increase; correspondingly there is also a need for standardisation efforts to support the attainment of these goals. The second article, focuses on the use of specific Web 2.0 technologies written by Abdullah Kuzu (Anadolu University, Turkey looks at pre-service teachers’ perceptions of the use of blogs for instruction and

  12. (15)N and (13)C group-selective techniques extend the scope of STD NMR detection of weak host-guest interactions and ligand screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kövér, Katalin E; Wéber, Edit; Martinek, Tamás A; Monostori, Eva; Batta, Gyula

    2010-10-18

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) is a valuable tool for studying the binding of small molecules to large biomolecules and for obtaining detailed information on the binding epitopes. Here, we demonstrate that the proposed (15)N/(13)C variants of group-selective, "GS-STD" experiments provide a powerful approach to mapping the binding epitope of a ligand even in the absence of efficient spin diffusion within the target protein. Therefore, these experimental variants broaden the scope of STD studies to smaller and/or more-dynamic targets. The STD spectra obtained in four different experimental setups (selective (1)H STD, (15)N GS-STD, (13)C(Ar) and (13)C(aliphatic) GS-STD approaches) revealed that the signal-intensity pattern of the difference spectra is affected by both the type and the spatial distribution of the excited "transmitter" atoms, as well as by the efficiency of the spin-diffusion-mediated magnetization transfer. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated on a system by using the lectin, galectin-1 and its carbohydrate ligand, lactose.

  13. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Host-Guest Complexes of C-Ethyl-2-methylresorcinarene and AromaticN,N'-Dioxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttreddy, Rakesh; Beyeh, Ngong Kodiah; Ras, Robin H A; Rissanen, Kari

    2017-06-01

    The C-ethyl-2-methylresorcinarene ( 1 ) forms 1:1 in-cavity complexes with aromatic N , N' -dioxides, only if each of the aromatic rings has an N-O group. The structurally different C-shaped 2,2'-bipyridine N , N '-dioxide (2,2'-BiPyNO) and the linear rod-shaped 4,4'-bipyridine N , N '-dioxide (4,4'-BiPyNO) both form 1:1 in-cavity complexes with the host resorcinarene in C 4 v crown and C 2 v conformations, respectively. In the solid state, the host-guest interactions between the 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane N , N '-dioxide (BiPyPNO) and the host 1 stabilize the unfavorable anti - gauche conformation. Contrary to the N , N '-dioxide guests, the mono -N -oxide guest, 4-phenylpyridine N -oxide (4PhPyNO), does not form an in-cavity complex in the solid state. The host-guest complexation and the relative guest affinities were studied through 1 H NMR competition experiments in methanol. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography of the 1:1 complexes supports the proposed solution-state structures, also revealing strong hydrogen bonds between the host and the guests, not observed in solution owing to hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange processes in methanol.

  15. Rotaxane and catenane host structures for sensing charged guest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The promise of mechanically interlocked architectures, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, as prototypical molecular switches and shuttles for nanotechnological applications, has stimulated an ever increasing interest in their synthesis and function. The elaborate host cavities of interlocked structures, however, can also offer a novel approach toward molecular recognition: this Account describes the use of rotaxane and catenane host systems for binding charged guest species, and for providing sensing capability through an integrated optical or electrochemical reporter group. Particular attention is drawn to the exploitation of the unusual dynamic properties of interlocked molecules, such as guest-induced shuttling or conformational switching, as a sophisticated means of achieving a selective and functional sensor response. We initially survey interlocked host systems capable of sensing cationic guests, before focusing on our accomplishments in synthesizing rotaxanes and catenanes designed for the more challenging task of selective anion sensing. In our group, we have developed the use of discrete anionic templation to prepare mechanically interlocked structures for anion recognition applications. Removal of the anion template reveals an interlocked host system, possessing a unique three-dimensional geometrically restrained binding cavity formed between the interlocked components, which exhibits impressive selectivity toward complementary anionic guest species. By incorporating reporter groups within such systems, we have developed both electrochemical and optical anion sensors which can achieve highly selective sensing of anionic guests. Transition metals, lanthanides, and organic fluorophores integrated within the mechanically bonded structural framework of the receptor are perturbed by the binding of the guest, with a concomitant change in the emission profile. We have also exploited the unique dynamics of interlocked hosts by demonstrating that an

  16. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF CINNAMALDEHYDE WITH Pt AND Pt-Fe CATALYSTS: EFFECTS OF THE SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. da Silva

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature reduced TiO2-supported Pt and Pt-Fe catalysts are much more active and selective for the liquid–phase hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to unsaturated cinnamyl alcohol than the corresponding carbon-supported catalysts. High-temperature reduced catalysts, where the SMSI effect should be present, are almost inactive for this reaction. There is at present no definitive explanation for this effect but an electronic metal-support interaction is most probably involved.

  17. Selective three-phase hydrogenation of aromatic nitro-compounds over β-molybdenum nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cárdenas-Lizana, F.; Lamey, D.; Gómez-Quero, S.; Perret, N.; Kiwi-Minsker, L.; Keane, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A tetragonal molybdenum nitride (β-Mo2N) has been prepared by temperature programmed treatment of MoO3 in flowing N-2 + H-2 and for the first time shown to catalyze the liquid phase selective hydrogenation (T = 423 K; P-H2 = 11 bar) of a series of para-substituted (-H, -OH, -O-CH3, -CH3, -Cl, -I and

  18. Effect of chemically reduced palladium supported catalyst on sunflower oil hydrogenation conversion and selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of sunflower oil was studied in order to improve the conversion and to reduce the trans-isomerization selectivity. The hydrogenation was performed using Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 prepared catalyst and Pd/Al2O3 commercial catalyst under similar conditions. The Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation and chemical reduction processes. It was characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis (BET, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The result of sunflower oil hydrogenation on Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst showed a 17% higher conversion and a 23% lower trans-isomerization selectivity compared to the commercial Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. The chemical reduction of palladium supported catalyst using potassium borohydride (KBH4 has affected the Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst’s structure and particle size. These most likely influenced its catalytic performance toward higher conversion and lower trans-isomerization selectivity.

  19. The use of ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Vinciane; Wendt, Bianca; Werkmeister, Svenja; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-04-28

    The performance of well-defined ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C and C=X bonds is reported. Monodisperse iron nanoparticles of about 2 nm size are synthesized by the decomposition of {Fe(N[Si(CH3)3]2)2}2 under dihydrogen. They are found to be active for the hydrogenation of various alkenes and alkynes under mild conditions and weakly active for C=O bond hydrogenation.

  20. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Gagić Snježana; Kalenjuk Bojana; Jovičić Ana; Petrović Marko

    2015-01-01

    The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers...

  1. Selective hydrogenation of halogenated arenes using porous manganese oxide (OMS-2) and platinum supported OMS-2 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Iain J; Daly, Helen; Manyar, Haresh G; Taylor, S F Rebecca; Thompson, Jillian M; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-07-04

    Porous manganese oxide (OMS-2) and platinum supported on OMS-2 catalysts have been shown to facilitate the hydrogenation of the nitro group in chloronitrobenzene to give chloroaniline with no dehalogenation. Complete conversion was obtained within 2 h at 25 °C and, although the rate of reaction increased with increasing temperature up to 100 °C, the selectivity to chloroaniline remained at 99.0%. Use of Pd/OMS-2 or Pt/Al2O3 resulted in significant dechlorination even at 25 °C and 2 bar hydrogen pressure giving a selectivity to chloroaniline of 34.5% and 77.8%, respectively, at complete conversion. This demonstrates the potential of using platinum group metal free catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of halogenated aromatics. Two pathways were observed for the analogous nitrobenzene hydrogenation depending on the catalyst used. The hydrogenation of nitrobenzene was found to follow a direct pathway to aniline and nitrosobenzene over Pd/OMS-2 in contrast to the OMS and Pt/OMS-2 catalysts which resulted in formation of nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene and azobenzene/hydrazobenzene intermediates before complete conversion to aniline. These results indicate that for Pt/OMS-2 the hydrogenation proceeds predominantly over the support with the metal acting to dissociate hydrogen. In the case of Pd/OMS-2 both the hydrogenation and hydrogen adsorption occur on the metal sites.

  2. Foreign Guests in Ancient Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora Žbontar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xenía was a special relationship between a foreign guest and his host in Ancient Greece. The ritual of hosting a foreigner included an exchange of objects, feasting, and the establishment of friendship between people from different social backgrounds. This relationship implied trust, loyalty, friendship, and mutual aid between the people involved. Goods and services were also exchanged without any form of payment. There were no formal laws governing xenía – it was based entirely on a moral appeal. Mutual appreciation between the host and the guest was established during the ritual, but the host did retain a certain level of superiority over the guest. Xenía was one of the most important institutions in Ancient Greece. It had a lot of features and obligations similar to kinship and marriage. In literary sources the word xénos varies in meaning from “enemy stranger”, “friendly stranger”, “foreigner”, “guest”, “host” to “ritual friend”, and it is often hard to tell which usage is appropriate in a given passage. The paper describes the emphasis on hospitality towards foreigners. It presents an example of a depiction indicating xenía is presented, as well as several objects which were traded during the ritual. The paper also addresses the importance of hospitality in Greek drama in general, especially with examples of violations of the hospitality code.

  3. Highly Sensitive and Selective Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using the Mesoporous SnO₂ Modified Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Niuzi; Zhang, Qinyi; Zhang, Shunping; Zong, Pan; Yang, Feng

    2017-10-14

    It is important to improve the sensitivities and selectivities of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors when they are used to monitor the state of hydrogen in aerospace industry and electronic field. In this paper, the ordered mesoporous SnO₂ (m-SnO₂) powders were prepared by sol-gel method, and the morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The gas sensors were fabricated using m-SnO₂ as the modified layers on the surface of commercial SnO₂ (c-SnO₂) by screen printing technology, and tested for gas sensing towards ethanol, benzene and hydrogen with operating temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 400 °C. Higher sensitivity was achieved by using the modified m-SnO₂ layers on the c-SnO₂ gas sensor, and it was found that the S(c/m2) sensor exhibited the highest response (Ra/Rg = 22.2) to 1000 ppm hydrogen at 400 °C. In this paper, the mechanism of the sensitivity and selectivity improvement of the gas sensors is also discussed.

  4. Efficient and selective hydrogen generation from bioethanol using ruthenium pincer-type complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponholz, Peter; Mellmann, Dörthe; Cordes, Christoph; Alsabeh, Pamela G; Li, Bin; Li, Yang; Nielsen, Martin; Junge, Henrik; Dixneuf, Pierre; Beller, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    Catalytic generation of hydrogen from aqueous ethanol solution proceeds in the presence of pincer-type transition metal catalysts. Optimal results are obtained applying a [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(iPr2PEtN(H)EtPiPr2)] complex (catalyst TON 80,000) in the presence of water and base. This dehydrogenation reaction provides up to 70% acetic acid in a selective manner. For the first time, it is shown that bioethanol obtained from fermentation processes can be used directly in this protocol without the need for water removal. The produced hydrogen can be directly utilized in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, since very low amounts of CO are formed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Jeff; Moffett, Jonathan

    1996-06-01

    Special Issue on Management This special issue contains seven papers originally presented at an International Workshop on Services for Managing Distributed Systems (SMDS'95), held in September 1995 in Karslruhe, Germany. The workshop was organized to present the results of two ESPRIT III funded projects, Sysman and IDSM, and more generally to bring together work in the area of distributed systems management. The workshop focused on the tools and techniques necessary for managing future large-scale, multi-organizational distributed systems. The open call for papers attracted a large number of submissions and the subsequent attendance at the workshop, which was larger than expected, clearly indicated that the topics addressed by the workshop were of considerable interest both to industry and academia. The papers selected for this special issue represent an excellent coverage of the issues addressed by the workshop. A particular focus of the workshop was the need to help managers deal with the size and complexity of modern distributed systems by the provision of automated support. This automation must have two prime characteristics: it must provide a flexible management system which responds rapidly to changing organizational needs, and it must provide both human managers and automated management components with the information that they need, in a form which can be used for decision-making. These two characteristics define the two main themes of this special issue. To satisfy the requirement for a flexible management system, workers in both industry and universities have turned to architectures which support policy directed management. In these architectures policy is explicitly represented and can be readily modified to meet changing requirements. The paper `Towards implementing policy-based systems management' by Meyer, Anstötz and Popien describes an approach whereby policy is enforced by event-triggered rules. Krause and Zimmermann in their paper `Implementing

  6. NANOPARTICLES OF TUNGSTEN AS LOW-COST MONOMETALLIC CATALYST FOR SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF 3-HEXYNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Juliana Maccarrone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost tungsten monometallic catalysts containing variable amounts of metal (4.5, 7.1 and 8.5%W were prepared by impregnating alumina with ammonium metatungstate as an inexpensive precursor. The catalysts were characterized using ICP, XPS, XRD, TPR and hydrogen chemisorption. These techniques revealed mainly WO3-Al2O3 (W6+ species on the surface. The effects of the content of W nanoparticles and reaction temperature on activity and selectivity for the partial hydrogenation of 3-hexyne, a non-terminal alkyne, were assessed under moderate conditions of temperature and pressure. The monometallic catalysts prepared were found to be active and stereoselective for the production of (Z -3-hexene, had the following order: 7.1WN/A > 8.5 WN/A ≥ 4.5 WN/A. Additionally, the performance of the synthesized xWN/A catalysts exhibited high sensitivity to temperature variation. In all cases, the maximum 3-hexyne total conversion and selectivity was achieved at 323 K. The performance of the catalysts was considered to be a consequence of two phenomena: a the electronic effects, related to the high charge of W (+6, causing an intensive dipole moment in the hydrogen molecule (van der Waals forces and leading to heterolytic bond rupture; the H+ and H- species generated approach a 3-hexyne adsorbate molecule and cause heterolytic rupture of the C≡C bond into C- = C+; and b steric effects related to the high concentration of WO3 on 8.5WN/A that block the Al2O3 support. Catalyst deactivation was detected, starting at about 50 min of reaction time. Electrodeficient W6+ species are responsible for the formation of green oil at the surface level, blocking pores and active sites of the catalyst, particularly at low reaction temperatures (293 and 303 K. The resulting best catalyst, 7.1WN/A, has low fabrication cost and high selectivity for (Z -3-hexene (94% at 323 K. This selectivity is comparable to that of the classical and more expensive industrial Lindlar catalyst

  7. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  8. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of 129 Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, 129 Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature

  9. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions.

  10. Capturing the guest experience in hotels phase one : theoretical background and development of the guest experience scan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marle, van R.S.F. (Rienk); Pijls, R. (Ruth); Schreiber, G.H. (Gerrit)

    2011-01-01

    The goal for the coming years is to get insight in the guest experience in hotels. What is guest experience? How to measure guest experience? What is the relation between guest experience and guest loyalty? And finally, what tangible elements in the physical environment of hotels and the contact

  11. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Lederhos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ≫ RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects.

  12. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederhos, Cecilia R.; Badano, Juan M.; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M. Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ≫ RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  13. Highly selective and rapidly responsive fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide detection in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Jialin; Yang, Shaoxiang; Tian, Hongyu; Liu, Yongguo; Sun, Baoguo

    2018-08-15

    A new fluorescent probe 6-(2, 4-dinitrophenoxy)-2-naphthonitrile (probe 1) was designed and synthesized for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). The addition of H 2 S to a solution of probe 1 resulted in a marked fluorescence turn-on alongside a visual color change from colorless to light yellow. Importantly, this distinct color response indicated that probe 1 could be used as a visual sensor for H 2 S. Moreover, probe 1 was successfully used as a signal tool to determine the H 2 S levels in beer and red wine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective Hydrogenation of Concentrated Vinyl Acetylene Mixed C4 by Modified Pd Catalysts: Effect of Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paisan Insorn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pd and Pd-Cu on alumina catalysts were tested for hydrogenation of vinyl acetylene in mixed C4 in a circulating tubular reactor. The results showed that adding proper amounts of Cu improved the reaction activity, but inhibited 1,3-butadiene selectivity. Moreover, the presence of Cu retarded the carbon deposition on catalysts during the reaction. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO, Temperature programmed reduction (TPR, H2 chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were utilized to characterize the catalysts. The characterization suggested both geometric and electronic modifications.

  15. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.T.; Sutawane, U.B.; Rathi, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage, (2) isotope exchange, 3) isotope analysis, (4) properties and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762. (author)

  16. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH 3 -H 2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  17. Highly Sensitive and Selective Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using the Mesoporous SnO2 Modified Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Niuzi Xue; Qinyi Zhang; Shunping Zhang; Pan Zong; Feng Yang

    2017-01-01

    It is important to improve the sensitivities and selectivities of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors when they are used to monitor the state of hydrogen in aerospace industry and electronic field. In this paper, the ordered mesoporous SnO2 (m-SnO2) powders were prepared by sol-gel method, and the morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET). The gas sensors were fabricated usin...

  18. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  19. Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbons in a Novel Hydrogen-Selective Membrane-Based Fuel Processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2006-03-10

    In this work, asymmetric dense Pd/porous stainless steel composite membranes were fabricated by depositing palladium on the outer surface of the tubular support. The electroless plating method combined with an osmotic pressure field was used to deposit the palladium film. Surface morphology and microstructure of the composite membranes were characterized by SEM and EDX. The SEM and EDX analyses revealed strong adhesion of the plated pure palladium film on the substrate and dense coalescence of the Pd film. Membranes were further characterized by conducting permeability experiments with pure hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium gases at temperatures from 325 to 450 C and transmembrane pressure differences from 5 to 45 psi. The permeation results showed that the fabricated membranes have both high hydrogen permeability and selectivity. For example, the hydrogen permeability for a composite membrane with a 20 {micro}m Pd film was 3.02 x 10{sup -5} moles/m{sup 2}.s.Pa{sup 0.765} at 450 C. Hydrogen/nitrogen selectivity for this composite membrane was 1000 at 450 C with a transmembrane pressure difference of 14.7 psi. Steam reforming of methane is one of the most important chemical processes in hydrogen and syngas production. To investigate the usefulness of palladium-based composite membranes in membrane-reactor configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen, steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift was studied. The steam reforming of methane using a packed-bed inert membrane tubular reactor (PBIMTR) was simulated. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model with parallel flow configuration was developed for steam reforming of methane. The shell volume was taken as the feed and sweep gas was fed to the inside of the membrane tube. Radial diffusion was taken into account for concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential

  20. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Linehan, Sue [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lipiecki, Frank [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Christopher, Aardahl L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  1. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng

    2017-05-30

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  2. Hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. Development of CO{sub 2}-selective biogas membrane. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestboe, A.P.

    2012-02-15

    The project started as a literature study and technology development project for a hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. The introduction of hydrogen (for example produced from wind turbines by surplus electricity) in the gas system makes it possible to store energy which can be selectively used with high energy conversion in fuel cells directly located at the end users. In order to make this possible, it is necessary to have a separating unit that can selectively remove hydrogen from the gas mixture and deliver it as fuel to the electrical generator (a fuel cell). In the project, several existing technologies were evaluated with regard to the application in view. It was concluded that while other technologies are ripe, they are costly in energy and unsuitable for the relatively low capacity application that are in question close to the end users. Membrane technology was evaluated to be the most suitable, although the technology is still under development in many cases. In the project it was found that metallic membranes in the form of palladium coated stainless discs would answer the needs for the high purity needed. Laboratory development yielded discs that could separate hydrogen from natural gas, however, the flux was low compared to the needs of the application. It was found that at least 2 bar pressure difference of hydrogen would be needed to get a high enough flux. The way to achieve this pressure would necessitate a compressor which would consume an energy amount high enough to invalidate the concept. When concluding on the results and the study it was found that the direction of the project could be changed towards developing CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with the goal of developing membrane technology that could upgrade biogas by removing CO{sub 2}. The laboratory equipment and setup that were developed in the first part of the project could be used directly in this second part of the project. In this second part of the project it was

  3. Cu/MgAl(2)O(4) as bifunctional catalyst for aldol condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and selective transfer hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupovac, Kristina; Palkovits, Regina

    2013-11-01

    Copper supported on mesoporous magnesium aluminate has been prepared as noble-metal-free solid catalyst for aldol condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with acetone, followed by hydrogenation of the aldol condensation products. The investigated mesoporous spinels possess high activity as solid-base catalysts. Magnesium aluminate exhibits superior activity compared to zinc and cobalt-based aluminates, reaching full conversion and up to 81 % yield of the 1:1 aldol product. The high activity can be correlated to a higher concentration of basic surface sites on magnesium aluminate. Applying continuous regeneration, the catalysts can be recycled without loss of activity. Focusing on the subsequent hydrogenation of aldol condensation products, Cu/MgAl2 O4 allows a selective hydrogenation and CO bond cleavage, delivering 3-hydroxybutyl-5-methylfuran as the main product with up to 84 % selectivity avoiding ring saturation. Analysis of the hydrogenation activity reveals that the reaction proceeds in the following order: CC>CO>CO cleavage>ring hydrogenation. Comparable activity and selectivity can be also achieved utilizing 2-propanol as solvent in the transfer hydrogenation, providing the possibility for partial recycling of acetone and optimization of the hydrogen management. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Photocaged Competitor Guests: A General Approach Toward Light-Activated Cargo Release From Cucurbiturils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Miguel A; Basílio, Nuno; Moro, Artur J; Domingues, Mara; González-Delgado, José A; Arteaga, Jesús F; Pischel, Uwe

    2017-09-21

    A general approach toward the light-induced guest release from cucurbit[7]uril by means of a photoactivatable competitor was devised. An o-nitrobenzyl-caged competitor is photolyzed to generate a competitive guest that can displace cargo from the host macrocycle solely based on considerations of chemical equilibrium. With this method the release of terpene guests from inclusion complexes with cucurbit[7]uril was demonstrated. The binding of the herein investigated terpenes, all being lead fragrant components in essential oils, has been characterized for the first time. They feature binding constants of up to 10 8  L mol -1 and a high differential binding selectivity (spanning four orders of magnitude for the binding constants for the particular set of terpenes). By fine-tuning the photoactivatable competitor guest, selective and also sequential release of the terpenes was achieved. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. 32 CFR 705.23 - Guest cruises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... families and personal guests of naval personnel has contributed materially to the morale of the family... informed of security restrictions. Unclassified photography should be permitted on board, as pictures renew... photography is prohibited, and security regulations will be courteously but firmly enforced. (E) Guests will...

  6. Antibacterial effects of hydrogen peroxide and silver composition on selected pathogenic enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Davoudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Antibacterial effects of hydrogen peroxide and silver composition on selected pathogenic enterobacteriaceae was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: The efficacy of 30 ppb silver in 0.3% hydrogen peroxide solution for inactivation of selected Enterobacteriaceae, including Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was assessed for 72 hours in a designated nutrient broth medium and steel surface. The bactericidal growth ability was determined for each bacterium genus by the conventional colony count method and turbidimetry via an optical density (OD assay at 450 nm in a time interval of 24 hours. Results: Suspensions of K.pneumoniae, and P.mirabilis showed a significant OD reduction at three 24-hour intervals (CI = 0.95; P < 0.05, for both, along with blocked growth in a designated broth medium during 24 to 48 hours of exposure. The disinfectant was also significantly efficient for inactivating of the mentioned bacteria on steel surfaces after a 15-minute time exposure (CI = 0.95; P < 0.05. For E.coli, the OD decreased slightly during the initial exposure time, but increased after 24 hours. Viable E.coli cells were proved by colonies grown on the plate. A qualitative surface decontamination test showed that three pathogenic bacteria were inactivated significantly after disinfectant exposure (CI = 0.95, P < 0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, a combination of hydrogen peroxide and silver ions was proposed as a strong disinfecting agent both in suspensions and on the surfaces against these three important human pathogens.

  7. Decorating multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel nanoparticles for selective hydrogenation of citral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yuechao; Yang Dong; Qin Feng; Hu Jianhua; Wang Changchun; Xu Hualong

    2009-01-01

    The nanocomposites of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) decorated with nickel nanoparticles were conveniently prepared by a chemical reduction of nickel salt in the present of poly(acrylic acid) grafted MWNTs (PAA-g-MWNTs). Due to the strong interaction between Ni 2+ and -COOH, PAA-g-MWNTs became an excellent supporting material for Ni nanoparticles. The morphology and distribution of Ni nanoparticles on the surface of MWNTs were greatly influenced by the reduction temperatures, the experimental results also showed that the distribution of Ni nanoparticles was greatly improved while the MWNTs were modified by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The hydrogenation activity and selectivity of MWNTs decorated with Ni nanoparticles (Ni-MWNTs) for α, β-unsaturated aldehyde (citral) were also studied, and the experimental results showed that the citronellal, an important raw material for flavoring and perfumery industries, is the favorable product with a percentage as high as 86.9%, which is 7 times higher than that of catalyst by Ni-supported active carbon (Ni-AC). - Abstract: Nickel nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) nanocomposites were conveniently prepared by a chemical reduction of nickel salt in the present of poly(acrylic acid) grafted MWNTs (PAA-g-MWNTs). These nanocomposites possessed excellent catalytic activity and selectivity for hydrogenation of citral.

  8. Characterization of All Solid State Hydrogen Ion Selective Electrode Based on PVC-SR Hybrid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Bo Shim

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen ion selective membranes formulated with 3140 RTV silicone rubber (SR in PVC were studied to extend the life time of solid state ion sensors through improved membrane adhesion. All solid state hydrogen ion selective electrodes were prepared by incorporation of tridodecyl amine (TDDA as an ionophore, potassium tetrakis[3.5-bis(p-chlorophenylborate (KTpClPB as a lipophilic additive, bis(2-ethylhexyladipate (DOA as a plasticizer. Their linear dynamic range was pH 2.0-11.0 and showed the near Nernstian slope of 55.1±0.2 mV/pH (r=0.999. The ifluences from alkali and alkaline earth metal ions were studied for the response of the final ISE membrane composition. Impedance spectroscopic data showed that the resistance was increased by increasing SR content in PVC. Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM image showed clear differences according to the SR compositions in PVC. Life time of the all solid state membrane electrode was extended to about 2 months by preparing the membrane with PVC and SR. The standard reference material from NIST (2181 HEPES Free acid and 2182 NaHEPESate was tested for the ISE and it gave good result.

  9. Microwave-activated Ni/carbon catalysts for highly selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinhuan; He, Jie; Jing, Run; Tao, Peipei; Nie, Renfeng; Zhou, Dan; Xia, Qinghua

    2017-06-01

    Biocarbon supported Ni catalysts have been prepared by facile impregnation of Ni species by microwave-heating and used for selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, N2 sorption measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction of H2 and H2 temperature-programmed desorption. The morphology and particle size of catalysts were imaged by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. For the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine, 10%Ni/CSC-II(b) exhibits the best catalytic activity to achieve 100 mol% conversion of nitrobenzene and 96.7% selectivity of cyclohexylamine under reaction conditions of 2.0 MPa H2 and 200 °C, ascribed to high dispersion of Ni species and formation of nanosized Ni particles on the support aided by microwave-heating. Thus-prepared Ni/CSC catalyst is greatly activated, in which the addition of precious metal like Rh is totally avoided.

  10. Molybdenum disulfide nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide: highly sensitive and selective hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, A.; Rathi, Servin; Lee, In-yeal; Park, Jinwoo; Lim, Dongsuk; Kang, Moonshik; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Gil-Ho; Kannan, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we report on the hydrogen (H2) sensing behavior of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nano particles (NPs) based composite film. The RGO/MoS2 composite exhibited a highly enhanced H2 response (∼15.6%) for 200 ppm at an operating temperature of 60 °C. Furthermore, the RGO/MoS2 composite showed excellent selectivity to H2 with respect to ammonia (NH3) and nitric oxide (NO) which are highly reactive gas species. The composite’s response to H2 is 2.9 times higher than that of NH3 whereas for NO it is 3.5. This highly improved H2 sensing response and selectivity of RGO/MoS2 at low operating temperatures were attributed to the structural integration of MoS2 nanoparticles in the nanochannels and pores in the RGO layer.

  11. Guest-responsive reversible swelling and enhanced fluorescence in a super-absorbent, dynamic microporous polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K Venkata; Mohapatra, Sudip; Maji, Tapas Kumar; George, Subi J

    2012-04-10

    A swell idea! The guest-responsive reversible swelling and fluorescence enhancement of a dynamic, microporous polymer network is presented. Guest-induced breathing of hydrophobic pores imparts multi-functional properties, such as super-absorbency, phase-selective swelling of oil from water and encapsulation of C(60) (see figure), to this soft micro-porous organic polymer. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Enhanced hydrogenation and reduced lattice distortion in size selected Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kulriya, P. K.; Khan, S. A. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2013-10-21

    Important correlation between valence band spectra and hydrogenation properties in Pd alloy nanoparticles is established by studying the properties of size selected and monocrystalline Pd, Ag, Cu, Pd-Ag, and Pd-Cu nanoparticles. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection analysis show that size induced Pd4d centroid shift is related to enhanced hydrogenation with H/Pd ratio of 0.57 and 0.49 in Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu nanoparticles in comparison to reported bulk values of 0.2 and 0.1, respectively. Pd-alloy nanoparticles show lower hydrogen induced lattice distortion. The reduced distortion and higher hydrogen reactivity of Pd-alloy nanoparticles is important for numerous hydrogen related applications.

  13. A grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of hydrogen technologiess in Life Cycle Sustainability perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzardo, Alessandro; Ren, Jingzheng; Mazzi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of the best renewable energy technology (including hydrogen) using a life cycle sustainability perspective. The traditional grey relational analysis has been modified to better address...... using the proposed methodology, electrolysis of water technology by hydropower has been considered to be the best technology for hydrogen production according to the decision-making group....

  14. Hydrogen from formic acid through its selective disproportionation over sodium germanate--a non-transition-metal catalysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Ruth I J; Heinroth, Falk; Chan, Bun; Zheng, Sisi; Haynes, Brian S; Easton, Christopher J; Masters, Anthony F; Radom, Leo; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2014-10-13

    A robust catalyst for the selective dehydrogenation of formic acid to liberate hydrogen gas has been designed computationally, and also successfully demonstrated experimentally. This is the first such catalyst not based on transition metals, and it exhibits very encouraging performance. It represents an important step towards the use of renewable formic acid as a hydrogen-storage and transport vector in fuel and energy applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Selective hydrogenation of citral over supported Pt catalysts: insight into support effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofeng [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (United States); Hu, Weiming; Deng, Baolin [University of Missouri, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Liang, Xinhua, E-mail: liangxin@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highly dispersed platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on various substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor at 300 °C. The substrates included multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), silica gel (SiO{sub 2}), commercial γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ALD-prepared porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The results of TEM analysis showed that ~1.3 nm Pt NPs were highly dispersed on all different supports. All catalysts were used for the reaction of selective hydrogenation of citral to unsaturated alcohols (UA), geraniol, and nerol. Both the structure and acidity of supports affected the activity and selectivity of Pt catalysts. Pt/SiO{sub 2} showed the highest activity due to the strong acidity of SiO{sub 2} and the conversion of citral reached 82% after 12 h with a selectivity of 58% of UA. Pt/MWCNTs showed the highest selectivity of UA, which reached 65% with a conversion of 38% due to its unique structure and electronic effect. The cycling experiments indicated that Pt/MWCNTs and Pt/ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were more stable than Pt/SiO{sub 2}, as a result of the different interactions between the Pt NPs and the supports.

  16. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  17. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero eSalminen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs. Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC. The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  18. Selectivity of layered double hydroxides and their derivative mixed metal oxides as sorbents of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mohamed A; Zahid, Waleed M; Abasaeed, Ahmed E

    2013-06-15

    In the context of finding high efficient sorbent materials for removing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air stream, a screening study was performed to find the best combination of metals for the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivative mixed metal oxides. Based on selectivity of 998 natural mineral species of sulfur-containing compounds, Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) were selected as divalent metals, and Fe(3+), Al(3+) and Cr(3+) as trivalent metals to synthesis the LDHs sorbents. 10 LDHs materials and their calcined mixed metal oxides, Ni(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.32)Al(0.33), Zn(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.36)Zn(0.32)Al(0.32), Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Fe(0.34), Ni(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Cr(0.34), Zn(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.33)Zn(0.32)Cr(0.35) were synthesized, characterized chemically and physically, and then tested using breakthrough test to determine their sulfur uptake. Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was found to have the best uptake of hydrogen sulfide (136 mg H₂S/g). Regeneration of spent Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was studied using two different mixture solutions, NaCl/NaOH and acetate-buffer/NaCl/NaOH. The latter mixture successfully desorbed the sulfur from the Ni0.64Fe0.36 sorbent for 2 cycles of regeneration/sorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui

    2017-11-20

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  20. Influence of Particle Size on Reaction Selectivity in Cyclohexene Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation over Silica-Supported Monodisperse Pt Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, R. M.; Hsu, B. B.; Grass, M. E.; Song, H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-11

    The role of particle size during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene (10 Torr C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, 200-600 Torr H{sub 2}, and 273-650 K) was studied over a series of monodisperse Pt/SBA-15 catalysts. The conversion of cyclohexene in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}:C{sub 6}H{sub 10} ratio = 20-60) is characterized by three regimes: hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane at low temperature (< 423 K), an intermediate temperature range in which both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation occur; and a high temperature regime in which the dehydrogenation of cyclohexene dominates (> 573 K). The rate of both reactions demonstrated maxima with temperature, regardless of Pt particle size. For the hydrogenation of cyclohexene, a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (apparent negative activation energy) was observed. Hydrogenation is structure insensitive at low temperatures, and apparently structure sensitive in the non-Arrhenius regime; the origin of the particle-size dependent reactivity with temperature is attributed to a change in the coverage of reactive hydrogen. Small particles were more active for dehydrogenation and had lower apparent activation energies than large particles. The selectivity can be controlled by changing the particle size, which is attributed to the structure sensitivity of both reactions in the temperature regime where hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are catalyzed simultaneously.

  1. Selection of components for the IDEALHY preferred cycle for the large scale liquefaction of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quack, H.; Seemann, I.; Klaus, M.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Berstad, D.; Walnum, H. T.; Neksa, P.; Decker, L.

    2014-01-01

    In a future energy scenario, in which storage and transport of liquid hydrogen in large quantities will be used, the efficiency of the liquefaction of hydrogen will be of utmost importance. The goal of the IDEALHY working party is to identify the most promising process for a 50 t/d plant and to select the components, with which such a process can be realized. In the first stage the team has compared several processes, which have been proposed or realized in the past. Based on this information a process has been selected, which is thermodynamically most promising and for which it could be assumed that good components already exist or can be developed in the foreseeable future. Main features of the selected process are the compression of the feed stream to a relatively high pressure level, o-p conversion inside plate-fin heat exchangers and expansion turbines in the supercritical region. Precooling to a temperature between 150 and 100 K will be obtained from a mixed refrigerant cycle similar to the systems used successfully in natural gas liquefaction plants. The final cooling will be produced by two Brayton cycles, both having several expansion turbines in series. The selected overall process has still a number of parameters, which can be varied. The optimum, i.e. the final choice will depend mainly on the quality of the available components. Key components are the expansion turbines of the two Brayton cycles and the main recycle compressor, which may be common to both Brayton cycles. A six-stage turbo-compressor with intercooling between the stages is expected to be the optimum choice here. Each stage may consist of several wheels in series. To make such a high efficient and cost-effective compressor feasible, one has to choose a refrigerant, which has a higher molecular weight than helium. The present preferred choice is a mixture of helium and neon with a molecular weight of about 8 kg/kmol. Such an expensive refrigerant requires that the whole refrigeration loop

  2. Have the Guests Perceived Superior Value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levyda Levyda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to describe guests’ perceived value by using a multidimensional approach. From previous research, guests’ perceived value consisted of some functional value, emotional value, and social value. Based on guest experience, and functional value consisted of physical evidence, guest room, food and beverage, hotel staff, and price. This research was conducted in four-star hotels in Jakarta. The respondents were the guests who had stayed in four-star hotels. The number of the respondent was 405. The data were obtained by using self-administered questionnaires. This research shows that guests have not perceived superior value. Some of the values and the necessary efforts need to be improved.

  3. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  4. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ling-Ling [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lv, Cun-Qin, E-mail: lcq173@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009, Shanxi Province (China); Wang, Gui-Chang, E-mail: wangguichang@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H{sub 2}. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H{sub 2

  5. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-07-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of Csbnd H/Csbnd C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H2 dissociation and

  6. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum-copper alloys at the single-atom limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, Felicia R; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum-copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C-C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  7. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions. PMID:26449766

  8. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-05-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation.

  9. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  10. Selection rule engineering of forbidden transitions of a hydrogen atom near a nanogap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyunyoung Y.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform an analytical study on the allowance of forbidden transitions for a hydrogen atom placed near line dipole sources, mimicking light emanating from a one-dimensional metallic nanogap. It is shown that the rapid variation of the electric field vector, inevitable in the near zone, completely breaks the selection rule of Δl=±1. While the forbidden transitions between spherically symmetric S states, such as 2S to 1S or 3S to 1S (Δl=0, are rather robust against selection rule breakage, Δl=±2 transitions such as between 3D and 1S or 3D and 2S states are very vulnerable to the spatial variation of the perturbing electric field. Transitions between 2S and 3D states are enhanced by many orders of magnitude, aided by the quadratic nature of both the perturbing Hamiltonian and D wavefunctions. The forbidden dipole moment, which approaches one Bohr radius times the electric charge in the vicinity of the gap, can be written in a simple closed form owing to the one-dimensional nature of our gap. With large enough effective volume together with the symmetric nature of the excited state wavefunctions, our work paves way towards atomic physics application of infinitely long nanogaps.

  11. Selection rule engineering of forbidden transitions of a hydrogen atom near a nanogap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunyoung Y.; Kim, Daisik S.

    2018-01-01

    We perform an analytical study on the allowance of forbidden transitions for a hydrogen atom placed near line dipole sources, mimicking light emanating from a one-dimensional metallic nanogap. It is shown that the rapid variation of the electric field vector, inevitable in the near zone, completely breaks the selection rule of Δl=±1. While the forbidden transitions between spherically symmetric S states, such as 2S to 1S or 3S to 1S (Δl=0), are rather robust against selection rule breakage, Δl=±2 transitions such as between 3D and 1S or 3D and 2S states are very vulnerable to the spatial variation of the perturbing electric field. Transitions between 2S and 3D states are enhanced by many orders of magnitude, aided by the quadratic nature of both the perturbing Hamiltonian and D wavefunctions. The forbidden dipole moment, which approaches one Bohr radius times the electric charge in the vicinity of the gap, can be written in a simple closed form owing to the one-dimensional nature of our gap. With large enough effective volume together with the symmetric nature of the excited state wavefunctions, our work paves way towards atomic physics application of infinitely long nanogaps.

  12. Carbon Nanodots as Dual-Mode Nanosensors for Selective Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cheng-Long; Su, Li-Xia; Zang, Jin-Hao; Li, Xin-Jian; Lou, Qing; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important product of oxidase-based enzymatic reactions, such as glucose/glucose oxidase (GOD) reaction. Therefore, the probing of generated H2O2 for achieving the detection of various carbohydrates and their oxidases is very significative. Herein, we report one kind of dual-emission carbon nanodots (CDs) that can serve as novel dual-mode nanosensors with both fluorometric and colorimetric output for the selective detection of H2O2. The dual-model nanosensors are established only by the undecorated dual-emission CDs, where significant fluorometric and colorimetric changes are observed with the addition of different concentrations of H2O2 in the CD solution, which benefit to the achievement of the naked-eye detection for H2O2. The mechanism of the nanosensors can be attributed to the fact that the external chemical stimuli like hydroxyl radicals from H2O2 bring about the change of surface properties and the aggregation of CDs, which dominate the emission and absorption of CDs. The constructed dual-mode nanosensors exhibit good biocompatibility and high selectivity toward H2O2 with a linear detection range spanning from 0.05 to 0.5 M and allow the detection of H2O2 as low as 14 mM.

  13. Particle size effects for carbon nanofiber supported platinum and ruthenium catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.; Vuori, H.; Krause, A.O.I.; de Jong, K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde was studied over carbon nanofibers (CNF) supported platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The catalysts differed independently in their metal particle sizes and amount of acidic oxygen groups on the CNF surface. For the catalysts with oxygen on the CNF

  14. Selective hydrogenation of indolizines: an expeditious approach to derive tetrahydroindolizines and indolizidines from morita-baylis-hillman adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Bruno V M; Correia, José Tiago M; Coelho, Fernando

    2015-03-06

    In this study, we describe the hydrogenation of indolizines derived from Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts. We demonstrate that functionalized tetrahydroindolizines and indolizidines can be prepared selectively, at low pressure, by simply adjusting the acidity of the medium. Using this simple and straightforward strategy, substituted tetrahydroindolizines and indolizidines were obtained diastereoselectively in high yield.

  15. Pd(II-dissolved in ionic liquids: a recyclable catalytic system for the selective biphasic hydrogenation of dienes to monoenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupont Jairton

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium acetylacetonate dissolved in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid catalyses the selective two-phase hydrogenation of conjugated and non-conjugated (functionalized and non-functionalized dienes into the respective monoenes. The system does not require the use of organic solvents, the products are removed by simple decantation or distillation and the recovered ionic catalytic solution can be reused several times without any significant changes in its catalytic activity and selectivity.

  16. Selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone over Pd@CN (N-doped porous carbon): Role of catalyst reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuo; Yang, Guangxin; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Yefei; Chen, Rizhi

    2018-03-01

    Selective phenol hydrogenation is a green and sustainable technology to produce cyclohexanone. The work focused on investigating the role of catalyst reduction method in the liquid-phase phenol hydrogenation to cyclohexanone over Pd@CN (N-doped porous carbon). A series of reduction methods including flowing hydrogen reduction, in-situ reaction reduction and liquid-phase reduction were designed and performed. The results highlighted that the reduction method significantly affected the catalytic performance of Pd@CN in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone, and the liquid-phase reduction with the addition of appropriate amount of phenol was highly efficient to improve the catalytic activity of Pd@CN. The influence mechanism was explored by a series of characterizations. The results of TEM, XPS and CO chemisorption confirmed that the reduction method mainly affected the size, surface composition and dispersion of Pd in the CN material. The addition of phenol during the liquid-phase reduction could inhibit the aggregation of Pd NPs and promote the reduction of Pd (2+), and then improved the catalytic activity of Pd@CN. The work would aid the development of high-performance Pd@CN catalysts for selective phenol hydrogenation.

  17. Contrasting guest binding interaction of cucurbit[7-8]urils with neutral red dye: controlled exchange of multiple guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Mhejabeen; Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Mohanty, Jyotirmayee; Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Pal, Haridas

    2010-07-14

    Interactions among macrocyclic hosts and dyes/drugs have been explored extensively for their direct usage in controlled uptake and release of large number of potential drug molecules. In this paper we report the non-covalent interaction of cucurbit[8]uril macrocycle (CB8) with a biologically important dye, neutral red, by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A comparative analysis with the complexation behaviour of the dye with CB7, the lower homologue of CB8, indicates contrasting guest binding behaviour with significant changes in the photophysical characteristics of the dye. While CB7 interaction leads to a 1 ratio 1 stoichiometry resulting in approximately 6 fold enhancement in the fluorescence emission of the dye, CB8 displays signatures for a 1 ratio 2 host-guest stoichiometry with drastic reduction in the fluorescence emission. Apart from the evaluation of approximately 2 unit shift in the protolytic equilibrium on complexation (pK(a) shift), the measurements with tryptophan established a selective guest exchange to favour a co-localized dimer inside the CB8 cavity. In a protein medium (BSA), the 1 ratio 2 complex was converted to a 1 ratio 1 ratio 1 CB8-NRH(+)-BSA complex. The finding that NRH(+) can be transferred from CB8 to BSA, even though the binding constant for NRH(+)-CB8 is much higher than NRH(+)-BSA, is projected for a controlled slow release of NRH(+) towards BSA. Since the release and activity of drugs can be controlled by regulating the protolytic equilibrium, the macromolecular encapsulation and release of NRH(+) demonstrated here provide information relevant to host-guest based drug delivery systems and its applications.

  18. Structural and medium effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with intramolecular hydrogen bonded phenols. The interplay between hydrogen-bonding and acid-base interactions on the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Amorati, Riccardo; Menichetti, Stefano; Viglianisi, Caterina; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-07-03

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded 2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (1) and 4-methoxy-2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (2) and with 4-methoxy-3-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (3) has been carried out. In acetonitrile, intramolecular hydrogen bonding protects the phenolic O-H of 1 and 2 from attack by CumO(•) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) exclusively occurs from the C-H bonds that are α to the piperidine nitrogen (α-C-H bonds). With 3 HAT from both the phenolic O-H and the α-C-H bonds is observed. In the presence of TFA or Mg(ClO4)2, protonation or Mg(2+) complexation of the piperidine nitrogen removes the intramolecular hydrogen bond in 1 and 2 and strongly deactivates the α-C-H bonds of the three substrates. Under these conditions, HAT to CumO(•) exclusively occurs from the phenolic O-H group of 1-3. These results clearly show that in these systems the interplay between intramolecular hydrogen bonding and Brønsted and Lewis acid-base interactions can drastically influence both the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The possible implications of these findings are discussed in the framework of the important role played by tyrosyl radicals in biological systems.

  19. The reaction mechanism and selectivity of acetylene hydrogenation over Ni-Ga intermetallic compound catalysts: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, De-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Tong; Li, Chang-Ming; Chen, Yu-Di; Pu, Min; Yan, Hong; Wei, Min

    2018-03-28

    Intermetallic compounds (IMCs) have shown excellent catalytic performance toward the selective hydrogenation of acetylene, but the theoretical understanding on this reaction over Ni-based IMCs is rather limited. In this work, the adsorptions of the C 2 species, Bader charge, projected density of states (PDOS) and the reaction pathways were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method to investigate the mechanism and selectivity for the acetylene hydrogenation on the (111) surface of Ni n Ga (n = 1, 3) IMCs, with a comparative study on the pristine Ni(111) surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of acetylene increased along with the Ni/Ga ratio, therefore a feasible acetylene adsorption on the Ga-rich surface guaranteed a low effective barrier, leading to the best activity for the NiGa(111) surface among three surfaces. Bader charge analysis shows that electrons transferred from Ga atoms to Ni atoms and further delivered to C 2 species, decreasing the adsorption capacity of C 2 species on NiGa(111) in comparison with those on Ni(111) and Ni 3 Ga(111). The reaction pathway of acetylene hydrogenation to ethylene via vinyl or even over-hydrogenation to ethane via ethyl is more favorable than the pathway involving the ethylidene intermediate on all surfaces. Moreover, the ethylene selectivity has a positive correlation with the gallium content by comparing the desorption barrier with the hydrogenation barrier of ethylene, thus the NiGa(111) surface also exhibits the best selectivity. Therefore, the NiGa(111) surface demonstrates to be an excellent reaction facet for the semihydrogenation of acetylene, which agreed with the experimental findings, and would provide helpful instructions for designing and preparing highly-selective and noble-substitute catalysts of alkyne semihydrogenation.

  20. Biological hydrogen production from probiotic wastewater as substrate by selectively enriched anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, D.; Sreekanth, D.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500072, Andhra Pradesh (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Biohydrogen production from probiotic wastewater using mixed anaerobic consortia is reported in this paper. Batch tests are carried out in a 5.0 L batch reactor under constant mesophillic temperature (37 C). The maximum hydrogen yield 1.8 mol-hydrogen/mol-carbohydrate is obtained at an optimum pH of 5.5 and substrate concentration 5 g/L. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 168 ml/h. The hydrogen content in the biogas is more than 65% and no significant methane is observed throughout the study. In addition to hydrogen, acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol are found to be the main by-products in the metabolism of hydrogen fermentation. (author)

  1. Highly Dispersed Metal Carbide on ZIF-Derived Pyridinic-N-Doped Carbon for CO2Enrichment and Selective Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunhua; Cai, Xiaohu; Chen, Sijing; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Kevin H L; Hong, Jinqing; Chen, Binghui; Kuo, Dong-Hau; Wang, Wenju

    2018-02-08

    Catalytic conversion of CO 2 into chemicals is a critical issue for energy and environmental research. Among such reactions, converting CO 2 into CO has been regarded as a significant foundation to generate a liquid fuels and chemicals on a large scale. In this work, zeolitic imidazolate framework-derived N-doped carbon-supported metal carbide catalysts (M/ZIF-8-C; M=Ni, Fe, Co and Cu) with highly dispersed metal carbide were prepared for selective CO 2 hydrogenation. Under the same metal loadings, catalytic activity for CO 2 hydrogenation to CO follows the order: Ni/ZIF-8-C≈Fe/ZIF-8-C>Co/ZIF-8-C>Cu/ZIF-8-C. These catalysts are composed of carbide or metal supported on pyridinic N sites within the N-doped carbon structure. ZIF-8-derived pyridinic nitrogen and carbide effect CO 2 adsorption, whereas dispersed Ni or Fe carbide and metal species serve as an active site for CO 2 hydrogenation. The supported Ni catalyst exhibits extraordinary catalytic performance, which results from high dispersion of the metal and exposure of the carbide. Based on high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS) and line scan results, density functional theory (DFT) was used to understand reaction mechanism of selective CO 2 hydrogenation over Ni/ZIF-8-C. The product CO is derived mainly from the direct cleavage of C-O bonds in CO 2 * rather than decomposition of COOH*. The CO* desorption energy on Ni/ZIF-8-C is lower than that for further hydrogenation and dissociation. Comparison of Ni/ZIF-8-C with ZIF-8-C indicates that the combined effects of the highly dispersed metal or carbide and weak CO adsorption result in high CO selectivity for CO 2 hydrogenation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Selective hydrogen production from methanol with a defined iron pincer catalyst under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberico, Elisabetta; Sponholz, Peter; Cordes, Christoph; Nielsen, Martin; Drexler, Hans-Joachim; Baumann, Wolfgang; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2013-12-23

    Molecularly well-defined iron pincer complexes promote the aqueous-phase reforming of methanol to carbon dioxide and hydrogen, which is of interest in the context of a methanol and hydrogen economy. For the first time, the use of earth-abundant iron complexes under mild conditions for efficient hydrogen generation from alcohols is demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Cucurbit[7]uril host-guest complexes with small polar organic guests in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Ian W; Macartney, Donal H

    2008-05-21

    The host-guest stability constants for the inclusion of a series of small neutral polar organic guests in cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) have been determined in aqueous solution by (1)H NMR titrations. The dependence of the stability constant on the nature of the guests indicates that hydrophobic and dipole-quadrupole interactions are responsible for the binding. The complexation-induced chemical shift changes in the guest proton resonances, coupled with energy-minimization calculations, suggest that the guests are located such that their dipole moment is aligned perpendicular with the quadrupole moment of the CB[7] host. The stability constants for acetone and acetophenone decrease in the presence of Na(+) or K(+) cations as a result of cation capping of the CB[7] portals.

  4. Highly Selective TiN-Supported Highly Dispersed Pt Catalyst: Ultra Active toward Hydrogen Oxidation and Inactive toward Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junming; Tang, Haibo; Tian, Xinlong; Hou, Sanying; Li, Xiuhua; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2018-01-31

    The severe dissolution of the cathode catalyst, caused by an undesired oxygen reduction reaction at the anode during startup and shutdown, is a fatal challenge to practical applications of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. To address this important issue, according to the distinct structure-sensitivity between the σ-type bond in H 2 and the π-type bond in O 2 , we design a HD-Pt/TiN material by highly dispersing Pt on the TiN surface to inhibit the unwanted oxygen reduction reaction. The highly dispersed Pt/TiN catalyst exhibits excellent selectivity toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. With a Pt loading of 0.88 wt %, our catalyst shows excellent hydrogen oxidation reaction activity, close to that of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and much lower oxygen reduction reaction activity than the commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. The lack of well-ordered Pt facets is responsible for the excellent selectivity of the HD-Pt/TiN materials toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. Our work provides a new and cost-effective solution to design selective catalysts toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions, making the strategy of using oxygen-tolerant anode catalyst to improve the stability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells during startup and shutdown more affordable and practical.

  5. New dendrimer - Peptide host - Guest complexes: Towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Adamantyl urea and adamantyl thiourea modified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers act as hosts for N-terminal tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-protected peptides and form chloroform-soluble complexes. investigations with NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide is bound to the dendrimer by ionic interactions...... between the dendrimer outer shell tertiary amines and the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide, and also through host-urea to peptide-amide hydrogen bonding. The hydrogen-bonding nature of the peptide dendrimer interactions was further confirmed by using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, for which...... on the dendrimer host. The influence of side-chain motif on interactions with the host is analyzed by using seven different N-Boc-protected tripeptides as guests for the dendrimer, Downfield shifts of up to 1.3 ppm were observed for the guest amide NH-proton signals. These shifts decrease with increasing...

  6. Fine Tuning and Specific Binding Sites with a Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Metal-Complex Framework for Gas Selective Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zongbi; Xie, Danyan; Chang, Ganggang; Wu, Hui; Li, Liangying; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xing, Huabin; Yang, Qiwei; Zaworotko, Michael J; Ren, Qilong; Chen, Banglin

    2018-04-04

    Research on hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) has been developed for quite a long time; however, those with both established permanent porosities and functional properties are extremely rare due to weak hydrogen-bonding interactions among molecular organic linkers, which are much more fragile and difficult to stabilize. Herein, through judiciously combining the superiority of both the moderately stable coordination bonds in metal-organic frameworks and hydrogen bonds, we have realized a microporous hydrogen-bonded metal-complex or metallotecton framework HOF-21, which not only shows permanent porosity, but also exhibits highly selective separation performance of C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 at room temperature. The outstanding separation performance can be ascribed to sieving effect confined by the fine-tuning pores and the superimposed hydrogen-bonding interaction between C 2 H 2 and SiF 6 2- on both ends as validated by both modeling and neutron powder diffraction experiments. More importantly, the collapsed HOF-21 can be restored by simply immersing it into water or salt solution. To the best of our knowledge, such extraordinary water stability and restorability of HOF-21 were observed for the first time in HOFs, underlying the bright perspective of such new HOF materials for their industrial usage.

  7. Host-guest interactions between octa acid and cations/nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2018-01-30

    The nature of host-guest interaction in between octa acid cavitand (OA) and some representative cationic guests (Li + , Na + , K + , Be +2 , Mg +2 , Ca +2 , Li 3 O + , Na 3 O + , K 3 O + ) as well as heterocyclic moieties like [adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T), uracil (U), and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)] has been examined with the aid of density functional theory (DFT)-based computations. Thermochemical results indicate that all the guests bind with OA in a thermodynamically favorable fashion at 298.15 K temperature and one atmospheric pressure. OA exhibits high selectivity in binding the lighter cations/metal cluster cations as compared to the heavier congeners along each given series. Moreover, OA exhibits enhanced affinity as well as selectivity in binding A/G/TTF molecules as compared to C/T/U. Noncovalent interaction and energy decomposition analyses reveal that in addition to the van der Waals interaction, significant contribution from electrostatic as well as orbital interactions dictate the outcome in all the host-guest complexes. Time dependent DFT calculations have been carried out to assess the role of the guests in tuning the electronic properties as well as absorption spectrum of OA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Guest speakers and internationalization in higher education: A critical reflection of guest speakers in tourism programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At its general term, this paper discusses the role of guest lecturers in higher education. More precisely, the paper considers the role of guest lecturers in tourism Management programmes taught to student in Universities. The paper examines theory and literature relating to tourism studies and higher education in general. It discusses the relevance of guest speakers in universities and examines their contributions towards tourism programmes. The paper discusses lecturers in tourism degrees suggesting that they might lack industry experiences but are still required to deliver theories to students and are seen as classroom managers and student mentors. The paper further investigates how lecturers and guest speakers are perceived as two different entities by students where lecturers are seen as classroom managers and guest speakers are seen as the industry knowledge providers. As internationalization of education becomes the focus of higher education institutions that aim to deliver education in a more international context, guest speakers that address local practical occurrences become less appealing. With the rapid spread of distant learning and online education, the paper concludes that guest lecturers are not the solution for perfect academic experiences in higher education in general and specifically in tourism programmes.

  9. Multi-component transport in polymers: hydrocarbon / hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membrane; Transport multi-composants dans les polymeres: separation hydrocarbures / hydrogene par membrane a selectivite inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauviel, G.

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membranes is investigated. The first goal is to develop materials showing an increased selectivity. Silicone membranes loaded with inorganic fillers have been prepared, but the expected enhancement is not observed. The second goal is to model the multi- component transport through rubbers. Indeed the permeability model is not able to predict correctly permeation when a vapour is present. Thus many phenomena have to be considered: diffusional inter-dependency, sorption synergy, membrane swelling and drag effect. The dependence of diffusivities with the local composition is modelled according to free-volume theory. The model resolution allows to predict the permeation flow-rates of mixed species from their pure sorption and diffusion data. For the systems under consideration, the diffusional inter-dependency is shown to be preponderant. Besides, sorption synergy importance is pointed out, whereas it is most often neglected. (author)

  10. Ion source parameters and hydrogen scrambling in the ECD of selectively deuterated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchateau, Magalie; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Robine, Ophélie

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has become an important method to study protein dynamics in solution. Recently, electron-based fragmentation methods (ECD and ETD) have been utilized in HDX-MS/MS experiments as experimental tools to increase the spatial resolution...... (the ability to obtain deuterium levels of individual residues). An essential prerequisite for this approach is that the level of hydrogen scrambling is negligible. The occurrence of hydrogen scrambling depends critically on the extent of vibrational excitation in the mass spectrometer. In particular......, the desolvation process in the electrospray ion source is likely to induce scrambling at standard operating conditions. Consequently, finding experimental conditions that minimize hydrogen scrambling to a negligible level is thus pivotal for the application of electron-based fragmentation in HDX-MS/MS experiments...

  11. Binding of Hydrophobic Guests in a Coordination Cage Cavity is Driven by Liberation of "High-Energy" Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherell, Alexander J; Cullen, William; Williams, Nicholas H; Ward, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    The cavity of an M 8 L 12 cubic coordination cage can accommodate a cluster of ten water molecules in which the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule is 0.5 H-bonds less than it would be in the bulk solution. The presence of these "hydrogen-bond frustrated" or "high-energy" water molecules in the cavity results in the hydrophobic effect associated with guest binding being predominantly enthalpy-based, as these water molecules can improve their hydrogen-bonding environment on release. This contrasts with the classical form of the hydrophobic effect in which the favourable entropy change associated with release of ordered molecules from hydrophobic surfaces dominates. For several guests Van't Hoff plots showed that the free energy of binding in water is primarily enthalpy driven. For five homologous pairs of guests related by the presence or absence of a CH 2 group, the incremental changes to ΔH and TΔS for guest binding-that is, ΔΔH and TΔΔS, the difference in contributions arising from the CH 2 group-are consistently 5(±1) kJ mol -1 for ΔΔH and 0(±1) kJ mol -1 for TΔΔS. This systematic dominance of ΔH in the binding of hydrophobic guests is consistent with the view that guest binding is dominated by release of "high energy" water molecules into a more favourable solvation environment, as has been demonstrated recently for some members of the cucurbituril family. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  12. Molecularly Defined Manganese Pincer Complexes for Selective Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Marc; Elangovan, Saravanakumar; Spannenberg, Anke; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2017-01-10

    For the first time an easily accessible and well-defined manganese N,N,N-pincer complex catalyzes the transfer hydrogenation of a broad range of ketones with good to excellent yields. This cheap earth abundant-metal based catalyst provides access to useful secondary alcohols without the need of hydrogen gas. Preliminary investigations to explore the mechanism of this transformation are also reported. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Selective N-alkylation of amines using nitriles under hydrogenation conditions: facile synthesis of secondary and tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Takashi; Fujita, Yuki; Mizusaki, Tomoteru; Betsuin, Sae; Takamatsu, Haruki; Maegawa, Tomohiro; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2012-01-14

    Nitriles were found to be highly effective alkylating reagents for the selective N-alkylation of amines under catalytic hydrogenation conditions. For the aromatic primary amines, the corresponding secondary amines were selectively obtained under Pd/C-catalyzed hydrogenation conditions. Although the use of electron poor aromatic amines or bulky nitriles showed a lower reactivity toward the reductive alkylation, the addition of NH(4)OAc enhanced the reactivity to give secondary aromatic amines in good to excellent yields. Under the same reaction conditions, aromatic nitro compounds instead of the aromatic primary amines could be directly transformed into secondary amines via a domino reaction involving the one-pot hydrogenation of the nitro group and the reductive alkylation of the amines. While aliphatic amines were effectively converted to the corresponding tertiary amines under Pd/C-catalyzed conditions, Rh/C was a highly effective catalyst for the N-monoalkylation of aliphatic primary amines without over-alkylation to the tertiary amines. Furthermore, the combination of the Rh/C-catalyzed N-monoalkylation of the aliphatic primary amines and additional Pd/C-catalyzed alkylation of the resulting secondary aliphatic amines could selectively prepare aliphatic tertiary amines possessing three different alkyl groups. According to the mechanistic studies, it seems reasonable to conclude that nitriles were reduced to aldimines before the nucleophilic attack of the amine during the first step of the reaction.

  14. Ni Nanoparticles Supported on Cage-Type Mesoporous Silica for CO2 Hydrogenation with High CH4 Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Canggih Setya; Wu, Hung-Chi; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Saikia, Diganta; Kao, Hsien-Ming

    2016-09-08

    Ni nanoparticles (around 4 nm diameter) were successfully supported on cage-type mesoporous silica SBA-16 (denoted as Ni@SBA-16) via wet impregnation at pH 9, followed by the calcination-reduction process. The Ni@SBA-16 catalyst with a very high Ni loading amount (22.9 wt %) exhibited exceptionally high CH4 selectivity for CO2 hydrogenation. At a nearly identical loading amount, the Ni@SBA-16 catalysts with smaller particle size of Ni NPs surprisingly exhibited a higher catalytic activity of CO2 hydrogenation and also led to a higher selectivity on CH4 formation than the Ni@SiO2 catalysts. This enhanced activity of the Ni@SBA-16 catalyst is suggested to be an accumulative result of the advantageous structural properties of the support SBA-16 and the well confined Ni NPs within the support; both induced a favorable reaction pathway for high selectivity of CH4 in CO2 hydrogenation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery | Enslin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 8 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery. JMN Enslin. Abstract. No Abstract.

  16. Electronic structure and (1)H NMR chemical shifts in host-guest complexes of cucurbit[6]uril and sym-tetramethyl cucurbit[6]uril with imidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Priyanka H; Pinjari, Rahul V; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2010-10-14

    Binding patterns and (1)H NMR chemical shifts in the complexes of protonated N-(4-hydroxylphenyl)imidazole (g1), N-(4-aminophenyl)imidazole (g2), 2-phenylimidazole (g3) guests with cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]), and sym-substituted tetramethyl cucurbit[6]uril (TMeCB[6]) in the gas phase as well as in water have been investigated using the density functional theory. It has been shown that the inclusion complexes of g1 and g2 with CB[6] or TMeCB[6] exhibit selective encapsulation of the phenyl moiety with its substituents binding to portal oxygens on the lower rim of the host and imidazole protons facilitate C-H···O interactions externally with upper rim ureido oxygens. On the other hand, the lowest-energy g3 complex encapsulates the imidazole ring within the host, engendering N-H···O interactions with portal oxygens on the upper rim of the host with the phenyl ring residing outside the cavity owing to an absence of para-substituent and show qualitatively different host-guest binding patterns. Calculated (1)H NMR spectra of the complexes in water reveal shielding of phenyl ring protons within the host cavity which exhibit signals at 0.2-0.5 ppm, whereas the protons of the imidazole ring participating in hydrogen bonded interactions exhibit deshielding, and the corresponding (1)H NMR signals are downshifted by 1.1-1.5 ppm in the spectra compared to those in the unbound guest. (1)H NMR chemical shifts of inclusion complexes thus obtained are in consonant with δ(H) patterns observed in experiments reported in the literature.

  17. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2017-01-18

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  18. Activation of the C-H bond: catalytic hydroxylation of hydrocarbons by new cobaltic alkylperoxydic complexes; selective and catalytic cycloalkane dehydrogenation in presence of uranium for hydrogen transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazi, E.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to improve efficiency and selectivity of chemical reactions for alkane transformations. In the first part decomposition of hydroperoxides and hydrocarbon hydroxylation by cobalt complexes is studied. In the second part cycloalkanes are dehydrogenated into aromatics with a Pt catalyst, trapping hydrogen by uranium. Uranium hydride UH 3 can yield very pure hydrogen at reasonable temperature [fr

  19. Titanium-Oxide Host Clusters with Exchangeable Guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanyun; Li, Wenyun; Liu, Caiyun; Jia, Jiong; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wang, Yifeng

    2018-01-10

    A novel family of water-soluble, polyoxocationic titanium-oxide host-guest clusters are reported herein. They exhibit an unprecedented hexagonal prismatic core structure for hosting univalent cationic guests like K + , Rb + , Cs + and H 3 O + . Guest exchange has been studied using 133 Cs NMR, showing the flexible pore of a host permits passage of a comparatively larger cation and giving an equilibrium constant of ca. 13 for displacing Rb + by Cs + . Attractive ion-dipole interaction, depending on host-guest size complementarity, plays a dominant role for the preferential encapsulation of larger alkali-metal cationic guests.

  20. Hydrazine as efficient fuel for low-temperature SOFC through ex-situ catalytic decomposition with high selectivity toward hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jia; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mofan Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Hydrazine is a promising fuel for portable fuel cells because it is a liquid, it is carbon free and it has a high energy density. In this work, hydrazine was investigated as an efficient fuel for low temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a traditional nickel anode. A catalytic system with high selectivity toward hydrogen was developed using Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF) as the main catalyst and potassium hydroxide as the promoter. The result of compositional analysis of the products showed that the hydrazine can be decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen with 100% selectivity when an appropriate amount of KOH promoter is used. Acceptable power densities were achieved for a thin-film samaria-doped ceria (SDC) electrolyte cell operating on hydrazine decomposition products and hydrogen over a complete operation temperature range of 650-450 C. In addition, a similar cell with ammonia as the fuel displayed a much lower performance. (author)

  1. Bridging the Gap: From Model Surfaces to Nanoparticle Analogs for Selective Oxidation and Steam Reforming of Methanol and Selective Hydrogenation Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Matthew B.

    Most industrial catalysts are very complex, comprising of non-uniform materials with varying structures, impurities, and interaction between the active metal and supporting substrate. A large portion of the ongoing research in heterogeneous catalysis focuses on understanding structure-function relationships in catalytic materials. In parallel, there is a large area of surface science research focused on studying model catalytic systems for which structural parameters can be tuned and measured with high precision. It is commonly argued, however, that these systems are oversimplified, and that observations made in model systems do not translate to robust catalysts operating in practical environments; this discontinuity is often referred to as a "gap." The focus of this thesis is to explore the mutual benefits of surface science and catalysis, or "bridge the gap," by studying two catalytic systems in both ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and near ambient-environments. The first reaction is the catalytic steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The SRM reaction is a promising route for on-demand hydrogen production. For this catalytic system, the central hypothesis in this thesis is that a balance between redox capability and weak binding of reaction intermediates is necessary for high SRM activity and selectivity to carbon dioxide. As such, a new catalyst for the SRM reaction is developed which incorporates very small amounts of gold (liquid-phase, stirred-tank batch reactor under a hydrogen head pressure of approximately 7 bar. Palladium alloyed into the surface of otherwise inactive copper nanoparticles shows a marked improvement in selectivity when compared to monometallic palladium catalysts with the same metal loading. This effect is attributed hydrogen spillover onto the copper surface. In summary, the development of new, highly active and selective catalysts for the methanol steam reforming reaction and for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes

  2. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meile Leo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. Results At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 1013 CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2 after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Conclusions Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  3. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  4. Selective hydrogenation of maleic anhydride over Pd/Al2O3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results showed that the activity of the Pd/Al2O3 catalysts was excellent due to its high active surface area. ... avoid the high cost of separating the solvent from the reaction mixture, solvent-free hydrogenation of MA ... loss of reaction activity was observed after 120 h.3. Noble catalysts, especially Pd-based catalysts, have.

  5. Combined exposure to hydrogen peroxide and light - selective effects on cyanobacteria, green algae, and diatoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drábková, Michaela; Admiraal, W.; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2007), s. 309-314 ISSN 0013-936X Grant - others:-(XE) EVK2-CT-2002-57004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Hydrogen peroxide * cyanobacterie * green algae * diatoms Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.363, year: 2007

  6. Encapsulated-guest rotation in a self-assembled heterocapsule directed toward a supramolecular gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Hitomi; Kobori, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Masamichi; Yoza, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The self-assembled heterocapsule 1·2, which is formed by the hydrogen bonds of tetra(4-pyridyl)-cavitand 1 and tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-cavitand 2, encapsulates 1 molecule of guests such as 1,4-diacetoxybenzene 3a, 1,4-diacetoxy-2,5-dimethylbenzene 3b, 1,4-diacetoxy-2,5-dialkoxybenzenes (3c, OCH3; 3d, OC2H5; 3e, OC3H7; 3f, OC4H9; 3g, OC5H11; 3h, OC6H13; 3i, OC8H17), 1,4-diacetoxy-2,5-difluorobenzene 4a, and 1,4-diacetoxy-2,3-difluorobenzene 4b. The X-ray crystallographic analysis of 3c@(1·2) showed that the acetoxy groups at the 1,4-positions of 3c are oriented toward the 2 aromatic cavity ends of 1·2 and that 3c can rotate along the long axis of 1·2. Thus, the 1·2 (stator) with the encapsulation guest (rotator) behaves as a supramolecular gyroscope. A variable temperature (VT) 1H NMR study in CDCl3 showed that 3a, 3b, 4a, and 4b within 1·2 rotate rapidly even at 218 K, whereas guest rotation is almost inhibited for 3h and 3i even at 323 K. In this respect, 4b with a large dipole moment is a good candidate for the rotator of 1·2. For 3c–3g, the enthalpic (ΔH‡) and entropic (ΔS‡) contributions to the free energy of activation (ΔG‡) for the guest-rotational steric barriers within 1·2 were obtained from Eyring plots based on line-shape analysis of the VT 1H NMR spectra. The value of ΔG‡ increased in the order 3c guest rotation within 1·2. PMID:19416810

  7. Editorial Statement: From the Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Feng

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available As the editors in charge of this special issue ‘Home Education in China: Trends and Problems’, we would like to express our gratitude to Dr. Chen Xinren and Dr. Mustafa Yunus Eryaman, the editors of IJPE, and their colleagues at the editorial board, for inviting us to become the guest editors of this issue. They enabled us to have a global ‘Call for Manuscripts’ related with Chinese home education.

  8. Editorial Statement: From the Guest Editors

    OpenAIRE

    LUO Feng; HO Kwok Keung

    2006-01-01

    As the editors in charge of this special issue ‘Home Education in China: Trends and Problems’, we would like to express our gratitude to Dr. Chen Xinren and Dr. Mustafa Yunus Eryaman, the editors of IJPE, and their colleagues at the editorial board, for inviting us to become the guest editors of this issue. They enabled us to have a global ‘Call for Manuscripts’ related with Chinese home education.

  9. Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol in the Presence of a Recyclable Cobalt/SBA-15 Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemar, Maïté; Ciotonea, Carmen; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Royer, Sébastien; Ungureanu, Adrian; Dragoi, Brindusa; Dumitriu, Emil; Jérôme, François

    2015-06-08

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol was performed in the presence of a Co/SBA-15 catalyst. High selectivity (96 %) at a conversion higher than 95 % is reported over this catalytic system. As the conversion of furfural to furfuryl alcohol occurs over metallic Co sites, the effect of reduction temperature, H2 pressure, and reaction temperature were studied. Optimum reaction conditions were: 150 °C, 1.5 h, 2.0 MPa of H2 . The catalyst was recyclable, and furfuryl alcohol was recovered with a purity higher than 90 %. The effect of the solvent concentration was also studied. With a minimum of 50 wt % of solvent, the selectivity to furfuryl alcohol and the conversion of furfural remained high (both over 80 %). Likewise, the activity of the catalyst is maintained even in pure furfural, which confirms the real potential of the proposed catalytic system. This catalyst was also used in the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to produce γ-valerolactone selectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated......, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers...

  11. Fluid phase equilibria of the reaction mixture during the selective hydrogenation of 2-butenal in dense carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musko, Nikolai; Jensen, Anker Degn; Baiker, Alfons

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase behaviour and composition is of paramount importance for understanding multiphase reactions. We have investigated the effect of the phase behaviour in the palladium-catalysed selective hydrogenation of 2-butenal to saturated butanal in dense carbon dioxide. The reactions were...... performed using a 5wt% Pd on activated carbon in custom-designed high pressure autoclaves at 323K. The Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state was employed to model the phase behaviour of the experimentally studied systems. CPA binary interaction parameters were estimated based on the experimental...

  12. pH-dependent binding of guests in the cavity of a polyhedral coordination cage: reversible uptake and release of drug molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, William; Turega, Simon; Hunter, Christopher A; Ward, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    A range of organic molecules with acidic or basic groups exhibit strong pH-dependent binding inside the cavity of a polyhedral coordination cage. Guest binding in aqueous solution is dominated by a hydrophobic contribution which is compensated by stronger solvation when the guests become cationic (by protonation) or anionic (by deprotonation). The Parkinson's drug 1-amino-adamantane ('amantadine') binds with an association constant of 10 4 M -1 in the neutral form (pH greater than 11), but the stability of the complex is reduced by three orders of magnitude when the guest is protonated at lower pH. Monitoring the uptake of the guests into the cage cavity was facilitated by the large upfield shift for the 1 H NMR signals of bound guests due to the paramagnetism of the host. Although the association constants are generally lower, guests of biological significance such as aspirin and nicotine show similar behaviour, with a substantial difference between neutral (strongly binding) and charged (weakly binding) forms, irrespective of the sign of the charged species. pH-dependent binding was observed for a range of guests with different functional groups (primary and tertiary amines, pyridine, imidazole and carboxylic acids), so that the pH-swing can be tuned anywhere in the range of 3.5-11. The structure of the adamantane-1-carboxylic acid complex was determined by X-ray crystallography: the oxygen atoms of the guest form CH···O hydrogen bonds with one of two equivalent pockets on the internal surface of the host. Reversible uptake and release of guests as a function of pH offers interesting possibilities in any application where controlled release of a molecule following an external stimulus is required.

  13. The impact of guest compounds on cyclodextrin aggregation behavior: A series of structurally related parabens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappaerts, Jef; Do Thi, Thao; Dominguez-Vega, Elena; Somsen, Govert W; Van den Mooter, Guy; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-08-30

    Several studies have demonstrated the presence of aggregates in aqueous cyclodextrin containing solutions. The presence of guest compounds has been shown to influence this cyclodextrin aggregation process. In an attempt to gain insight into the effect of the physicochemical properties of the guest compound on 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin aggregation formation, a series of structurally related parabens was selected as model compounds. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and phase solubility studies, these parabens, differing only in side chain length, were demonstrated to form inclusion complexes with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Additional techniques were subsequently applied to evaluate the aggregation behavior of this cyclodextrin in presence of the selected parabens. Solutions containing a broad range of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin concentrations were saturated with the guest compounds and were used as test media. Results obtained from dialysis experiments, dynamic light scattering and mass spectrometry revealed a positive effect of the side chain length of the parabens on aggregate formation: in presence of heptylparaben, more and larger aggregates were observed than in presence of parabens with shorter side chains such as methyl- and butylparaben. No clear connection could be demonstrated between the cyclodextrin concentration and the extent of aggregate formation in presence of the guest compound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Octahedral [Pd6L8]12+Metallosupramolecular Cages: Synthesis, Structures and Guest-Encapsulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Y; Digal, Lori; Gardiner, Michael G; Lucas, Nigel T; Crowley, James D

    2017-10-26

    Four planar tripyridyl ligands (L tripy ), 1,3,5-tris(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)benzene 1 a, 1,3,5-tris[4-(3-pyridyl)phenyl]benzene 2 a, and the hexyloxy chain functionalized derivatives 1,3,5-tris[(3-hexyloxy-5-pyridyl)ethynyl]benzene 1 b, and 1,3,5-tris[4-(3-hexyloxy-5-pyridyl)phenyl]benzene 2 b, were synthesized and used to generate a family of [Pd 6 (L tripy ) 8 ](BF 4 ) 12 octahedral cages (L tripy =1 a, b or 2 a, b). The ligands and cages were characterized using a combination of 1 H, 13 C, and DOSY nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and in three cases, X-ray crystallography. The molecular recognition properties of the cages with neutral and anionic guests were examined, in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), using NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and molecular modeling. No binding was observed with simple aliphatic and aromatic guest molecules. However, anionic sulfonates were found to interact with the octahedral cages and the binding interaction was size selective. The smaller [Pd 6 (1 a, b) 8 ] 12+ cages were able to interact with three p-toluenesulfonate guest molecules while the larger [Pd 6 (2 a, b) 8 ] 12+ systems could host four of the anionic guest molecules. To probe the importance of the hydrophobic effect, a mixed water-DMSO (1:1) solvent system was used to reexamine the binding of the neutral organic guests adamantane, anthracene, pyrene and 1,8-naphthalimide within the cages. In this solvent system all the guests except adamantane were observed to bind within the cavities of the cages. NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the cages bind multiple copies of the individual guests (between 3-6 guest molecules per cage). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Special Issue: Guest Editors' Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Goodman

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available PORTAL opens 2006 with a special selection of papers focusing on the transformative power of social movements. In an age of globalisation and of ideologies of globalism, we debate sources and potential for alternative scenarios, for ‘other worlds.’ Many commentators have proclaimed this the global age, where humanity lives under one world power, one world market, and one world order. Yet many other worlds find new and fertile ground in this age, flourishing against the norm. Social movements set new agendas, inspire participation and crystalise solidarity. At the centre of contestation, they can create emancipatory knowledges—knowledges for change. In this issue of PORTAL we ask how social movements generate new ways of being, new subjectivities, or new modes of existence. We debate the role of affective meaning, of symbolic action and collective conscience, and discuss the place of reflective action. Contributors debate the dialectics between power and counter-power, and the role of strategic conflict and dialogue. They analyse sources of revolutionary and transformative change, discussing the praxis of counter-globalism.

  16. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  17. Selective production of oxygenates from CO2 hydrogenation over mesoporous silica supported Cu-Ga nanocomposite catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-11-23

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to oxygenates (methanol and dimethyl ether (DME)) was investigated over bifunctional supported copper catalysts promoted with gallium (Ga). Supported Cu-Ga nanocomposite catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H2 temperature programmed reduction. In comparison with Cu-SBA-15 based catalysts, Ga promoted catalysts prepared by the urea deposition method (CuGa/SBA-15-UDP) was found active and selective for CO2 hydrogenation to oxygenates. The use of Ga as the promoter showed increased acidic sites as confirmed by the NH3-TPD, Pyridine-IR and 2,6-lutidine-IR studies. The favorable effect of Ga on CO2 conversion and selectivity to oxygenate may come from the strong interaction of Ga with silica, which is responsible for the enhanced metal surface area, formation of nanocomposite and metal dispersion. Notably, incorporation of Ga to Cu/SiO2 showed a several-fold higher rate for methanol formation (13.12 mol/gCu·sec) with a reasonable rate for the DME formation (2.15 mol/gCu·sec) as compared to those of Cu/SiO2 catalysts.

  18. Regeneration of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} poisoned by thiophene during the selective hydrogenation of styrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L`Argentiere, P.C.; Liprandi, D.A.; Figoli, N.S. [Inst. de Investigaciones en Catalysis y Petroquimica, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    1995-11-01

    The poisoning by thiophene and the regeneration of a Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during the selective hydrogenation of styrene at 353 K was studied. It was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the sulfur species adsorbed during the catalyst poisoning is thiophene, which is adsorbed coplanarly to the surface. The catalyst was regenerated by H{sub 2} treatments for different times and at several pressures. Part of the sulfur remained irreversibly adsorbed after regeneration, and hence the activity and selectivity values corresponding to the nonpoisoned catalyst were never recovered. After the regeneration treatments at 473 K, a modification on the adsorbed sulfur electronic state was detected, which can be ascribed to thiophene hydrogenolysis, thus producing superficial sulfide adsorbed species.

  19. Microwave-Assisted Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol Employing a Green and Noble Metal-Free Copper Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Pedro N; de Almeida, João M A R; Carvalho, Yuri; Priecel, Peter; Falabella Sousa-Aguiar, Eduardo; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A

    2016-12-20

    Green, inexpensive, and robust copper-based heterogeneous catalysts achieve 100 % conversion and 99 % selectivity in the conversion of furfural to furfuryl alcohol when using cyclopentyl-methyl ether as green solvent and microwave reactors at low H 2 pressures and mild temperatures. The utilization of pressurized microwave reactors produces a 3-4 fold increase in conversion and an unexpected enhancement in selectivity as compared to the reaction carried out at the same conditions using conventional autoclave reactors. The enhancement in catalytic rate produced by microwave irradiation is temperature dependent. This work highlights that using microwave irradiation in the catalytic hydrogenation of biomass-derived compounds is a very strong tool for biomass upgrade that offers immense potential in a large number of transformations where it could be a determining factor for commercial exploitation. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A Combined Fuzzy-AHP and Fuzzy-GRA Methodology for Hydrogen Energy Storage Method Selection in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytac Yildiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to select the most appropriate Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES method for Turkey from among the alternatives of tank, metal hydride and chemical storage, which are determined based on expert opinions and literature review. Thus, we propose a Buckley extension based fuzzy Analytical Hierarchical Process (Fuzzy-AHP and linear normalization based fuzzy Grey Relational Analysis (Fuzzy-GRA combined Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM methodology. This combined approach can be applied to a complex decision process, which often makes sense with subjective data or vague information; and used to solve to solve HES selection problem with different defuzzification methods. The proposed approach is unique both in the HES literature and the MCDM literature.

  1. Determination of nickel in hydrogenated fats and selected chocolate bars in Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnalova, Lucie; Bucek, Pavel; Vobornik, Petr; Dohnal, Vlastimil

    2017-02-15

    Nickel is a metal that can be present in products containing hardened edible oils, possibly as leftover catalyst from the vegetable oil hardening process. Nickel may cause toxic effects including the promotion of cancer and contact allergy. In this work, nickel content was determined in hydrogenated vegetable fats and confectionery products, made with these fats, available on the Czech market using newly developed method combining microwave digestion and graphite furnace AAS. While concentrations of 0.086±0.014mg.kg(-1) or less were found in hydrogenated vegetable fats, the Ni content in confectionery products was significantly higher, varying between 0.742±0.066 and 3.141±0.217mg.kg(-1). Based on an average consumer basket, daily intake of nickel from vegetable fats is at least twice as low as intake from confectionery products. Based on results, the levels of nickel in neither vegetable fats nor confectionery products, do not represent a significant health risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF MALEIC ANHYDRIDE TO Y-BUTYROLACTONE OVER PD/AL(2)O(3) CATALYST USING SUPERCRITICAL CO(2) AS SOLVENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A selective hydrogenation of maleic anhydride to either y-butyrolactone or succinic anhydride over simple Pd/Al(2)O(3) catalyst under supercritical CO(2) medium is described for the first time which has considerable promise for obht lab-scale as well as industrial selective hydro...

  3. Predicting complexation thermodynamic parameters of β-cyclodextrin with chiral guests by using swarm intelligence and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasvudhisarn, Chakguy; Wolschann, Peter; Lawtrakul, Luckhana

    2009-05-14

    The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) approaches are used for predicting the thermodynamic parameters for the 1:1 inclusion complexation of chiral guests with beta-cyclodextrin. A PSO is adopted for descriptor selection in the quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) of a dataset of 74 chiral guests due to its simplicity, speed, and consistency. The modified PSO is then combined with SVMs for its good approximating properties, to generate a QSPR model with the selected features. Linear, polynomial, and Gaussian radial basis functions are used as kernels in SVMs. All models have demonstrated an impressive performance with R(2) higher than 0.8.

  4. Site-selective oxidation, amination and epimerization reactions of complex polyols enabled by transfer hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christopher K.; Hartwig, John F.

    2017-12-01

    Polyoxygenated hydrocarbons that bear one or more hydroxyl groups comprise a large set of natural and synthetic compounds, often with potent biological activity. In synthetic chemistry, alcohols are important precursors to carbonyl groups, which then can be converted into a wide range of oxygen- or nitrogen-based functionality. Therefore, the selective conversion of a single hydroxyl group in natural products into a ketone would enable the selective introduction of unnatural functionality. However, the methods known to convert a simple alcohol, or even an alcohol in a molecule that contains multiple protected functional groups, are not suitable for selective reactions of complex polyol structures. We present a new ruthenium catalyst with a unique efficacy for the selective oxidation of a single hydroxyl group among many in unprotected polyol natural products. This oxidation enables the introduction of nitrogen-based functional groups into such structures that lack nitrogen atoms and enables a selective alcohol epimerization by stepwise or reversible oxidation and reduction.

  5. A Selective and Functional Group-Tolerant Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis/Transfer Hydrogenation Tandem Sequence Using Formic Acid as Hydrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Majtczak, Jarosława; Gutowski, Maciej; Grela, Karol

    2018-03-02

    A ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of olefins utilizing formic acid as a hydrogen donor is described. The application of commercially available alkylidene ruthenium complexes opens access to attractive C(sp3)-C(sp3) bond formation in an olefin metathesis/transfer hydrogenation sequence under tandem catalysis conditions. High chemoselectivity of the developed methodology provides a remarkable synthetic tool for the reduction of various functionalized alkenes under mild reaction conditions. The developed methodology is applied for the formal synthesis of the drugs pentoxyverine and bencyclane.

  6. Hydrogen-bonded encapsulation complexes in protic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Toru; Rebek, Julius

    2004-11-03

    We describe here the behavior of the hydrogen-bonded capsule 1.1 and its complexes in protic solvents. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the encapsulation process were determined through conventional (1)H NMR methods. The enthalpies and entropies of encapsulation are both positive, indicating a process that liberates solvent molecules. The rates of dissociation-association of the capsule were comparable to the rates for the in-out exchange of large guests, which suggests that guest exchange occurs by complete dissociation of the capsule in protic solvents. The stability of the hydrogen-bonded capsule 1.1 toward protic solvents depends strongly on the guests, with the best guest being dimethylstilbene 8. The results establish guidelines for the properties of capsules that could be accessed in water.

  7. Efficient Pd@MIL-101(Cr) hetero-catalysts for 2-butyne-1,4-diol hydrogenation exhibiting high selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Dongdong

    2017-01-05

    Pd@MIL-101(Cr) hetero-catalysts have been successfully prepared using the metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) approach, by choosing [Pd(η-CH)(η-CH)] as a volatile precursor, and the hydrothermally stable metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Cr) as a support. The prepared Pd@MIL-101(Cr) hetero-catalysts characterized with various analytical techniques, exhibited highly monodispersed immobilized Pd nanoparticles in the MIL-101(Cr) cavities, while retaining the pristine crystallinity and porosity. The intact hybrid Pd@MIL-101(Cr) has been demonstrated to be an efficient catalyst for 2-butyne-1,4-diol hydrogenation with excellent activity, stability and selectivity (2-butene-1,4-diol (>94%)).

  8. Selective Hydrogen Atom Abstraction via Induced Bond Polarization: The Direct -Arylation of Alcohols via Photoredox, HAT and Nickel Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilton, Jack; Christensen, Melodie; DiRocco, Daniel A; Ruck, Rebecca T; Davies, Ian W; MacMillan, David William

    2018-02-28

    The combination of nickel metallaphotoredox catalysis, hydrogen atom transfer catalysis, and a Lewis acid activation mode, has led to the development of an arylation protocol for the selective functionalization of alcohol -hydroxy C-H bonds. This approach employs zinc-mediated alcohol deprotonation to activate -hydroxy C-H bonds while simultaneously suppressing C-O bond formation by inhibiting formation of nickel alkoxide species. The use of Zn based Lewis acids also deactivates other hydridic bonds such as -amino and -oxy C-H bonds. This technology facilitates rapid access to benzylic alcohols, an important motif in drug discovery. A 3-step synthesis of the Prozac exemplifies the utility of this new method. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The benefit of guest loyalty programmes | La Rose | Research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the literature review of this research, the following aspects are discussed: a loyalty programme and its use; the sort of loyalty programmes; the effects of a loyalty programme; and the wishes and needs of a leisure guest. Surveys were divided among 46 leisure guests of Apollo Hotels and Resorts in order to collect data on ...

  10. Guest Speakers in School-Based Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Madsen, Nikki; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2014-01-01

    This study, using data from a statewide survey (n = 332), examined teachers' practices regarding the inclusion of guest speakers to cover sexuality content. More than half of teachers (58%) included guest speakers. In multivariate analyses, teachers who taught high school, had professional preparation in health education, or who received…

  11. Total solid content drives hydrogen production through microbial selection during thermophilic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Jean-Charles; Trably, Eric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Escudié, Renaud; Bonnafous, Anaïs; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernet, Nicolas; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Dumas, Claire

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the effect of total solid content (TS) on thermophilic hydrogen production from wheat straw was investigated. Six TS contents ranging from wet to dry conditions (10-34%TS) were tested in batch tests. A decrease of H₂ yields was observed and three statistical groups were distinguished according to the TS content: wet conditions (10% and 14%TS) with 15.3 ± 1.6 NmlH₂ gTS(-1), intermediate conditions (19%TS) with 6.4 ± 1.0 NmlH₂ gTS(-1) and dry conditions (25-34%TS) with 3.4 ± 0.8 NmlH₂ gTS(-1). Such a decrease in biohydrogen yields was related to a metabolic shift with an accumulation of lactic acid under dry conditions. Concomitantly, a microbial population shift was observed with a dominance of species related to the class Clostridia under wet conditions, and a co-dominance of members of Bacilli, Clostridia classes and Bacteroidetes phylum under dry conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective carboxylate production by controlling hydrogen, carbon dioxide and substrate concentrations in mixed culture fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, D.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Diels, L.; Wever, de H.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    This research demonstrated the selective production of n-butyrate from mixed culture by applying 2 bar carbon dioxide into the headspace of batch fermenters or by increasing the initial substrate concentration. The effect of increasing initial substrate concentration was investigated at 8, 13.5 and

  13. Hydrogen Uptake on Coordinatively Unsaturated Metal Sites in VSB-5: Strong Binding Affinity Leading to High-Temperature D2/H2Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Lawler, Keith V; Wolffis, Jarod J; Eckdahl, Christopher T; McDonald, Cooper S; Rowsell, Jesse L C; FitzGerald, Stephen A; Forster, Paul M

    2017-12-26

    We examine the adsorption of hydrogen and deuterium into the nanoporous nickel phosphate, VSB-5. On the basis of gas sorption analysis, VSB-5 exhibits one of the highest measured H 2 heats of adsorption (HOA) for hydrogen (16 kJ/mol) yet reported. This high HOA is consistent with an unusually large red shift in the Q(1) and Q(0) hydrogen vibrational modes as measured with in situ infrared spectroscopy. The HOA for D 2 is measured to be 2 kJ/mol higher than that for H 2 . "Ideal adsorbed solution theory" analysis of H 2 and D 2 isotherms provides selectivities above 4 for deuterium at 140 K, suggesting that VSB-5 is a promising adsorbent for pressure-swing adsorption-type separations of hydrogen isotopes.

  14. Ni–Sn-Supported ZrO2 Catalysts Modified by Indium for Selective CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol

    KAUST Repository

    Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa

    2018-04-02

    Ni and NiSn supported on zirconia (ZrO2) and on indium (In)-incorporated zirconia (InZrO2) catalysts were prepared by a wet chemical reduction route and tested for hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol in a fixed-bed isothermal flow reactor at 250 °C. The mono-metallic Ni (5%Ni/ZrO2) catalysts showed a very high selectivity for methane (99%) during CO2 hydrogenation. Introduction of Sn to this material with the following formulation 5Ni5Sn/ZrO2 (5% Ni-5% Sn/ZrO2) showed the rate of methanol formation to be 0.0417 μmol/(gcat·s) with 54% selectivity. Furthermore, the combination NiSn supported on InZrO2 (5Ni5Sn/10InZrO2) exhibited a rate of methanol formation 10 times higher than that on 5Ni/ZrO2 (0.1043 μmol/(gcat·s)) with 99% selectivity for methanol. All of these catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, CO2-temperature-programmed desorption, and density functional theory (DFT) studies. Addition of Sn to Ni catalysts resulted in the formation of a NiSn alloy. The NiSn alloy particle size was kept in the range of 10–15 nm, which was evidenced by HRTEM study. DFT analysis was carried out to identify the surface composition as well as the structural location of each element on the surface in three compositions investigated, namely, Ni28Sn27, Ni18Sn37, and Ni37Sn18 bimetallic nanoclusters, and results were in agreement with the STEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy results. Also, the introduction of “Sn” and “In” helped improve the reducibility of Ni oxide and the basic strength of catalysts. Considerable details of the catalytic and structural properties of the Ni, NiSn, and NiSnIn catalyst systems were elucidated. These observations were decisive for achieving a highly efficient formation rate of methanol via CO2 by the H2 reduction process with high methanol selectivity.

  15. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that peptide amide hydrogens undergo extensive intramolecular migration (i.e., complete hydrogen scrambling) upon collisional activation of protonated peptides (Jørgensen et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2785-2793). The occurrence of hydrogen scrambling enforces severe...

  16. Flexible Yttrium Coordination Geometry Inhibits “Bare-Metal” Guest Interactions in the Metal-Organic Framework Y(btc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie E. Auckett

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Y(btc (btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate is a metal-organic framework that exhibits significant adsorption of industrially-relevant gases such as H2, CH4, and O2. Previous studies have noted a surprising lack of close interactions between the adsorbed guest molecules and Y, despite the apparent availability of a “bare-metal” binding site. We have extended our previous work in a detailed investigation of the adsorption behaviours of CO2, CD4, and O2 in Y(btc over a range of concentrations using in situ neutron powder diffraction methods. The O–Y–O bond angles enclosing the bare-metal site are found to change considerably depending on the type and quantity of guest molecules present. Multiple binding sites are found for each guest species, and the largest changes in O–Y–O angles are accompanied by changes in the filling sequences of the binding sites, pointing to an important interplay between guest-induced framework distortions and binding site accessibility. These results suggest the potential for coordinatively flexible rare-earth metal centres to promote guest-selective binding in metal-organic frameworks.

  17. A solid-contact pH-selective electrode based on tridodecylamine as hydrogen neutral ionophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Guo, Yixuan; Li, Shangjin; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The solid-state pH electrode has the potential possibility to be used in many extreme situations with satisfactory accuracy and low cost. But its performance is affected by the solid electrolyte, preparation process, and the structure of the sensitive membrane, etc. In this work, the relationships between these factors and the characteristic of the prepared electrode were verified by controlling the preparation conditions with a variety of electrochemical methods. Firstly, the solid electrolyte poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) was electrochemically deposited on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) substrate by a potentiostatic method in an aqueous solution containing 0.01 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and 0.1 M polystyrene sulfonic (PSS) acid as the supporting electrolyte. The PEDOT films were then characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the 0.1 M NaNO3 aqueous solution in order to obtain the optimized polymerization potential and charges where the PEDOT film would have a higher redox capacitance. Finally, the pH electrode was prepared by coating the SPCE/PEDOT(PSS) with a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane containing tridodecylamine as hydrogen ionophore manually, and experiments were carried out to study the effect of the usage of PVC per square millimeter on the response time and stability of the electrode to optimize the PVC film thickness. The potentiometric response of the pH electrode was studied in the buffer solutions with pH ranging from 5.00 to 10.81 by the open-circuit potential (OCP) method. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the electrode is  −55.7  ±  0.5 mV pH −1 ( r 2   >  0.9980) at room temperature (24  ±  1 °C) with pH ranging from 2.00–10.50, approximating to the theoretical nernstian slope (−59.16 mV pH −1 ),and the response time was less than 10 s. Moreover, it has low impedance, high accuracy and potential stability

  18. A solid-contact pH-selective electrode based on tridodecylamine as hydrogen neutral ionophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Guo, Yixuan; Li, Shangjin; Xu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The solid-state pH electrode has the potential possibility to be used in many extreme situations with satisfactory accuracy and low cost. But its performance is affected by the solid electrolyte, preparation process, and the structure of the sensitive membrane, etc. In this work, the relationships between these factors and the characteristic of the prepared electrode were verified by controlling the preparation conditions with a variety of electrochemical methods. Firstly, the solid electrolyte poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) was electrochemically deposited on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) substrate by a potentiostatic method in an aqueous solution containing 0.01 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and 0.1 M polystyrene sulfonic (PSS) acid as the supporting electrolyte. The PEDOT films were then characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the 0.1 M NaNO3 aqueous solution in order to obtain the optimized polymerization potential and charges where the PEDOT film would have a higher redox capacitance. Finally, the pH electrode was prepared by coating the SPCE/PEDOT(PSS) with a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane containing tridodecylamine as hydrogen ionophore manually, and experiments were carried out to study the effect of the usage of PVC per square millimeter on the response time and stability of the electrode to optimize the PVC film thickness. The potentiometric response of the pH electrode was studied in the buffer solutions with pH ranging from 5.00 to 10.81 by the open-circuit potential (OCP) method. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the electrode is  -55.7  ±  0.5 mV pH-1 (r 2  >  0.9980) at room temperature (24  ±  1 °C) with pH ranging from 2.00-10.50, approximating to the theoretical nernstian slope (-59.16 mV pH-1),and the response time was less than 10 s. Moreover, it has low impedance, high accuracy and potential stability as well as some

  19. Interview with the Guest Editor - Jenny Russinova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-29

    Jenny Russinova graduated in biotechnology from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, and subsequently obtained her PhD at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, where she worked on gene expression in plant embryogenesis. Jenny then moved to the Netherlands to do her post-doctoral studies at Wageningen University, Wageningen, in the laboratory of Sacco de Vries. There, she worked on cellular regulation, mechanisms and localization of plant receptor-like kinases. In 2006, she started her own research group at the Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB) at Ghent University, Belgium, focusing on brassinosteroid signaling regulation in plants. Jenny is the Guest Editor for the 2018 plant cell biology Special Issue in Journal of Cell Science. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. From the Guest Editor: Caring Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riane Eisler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Interdisciplinary Journal of Partnership Studies was launched in the fall of 2014, and as Editor in Chief, I am happy to report that since our launch we have had more than 10,000 downloads of articles by readers all over the world. I also want to take this opportunity to welcome our new Managing Editor, Heidi Bruce, and to thank her for being part of the wonderful team producing this journal, which, among others, includes Liz Fine Weinfurter, Marty Lewis-Hunstiger, Teddie Potter, Peg Lonnquist, and Virajita Singh of the University of Minnesota. I am honored to be the Guest Editor for our first themed issue on Caring Democracy, a subject that is especially timely at this historic juncture, and to have so many distinguished contributors to it. Here is a brief outline of its contents.

  1. A New Concept for the Fabrication of Hydrogen Selective Silica Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Tsapatsis

    2006-07-31

    We are attempting to fabricate H{sub 2}-selective silica-based films by ''layer-by-layer'' deposition as a new approach for thin films. A sonication-assisted deposition method was mainly used for ''layer-by-layer'' deposition. In addition, other approaches such as a dip-coating and the use of a polymer matrix with a layered silicate were contrived as well. This report shows the progress done during the 2nd Year of this award.

  2. Beyond the use of modifiers in selective alkyne hydrogenation: silver and gold nanocatalysts in flow mode for sustainable alkene production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilé, Gianvito; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-10-01

    We report on the excellent stereo and chemoselectivity of nanosized silver and gold catalysts in the three-phase hydrogenation of acetylenic compounds under flow chemistry conditions. The materials featuring metal nanoparticles in the range of 2-21 nm were prepared by spray deposition or incipient wetness impregnation of silver nitrate and sol immobilisation of gold chloride on different carriers (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and carbon), followed by activation in various atmospheres. The samples were characterised by ICP-OES, N2 sorption, XPS, HAADF-STEM, and HRTEM, and evaluated in a continuous-flow flooded-bed micro-reactor. Both metals display optimal activities for particles below 5 nm, enabling stable operation at T = 373 K and P = 10 bar. While the performance of the silver catalysts is less influenced by the support, the gold nanoparticles exhibit significant activity only when deposited on TiO2, likely due to the strong metal-support interaction. Hydrogenations of functionalised alkynes reveal that silver and gold match, and in some cases exceed, the selectivity of benchmark palladium-based catalysts. Furthermore, in contrast to Pd, the Ag and Au samples require no modifiers, which brings fundamental and practical simplifications for their understanding and large scale manufacture. Therefore, these materials could be advantageously used for the continuous production of olefinic intermediates in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries.We report on the excellent stereo and chemoselectivity of nanosized silver and gold catalysts in the three-phase hydrogenation of acetylenic compounds under flow chemistry conditions. The materials featuring metal nanoparticles in the range of 2-21 nm were prepared by spray deposition or incipient wetness impregnation of silver nitrate and sol immobilisation of gold chloride on different carriers (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and carbon), followed by activation in various atmospheres. The samples were characterised by ICP-OES, N2 sorption

  3. Heterophase-structured nanocrystals as superior supports for Ru-based catalysts in selective hydrogenation of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhikun; Liu, Xu; Li, Shuaihui; Li, Zhongjun; Li, Baojun; Liu, Zhongyi; Liu, Shouchang

    2017-01-01

    ZrO2 heterophase structure nanocrystals (HSNCs) were synthesized with tunable ratios of monoclinic ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) to tetragonal ZrO2 (t-ZrO2). The phase mole ratio of m-ZrO2 versus t-ZrO2 in ZrO2 HSNCs was tuned from 40% to 100%. The concentration of the surface hydroxyl groups on m-ZrO2 is higher than that on t-ZrO2. ZrO2 HSNCs have different surface hydroxyl groups on two crystalline phases. This creates more intimate synergistic effects than their single-phase counterparts. The ZrO2 HSNCs were used as effective supports to fabricate heterophase-structured Ru/ZrO2 catalysts for benzene-selective hydrogenation. The excellent catalytic performance including high activity and selectivity is attributed to the heterogeneous strong/weak hydrophilic interface and water layer formed at the m-ZrO2/t-ZrO2 catalyst junction. PMID:28057914

  4. A nanoscale Zr-based fluorescent metal-organic framework for selective and sensitive detection of hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanping; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Ke; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been commonly viewed as a gas signaling molecule in various physiological and pathological processes. However, the highly efficient H2S detection still remains challenging. Herein, we designed a new robust nano metal-organic framework (MOF) UiO-66-CH=CH2 as a fluorescent probe for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of biological H2S. UiO-66-CH=CH2 was prepared by heating ZrCl4 and 2-vinylterephthalic acid via a simple method. UiO-66-CH=CH2 displayed fluorescence quenching to H2S and kept excellent selectivity in the presence of biological relevant analytes especially the cysteine and glutathione. This MOF-based probe also exhibited fast response (10 s) and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 6.46 μM which was within the concentration range of biological H2S in living system. Moreover, this constructed MOF featured water-stability, nanoscale (20-30 nm) and low toxicity, which made it a promising candidate for biological H2S sensing.

  5. Selective EPR Detection of Primary Amines in Water with a Calix[6]azacryptand-Based Copper(II) Funnel Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inthasot, Alex; Le Poul, Nicolas; Luhmer, Michel; Colasson, Benoit; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2018-04-02

    A water-soluble calix[6]arene-based azacryptand was synthesized. The corresponding tren [tris(2-aminoethyl)amine] cap grafted at the small rim coordinates strongly a copper(II) ion over a wide range of pH. The host-guest properties of the complex were explored by EPR spectroscopy. Due to second coordination sphere effects and the hydrophobic effect ascribed to the calixarene cavity, this funnel complex selectively binds neutral molecules (alcohols, nitriles, amines) versus anions in water near physiological pH. Among the coordinating guests, hydrophobic primary amines are preferentially recognized thanks to the combined effect of the better metal-ligand interaction and hydrogen bonding to the oxygen atoms present at the small rim. Hence, this Cu(II) calix[6]arene-based funnel complex behaves as a sensitive and selective EPR probe for primary amines, including biologically important molecules such as tyramine and tryptamine, in water, over a large pH window.

  6. Aluminium and hydrogen ions inhibit a mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    The tension-dependent activity of mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in excised plasmalemmal patches from onion bulb scale epidermis is modulated by pH in the physiologically meaningful range between 4.5 and 7.2. It is rapidly lowered by lowering pH and rapidly raised by raising pH. Channel activity is effectively inhibited by low levels of aluminium ions and activity can be partially restored by washing for a few minutes. We suggest that under normal conditions the sensitivity of the mechanosensory channels to pH of the wall free space plays important roles in regulation of plant activities such as growth. We further suggest that, when levels of acid and aluminium ions in the soil solution are high, they might inhibit similar sensory channels in cells of the root tip, thus contributing critically to the acid soil syndrome.

  7. A rod-packing microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2014-11-13

    Self-assembly of a trigonal building subunit with diaminotriazines (DAT) functional groups leads to a unique rod-packing 3D microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF-3). This material shows permanent porosity and demonstrates highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at ambient temperature and pressure.

  8. Bismuth-doped ceria, Ce0.90Bi0.10O2: A selective and stable catalyst for clean hydrogen combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Lee, A.F.; Rothenberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Bismuth-doped cerias are successfully applied as solid oxygen reservoirs in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. The lattice oxygen of the ceria is used to selectively combust hydrogen from the dehydrogenation mixture at 550 °C. This process has three key advantages: it shifts the

  9. A rationally designed amino-borane complex in a metal organic framework: A novel reusable hydrogen storage and size-selective reduction material

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xinbo

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino-borane complex inside a stable metal organic framework was synthesized for the first time. It releases hydrogen at a temperature of 78 °C with no volatile contaminants and can be well reused. Its application as a size-selective reduction material in organic synthesis was also demonstrated. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  10. Single-Atom Pd₁/Graphene Catalyst Achieved by Atomic Layer Deposition: Remarkable Performance in Selective Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Cheng, Hao; Yi, Hong; Lin, Yue; Yao, Tao; Wang, Chunlei; Li, Junjie; Wei, Shiqiang; Lu, Junling

    2015-08-26

    We reported that atomically dispersed Pd on graphene can be fabricated using the atomic layer deposition technique. Aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy both confirmed that isolated Pd single atoms dominantly existed on the graphene support. In selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene, the single-atom Pd1/graphene catalyst showed about 100% butenes selectivity at 95% conversion at a mild reaction condition of about 50 °C, which is likely due to the changes of 1,3-butadiene adsorption mode and enhanced steric effect on the isolated Pd atoms. More importantly, excellent durability against deactivation via either aggregation of metal atoms or carbonaceous deposits during a total 100 h of reaction time on stream was achieved. Therefore, the single-atom catalysts may open up more opportunities to optimize the activity, selectivity, and durability in selective hydrogenation reactions.

  11. Nanoporous spongy graphene: Potential applications for hydrogen adsorption and selective gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostoglou, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikolaos.kostoglou@stud.unileoben.ac.at [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Constantinides, Georgios [Research Unit for Nanostructured Materials Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Cyprus University of Technology, 3036 Lemesos (Cyprus); Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Agia Paraskevi Attikis, 15310 Athens (Greece); Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Li, Yuanqing; Liao, Kin [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ryzhkov, Vladislav [Nanotube Production Department, Fibrtec Incorporation, TX, 75551 Atlanta (United States); Mitterer, Christian [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Rebholz, Claus, E-mail: claus@ucy.ac.cy [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, a nanoporous (pore width ~ 0.7 nm) graphene-based sponge-like material with large surface area (~ 350 m{sup 2}/g) was synthesized by wet chemical reduction of graphene oxide in combination with freeze-drying. Surface morphology and elemental composition were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Surface chemistry was qualitatively examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, while the respective structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Textural properties, including Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, micropore volume and surface area as well as pore size distribution, were deduced from nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption data obtained at 77 K and up to 1 bar. Potential use of the spongy graphene for gas storage and separation applications was preliminarily assessed by low-pressure (0–1 bar) H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} sorption measurements at different temperatures (77, 273 and 298 K). The adsorption capacities for each gas were evaluated up to ~ 1 bar, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption for CO{sub 2} (28–33 kJ/mol) and CH{sub 4} (30–38 kJ/mol) were calculated using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, while the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas selectivity (up to 95:1) was estimated using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). - Highlights: • Nanoporous sponge produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and freeze-drying • Characterization performed using SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR, BET and XRD methods • Gas storage performance evaluated towards H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption up to 1 bar • CO{sub 2} over CH{sub 4} gas selectivity estimated between 45 and 95 at 273 K using the IAST model.

  12. Importance of location and exterior of city hotels as elements of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepavčević Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Business practices and attitudes of tourists show that hospitality represents the primary factor in the development of urban tourism. It is considered that, besides the exclusive appearance, there is no business success for hotel properties without a proper location. It is known that a typical tourist would like to be close enough to tourist attractions, to be able to reach them on foot. This paper deals with the importance of location and exterior of urban hotels on guests decision on the selection and overall satisfaction with hotel products. The survey was conducted in the hotels two largest urban centers in Serbia (Belgrade and Novi Sad. The aim of the research is an insight into the real impact of location and exterior when assessing the guest satisfaction. Descriptive statistical analysis, t-test and regression analysis were used for statistical data processing.

  13. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  14. Zoniporide: a potent and selective inhibitor of the human sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, W Ross; Allen, Mary C; Frazier, Donald E; Fossa, Anthony A; Johnson, Celeste G; Marala, Ravi B; Knight, Delvin R; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2003-01-01

    The sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 (NHE-1) plays an important role in the myocardial response to ischemia-reperfusion; inhibition of this exchanger protects against ischemic injury, including reduction in infarct size. Herein we describe a novel, potent, and highly selective NHE-1 inhibitor, zoniporide (CP-597,396; [1-(quinolin-5-yl)-5-cyclopropyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbonyl] guanidine). Zoniporide inhibits human NHE-1 with an IC(50) of 14 nM, has >150-fold selectivity vs. other NHE isoforms, and potently inhibits ex vivo NHE-1-dependent swelling of human platelets. This compound is well tolerated in preclinical animal models, exhibits moderate plasma protein binding, has a t(1/2) of 1.5 h in monkeys, and has one major active metabolite. In both in vitro and in vivo rabbit models of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, zoniporide markedly reduced infarct size without adversely affecting hemodynamics or cardiac function. In the isolated heart (Langendorff), zoniporide elicited a concentration-dependent reduction in infarct size (EC(50) = 0.25 nM). At 50 nM it reduced infarct size by 83%. This compound was 2.5-20-fold more potent than either eniporide or cariporide (EC(50)s of 0.69 and 5.11 nM, respectively), and reduced infarct size to a greater extent than eniporide. In open chest, anesthetized rabbits, zoniporide also elicited a dose-dependent reduction in infarct size (ED(50) = 0.45 mg/kg/h) and inhibited NHE-1-mediated platelet swelling (93% inhibition at 4 mg/kg/h). Furthermore, zoniporide attenuated postischemic cardiac contractile dysfunction in conscious primates, and reduced both the incidence and duration of ischemia-reperfusion-induced ventricular fibrillation in rats. Zoniporide represents a novel class of potent and selective human NHE-1 inhibitors with potential utility for providing cardioprotection in a clinical setting.

  15. The guest-worker in Western Europe--an obituary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, S

    1986-01-01

    The significance of guest workers is examined for six Western European countries. It is found that "the dynamics of the migratory process led to family reunification and settlement, against the original intentions of the workers, employers and states concerned. The recruitment of guest-workers stopped after 1974, but many migrants stayed on, becoming permanent ethnic minorities, in a situation of economic and social crisis. It is argued that guest-worker systems inevitably lead to permanent migration in the long run, and that it is better to plan for orderly settlement through appropriate policies." excerpt

  16. Diastereo- and enantioselective anti-selective hydrogenation of α-amino-β-keto ester hydrochlorides and related compounds using transition-metal-chiral-bisphosphine catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yasumasa

    2014-04-01

    This review describes our recent works on the diastereo- and enantioselective synthesis of anti-β-hydroxy-α-amino acid esters using transition-metal-chiral-bisphosphine catalysts. A variety of transition metals, namely ruthenium (Ru), rhodium (Rh), iridium (Ir), and nickel (Ni), in combination with chiral bisphosphines, worked well as catalysts for the direct anti-selective asymmetric hydrogenation of α-amino-β-keto ester hydrochlorides, yielding anti-β-hydroxy-α-amino acid esters via dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) in excellent yields and diastereo- and enantioselectivities. The Ru-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of α-amino-β-ketoesters via DKR is the first example of generating anti-β-hydroxy-α-amino acids. Complexes of iridium and axially chiral bisphosphines catalyze an efficient asymmetric hydrogenation of α-amino-β-keto ester hydrochlorides via dynamic kinetic resolution. A homogeneous Ni-chiral-bisphosphine complex also catalyzes an efficient asymmetric hydrogenation of α-amino-β-keto ester hydrochlorides in an anti-selective manner. As a related process, the asymmetric hydrogenation of the configurationally stable substituted α-aminoketones using a Ni catalyst via DKR is also described. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Performance of polydimethylsiloxane membrane contactor process for selective hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Ebrahim; Bayrakdar, Alper; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Çalli, Bariş

    2017-03-01

    H 2 S in biogas affects the co-generation performance adversely by corroding some critical components within the engine and it has to be removed in order to improve the biogas quality. This work presents the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane contactor for selective removal of H 2 S from the biogas. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of different pH of absorption liquid, biogas flowrate and temperature on the absorption performances. The results revealed that at the lowest loading rate (91mg H 2 S/m 2 ·h) more than 98% H 2 S and 59% CO 2 absorption efficiencies were achieved. The CH 4 content in the treated gas increased from 60 to 80% with nearly 5% CH 4 loss. Increasing the pH (7-10) and loading rate (91-355mg H 2 S/m 2 ·h) enhanced the H 2 S absorption capacity, and the maximum H 2 S/CO 2 and H 2 S/CH 4 selectivity factors were 2.5 and 58, respectively. Temperature played a key role in the process and lower temperature was beneficial for intensifying H 2 S absorption performance. The highest H 2 S fluxes at pH 10 and 7 were 3.4g/m 2 ·d and 1.8g/m 2 ·d with overall mass transfer coefficients of 6.91×10 -6 and 4.99×10 -6 m/s, respectively. The results showed that moderately high H 2 S fluxes with low CH 4 loss may be achieved by using a robust and cost-effective membrane based absorption process for desulfurization of biogas. A tubular PDMS membrane contactor was tested for the first time to remove H 2 S from biogas under slightly alkaline conditions and the suggested process could be a promising for real scale applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fine CuO anisotropic nanoparticles supported on mesoporous SBA-15 for selective hydrogenation of nitroaromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Shweta; Mutreja, Vishal; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali

    2016-01-01

    SBA-15 modified with APTMS (3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane) having pore diameter (∼8 nm) has been synthesized and impregnated with 1-10 wt.% Cu using Cu(NO3)2 as a metal source followed by calcination at 350 °C. As-prepared CuO/ap-SBA-15 powder showed changes in the color from white for bare SBA-15 to light green due to formation of anisotropic CuO nanoparticles that exhibited a characteristic plasmon absorption band at 359 and 747 nm. TEM studies showed a change in the morphology of CuO NPs as a function of increased Cu loading. Moreover, well dispersed CuO nanospheres (∼5-6 nm) and nanorods (aspect ratio ∼11-20 nm) having monoclinic crystal phase were observed within the mesoporous channels of SBA-15. Elemental mapping studies confirmed uniform distribution of CuO nanoparticles on the surface of SBA-15. An increase in surface area was also observed from 694 m(2) g(-1) for SBA-15 to 762 m(2) g(-1) for 10 wt.% Cu loading probably due to the deposition of excess of CuO nanoparticles on the outer siliceous surface. The catalytic activity also increased with Cu loading and 10 wt.% CuO/ap-SBA-15 catalyst displayed the highest catalytic activity for the reduction of m-chloronitrobenzene and m-nitrotoluene with 83% and 100% selectivity for m-chloroaniline and m-aminotoluene respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.; Schreiber, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300-360°C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N2 gas. Results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  20. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  1. From the Lindlar catalyst to supported ligand-modified palladium nanoparticles: selectivity patterns and accessibility constraints in the continuous-flow three-phase hydrogenation of acetylenic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilé, Gianvito; Almora-Barrios, Neyvis; Mitchell, Sharon; López, Núria; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-05-12

    Site modification and isolation through selective poisoning comprise an effective strategy to enhance the selectivity of palladium catalysts in the partial hydrogenation of triple bonds in acetylenic compounds. The recent emergence of supported hybrid materials matching the stereo- and chemoselectivity of the classical Lindlar catalyst holds promise to revolutionize palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations, and will benefit from an in-depth understanding of these new materials. In this work, we compare the performance of bare, lead-poisoned, and ligand-modified palladium catalysts in the hydrogenation of diverse alkynes. Catalytic tests, conducted in a continuous-flow three-phase reactor, coupled with theoretical calculations and characterization methods, enable elucidation of the structural origins of the observed selectivity patterns. Distinctions in the catalytic performance are correlated with the relative accessibility of the active site to the organic substrate, and with the adsorption configuration and strength, depending on the ensemble size and surface potentials. This explains the role of the ligand in the colloidally prepared catalysts in promoting superior performance in the hydrogenation of terminal and internal alkynes, and short-chain alkynols. In contrast, the greater accessibility of the active surface of the Pd-Pb alloy and the absence of polar groups are shown to be favorable in the conversion of alkynes containing long aliphatic chains and/or ketone groups. These findings provide detailed insights for the advanced design of supported nanostructured catalysts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Design of Molecular Hosts, Guests, and Their Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origins, definitions, tools, and principles of host-guest chemistry. Gives examples of chiral recognition in complexation, of partial transacylase mimics, of caviplexes, and of a synthetic molecular cell. (Author/RT)

  3. Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South Africa on the path towards universal health coverage. Mark Blecher, Anban Pillay, Walaiporn Patcharanarumol, Warisa Panichkriangkrai, Viroj Tangcharoensathien, Yot Teerawattananon, Supasit Pannarunothai, Jonatan Davén ...

  4. Greener Selective Cycloalkane Oxidations with Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Copper-5-(4-pyridyl)tetrazolate Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luísa; Nasani, Rajendar; Saha, Manideepa; Mobin, Shaikh; Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Pombeiro, Armando

    2015-10-21

    Microwave assisted synthesis of the Cu(I) compound [Cu(µ₄-4-ptz)]n [1, 4-ptz=5-(4-pyridyl)tetrazolate] has been performed by employing a relatively easy method and within a shorter period of time compared to its sister compounds. The syntheses of the Cu(II) compounds [Cu₃(µ₃-4-ptz)₄(µ₂-N₃)₂(DMF)₂]n∙(DMF)2n (2) and [Cu(µ₂-4-ptz)₂(H₂O)₂]n (3) using a similar method were reported previously by us. MOFs 1-3 revealed high catalytic activity toward oxidation of cyclic alkanes (cyclopentane, -hexane and -octane) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide, under very mild conditions (at room temperature), without any added solvent or additive. The most efficient system (2/H₂O₂) showed, for the oxidation of cyclohexane, a turnover number (TON) of 396 (TOF of 40 h(-1)), with an overall product yield (cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone) of 40% relative to the substrate. Moreover, the heterogeneous catalytic systems 1-3 allowed an easy catalyst recovery and reuse, at least for four consecutive cycles, maintaining ca. 90% of the initial high activity and concomitant high selectivity.

  5. Greener Selective Cycloalkane Oxidations with Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Copper-5-(4-pyridyltetrazolate Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Martins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microwave assisted synthesis of the Cu(I compound [Cu(µ4-4-ptz]n [1, 4-ptz = 5-(4-pyridyltetrazolate] has been performed by employing a relatively easy method and within a shorter period of time compared to its sister compounds. The syntheses of the Cu(II compounds [Cu3(µ3-4-ptz4(µ2-N32(DMF2]n∙(DMF2n (2 and [Cu(µ2-4-ptz2(H2O2]n (3 using a similar method were reported previously by us. MOFs 1-3 revealed high catalytic activity toward oxidation of cyclic alkanes (cyclopentane, -hexane and -octane with aqueous hydrogen peroxide, under very mild conditions (at room temperature, without any added solvent or additive. The most efficient system (2/H2O2 showed, for the oxidation of cyclohexane, a turnover number (TON of 396 (TOF of 40 h−1, with an overall product yield (cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone of 40% relative to the substrate. Moreover, the heterogeneous catalytic systems 1–3 allowed an easy catalyst recovery and reuse, at least for four consecutive cycles, maintaining ca. 90% of the initial high activity and concomitant high selectivity.

  6. Thermally stable single atom Pt/m-Al2O3 for selective hydrogenation and CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zailei

    2017-07-27

    Single-atom metal catalysts offer a promising way to utilize precious noble metal elements more effectively, provided that they are catalytically active and sufficiently stable. Herein, we report a synthetic strategy for Pt single-atom catalysts with outstanding stability in several reactions under demanding conditions. The Pt atoms are firmly anchored in the internal surface of mesoporous Al2O3, likely stabilized by coordinatively unsaturated pentahedral Al3+ centres. The catalyst keeps its structural integrity and excellent performance for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene after exposure to a reductive atmosphere at 200 °C for 24 h. Compared to commercial Pt nanoparticle catalyst on Al2O3 and control samples, this system exhibits significantly enhanced stability and performance for n-hexane hydro-reforming at 550 °C for 48 h, although agglomeration of Pt single-atoms into clusters is observed after reaction. In CO oxidation, the Pt single-atom identity was fully maintained after 60 cycles between 100 and 400 °C over a one-month period.

  7. Regenerable Subnanometer Pd Clusters on Zirconia for Highly Selective Hydrogenation of Biomass-Derived Succinic Acid in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The size of metal particles is an important factor to determine the performance of the supported metal catalysts. In this work, we report subnanometer Pd clusters supported on zirconia by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The presence of subnanometer Pd clusters on the zirconia surface was confirmed by two-dimensional Gaussian-function fits of the aberration-corrected high-angle annual dark-field images. These subnanometer Pd catalysts exhibit high catalytic performance for the hydrogenation of biomass-derived succinic acid to γ-butyrolactone in water and avoid the formation of overhydrogenated products, such as 1,4-butanediol and tetrahydrofuran. The catalyst with an ultra-low Pd loading of 0.2 wt. % demonstrated high selectivity (95% for γ-butyrolactone using water as a solvent at 473 K and 10 MPa. Moreover, it can be reused at least six times without the loss of catalytic activity, illustrating high performance of the small Pd clusters.

  8. Gated molecular recognition and dynamic discrimination of guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieth, Stephen; Bao, Xiaoguang; Wang, Bao-Yu; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2010-01-20

    Some highly efficient enzymes, e.g., acetylcholinesterase, use gating as a tool for controlling the rate by which substrates access their active site to direct product formation. Mastering gated molecular encapsulation could therefore be important for manipulating reactivity in artificial environments, albeit quantitative relationships that describe these processes are unknown. In this work, we examined the interdependence between the thermodynamics (DeltaG(o)) and the kinetics (DeltaG(in)(double dagger) and DeltaG(out)(double dagger)) of encapsulation as mediated by gated molecular basket 1. For a series of isosteric guests (2-6, 106-107 A(3)) entering/exiting 1, we found a linear correlation between the host-guest affinities (DeltaG(o)) and the free energies of the activation (DeltaG(in)(double dagger) and DeltaG(out)(double dagger)), which was fit to the following equation: DeltaG(double dagger) = rhoDeltaG(o) + delta. Markedly, the kinetics for the entrapment of smaller guest 7 (93 A(3)) and bigger guest 8 (121 A(3)) did not follow the free energy trends observed for 2-6. Thus, it appears that the kinetics of the gated encapsulation mediated by 1 is a function of the encapsulation's favorability (DeltaG(o)) and the guest's profile. When the size/shape of guests is kept constant, a linear dependence between the encapsulation potential (DeltaG(o)) and the rate of guests' entering/departing basket (DeltaG(in/out)(double dagger)) holds. However, when the potential (DeltaG(o)) is fixed, the basket discriminates guests on the basis of their size/shape via dynamic modulation of the binding site's access.

  9. Ce0.95Cr0.05O2 and Ce0.97Cu0.03O2: Active, selective and stable catalysts for selective hydrogen combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Rothenberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Ceria-based materials are promising solid oxygen reservoirs for propane oxidative dehydrogenation. The ceria lattice oxygen can selectively combust hydrogen from the dehydrogenation mixture at 550 °C. This shifts the dehydrogenation equilibrium to the desired products side, generates heat aiding the

  10. Ce0.95Cr0.05O2 and Ce0.97Cu0.03O2: active, selective and stable catalysts for selective hydrogen combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Jurriaan; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2009-08-07

    Ceria-based materials are promising solid "oxygen reservoirs" for propane oxidative dehydrogenation. The ceria lattice oxygen can selectively combust hydrogen from the dehydrogenation mixture at 550 degrees C. This shifts the dehydrogenation equilibrium to the desired products side, generates heat aiding the endothermic dehydrogenation, and simplifies product separation. The process is also safer, since it avoids mixing O(2) and H(2) at high temperatures. While ceria itself is unselective, its catalytic properties can be tuned by doping. We study the effects of dopant type, concentration and the crystallite size on the catalytic properties. Doping with Cr or Cu increases both the selectivity and activity of the ceria, albeit that propane combustion also increases linearly with the Cu-concentration. The Cu-doped catalysts give selectivities up to 95% and combust up to 8% of the hydrogen feed. The best results are obtained with Cr-doped ceria, with selectivities up to 98%, and combustion of up to 15% of the hydrogen feed. The Cr-doped catalysts are stable in the reductive gas feed, and no extra coke is formed when the catalyst is subjected to an extra 10 min in the dehydrogenation mixture, after the hydrogen combustion reaction has stopped. This robustness is essential for industrial dehydrogenation applications.

  11. Penerapan Aplikasi Web Di Hotel Arinda Guest House Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Mubarok

    2017-09-01

    Abstract Hotel was a thriving industry very fast with the advent of the information technology. One factor that can provide comfort is the existence of the information rapid to a reservation hotel. Several problems that ordinarily encountered hotel management and customers as it tough for rapid information, do check in and the payment of requiring guests come to the hotel, include families in village records the guest log and make a report manually.In writing thesis this, writer build a application of hotel by adopting information technology. The model used to the development of software is the method waterfall, which begins with analysis needs adapted to systems are go at the hotel arinda guest house, design system and software, coding, testing, and implementation.So that this research produce information system a reservation hotel web-based. Of interface ease of use user and showing functionality that can be used to at the check in , the hotel , faster information and save time prospective guest on do reservations , efficient in recording the guest log and reports.   Keywords: Website, Aplication, Hotel Arinda Guest House, checked in, Waterfall.

  12. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  13. Encapsulated Guests in the Smallest Spaces: Shrinking Guests by Compression and Investigations under Solvent-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberhauer, Gebhard; Woitschetzki, Sascha; Füten, Christof

    2015-08-21

    Noncovalent interactions play a pivotal role in a variety of biological and chemical processes. The experimental determination and quantum chemical calculations of the forces driving these interactions are of utmost importance. Of special interest are interactions of molecules in small spaces which show phenomena different from conventional behavior in solution. An extension is the encapsulation of guests in smallest spaces: The guests are too large to be included under standard conditions and hence must be forced to intrude into the cavity. Here, we show the design of such a host-guest system which allows to directly compare the measured thermodynamic values to gas-phase quantum chemical calculations. Structural investigation of the complexes reveals that the encapsulation process causes not only an extension of the hollow space of the host but also a shrinking of the included guest by compression.

  14. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  15. Direct observation of the substitution effects on the hydrogen bridge dynamics in selected Schiff bases—A comparative molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J.; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Koll, Aleksander; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    We have studied substituent effects on the properties of the intramolecular hydrogen bond of some ortho-hydroxy Schiff bases using density functional theory (DFT) based first-principle molecular dynamics (FPMD) and path integral molecular dynamics. The studied compounds possess a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond (r(OṡṡṡN) ≤ 2.6 Å), which can be tuned by substitution to either (i) enhance the basicity of the acceptor moiety by induction effects or (ii) decrease the hydrogen bond length through steric repulsion. DFT calculations and FPMD were employed to investigate structural and dynamical properties of the selected molecules, while quantum effects on the structural properties were assessed using path integral FPMD. The simulations were performed in vacuo and in the solid state to study the influence of the environment on the hydrogen bond and spectroscopic properties. We give computational support to the suggestion that induction effects are less effective to tune the intramolecular hydrogen bond properties of the discussed ortho-hydroxy Schiff bases than the steric or the environmental effects.

  16. Direct observation of the substitution effects on the hydrogen bridge dynamics in selected Schiff bases--a comparative molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Koll, Aleksander; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2011-01-21

    We have studied substituent effects on the properties of the intramolecular hydrogen bond of some ortho-hydroxy Schiff bases using density functional theory (DFT) based first-principle molecular dynamics (FPMD) and path integral molecular dynamics. The studied compounds possess a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond (r((O⋅⋅⋅N)) ≤ 2.6 Å), which can be tuned by substitution to either (i) enhance the basicity of the acceptor moiety by induction effects or (ii) decrease the hydrogen bond length through steric repulsion. DFT calculations and FPMD were employed to investigate structural and dynamical properties of the selected molecules, while quantum effects on the structural properties were assessed using path integral FPMD. The simulations were performed in vacuo and in the solid state to study the influence of the environment on the hydrogen bond and spectroscopic properties. We give computational support to the suggestion that induction effects are less effective to tune the intramolecular hydrogen bond properties of the discussed ortho-hydroxy Schiff bases than the steric or the environmental effects.

  17. Probing Conformational Changes of Ubiquitin by Host-Guest Chemistry Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Wha; Heo, Sung Woo; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Ko, Jae Yoon; Kim, Hyungjun; Kim, Hugh I.

    2013-01-01

    We report mechanistic studies of structural changes of ubiquitin (Ub) by host-guest chemistry with cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with circular dichroism spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. CB[6] binds selectively to lysine (Lys) residues of proteins. Low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protein-CB[6] complex reveals CB[6] binding sites. We previously reported ( Anal. Chem. 2011, 83, 7916-7923) shifts in major charge states along with Ub-CB[6] complexes in the ESI-MS spectrum with addition of CB[6] to Ub from water. We also reported that CB[6] is present only at Lys6 or Lys11 in high charge state (+13) complex. In this study, we provide additional information to explain unique conformational change mechanisms of Ub by host-guest chemistry with CB[6] compared with solvent-driven conformational change of Ub. Additional CID study reveals that CB[6] is bound only to Lys48 and Lys63 in low charge state (+7) complex. MD simulation studies reveal that the high charge state complexes are attributed to the CB[6] bound to Lys11. The complexation prohibits salt bridge formation between Lys11 and Glu34 and induces conformational change of Ub. This results in formation of high charge state complexes in the gas phase. Then, by utilizing stronger host-guest chemistry of CB[6] with pentamethylenediamine, refolding of Ub via detaching CB[6] from the protein is performed. Overall, this study gives an insight into the mechanism of denatured Ub ion formation via host-guest interactions with CB[6]. Furthermore, this provides a direction for designing function-controllable supramolecular system comprising proteins and synthetic host molecules.

  18. WFIRST: Science from the Guest Investigator and Parallel Observation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Nataf, David; Furlanetto, Steve; Milam, Stephanie; Robertson, Brant; Williams, Ben; Teplitz, Harry; Moustakas, Leonidas; Geha, Marla; Gilbert, Karoline; Dickinson, Mark; Scolnic, Daniel; Ravindranath, Swara; Strolger, Louis; Peek, Joshua; Marc Postman

    2018-01-01

    The Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission will provide an extremely rich archival dataset that will enable a broad range of scientific investigations beyond the initial objectives of the proposed key survey programs. The scientific impact of WFIRST will thus be significantly expanded by a robust Guest Investigator (GI) archival research program. We will present examples of GI research opportunities ranging from studies of the properties of a variety of Solar System objects, surveys of the outer Milky Way halo, comprehensive studies of cluster galaxies, to unique and new constraints on the epoch of cosmic re-ionization and the assembly of galaxies in the early universe.WFIRST will also support the acquisition of deep wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopic data obtained in parallel during campaigns with the coronagraphic instrument (CGI). These parallel wide-field imager (WFI) datasets can provide deep imaging data covering several square degrees at no impact to the scheduling of the CGI program. A competitively selected program of well-designed parallel WFI observation programs will, like the GI science above, maximize the overall scientific impact of WFIRST. We will give two examples of parallel observations that could be conducted during a proposed CGI program centered on a dozen nearby stars.

  19. Recyclable Earth-Abundant Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Selective Transfer Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to Produce γ-Valerolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Ravikumar R; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) derived from earth-abundant metal(0) carbonyls catalyze conversion of bio-derived levulinic acid into γ-valerolactone in up to 93% isolated yield. This sustainable and green route uses non-precious metal catalysts and can be performed in aqueous or ethanol solution without using hydrogen gas as the hydrogen source. Generation of metal NPs using microwave irradiation greatly enhances the rate of the conversion, enables the use of ethanol as both solvent and hydrogen source without forming the undesired ethyl levulinate, and affords recyclable polymer-stabilized NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Highly sensitive and selective determination of hydrogen sulfide by resonance light scattering technique based on silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yangfang; Chen, Shu; Long, Yunfei

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a green approach to prepare DNA-templated silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) from the direct reaction between Ag + and ascorbic acid in the presence of DNA and sodium hydroxide. The Ag-NPs showed strong resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity property. Then, the interaction between hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and Ag-NPs was studied by measuring their RLS spectra. The results showed that there is a strong interaction between Ag-NPs and H 2 S, which resulted in a decrease in the size of Ag-NPs and a decrease in the RLS intensity of the Ag-NPs solution at the wavelength of 467 nm. The results demonstrated that the RLS technique offers a sensitive and simple tool for investigating the interaction between Ag-NPs and H 2 S, which can be applied to detect H 2 S with high sensitivity and selectivity without complex readout equipment. The linear range for H 2 S determination was found to be the range from 5.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -7  mol L -1 , and the detection limit (3σ/k) was 2.8 × 10 -9  mol L -1 . Moreover, the proposed method was applied for the determination of H 2 S in natural water samples with satisfactory results. Graphical abstract The application of Ag-NPs in H 2 S detection.

  1. Selective Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid with Well-Defined Complexes of Ruthenium and Phosphorus-Nitrogen PN3-Pincer Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yupeng

    2016-04-22

    An unsymmetrically protonated PN3-pincer complex in which ruthenium is coordinated by one nitrogen and two phosphorus atoms was employed for the selective generation of hydrogen from formic acid. Mechanistic studies suggest that the imine arm participates in the formic acid activation/deprotonation step. A long life time of 150 h with a turnover number over 1 million was achieved. Grabbing hold: A PN3-pincer complex was employed for the selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. Mechanistic studies suggest the imine arm participates in the formic acid activation/deprotonation step. A long life time of 150 h with a turnover number over 1 million was achieved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  3. Guest authors in an Iranian journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-04-01

    Although most biomedical journals have adopted the authorship criteria established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) in 1985, little is known about the extent Iranian researchers are familiar with these criteria. The study seeks to evaluate the number of authors fulfilling ICMJE authorship criteria (considering the names mentioned in the byline of 12 issues of the Archives of Iranian Medicine (AIM) journal), and to determine the type of contribution made by each author. The fulfilment of authorship criteria and contribution percentage of each researcher were evaluated according to their position in the bylines of 12 issues of the Archives of Iranian Medicine (AIM) journal published from January 2005 to October 2007. We asked corresponding authors to answer our questionnaire which was designed to assess authorship criteria and contribution. A total of 576 researchers' names were in the studied article bylines. The ratio of authors to articles was 3.48 in 2005, 4.06 in 2006, and 5.59 in 2007. Sixty three out of 128 corresponding authors (49.21%) responded to our questionnaire, so we evaluated 296 researchers' names, from which 186 authors (62.83%) met the authorship criteria; 110 authors (37.17%) were identified as guest authors, 97 of which deserved to be mentioned in the acknowledgement section. The major criteria used for authors order was their participation in research projects in addition to article writing, mostly determined by the corresponding author. Two authors (0.67%) whose names were not mentioned in the articles were considered to be ghost writers as the articles were based on the results of their thesis. It is essential to make Iranian researchers familiar with ICMJE authorship criteria and to encourage applying the criteria in scientific writing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  5. Neutron diffraction reveals hydrogen bonds critical for cGMP-selective activation: insights for cGMP-dependent protein kinase agonist design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gilbert Y; Gerlits, Oksana O; Blakeley, Matthew P; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Kim, Choel

    2014-11-04

    High selectivity of cyclic-nucleotide binding (CNB) domains for cAMP and cGMP are required for segregating signaling pathways; however, the mechanism of selectivity remains unclear. To investigate the mechanism of high selectivity in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), we determined a room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron (XN) structure of PKG Iβ CNB-B, a domain 200-fold selective for cGMP over cAMP, bound to cGMP (2.2 Å), and a low-temperature X-ray structure of CNB-B with cAMP (1.3 Å). The XN structure directly describes the hydrogen bonding interactions that modulate high selectivity for cGMP, while the structure with cAMP reveals that all these contacts are disrupted, explaining its low affinity for cAMP.

  6. Study of the selective abstration reaction of the hydrogen atom in the radiolysis and photolysis of alkane mixture at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, S.M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The occurence of the selective abstraction reaction of the solute hydrogen atom by hydrogen atom produced during radiolysis or photolysis of the systems such as neopentane/cyclo-hexane/HI, neopentane/2,3 dimethylbutane, n-pentane/HI/cyclo-hexane and cyclo-hexane/HI/n-pentane, at 77 K is studied. Experiments have been undertaken on the kinetics nature of the active species, the H atom, during radiolysis and photolysis of the neopentane/cyclo-hexane/HI system at 77 K, presenting competitive reactions. Studies have also been made on the occurrence of the selective abstraction reaction in inverted systems, in which the concentrations of the components of a system are so much altered that the solute becomes the solvent and vice-versa, in the other system. By means of photolysis at 77 K, it has been observed that for the two systems constitued by the cyclo-hexane and n-pentane the selective abstraction reaction occurs. However, for radiolysis of that same two systems it has been observed that only the hydrogen atom abstraction reaction corresponding to the solvent occurs. (Author) [pt

  7. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  8. Selective hydrogenation of acetylene on SiO{sub 2} supported Ni-In bimetallic catalysts: Promotional effect of In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanjun; Chen, Jixiang, E-mail: jxchen@tju.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A suitable Ni/In ratio remarkably enhanced the acetylene conversion, the selectivity to ethylene and the catalyst stability. Display Omitted - Highlights: • There was a promotional effect of In on the performance of Ni/SiO{sub 2}. • A suitable Ni/In ratio was required for good performance of Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2}. • Both geometrical and electronic effects of In contributed to good performance. • Ni/SiO{sub 2} deactivation is mainly owing to phase change from Ni to nickel carbide. • The carbonaceous deposit was the main reason for Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2} deactivation. - Abstract: Ni/SiO{sub 2} and the bimetallic Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Ni/In ratios were tested for the selective hydrogenation of acetylene, and their physicochemical properties before and after the reaction were characterized by means of N{sub 2}-sorption, H{sub 2}-TPR, XRD, TEM, XPS, H{sub 2} chemisorption, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}-TPD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, FT-IR of adsorbed pyridine, and TG/DTA and Raman. A promotional effect of In on the performance of Ni/SiO{sub 2} was found, and Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2} with a suitable Ni/In ratio gave much higher acetylene conversion, ethylene selectivity and catalyst stability than Ni/SiO{sub 2}. This is ascribed to the geometrical isolation of the reactive Ni atoms with the inert In ones and the charge transfer from the In atoms to Ni ones, both of which are favorable for reducing the adsorption strength of ethylene and restraining the C−C hydrogenolysis and the polymerizations of acetylene and the intermediate compounds. On the whole, Ni{sub 6}In/SiO{sub 2} and Ni{sub 10}In/SiO{sub 2} had better performance. Nevertheless, with increasing the In content, the selectivity to the C4+ hydrocarbons tended to increase due to the enhanced catalyst acidity because of the charge transfer from the In atoms to Ni ones. As the Lewis acid ones, the In sites could promote the polymerization. The catalyst deactivation was also analyzed

  9. Total Quality Management Implementation and Guest Satisfaction in Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Knežević

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management (TQM has become a modern system of constant improvement of the quality of all company activities. The purpose of this study is to measure the expectations and satisfaction of the guests concerning the attribute quality of the hotel product. Furthermore obtained results were compared in such a way as to analyse particularly the reviews of hotels which have implemented TQM and have the ISO 9001 certificates with reviews from hotels which have not implemented TQM and do not have the ISO 9001 certificates. The conducted analysis included 55 hotels in Serbia belonging to the 4- and 5-star categories, i.e. 1308 guests who have stayed in them. The results show that between the observed groups of guests there are fewer differences in expectations than in perception, and that generally speaking guests who have stayed in the hotels that have implemented TQM are more satisfied. The biggest difference concerning the guest satisfaction with the quality of service in the observed hotels is noticeable in relation to the employees and the value-for-money.

  10. Preparation and guest-uptake protocol for a porous complex useful for 'crystal-free' crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuma, Yasuhide; Yoshioka, Shota; Ariyoshi, Junko; Arai, Tatsuhiko; Fujita, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    We recently reported a new method for single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCD) analysis that does not require the crystallization of the target compound. In this 'crystal-free' crystallography, a tiny crystal of a porous complex is soaked in the solution of the target guest. The guest molecules are absorbed and oriented in the crystal pores and can be analyzed by X-ray diffraction. We describe here a detailed synthetic protocol for the preparation of uniform single crystals of the porous host complex and for the subsequent guest uptake. The protocol describes our most versatile porous complex, which is prepared from commercially available ZnI2 and 2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine. The host complex has large pores with a cross-section of 8 × 5 Å(2). Single crystals of the complex are grown from layered solutions of the two components. The pores of the as-synthesized complex are filled with nitrobenzene, which is replaced with the inert solvent cyclohexane. This solvent exchange is essential for the rapid and effective inclusion of target compounds. The most crucial and delicate step is the selection of high-quality single crystals from the mixture of crystals of various shapes and sizes. We suggest using the facial indices of the single crystals as a criterion for crystal selection. Single-crystal samples for X-ray analysis can be prepared by immersing the selected crystals in a cyclohexane/dichloromethane solution of target compound. After a very slow evaporation of the solvent, typically over 2 d, the final crystal can be picked and directly subjected to SCD analysis. The protocol can be completed within ∼16 d.

  11. ;Host-guest; interactions in Captisol®/Coumestrol inclusion complex: UV-vis, FTIR-ATR and Raman studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Valentina; Stancanelli, Rosanna; Acri, Giuseppe; Crupi, Vincenza; Paladini, Giuseppe; Testagrossa, Barbara; Tommasini, Silvana; Ventura, Cinzia Anna; Majolino, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    The ability of Captisol® (sulphobutylether-β-cyclodextrin, SBE-β-CD), to form inclusion complexes, both in solution and in the solid state, has been tested in order to improve some unfavorable chemical-physical characteristics, such as poor solubility in water, of a bioflavonoid, Coumestrol (Coum), well known for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal and anti-viral activity. In pure water, a phase-solubility study was carried out to evaluate the enhancement of the solubility of Coum and, therefore, the occurred complexation with the macrocycle. The stoichiometry and the stability constant of the SBE-β-CD/Coum complex were calculated with the phase solubility method and through the Job's plot. After that, the solid SBE-β-CD/Coum complex was prepared utilizing a kneading method. The spectral changes induced by complexation on characteristic vibrational band of Coum were complementary investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance geometry (FTIR-ATR) and Raman spectroscopy, putting into evidence the guest chemical groups involved in the "host-guest" interactions responsible of the formation and stabilization of the complex. Particular attention was paid to the Cdbnd O and Osbnd H stretching vibrations, whose temperature-evolution respectively furnished the enthalpy changes associated to the binding of host and guest in solid phase and to the reorganization of the hydrogen bond scheme upon complexation. From the whole set of results, an inclusion geometry is also proposed.

  12. Selective detection of acetone and hydrogen sulfide for the diagnosis of diabetes and halitosis using SnO(2) nanofibers functionalized with reduced graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Jin; Jang, Bong-Hoon; Lee, Seo-Jin; Min, Byoung Koun; Rothschild, Avner; Kim, Il-Doo

    2014-02-26

    Sensitive detection of acetone and hydrogen sulfide levels in exhaled human breath, serving as breath markers for some diseases such as diabetes and halitosis, may offer useful information for early diagnosis of these diseases. Exhaled breath analyzers using semiconductor metal oxide (SMO) gas sensors have attracted much attention because they offer low cost fabrication, miniaturization, and integration into portable devices for noninvasive medical diagnosis. However, SMO gas sensors often display cross sensitivity to interfering species. Therefore, selective real-time detection of specific disease markers is a major challenge that must be overcome to ensure reliable breath analysis. In this work, we report on highly sensitive and selective acetone and hydrogen sulfide detection achieved by sensitizing electrospun SnO2 nanofibers with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets. SnO2 nanofibers mixed with a small amount (0.01 wt %) of RGO nanosheets exhibited sensitive response to hydrogen sulfide (Rair/Rgas = 34 at 5 ppm) at 200 °C, whereas sensitive acetone detection (Rair/Rgas = 10 at 5 ppm) was achieved by increasing the RGO loading to 5 wt % and raising the operation temperature to 350 °C. The detection limit of these sensors is predicted to be as low as 1 ppm for hydrogen sulfide and 100 ppb for acetone, respectively. These concentrations are much lower than in the exhaled breath of healthy people. This demonstrates that optimization of the RGO loading and the operation temperature of RGO-SnO2 nanocomposite gas sensors enables highly sensitive and selective detection of breath markers for the diagnosis of diabetes and halitosis.

  13. Terpsichorean Architecture: Guest Editor’s Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Mitchell

    2011-09-01

    light to form and how we hear ourselves live in that form.’ This special issue, guest edited by Tony Mitchell, University of Technology Sydney, contains papers that discuss a wide range of different modes and forms of music and music writing in all fields, and in many parts of the world, from a perspective of history, performance, and architecture (including ‘natural’ architectural forms.

  14. Guest editorial - Networked collaboration, sharing and response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Skundberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available  This issue of Seminar.net contains three articles that were written in connection with a Norwegian e-learning conference titled “Networked collaboration, sharing and response”. The conference was held in Mars 2008 in Trondheim, and the presentations from the conference is available (in norwegian language at http://www.nvu.no. Networked collaboration was chosen as a theme because collaboration is important to achieve learning, according to the social-constructivistic pedagogy that has a strong standing in Norway, but how should this occur on the net? Sharing of content, as in digital learning resources, is a phenomenon with increasing popularity as described in the OECD-report “Giving Knowledge for Free”. But to achieve reuse of content, not only publishing it, it is important with a networked community where the plethora of information can be sorted with relevance to specific topics. Response is about guiding, coaching and tutoring. In what ways may resources and tools be used to move in the direction of solving Bloom’s two sigma problem/challenge? The first article, by Morten Flate Paulsen, shows how cooperative learning can be implemented successfully so that students have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The second article, by Carl F. Dons, shows how student teachers can be prepared to deal with pupils who have a wide range of experiences of the digital world. The third and last article, by Kristin Dale, is sharing experiences with multiple choice-tests to give midterm responses to students. In addition, this issue has a commentary article by Rune Krumsvik discussing the need to develop new practices for teachers and students on the background of the digital developments. The conference and articles covers three big themes. It may be difficult to find more important issues, apart from finding money and time to support its development. Olav Skundberg, guest editorAssociate professor

  15. Importance of satisfaction and guests experience in hotel business organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Srđan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotel companies which operate in today's competitive environment must constantly work on improving their products and services, at the request of their guests. Customer satisfaction is the key to retaining existing and attracting new guests. To achieve this goal, managers in the hotel organizations have become aware of the fact that the quality of staying in hotel represent unique experience for tourists. Lot of papers are dealing with the exploration of this topic, it only proves its importance nowadays. However, insufficient attention is paid to the simultaneous study of experience of guests and their satisfaction through the offered models (indexes that are created for this purpose. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of these issues and identify their potential symbiosis.

  16. Controlling the particle size of interpolymer complexes through host-guest interaction for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Pang, Yan; Wu, Jieli; Su, Yue; Liu, Jinyao; Wang, Ruibin; Zhu, Bangshang; Yao, Yefeng; Yan, Deyue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Chen, Qun

    2010-06-01

    A new method to adjust the particle size of interpolymer complexes has been developed by introduction of host-guest interaction into the dilute aqueous solution of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Because of the cooperative hydrogen-bonding interaction, PAA can form the interpolymer complexes with PEG. Putting beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) into dilute PAA/PEG aqueous solution, the competition between host-guest and hydrogen-bonding interactions happens. The beta-CD/PAA/PEG ternary systems have been well characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), diffusion NMR spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the hydrophobic cavity of beta-CD is threaded by linear polymers so that the hydrophilicity of PAA/PEG interpolymer complexes is improved greatly. Adjusting the amounts of beta-CD, the particle size of the interpolymer complexes can be readily controlled. The low cytotoxicity of various beta-CD/PAA/PEG ternary complexes has been confirmed using the MTT assay in COS-7 cell line. Doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug, has been encapsulated into the beta-CD/PAA/PEG ternary complexes. The DOX-loaded beta-CD/PAA/PEG ternary complexes have been analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), flow cytometry analysis, and the MTT assay against human cervical carcinoma cell (Hela). The results indicate that beta-CD/PAA/PEG ternary complexes with controlled particle size could be used as safe and promising drug carriers.

  17. Effects of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, David A; Siegford, Janice M; Snider, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Zoological institutions develop human-animal interaction opportunities for visitors to advance missions of conservation, education, and recreation; however, the animal welfare implications largely have yet to be evaluated. This behavioral study was the first to quantify impacts of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior and welfare, by documenting giraffe time budgets that included both normal and stereotypic behaviors. Thirty giraffes from nine zoos (six zoos with varying guest feeding programs and three without) were observed using both instantaneous scan sampling and continuous behavioral sampling techniques. All data were collected during summer 2012 and analyzed using linear mixed models. The degree of individual giraffe participation in guest feeding programs was positively associated with increased time spent idle and marginally associated with reduced time spent ruminating. Time spent participating in guest feeding programs had no effect on performance of stereotypic behaviors. When time spent eating routine diets was combined with time spent participating in guest feeding programs, individuals that spent more time engaged in total feeding behaviors tended to perform less oral stereotypic behavior such as object-licking and tongue-rolling. By extending foraging time and complexity, guest feeding programs have the potential to act as environmental enrichment and alleviate unfulfilled foraging motivations that may underlie oral stereotypic behaviors observed in many captive giraffes. However, management strategies may need to be adjusted to mitigate idleness and other program consequences. Further studies, especially pre-and-post-program implementation comparisons, are needed to better understand the influence of human-animal interactions on zoo animal behavior and welfare. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Guest Controlled Nonmonotonic Deep Cavity Cavitand Assembly State Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Du; Barnett, J Wesley; Gibb, Bruce C; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2017-11-30

    Octa-acid (OA) and tetra-endo-methyl octa-acid (TEMOA) are water-soluble, deep-cavity cavitands with nanometer-sized nonpolar pockets that readily bind complementary guests, such as n-alkanes. Experimentally, OA exhibits a progression of 1:1 to 2:2 to 2:1 host/guest complexes (X:Y where X is the number of hosts and Y is the number of guests) with increasing alkane chain length from methane to tetradecane. Differing from OA only by the addition of four methyl groups ringing the portal of the pocket, TEMOA exhibits a nonmonotonic progression of assembly states from 1:1 to 2:2 to 1:1 to 2:1 with increasing guest length. Here we present a systematic molecular simulation study to parse the molecular and thermodynamic determinants that distinguish the succession of assembly stoichiometries observed for these similar hosts. Potentials of mean force between hosts and guests, determined via umbrella sampling, are used to characterize association free energies. These free energies are subsequently used in a reaction network model to predict the equilibrium distributions of assemblies. Our models accurately reproduce the experimentally observed trends, showing that TEMOA's endo-methyl units constrict the opening of the binding pocket, limiting the conformations available to bound guests and disrupting the balance between monomeric complexes and dimeric capsules. The success of our simulations demonstrate their utility at interpreting the impact of even simple chemical modifications on supramolecular assembly and highlight their potential to aid bottom-up design.

  19. Boronic Acid Moiety as Functional Defect in UiO-66 and Its Effect on Hydrogen Uptake Capacity and Selective CO2 Adsorption: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkartal, Mustafa; Sen, Unal

    2018-01-10

    Herein, we use linker fragmentation approach to introduce boronic acid moieties as functional defects into Zr-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, UiO-66). Our findings show that the amount of permanently incorporated boronic acid containing ligand is directly dependent on the synthesis method. The accessible boronic acid moieties in the pore surfaces significantly improve the hydrogen uptake values, which are 3.10 and 3.44 wt % at 21 bar, 77 K for dimethylformamide (DMF)/H 2 O and DMF/HCI synthesis methods, respectively. Also, CO 2 selectivity of the resulting MOFs over N 2 and CH 4 significantly increases due to the quadrupolar interaction between active surfaces and CO 2 molecules. To the best of our knowledge, both hydrogen storage and selectivity of CO 2 for UiO-66 are the highest reported values in the literature to date. Furthermore, another striking result that emerged from the high-pressure hydrogen uptake isotherms is the direct correlation between the defects and hysteric adsorption behavior, which may result in the shift from rigidity to flexibility of the framework due to the uncoordinated sites.

  20. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142 m2 g−1 were demonstrated to be an excellent supports for loading small-size Pt nanoparticles. Superior furfural hydrogenation activity in water with complete conversion of furfural and high selectivity of furfuryl alcohol (>99%) was observed for g-C3N4 nanosheets supported Pt catalysts. The large specific surface area, uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and the stronger furfural adsorption ability of nanosheets contributed to the considerable catalytic performance. The reusability tests showed that the novel Pt catalyst could maintain high activity and stability in the furfural hydrogenation reaction. PMID:27328834

  1. The development of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a highly selective probe for the detection and quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Rudnicki-Velasquez, Paweł Błażej; Krzymiński, Karol; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Niedziałkowski, Paweł; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2017-01-01

    1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF) has been developed as a selective probe for the detection and quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide in samples containing different reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS). DPBF is a fluorescent probe which, for almost 20 years, was believed to react in a highly specific manner toward some reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen and hydroxy, alkyloxy or alkylperoxy radicals. Under the action of these individuals DPBF has been rapidly transformed to 1,2-dibenzoylbenzene (DBB). In order to check if DPBF can act as a unique indicator of the total amount of different RNOS, as well as oxidative stress caused by an overproduction of these individuals, a series of experiments was carried out, in which DPBF reacted with peroxynitrite anion, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorite anion, and anions commonly present under biological conditions, namely nitrite and nitrate. In all cases, except for hydrogen peroxide, the product of the reaction is DBB. Only under the action of H 2 O 2 9-hydroxyanthracen-10(9H)-one (oxanthrone) is formed. This product has been identified with the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). A linear relationship was found between a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of DPBF and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of concentrations of 0.196-3.941 mM. DPBF responds to hydrogen peroxide in a very specific way with the limits of detection and quantitation of 88 and 122.8 μM, respectively. The kinetics of the reaction between DBBF and H 2 O 2 was also studied.

  2. Predicting Complexation Thermodynamic Parameters of β-Cyclodextrin with Chiral Guests by Using Swarm Intelligence and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckhana Lawtrakul

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO and Support Vector Machines (SVMs approaches are used for predicting the thermodynamic parameters for the 1:1 inclusion complexation of chiral guests with β-cyclodextrin. A PSO is adopted for descriptor selection in the quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR of a dataset of 74 chiral guests due to its simplicity, speed, and consistency. The modified PSO is then combined with SVMs for its good approximating properties, to generate a QSPR model with the selected features. Linear, polynomial, and Gaussian radial basis functions are used as kernels in SVMs. All models have demonstrated an impressive performance with R2 higher than 0.8.

  3. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  4. Development of nickel membranes deposited on ceramic materials by electroless plating: studies of the hydrogen perm-selectivity properties at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, J.

    2008-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to synthesize nickel based membranes by electroless plating on materials such as alumina-α, alumina-γ and zirconia with various textures and to determine their hydrogen perm-selectivity at high temperatures. The synthesis of metal films of high purity (≥ 99% mass Ni) resulting from the choice of hydrazine with its dual role of reducing and complexing agent has revealed that the diameter of pores on the surface support has an impact on the quality of metal adherence. The various contributions of hydrogen transport through these composite membranes at low temperatures (Knudsen and surface diffusion) and at high temperatures (Knudsen and activated diffusion) was established. At its implementation in a membrane reactor (reaction of propane dehydrogenation), the layer of nickel showed a very good resistance to coking. (author)

  5. Tuning the Selectivity of Catalytic Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation over Iridium/Cerium Oxide Catalysts with a Strong Metal-Support Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Xu, Yao; Chen, Yifu; Li, Weizhen; Lin, Lili; Li, Mengzhu; Deng, Yuchen; Wang, Xiaoping; Ge, Binghui; Yang, Ce; Yao, Siyu; Xie, Jinglin; Li, Yongwang; Liu, Xi; Ma, Ding

    2017-08-28

    A one-step ligand-free method based on an adsorption-precipitation process was developed to fabricate iridium/cerium oxide (Ir/CeO 2 ) nanocatalysts. Ir species demonstrated a strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) with the CeO 2 substrate. The chemical state of Ir could be finely tuned by altering the loading of the metal. In the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) hydrogenation reaction it was shown that the chemical state of Ir species-induced by a SMSI-has a major impact on the reaction selectivity. Direct evidence is provided indicating that a single-site catalyst is not a prerequisite for inhibition of methanation and sole production of carbon monoxide (CO) in CO 2 hydrogenation. Instead, modulation of the chemical state of metal species by a strong metal-support interaction is more important for regulation of the observed selectivity (metallic Ir particles select for methane while partially oxidized Ir species select for CO production). The study provides insight into heterogeneous catalysts at nano, sub-nano, and atomic scales. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Host-guest chemistry of mesoporous silicas: precise design of location, density and orientation of molecular guests in mesopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohmiya, Minoru; Saito, Kanji; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Mesoporous solids, which were prepared from inorganic-surfactant mesostructured materials, have been investigated due to their very large surface area and high porosity, pore size uniformity and variation, periodic pore arrangement and possible pore surface modification. Morphosyntheses from macroscopic morphologies such as bulk monolith and films, to nanoscopic ones, nanoparticles and their stable suspension, make mesoporous materials more attractive for applications and detailed characterization. This class of materials has been studied for such applications as adsorbents and catalysts, and later on, for optical, electronic, environmental and bio-related ones. This review summarizes the studies on the chemistry of mesoporous silica and functional guest species (host-guest chemistry) to highlight the present status and future applications of the host-guest hybrids.

  7. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with

  8. Highly Selective Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to γ-Valerolactone Over Ru/ZrO2 Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filiz, B.C.; Gnanakumar, E.S.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Gengler, R.; Rudolf, P.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    We studied the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid over zirconia supported ruthenium catalysts. Four different Ru/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by different pre-treatments and using different zirconium supports (ZrOx(OH)4−2x and ZrO2). Although the final compositions of the catalysts are the

  9. Highly Selective Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to gamma-Valerolactone Over Ru/ZrO2 Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filiz, Bilge Coskuner; Gnanakumar, Edwin S.; Martinez-Arias, Arturo; Gengler, Regis; Rudolf, Petra; Rothenberg, Gadi; Shiju, N. Raveendran

    We studied the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid over zirconia supported ruthenium catalysts. Four different Ru/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by different pre-treatments and using different zirconium supports (ZrOx(OH)(4-2x) and ZrO2). Although the final compositions of the catalysts are the

  10. The Role of the Hydrogen Source on the Selective Production of γ-Valerolactone and 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran from Levulinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón, Iker; Gandarias, Inaki; Al-Shaal, Mohammad G; Mevissen, Christian; Arias, Pedro L; Palkovits, Regina

    2016-09-08

    A mechanistic study of the hydrogenation reaction of levulinic acid (LA) to 2-methyltetrahydrofuyran (MTHF) was performed using three different solvents under reactive H2 and inert N2 atmospheres. Under the applied reaction conditions, catalytic transfer hydrogenation and hydrogenation with molecular H2 were effective at producing high yields of γ-valerolactone. However, the conversion of this stable intermediate to MTHF required the combination of both hydrogen sources (the solvent and the H2 atmosphere) to achieve good yields. The reaction system with 2-propanol as solvent and Ni-Cu/Al2 O3 as catalyst allowed full conversion of LA and a MTHF yield of 80 % after 20 h reaction time at 250 °C and 40 bar of H2 (at room temperature). The system showed the same catalytic activity at LA feed concentrations of 5 and up to 30 wt%, and also when high acetone concentration at the beginning of the reaction were added, which confirmed the potential industrial applications of this solvent/catalyst system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  12. Quality of customer service: perceptions from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel L. Frater

    2007-01-01

    With data collected from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica, West Indies, the purposes of this study were to: (1) delineate unique dimensions of customer service perceptions among guests and (2) report the finding of a study that measured guests' perceptions of the quality of customer service in all-inclusive resorts. The study asked the following research...

  13. Guest-host chemistry with dendrimers—binding of carboxylates in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes Fabritius; Hansen, Jon Stefan

    2015-01-01

    with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2...

  14. Supramolecular Chemistry: Induced Circular Dichroism to Study Host-Guest Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicuti, Francisco; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Maria Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students obtain information about the structure of a host-guest complex from the interpretation of circular dichroism measurements. The value and sign of the induced circular dichroism (ICD) on an achiral chromophore guest when it complexes with a cyclodextrin can be related to the guest penetration and its…

  15. Graphene-supported Pd catalyst for highly selective hydrogenation of resorcinol to 1, 3-cyclohexanedione through giant π-conjugate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zuojun; Pan, Ruofei; Hou, Yaxin; Yang, Yao; Liu, Yingxin

    2015-01-01

    The selective hydrogenation of resorcinol (RES) to 1, 3-cyclohexanedione (1,3-CHD) without the addition of alkali is a big challenge. In this article, a novel reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supported Pd catalyst was prepared through co-reduction method, over which we obtained 99.9% of resorcinol conversion and 94.2% of the ever-reported highest 1,3-cyclohexanedione selectivity at 25 °C in only CH2Cl2 solvent. The excellent selectivity was contributed to the strong π-π and p-π interactions between the graphene nanosheet and the benzene ring as well as hydroxyl in RES molecule. The followed adsorption experiment and Raman analysis also showed the existence of aromatic graphite structures in rGO, which exhibited stronger adsorption towards RES than towards 1,3-CHD. PMID:26494123

  16. Graphene-supported Pd catalyst for highly selective hydrogenation of resorcinol to 1, 3-cyclohexanedione through giant π-conjugate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zuojun; Pan, Ruofei; Hou, Yaxin; Yang, Yao; Liu, Yingxin

    2015-10-01

    The selective hydrogenation of resorcinol (RES) to 1, 3-cyclohexanedione (1,3-CHD) without the addition of alkali is a big challenge. In this article, a novel reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supported Pd catalyst was prepared through co-reduction method, over which we obtained 99.9% of resorcinol conversion and 94.2% of the ever-reported highest 1,3-cyclohexanedione selectivity at 25 °C in only CH2Cl2 solvent. The excellent selectivity was contributed to the strong π-π and p-π interactions between the graphene nanosheet and the benzene ring as well as hydroxyl in RES molecule. The followed adsorption experiment and Raman analysis also showed the existence of aromatic graphite structures in rGO, which exhibited stronger adsorption towards RES than towards 1,3-CHD.

  17. A light controlled cavitand wall regulates guest binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Orion B; Sather, Aaron C; Rebek, Julius

    2011-01-14

    Here we report a cavitand with a photochemical switch as one of the container walls. The azo-arene switch undergoes photoisomerization when subjected to UV light producing a self-fulfilled cavitand. This process is thermally and photochemically reversible. The reported cavitand binds small molecules and these guests can be ejected from the cavitand through this photochemical process.

  18. Guest driven structural transformation studies of a luminescent metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ; crystal to crystal transformation; luminescence. ... On air drying the MOF loses free DCM molecules and changed its structure in a crystal to crystal manner to produce compound 1 [{Zn(L)2(OTf)2}.XG](1). This guest-induced breathing of the ...

  19. Guest Editorial Team | Kachimba | Medical Journal of Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Journal of Zambia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 43, No 2 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial Team. John S Kachimba. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  20. Some Perspective of Hosts and Guests on Coastal Tourism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the flipside, however, a number of physical/environmental economic and socio-cultural concerns have emerged requiring proactive measures for overcoming any hiccups to the sustainable development or the industry. Based on insights drawn from interviewing hosts and guests and physical tests conducted on major ...

  1. Editor's note/Guest editorial | Greeff | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 27, No 3 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editor's note/Guest editorial. D Greeff. Abstract. No abstract.

  2. Guest Editorial | Frade | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial. Nelia Frade. Abstract. Tutoring and ...

  3. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Motsoaledi | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A Motsoaledi. Abstract. No abstract ...

  4. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. AM Meyers. Abstract. No abstract.

  5. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 107, No 9 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A.M. Meyers. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  6. Forward by Guest Editors | Potgieter | African Journal on Conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal on Conflict Resolution. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Forward by Guest Editors. Cheryl Potgieter, Paulus ...

  7. Technology Support for Self-Organized Learners (Guest Editorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Koper, Rob; Hornung-Prähauser, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Kalz, M., Koper, R., & Hornung-Prähauser, V. (2009). Technology Support for Self-Organized Learners (Guest Editorial) [Special issue]. In M. Kalz, R. Koper & V. Hornung-Prähauser (Eds.), Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(3), 1-3.

  8. Guest Editorial: Globalisation and higher education restructuring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial: Globalisation and higher education restructuring in South Africa: moving towards distributive justice. Y Waghid, L le Grange. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajhe.v16i1.25265 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  9. GUEST EDITORIAL Language Practice — one profession, multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GUEST EDITORIAL Language Practice — one profession, multiple applications. ... Specific focus is on the University of the Free State and how it approaches challenges in the teaching and learning environment where a multilingual demographic asks for innovative solutions in order to transform successfully. One solution ...

  10. The Association between Energy Saving and Guest Comfort in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents the association between energy saving in guesthouses and guest comfort. The study was conducted in the Mpumalanga Province, one of the nine provinces of South Africa and a leading tourism destination. The focus was to determine the relationship between energy reduction and its impact on the ...

  11. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and increased retention.Service quality is fundamental component which produce higher levels of guest satisfaction, which in turn lead to higher sales revenue.The main purpose of this study was to examine the quality dimensions that affect guest satisfaction in restaurant industry. Food and beverage quality, the quality of service delivery, physical environment and price fairness are analyzed as a key components of restaurant experience. The results could be helpful tool for restaurant managers to invest their resources more efficiently, making changes to crucial quality attributes that elicit the guests’ satisfaction level. A management approach focused on guest satisfaction can improve restaurant business performance.

  12. Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle cell disorder. Charles Wambele. Abstract. No Abstract. Discovery and Innovation Vol. 18(1) 2006: 1-4. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v18i1.15718.

  13. Superior Stability of Au/SiO2Compared to Au/TiO2Catalysts for the Selective Hydrogenation of Butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Nazila; Delannoy, Laurent; Schaink, Herrick; van der Eerden, Ad; de Rijk, Jan Willem; Silva, Tiago A G; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Meeldijk, Johannes D; de Jong, Krijn P; Louis, Catherine; de Jongh, Petra E

    2017-09-01

    Supported gold nanoparticles are highly selective catalysts for a range of both liquid-phase and gas-phase hydrogenation reactions. However, little is known about their stability during gas-phase catalysis and the influence of the support thereon. We report on the activity, selectivity, and stability of 2-4 nm Au nanoparticulate catalysts, supported on either TiO 2 or SiO 2 , for the hydrogenation of 0.3% butadiene in the presence of 30% propene. Direct comparison of the stability of the Au catalysts was possible as they were prepared via the same method but on different supports. At full conversion of butadiene, only 0.1% of the propene was converted for both supported catalysts, demonstrating their high selectivity. The TiO 2 -supported catalysts showed a steady loss of activity, which was recovered by heating in air. We demonstrated that the deactivation was not caused by significant metal particle growth or strong metal-support interaction, but rather, it is related to the deposition of carbonaceous species under reaction conditions. In contrast, all the SiO 2 -supported catalysts were highly stable, with very limited formation of carbonaceous deposits. It shows that SiO 2 -supported catalysts, despite their 2-3 times lower initial activities, clearly outperform TiO 2 -supported catalysts within a day of run time.

  14. [Selectivity and sensitivity to blocking by hydrogen ions of batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in nerve fiber membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhaeva, G N; Naumov, A P; Khodorov, B I

    1983-01-01

    Currents through normal and batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in frog nerve were measured under voltage clamp conditions. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation were used to calculate relative permeabilities. The permeability ratios were: PNa: PNH4: PK = 1: 0.47: 0.19. Hydrogen-to-sodium permeability ratio was estimated from reversal potential measurements in Na-free acid (pH 3.7-3.8) solutions. It was 528 +/- 46 for batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels. Modified channels were less sensitive to hydrogen block as compared with normal ones. The difference in apparent pKa for acid group between normal and modified channels was about 0.40.

  15. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Ultrafine Pd and Pd-Cu Catalysts: Enhanced Reactivity, Selectivity, and Longevity for Nitrite and Nitrate Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Durkin, David P; Banek, Nathan A; Wagner, Michael J; Shuai, Danmeng

    2017-08-23

    Novel Pd-based catalysts (i.e., Pd and Pd-Cu) supported on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) were prepared for nitrite and nitrate hydrogenation. The catalysts prepared by ethylene glycol reduction exhibited ultrafine Pd and Pd-Cu nanoparticles (∼2 nm), and they showed high reactivity, high selectivity toward nitrogen gas over byproduct ammonium, and excellent stability over multiple reaction cycles. The unique nitrogen-abundant surface, porous structure, and hydrophilic nature of g-C 3 N 4 facilitates metal nanoparticle dispersion, mass transfer of reactants, and nitrogen coupling for nitrogen gas production to improve catalytic performance.

  16. Chiral and achiral crystals, charge-assisted hydrogen-bond patterns and self-organization of selected solid diaminium thiosulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozdowska, Agnieszka; Chojnacki, Jarosław

    2017-06-01

    A series of diaminium thiosulfates, derivatives of diamines: NH 2 CH 2 CH(CH 3 )NH 2 (1) and NH 2 (CH 2 ) n NH 2 , n = 3-6 [(2)-(5)] and thiosulfuric acid were prepared and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds (1), (2) and (4) turned out to be hydrates. The crystal structure of 1,2-propylenediaminium thiosulfate is chiral and exhibits spontaneous resolution. Crystals for both enantiomers [(1a) and (1b)] were obtained with high enantiometric excess and examined. An extended network of strong, charge-assisted hydrogen bonding of the + N-H...O - type (also O-H...O and O-H...S for hydrates) is most likely the main factor defining crystal packing and the variable conformation of the cations. The formation of chiral hydrogen-bond motifs - distorted cubans - seems to induce the formation of chiral solid-state structure from achiral components in the case of (4). Diaminium thiosulfates with an odd number of C atoms in the alkyl chain [compounds (1), (2) and (4)] form three-dimensional supramolecular networks, while in the case of diaminium salts with an even number of C atoms [(3) and (5)], two-dimensional layers of hydrogen-bond domains are observed. The aminium thiosulfates were also characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and Fourier transform (FT)-IR spectroscopy. The conformations of α,ω-alkyldiaminium cations in the solid state are discussed and rationalized by DFT calculations.

  17. Modeling Perceived Quality, Customer Satisfaction and Probability of Guest Returning to the Destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Blagojevic Popovic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the hotel industry, it is a well-known fact that, despite of quality and variety of services provided, there is a low probability that the guests will return. This research is focused on identifying the basic factors of the hotel offer, which could determine the influence on the correlation between the guests’ satisfaction and the probability of their return. The objective of the article is to explore the relationship between the guests’ satisfaction with the quality hotel services in total (including the tourist offer of the place and the probability of his return to the same destination. The questionnaire method was applied in the survey, and the data were analysed based on factor analysis. Thereafter, the model for forecasting the probability of the guests returning to the destination was established, by using the example of Montenegrin tourism. The model represents a defined framework for the guest’s decision-making process. It identifies two main characteristics of guest experiences: satisfaction and rated quality (of the destination’s overall hotel service and tourist offer. The same model evaluates the impact of the above factors on the probability of the guests’ returning to the same destination. The starting hypothesis was the existence of a high degree of correlation between the guests’ satisfaction (with the destination’s hotel services and tourist offer and the probability of returning to the selected Montenegrin destinations. The research confirmed the above-mentioned hypothesis. The results have revealed that there are significant differences in perceived quality, i.e. satisfaction between the target groups of Eastern and Western European tourists

  18. On the interaction of guest molecules with Co-MOF-74: A Vis/NIR and Raman approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ina; Mundstock, Alexander; Hinrichs, Dominik; Himstedt, Rasmus; Knebel, Alexander; Reinhardt, Carsten; Dorfs, Dirk; Caro, Jürgen

    2018-03-13

    Co-MOF-74 rod like crystals with a length of several hundred micrometers have been synthesized via a solvothermal procedure and their interaction with different gases has been evaluated in view of selective gas sensing. We show strongly anisotropic absorption behaviour of the Co-MOF-74 crystals when illuminated with polarized light. This study then addresses the interactions of guests (CO2, propane, propene, Ar, MeOH, H2O) with Co-MOF-74, studied by various spectroscopic techniques. Via Vis/NIR measurements, peak shifts of Co-MOF-74 depending on the interaction with the guest molecules were observed and distinguished. In the visible as well as in the near infrared region, the maximum absorbance is shifted selectively corresponding to the intensity of the CoII-guest interaction. Even propene and propane could be distinguished at room temperature according to their different interactions with Co-MOF-74. Furthermore, we used Raman spectroscopy to detect a modified vibrational behaviour of Co-MOF-74 upon gas adsorption. We show that the adsorption of H2O leads to a characteristic shift of the peak maxima in the Raman spectra. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Guest editorial: Pharmacology of male sexual behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, Marcel D; Olivier, Berend

    The introduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the mid 1980s has led not only to an increased attention to antidepressant-induced sexual side effects, but also to a paradigm shift in the theory of premature ejaculation (PE). Because of their ejaculation delaying effects,

  20. Well-dispersed Ni nanoclusters on the surfaces of MFI nanosheets as highly efficient and selective catalyst for the hydrogenation of naphthalene to tetralin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pengyu; Li, Baoshan; Kong, Xianglong; Liu, Jianjun; Zuo, Shengli

    2017-11-01

    One of the challenges in material science has been to design and prepare highly efficient and selective catalysts for target reactions. Here we demonstrate a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchical MFI nanosheets with nickel species chemically bonded on the outer surfaces. It turns out that the growth and morphologies of self-pillared MFI nanosheets are affected by Ni content, and the thickness of MFI nanosheets are determined to be 2.3 nm or 3.0 nm. Specially, the bonded Ni on the outer surfaces can effectively prevent adjacent nanosheets from forming new Sisbnd Osbnd Si bonds, and in conjunction with the self-pillared structure, can hamper complete collapse of Ni-MFI-NSs during calcination. In naphthalene hydrogenation, the separated Ni species are previously reduced to highly-dispersed metallic Ni nanoclusters with size below 1.6 nm, which are highly active for hydrogenation. And the hierarchical porosity of Ni-MFI-NSs significantly enhances the diffusion of substrates and the accessibility of active sites. As a result, Ni-MFI-NSs achieve 100% selectivity for tetralin and 84.9% conversion of naphthalene with Ni content of only 4.2 wt%. Furthermore, the gradually enlarged Ni nanoparticles cause the decline of catalytic activities of catalysts.

  1. Performance of Ru/La2O3–ZnO Catalyst for the Selective Hydrogenation of Benzene to Cyclohexene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Spod

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclohexene is an important intermediate product for a highly efficient and greener formation of major end products like adipic acid, nylon 6, and nylon 6.6. By using a complex tetra-phase system (g/l/l/s including hydrogen (g, water (l, an organic phase, i.e., benzene (l, and a supported ruthenium catalyst (s it is possible to get the desired intermediate cyclohexene based on benzene. We prepared an oxide-supported ruthenium catalyst that was applied together with minimal amounts of the additive NaDCA (sodium dicyanamide in a batch and continuous apparatus for the selective benzene hydrogenation. We compared these two processes and reached by an optimization of the reaction parameters in continuous process selectivities up to 50% at conversions of 36%. This corresponds to cyclohexene yields of 18% over a period of 100 h. Finally, the catalyst was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, and laser scattering to understand the performance of the catalyst and the effect of the small deactivation.

  2. Equilibrium isotope effects on noncovalent interactions in a supramolecular host-guest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembled supramolecular complex [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) can act as a molecular host in aqueous solution and bind cationic guest molecules to its highly charged exterior surface or within its hydrophobic interior cavity. The distinct internal cavity of host 1 modifies the physical properties and reactivity of bound guest molecules and can be used to catalyze a variety of chemical transformations. Noncovalent host-guest interactions in large part control guest binding, molecular recognition and the chemical reactivity of bound guests. Herein we examine equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) on both exterior and interior guest binding to host 1 and use these effects to probe the details of noncovalent host-guest interactions. For both interior and exterior binding of a benzylphosphonium guest in aqueous solution, protiated guests are found to bind more strongly to host 1 (K(H)/K(D) > 1) and the preferred association of protiated guests is driven by enthalpy and opposed by entropy. Deuteration of guest methyl and benzyl C-H bonds results in a larger EIE than deuteration of guest aromatic C-H bonds. The observed EIEs can be well explained by considering changes in guest vibrational force constants and zero-point energies. DFT calculations further confirm the origins of these EIEs and suggest that changes in low-frequency guest C-H/D vibrational motions (bends, wags, etc.) are primarily responsible for the observed EIEs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Synthesis and Study of Guest-Rebinding of MIP Based on MAA Prepared using Theophylline Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, T.; Yanti; Royani, I.; Widayani; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on methacrylic acid (MAA) monomer and theophylline template has been synthesized using a modified bulk polymerization method. Theophylline was employed as a template and it formed a complex with MAA through hydrogen bonding. Self-assembly of template-monomer was followed by cross-linking process using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) cross-linker. The polymerization process was initiated by thermal decomposition of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as the initiator at 60oC after cooling treatment at -5oC. After 7 hours, a rigid polymer was obtained and followed by grinding the polymer and removing the template. As a reference, a nonimprinted polymer (NIP) has also been synthesized using similar procedure by excluding the template. FTIR study was carried out to investigate the presence of theophylline in the as- prepared polymer, MIP, and NIP. The spectra indicated that theophylline was successfully incorporated in the as-prepared polymer. This result was also confirmed by EDS analysis showing that N atoms of the as-prepared polymer were derived from amino group of theophylline. Furthermore, the polymer particles of MIP were irregular in shape and size as shown by its SEM image. The capability of guest-rebinding of the MIP was analyzed through Batchwise guest-binding experiment. The results showed that for initial concentration of theophylline in methanol/chloroform (1/1, v/v) of 0.333 mM, the binding capacity of the MIP was 23.22 /mol/g. Compared to the MIP, the adsorption capacity of the NIP was only 3.73 /mol/g. This result shows that MIP has higher affinity than NIP.

  4. Computational Calorimetry: High-Precision Calculation of Host–Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present a strategy for carrying out high-precision calculations of binding free energy and binding enthalpy values from molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. The approach is used to calculate the thermodynamic profiles for binding of nine small molecule guests to either the cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) or β-cyclodextrin (βCD) host. For these systems, calculations using commodity hardware can yield binding free energy and binding enthalpy values with a precision of ∼0.5 kcal/mol (95% CI) in a matter of days. Crucially, the self-consistency of the approach is established by calculating the binding enthalpy directly, via end point potential energy calculations, and indirectly, via the temperature dependence of the binding free energy, i.e., by the van’t Hoff equation. Excellent agreement between the direct and van’t Hoff methods is demonstrated for both host–guest systems and an ion-pair model system for which particularly well-converged results are attainable. Additionally, we find that hydrogen mass repartitioning allows marked acceleration of the calculations with no discernible cost in precision or accuracy. Finally, we provide guidance for accurately assessing numerical uncertainty of the results in settings where complex correlations in the time series can pose challenges to statistical analysis. The routine nature and high precision of these binding calculations opens the possibility of including measured binding thermodynamics as target data in force field optimization so that simulations may be used to reliably interpret experimental data and guide molecular design. PMID:26523125

  5. GUEST SERVICES QUALITY ASSESMENT IN TOURISM, USING AN ATTRIBUTES SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA LUMINITA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is considered that a weakness of the Romanian tourism offer is the quality of guest services. In this paper we established as an objective to examine in detail the importance given by the consumers to the components of guest service quality and their perceived performance, based on the three pillars of service quality: the material base (equipments, staff training and staff behavior. The emphasis is on the investigation regarding staff training and behaviour, taking into account the multiple attributes SERVQUAL scale. On the basis of this work lies a survey done in March-April 2010 on the population of Oradea, on a sample of 1060 people. Results confirm the importance granted to staff in ensuring quality of tourism services and their perceived relatively weak performance.

  6. A CATALYST, A PROCESS FOR SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ACETYLENE TO ETHYLENE AND A METHOD FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF THE CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A catalyst comprising a mixture of metal A selected from the group of Fe, Co and Ni and metal B selected from the group of Zn and Ga, and a support material, wherein the two metals are present in an intermetallic composition; A method for the manufacture of the catalyst; and the use of above...

  7. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Snježana Gagić; Dragan Tešanović; Ana Jovičić

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and inc...

  8. Complaint Speech Act of Hotel and Restaurant Guests

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawan, I Nengah; Putra Yadnya, Ida Bagus; Puspani, Ida Ayu Made

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at analyzing how complaint speech act of hotel and restaurant guests are performed and responded based on categories of speech acts and how they are performed considering the aspects of acts: locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary. The method and technique of collecting data in this study is documentation method in which the data were collected using the technique of note taking and were qualitatively analyzed. The findings show that complaint of hotel and restaura...

  9. Perspectives on Operational Testing: Guest Lecture at Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    provide a guest lecture to students in the T&E course. The briefing covers three primary themes: 1) evaluation of military systems on the basis of...be designed to be reliable, equipped with self-protection features and radios, and capable of transporting weapons and sonobuoys across the...specified distances , but would not actually have to have the ability to successfully find and sink threat submarines in an Anti-Submarine Warfare mission

  10. Managing Guest as an Asset: a Conceptual Review in the Context of Accommodation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Suhartanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of a customer as an asset of business in the accommodation industry. The purpose of this article is to examine the value of guests as a firm asset and to propose a model for managing guests as an asset in the context of accommodation services. A guest is considered an asset due to its role in providing revenue to the accommodation firm. Because of this role, the accommodation guest needs to be managed appropriately. This article argues that guest service evaluation (i.e. service quality, perceived value, and guest satisfaction and service loyalty are important factors in the development of guest lifetime value. The proposed model of managing guests as an asset consists of marketing instruments, service evaluation, guest loyalty, and financial outcomes provides a comprehensive guide on how accommodation firms can manage the lifetime value of their guests. Finally, as there are limited studies examining this issue, future research should test the proposed model.

  11. Design and Construction of a Smart Targeting Drug Delivery System Based on Phototriggered Competition of Host-Guest Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Yi, Xiaoqing; Yuan, Gongdao; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Feng

    2017-09-01

    A smart targeting drug delivery nanocarrier is successfully constructed based on phototriggered competition of host-guest interaction. The targeting motif, i.e., biotin is first concealed by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) via host-guest interaction. When the nanoparticles are exposed to UV light, the cleavage of photosensitive groups results in the exposure of adamantane (Ad) groups initially located in the interior of nanoassemblies, and β-CDs capped on biotin ligands can be replaced by Ad because of the higher binding constant between Ad and β-CD than that between biotin and β-CD. The competition of host-guest interaction leads to the recovery of targeting capacity of biotin ligands on the nanocarriers. By virtue of photoregulation, the nanocarriers exhibit controllable ligand-receptor recognition, which is proved by flow cytometry, laser confocal microscopy, and cytotoxicity assay. This strategy has a potential to improve the selectivity and safety of targeting drug delivery systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Binding enthalpy calculations for a neutral host-guest pair yield widely divergent salt effects across water models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kaifu; Yin, Jian; Henriksen, Niel M; Fenley, Andrew T; Gilson, Michael K

    2015-10-13

    Dissolved salts are a part of the physiological milieu and can significantly influence the kinetics and thermodynamics of various biomolecular processes, such as binding and catalysis; thus, it is important for molecular simulations to reliably describe their effects. The present study uses a simple, nonionized host-guest model system to study the sensitivity of computed binding enthalpies to the choice of water and salt models. Molecular dynamics simulations of a cucurbit[7]uril host with a neutral guest molecule show striking differences in the salt dependency of the binding enthalpy across four water models, TIP3P, SPC/E, TIP4P-Ew, and OPC, with additional sensitivity to the choice of parameters for sodium and chloride. In particular, although all of the models predict that binding will be less exothermic with increasing NaCl concentration, the strength of this effect varies by 7 kcal/mol across models. The differences appear to result primarily from differences in the number of sodium ions displaced from the host upon binding the guest rather than from differences in the enthalpy associated with this displacement, and it is the electrostatic energy that contributes most to the changes in enthalpy with increasing salt concentration. That a high sensitivity of salt affecting the choice of water model, as observed for the present host-guest system despite it being nonionized, raises issues regarding the selection and adjustment of water models for use with biological macromolecules, especially as these typically possess multiple ionized groups that can interact relatively strongly with ions in solution.

  13. Discovery of zoniporide: a potent and selective sodium-hydrogen exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) inhibitor with high aqueous solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Perez, A; Wester, R T; Allen, M C; Brown, J A; Buchholz, A R; Cook, E R; Day, W W; Hamanaka, E S; Kennedy, S P; Knight, D R; Kowalczyk, P J; Marala, R B; Mularski, C J; Novomisle, W A; Ruggeri, R B; Tracey, W R; Hill, R J

    2001-03-26

    Zoniporide (CP-597,396) is a potent and selective inhibitor of NHE-1, which exhibits high aqueous solubility and acceptable pharmacokinetics for intravenous administration. The discovery, synthesis, activities, and rat and dog pharmacokinetics of this compound are presented. The potency and selectivity of zoniporide may be due to the conformation that the molecule adopts due to the presence of a cyclopropyl and a 5-quinolinyl substituent on the central pyrazole ring of the molecule.

  14. Selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone in water over Pd@N-doped carbons derived from ZIF-67: Role of dicyandiamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Chunhua; Liu, Yefei; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Rizhi

    2017-12-01

    Highly efficient Pd@CN catalysts for selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone in water were successfully fabricated by loading Pd nanoparticles (NPs) in N-doped carbons (CN) derived from ZIF-67 with dicyandiamide (DICY) as the additional nitrogen source. For comparison, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was also used as the additional nitrogen source during the ZIF-67 synthesis. The results showed that the PVP and DICY had significantly different impacts on the microstructures of as-obtained CN materials and the catalytic performance of Pd@CN catalysts in the phenol hydrogenation. The addition of DICY had the positive promotion effect on the surface area of the obtained CN materials. Moreover, the introduction of DICY could increase the nitrogen content of CN and then prevent the re-oxidation of Pd NPs during air contact, resulting in higher Pd0 ratio. In comparison with PVP, the DICY was more suitable as the additional nitrogen source for the formation of CN and Pd@CN (Pd@CND, Pd@CNP). The Pd@CND exhibited superior catalytic activity as compared to Pd@CNP (phenol conversion 96.9% vs. 67.4%). More importantly, the as-prepared Pd@CND catalyst could be reused for four times without catalytic performance reduction. The work would aid the development of Pd@CN catalysts with superior catalytic properties.

  15. Fine-Tuned Intrinsically Ultramicroporous Polymers Redefine the Permeability/Selectivity Upper Bounds of Membrane-Based Air and Hydrogen Separations

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2015-08-20

    Intrinsically ultramicroporous (<7 Å) polymers represent a new paradigm in materials development for membrane-based gas separation. In particular, they demonstrate that uniting intrachain “rigidity”, the traditional design metric of highly permeable polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs), with gas-sieving ultramicroporosity yields high-performance gas separation membranes. Highly ultramicroporous PIMs have redefined the state-of-the-art in large-scale air (e.g., O2/N2) and hydrogen recovery (e.g., H2/N2, H2/CH4) applications with unprecedented molecular sieving gas transport properties. Accordingly, presented herein are new 2015 permeability/selectivity “upper bounds” for large-scale commercial membrane-based air and hydrogen applications that accommodate the substantial performance enhancements of recent PIMs over preceding polymers. A subtle balance between intrachain rigidity and interchain spacing has been achieved in the amorphous microstructures of PIMs, fine-tuned using unique bridged-bicyclic building blocks (i.e., triptycene, ethanoanthracene and Tröger’s base) in both ladder and semiladder (e.g., polyimide) structures.

  16. Determination of trans Fat in Selected Fast Food Products and Hydrogenated Fats of India Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Umar; Hassan, Mohammad Fahimul; Rauf, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the application of a simple and rapid method for the determination of trans fatty acid (TFA) content in some of the selected Indian fast food products and hydrogenated fats using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in conjunction with second derivative procedure. FTIR spectroscopy has been successfully applied to trans measurement using the absorbance bands at or near 966 cm -1 in the FTIR spectra. It was found from the analysis that TFA content of fast food product was ranging from 1.57% to 3.83% of the total fat while for hydrogenated fats, comparatively large quantity of TFA was detected in the range of 3.31% to 4.73%. Since GC-FID is most widely used method for the determination of fatty acid (FA) composition, this method was used for the sake of comparison. Value of regression coefficient was found very close to one (0.99503) with standard deviation of 0.10247 showing a good agreement between GC-FID and proposed ATR-FTIR method.

  17. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  18. Guest editor's introduction: Energy homeostasis in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Energy homeostasis is achieved through neuroendocrine and metabolic control of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Traditionally, these controls have been studied in an unrealistic and narrow context. The appetite for food, for example, is most often assumed to be independent of other motivations, such as sexual desire, fearfulness, and competition. Furthermore, our understanding of all aspects of energy homeostasis is based on studying males of only a few species. The baseline control subjects are most often housed in enclosed spaces, with continuous, unlimited access to food. In the last century, this approach has generated useful information, but all the while, the global prevalence of obesity has increased and remains at unprecedented levels (Ogden et al., 2013, 2014). It is likely, however, that the mechanisms that control ingestive behavior were molded by evolutionary forces, and that few, if any vertebrate species evolved in the presence of a limitless food supply, in an enclosed 0.5 × 1 ft space, and exposed to a constant ambient temperature of 22+2 °C. This special issue of Hormones and Behavior therefore contains 9 review articles and 7 data articles that consider energy homeostasis within the context of other motivations and physiological processes, such as early development, sexual differentiation, sexual motivation, reproduction, seasonality, hibernation, and migration. Each article is focused on a different species or on a set of species, and most vertebrate classes are represented. Energy homeostasis is viewed in the context of the selection pressures that simultaneously molded multiple aspects of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. This approach yields surprising conclusions regarding the function of those traits and their underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Hydrogenation apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  20. Effects of selected electron transport chain inhibitors on 24-h hydrogen production by Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Elizabeth H; Chaplen, Frank W R; Ely, Roger L

    2011-02-01

    One factor limiting biosolar hydrogen (H(2)) production from cyanobacteria is electron availability to the hydrogenase enzyme. In order to optimize 24-h H(2) production this study used Response Surface Methodology and Q2, an optimization algorithm, to investigate the effects of five inhibitors of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Over 3 days of diurnal light/dark cycling, with the optimized combination of 9.4 mM KCN (3.1 μmol 10(10) cells(-1)) and 1.5 mM malonate (0.5 μmol 10(10) cells(-1)) the H(2) production was 30-fold higher, in EHB-1 media previously optimized for nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and carbon (C) concentrations (Burrows et al., 2008). In addition, glycogen concentration was measured over 24 h with two light/dark cycling regimes in both standard BG-11 and EHB-1 media. The results suggest that electron flow as well as glycogen accumulation should be optimized in systems engineered for maximal H(2) output. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  2. Design of an organic zeolite toward the selective adsorption of small molecules at the dispersion corrected density functional theory level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenliang; Gahungu, Godefroid; Zhang, Jingping; Hao, Lizhu

    2009-12-31

    Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) became the compound of choice to investigate the structural features of organic zeolites and their potential applications as soft materials. A van der Waals crystal of the TPP analogue (host) with the thiophene side fragment tris(3,4-thiophenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TTP) was designed to investigate the selective adsorption among some common gases (guest): methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), nitrogen (N(2)), or hydrogen (H(2)). The crystal structure of TTP was modeled by applying minimization methods using the COMPASS (condensed-phase optimized molecular potentials for atomic simulation studies) force field. Interaction energies and structural properties of van der Waals complexes of the crystal of TTP and gas molecules were studied using the dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT-D). The proper functional and basis set were selected after comparing with benchmark data of the coupled-cluster calculations with singles, doubles, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] estimated at the complete basis set (CBS) limit. On the basis of our results, the interaction energy between the host and the guest molecules was predicted in the increasing order of host-H(2) < host-N(2) < host-CH(4) < host-CO(2), suggesting the designed TTP is a good candidate as an organic zeolite for potential fuel storage, hydrogen purification, carbon dioxide removal from the air, as well as safety care in a coal mine.

  3. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Bradić; Ljiljana Kosar; Bojana Kalenjuk

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores) given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in...

  4. Driving Forces Controlling Host-Guest Recognition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Francesca; Altarsha, Muhannad; Dumarçay, Florence; Kevern, Gwendal; Barth, Danielle; Marsura, Alain; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2016-02-24

    The formation of supramolecular host-guest complexes is a very useful and widely employed tool in chemistry. However, supramolecular chemistry in non-conventional solvents such as supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ), one of the most promising sustainable solvents, is still in its infancy. In this work, we explored a successful route to the development of green processes in supercritical CO2 by combining a theoretical approach with experiments. We were able to synthesize and characterize an inclusion complex between a polar aromatic molecule (benzoic acid) and peracetylated-β-cyclodextrin, which is soluble in the supercritical medium. This finding opens the way to wide, environmental friendly, applications of scCO2 in many areas of chemistry, including supramolecular synthesis, reactivity and catalysis, micro and nano-particle formation, molecular recognition, as well as enhanced extraction processes with increased selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Investigation of the host-guest complexation between 4-sulfocalix[4]arene and nedaplatin for potential use in drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Sherif Ashraf; Ponte, Fortuna; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K.; Russo, Nino; Sicilia, Emilia; Shoeib, Tamer

    2018-03-01

    Macromolecules including macrocyclic species have been reported to have the potential to encapsulate biologically active compounds such as drugs through host-guest complexation to increase their solubility, stability and bioavailability. In this paper the first experimental and theoretical investigation of the complexation between nedaplatin, a second generation antineoplastic drug, and p-4-sulfocalix[4]arene, a macromolecule possessing a bipolar amphiphilic structure with good biocompatibility and relatively low haemolytic toxicity for potential use as a drug delivery system is presented. Data from 1H NMR, UV, Job's plot analysis, HPLC and DFT calculations are detailed and suggest the formation of a 1:1 complex. The stability constant of the complex was experimentally estimated to be 3.6 × 104 M- 1 and 2.1 × 104 M- 1 which correspond to values of - 6.2 and - 5.9 kcal mol- 1, respectively for the free energy of complexation while the interaction free energy is calculated to be - 4.9 kcal mol- 1. The formed species is shown to be stabilised in solution through hydrogen bonding between the host and the guest which may allow for this strategy to be effective for potential use in drug delivery.

  6. Fast Diffusion of Long Guest Rods in a Lamellar Phase of Short Host Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Laura; Lettinga, M. Paul; Grelet, Eric

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the dynamic behavior of long guest rodlike particles immersed in liquid crystalline phases formed by shorter host rods, tracking both guest and host particles by fluorescence microscopy. Counterintuitively, we evidence that long rods diffuse faster than short rods forming the one-dimensional ordered smectic-A phase. This results from the larger and noncommensurate size of the guest particles as compared to the wavelength of the energy landscape set by the lamellar stack of liquid slabs. The long guest particles are also shown to be still mobile in the crystalline smectic-B phase, as they generate their own voids in the adjacent layers.

  7. Enhancement of Hydrogen Storage Capacity in Hydrate Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2012-02-16

    First principles electronic structure calculations of the gas phase pentagonal dodecahedron (H2O)20 (D-cage) and tetrakaidecahedron (H2O)24 (T-cage), which are building blocks of structure I (sI) hydrate lattice, suggest that these can accommodate up to a maximum of 5 and 7 guest hydrogen molecules, respectively. For the pure hydrogen hydrate, Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations of periodic (sI) hydrate lattices indicate that the guest molecules are released into the vapor phase via the hexagonal phases of the larger T-cages. An additional mechanism for the migration between neighboring D- and T-cages was found to occur through a shared pentagonal face via the breaking and reforming of a hydrogen bond. This molecular mechanism is also found for the expulsion of a CH4 molecule from the D-cage. The presence of methane in the larger T-cages was found to block this release, therefore suggesting possible scenarios for the stabilization of these mixed guest clathrate hydrates and the potential enhancement of their hydrogen storage capacity.

  8. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  9. SPIRORBID POLYCHAETES AS BOREAL GUESTS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN PLEISTOCENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSSANA SANFILIPPO

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available A first report of Spirorbis spirorbis (Linnaeus, 1758 and Spirorbis corallinae (de Silva & Knight-Jones, 1962 from Early and Middle Pleistocene deposits in Sicily and submerged Late Glacial sediments in the Western Mediterranean is presented. Today both species live on shores and very shallow bottoms in the North Atlantic and are unknown from the Recent Mediterranean. Such differences in their present and past biogeographic distributions suggest that these species were Boreal Guests (BGs in the Mediterranean Pleistocene. Special attention is paid to tube morphology and structure, which bear some diagnostic features for species identification. 

  10. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  11. Tweens on the Internet - communication in virtual guest books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnBritt Enochsson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available  Today digital communication is a natural part of young people’s social life. It has increased drastically during the last few years, and there are still a lot of questions about what this means, and how this new media affects communication. This study focuses on young people of 11-13, i.e.the age between children and teenagers, also called tweens. In a large study, the overall aim is to see what communication in the Internet community LunarStorm means to them in their social life. This particular paper reports on the content of the asynchronous communication in the participants’ digital guest books, which is one of the main channels for communication between the participants. A group of 15 tweens from a small village in Sweden were studied when communicating in Sweden’s largest Internet community, LunarStorm. The research method used was what is usually described as cyber ethnography. The contributions in the participants’ digital guest books are not written by the guest book owners themselves, which means that the focus is on the collective aspects of this communication, and not from a specific children’s point of view. Qualitative analyses were made of the content of 947 contributions in the participants’ guest books in order to make a statistical analysis. Most of the participants’ communication was between friends in the same geographical neighbourhood concerning how things are going, what to do, when to meet and similar things. The contributions were divided into three categories: (1 Social chat (2 Chain letters, and (3 Messages incomprehensible to outsiders. The information-category was divided into three sub-categories depending on the emotions expressed. 44% of the total messages were considered as emotionally neutral information, 39% as kind or encouraging, and also with an aim to sort things out, and 6% of the total messages contained insults and elements of anger. Among the younger users of the Internet community

  12. The hotel comment card: a motivator of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred W. Ogle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This   paper   explores   the   traditional   pen   and   paper   hotel   comment   card   (HCC   from   the  guests’  perspective  to  gain  an  insight  and  to  improve  its  effectiveness.  The  HCC  has  long  been   the  predominant  method  of  soliciting  guest  feedback.  Although  electronic  methods  of  collection  are  now  available  the  HCC  has  a  sense  of  familiarity,  has  general  acceptance,  and   is   widely   employed.   Initially,   a   literature   review   of   the   hotel   comment   card   is  provided.  Then,  the  study  explores  how  frequent  guests  categorize  HCC  attributes.  These  attributes  are  then  extended  to  include  evaluation  criteria  identified  in  the  literature  and  desired  by  hotel  managers.    The  extended  evaluation  criterion  is  then  used  to  explore  how  frequent  hotel  guests  believe  that  future  HCCs  may  motivate  guests  to  provide  feedback   and   assist   in   the   co-­creation   of   value.   The   overall   finding   is   that   the   HCCs   design   and  execution  can  be  improved.

  13. Enhancing Reactivity and Site-Selectivity in Hydrogen Atom Transfer from Amino Acid C-H Bonds via Deprotonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipitone, Luca Maria; Carboni, Giulia; Sorrentino, Daniela; Galeotti, Marco; Salamone, Michela; Bietti, Massimo

    2018-02-02

    A kinetic study on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO • ) with N-Boc-protected amino acids in the presence of the strong organic base DBU has been carried out. CO 2 H deprotonation increases the electron density at the α-C-H bonds activating these bonds toward HAT to the electrophilic CumO • strongly influencing the intramolecular selectivity. The implications of these results are discussed in the framework of HAT-based aliphatic C-H bond functionalization of amino acids and peptides.

  14. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-05

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu 2 ) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H 2 O/DMSO (4:1v/v, 1.0mmolL -1 HEPES buffer solution pH7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO 4 2- determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3 lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46μmolL -1 , respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu 2 complex to detect HPO 4 2- in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO 4 2- over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P 2 O 5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu 2+ and HPO 4 2- as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Selective catalytic hydrogenation of the N-acyl and uridyl double bonds in the tunicamycin family of protein N-glycosylation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Neil Pj; Jackson, Michael A; Vermillion, Karl E; Blackburn, Judith A; Li, Jiakun; Yu, Biao

    2017-12-01

    Tunicamycin is a Streptomyces-derived inhibitor of eukaryotic protein N-glycosylation and bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, and is a potent and general toxin by these biological mechanisms. The antibacterial activity is dependent in part upon a π-π stacking interaction between the tunicamycin uridyl group and a specific Phe residue within MraY, a tunicamycin-binding protein in bacteria. We have previously shown that reducing the tunicamycin uridyl group to 5,6-dihydrouridyl (DHU) significantly lowers its eukaryotic toxicity, potentially by disrupting the π-stacking with the active site Phe. The present report compares the catalytic hydrogenation of tunicamycin and uridine with various precious metal catalysts, and describe optimum conditions for the selective production of N-acyl reduced tunicamycin or for tunicamycins reduced in both the N-acyl and uridyl double bonds. At room temperature, Pd-based catalysts are selective for the N-acyl reduction, whereas Rh-based catalysts favor the double reduction to provide access to fully reduced tunicamycin. The reduced DHU is highly base-sensitive, leading to amide ring opening under mild alkaline conditions.

  16. Hydrogen-Permeable Tubular Membrane Reactor: Promoting Conversion and Product Selectivity for Non-Oxidative Activation of Methane over an Fe©SiO2Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakbodin, Mann; Wu, Yiqing; Oh, Su Cheun; Wachsman, Eric D; Liu, Dongxia

    2016-12-23

    Non-oxidative methane conversion over Fe©SiO 2 catalyst was studied for the first time in a hydrogen (H 2 ) permeable tubular membrane reactor. The membrane reactor is composed of a mixed ionic-electronic SrCe 0.7 Zr 0.2 Eu 0.1 O 3-δ thin film (≈20 μm) supported on the outer surface of a one-end capped porous SrCe 0.8 Zr 0.2 O 3-δ tube. Significant improvement in CH 4 conversion was achieved upon H 2 removal from the membrane reactor compared to that in a fixed-bed reactor. The Fe©SiO 2 catalyst in the H 2 permeable membrane reactor demonstrated a stable ≈30 % C 2+ single-pass yield, with up to 30 % CH 4 conversion and 99 % selectivity to C 2 (ethylene and acetylene) and aromatic (benzene and naphthalene) products, at the tested conditions. The selectivity towards C 2 or aromatics was manipulated purposely by adding H 2 into or removing H 2 from the membrane reactor feed and permeate gas streams. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. High Sensitive and Selective Sensing of Hydrogen Peroxide Released from Pheochromocytoma Cells Based on Pt-Au Bimetallic Nanoparticles Electrodeposited on Reduced Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxia Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high sensitive and selective hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 sensor was successfully constructed with Pt-Au bimetallic nanoparticles (Pt-Au NPs/reduced graphene sheets (rGSs hybrid films. Various molar ratios of Au to Pt and different electrodeposition conditions were evaluated to control the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Pt-Au bimetallic nanoparticles. Upon optimal conditions, wide linear ranges from 1 µM to 1.78 mM and 1.78 mM to 16.8 mM were obtained, with a detection limit as low as 0.31 µM. Besides, due to the synergetic effects of the bimetallic NPs and rGSs, the amperometric H2O2 sensor could operate at a low potential of 0 V. Under this potential, not only common anodic interferences induced from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine, but also the cathodic interference induced from endogenous O2 could be effectively avoided. Furthermore, with rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC 12 as model, the proposed sensor had been successfully used in the detection of H2O2 released from the cancer cells. This method with wide linear ranges and excellent selectivity can provide a promising alternative for H2O2 monitoring in vivo in the fields of physiology, pathology and diagnosis.

  18. The energy dependence of selective hydrogen atom abstraction by H(D) atoms in the photolysis of neopentane - ethane mixtures at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Fueki, K.

    1980-01-01

    Selective hydrogen - atom - abstraction reaction by H or D atom has been studied in a neo C 5 H 12 - C 2 H 6 (less than 1 mol %) mixture at 77 K by ESR spectroscopy. The H (or D) atom produced by the photolysis of HI (or DI) reacts with neo - C 2 H 12 and C 2 H 6 to form neo - C 5 H 11 and C 2 H 5 radicals. In order to obtain H atoms with different kinetic energies, the photolysis was performed with different lights of 313, 254 and 229 nm. The selective formation of the C 2 H 5 radical by the reaction of the H (or D) atom with C 2 H 6 becomes more effective with the decrease in the energy of the H (or D) atom. The formation of the neo - C 5 H 11 radical by the reaction of the H (or D) atom with neo - C 2 H 12 becomes more effective with the increase in the energy of the H (or D) atom. (A.R.H.) [pt

  19. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pez, Guido Peter [Allentown, PA; Cooper, Alan Charles [Macungie, PA; Scott, Aaron Raymond [Allentown, PA

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  20. Bioinspired Programmable Polymer Gel Controlled by Swellable Guest Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Heng; Dong, Yuan; Su, Jheng-Wun; Zhang, Cheng; Xie, Yunchao; Zhang, Chi; Maschmann, Matthew R; Lin, Yuyi; Lin, Jian

    2017-09-13

    Responsive materials with functions of forming three-dimensional (3D) origami and/or kirigami structures have a broad range of applications in bioelectronics, metamaterials, microrobotics, and microelectromechanical (MEMS) systems. To realize such functions, building blocks of actuating components usually possess localized inhomogeneity so that they respond differently to external stimuli. Previous fabrication strategies lie in localizing nonswellable or less-swellable guest components in their swellable host polymers to reduce swelling ability. Herein, inspired by ice plant seed capsules, we report an opposite strategy of implanting swellable guest medium inside nonswellable host polymers to locally enhance the swelling inhomogeneity. Specifically, we adopted a skinning effect induced surface polymerization combined with direct laser writing to control gradient of swellable cyclopentanone (CP) in both vertical and lateral directions of the nonswellable SU-8. For the first time, the laser direct writing was used as a novel strategy for patterning programmable polymer gel films. Upon stimulation of organic solvents, the dual-gradient gel films designed by origami or kirigami principles exhibit reversible 3D shape transformation. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation illustrates that CP greatly enhances diffusion rates of stimulus solvent molecules in the SU-8 matrix, which offers the driving force for the programmable response. Furthermore, this bioinspired strategy offers unique capabilities in fabricating responsive devices such as a soft gripper and a locomotive robot, paving new routes to many other responsive polymers.

  1. Chemical Integration of Myrmecophilous Guests in Aphaenogaster Ant Nests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Lenoir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Social insect nests provide a safe and favourable shelter to many guests and parasites. In Aphaenogaster senilis nests many guests are tolerated. Among them we studied the chemical integration of two myrmecophile beetles, Sternocoelis hispanus (Coleoptera: Histeridae and Chitosa nigrita (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae, and a silverfish. Silverfishes bear low quantities of the host hydrocarbons (chemical insignificance, acquired probably passively, and they do not match the colony odour. Both beetle species use chemical mimicry to be accepted; they have the same specific cuticular hydrocarbon profile as their host. They also match the ant colony odour, but they keep some specificity and can be recognised by the ants as a different element. Sternocoelis are always adopted in other conspecific colonies of A. senilis with different delays. They are adopted in the twin species A. iberica but never in A. simonellii or A. subterranea. They are readopted easily into their mother colony after an isolation of different durations until one month. After isolation they keep their hydrocarbons quantity, showing that they are able to synthesize them. Nevertheless, their profile diverges from the host colony, indicating that they adjust it in contact with the hosts. This had never been demonstrated before in myrmecophile beetles. We suggest that the chemical mimicry of Sternocoelis is the result of a coevolution with A. senilis with a possible cleaning symbiosis.

  2. PPII propensity of multiple-guest amino acids in a proline-rich environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2011-07-07

    There has been considerable debate about the intrinsic PPII propensity of amino acid residues in denatured polypeptides. Experimentally, this scale is based on the behavior of guest amino acid residues placed in the middle of proline-based hosts. We have used classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with replica-exchange methods to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the conformational equilibria of proline-based host oligopeptides with multiple guest amino acids including alanine, glutamine, valine, and asparagine. The tracked structural characteristics include the secondary structural motifs based on the Ramachandran angles and the cis/trans isomerization of the prolyl bonds. In agreement with our recent study of single amino acid guests, we did not observe an intrinsic PPII propensity in any of the guest amino acids in a multiple-guest setting. Instead, the experimental results can be explained in terms of (i) the steric restrictions imposed on the C-terminal guest amino acid that is immediately followed by a proline residue and (ii) an increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds due to the presence of guest residues. In terms of the latter, we found that the more guests added to the system, the larger the increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds, which results in an effective increase in the PPII content of the peptide.

  3. A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach to Promote Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Guo, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement has become a big challenge in higher education, especially when distance learning is getting more and more popular. Guest lecturing is a popular method to bring relevance to the classroom and engage in students. Ground on the theory of constructivism, this paper introduces a student-centered guest lecturing that allows students…

  4. Controlling the Host-Guest Interaction Mode through a Redox Stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Alévêque, Olivier; Levillain, Eric; Allain, Magali; Aragó, Juan; Ortí, Enrique; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2017-12-18

    A proof-of-concept related to the redox-control of the binding/releasing process in a host-guest system is achieved by designing a neutral and robust Pt-based redox-active metallacage involving two extended-tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligands. When neutral, the cage is able to bind a planar polyaromatic guest (coronene). Remarkably, the chemical or electrochemical oxidation of the host-guest complex leads to the reversible expulsion of the guest outside the cavity, which is assigned to a drastic change of the host-guest interaction mode, illustrating the key role of counteranions along the exchange process. The reversible process is supported by various experimental data ( 1 H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-FTICR, and spectroelectrochemistry) as well as by in-depth theoretical calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bohner

    Full Text Available Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204, descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room" and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous. Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  6. A Pyrene- and Phosphonate-Containing Fluorescent Probe as Guest Molecule in a Host Polymer Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Marchand-Brynaert

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available New host-guest materials have been prepared by incorporation of a home-made organic probe displaying a pyrene motif and a phosphonate function into a regular amphiphilic copolymer. Using powder X-Ray diffraction, photoluminescence and FT-IR spectroscopy, we have been able to study the non-covalent interactions between the host matrix and the guest molecule in the solid state. Interestingly, we have shown that the matrix directs the guest spatial localization and alters its properties. Thanks to the comparison of pyrene vs. N-pyrenylmaleimide derivatives, the influence of the chemical nature of the guest molecules on the non-covalent interactions with the host have been studied. In addition, using polyethylene glycol as a reference host, we have been able to evidence a true matrix effect within our new insertion materials. The phosphonated guest molecule appears to be a novel probe targeting the hydrophilic domain of the host copolymer.

  7. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  8. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  9. Steric and Electronic Effects in the Host-Guest Hydrogen Bonding in Clathrate Hydrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulig, W.; Kubisiak, P.; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 23 (2011), s. 6149-6154 ISSN 1089-5639 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : basis-sets * density * clathrate hydrates Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  10. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H m . Some of these compounds have fascinating structures (1,2,3). However the most interesting interaction of hydrogen, is the hydrogen bond. When a hydrogen atom is bound to an electronegative element it acquires a slight positive charge. As a result, it is attracted to other atoms such as nitrogen or oxygen in the ...

  11. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  12. Conceptual design and selection of deposited metal on the valve seat for the high temperature isolation valve in the HTTR hydrogen production system (contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Iwatsuki, Jin

    1999-11-01

    In the HTTR hydrogen production system a high temperature isolation valve should be provided outside the penetration of containment vessel on the secondary helium loop. As the secondary helium gas is at temperature of 905degC and pressure of 4.1 MPa, there is not any available isolation valve used under such conditions. Once demonstration test of high temperature isolation valve was carried out in the ERANS project. Tested valve could meet the basic design requirements but some problems remained. In this report a conceptual design of the high temperature isolation valve is performed in consideration of resolving these problems. The structural reliability is confirmed by the three-dimensional stress analysis. With respect to the deposited metal on valve seat, a screening test is done to observe the basic properties of candidate metals. From these results, it is shown that Stellite alloy that is used in practical valve has a possibility of the separation at welding layer and carbon diffusion from deposited metal into the base metal. Nickel-base super alloy has a possibility of internal and intergranular oxidation due to contained Al and Ti. Therefore, detail metallographical and mechanical tests for long period are planned to select the adequate deposited metal. (author)

  13. Differential effect of ethanol and hydrogen peroxide on barrier function and prostaglandin E2 release in differentiated Caco-2 cells: selective prevention by growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalioto, Rose-Marie; Festa, Carla; Triolo, Antonio; Altamura, Maria; Maggi, Carlo Alberto; Giuliani, Sandro

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigates the effects of ethanol and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), the transport of reference compounds and lactate dehydrogenase leakage, the PGE(2) release by enzyme immunoassay. Ethanol and H(2)O(2) decreased TEER and increased the transport of lucifer yellow without affecting that of propranolol and phenylalanine. Only the effects of ethanol were accompanied by PGE(2) production and were reversible without causing long-term cytotoxicity. The cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, NS-398, prevented the effect of ethanol on both PGE(2) release and TEER, while inhibition of both cyclooxygenase-2 and tyrosine kinase drastically compromised cell viability and TEER recovery. Hepatocyte growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor or insulin prevented the effect of ethanol on cell permeability, but not on PGE(2) release. Their combination prevented the effect of H(2)O(2). In conclusion, ethanol and H(2)O(2) increased paracellular permeability in differentiated Caco-2 cells without affecting transcellular and active transport. Cyclooxygenase-2 stimulated PGE(2) release mediated the reversible effect of ethanol on tight junctions and, meanwhile, contributed to cell survival. Growth factors, normally present in the intestine, exerted a selective protective effect toward paracellular permeability increase induced by irritants.

  14. Novel nano-semiconductor film layer supported nano-Pd Complex Nanostructured Catalyst Pd/Ⓕ-MeOx/AC for High Efficient Selective Hydrogenation of Phenol to Cyclohexanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiaqi; Ouyang, Wenbing; Zhang, Yanji; Xu, Wentao; Zhou, Jicheng

    2017-04-28

    Supported metal as a type of heterogeneous catalysts are the most widely used in industrial processes. High dispersion of the metal particles of supported catalyst is a key factor in determining the performance of such catalysts. Here we report a novel catalyst Pd/Ⓕ-MeO x /AC with complex nanostructured, Pd nanoparticles supported on the platelike nano-semiconductor film/activated carbon, prepared by the photocatalytic reduction method, which exhibited high efficient catalytic performance for selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone. Conversion of phenol achieved up to more than 99% with a lower mole ratio (0.5%) of active components Pd and phenol within 2 h at 70 °C. The synergistic effect of metal nanoparticles and nano-semiconductors support layer and the greatly increasing of contact interface of nano-metal-semiconductors may be responsible for the high efficiency. This work provides a clear demonstration that complex nanostructured catalysts with nano-metal and nano-semiconductor film layer supported on high specific surface AC can yield enhanced catalytic activity and can afford promising approach for developing new supported catalyst.

  15. Design, Synthesis, Characterization of Novel Ruthenium(II Catalysts: Highly Efficient and Selective Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde to (E-3-Phenylprop-2-en-1-ol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany W. Darwish

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, two novel supported and non-supported ruthenium(II complexes of type [RuCl2(dppme(NN] where [dppme is H2C=C(CH2PPh22 and NN is N1-(3-(trimethoxysilylpropylethane-1,2-diamine] were prepared. The NN co-ligand caused release of one of the dppme ligands from [RuCl2(dppme2] precursor to yield complex 1. The process of substitution of dppme by NN was monitored by 31P{1H}-NMR. Taking advantage of the presence of trimethoxysilane group in the backbone of complex 1, polysiloxane xerogel counterpart, X1, was prepared via sol-gel immobilization using tetraethoxysilane as cross-linker. Both complexes 1 and X1 have been characterized via elemental analysis, CV and a number of spectroscopic techniques including FT-IR, 1H-, 13C-, and 31P-NMR, and mass spectrometry. Importantly, carbonyl selective hydrogenation was successfully accomplished under mild conditions using complex 1 as a homogenous catalyst and X1 as a heterogeneous catalyst, respectively.

  16. STRATEGIC MARKETING ALTERNATIVES AT AGRO-TOURISM GUEST HOUSE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta-Andreea ANDREIANA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, tourists started to turn away from the mass tourism and consider the alternative one. Therefore, various forms of tourism were born, among which the rural tourism, to be regarded from two perspectives: it contributes to local and regional development and brings benefits to tourism by creating a new, higher quality holiday concept. This requires the participation of local authorities in the preparing of area development strategies, involving the inhabitants and local traders. By following up the dramatic condition of the Romanian tourism, the insufficient development of the rural tourism and the low involvement degree of the local authorities, we proposed an assessment and recommended strategic marketing alternatives for the improvement of the current condition of the agro tourism guest houses.

  17. Controlled release of hydrophilic guest molecules from photoresponsive nucleolipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yawei; Yan, Yongfeng; Wang, Mingqing; Chen, Cuixia; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2013-07-10

    Amphiphilic hybrid nucleolipids bear the structural and functional hallmarks of both lipids and nucleic acids and hold great potential for biotechnological applications. However, further tailoring of their structures and properties for specific applications represents a major challenge. We here report a novel design and synthesis of a light-responsive nucleolipid by introducing an o-nitrobenzyl group that acts as a linker between a nucleotide and a lipid. The nucleolipid was applied readily to preparing smart vesicles and encapsulating hydrophilic guest molecules 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) in their inner aqueous phase. Upon light irradiation, their vesicular structure was disrupted as a result of the photolytic degradation of the nucleotide, resulting in CF release. Furthermore, temporally controlled CF release from these vesicles could be readily realized by turning on and off light. By demonstrating the molecular assembly and photodisassembly cycle, this report aims to stimulate further research exploring practical applications of nucleolipids.

  18. Communication of Slovenian Tourism Workers with Italian guests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Gomzi Praprotnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For an Italian guest, getting to know Slovenia as a tourist destination is inevitably connected with getting to know the Slovenian cuisine. Italians are a nation eagerly developing the culture of food, and therefore the gastronomic offer in a certain environment and at a certain time is for them often the basis for a comprehensive perception of the said destination. A good offer, a suitable marketing and an attractive presentation of typical Slovenian dishes play an important role in getting to know natural and cultural heritage as they can widen the knowledge about people and places, eliminate prejudice and strengthen intercultural cooperation. Kind and professional staff, knowledge of the language, civilisation, cultural habits, and differences may be the factors contributing to the assertion of local products and services, and to educating the users of restaurant and tourism services.

  19. Understanding hospitality house guests' needs: a brief case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mary Katherine Waibel

    2011-08-01

    A.E. Kazak's (2006) call to develop theory-driven and empirically supported programs aimed at strengthening the competencies of families affected by pediatric illness applies to both medical and nonmedical facilities and institutions that care for pediatric patients and their loved ones. M.K.W. Duncan and A. Blugis (in press, this issue) note that despite the intuitive and practical nature of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, no theory translates into an infallible understanding of any individual guest's needs or a program of universally applied best practice standards for meeting those needs. Using Maslow's theory as a framework, this brief report describes the complexity and fluidity of one mother's needs during her stay at a hospitality house following the birth of her premature twin babies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (~10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure.

  1. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  2. Versatile and Resilient Hydrogen-Bonded Host Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Takuji; Ward, Michael D

    2016-12-20

    Low-density molecular host frameworks, whether equipped with persistent molecular-scale pores or virtual pores that are sustainable only when occupied by guest molecules, have emerged as a promising class of materials owing to the ability to tailor the size, geometry, and chemical character of their free space through the versatility of organic synthesis. As such, molecular frameworks are promising candidates for storage, separations of commodity and fine chemicals, heterogeneous catalysis, and optical and electronic materials. Frameworks assembled through hydrogen bonds, though generally not stable toward collapse in the absence of guests, promise significant chemical and structural diversity, with pores that can be tailored for a wide range of guest molecules. The utility of these frameworks, however, depends on the resilience of n-dimensional hydrogen-bonded motifs that serve as reliable building blocks so that the molecular constituents can be manipulated without disruption of the anticipated global solid-state architecture. Though many hydrogen-bonded frameworks have been reported, few exist that are amenable to systematic modification, thus limiting the design of functional materials. This Account reviews discoveries in our laboratory during the past decade related to a series of host frameworks based on guanidinium cations and interchangeable organosulfonate anions, in which the 3-fold symmetry and hydrogen-bonding complementarity of these ions prompt the formation of a two-dimensional (2-D) quasi-hexagonal hydrogen-bonding network that has proven to be remarkably resilient toward the introduction of a wide range of organic pendant groups attached to the sulfonate. Since an earlier report in this journal that focused primarily on organodisulfonate host frameworks with lamellar architectures, this unusually persistent network has afforded an unparalleled range of framework architectures and hundreds of new crystalline materials with predictable solid

  3. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, B.

    2016-05-11

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  5. Host–Guest Chirality Interplay: A Mutually Induced Formation of a Chiral ZMOF and Its Double-Helix Polymer Guests

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaolong

    2016-01-12

    A novel homochiral zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF), [(Cu4I4) (dabco)2]·[Cu2(bbimb)]·3DMF (JLU-Liu23, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-octane, H2bbimb =1,3-bis(2-benzimidazol)benzene, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), has been successfully constructed to host unprecedented DNA-like [Cu2(bbimb)]n polymers with double-helicity. The host-guest chirality interplay permitted the induced formation of an unusual gyroid MOF with homochirality and helical channels in the framework for the first time, JLU-Liu23. Importantly, the enantiomeric pairs (23P, 23M) can be promoted and isolated in the presence of appropriate chiral inducing agents, affording enantioselective separation of chiral molecules as well as small gas molecules. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  6. Host-Guest Chirality Interplay: A Mutually Induced Formation of a Chiral ZMOF and Its Double-Helix Polymer Guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaolong; Cao, Yu; Wang, Tao; Li, Guanghua; Li, Jiangang; Yang, Yonggang; Xu, Zhongxuan; Zhang, Jian; Huo, Qisheng; Liu, Yunling; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-01-27

    A novel homochiral zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF), [(Cu4I4) (dabco)2]·[Cu2(bbimb)]·3DMF (JLU-Liu23, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-octane, H2bbimb =1,3-bis(2-benzimidazol)benzene, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), has been successfully constructed to host unprecedented DNA-like [Cu2(bbimb)]n polymers with double-helicity. The host-guest chirality interplay permitted the induced formation of an unusual gyroid MOF with homochirality and helical channels in the framework for the first time, JLU-Liu23. Importantly, the enantiomeric pairs (23P, 23M) can be promoted and isolated in the presence of appropriate chiral inducing agents, affording enantioselective separation of chiral molecules as well as small gas molecules.

  7. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  8. Perception of service quality in agrotourism accommodations: Impact on guest loyalty and re-visit intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryssoula Chatzigeorgiou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development of a conceptual model that demonstrates the dynamic nature of the relationship between service quality and guest satisfaction in the agrotourism accommodation sector, based on theories derived from social psychology and previous research in the marketing, management, and services literature. The model was tested using sample data from guests of four different agrotourism firms, and was modified because of empirical results. The final model improves understanding of the relationship between service quality and guest satisfaction because these constructs were examined from the process perspective of an agrotourism accommodation experience; it portrays service quality and satisfaction in the context of a complete system.

  9. Get Your Hotel Operations Team Onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Doug

    2018-01-01

    As hospitality industry trainers know, using symbols and models can help trainees grasp abstract concepts and make seemingly-complex paradigms easy to understand. Seems like is a good time for the hotel industry to update its model, so let’s get your team onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service. When you think about it, a tricycle is a perfect model for a positive guest experience. For one, it has three wheels, just like the three components of a memorable guest stay. The back wheels repres...

  10. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bradić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in business tourism segment.

  11. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  12. Why hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  13. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century

  14. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

  15. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  16. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Selective Hydrogenation of bis-Arylidene Tetramic Acids. Application to the Synthesis of Novel Structurally Diverse Pyrrolidine-2,4-diones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Igglessi-Markopoulou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of 3,5-bis-arylidenetetramic acids, known for their biological activity, has been developed. The chemoselective ruthenium-catalyzed reduction of the exocyclic carbon-carbon double bonds on pyrrolidine-2,4-dione ring system, containing other reducible functions, has been investigated. Depending on the substrate the yield of the hydrogenation process can reach up to 95%. The structural elucidation has been established using NMR and HRMS spectral data.

  17. Special Section Guest Editorial: Nanostructured Thin Films IX: Design, Fabrication, Characterization, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Mackay, Tom G.; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2017-10-01

    This guest editorial introduces the special section on Nanostructured Thin Films IX: Design, Fabrication, Characterization, and Modeling, which appears in the October-December 2017 issue of the Journal of Nanophotonics.

  18. Cluster analysis as a tool of guests segmentation by the degree of their demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damijan Mumel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors demonstrate the use of cluster analysis in finding out (ascertaining the homogenity/heterogenity of guests as to the degree of their demand. The degree of guests’ demand is defined according to the importance of perceived service quality components measured by SERVQUAL, which was adopted and adapted, according to the specifics of health spa industry in Slovenia. Goals of the article are: (a the identification of the profile of importance of general health spa service quality components, and (b the identification of groups of guests (segments according to the degree of their demand in the research in 1991 compared with 1999. Cluster analysis serves as useful tool for guest segmentation since it reveals the existence of important differences in the structure of guests in the year 1991 compared with the year 1999. The results serve as a useful database for management in health spas.

  19. Enantioselective Light Harvesting with Perylenediimide Guests on Self-Assembled Chiral Naphthalenediimide Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethy, Ramarani; Kumar, Jatish; Métivier, Rémi; Louis, Marine; Nakatani, Keitaro; Mecheri, Nila Mohan Thazhe; Subhakumari, Akhila; Thomas, K George; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Nakashima, Takuya

    2017-11-20

    Self-assembling molecular systems often display amplified chirality compared to the monomeric state, which makes the molecular recognition more sensitive to chiral analytes. Herein, we report the almost absolute enantioselective recognition of a chiral perylenediimide (PDI) molecule by chiral supramolecular nanofibers of a bichromophoric naphthalenediimide (NDI) derivative. The chiral recognition was evaluated through the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the NDI-based host nanofibers to the guest PDI molecules. The excitation energy was successfully transferred to the guest molecule through efficient energy migration along the host nanofiber, thus demonstrating the light-harvesting capability of these hybrid systems. Furthermore, circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) was enantioselectively sensitized by the guest molecule as the wavelength band and sign of the CPL signal were switched in response to the chiral guest molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  1. Monte Carlo calculations of the free energy of binary sII hydrogen clathrate hydrates for identifying efficient promoter molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamas, Alexander A; Cuppen, Herma M; Koudriachova, Marina V; de Leeuw, Simon W

    2013-01-31

    The thermodynamics of binary sII hydrogen clathrates with secondary guest molecules is studied with Monte Carlo simulations. The small cages of the sII unit cell are occupied by one H(2) guest molecule. Different promoter molecules entrapped in the large cages are considered. Simulations are conducted at a pressure of 1000 atm in a temperature range of 233-293 K. To determine the stabilizing effect of different promoter molecules on the clathrate, the Gibbs free energy of fully and partially occupied sII hydrogen clathrates are calculated. Our aim is to predict what would be an efficient promoter molecule using properties such as size, dipole moment, and hydrogen bonding capability. The gas clathrate configurational and free energies are compared. The entropy makes a considerable contribution to the free energy and should be taken into account in determining stability conditions of binary sII hydrogen clathrates.

  2. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  3. Hydrogen energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P P; Kuznetsov, V L; David, W I F

    2007-04-15

    The problem of anthropogenically driven climate change and its inextricable link to our global society's present and future energy needs are arguably the greatest challenge facing our planet. Hydrogen is now widely regarded as one key element of a potential energy solution for the twenty-first century, capable of assisting in issues of environmental emissions, sustainability and energy security. Hydrogen has the potential to provide for energy in transportation, distributed heat and power generation and energy storage systems with little or no impact on the environment, both locally and globally. However, any transition from a carbon-based (fossil fuel) energy system to a hydrogen-based economy involves significant scientific, technological and socio-economic barriers. This brief report aims to outline the basis of the growing worldwide interest in hydrogen energy and examines some of the important issues relating to the future development of hydrogen as an energy vector.

  4. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  5. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Thai Viet [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  6. Exploring Environmental Awareness and Behavior among Guests at Hotels That Apply Water-Saving Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Gabarda-Mallorquí

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate guest profiles at a hotel that has created a best-practices water management model to determine how different types of guests contribute to saving water during their stay. To do this, we analyzed levels of environmental awareness and pro-environmental behavior among the guests. Information was gathered through 648 structured surveys with guests at Hotel Samba in the Spanish seaside resort of Lloret de Mar between September 2015 and August 2016. Cluster analysis revealed four profiles of guests with different sociodemographic characteristics and different levels of awareness and proactivity in relation to water conservation. We combined our findings to develop a framework that illustrates how the two dimensions of environmental awareness and pro-environmental behavior are related in this setting. This article provides new insights into how hotel guests’ environmental awareness and engagement can influence a hotel’s water-saving efforts. These insights should help hotel operators to devise new, guest-centered strategies for saving water.

  7. Synthesis of nano-sized hydrogen phosphate-imprinted polymer in acetonitrile/water mixture and its use as a recognition element of hydrogen phosphate selective all-solid state potentiometric electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Taher; Atayi, Khalil

    2018-02-01

    Herein, a new recipe is introduced for the preparation of hydrogen phosphate ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nano-IIP) in acetonitrile/water (63.5:36.5) using phosphoric acid as the template. The nano-IIP obtained was used as the recognition element of a carbon paste potentiometric sensor. The IIP electrode showed a Nernstian response to hydrogen phosphate anion; whereas, the non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-based electrode had no considerable sensitivity to the anion. The presence of both methacrylic acid and vinyl pyridine in the IIP structure, as well as optimization of the functional monomers-template proportion, was found to be important to observe the sensing capability of the IIP electrode. The nano-IIP electrode showed a dynamic linear range of 1 × 10 -5 -1 × 10 -1  mol L-1, Nernstian slope of 30.6 ± (0.5) mV decade -1 , response time of 25 seconds, and detection limit of 4.0 × 10 -6  mol L -1 . The utility of the electrodes was checked by potentiometric titration of hydrogen phosphate with La 3+ solution. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Interfacial assembly of dendritic microcapsules with host-guest chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Yu, Ziyi; Parker, Richard M.; Wu, Yuchao; Abell, Chris; Scherman, Oren A.

    2014-12-01

    The self-assembly of nanoscale materials to form hierarchically ordered structures promises new opportunities in drug delivery, as well as magnetic materials and devices. Herein, we report a simple means to promote the self-assembly of two polymers with functional groups at a water-chloroform interface using microfluidic technology. Two polymeric layers can be assembled and disassembled at the droplet interface using the efficiency of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) host-guest supramolecular chemistry. The microcapsules produced are extremely monodisperse in size and can encapsulate target molecules in a robust, well-defined manner. In addition, we exploit a dendritic copolymer architecture to trap a small hydrophilic molecule in the microcapsule skin as cargo. This demonstrates not only the ability to encapsulate small molecules but also the ability to orthogonally store both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cargos within a single microcapsule. The interfacially assembled supramolecular microcapsules can benefit from the diversity of polymeric materials, allowing for fine control over the microcapsule properties.

  9. NEW CHALLENGES FOR RURAL TOURISM. SPECIALIZATION OF AGRITOURISM GUEST HOUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cătălin CREŢU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative of Romania’s sustainable development, rural tourism is considered to be an assembly of productprice- consumption, which awards the country multiple opportunities for integration into European structures. Taking into consideration the Government Decision no. 20/2012 on the approval of multi-annual programmer for destinations, forms and tourism products development, the 3rd article, the 1st line, e item “actions regarding a specialized ranking of reception structures with accommodation in the hydropathical (spa and rural tourism in Romania”, as well as the measures covered in the Strategic and Operational Marketing Plan for Romania during 2011-2015, the National Authority for Tourism together with the National Organization for Rural, Ecological and Cultural Tourism, The Partnership Federation in Romanian Tourism and the Management, Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development at the University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine in Bucharest launch the pilot project: “A thematic specialization of tourism and agritourism guest houses in Romania”.

  10. The "third option": Oscilliatory migrations of retired guest workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonijević Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is focused on new migration tendencies of retired guest workers. This paper represents one part of a study conducted during 2014 in eastern Serbia and Vienna regarding life strategies of retired labor migrants. In domestic (Serbian social sciences this subject was neglected, but recently it has attracted global social scientific attention with an idea of interdisciplinary merge of migration and age studies. To the day, global literature has only covered retired migrant laborers return to their home countries, but recent studies show changes in migration tendencies of retired laborers of many different nationalities, who have spent their work age in Western Europe. These new migration patterns were called “oscillatory movement” or as a new, alternative “third option”. They are only a form of seasonal and circular migrations which present the most dominant fashion of modern migrant mobility in Europe. Therefore we wanted to see what is the situation with labor migrants from Serbia – do they return to Serbia once they retire or not, and what are their reasons for choosing to live on “two addresses”. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177035: Antropološko proučavanje Srbije – od kulturnog nasleđa do modernog društva

  11. Unusually high efficiency of β-cyclodextrin clathrate preparation by water-free solid-phase guest exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatchuk, Valery V; Gatiatulin, Askar K; Ziganshin, Marat A; Gubaidullin, Aidar T; Yakimova, Luidmila S

    2013-11-21

    An effective preparation procedure is offered for β-cyclodextrin (bCD) clathrates with volatile guests of moderate hydrophilicity, which otherwise require a finely tuned optimization of the bCD/water/guest ratio. The proposed procedure includes guest exchange in a water-free bCD matrix. As a result, more stable clathrates with a higher inclusion capacity can be prepared than by direct saturation of dried or hydrated bCD. To find an optimal preparation method, the structure-property relationships were studied for four different ways of bCD clathrate formation with guests of varying molecular structure. The study was much simplified by used procedures excluding direct contact of guest and water liquids with bCD. Besides, in clathrate preparation experiments, the thermodynamic activities of water and guest were varied independently, which makes explicit the role of water in this process. Hydration of bCD reduces its inclusion threshold for hydrophobic guests by their activity (relative vapor pressure), giving favorable hydration effect for their inclusion. Besides, water competes with hydrophilic guests for binding sites in bCD at high water activities. Together with bCD dehydration by excess of hydrophilic guests, these observations give a complete thermodynamic picture, which may be fruitful for elaboration of guest encapsulation techniques by cyclodextrins.

  12. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  13. Ash removal by hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.; von Hartmann, G.B.

    1942-10-17

    This method for the production of high-quality electrode coke involved the hydrogenation of coal to a filterable bitumen product. The hydrogenation and splitting processes were carried out to end at high-molecular-weight bitumens with some lighter oils produced. Variations in temperature, pressure, and throughput determined the type and amount of bitumens. Proper conditions allowed sufficient middle oil for recirculation as pasting oil as well as for increasing filterability by dilution. This partial hydrogenation could be performed without the addition of hydrogen, if hydrogen-producing aromatic compounds, such as tetraline or cresol, were used as pasting oils. For 700-atm hydrogenation, it was found that the Upper Silesian coal was the best with respect to yield, filterability, and recovery of the recycle oils. The lower pressures gave a better filterability while sacrificing yield and recycle oil. The more severe the hydrogenating conditions, the lighter the bitumens and the lower the melting point. For the range of 300 to 600 atm, it was found that filterability improved with increased temperature and decreased with a pressure gain. Larger throughputs caused relatively moderate decreases in filterability. The use of iron catalysts decreased filterability while changing gas and pasting-oil content had little effect. The optimum conditions established a pasting-oil equilibrium with the best filterability. Greater degrees of hydrogenation or splitting produced more recycle middle oils but decreased filterability, thus only the necessary paste oil was produced. By selecting proper conditions, an ashfree bituminous binder could be produced, as used in the production of the Soederberg electrode. 2 tables, 2 graphs

  14. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  15. Organic salts formed by 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine and selected carboxylic acids via a variety of hydrogen bonds: Synthons cooperation, and crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Peiqi; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yingying; Wang, Kunpeng; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Lei

    2017-05-01

    By using solvent evaporation method, 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAPI) is employed to crystallize with a variety of acids, including 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (HDHBA), 3-nitrophthalic acid (H2NPA), 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid (H2ATIPIA), 2,5-dibromoterephthalic acid (H2DBTPA), 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (H2NDSA), sebacic acid (H2SA), 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTA), and biphenyl-2,2‧,5,5'-tetracarboxylic acid (H4BPTA). In all eight complexes, protons are completely exchanged from O atom of acid to nitrogen of TAPI in 1, 3, 4, and, 5, partly transferred in 2, 6, 7, and 8. The crystal structure of all eight complexes exhibit that classical robust hydrogen bonds X-H⋯X (X = O/N) direct the molecular crystals to bind together in a stacking modes. Classical hydrogen bond Nsbnd H⋯O is participated in forming all eight organic salts, while hydrogen bonding Osbnd H⋯O are found in constructing the diversity structures in salts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7. The analysis shows that some classical supramolecular synthons, such as I R22(8), V R24(12), and VI S(6), are observed again in the construction of hydrogen-bonding networks. In the formation of layered and reticular structure, strong hydrogen bonds between water molecules and ligands having well-refined hydrogen atoms have been considered. Water molecules play an important role in building supramolecular structures of 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 8. Moreover, salts 1-8 are further characterized and analyzed by element analysis, infrared radiation, thermogravimetric analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and mass spectra.

  16. A chemical preformulation study of a host-guest complex of cucurbit[7]uril and a multinuclear platinum agent for enhanced anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Alan R; Florence, Alastair J; McInnes, Fiona J; Wheate, Nial J

    2009-10-07

    Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction have been used to examine the host-guest complex of cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and the model dinuclear platinum anticancer complex trans-[{PtCl(NH(3))(2)}(2)mu-dpzm](2+) (di-Pt, dpzm= 4,4'-dipyrazolylmethane). The single crystal structure shows that the host-guest complex forms with the di-Pt dpzm ligand within the CB[7] cavity and with the platinum groups just beyond the macrocycle portals. Binding is stabilised through hydrophobic interactions and six hydrogen bonds between the platinum ammine ligands and the dpzm pyrazole amine to the CB[7] carbonyls. Each host-guest complex crystallises with two chloride counterions and 5.5 water molecules. The unit cell comprises four asymmetric units, each of which contains three crystallographically independent CB[7]-di-Pt moieties. X-Ray powder diffraction demonstrated structural consistency of the bulk crystals with a single polycrystalline phase that is identical with the single crystal structure. Finally, the effect of CB[7] encapsulation of the thermal stability of di-Pt was examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). From the TGA experiments it was found that free CB[7] and the CB[7]-di-Pt complex lose 11 and 3.5% of their mass respectively, through the loss of water molecules, upon heating to 160 degrees C. The DSC results showed that the free dpzm ligand melts between 186 and 199 degrees C, with a standard enthalpy of fusion of 27.92 kJ mol(-1). As a 2+ inorganic salt the metal complex does not melt but undergoes several decomposition events between 140 and 290 degrees C. Encapsulation by CB[7] completely stabilises di-Pt with no decomposition of either the macrocycle or metal complex at temperatures up to 290 degrees C.

  17. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  18. Unique properties of α-NaFeO{sub 2}: De-intercalation of sodium via hydrolysis and the intercalation of guest molecules into the extract solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monyoncho, Evans; Bissessur, Rabin, E-mail: rabissessur@upei.ca

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile de-intercalating Na from NaFeO2. • Formation of layered sodium hydrogen carbonate hydrate. • Intercalation chemistry on layered sodium hydrogen carbonate hydrate. - Abstract: We report on a versatile method for the de-intercalation of Na from α-NaFeO{sub 2} by using water to produce α-Na{sub 1−x}FeO{sub 2}, where x ≈ 1. This de-intercalation technique provides an excellent route to ion exchange Na with other metal ions in α-NaFeO{sub 2}. The hydrolysis mechanism is provided. We show that the extracted solution captures CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere leading to the formation of sodium hydrogen carbonate hydrate crystals. The lamellar structure of the hydrate crystals was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, and were found Na-deficient via elemental analysis. Intercalation of guest molecules such as polymers, alcohols, and inorganic ions into the gallery space of the newly formed sodium hydrogen carbonate hydrate crystals was demonstrated by the use of powder X-ray diffraction technique. The reported materials were also characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  20. Network and guest dependent thermal stability and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    non-hydrogen atoms were refined anisotropically and the H atoms bonded to C were fixed in calculated posi- ..... I or II clathrates of BrPOT form concomitantly from the THF or DCM solution of the host respective- ly. ... room temperature outside the mother liquor. On the other hand, the crystals of the cage-I THF clathrate were.

  1. Guests of Differing Polarities Provide Insight into Structural Requirements for Templates of Water-Soluble Nano-Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Corinne L. D.; Gibb, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    Guests covering a range of polarities were examined for their ability to bind to a water-soluble cavitand and trigger its assembly into a supramolecular capsule. Specifically the guests examined were: tridecane 2, 1-dodecanol 3, 2-nonyloxy ethanol (ethylene glycol monononyl ether) 4, 2-(2-hexyloxyethoxy) ethanol (Di(ethylene glycol) hexyl ether) 5, 2-[2-(2 propoxyethoxy)ethoxy] ethanol (Tri(ethylene glycol) propyl ether 6, and bis [2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)ethyl] ether (tetra(ethylene glycol)) 7. In this series, guest 6 proved to signify the boundary between assembly and the formation of 2:1 complexes, and simple 1:1 complexation. Thus, guests 2–5 formed relatively kinetically stable capsules, guest 6 formed a capsule that was unstable relative to the NMR timescale, and guest 7 formed a simple 1:1 complex. PMID:20606762

  2. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF MALEIC ANHYDRIDE TO Y-BUTROLACTONE OVER PD/AL2O3 CATALYST USING SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE MEDIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogenation of maleic anhydride to g-butyrolactone over Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under supercritical carbondioxide mediumUnnikrishnan R. Pillai and Endalkachew Sahle-DemessieNational Risk Management Research laboratory (NRMRL), Clean Processes Branch, MS 443, United States...

  3. Theoretical model estimation of guest diffusion in Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Bin

    2015-08-11

    Characterizing molecule diffusion in nanoporous matrices is critical to understanding the novel chemical and physical properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this paper, we developed a theoretical model to fastly and accurately compute the diffusion rate of guest molecules in a zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8). The ideal gas or equilibrium solution diffusion model was modified to contain the effect of periodical media via introducing the possibility of guests passing through the framework gate. The only input in our model is the energy barrier of guests passing through the MOF’s gate. Molecular dynamics (MD) methods were employed to gather the guest density profile, which then was used to deduce the energy barrier values. This produced reliable results that require a simulation time of 5 picoseconds, which is much shorter when using pure MD methods (in the billisecond scale) . Also, we used density functional theory (DFT) methods to obtain the energy profile of guests passing through gates, as this does not require specification of a force field for the MOF degrees of freedom. In the DFT calculation, we only considered one gate of MOFs each time; as this greatly reduced the computational cost. Based on the obtained energy barrier values we computed the diffusion rate of alkane and alcohol in ZIF-8 using our model, which was in good agreement with experimental test results and the calculation values from standard MD model. Our model shows the advantage of obtaining accurate diffusion rates for guests in MOFs for a lower computational cost and shorter calculation time. Thus, our analytic model calculation is especially attractive for high-throughput computational screening of the dynamic performance of guests in a framework.

  4. Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

  5. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  6. Amorphous Metal-Free Room-Temperature Phosphorescent Small Molecules with Multicolor Photoluminescence via a Host-Guest and Dual-Emission Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengfeng; Lu, Feifei; Wang, Jie; Hu, Wende; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Xiang; Tian, He

    2018-02-07

    Metal-free room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials offer unprecedented potentials for photoelectric and biochemical materials due to their unique advantages of long lifetime and low toxicity. However, the achievements of phosphorescence at ambient condition so far have been mainly focused on ordered crystal lattice or on embedding into rigid matrices, where the preparation process might bring out poor repeatability and limited application. In this research, a series of amorphous organic small molecular compounds were developed with efficient RTP emission through conveniently modifying phosphor moieties to β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The hydrogen bonding between the cyclodextrin derivatives immobilizes the phosphors to suppress the nonradiative relaxation and shields phosphors from quenchers, which enables such molecules to emit efficient RTP emission with decent quantum yields. Furthermore, one such cyclodextrin derivative was utilized to construct a host-guest system incorporating a fluorescent guest molecule, exhibiting excellent RTP-fluorescence dual-emission properties and multicolor emission with a wide range from yellow to purple including white-light emission. This innovative and universal strategy opens up new research paths to construct amorphous metal-free small molecular RTP materials and to design organic white-light-emitting materials using a single supramolecular platform.

  7. pH-Responsive Host–Guest Complexation in Pillar[6]arene-Containing Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A water-soluble, anionic pillar[6]arene derivative (WP6 is applied as monomeric building block for the layer-by-layer self-assembly of thin polyelectrolyte multilayer films, and its pH-dependent host–guest properties are employed for the reversible binding and release of a methylviologen guest molecule. The alternating assembly of anionic WP6 and cationic diazo resin (DAR is monitored in-situ by a dissipative quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D. In solution, the formation of a stoichiometric inclusion complex of WP6 and cationic methylviologen (MV as guest molecule is investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively, and attributed to electrostatic interactions as primary driving force of the host–guest complexation. Exposure of WP6-containing multilayers to MV solution reveals a significant decrease of the resonance frequency, confirming MV binding. Subsequent release is achieved by pH lowering, decreasing the host–guest interactions. The dissociation of the host–guest complex, release of the guest from the film, as well as full reversibility of the binding event are identified by QCM-D. In addition, UV-vis data quantify the surface coverage of the guest molecule in the film after loading and release, respectively. These findings establish the pH-responsiveness of WP6 as a novel external stimulus for the reversible guest molecule recognition in thin films.

  8. Discrimination of chiral guests by chiral channels: variable temperature studies by SXRD and solid state 13C NMR of the deoxycholic acid complexes of camphorquinone and endo-3-bromocamphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Mohamed I M; Rees, Nicholas H; Heyes, Stephen J; Cowley, Andrew R; Prout, Keith

    2008-07-01

    3alpha,12alpha-dihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid (deoxycholic acid DCA) is able to discriminate between the R- and S-enantiomers of camphorquinone and endo-(+)-3-bromocamphor and select only the S-enantiomers from a racemic mixture. DCA forms novel well ordered 1:1 adducts with (1S)-(+)-camphorquinone and (1S)-endo-(-)-3-bromocamphor, both of which have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD). When DCA is cocrystallized with (RS)-camphorquinone and (RS)-endo-3-bromocamphor, 1:1 adducts of the S-enantiomers are produced together with crystals of the free racemic guest. In contrast, in the absence of (1S)-(+)-camphorquinone, DCA forms a 2:1 adduct with (1R)-(-)-camphorquinone. In this 2:1 adduct the guest is disordered at ambient temperature and undergoes a phase change in the region 160-130 K similar to that observed for the ferrocene adduct, but with only partial ordering of the guest. The SXRD structure of the low temperature form and the variable temperature (13)C CP/MAS NMR are reported. Cocrystallizing DCA with (1R)-endo-(+)-3-bromocamphor gives the free guest and a glassy solid. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Mechanochromic MOF nanoplates: spatial molecular isolation of light-emitting guests in a sodalite framework structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijeet K; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2018-02-22

    Mechanochromic materials have a wide range of promising technological applications, such as photonics-based sensors and smart optoelectronics. The examples of mechanochromic metal-organic framework (MOF) materials, however, are still relatively uncommon in the literature. Herein, we present a previously undescribed Guest@MOF system, comprising "Perylene@ZIF-8" nanoplates, which will undergo a reversible 442 nm ⇌ 502 nm photoemission switching when subjected to a moderate level of mechanically-induced pressure at several tens of MPa. The nanoplates were constructed via high-concentration reaction (HCR) strategy at ambient conditions to yield a crystalline ZIF-8 framework hosting the luminous Perylene guests. The latter confined within the porous sodalite cages of ZIF-8. Remarkably, we show that in a solid-state condition, it is the spatial isolation and nano-partitioning of the luminescent guests that bestow the unique solution-like optical properties measured in the host-guest assembly. As such, we demonstrate that switchable red- or blue-shifts of the visible emission can be accomplished by mechanically modifying the nanoscale packing of the nanoplates (e.g. monoliths, pellets). Theoretical calculations suggest that the elasticity of the host's sodalite cage coupled with the intermolecular weak interactions of the confined guest are responsible for the unique mechanochromic luminescence behavior observed.

  10. Palladium nanoparticles supported on fibrous-structured silica nanospheres (KCC-1): An efficient and selective catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of alkenes

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin

    2015-01-09

    An efficient palladium catalyst supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, providing excellent yields of the corresponding products with remarkable chemoselectivity. Comparison (high-resolution TEM, chemisorption) with analogous mesoporous (MCM-41, SBA-15) silica-supported Pd nanocatalysts prepared under identical conditions, demonstrates the advantage of employing the fibrous KCC-1 morphology versus traditional supports because it ensures superior accessibility of the catalytically active cores along with excellent Pd dispersion at high metal loading. This morphology ultimately leads to higher catalytic activity for the KCC-1-supported nanoparticles. The protocol developed for hydrogenation is advantageous and environmentally benign owing to the use of HCOOH as a source of hydrogen, water as a solvent, and because of efficient catalyst recyclability and durability. The recycled catalyst has been analyzed by XPS spectroscopy and TEM showing only minor changes in the oxidation state of Pd and in the morphology after the reaction, thus confirming the robustness of the catalyst.

  11. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  12. Hydrogen usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-22

    This short tabular report listed the number of m/sup 3/ of hydrogen required for a (metric) ton of product for various combinations of raw material and product in a hydrogenation procedure. In producing auto gasoline, bituminous coal required 2800 m/sup 3/, brown coal required 2400 m/sup 3/, high-temperature-carbonization tar required 2100 m/sup 3/, bituminous coal distillation tar required 1300 m/sup 3/, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 850 m/sup 3/, petroleum residues required 900 m/sup 3/, and gas oil required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, brown coal required 1900 m/sup 3/, whereas petroleum residues required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, lubricants, and paraffin by the TTH (low-temperature-hydrogenation) process, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 550 m/sup 3/. 1 table.

  13. Carbohydrate-Based Host-Guest Complexation of Hydrophobic Antibiotics for the Enhancement of Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daham; Joo, Sang-Woo; Shinde, Vijay Vilas; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2017-08-08

    Host-guest complexation with various hydrophobic drugs has been used to enhance the solubility, permeability, and stability of guest drugs. Physical changes in hydrophobic drugs by complexation have been related to corresponding increases in the bioavailability of these drugs. Carbohydrates, including various derivatives of cyclodextrins, cyclosophoraoses, and some linear oligosaccharides, are generally used as host complexation agents in drug delivery systems. Many antibiotics with low bioavailability have some limitations to their clinical use due to their intrinsically poor aqueous solubility. Bioavailability enhancement is therefore an important step to achieve the desired concentration of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections. Antibiotics encapsulated in a complexation-based drug delivery system will display improved antibacterial activity making it possible to reduce dosages and overcome the serious global problem of antibiotic resistance. Here, we review the present research trends in carbohydrate-based host-guest complexation of various hydrophobic antibiotics as an efficient delivery system to improve solubility, permeability, stability, and controlled release.

  14. Bringing guest scientists to the university biology classroom via the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiliko, Nathan; Gupta, Varun

    2015-08-01

    This commentary describes an initiative to bring national and international guest scientists to undergraduate and introductory graduate classrooms via web videoconferencing to facilitate interesting and effective research-informed teaching. Interactions center around both journal articles authored by the guests that are in line with weekly course lecture topics and on learning about the nature of academia in other parts of the world. Some particularly interesting perspectives from guests have come about by connecting with a journal editor-in-chief, a textbook author and with a scientist who shared a recently rejected manuscript and peer reviews. Beyond allowing students a unique behind-the-scenes look into how research questions are asked and answered, this initiative helps overcome the limited nature of a single instructor's research area to better complement the comprehensive scope of university courses. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The SAMPL4 host-guest blind prediction challenge: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddana, Hari S.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Mobley, David L.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2014-04-01

    Prospective validation of methods for computing binding affinities can help assess their predictive power and thus set reasonable expectations for their performance in drug design applications. Supramolecular host-guest systems are excellent model systems for testing such affinity prediction methods, because their small size and limited conformational flexibility, relative to proteins, allows higher throughput and better numerical convergence. The SAMPL4 prediction challenge therefore included a series of host-guest systems, based on two hosts, cucurbit[7]uril and octa-acid. Binding affinities in aqueous solution were measured experimentally for a total of 23 guest molecules. Participants submitted 35 sets of computational predictions for these host-guest systems, based on methods ranging from simple docking, to extensive free energy simulations, to quantum mechanical calculations. Over half of the predictions provided better correlations with experiment than two simple null models, but most methods underperformed the null models in terms of root mean squared error and linear regression slope. Interestingly, the overall performance across all SAMPL4 submissions was similar to that for the prior SAMPL3 host-guest challenge, although the experimentalists took steps to simplify the current challenge. While some methods performed fairly consistently across both hosts, no single approach emerged as consistent top performer, and the nonsystematic nature of the various submissions made it impossible to draw definitive conclusions regarding the best choices of energy models or sampling algorithms. Salt effects emerged as an issue in the calculation of absolute binding affinities of cucurbit[7]uril-guest systems, but were not expected to affect the relative affinities significantly. Useful directions for future rounds of the challenge might involve encouraging participants to carry out some calculations that replicate each others' studies, and to systematically explore

  16. The SAMPL4 host–guest blind prediction challenge: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddana, Hari S.; Fenley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Prospective validation of methods for computing binding affinities can help assess their predictive power and thus set reasonable expectations for their performance in drug design applications. Supramolecular host–guest systems are excellent model systems for testing such affinity prediction methods, because their small size and limited conformational flexibility, relative to proteins, allows higher throughput and better numerical convergence. The SAMPL4 prediction challenge therefore included a series of host–guest systems, based on two hosts, cucurbit[7]uril and octa-acid. Binding affinities in aqueous solution were measured experimentally for a total of 23 guest molecules. Participants submitted 35 sets of computational predictions for these host–guest systems, based on methods ranging from simple docking, to extensive free energy simulations, to quantum mechanical calculations. Over half of the predictions provided better correlations with experiment than two simple null models, but most methods underperformed the null models in terms of root mean squared error and linear regression slope. Interestingly, the overall performance across all SAMPL4 submissions was similar to that for the prior SAMPL3 host–guest challenge, although the experimentalists took steps to simplify the current challenge. While some methods performed fairly consistently across both hosts, no single approach emerged as consistent top performer, and the nonsystematic nature of the various submissions made it impossible to draw definitive conclusions regarding the best choices of energy models or sampling algorithms. Salt effects emerged as an issue in the calculation of absolute binding affinities of cucurbit[7]uril-guest systems, but were not expected to affect the relative affinities significantly. Useful directions for future rounds of the challenge might involve encouraging participants to carry out some calculations that replicate each others’ studies, and to systematically

  17. Removable Water-Soluble Olefin Metathesis Catalyst via Host-Guest Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheoljae; Ondrusek, Brian A; Chung, Hoyong

    2018-02-02

    A highly removable N-heterocyclic carbene ligand for a transition-metal catalyst in aqueous media via host-guest interactions has been developed. Water-soluble adamantyl tethered ethylene glycol in the ligand leads a hydrophobic inclusion into the cavity of β-cyclodextrin. Ruthenium (Ru) olefin metathesis catalyst with this ligand demonstrated excellent performance in various metathesis reactions in water as well as in CH 2 Cl 2 , and removal of residual Ru was performed via filtration utilizing a host-guest interaction and extraction.

  18. Lattice dynamics study of low energy guest host coupling in clathrate hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue-Hai; Dong, Shun-Le; Wang, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Our lattice dynamics simulation of Xe-hydrate with four-site TIP4P oxygen-shell model can accurately reproduce each peak position in the inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectrum at the acoustic band (below 15meV) and yield correct relative intensity. Based on the results, the uncertain profile at ~6 meV is assigned to anharmonic guest modes coupled strongly to small cages. Blue shift is proposed in phonon dispersion sheet in the case of anticrossing and found to be an evident signal for guest-host coupling that explains the anomalous thermal conductivity of clathrate hydrate.

  19. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen is probably the most intriguing ele- ment in the periodic table. Although it is only the seventh most abundant element on earth, it is the most abundant element in the uni- verse. It combines with almost all the ele- ments of the periodic table, except for a few transition elements, to form binary compounds of the type E.

  20. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  1. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes. 2. Effects of molecular properties of guests and surface functionalities of dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Cheng, Yiyun; Wu, Qinglin; Zhao, Libo; Xu, Tongwen

    2009-08-06

    The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is investigated by NMR techniques, including (1)H NMR and 2D-NOESY studies. The effects of molecular properties of drug molecules (protonation ability and spatial steric hindrance of charged groups) and surface functionalities of dendrimers (positively charged amine groups and negatively charged carboxylate groups) on the host-guest interactions are discussed. Different interaction mechanisms between dendrimers and drug molecules are proposed on the basis of NMR results. Primary amine- and secondary amine-containing drugs preferentially bind to negatively charged dendrimers by strong electrostatic interactions, whereas tertiary amine and quaternary ammonium-containing drugs have weak binding ability with dendrimers due to relatively low protonation ability of the tertiary amine group and serious steric hindrance of the quaternary ammonium group. Positively charged drugs locate only on the surface of negatively charged dendrimers, whereas negatively charged drugs locate both on the surface and in the interior cavities of positively charged dendrimers. The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is promising for the development of new drug delivery systems.

  2. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  3. (14)N NQR, (1)H NMR and DFT/QTAIM study of hydrogen bonding and polymorphism in selected solid 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Janez; Zagar, Veselko; Latosińska, Jolanta N

    2010-10-28

    The 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives (2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole, acetazolamide, sulfamethizole) have been studied experimentally in the solid state by (1)H-(14)N NQDR spectroscopy and theoretically by Density Functional Theory (DFT). The specific pattern of the intra and intermolecular interactions in 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives is described within the QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules)/DFT formalism. The results obtained in this work suggest that considerable differences in the NQR parameters permit differentiation even between specific pure association polymorphic forms and indicate that the stronger hydrogen bonds are accompanied by the larger η and smaller ν(-) and e(2)Qq/h values. The degree of π-electron delocalization within the 1,3,4-thiadiazole ring and hydrogen bonds is a result of the interplay between the substituents and can be easily observed as a change in NQR parameters at N atoms. In the absence of X-ray data NQR parameters can clarify the details of crystallographic structure revealing information on intermolecular interactions.

  4. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey's continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta 2 H (δ 2 H) and as delta 18 O (δ 18 O), respectively. The values of δ 2 H and δ 18 O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of δ 2 H and δ 18 O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively

  5. Deuterium exchange at terminal boron--hydrogen bonds catalyzed by certain transition metal complexes. A qualitative study of selectivity and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, E.L.; Talebinasab-Savari, M.; Hawthorne, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    A wide variety of substrates, including carboranes, metallocarboranes, and boron hydrides, were found to undergo catalytic isotopic exchange of terminal hydrogen with deuterium gas in the presence of various transition metal complexes. With (PPh 3 ) 3 RuHCl as catalyst, exchange was found to proceed with stereoselectivity indicative of nucleophilic attack at boron; e.g., the order of rates for deuterium incorporation at chemically nonequivalent sites in 1,2-C 2 B 10 H 12 was B(3,6) greater than B(4,5,7,11) greater than B(8,10) greater than B(9,12). Other catalysts, most notably the series of hydridometallocarboranes, (PPh 3 ) 2 HMC 2 B 9 H 11 (M = Rh, Ir), showed little or no stereoselectivity during deuterium exchange. Intermediate stereoselectivity was found with (PPh 3 ) 2 (CO)IrCl and (PPh 3 ) 2 IrCl species as catalysts, while exchange catalyzed by (AsPh 3 ) 2 IrCl exhibited the stereoselectivity found with (PPh 3 ) 3 RuHCl. A mechanism is postulated which rationalizes the varied results and which involves oxidative addition of boron--hydrogen bonds to catalytic species

  6. On the characterization of host-guest complexes : Surface tension, calorimetry, and molecular dynamics of cyclodextrins with a non-ionic surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pineiro, Angel; Banquy, Xavier; Perez-Casas, Silvia; Tovar, Edgar; Garcia, Abel; Villa, Alessandra; Amigo, Alfredo; Mark, Alan E.; Costas, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Three host-guest systems have been characterized using surface tension (sigma), calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations (MD). The hosts were three native cyclodextrins (CD) and the guest the non-ionic carbohydrate surfactant octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside. It is shown that, for any host-guest

  7. Synthesis of C3-symmetric tri(alkylamino) guests and their interaction with cyclodextrins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednaříková, T.; Tošner, Z.; Horský, Jiří; Jindřich, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, 1-2 (2015), s. 141-152 ISSN 0923-0750 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cyclodextrin * supramolecular interactions * C3-symmetric guests Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.253, year: 2015

  8. Edit What do guests value most in Airbnb accommodations? An application of the hedonic pricing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Dogru

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Private rooms, entire homes, laundry, free parking, kitchens - these are just some of the amenities that Airbnb guests are looking for in accommodations. Using data from the Greater Boston Area, Dr. Dogru and Osman Pekin uncover how these amenities affect Airbnb nightly rates.

  9. Energy-cascade organic photovoltaic devices incorporating a host-guest architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, S Matthew; Holmes, Russell J

    2015-02-04

    In planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs), broad spectral coverage can be realized by incorporating multiple molecular absorbers in an energy-cascade architecture. Here, this approach is combined with a host-guest donor layer architecture previously shown to optimize exciton transport for the fluorescent organic semiconductor boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) when diluted in an optically transparent host. In order to maximize the absorption efficiency, energy-cascade OPVs that utilize both photoactive host and guest donor materials are examined using the pairing of SubPc and boron subnaphthalocyanine chloride (SubNc), respectively. In a planar heterojunction architecture, excitons generated on the SubPc host rapidly energy transfer to the SubNc guest, where they may migrate toward the dissociating, donor-acceptor interface. Overall, the incorporation of a photoactive host leads to a 13% enhancement in the short-circuit current density and a 20% enhancement in the power conversion efficiency relative to an optimized host-guest OPV combining SubNc with a nonabsorbing host. This work underscores the potential for further design refinements in planar heterojunction OPVs and demonstrates progress toward the effective separation of functionality between constituent OPV materials.

  10. Mystery Guests 2. Begeleidend evaluatie onderzoek naar het vervolgproject in inspectie ouderenzorg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.V. Stoopendaal (Annemiek)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In het najaar van 2014 is de IGZ begonnen met een tweede pilot mystery guests in het toezicht op de ouderenzorg. Het begeleidend onderzoek naar dit vervolgproject had ten doel antwoord te krijgen op de vraag welke informatie de inzet van getrainde en opgeleide

  11. Motivations of farm tourism hosts and guests in the South West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study employs a combined methodological research model drawn from the work of distinguished phenomenologists to explicate the experience of hosts and guests. The phenomenological descriptions derived through the explication process encapsulate the invariant structures or essence of meaning for each group.

  12. Do the COX-2 inhibitors still have a role to play? : guest editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do the COX-2 inhibitors still have a role to play? : guest editorial. A Beeton. Abstract. No Abstract Available Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia Vol.11(2) 2005: 55-60. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics ...

  13. The educational attainment of the children of the Danish ”guest worker” immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Vibeke; Smith, Nina

    analyse potential immigrant-specific factors as language proficiency, attending mother-tongue courses and expectations concerning out or return migration from Denmark. The results show that intergenerational transmission effects are strong among ‘guest worker’ immigrants, especially among men. Other...

  14. Host and guest: an applied hermeneutic study of mental health nurses' practices on inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Graham

    2014-09-01

    The metaphor of host and guest has value for exploring the practice and role identity of nurses on inpatient mental health units. Two complementary texts, one from the ancient Zen record of Lin-chi, and the other from the contemporary hermeneutic philosopher Richard Kearney, are used to elaborate meanings of host and guest that can be applied to the situation of mental health nurses. In a doctoral study with a hermeneutic design, I addressed the topic of nurse-patient relationship using an interpretive framework that included sources from Buddhist thought. The positions of host and guest emerged from interviews with nurses as one interpretive theme to open up new understanding of the topic. The two texts, originally distant in era and culture, both employ the host and guest metaphor. They are applied to extracts from interviews to open up discussions of hierarchy, status, patients' perspectives, otherness and resistances as features of nurses' complex experience. These provide insights into understanding practice and suggest implications for how institutional environments shape practice. An intercultural reading of texts can provide a source of new understanding of nurse-patient relationships. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Innkeeper's Liability for Loss Suffered by Guests:Drake v Dow

    OpenAIRE

    Du Plessis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Drake v Dow is concerned with the issue of strict liability attributed to innkeepers for loss suffered by guests. The case also contains an entertaining foray into the historical development of the law of delict in Scotland and may therefore be of interest to legal historians.

  16. Self-Assembly, Guest Capture, and NMR Spectroscopy of a Metal-Organic Cage in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Eun Bin; Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Cheng, Stephanie L.; Vosburg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A green organic-inorganic laboratory experiment has been developed in which students prepare a self-assembling iron cage in D[subscript 2]O at room temperature. The tetrahedral cage captures a small, neutral molecule such as cyclohexane or tetrahydrofuran. [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis distinguishes captured and free guests through diagnostic…

  17. Impact of Industry Guest Speakers on Business Students' Perceptions of Employability Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, L.; Sibson, R.; Roepen, D.; Meakins, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insights into the perceptions and expectations of Australian undergraduate business students (n=150) regarding the incorporation of guest speakers into the curriculum of a leadership unit focused on employability skills development. The authors adopted a mixed methods approach. A survey was conducted, with quantitative results…

  18. Quantification of photoinduced order increase in liquid crystals with naphthopyran guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, Mariacristina; Cazzell, Seth A; Kosa, Tamas; Sukhomlinova, Ludmila; Taheri, Bahman; White, Timothy J; Bunning, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Photoinduced order-increasing phase transitions can occur in dye-liquid crystal mixtures when the photoproduct of the excitation of the dye molecules is more compatible with the liquid crystalline medium than the initial dye species. A detailed investigation of the photoinduced changes of the phase behavior and optical properties of mixtures of liquid crystals with naphthopyran guests upon exposure to light at 365 nm is presented here. In these guest-host systems, the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition temperature is increased upon irradiation. We show that the nematic range can be extended up to 2.9 °C by illumination in 5CB (4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl) liquid crystal mixtures. The order parameter is significantly increased by illumination at all temperatures within the nematic range and the changes are larger at higher concentrations of the guests. In particular, the illuminated guest-host mixtures exhibit order parameters close to those of the neat liquid crystal host at the same temperature relative to the clearing point. An improved understanding of the photophysical processes taking place at the molecular level in these material systems can inform the design of photoresponsive materials and enhance their potential utility in optical or photonic devices.

  19. Pedagogical Guest Room as an Educational Form of Students' Pedagogical Competence Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirova, Elvira G.

    2016-01-01

    Actuality of the studied problem is conditioned by the fact that certain work forms with students represent possibilities for organizing educative activity of more complex level. The article is aimed on revealing educative potentiality of "pedagogical guest room" as one of the forms intended on development of students' pedagogical…

  20. Invited Guest or Wedding Crasher?: School Librarians' Involvement in National Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Nationwide education initiatives are underway in various parts of the world, including a push for national curricula in the U.S. and Australia. In Australia, school librarians have been invited guests to provide input into the integration of digital/information literacy across curriculum areas. Conversely, U.S., school librarians crashed the…

  1. Chemical signals turn on guest binding through structural reconfiguration of triangular helicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne; Castilla, Ana M.; Ronson, Tanya K.

    2013-01-01

    Be my guest: The function of a system based on self-assembled Zn(II) complexes can be controlled by external chemical stimuli. The complexes are based on a C3 -symmetric ligand that forms a unique triangular triple helicate structure 1. Upon subcomponent substitution, 1 is able to transform into ...

  2. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  3. Catalysts for selective hydrogenation of furfural derived from the double complex salt [Pd(NH 3 ) 4 ](ReO 4 ) 2 on γ-Al 2 O 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Simon T.; Lamb, H. Henry

    2017-06-01

    The double complex salt [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 was employed as precursor of supported bimetallic catalysts for selective hydrogenation of furfural. Direct reduction of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 in flowing H2 at 400 °C yields bimetallic nanoparticles 1–2 nm in size that exhibit significant interaction between the metals, as evidenced by temperature-programmed hydride decomposition (complete suppression of β-PdHx formation), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Pd K and Re LIII edges (PdRe distance = 2.72 Å), and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In contrast, calcination of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 at 350 °C in air and subsequent reduction in H2 at 400 °C results in metal segregation and formation of large (>50 nm) supported Pd particles; Re species cover the Pd particles and γ-Al2O3 support. A PdRe 1:2 catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation and calcination using HReO4 and [Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2 has a similar morphology. The catalyst derived by direct reduction of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 exhibits remarkably high activity for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol (FAL) at 150 °C and 1 atm. Suppression of H2 chemisorption via elimination of Pd threefold sites, as evidenced by CO diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, correlates with increased FAL selectivity.

  4. Unanticipated guest motion during a phase transition in a ferroelastic inclusion compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Mark D; Peterson, Matthew L; Pate, Kevin L; Dinkelmeyer, Brian D; Brown, Michael E

    2002-03-13

    Urea inclusion compounds (UICs) have been used as tools to understand ferroelastic domain switching and molecular recognition during crystal growth. Although the vast majority of UICs contain helical arrangements of host H-bonds, those containing guests with the formula X(CH(2))(6)Y (X, Y = Br, Cl, CN, NC) adopt an alternative P2(1)/n packing mode in which the host molecules exist as stacked loops of urea hexamers. Such structures may be further separated into two classes, ones distorted away from hexagonal symmetry along [100] (Br(CH(2))(6)Br, Br(CH(2))(6)Cl, and Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl) and those distorted along [001] (e.g. NC(CH(2))(6)CN). In each of these systems, guests exist as equilibrium mixtures of gauche conformers whose populations control the direction and magnitude of the observed distortion. Such UICs are potentially ferroelastic, but the n-glide requires that domains are not related by a simple rotation-translation mechanism as in the helical systems. Ferroelastic (degenerate) domain reorientation would necessitate a large-scale reorganization of the urea framework and rupture of numerous H-bonds. Coupled with distortions of 2 to 10%, this mechanism-based barrier to domain switching has precluded observation of this phenomenon. To prepare ferroelastic UICs with minimal distortions from hexagonal symmetry, attempts were made to form solid solutions of UICs containing guests from the two classes. This failed, however: solid solution formation of the stacked loop form is usually possible within a series (e.g. with Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl and Br(CH(2))(6)Br), but not between series (e.g. Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl and NC(CH(2))(6)CN). Crystals of Cl(CH(2))(6)CN/urea, in which a single guest contains substituents from each class, are distorted along [001] by only 0.5% from hexagonal symmetry at 298 K and exhibit ferroelastic domain reorientation at high forces. At -66 degrees C, Cl(CH(2))(6)CN/urea undergoes a topotactic phase transition that is unexpectedly nontopochemical. The

  5. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds. Keywords. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon; metastable electronic states; hydrogen diffusion. PACS Nos 61.43.Dq; 66.30.-h; 71.23.Cq. 1. Introduction. Hydrogen passivation of dangling bonds ...

  6. dimensional architectures via hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The analyses show that the weight loss observed in complexes of 8 follow the same pattern and does not depend on the type of guest molecules present in the network. When naphthalene is present as guest molecule (8a), the 12⋅6% of weight loss observed till 168°C corresponds to the loss of naph- thalene molecules ...

  7. Nurses as 'guests'--a study of a concept in light of Jacques Derrida's philosophy of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresland, Stina; Lutzén, Kim; Norberg, Astrid; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Määttä, Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    As revealed in previous empirical research, nurses describe their position in home-based nursing care (HBNC) as that of 'guests' in the patient's home. Such a description is problematic as 'guests' might not be considered to belong to the realm of professionalism. As Jacques Derrida's work on hospitality has received wide publicity, sparking theoretical and philosophical discussion about host and guest, the aim of this study was to explore how the concept 'guests' can be understood in the light of Derrida's philosophy of hospitality. The study revealed that (a) guest must be considered a binary concept; and (b) hospitality should be regarded as an exchange of giving and receiving between a host and a guest. The present study demonstrated that it is important to reflect on the meaning of the concepts used by nurses in HBNC. Further theoretical and empirical exploration of the concept 'hospitality' would be fruitful, i.e. what is patients' understanding of 'hospitality' and 'hostility' related to nurses' descriptions of themselves as 'guests' in the patient's home. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Production of dimethylfuran from hydroxymethylfurfural through catalytic transfer hydrogenation with ruthenium supported on carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Jungho; Zheng, Weiqing; Lobo, Raul F; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-07-01

    RuC ees' transfer: Transfer hydrogenation using alcohols as hydrogen donors and supported ruthenium catalysts results in the selective conversion of hydroxymethylfurfural to dimethylfuran (>80% yield). During transfer hydrogenation, the hydrogen produced from alcohols is utilized in the hydrogenation of hydroxymethylfurfural. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  10. Recruiting Future Engineers Through Effective Guest Speaking In Elementary School Classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Young

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, the author describes how engineers can increase the number of future engineers by volunteering as guest speakers in the elementary school classroom. The paper is divided into three main subjects. First, the importance of engineers speaking directly with young students is discussed. Next, several best practice techniques for speaking with young students are described. Finally, information on getting started as a guest speaker is presented, and a list of resources available to guest speakers is provided. The guest engineer speaking to an elementary school audience (ages 6-11) performs a critical role in encouraging young students to pursue a career in engineering. Often, he or she is the first engineer these students meet in person, providing a crucial first impression of the engineering career field and a positive visual image of what an engineer really looks like. A dynamic speaker presenting a well-delivered talk creates a lasting, positive impression on students, influencing their future decisions to pursue careers in engineering. By reaching these students early in life, the guest speaker will help dispel the many prevailing stereotypes about engineers which discourage so many students, especially young women, from considering this career. The guest speaker can ensure young students gain a positive first impression of engineers and the engineering career field by following some best practice techniques in preparing for and delivering their presentation. The author, an electrical engineer, developed these best practice techniques over the past 10 years while presenting over 350 talks on engineering subjects to elementary school students as a volunteer speaker with the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory’s Speakers Bureau. Every engineer can make a meaningful contribution toward reversing the predicted shortfall of future engineers by volunteering to speak with young students at the elementary school level. Elementary school

  11. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  12. Selective and regular localization of accessible Pt nanoparticles inside the walls of an ordered silica: Application as a highly active and well-defined heterogeneous catalyst for propene and styrene hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Boualleg, Malika

    2011-12-01

    We describe here an original methodology related to the "build-the-bottle-around-the-ship" approach yielding a highly ordered silica matrix containing regularly distributed Pt nanoparticles (NPs) located inside the silica walls, Pt@{walls}SiO2. The starting colloidal solution of crystalline Pt nanoparticles was obtained from Pt(dba)2 (dba = dibenzylidene acetone) and 3-chloropropylsilane. The resulting nanoparticles (diameter: 2.0 ± 0.4 nm determined by HRTEM) resulted hydrophilic. The NPs present in the THF colloidal solution were incorporated inside the walls of a highly ordered 2D hexagonal mesoporous silica matrix via sol-gel process using a templating route with tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS, as the silica source, and block copolymer (EthyleneOxide) 20(PropyleneOxide)70(EthyleneOxide)20 (Pluronic P123) as the structure-directing agent. Low-temperature calcination of the crude material at 593 K led to the final solid Pt@{walls}SiO2. Characterization by IR, HRTEM, BF-STEM and HAADF-STEM, SAXS, WAXS, XRD, XPS, H2 chemisorption, etc. of Pt@{walls}SiO2 confirmed the 2D hexagonal structuration and high mesoporosity (870 m2/g) of the material as well as the presence of stable 2-nm-sized crystalline Pt(0) NPs embedded inside the walls of the silica matrix. The material displayed no tendency to NPs sintering or leaching (Pt loading 0.3 wt.%) during its preparation. Pt@{walls}SiO2 was found to be a stable, selective and highly active hydrogenation catalyst. The catalytic performances in propene hydrogenation were tested under chemical regime conditions in a tubular flow reactor (278 K, propene/H2/He = 20/16/1.09 cm3/min, P tot = 1 bar) and were found superior to those of an homologous solid containing Pt NPs along its pore channels Pt@{pores}SiO2 and to those of a classical industrial catalysts Pt/Al2O3, (TOF = 2.3 s-1 vs. TOF = 0.90 and 0.92 s-1, respectively, calculated per surface platinum atoms). Pt@{walls}SiO2 also catalyzes fast and selective styrene

  13. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  14. Selective deoxygenation of sugar polyols to alpha,omega-diols and other oxygen content reduced materials--a new challenge to homogeneous ionic hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaf, Marcel

    2006-10-21

    An oxygen atom on every carbon--this is the problem! While nature provides linear C(3) to C(6) building blocks in the form of sugar alcohols in large and renewable abundance, they are overfunctionalized for the purpose of most chemical applications. Selective deoxygenation by anthropogenic catalyst systems may be one answer to this challenge.

  15. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z., E-mail: val@physics.utah.edu

    2014-11-15

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E{sub T}(guest), lies higher than that of the host, E{sub T}(host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E{sub T}(guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E{sub T}(guest)>E{sub T}(host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E{sub T}(guest) to E{sub T}(host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again.

  16. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Smol, Robert; Farber, Gerald; Naphtali, Leonard M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  17. New ultrahigh affinity host-guest complexes of cucurbit[7]uril with bicyclo[2.2.2]octane and adamantane guests: thermodynamic analysis and evaluation of M2 affinity calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Sarvin; Yang, Cheng; Rekharsky, Mikhail; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Gilson, Michael K

    2011-03-16

    A dicationic ferrocene derivative has previously been shown to bind cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) in water with ultrahigh affinity (ΔG(o) = -21 kcal/mol). Here, we describe new compounds that bind aqueous CB[7] equally well, validating our prior suggestion that they, too, would be ultrahigh affinity CB[7] guests. The present guests, which are based upon either a bicyclo[2.2.2]octane or adamantane core, have no metal atoms, so these results also confirm that the remarkably high affinities of the ferrocene-based guest need not be attributed to metal-specific interactions. Because we used the M2 method to compute the affinities of several of the new host-guest systems prior to synthesizing them, the present results also provide for the first blinded evaluation of this computational method. The blinded calculations agree reasonably well with experiment and successfully reproduce the observation that the new adamantane-based guests achieve extremely high affinities, despite the fact that they position a cationic substituent at only one electronegative portal of the CB[7] host. However, there are also significant deviations from experiment, and these lead to the correction of a procedural error and an instructive evaluation of the sensitivity of the calculations to physically reasonable variations in molecular energy parameters. The new experimental and computational results presented here bear on the physical mechanisms of molecular recognition, the accuracy of the M2 method, and the usefulness of host-guest systems as test-beds for computational methods.

  18. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T.; Henriksen, Niel M.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by non-optimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery. PMID:26181208

  19. Identification of the guest star of AD 185 as a comet rather than a supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Y.-N.; Huang, Y.-L.

    1994-09-01

    VERY few nearby supernovae have been bright enough to see with the naked eye. The only such case this century was supernova 1987A. Matching historical records of such events with presently observable remnants allows accurate estimates to be made of the age and incidence rate of supernovae; ancient Chinese astronomical records are a particularly valuable resource for this purpose. The Houhanshu1 of the Later Han dynasty records the appearance of a 'guest star' in AD 185. This is widely regarded as the oldest supernova recorded historically, and several candidate remnants have been suggested2,3, in particular the object RCW862. Here we show that a reinterpretation of the relevant passage in the Houhan-shu is inconsistent with the supernova interpretation, but suggests instead that the guest star was a comet. Our findings indicate that some of the keywords used by Chinese astronomers in historical records must be interpreted with caution.

  20. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Praveen, E-mail: pmalik100@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar 144011, Punjab (India); Raina, K.K. [Liquid Crystal Group, Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India)

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that approx1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.