WorldWideScience

Sample records for guests selective hydrogen

  1. Selecting non-classified hotels in Kenya: what really matters for business guests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Kivuva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-classified hotels, which comprise small hotels and guest houses, are important accommodation providers offering limited services and products as compared to the classified hotels. Through guest satisfaction, they can achieve repeat business and also get new business through word of mouth from previous guests. The main focus is for the hoteliers to know exactly the determinants of selection of hotels by their guests. In this case, the focus was on non-classified hotels in Mtwapa town at the Kenyan coast. The study adopted a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. Results from this study clearly indicate that all aspects of hotel operations are important to business guests’ selection of a non-classified hotel. However, it was revealed that this was not on equal basis. Results indicate that the core product (guestroom comfortability, hygiene and cleanliness were the most important factors in determining guests’ selection of where to stay. This research therefore suggests that any efforts towards quality improvement in a hotel should focus primarily on ensuring customer satisfaction with the guestroom. While acknowledging the importance of all aspects of hotel operations, managers should recognize the importance of the guestroom and its facilities towards hotel selection and overall customer satisfaction. Therefore, it is imperative that managers channel their resources towards improving guest services in the guestrooms in accordance with the requirements of the clientele. This includes such aspects as the look of the guest rooms, facilities provided in the guest rooms and comfortability of the bed and mattress.

  2. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Dylan K.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  3. A Tunable Cyclic Container: Guest-Induced Conformational Switching, Efficient Guest Exchange, and Selective Isolation of C70 from a Fullerene Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pritam; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2017-07-18

    An adaptable cyclic porphyrin dimer with highly flexible linkers has been used as an artificial molecular container that can efficiently encapsulate various aromatic guests (TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 ) through strong π-π interactions by adjusting its cavity size and conformation. The planar aromatic guest (TCNQ) can be easily and selectively exchanged with larger aromatic guests (C 60 /C 70 ). During the guest-exchange process, the two porphyrin rings switch their relative orientation according to the size and shape of the guests. This behavior of the cyclic container has been thoroughly investigated by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystal structure determination of the host-guest assemblies. The electrochemical and photophysical studies demonstrated the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from bisporphyrin to TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 in the respective host-guest assemblies. The cyclic host can form complexes with C 60 and C 70 with association constants of (2.8±0.2)×10 5 and (1.9±0.3)×10 8  m -1 , respectively; the latter value represents the highest binding affinity for C 70 reported so far for zinc(II) bisporphyrinic receptors. This high selectivity for the binding of C 70 versus C 60 allows the easy extraction and efficient isolation of C 70 from a C 60 /C 70 fullerene mixture. Experimental evidence was substantiated by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host-guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Ibarra, Borja; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host-guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor-cyanuric acid host-guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host-guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1-2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry.

  5. Hydrogen bonding assemblies in host guest complexes with 18-crown-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonari, M. S.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Kravtsov, V. Ch.; Lipkowski, J.; Ganin, E. V.; Yavolovskii, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structural data for two novel 1:2 host-guest complexes of 18-crown-6 with neutral organic molecules, thiaamide hydrazide of 2-aminobenzoic acid and thiaamide hydrazide of 4-amino-1,2,5-thiadiazole-3-carbonic acid are reported. The supramolecular structures of these two and five relative complexes are discussed from the point of view of participation of donor groups in coordination with the crown ether, and donor and acceptor groups in the self-assembly of the guest molecules. Guest molecules have incorporated amine and hydrazine moieties as proton donors and carbonyl oxygen and sulfur (in thiadiazole and in thiaamine moieties) as proton acceptors. The guest-guest interactions appeared to be crucial in the final architecture.

  6. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Tianlong Gu; Shenghui Liu

    2011-01-01

    This special issue comprises of 14 selected papers from the International Workshop on Computer Science for Environmental Engineering and EcoInformatics (CSEEE 2011). The conferences received 860 paper submissions from 15 countries and regions, of which 450 were selected for presentation after a rigorous review process. From these 450 research papers, through two rounds of reviewing, the guest editors selected 14 as the best papers on the Networking Technologies and Information track of the Co...

  7. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  8. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  9. Chemical-clathrate hybrid hydrogen storage: storage in both guest and host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Timothy A; Kim, Yongkwan; Andrews, Gary S; Ferrell, Jack R; Koh, Carolyn A; Herring, Andrew M; Sloan, E Dendy

    2008-11-12

    Hydrogen storage from two independent sources of the same material represents a novel approach to the hydrogen storage problem, yielding storage capacities greater than either of the individual constituents. Here we report a novel hydrogen storage scheme in which recoverable hydrogen is stored molecularly within clathrate cavities as well as chemically in the clathrate host material. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm the formation of beta-hydroquinone (beta-HQ) clathrate with molecular hydrogen. Hydrogen within the beta-HQ clathrate vibrates at considerably lower frequency than hydrogen in the free gaseous phase and rotates nondegenerately with splitting comparable to the rotational constant. Compared with water-based clathrate hydrate phases, the beta-HQ+H2 clathrate shows remarkable stability over a range of p-T conditions. Subsequent to clathrate decomposition, the host HQ was used to directly power a PEM fuel cell. With one H2 molecule per cavity, 0.61 wt % hydrogen may be stored in the beta-HQ clathrate cavities. When this amount is combined with complete dehydrogenation of the host hydroxyl hydrogens, the maximum hydrogen storage capacity increases nearly 300% to 2.43 wt %.

  10. MIS-based sensors with hydrogen selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,; Dongmei, [Boulder, CO; Medlin, J William [Boulder, CO; McDaniel, Anthony H [Livermore, CA; Bastasz, Robert J [Livermore, CA

    2008-03-11

    The invention provides hydrogen selective metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors which include a layer of hydrogen selective material. The hydrogen selective material can be polyimide layer having a thickness between 200 and 800 nm. Suitable polyimide materials include reaction products of benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride 4,4-oxydianiline m-phenylene diamine and other structurally similar materials.

  11. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  12. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  13. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapatsis, Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Daoutidis, Prodromos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Elyassi, Bahman [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Lima, Fernando [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Iyer, Aparna [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Agrawal, Kumar [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Sabnis, Sanket [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants

  14. Selective hydrogenation processes in steam cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Schroeter, M.K.; Hinrichs, M.; Makarczyk, P. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Hydrogen is the key elixir used to trim the quality of olefinic and aromatic product slates from steam crackers. Being co-produced in excess amounts in the thermal cracking process a small part of the hydrogen is consumed in the ''cold part'' of a steam cracker to selectively hydrogenate unwanted, unsaturated hydrocarbons. The compositions of the various steam cracker product streams are adjusted by these processes to the outlet specifications. This presentation gives an overview over state-of-art selective hydrogenation technologies available from BASF for these processes. (Published in summary form only) (orig.)

  15. Study of hydrogen-molecule guests in type II clathrate hydrates using a force-matched potential model parameterised from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J.; Futera, Zdenek; English, Niall J.

    2018-03-01

    The force-matching method has been applied to parameterise an empirical potential model for water-water and water-hydrogen intermolecular interactions for use in clathrate-hydrate simulations containing hydrogen guest molecules. The underlying reference simulations constituted ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) of clathrate hydrates with various occupations of hydrogen-molecule guests. It is shown that the resultant model is able to reproduce AIMD-derived free-energy curves for the movement of a tagged hydrogen molecule between the water cages that make up the clathrate, thus giving us confidence in the model. Furthermore, with the aid of an umbrella-sampling algorithm, we calculate barrier heights for the force-matched model, yielding the free-energy barrier for a tagged molecule to move between cages. The barrier heights are reasonably large, being on the order of 30 kJ/mol, and are consistent with our previous studies with empirical models [C. J. Burnham and N. J. English, J. Phys. Chem. C 120, 16561 (2016) and C. J. Burnham et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 19, 717 (2017)]. Our results are in opposition to the literature, which claims that this system may have very low barrier heights. We also compare results to that using the more ad hoc empirical model of Alavi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 024507 (2005)] and find that this model does very well when judged against the force-matched and ab initio simulation data.

  16. Selectivity and stoichiometry boosting of beta-cyclodextrin in cationic/anionic surfactant systems: when host-guest equilibrium meets biased aggregation equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yu, Caifang; Deng, Manli; Jin, Changwen; Wang, Yilin; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2010-02-18

    Cationic surfactant/anionic surfactant/beta-CD ternary aqueous systems provide a platform for the coexistence of the host-guest (beta-CD/surfactant) equilibrium and the biased aggregation (monomeric/aggregated surfactants) equilibrium. We report here that the interplay between the two equilibria dominates the systems as follows. (1) The biased aggregation equilibrium imposes an apparent selectivity on the host-guest equilibrium, namely, beta-CD has to always selectively bind the major surfactant (molar fraction > 0.5) even if binding constants of beta-CD to the pair of surfactants are quite similar. (2) In return, the host-guest equilibrium amplifies the bias of the aggregation equilibrium, that is, the selective binding partly removes the major surfactant from the aggregates and leaves the aggregate composition approaching the electroneutral mixing stoichiometry. (3) This composition variation enhances electrostatic attractions between oppositely charged surfactant head groups, thus resulting in less-curved aggregates. In particular, the present apparent host-guest selectivity is of remarkably high values, and the selectivity stems from the bias of the aggregation equilibrium rather than the difference in binding constants. Moreover, beta-CD is defined as a "stoichiometry booster" for the whole class of cationic/anionic surfactant systems, which provides an additional degree of freedom to directly adjust aggregate compositions of the systems. The stoichiometry boosting of the compositions can in turn affect or even determine microstructures and macroproperties of the systems.

  17. Guest Editorial: Special issue: Selected papers from NorCAS 2016, the 2nd Nordic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    complex digital systems to advanced analog and mixed-mode circuits. For this Special Issue, the papers are selected among those dealing with analog and mixed-mode circuits and systems. More than 25 papers were presented in this field, and from these, 8 papers have been selected for the Special Issue...

  18. Selecting appropriate technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamhankar, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Technologies for the production of synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a precursor to hydrogen, from a variety of fossil fuels are well known in industrial applications at relatively large scale. These include Steam Reforming (SR), Auto-Thermal Reforming (ATR) and Partial Oxidation (POX). A particular technology is selected based on the feed type and the desired products. Steam reforming is a mature technology, and is most prevalent for hydrogen production because of its high efficiency. However, at the smaller scale, the capital cost becomes a more significant factor, and a substantial reduction in this cost is necessary to meet the overall H2 gas cost targets, such as that stated by DOE ($1.50/kg). In developing small-scale H2 technologies, often, incremental improvements are incorporated. While useful, these are not adequate for the desired cost reduction. Also, for effective cost reduction, the whole system, including production, purification and associated equipment needs to be evaluated; cost reduction in just one of the units is not sufficient. This paper provides a critical assessment of the existing as well as novel technology options, specifically targeted at small scale H2 production. The technology options are evaluated to clearly point out which may or may not work and why. (author)

  19. Guest-host chemistry with dendrimers—binding of carboxylates in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes Fabritius; Hansen, Jon Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and binding of anions in water is difficult due to the ability of water molecules to form strong hydrogen bonds and to solvate the anions. The complexation of two different carboxylates with 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution using...... the carboxylate-dendrimer interaction selectively. The binding stoichiometry for 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate was found to be two strongly bound guest molecules per dendrimer and an additional 40 molecules with weak binding affinity. The NOESY NMR showed a clear binding correlation of sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate...... with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2...

  20. Guest editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-07-15

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982.

  1. Guest editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982

  2. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Samson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is an honor and a pleasure to have the December 2013 issue of Higher Learning Research Communications dedicate its issue to selected papers from the 4th International Conference on Teaching and Learning, held in Bangkok in November, 2013. The conference theme, Higher Learning in the ASEAN Context, highlights the emerging community of ten Southeast Asian nations and the upcoming launch of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC in 2015. The AEC will affect higher education systems in Southeast Asia in terms of harmonization of higher education and student mobility. This emerging regional demographic gives us a glimpse of the future of transnational education. The papers selected for this issue represent research both within and outside of ASEAN, all touching on aspects of transnational education. Jeannin reports on how diversity affects students’ learning in an international classroom in Thailand. Billingham, Gragg, and Bentley (Australia highlight technology integration as an internationalizing practice. Ling considers challenges and outcomes of bilingual teaching and learning at the graduate level in Vietnam, contributing to the postgraduate educational field, which has not been amply explored in this matter. Stetz and Bauman (US ask us to rethink the efficacy of recording our lectures for online viewing. Hartfield (Australia, Beltram-Cruz (Philippines, and Cruz (Philippines review new pedagogical paradigms utilizing technology. Al-Masum and Chowdhury report on problems and progress at Bangladesh Open University in bringing higher education to an underserved population. Throughout this issue, the authors bring a sense of internationality and the transnational transformation of higher education, along with the ubiquity of technology in the hands of the students and its impact on our teaching and learning styles. This issue of the HLRC Journal highlights some impacts that ASEAN and the AEC can and will have on higher education everywhere.

  3. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3......−, and conceptually illustrates the remediation of a waste product for producing valuable chemicals....

  4. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  5. Controlling hydrogenation activity and selectivity of bimetallic surfaces and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Luis E.

    also discussed. Chemisorption, TPD, FTIR using a batch reactor for the self-hydrogenation of cyclohexene and CO adsorbed on the bimetallic surfaces were carried out to correlate surface science findings with experiments on supported bimetallic catalysts. To expand the studies on the effect of bimetallic structures on hydrogenation reactions, molecules with multiple functional groups such as alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes were also investigated. Studies of selective hydrogenation of a,ss-unsaturated aldehydes toward the desired unsaturated alcohols are of interest for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. In these compounds, competitive hydrogenation of the C=C and C=O bonds occurs. TPD and HREELS experiments of acrolein (CH2=CH-CH=O) on Pt-based bimetallic surfaces are performed to investigate their effects on the hydrogenation activity of the C-O bond. The production of the desired unsaturated alcohol, allyl alcohol, has been observed for the first time on Pt-Ni-Pt(111) under UHV conditions. However, the propionaldehyde yield is five times higher than the allyl alcohol yield. Thus, a preferential isomerization reaction of allyl alcohol to propionaldehyde is very likely to occur on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface as observed on the desorption studies of allyl alcohol on this surface. The hydrogenation of acrolein is also carried out under UHV conditions on other 3d-transition metal/Pt(111) surfaces such as Co/Pt(111), Fe/Pt(111), and Cu/Pt(111). So far, the highest activity and allyl alcohol yield are found on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface with pre-adsorbed hydrogen.

  6. The recruitment mechanism in Spaish and U.S. guest worker programs: preventing fraud and abuse in worker selection and hiring

    OpenAIRE

    Minaya, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Fraudulent recruitment of authorized, temporary “guest workers” is a growing concern among international policy makers. Recruitment in many countries is regulated through a combination of immigration, criminal, and administrative laws. This paper will compare how two countries, Spain and the United States, regulate the recruitment of agricultural and low-skilled guest workers, a population generally vulnerable to fraud, based on a review of each country’s laws and relevant literature. The con...

  7. Host–guest complexes of mixed glycol-bipyridine cryptands: prediction of ion selectivity by quantum chemical calculations, part V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Begel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The selectivity of the cryptands [2.2.bpy] and [2.bpy.bpy] for the endohedral complexation of alkali, alkaline-earth and earth metal ions was predicted on the basis of the DFT (B3LYP/LANL2DZp calculated structures and complex-formation energies. The cavity size in both cryptands lay between that for [2.2.2] and [bpy.bpy.bpy], such that the complexation of K+, Sr2+ and Tl3+ is most favorable. While the [2.2.bpy] is moderately larger, preferring Rb+ complexation and demonstrating equal priority for Sr2+ and Ba2+, the slightly smaller [2.bpy.bpy] yields more stable cryptates with Na+ and Ca2+. Although the CH2-units containing molecular bars fixed at the bridgehead nitrogen atoms determine the flexibility of the cryptands, the twist angles associated with the bipyridine and glycol building blocks also contribute considerably.

  8. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Introduction The USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems (COOTS) is held annually in the late spring. The conference evolved from a set of C++ workshops that were held under the auspices of USENIX, the first of which met in 1989. Given the growing diverse interest in object-oriented technologies, the C++ focus of the workshop eventually became too narrow, with the result that the scope was widened in 1995 to include object-oriented technologies and systems. COOTS is intended to showcase advanced R&D efforts in object-oriented technologies and software systems. The conference emphasizes experimental research and experience gained by using object-oriented techniques and languages to build complex software systems that meet real-world needs. COOTS solicits papers in the following general areas: application of, and experiences with, object-oriented technologies in particular domains (e.g. financial, medical, telecommunication); the architecture and implementation of distributed object systems (e.g. CORBA, DCOM, RMI); object-oriented programming and specification languages; object-oriented design and analysis. The 4th meeting of COOTS was held 27 - 30 April 1998 at the El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Several tutorials were given. The technical program proper consisted of a single track of six sessions, with three paper presentations per session. A keynote address and a provocative panel session rounded out the technical program. The program committee reviewed 56 papers, selecting the best 18 for presentation in the technical sessions. While we solicit papers across the spectrum of applications of object-oriented technologies, this year there was a predominance of distributed, object-oriented papers. The accepted papers reflected this asymmetry, with 15 papers on distributed objects and 3 papers on object-oriented languages. The papers in this special issue are

  9. Potential application of palladium nanoparticles as selective recyclable hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, DebKumar

    2008-01-01

    The search for more efficient catalytic systems that might combine the advantages of both homogeneous (catalyst modulation) and heterogeneous (catalyst recycling) catalysis is one of the most exciting challenges of modern chemistry. More recently with the advances of nanochemistry, it has been possible to prepare soluble analogues of heterogeneous catalysts. These nanoparticles are generally stabilized against aggregation into larger particles by electrostatic or steric protection. Herein we demonstrate the use of room temperature ionic liquid for the stabilization of palladium nanoparticles that are recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon-carbon double bonds and application of these catalysts to the selective hydrogenation of internal or terminal C=C bonds in unsaturated primary alcohols. The particles suspended in room temperature ionic liquid show no metal aggregation or loss of catalytic activity even on prolonged use

  10. Heterometallic modular metal-organic 3D frameworks assembled via new tris-β-diketonate metalloligands: nanoporous materials for anion exchange and scaffolding of selected anionic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Lucia; Ciani, Gianfranco; Maggini, Simona; Proserpio, Davide M; Visconti, Marco

    2010-11-02

    -48% of the cell volume and include the anions and many guest solvent molecules. The guest solvent molecules can be reversibly removed by thermal activation with retention of the framework structure, which proved to be stable up to about 270°C, as confirmed by TGA and powder XRD monitoring. The anions could be easily exchanged in single-crystal to single-crystal processes, thereby allowing the insertion of selected anions into the framework channels.

  11. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  12. Tritium labelling of testosteron by selective hydrogenation of dihydrotestosteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Cristian; Matei, Lidia; Simion, Elena; Barna, Catalina; Condac, Eduard

    2002-01-01

    Elemental tritium is obtained during the decontamination process of the moderator from Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant. It might be stocked for use in controlled fusion, in a relatively far future, or, it might be immediately used as raw material in the synthesis of labelled compounds with important economic value. Labelling of testosteron with tritium was necessary for the carrying out of radiometric and molecular biology studies concerning androgen dependent diseases. Testosteron was labelled by selective hydrogenation of 1,2 dihydrotestosteron acetate. The forerunner was synthesized in two steps: 1) esterification of testosteron using acetic anhydride, and 2) selective dehydrogenation with 2,6-dichloro-3,5-dicyan-1,4 quinone (DDQ) of the ester formed in the first step. Testosteron acetate was synthesized and purified with yields of 73%, and 80%, respectively. The dehydrogenation process was characterized by yields of 82% for synthesis and 33% for purification. The tritium labelled hormone was obtained in two steps: 1) selective hydrogenation of Δ 1 - testosteron acetate in the presence of T 2 gas, at low pressure, and 2) hydrolysis of the ester at basic pH. The raw product obtained was purified by preparative thin layer chromatography. The physical and chemical characterization of labelled testosteron reveals a radiochemical purity higher than 98% and a specific activity of 53.4 Ci/mmol. (authors)

  13. Selective gettering of hydrogen in high pressure metal iodide lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuus, G.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main problems in the manufacture of high pressure gas discharge lamps is the elimination of gaseous impurities from their arc tubes. Long degassing processes of all the lamp components are necessary in order to produce lamps with a low ignition voltage and good maintenance of the radiation properties. The investigation described deals with a selective getter place in the arc tube which can replace the long degassing process. The getter consists of a piece of yttrium encapsulated in thin tantalum foil. By this way it is possible to use the gettering action of tantalum and yttrium without having reaction between the metal iodide of the arc tube and yttrium. Yttrium is used because this metal can adsorb a large quantity of hydrogen even at a temperature of 1000 0 C. Hydrogen forms the main gaseous impurity in the high pressure metal iodide lamp. For this reason the adsorption properties like adsorption rate and capacity of the tantalum--yttrium getter for hydrogen are examined, and the results obtained from lamp experiments are given

  14. Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL). A concept to improve the selectivity of selective hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess, A.; Korth, W. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Chair of Chemical Engineering

    2011-07-01

    Catalytic hydrogenations are important for refinery processes, petrochemical applications as well as for numerous processes of the fine chemicals industry. In some cases, hydrogenations consist of a sequence of consecutive reactions, and the desired product is the intermediate. An important goal is then a high yield and selectivity to the intermediate, if possible at a high conversion degree. The selectivity to an intermediate primarily depends on the chemical nature of the catalyst, but may also be influenced by diffusion processes. Ionic liquids (ILs) are low melting salts (< 100 C) and represent a promising solvent class. This paper focuses on the concept of a Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL), where the solid catalyst is coated with a thin IL layer to improve the selectivity. (orig.)

  15. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Technical report describing DOE's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence investigation into various adsorbent and chemisorption materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as related to DOE hydrogen storage targets and explains the basis for the down select decisions.

  16. An outstanding guest

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The person celebrating CERN's 25th anniversary whose photograph we published last week was not just any guest. Readers have pointed out that it was Wim Klein, whose remarkable abilities are part of CERN's history. Well known as one of the best "human calculators", Wim was recruited by CERN in 1957 to verify computer programs, which at the time were still stumbling. Moreover, he regularly beat their speed in calculating and gave breath-taking demonstrations. During one such demonstration in September 1973, he calculated the 19th root of a 133-digit number in less than 2 minutes !

  17. Determination of hydrogen abundance in selected lunar soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen was implanted in lunar soil through solar wind activity. In order to determine the feasibility of utilizing this solar wind hydrogen, it is necessary to know not only hydrogen abundances in bulk soils from a variety of locations but also the distribution of hydrogen within a given soil. Hydrogen distribution in bulk soils, grain size separates, mineral types, and core samples was investigated. Hydrogen was found in all samples studied. The amount varied considerably, depending on soil maturity, mineral types present, grain size distribution, and depth. Hydrogen implantation is definitely a surface phenomenon. However, as constructional particles are formed, previously exposed surfaces become embedded within particles, causing an enrichment of hydrogen in these species. In view of possibly extracting the hydrogen for use on the lunar surface, it is encouraging to know that hydrogen is present to a considerable depth and not only in the upper few millimeters. Based on these preliminary studies, extraction of solar wind hydrogen from lunar soil appears feasible, particulary if some kind of grain size separation is possible.

  18. Astrobee Guest Science Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jose; Smith, Marion F; Wheeler, Dawn; Fluckiger, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The Astrobee Research Facility will maintain three identical free-flying Astrobee robots on the ISS. After the Astrobees are launched and commissioned in 2018, they will replace the SPHERES robots that have been operating on the ISS since 2006 (Fig. 2). Over the years, the SPHERES have been among the most-used payloads on the ISS, supporting dozens of experiments from a variety of guest scientists. In the next section, we'll talk about past SPHERES experiments as possible inspiration for your future research on Astrobee. Compared to SPHERES, the Astrobee robots will offer many new capabilities and will require less astronaut time to support, so we hope the new facility will be able to fly experiments much more often.

  19. Selective hydrogen atom abstraction by hydrogen atoms in photolysis and radiolysis of alkane mixtures at 770 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Kinugawa, K.; Eguchi, M.; Guedes, S.M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms, has been found in Isobutane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane(TMB), cyclopropane matrices besides neopentane matrix. The selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction in neopentane-isobutane mixture is affected by the difference of kinetic energies of H atoms. The reaction occurs more favorably with decreasing the kinetic energy of H atoms. Competitive reaction between c-C 6 H 12 and Hi for H atoms has been studied in the radiolysis and photolysis of neo-C 5 H 12 HI mixture at 77 K. The rate constants of these reactions in neopentane matrix are quite different from these of thermal H atom reaction, but similar to those of hot H atom reaction. Importance of the selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms is pointed out in the radical formation in the radiolysis of pure TMB at 77 K [pt

  20. Engineering responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest molecular recognition for functional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: All living organisms and soft matter are intrinsically responsive and adaptive to external stimuli. Inspired by this fact, tremendous effort aiming to emulate subtle responsive features exhibited by nature has spurred the invention of a diverse range of responsive polymeric materials. Conventional stimuli-responsive polymers are constructed via covalent bonds and can undergo reversible or irreversible changes in chemical structures, physicochemical properties, or both in response to a variety of external stimuli. They have been imparted with a variety of emerging applications including drug and gene delivery, optical sensing and imaging, diagnostics and therapies, smart coatings and textiles, and tissue engineering. On the other hand, in comparison with molecular chemistry held by covalent bonds, supramolecular chemistry built on weak and reversible noncovalent interactions has emerged as a powerful and versatile strategy for materials fabrication due to its facile accessibility, extraordinary reversibility and adaptivity, and potent applications in diverse fields. Typically involving more than one type of noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, hydrophobic association, electrostatic interactions, van der Waals forces, and π-π stacking), host-guest recognition refers to the formation of supramolecular inclusion complexes between two or more entities connected together in a highly controlled and cooperative manner. The inherently reversible and adaptive nature of host-guest molecular recognition chemistry, stemming from multiple noncovalent interactions, has opened up a new platform to construct novel types of stimuli-responsive materials. The introduction of host-guest chemistry not only enriches the realm of responsive materials but also confers them with promising new applications. Most intriguingly, the integration of responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest recognition motifs will endow the former with

  1. Technology selection for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Alimah; Erlan Dewita

    2008-01-01

    The NPP can either be used to produce electricity, or as heat source for non-electric applications (cogeneration). High Temperature Reactor (HTR) with high outlet coolant temperature around 900~1000 o C, is a reactor type potential for cogeneration purposes such as hydrogen production and other chemical industry processes that need high heat. Considering the national energy policy that a balanced arrangement of renewable and unrenewable natural resources has to be made to keep environmental conservation for the sake of society prosperity in the future, hydrogen gas production using nuclear heat is an appropriate choice. Hydrogen gas is a new energy which is environmentally friendly that it is a prospecting alternative energy source in the future. Within the study, a comparison of three processes of hydrogen gas production covering electrolysis, steam reforming and sulfur-iodine cycle, have been conducted. The parameters that considered are the production cost, capital cost and energy cost, technological status, the independence of fossil fuel, the environmental friendly aspect, as well as the efficiency and the independence of corrosion-resistance material. The study result showed that hydrogen gas production by steam reforming is a better process compared to electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. Therefore, steam reforming process can be a good choice for hydrogen gas production using nuclear energy in Indonesia. (author)

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic and quantum theoretical study of host-guest interactions in clathrates: I. Hofmann type clathrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR M. PETRUSEVSKI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Hofmann type clatharates are host-guest compounds with the general formula M(NH32M'(CN4·2G, in which M(NH32M'(CN4 is the host lattice and G is benzene, the guest molecule. In previous studies, host-guest interactions have been investigated by analyzing the RT and LNT vibrational (infrared, far infrared and Raman spectra of these clathrates. All the observed changes in the vibrational spectra of these clathrates are referred to a host-guest interaction originating from weak hydrogen bonding between the ammonia hydrogen atoms from the host lattice and the p electron cloud of the guest (benzene molecules. In order to obtain an insight into the relative importance of the local crystalline field vs. the anharmonicity effects on the spectroscopic properties of the guest species upon enclathration, as well as to explain the observed band shifts and splittings, several quantum theoretical approaches are proposed.

  3. Multi-criteria analysis on how to select solar radiation hydrogen production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, G.; Naghiu, G. S., E-mail: naghiu.george@gmail.com; Felseghi, R.-A.; Giurca, I., E-mail: giurca-ioan@yahoo.com [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Building Services Engineering, Boulevard December 21, no. 128-130, Cluj-Napoca, 400604 (Romania); Răboacă, S. [National R& D Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, str. Uzinei, no. 4, Rm. Vălcea, 240050 (Romania); Aşchilean, I. [SC ACI Cluj SA, Avenue Dorobanţilor, no. 70, Cluj-Napoca, 400609 (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    The purpose of this article is to present a method of selecting hydrogen-production systems using the electric power obtained in photovoltaic systems, and as a selecting method, we suggest the use of the Advanced Multi-Criteria Analysis based on the FRISCO formula. According to the case study on how to select the solar radiation hydrogen production system, the most convenient alternative is the alternative A4, namely the technical solution involving a hydrogen production system based on the electrolysis of water vapor obtained with concentrated solar thermal systems and electrical power obtained using concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  4. Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang (Kevin); Shang, Jin; Gu, Qinfen; Awati, Rohan V.; Jensen, Nathan; Grant, Andrew; Zhang, Xueying; Sholl, David S.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Webley, Paul A.; May, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group's thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is crucial to systematic engineering of new functional materials such as tunable molecular sieves, gated membranes and controlled-release nanocontainers. The model was validated experimentally with H2, N2, Ar and CH4 on three classes of microporous materials: trapdoor zeolites, supramolecular host calixarenes and metal-organic frameworks. We demonstrate how temperature can be exploited to achieve appreciable hydrogen and methane storage in such materials without sustained pressure. These findings also open new avenues for gas sensing and isotope separation.

  5. Gold Supported on Graphene Oxide: An Active and Selective Catalyst for Phenylacetylene Hydrogenations at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Lidong; Huang, Xing; Teschner, Detre

    2014-01-01

    A constraint to industrial implementation of gold-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation is that the catalytic activity was always inferior to those of other noble metals. In this work, gold was supported on graphene oxide (Au/GO) and used in a hydrogenation application. A 99% selectivity toward styrene...

  6. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation

  7. Selective hydrogenation of maleic anhydride over Pd/Al2O3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Pd/Al2O3 catalyst; maleic anhydride; selective hydrogenation; succinic anhydride. 1. Introduction ... attracted a significant amount of attention because the majority of its ... added, and the colour of the resulting mixture turned brown.

  8. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S

  9. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Kyoichi; Taguchi, Tatsuhiko; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K.; Ohmura, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  10. Selective Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Organophosphorus Sensor Employing a Host-Guest Self-Assembly Monolayer of β-Cyclodextrin Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly and molecular imprinting technologies are very attractive technologies for the development of artificial recognition systems and provide chemical recognition based on need and not happenstance. In this paper, we employed a b-cyclodextrin derivative surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor for detecting the chemical warfare agents (CWAs sarin (O-Isoprophyl methylphosphonofluoridate, GB. Using sarin acid (isoprophyl hydrogen methylphosphonate as an imprinting template, mono[6-deoxy-6-[(mercaptodecamethylenethio

  11. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    system components (e.g. file server, operating system and network) are composed to build the required end-to-end service. Providing such a service may well require explicit resource allocation (e.g. of network bandwidth or CPU cycles); admission control may also be required to ensure that requested QoS levels can be met. QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation are concerned with supporting QoS during the run time of an application. QoS monitoring and QoS adaptation are conceptually related in a feedback loop in which current QoS levels are observed and fine grained reconfiguration is triggered as necessary to ensure that the required levels are maintained. An example of such a loop is to be found in Internet tools such as vic or vat which monitor network delay and adapt by adjusting the size of an elastic playout buffer. QoS renegotiation is a coarser grained adaptation, often explicitly initiated by the user, in which required QoS levels are revised at run time. An example could be a user scaling a video display from colour to monochrome so that sufficient resources can be freed to support an additional connection. The papers in this special issue were selected from the fourth QoS Workshop held in Paris in March 1996. To understand the overall evolution of QoS research it is useful to know some background on the series of workshops of which the Paris workshop was a part. The first workshop to be dedicated exclusively to QoS issues was organized in Canada by the European RACE project R2088 (TOPIC) in cooperation with the University of Montreal in June 1994. A European counterpart of this initiating event occurred in the same year in September 1994 in Aachen, Germany. This latter event was held in cooperation with the European Conference on Intelligence in Broadband Services and Networks (IS&N94). A third workshop was then held in conjunction with the IFIP conference on Open Distributed Processing (ICODP95) in Brisbane, Australia in March 1995. By 1996 more

  12. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S; Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Chikate, Rajeev C.; Rode, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  13. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S

    2018-03-20

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  14. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagić Snježana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers and thus enable businesses to uphold a guest's base. By recognizing loyalty guests' importance, the global hospitality industry created monetary and non-monetary rewards for loyal visitors, delayed gratification (points collection and immediate rewards, as well as numerous other reward systems that try to keep them. To win customer loyalty, together with all benefits arising from it, caterers need to become familiar with factors, which determine guests' loyalty. The paper will show the results of research regarding the impact of the service quality and guests' satisfaction to their loyalty. Many authors have confirmed that employees' satisfaction affected customers' satisfaction, so this paper will give an answer does it influence on customers' loyalty as well.

  15. Switchable host-guest systems on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Wei; Sun, Yu-Long; Song, Nan

    2014-07-15

    , such as light, pH variations, competitive binding, and enzyme. Rotaxanes have also been assembled onto the surfaces of gold nanodisks and microcantilevers to realize active molecular plasmonics and synthetic molecular actuators for device fabrication and function. Pillararenes have been successfully used to control and aid the synthesis of gold nanoparticles, semiconducting quantum dots, and magnetic nanoparticles. The resulting organic-inorganic hydrid nanomaterials have been successfully used for controlled self-assembly, herbicide sensing and detection, pesticide removal, and so forth, taking advantage of the selective binding of pillarenes toward target molecules. Cyclodextrins have also been successfully functionalized onto the surface of gold nanoparticles to serve as recycling extractors for C60. Many interesting prototypes of nanodevices based on synthetic macrocycles and their host-guest chemistry have been constructed and served for different potential applications. This Account will be a summary of the efforts made mainly by us, and others, on the host-guest chemistry of synthetic macrocyclic compounds on the surfaces of different solid supports.

  16. Characterisation of hydrocarbonaceous overlayers important in metal-catalysed selective hydrogenation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, David; Warringham, Robbie [School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Guidi, Tatiana [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Stewart F., E-mail: stewart.parker@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of a commercial dehydrogenation catalyst. • The overlayer present on the catalyst is predominantly aliphatic. • A population of strongly hydrogen bonded hydroxyls is also present. - Abstract: The hydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes over supported metal catalysts is an important industrial process and it has been shown that hydrocarbonaceous overlayers are important in controlling selectivity profiles of metal-catalysed hydrogenation reactions. As a model system, we have selected propyne hydrogenation over a commercial Pd(5%)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Inelastic neutron scattering studies show that the C–H stretching mode ranges from 2850 to 3063 cm{sup −1}, indicating the mostly aliphatic nature of the overlayer and this is supported by the quantification of the carbon and hydrogen on the surface. There is also a population of strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls, their presence would indicate that the overlayer probably contains some oxygen functionality. There is little evidence for any olefinic or aromatic species. This is distinctly different from the hydrogen-poor overlayers that are deposited on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts during methane reforming.

  17. Frof Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available GUEST EDITORIALThis special issue of TOJDE is centred around the theme of ‘Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education’. The Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005 movement, epitomised by such nascent technologies as blogs, wikis, RSS, podcasting, as well as tag-based folksonomies, social networking, collaborative editing and peer-to-peer (P2P media sharing applications, is purported to be redefining the way we conceive and make use of the Internet, and is enjoying considerable attention and popularity in both mainstream society and education. A major aim of this issue is to encourage ongoing discussion on the question of whether, and if so, in what ways, the advent and continued growth of Web 2.0 and social software has specific implications for the field of online and web-based distance education. The special issue opens with an article by P. Clint Rogers, Stephen W. Liddle, Peter Chan, Aaron Doxey and Brady Isom (all from the USA argue that the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, and the possibilities and the realities they represent, are fuelling profound changes to theoretical views of learning and teaching. According to the authors, in contrast to earlier e-learning efforts that simply replicated traditional models of learning and teaching in online environments, ‘E-Learning 2.0’ offers opportunities to move away from the highly centralised industrial model of learning of the past era, towards achieving individual empowerment within a global learning community. They also argue that as the personal, social and flexible technologies of Web 2.0 proliferate, the importance of re-usability and interoperability will also increase; correspondingly there is also a need for standardisation efforts to support the attainment of these goals. The second article, focuses on the use of specific Web 2.0 technologies written by Abdullah Kuzu (Anadolu University, Turkey looks at pre-service teachers’ perceptions of the use of blogs for instruction and

  18. Selective Hydrogenation of Acrolein Over Pd Model Catalysts: Temperature and Particle-Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Casey P; Dostert, Karl-Heinz; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-24

    The selectivity in the hydrogenation of acrolein over Fe 3 O 4 -supported Pd nanoparticles has been investigated as a function of nanoparticle size in the 220-270 K temperature range. While Pd(111) shows nearly 100 % selectivity towards the desired hydrogenation of the C=O bond to produce propenol, Pd nanoparticles were found to be much less selective towards this product. In situ detection of surface species by using IR-reflection absorption spectroscopy shows that the selectivity towards propenol critically depends on the formation of an oxopropyl spectator species. While an overlayer of oxopropyl species is effectively formed on Pd(111) turning the surface highly selective for propenol formation, this process is strongly hindered on Pd nanoparticles by acrolein decomposition resulting in CO formation. We show that the extent of acrolein decomposition can be tuned by varying the particle size and the reaction temperature. As a result, significant production of propenol is observed over 12 nm Pd nanoparticles at 250 K, while smaller (4 and 7 nm) nanoparticles did not produce propenol at any of the temperatures investigated. The possible origin of particle-size dependence of propenol formation is discussed. This work demonstrates that the selectivity in the hydrogenation of acrolein is controlled by the relative rates of acrolein partial hydrogenation to oxopropyl surface species and of acrolein decomposition, which has significant implications for rational catalyst design. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    have now measured the level of hydrogen scrambling in a deprotonated, selectively labeled peptide using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results conclusively show that hydrogen scrambling is prevalent in the deprotonated peptide upon collisional activation. The amide hydrogens ((1)H....../(2)H) have migrated extensively in the anionic peptide, thereby erasing the original regioselective deuteration pattern obtained in solution....

  20. Rotaxane and catenane host structures for sensing charged guest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The promise of mechanically interlocked architectures, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, as prototypical molecular switches and shuttles for nanotechnological applications, has stimulated an ever increasing interest in their synthesis and function. The elaborate host cavities of interlocked structures, however, can also offer a novel approach toward molecular recognition: this Account describes the use of rotaxane and catenane host systems for binding charged guest species, and for providing sensing capability through an integrated optical or electrochemical reporter group. Particular attention is drawn to the exploitation of the unusual dynamic properties of interlocked molecules, such as guest-induced shuttling or conformational switching, as a sophisticated means of achieving a selective and functional sensor response. We initially survey interlocked host systems capable of sensing cationic guests, before focusing on our accomplishments in synthesizing rotaxanes and catenanes designed for the more challenging task of selective anion sensing. In our group, we have developed the use of discrete anionic templation to prepare mechanically interlocked structures for anion recognition applications. Removal of the anion template reveals an interlocked host system, possessing a unique three-dimensional geometrically restrained binding cavity formed between the interlocked components, which exhibits impressive selectivity toward complementary anionic guest species. By incorporating reporter groups within such systems, we have developed both electrochemical and optical anion sensors which can achieve highly selective sensing of anionic guests. Transition metals, lanthanides, and organic fluorophores integrated within the mechanically bonded structural framework of the receptor are perturbed by the binding of the guest, with a concomitant change in the emission profile. We have also exploited the unique dynamics of interlocked hosts by demonstrating that an

  1. Selective hydrogenation of 4-isobutylacetophenone over a sodium-promoted Pd/C catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hong-Baek; Lee, Bae Uk; Nakayama, Tadachika; Park, Yeung-Ho; Ryu, Chung-Han

    2013-01-01

    The effect of sodium promotion on the selective hydrogenation of 4-isobutylacetophenone, 4-IBAP, was investigated over a Pd/C catalyst. A precipitation and deposition method was used to prepare the catalyst, and sodium was promoted on the Pd/C catalyst via post-impregnation while varying the sodium content. The sodium-promoted Pd/C catalyst resulted in a significantly improved yield greater than 96% of the desired product, 1-(4-isobutylphenyl) ethanol (4-IBPE), compared with the non-patented literature results under a mild hydrogenation condition. A detailed hydrogenation network over the Pd/C catalyst was suggested. The reaction mechanism for the yield and selectivity enhancement of 4-IBPE induced-by the promoted Pd/C was elucidated in relation to the geometric and electronic effects of reactant molecules in the microporous support depending on the reaction steps

  2. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  3. Foreign Guests in Ancient Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora Žbontar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xenía was a special relationship between a foreign guest and his host in Ancient Greece. The ritual of hosting a foreigner included an exchange of objects, feasting, and the establishment of friendship between people from different social backgrounds. This relationship implied trust, loyalty, friendship, and mutual aid between the people involved. Goods and services were also exchanged without any form of payment. There were no formal laws governing xenía – it was based entirely on a moral appeal. Mutual appreciation between the host and the guest was established during the ritual, but the host did retain a certain level of superiority over the guest. Xenía was one of the most important institutions in Ancient Greece. It had a lot of features and obligations similar to kinship and marriage. In literary sources the word xénos varies in meaning from “enemy stranger”, “friendly stranger”, “foreigner”, “guest”, “host” to “ritual friend”, and it is often hard to tell which usage is appropriate in a given passage. The paper describes the emphasis on hospitality towards foreigners. It presents an example of a depiction indicating xenía is presented, as well as several objects which were traded during the ritual. The paper also addresses the importance of hospitality in Greek drama in general, especially with examples of violations of the hospitality code.

  4. On the Role of Surface Modifications of Palladium Catalysts in the Selective Hydrogenation of Acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Summing Me up: DFT calculations have shown that alloying, subsurface carbon, and hydride formation, all increase the selectivity of Pd catalysts for acetylene hydrogenation by weakening the surface–adsorbate bond. A simple descriptor—the adsorption energy of a methyl group—has been used to quanti...

  5. Selective liquid phase hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol by Ru/Zr-MOFs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Q.; Zhang, D.; Haandel, van L.; Ye, F.; Xue, T.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Guan, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol under mild conditions was evaluated over Ru nanoparticles supported on a series of zirconium based metal organic frameworks (UiO-66, UiO-67, Zr6-NDC, MIL-140A, MIL-140B, and MIL-140C). The particle size and oxidation state of Ru in the

  6. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  7. Computations between metallocalix(4)arene host and a series of four oil-based fuel pollutant guests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, D.A.; Street, N.C.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations using PM3 and mechanics methods on metallocalix(4)arene hosts (1-10) and substituted dibenzothiophene guests (A-D), which are generally known as oil-based fuel pollutants, show that host-guest formation is energetically favored. Calculations have been carried out for both 1/1 and 1/4 ratios of host/guest. There is no direct bonding between the metal center of the host and the sulfur of the guest in the host-guest complex. Sterically hundered dibenzothiophene guests show similar energies to the unhindered analogs. For calix(4)arenas (5-10) in partial cone conformations and having hydrogen rather than p-tert-butyl groups on the wide rim, host-guest formation occurs within the narrow rim rather than the wide rim. Host-guest association appears to occur via Pie-Pie interactions between host and guest phenyl groups rather than via metal-sulfur bonding. The study has importance especially in oil refining to obtain environmentally safe fuel oils and help supramolecular chemists in designing and synthesizing more sophisticated host molecules for the removal of sulfur from crude oil / refinery oil. (author)

  8. Hydrogen cyanide formation in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides over Cu/ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, F; Koeppel, R; Baiker, A [Department of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, (Switzerland)

    1994-01-06

    Hydrogen cyanide is formed over Cu/ZSM-5 during the selective catalytic reduction of NO[sub x] by either propylene or ethylene in the temperature range 450-600 K. Under the reaction conditions used (reactant feed: 973 ppm NO, 907 ppm propene or 1448 ppm ethylene, 2% oxygen, W/F=0.1 g s cm[sup -3]), the concentration of hydrogen cyanide reaches 20, respectively, 30 ppm, depending on whether ethylene or propene are used as hydrocarbons. In addition, significant N[sub 2]O formation is observed at temperatures lower than 700 K, independent of the hydrocarbon used

  9. Fuzzy logic control for selective hydrogenation of acetylene in ethylene rich streams using visual basic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.R.; Suleman, H.; Khan, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Presence of acetylene is technically disadvantageous in the ethylene rich gas streams from steam crackers. Acetylene tends to polymerize and inactivates the transition metal catalysts, forming highly explosive compounds. The acetylene content has to be selectively reduced to less than one part per million for such streams. The acetylene hydrogenation unit requires stringent control parameters and needs specialized process control techniques for its operation. This study is concerned with application of Fuzzy Logic Control to manipulate and control the process plant with higher precision and greater simplicity. The control program has been written in visual Basic and entails all major scenarios of work modes for successful hydrogenation of Acetylene. (author)

  10. Influence of nonionic surfactants on the potentiometric response of hydrogen ion-selective polymeric membrane electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadas-Torre, C; Bakker, E; Barker, S; Meyerhoff, M E

    1996-05-01

    The influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based nonionic surfactants (i.e., Triton X-100 and Brij 35) in the sample phase on the response properties of hydrogen ion-selective polymeric membrane electrodes containing mobile (lipophilic amines) or covalently bound (aminated-poly-(vinyl chloride)) hydrogen ion carriers is reported. In the presence of these nonionic surfactants, membrane electrode response toward interfering cation activity (e.g., Na+) in the sample phase is increased substantially and the pH measuring range shortened. The degree of cation interference for pH measurements is shown to correlate with the basicity of the hydrogen ion carrier doped within the membrane phase. The observed deterioration in selectivity arises from the partitioning of the surfactant into the membrane and concomitant extraction of metal cations by the surfactants in the organic phase. The effect of nonionic surfactants on pH electrodes prepared with aminated-PVC membranes is shown to be more complex, with additional large shifts in EMF values apparently arising from multidentate interactions between the surfactant molecules and the polymeric amine in the membrane, leading to a change in the apparent pKa values for the amine sites. The effects induced by nonionic surfactants on the EMF response function of hydrogen ion-selective polymeric membrane electrodes are modeled, and experimental results are shown to correlate well with theoretical predictions.

  11. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  12. Partial hydrogenation of alkynes on highly selective nano-structured mesoporous silica MCM-41 composite catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojoori, R.K.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we have developed a silica MCM-41/Metformin/Pd (II) nano composite catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of alkynes to the corresponding (Z)-alkenes under a mild condition of atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Firstly, functionalized Si-MCM-41 metformin catalyst with the optimum performance was prepared. Then, the synthesized catalyst was elucidated by X-ray powder diffraction, BET surface area, FT-IR spectrophotometer, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and applied in partial hydrogenation of different alkynes, with high selectivity and high yield. The products were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, and Mass Spectrometry (MS) that strongly approved the (Z)-double bond configuration of produced alkenes. This prepared catalyst is competitive with the best palladium catalysts known for the selective liquid phase hydrogenation of alkynes and can be easily recovered and regenerated with keeping high activity and selectivity over at least three cycles with a simple regeneration procedure. (author)

  13. Contributions to reversed-phase column selectivity: III. Column hydrogen-bond basicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, P W; Dolan, J W; Dorsey, J G; Snyder, L R; Kirkland, J J

    2015-05-22

    Column selectivity in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) can be described in terms of the hydrophobic-subtraction model, which recognizes five solute-column interactions that together determine solute retention and column selectivity: hydrophobic, steric, hydrogen bonding of an acceptor solute (i.e., a hydrogen-bond base) by a stationary-phase donor group (i.e., a silanol), hydrogen bonding of a donor solute (e.g., a carboxylic acid) by a stationary-phase acceptor group, and ionic. Of these five interactions, hydrogen bonding between donor solutes (acids) and stationary-phase acceptor groups is the least well understood; the present study aims at resolving this uncertainty, so far as possible. Previous work suggests that there are three distinct stationary-phase sites for hydrogen-bond interaction with carboxylic acids, which we will refer to as column basicity I, II, and III. All RPC columns exhibit a selective retention of carboxylic acids (column basicity I) in varying degree. This now appears to involve an interaction of the solute with a pair of vicinal silanols in the stationary phase. For some type-A columns, an additional basic site (column basicity II) is similar to that for column basicity I in primarily affecting the retention of carboxylic acids. The latter site appears to be associated with metal contamination of the silica. Finally, for embedded-polar-group (EPG) columns, the polar group can serve as a proton acceptor (column basicity III) for acids, phenols, and other donor solutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  15. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of 129 Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, 129 Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature

  16. One-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation for biodiesel production from starting material of high degree of unsaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ru; Su, Mengxing; Li, Min; Zhang, Jianchun; Hao, Xinmin; Zhang, Hua

    2010-08-01

    A one-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation was established to produce biodiesel from hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed oil which is eliminated as a potential feedstock by a specification of iodine value (IV; 120 g I(2)/100g maximum) contained in EN 14214. A series of alkaline earth metal oxides and alkaline earth metal supported copper oxide were prepared and tested as catalysts. SrO supported 10 wt.% CuO showed the superior catalytic activity for transesterification with a biodiesel yield of 96% and hydrogenation with a reduced iodine value of 113 and also exhibited a promising selectivity for eliminating methyl linolenate and increasing methyl oleate without rising methyl stearate in the selective hydrogenation. The fuel properties of the selective hydrogenated methyl esters are within biodiesel specifications. Furthermore, cetane numbers and iodine values were well correlated with the compositions of the hydrogenated methyl esters according to degrees of unsaturation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Capturing the guest experience in hotels phase one : theoretical background and development of the guest experience scan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marle, van R.S.F. (Rienk); Pijls, R. (Ruth); Schreiber, G.H. (Gerrit)

    2011-01-01

    The goal for the coming years is to get insight in the guest experience in hotels. What is guest experience? How to measure guest experience? What is the relation between guest experience and guest loyalty? And finally, what tangible elements in the physical environment of hotels and the contact

  18. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF CINNAMALDEHYDE WITH Pt AND Pt-Fe CATALYSTS: EFFECTS OF THE SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. da Silva

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature reduced TiO2-supported Pt and Pt-Fe catalysts are much more active and selective for the liquid–phase hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to unsaturated cinnamyl alcohol than the corresponding carbon-supported catalysts. High-temperature reduced catalysts, where the SMSI effect should be present, are almost inactive for this reaction. There is at present no definitive explanation for this effect but an electronic metal-support interaction is most probably involved.

  20. Selective turn-on fluorescent probes for imaging hydrogen sulfide in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pluth, Michael D

    2012-05-16

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important biological messenger but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection. Here we report two bright fluorescent probes that are selective for H(2)S over cysteine, glutathione and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species. Both probes are demonstrated to detect H(2)S in live cells. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. New catalysts for selective hydrogenation of diene and acetylene hydrocarbons into olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, V.M.; Parenago, O.P.; Shuikina, L.P.

    1978-12-01

    New catalysts for selective hydrogenation of diene and acetylene hydrocarbons into olefins were obtained by reacting aqueous palladium, rhodium, or nickel chloride (0.005-0.05 mole/l.) at 50/sup 0/C, in an argon atmosphere with chelating nitrogen compounds, i.e., o-phenanthroline, ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-dipyridyl, sodium ethylenediaminetetracetate, morpholine, branched polyethylene imines, or amino acids such as glycine, ..cap alpha..-alanine, ..beta..-phenyl-..cap alpha..-alanine, tyrosine, or histidine, and treating the complexes so obtained with sodium borohydride at 1:1-1:5 NaBH/sub 4/-metal ratios, in an aqueous medium. Palladium-based complexes showed the highest activities (20-98Vertical Bar3< conversion) and selectivities (98-100Vertical Bar3<) in heterogeneous hydrogenation of cyclopentadiene, butadiene, 1-hexyne, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, or 1,3-cyclooctadiene at 20/sup 0/-60/sup 0/C and 0.5-15 atm hydrogen, carried out in a kinetic circulation reactor or a metallic autoclave. Thus, a catalytic system based on PdCl/sub 2/ and ..beta..-phenyl-..cap alpha..-alanine converted 98Vertical Bar3< of cyclopentadiene to cyclopentene with 99Vertical Bar3< selectivity. The palladium-based catalyst did not deactivate on the contact with air.

  2. A Hydrogen Ion-Selective Sensor Based on Non-Plasticised Methacrylic-acrylic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ahmad

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A methacrylic-acrylic polymer was synthesised for use as a non-plasticised membrane for hydrogen ion-selective sensor incorporating tridodecylamine as an ionophore. The copolymer consisted of methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate monomers in a ratio of 2:8. Characterisation of the copolymer using FTNMR demonstrated that the amount of each monomer incorporated during solution polymerisation was found to be similar to the amount used in the feed before polymerisation. The glass transition temperature of the copolymer determined by differential scanning calorimetry was -30.9 ºC. Potentiometric measurements conducted showed a linear pH response range of 4.3 – 9.6 with the response slope of 56.7 mV/decade. The selectivity of the sensors towards hydrogen ions was similar to other plasticiser based membrane electrodes and the logarithmic selectivity coefficients for discrimination against interference cations is close to –9.7. However, the incorporation of a lipophilic anion as membrane additive is essential in ensuring optimum performance of the hydrogen ion sensor.

  3. Mechanisms of Furfural Reduction on Metal Electrodes: Distinguishing Pathways for Selective Hydrogenation of Bioderived Oxygenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderdon, Xiaotong H.; Chadderdon, David J.; Matthiesen, John E.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of biomass-derived platform molecules is an emerging route for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. Understanding gaps between reaction conditions, underlying mechanisms, and product selectivity have limited the rational design of active, stable, and selective catalyst systems. Here, the mechanisms of electrochemical reduction of furfural, an important biobased platform molecule and model for aldehyde reduction, are explored through a combination of voltammetry, preparative electrolysis, thiol-electrode modifications, and kinetic isotope studies. It is demonstrated that two distinct mechanisms are operable on metallic Cu electrodes in acidic electrolytes: (i) electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) and (ii) direct electroreduction. The contributions of each mechanism to the observed product distribution are clarified by evaluating the requirement for direct chemical interactions with the electrode surface and the role of adsorbed hydrogen. Further analysis reveals that hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products are generated by parallel ECH pathways. By understanding the underlying mechanisms it enables the manipulation of furfural reduction by rationally tuning the electrode potential, electrolyte pH, and furfural concentration to promote selective formation of important biobased polymer precursors and fuels.

  4. Mechanisms of Furfural Reduction on Metal Electrodes: Distinguishing Pathways for Selective Hydrogenation of Bioderived Oxygenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, Xiaotong H; Chadderdon, David J; Matthiesen, John E; Qiu, Yang; Carraher, Jack M; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Wenzhen

    2017-10-11

    Electrochemical reduction of biomass-derived platform molecules is an emerging route for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. However, understanding gaps between reaction conditions, underlying mechanisms, and product selectivity have limited the rational design of active, stable, and selective catalyst systems. In this work, the mechanisms of electrochemical reduction of furfural, an important biobased platform molecule and model for aldehyde reduction, are explored through a combination of voltammetry, preparative electrolysis, thiol-electrode modifications, and kinetic isotope studies. It is demonstrated that two distinct mechanisms are operable on metallic Cu electrodes in acidic electrolytes: (i) electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) and (ii) direct electroreduction. The contributions of each mechanism to the observed product distribution are clarified by evaluating the requirement for direct chemical interactions with the electrode surface and the role of adsorbed hydrogen. Further analysis reveals that hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products are generated by parallel ECH pathways. Understanding the underlying mechanisms enables the manipulation of furfural reduction by rationally tuning the electrode potential, electrolyte pH, and furfural concentration to promote selective formation of important biobased polymer precursors and fuels.

  5. Effect of chemically reduced palladium supported catalyst on sunflower oil hydrogenation conversion and selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of sunflower oil was studied in order to improve the conversion and to reduce the trans-isomerization selectivity. The hydrogenation was performed using Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 prepared catalyst and Pd/Al2O3 commercial catalyst under similar conditions. The Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation and chemical reduction processes. It was characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis (BET, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The result of sunflower oil hydrogenation on Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst showed a 17% higher conversion and a 23% lower trans-isomerization selectivity compared to the commercial Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. The chemical reduction of palladium supported catalyst using potassium borohydride (KBH4 has affected the Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst’s structure and particle size. These most likely influenced its catalytic performance toward higher conversion and lower trans-isomerization selectivity.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the guest-concentration dependence of the mobility in a disordered fluorene-arylamine host-guest system in the guest-to-guest regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Hof, A.J.; Lu, M.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Vries, R. J.; Coehoorn, R.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transport in a polyspirobifluorene derivative with copolymerized N,N,N',N'-tetraaryldiamino biphenyl (TAD) hole transport units is investigated as a function of the TAD content. For TAD concentrations larger than 5%, guest-to-guest transport is observed. It is demonstrated that in this

  7. Quantitative analysis of the guest-concentration dependence of the mobility in a disordered fluorene-arylamine host-guest system in the guest-to-guest regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Hof, A.J.; Lu, M.; Blom, P.W.M.; Vries, R.J. de; Coehoorn, R.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transport in a polyspirobifluorene derivative with copolymerized N,N,N',N'-tetraaryldiamino biphenyl (TAD) hole transport units is investigated as a function of the TAD content. For TAD concentrations larger than 5, guest-to-guest transport is observed. It is demonstrated that in this

  8. The use of ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Vinciane; Wendt, Bianca; Werkmeister, Svenja; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-04-28

    The performance of well-defined ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C and C=X bonds is reported. Monodisperse iron nanoparticles of about 2 nm size are synthesized by the decomposition of {Fe(N[Si(CH3)3]2)2}2 under dihydrogen. They are found to be active for the hydrogenation of various alkenes and alkynes under mild conditions and weakly active for C=O bond hydrogenation.

  9. Selective hydrogenation of halogenated arenes using porous manganese oxide (OMS-2) and platinum supported OMS-2 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Iain J; Daly, Helen; Manyar, Haresh G; Taylor, S F Rebecca; Thompson, Jillian M; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-07-04

    Porous manganese oxide (OMS-2) and platinum supported on OMS-2 catalysts have been shown to facilitate the hydrogenation of the nitro group in chloronitrobenzene to give chloroaniline with no dehalogenation. Complete conversion was obtained within 2 h at 25 °C and, although the rate of reaction increased with increasing temperature up to 100 °C, the selectivity to chloroaniline remained at 99.0%. Use of Pd/OMS-2 or Pt/Al2O3 resulted in significant dechlorination even at 25 °C and 2 bar hydrogen pressure giving a selectivity to chloroaniline of 34.5% and 77.8%, respectively, at complete conversion. This demonstrates the potential of using platinum group metal free catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of halogenated aromatics. Two pathways were observed for the analogous nitrobenzene hydrogenation depending on the catalyst used. The hydrogenation of nitrobenzene was found to follow a direct pathway to aniline and nitrosobenzene over Pd/OMS-2 in contrast to the OMS and Pt/OMS-2 catalysts which resulted in formation of nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene and azobenzene/hydrazobenzene intermediates before complete conversion to aniline. These results indicate that for Pt/OMS-2 the hydrogenation proceeds predominantly over the support with the metal acting to dissociate hydrogen. In the case of Pd/OMS-2 both the hydrogenation and hydrogen adsorption occur on the metal sites.

  10. Photocaged Competitor Guests: A General Approach Toward Light-Activated Cargo Release From Cucurbiturils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Miguel A; Basílio, Nuno; Moro, Artur J; Domingues, Mara; González-Delgado, José A; Arteaga, Jesús F; Pischel, Uwe

    2017-09-21

    A general approach toward the light-induced guest release from cucurbit[7]uril by means of a photoactivatable competitor was devised. An o-nitrobenzyl-caged competitor is photolyzed to generate a competitive guest that can displace cargo from the host macrocycle solely based on considerations of chemical equilibrium. With this method the release of terpene guests from inclusion complexes with cucurbit[7]uril was demonstrated. The binding of the herein investigated terpenes, all being lead fragrant components in essential oils, has been characterized for the first time. They feature binding constants of up to 10 8  L mol -1 and a high differential binding selectivity (spanning four orders of magnitude for the binding constants for the particular set of terpenes). By fine-tuning the photoactivatable competitor guest, selective and also sequential release of the terpenes was achieved. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Highly Sensitive and Selective Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using the Mesoporous SnO2 Modified Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niuzi Xue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is important to improve the sensitivities and selectivities of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS gas sensors when they are used to monitor the state of hydrogen in aerospace industry and electronic field. In this paper, the ordered mesoporous SnO2 (m-SnO2 powders were prepared by sol-gel method, and the morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET. The gas sensors were fabricated using m-SnO2 as the modified layers on the surface of commercial SnO2 (c-SnO2 by screen printing technology, and tested for gas sensing towards ethanol, benzene and hydrogen with operating temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 400 °C. Higher sensitivity was achieved by using the modified m-SnO2 layers on the c-SnO2 gas sensor, and it was found that the S(c/m2 sensor exhibited the highest response (Ra/Rg = 22.2 to 1000 ppm hydrogen at 400 °C. In this paper, the mechanism of the sensitivity and selectivity improvement of the gas sensors is also discussed.

  12. Classical/quantum correspondence in state selective charge transfer and excitation reactions involving highly charged ions and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purkait, M

    2009-01-01

    State selective charge transfer and excitation cross sections for collisions of Ne q+ (q = 1-10) with atomic hydrogen are calculated within the framework of Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation.

  13. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions.

  14. Supramolecular polymeric materials via cyclodextrin-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akira; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakahata, Masaki

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cyclodextrins (CDs) have many attractive functions, including molecular recognition, hydrolysis, catalysis, and polymerization. One of the most important uses of CDs is for the molecular recognition of hydrophobic organic guest molecules in aqueous solutions. CDs are desirable host molecules because they are environmentally benign and offer diverse functions. This Account demonstrates some of the great advances in the development of supramolecular materials through host-guest interactions within the last 10 years. In 1990, we developed topological supramolecular complexes with CDs, polyrotaxane, and CD tubes, and these preparation methods take advantage of self-organization between the CDs and the polymers. The combination of polyrotaxane with αCD forms a hydrogel through the interaction of αCDs with the OH groups on poly(ethylene glycol). We categorized these polyrotaxane chemistries within main chain type complexes. At the same time, we studied the interactions of side chain type supramolecular complexes with CDs. In these systems the guest molecules modified the polymers and selectively formed inclusion complexes with CDs. The systems that used low molecular weight compounds did not show such selectivity with CDs. The multivalency available within the complex cooperatively enhances the selective binding of CD with guest molecules via the polymer side chains, a phenomenon that is analogous to binding patterns observed in antigen-antibody complexes. To incorporate the molecular recognition properties of CDs within the polymer side chains, we first prepared stimuli-responsive sol-gel switching materials through host-guest interactions. We chose azobenzene derivatives for their response to light and ferrocene derivatives for their response to redox conditions. The supramolecular materials were both redox-responsive and self-healing, and these properties resulted from host-guest interactions. These sol-gels with built in switches gave us insight for

  15. Promising SiC support for Pd catalyst in selective hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanglong; Liu, Yuefeng; Liu, Yan; Chu, Wei

    2018-06-01

    In this study, SiC supported Pd nanoparticles were found to be an efficient catalyst in acetylene selective hydrogenation reaction. The ethylene selectivity can be about 20% higher than that on Pd/TiO2 catalyst at the same acetylene conversion at 90%. Moreover, Pd/SiC catalyst showed a stable catalytic life at 65 °C with 80% ethylene selectivity. With the detailed characterization using temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 adsorption/desorption analysis, CO-chemisorption and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), it was found that SiC owns a lower surface area (22.9 m2/g) and a broad distribution of meso-/macro-porosity (from 5 to 65 nm), which enhanced the mass transfer during the chemical process at high reaction rate and decreased the residence time of ethylene on catalyst surface. Importantly, SiC support has the high thermal conductivity, which favored the rapid temperature homogenization through the catalyst bed and inhabited the over-hydrogenation of acetylene. The surface electronic density of Pd on Pd/SiC catalyst was higher than that on Pd/TiO2, which could promote desorption of ethylene from surface of the catalyst. TGA results confirmed a much less coke deposition on Pd/SiC catalyst.

  16. Evaluation tool for selection and optimisation of hydrogen demonstration projects. Application to a decentralized renewable hydrogen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracht, M.; De Groot, A.; Gregoire Padro, C.E.; Schucan, T.H.; Skolnik, E.

    1998-06-01

    As part of the International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, an evaluation tool to assist in the design, operation and optimisation of hydrogen demonstration facilities is under development. Using commercially available flowsheet simulation software (ASPEN- Plus) as the integrating platform, this tool is designed to provide system developers with a comprehensive data base or library of component models and an integrating platform through which these models may be linked. By combining several energy system components a conceptual design of a integrated hydrogen energy system can be made. As a part of the tool and connected to the library are design guidelines which can help finding the optimal configuration in the design process. The component categories considered include: production, storage, transport, distribution and end use. Many component models have already been included in the initial test platform. The use of the tool will be illustrated by presenting the results of a specific sample system that has been designed and assessed with use of the tool. The system considered is a decentralized renewable hydrogen system in which the hydrogen is produced by biomass gasification or pyrolysis, the produced hydrogen is transported through a pipeline or with a tank truck. The storage options that are considered are liquid hydrogen and compressed gas. The hydrogen is dispensed through a refueling station. Several options for integration are conceivable; i.e. storage of the hydrogen can take place centrally or district heat of a gasification unit can be used to generate electricity for liquefaction, etc. With use of the tool several configurations with different components and various integration options have been examined. Both the results of the modeling effort and an assessment of the evaluation tool will be presented. 5 refs

  17. State-selective charge transfer cross sections for light ion impact of atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D. R. [University of North Texas; Stancil, Phillip C. [University of Georgia, Athens; Havener, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the utility of diagnosing plasma properties such as impurity concentration and spatial distribution, and plasma temperature and rotation, by detection of photon emission following capture of electrons from atomic hydrogen to excited states of multiply charged ions, new calculations of state-selective charge transfer involving light ions have been carried out using the atomic orbital close-coupling and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. By comparing these with results of other approaches applicable in a lower impact energy regime, and by benchmarking them using key experimental data, knowledge of the cross sections can be made available across the range parameters needed by fusion plasma diagnostics.

  18. Highly selective and rapidly responsive fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide detection in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Jialin; Yang, Shaoxiang; Tian, Hongyu; Liu, Yongguo; Sun, Baoguo

    2018-08-15

    A new fluorescent probe 6-(2, 4-dinitrophenoxy)-2-naphthonitrile (probe 1) was designed and synthesized for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). The addition of H 2 S to a solution of probe 1 resulted in a marked fluorescence turn-on alongside a visual color change from colorless to light yellow. Importantly, this distinct color response indicated that probe 1 could be used as a visual sensor for H 2 S. Moreover, probe 1 was successfully used as a signal tool to determine the H 2 S levels in beer and red wine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.T.; Sutawane, U.B.; Rathi, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage, (2) isotope exchange, 3) isotope analysis, (4) properties and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762. (author)

  20. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH 3 -H 2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  1. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  2. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  3. Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbons in a Novel Hydrogen-Selective Membrane-Based Fuel Processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2006-03-10

    In this work, asymmetric dense Pd/porous stainless steel composite membranes were fabricated by depositing palladium on the outer surface of the tubular support. The electroless plating method combined with an osmotic pressure field was used to deposit the palladium film. Surface morphology and microstructure of the composite membranes were characterized by SEM and EDX. The SEM and EDX analyses revealed strong adhesion of the plated pure palladium film on the substrate and dense coalescence of the Pd film. Membranes were further characterized by conducting permeability experiments with pure hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium gases at temperatures from 325 to 450 C and transmembrane pressure differences from 5 to 45 psi. The permeation results showed that the fabricated membranes have both high hydrogen permeability and selectivity. For example, the hydrogen permeability for a composite membrane with a 20 {micro}m Pd film was 3.02 x 10{sup -5} moles/m{sup 2}.s.Pa{sup 0.765} at 450 C. Hydrogen/nitrogen selectivity for this composite membrane was 1000 at 450 C with a transmembrane pressure difference of 14.7 psi. Steam reforming of methane is one of the most important chemical processes in hydrogen and syngas production. To investigate the usefulness of palladium-based composite membranes in membrane-reactor configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen, steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift was studied. The steam reforming of methane using a packed-bed inert membrane tubular reactor (PBIMTR) was simulated. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model with parallel flow configuration was developed for steam reforming of methane. The shell volume was taken as the feed and sweep gas was fed to the inside of the membrane tube. Radial diffusion was taken into account for concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential

  4. Hydrogen selective NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) MOF membranes with high permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Zou, Xiaoqin; Gao, Xue; Fan, Songjie; Sun, Fuxing; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Guangshan [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic, Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2012-09-11

    Hydrogen-based energy is a promising renewable and clean resource. Thus, hydrogen selective microporous membranes with high performance and high stability are demanded. Novel NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membranes are evaluated for hydrogen separation for this goal. Continuous NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membranes have been prepared successfully on macroporous glass frit discs assisted with colloidal seeds. The gas sorption ability of NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) materials is studied by gas adsorption measurement. The isosteric heats of adsorption in a sequence of CO{sub 2}> N{sub 2}> CH{sub 4}{approx} H{sub 2} indicates different interactions between NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) framework and these gases. As-prepared membranes are measured by single and binary gas permeation at different temperatures. The results of singe gas permeation show a decreasing permeance in an order of H{sub 2}> CH{sub 4}> N{sub 2}> CO{sub 2}, suggesting that the diffusion and adsorption properties make significant contributions in the gas permeation through the membrane. In binary gas permeation, the NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membrane shows high selectivity for H{sub 2} with separation factors of 20.7, 23.9 and 30.9 at room temperature (288 K) for H{sub 2} over CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, respectively. In comparison to single gas permeation, a slightly higher separation factor is obtained due to the competitive adsorption effect between the gases in the porous MOF membrane. Additionally, the NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membrane exhibits very high permeance for H{sub 2} in the mixtures separation (above 1.5 x 10{sup -6} mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} Pa{sup -1}) due to its large cavity, resulting in a very high separation power. The details of the temperature effect on the permeances of H{sub 2} over other gases are investigated from 288 to 353 K. The supported NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membranes with high hydrogen separation power possess high stability, resistance to cracking, temperature cycling and show high reproducibility

  5. Have the Guests Perceived Superior Value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levyda Levyda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to describe guests’ perceived value by using a multidimensional approach. From previous research, guests’ perceived value consisted of some functional value, emotional value, and social value. Based on guest experience, and functional value consisted of physical evidence, guest room, food and beverage, hotel staff, and price. This research was conducted in four-star hotels in Jakarta. The respondents were the guests who had stayed in four-star hotels. The number of the respondent was 405. The data were obtained by using self-administered questionnaires. This research shows that guests have not perceived superior value. Some of the values and the necessary efforts need to be improved.

  6. Hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. Development of CO{sub 2}-selective biogas membrane. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestboe, A.P.

    2012-02-15

    The project started as a literature study and technology development project for a hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. The introduction of hydrogen (for example produced from wind turbines by surplus electricity) in the gas system makes it possible to store energy which can be selectively used with high energy conversion in fuel cells directly located at the end users. In order to make this possible, it is necessary to have a separating unit that can selectively remove hydrogen from the gas mixture and deliver it as fuel to the electrical generator (a fuel cell). In the project, several existing technologies were evaluated with regard to the application in view. It was concluded that while other technologies are ripe, they are costly in energy and unsuitable for the relatively low capacity application that are in question close to the end users. Membrane technology was evaluated to be the most suitable, although the technology is still under development in many cases. In the project it was found that metallic membranes in the form of palladium coated stainless discs would answer the needs for the high purity needed. Laboratory development yielded discs that could separate hydrogen from natural gas, however, the flux was low compared to the needs of the application. It was found that at least 2 bar pressure difference of hydrogen would be needed to get a high enough flux. The way to achieve this pressure would necessitate a compressor which would consume an energy amount high enough to invalidate the concept. When concluding on the results and the study it was found that the direction of the project could be changed towards developing CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with the goal of developing membrane technology that could upgrade biogas by removing CO{sub 2}. The laboratory equipment and setup that were developed in the first part of the project could be used directly in this second part of the project. In this second part of the project it was

  7. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  8. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng; Wang, Yuan; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  9. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng

    2017-05-30

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  10. Antibacterial effects of hydrogen peroxide and silver composition on selected pathogenic enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Davoudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Antibacterial effects of hydrogen peroxide and silver composition on selected pathogenic enterobacteriaceae was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: The efficacy of 30 ppb silver in 0.3% hydrogen peroxide solution for inactivation of selected Enterobacteriaceae, including Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was assessed for 72 hours in a designated nutrient broth medium and steel surface. The bactericidal growth ability was determined for each bacterium genus by the conventional colony count method and turbidimetry via an optical density (OD assay at 450 nm in a time interval of 24 hours. Results: Suspensions of K.pneumoniae, and P.mirabilis showed a significant OD reduction at three 24-hour intervals (CI = 0.95; P < 0.05, for both, along with blocked growth in a designated broth medium during 24 to 48 hours of exposure. The disinfectant was also significantly efficient for inactivating of the mentioned bacteria on steel surfaces after a 15-minute time exposure (CI = 0.95; P < 0.05. For E.coli, the OD decreased slightly during the initial exposure time, but increased after 24 hours. Viable E.coli cells were proved by colonies grown on the plate. A qualitative surface decontamination test showed that three pathogenic bacteria were inactivated significantly after disinfectant exposure (CI = 0.95, P < 0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, a combination of hydrogen peroxide and silver ions was proposed as a strong disinfecting agent both in suspensions and on the surfaces against these three important human pathogens.

  11. Microwave-activated Ni/carbon catalysts for highly selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinhuan; He, Jie; Jing, Run; Tao, Peipei; Nie, Renfeng; Zhou, Dan; Xia, Qinghua

    2017-06-01

    Biocarbon supported Ni catalysts have been prepared by facile impregnation of Ni species by microwave-heating and used for selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, N2 sorption measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction of H2 and H2 temperature-programmed desorption. The morphology and particle size of catalysts were imaged by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. For the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine, 10%Ni/CSC-II(b) exhibits the best catalytic activity to achieve 100 mol% conversion of nitrobenzene and 96.7% selectivity of cyclohexylamine under reaction conditions of 2.0 MPa H2 and 200 °C, ascribed to high dispersion of Ni species and formation of nanosized Ni particles on the support aided by microwave-heating. Thus-prepared Ni/CSC catalyst is greatly activated, in which the addition of precious metal like Rh is totally avoided.

  12. Rhodium Nanoparticle-mesoporous Silicon Nanowire Nanohybrids for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection with High Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiqian; Chang, Hucheng; Zhu, Weiqin; Xu, Chenlong; Feng, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Developing nanostructured electrocatalysts, with low overpotential, high selectivity and activity has fundamental and technical importance in many fields. We report here rhodium nanoparticle and mesoporous silicon nanowire (RhNP@mSiNW) hybrids for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection with high electrocatalytic activity and selectivity. By employing electrodes that loaded with RhNP@mSiNW nanohybrids, interference caused from both many electroactive substances and dissolved oxygen were eliminated by electrochemical assaying at an optimal potential of +75 mV. Furthermore, the electrodes exhibited a high detection sensitivity of 0.53 μA/mM and fast response (< 5 s). This high-performance nanohybrid electrocatalyst has great potential for future practical application in various oxidase-base biosensors. PMID:25588953

  13. Selective Propene Epoxidation on Immobilized Au6-10 Clusters: The Effect of Hydrogen and Water on Activity and Selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sungsik; Molina, Luis M.; López, María J.

    2009-01-01

    Epoxidation made easy: Subnanometer gold clusters immobilized on amorphous alumina result in a highly active and selective catalyst for propene epoxidation. The highest selectivity is found for gas mixtures involving oxygen and water, thus avoiding the use of hydrogen. Ab initio DFT calculations ...

  14. Influence of ni addition to a low-loaded palladium catalyst on the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Lederhos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-hydrogenation of alkynes has industrial and academic relevance on a large scale. To increase the activity, selectivity and lifetime of monometallic catalysts, the development of bimetallic catalysts has been investigated. 1-Heptyne hydrogenation over low-loaded Pd and Ni monometallic and PdNi bimetallic catalysts was studied in liquid phase at mild conditions. XPS results suggest that nickel addition to Pd modifies the electronic state of palladium as nickel loading is increased. Low-loaded Pd catalysts showed the highest selectivities (> 95%. The most active prepared catalyst, PdNi(1%, was more selective than the Lindlar catalyst.

  15. Selective hydrogenation of citral over supported Pt catalysts: insight into support effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofeng [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (United States); Hu, Weiming; Deng, Baolin [University of Missouri, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Liang, Xinhua, E-mail: liangxin@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highly dispersed platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on various substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor at 300 °C. The substrates included multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), silica gel (SiO{sub 2}), commercial γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ALD-prepared porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The results of TEM analysis showed that ~1.3 nm Pt NPs were highly dispersed on all different supports. All catalysts were used for the reaction of selective hydrogenation of citral to unsaturated alcohols (UA), geraniol, and nerol. Both the structure and acidity of supports affected the activity and selectivity of Pt catalysts. Pt/SiO{sub 2} showed the highest activity due to the strong acidity of SiO{sub 2} and the conversion of citral reached 82% after 12 h with a selectivity of 58% of UA. Pt/MWCNTs showed the highest selectivity of UA, which reached 65% with a conversion of 38% due to its unique structure and electronic effect. The cycling experiments indicated that Pt/MWCNTs and Pt/ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were more stable than Pt/SiO{sub 2}, as a result of the different interactions between the Pt NPs and the supports.

  16. Effect of antimony oxide on magnesium vanadates for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K.T.; Chi, Z.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tunghai University, ROC Taichung (Taiwan)

    2001-05-17

    The effect of antimony oxide addition to MgV{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Mg{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} was studied in the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur. Significant improvements in sulfur selectivity and yield were observed for the uncalcined mechanical mixtures of magnesium vanadates with {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Calcination of the mechanical mixtures resulted in the much stronger synergy in catalytic activity and sulfur selectivity. For the uncalcined samples, XRD, TPR and XPS studies indicated that antimony reduction behaviors in the mechanical mixtures differed very much from those in {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} alone, suggested that their selectivity improvements might be due to the interactions (probably oxygen transfer) between {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnesium vanadates. For the calcined samples, XRD results indicated that their better catalytic performances in H{sub 2}S oxidation were primarily attributed to the formation of VSbO{sub 4} compound from antimony oxide and magnesium vanadates.

  17. Biasing hydrogen bond donating host systems towards chemical warfare agent recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Jennifer R; Wells, Neil J; Ede, Jayne A; Gale, Philip A; Sambrook, Mark R

    2016-10-12

    A series of neutral ditopic and negatively charged, monotopic host molecules have been evaluated for their ability to bind chloride and dihydrogen phosphate anions, and neutral organophosphorus species dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP) and the chemical warfare agent (CWA) pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD, soman) in organic solvent via hydrogen bonding. Urea, thiourea and boronic acid groups are shown to bind anions and neutral guests through the formation of hydrogen bonds, with the urea and thiourea groups typically exhibiting higher affinity interactions. The introduction of a negative charge on the host structure is shown to decrease anion affinity, whilst still allowing for high stability host-GD complex formation. Importantly, the affinity of the host for the neutral CWA GD is greater than for anionic guests, thus demonstrating the potential for selectivity reversal based on charge repulsion.

  18. Hydrogen bond based smart polymer for highly selective and tunable capture of multiply phosphorylated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Guangyan; Lu, Qi; Li, Xiuling; Liu, Jing; Ye, Mingliang; Liang, Xinmiao; Sun, Taolei

    2017-09-06

    Multisite phosphorylation is an important and common mechanism for finely regulating protein functions and subsequent cellular responses. However, this study is largely restricted by the difficulty to capture low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) from complex biosamples owing to the limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here we show that smart polymer can serve as an ideal platform to resolve this challenge. Driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions, the smart polymer displays differential complexation with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides. Importantly, MPP binding can be modulated conveniently and precisely by solution conditions, resulting in highly controllable MPP adsorption on material surface. This facilitates excellent performance in MPP enrichment and separation from model proteins and real biosamples. High enrichment selectivity and coverage, extraordinary adsorption capacities and recovery towards MPPs, as well as high discovery rates of unique phosphorylation sites, suggest its great potential in phosphoproteomics studies.Capture of low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) is difficult due to limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here the authors show, a smart polymer driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions can differentially complex with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides.

  19. Spatially selective hydrogen irradiation of dilute nitride semiconductors: a brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Marco; Pettinari, Giorgio; Biccari, Francesco; Capizzi, Mario; Polimeni, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    We provide a brief survey of the most recent results obtained by performing spatially selective hydrogen irradiation of dilute nitride semiconductors. The striking effects of the formation of stable N–H complexes in these compounds—coupled to the ultrasharp diffusion profile of H therein—can be exploited to tailor the structural (lattice constant) and optoelectronic (energy gap, refractive index, electron effective mass) properties of the material in the growth plane, with a spatial resolution of a few nm. This can be applied to the fabrication of site-controlled quantum dots (QDs) and wires, but also to the realization of the optical elements required for the on-chip manipulation and routing of qubits in fully integrated photonic circuits. The fabricated QDs—which have shown the ability to emit single photons—can also be deterministically coupled with photonic crystal microcavities, proving their inherent suitability to act as integrated light sources in complex nanophotonic devices.

  20. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero eSalminen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs. Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC. The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  1. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  2. Selective hydrogenation of furfural on Ir/TiO2 catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Reyes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania-supported Ir catalysts were used in the hydrogenation of furfural. Reactions were carried out in a stirred batch type reactor at 0.62MPa and 363K using a 0.10M solution of furfural in a 1:1 mixture n-heptane -ethanol as solvent. Catalysts containing 2 wt% of Ir were reduced in H2 flow at different temperatures in the range 473-773K. The catalysts were characterized by H2 chemisorption, TEM, TPR, TPD of NH3 and XPS. Conversion of furfural is higher at lower reduction temperatures, but leads to byproducts whereas reduction at higher temperatures shows selectivity to furfuryl alcohol close to 100%.

  3. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui

    2017-11-20

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  4. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui; Olivos-Suarez, Alma I.; Osadchii, Dmitrii; Romero, Maria Jose Valero; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  6. Pt Single Atoms Embedded in the Surface of Ni Nanocrystals as Highly Active Catalysts for Selective Hydrogenation of Nitro Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuhan; Geng, Zhigang; Zhao, Songtao; Wang, Liangbing; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xu; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Li, Zhenyu; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2018-06-13

    Single-atom catalysts exhibit high selectivity in hydrogenation due to their isolated active sites, which ensure uniform adsorption configurations of substrate molecules. Compared with the achievement in catalytic selectivity, there is still a long way to go in exploiting the catalytic activity of single-atom catalysts. Herein, we developed highly active and selective catalysts in selective hydrogenation by embedding Pt single atoms in the surface of Ni nanocrystals (denoted as Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals). During the hydrogenation of 3-nitrostyrene, the TOF numbers based on surface Pt atoms of Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals reached ∼1800 h -1 under 3 atm of H 2 at 40 °C, much higher than that of Pt single atoms supported on active carbon, TiO 2 , SiO 2 , and ZSM-5. Mechanistic studies reveal that the remarkable activity of Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals derived from sufficient hydrogen supply because of spontaneous dissociation of H 2 on both Pt and Ni atoms as well as facile diffusion of H atoms on Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals. Moreover, the ensemble composed of the Pt single atom and nearby Ni atoms in Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals leads to the adsorption configuration of 3-nitrostyrene favorable for the activation of nitro groups, accounting for the high selectivity for 3-vinylaniline.

  7. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H_2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H_2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H_2 dissociation and

  8. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-07-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of Csbnd H/Csbnd C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H2 dissociation and

  9. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ling-Ling [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lv, Cun-Qin, E-mail: lcq173@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009, Shanxi Province (China); Wang, Gui-Chang, E-mail: wangguichang@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H{sub 2}. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H{sub 2

  10. Carbon Nanodots as Dual-Mode Nanosensors for Selective Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cheng-Long; Su, Li-Xia; Zang, Jin-Hao; Li, Xin-Jian; Lou, Qing; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important product of oxidase-based enzymatic reactions, such as glucose/glucose oxidase (GOD) reaction. Therefore, the probing of generated H2O2 for achieving the detection of various carbohydrates and their oxidases is very significative. Herein, we report one kind of dual-emission carbon nanodots (CDs) that can serve as novel dual-mode nanosensors with both fluorometric and colorimetric output for the selective detection of H2O2. The dual-model nanosensors are established only by the undecorated dual-emission CDs, where significant fluorometric and colorimetric changes are observed with the addition of different concentrations of H2O2 in the CD solution, which benefit to the achievement of the naked-eye detection for H2O2. The mechanism of the nanosensors can be attributed to the fact that the external chemical stimuli like hydroxyl radicals from H2O2 bring about the change of surface properties and the aggregation of CDs, which dominate the emission and absorption of CDs. The constructed dual-mode nanosensors exhibit good biocompatibility and high selectivity toward H2O2 with a linear detection range spanning from 0.05 to 0.5 M and allow the detection of H2O2 as low as 14 mM.

  11. Selection rule engineering of forbidden transitions of a hydrogen atom near a nanogap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunyoung Y.; Kim, Daisik S.

    2018-01-01

    We perform an analytical study on the allowance of forbidden transitions for a hydrogen atom placed near line dipole sources, mimicking light emanating from a one-dimensional metallic nanogap. It is shown that the rapid variation of the electric field vector, inevitable in the near zone, completely breaks the selection rule of Δl=±1. While the forbidden transitions between spherically symmetric S states, such as 2S to 1S or 3S to 1S (Δl=0), are rather robust against selection rule breakage, Δl=±2 transitions such as between 3D and 1S or 3D and 2S states are very vulnerable to the spatial variation of the perturbing electric field. Transitions between 2S and 3D states are enhanced by many orders of magnitude, aided by the quadratic nature of both the perturbing Hamiltonian and D wavefunctions. The forbidden dipole moment, which approaches one Bohr radius times the electric charge in the vicinity of the gap, can be written in a simple closed form owing to the one-dimensional nature of our gap. With large enough effective volume together with the symmetric nature of the excited state wavefunctions, our work paves way towards atomic physics application of infinitely long nanogaps.

  12. Microbial culture selection for bio-hydrogen production from waste ground wheat by dark fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argun, Hidayet; Kargi, Fikret; Kapdan, Ilgi K. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    Hydrogen formation performances of different anaerobic bacteria were investigated in batch dark fermentation of waste wheat powder solution (WPS). Serum bottles containing wheat powder were inoculated with pure cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum (CAB), Clostridium butyricum (CB), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA), heat-treated anaerobic sludge (ANS) and a mixture of those cultures (MIX). Cumulative hydrogen formation (CHF), hydrogen yield (HY) and specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) were determined for every culture. The heat-treated anaerobic sludge was found to be the most effective culture with a cumulative hydrogen formation of 560 ml, hydrogen yield of 223 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} starch and a specific hydrogen production rate of 32.1 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} h{sup -1}. (author)

  13. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  14. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery | Enslin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 8 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery. JMN Enslin. Abstract. No Abstract.

  15. Guest driven structural transformation studies of a luminescent metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at room temperature often render MOFs which gener- ally encapsulate low boiling solvents as free guests in the pores. These MOFs generally exhibit flexible char- acter because they often lose those trapped guests upon air drying of the MOFs crystals and undergo struc- tural variations, often termed as guest induced ...

  16. Selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone over Pd@CN (N-doped porous carbon): Role of catalyst reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuo; Yang, Guangxin; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Yefei; Chen, Rizhi

    2018-03-01

    Selective phenol hydrogenation is a green and sustainable technology to produce cyclohexanone. The work focused on investigating the role of catalyst reduction method in the liquid-phase phenol hydrogenation to cyclohexanone over Pd@CN (N-doped porous carbon). A series of reduction methods including flowing hydrogen reduction, in-situ reaction reduction and liquid-phase reduction were designed and performed. The results highlighted that the reduction method significantly affected the catalytic performance of Pd@CN in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone, and the liquid-phase reduction with the addition of appropriate amount of phenol was highly efficient to improve the catalytic activity of Pd@CN. The influence mechanism was explored by a series of characterizations. The results of TEM, XPS and CO chemisorption confirmed that the reduction method mainly affected the size, surface composition and dispersion of Pd in the CN material. The addition of phenol during the liquid-phase reduction could inhibit the aggregation of Pd NPs and promote the reduction of Pd (2+), and then improved the catalytic activity of Pd@CN. The work would aid the development of high-performance Pd@CN catalysts for selective phenol hydrogenation.

  17. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry can greatly improve the selectivity of biomolecule-ligand binding on account of recognition-directed interactions. In addition, functional structures and the actuation of supramolecular assemblies in molecular systems can be controlled efficiently through various host-guest chemistry. Together, these highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited as an alternative methodology for applications in the field of programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular soft materials through the reversible binding between complementary components. Many processes in living systems such as biotransformation, transportation of matter, and energy transduction begin with interfacial molecular recognition, which is greatly influenced by various external stimuli at biointerfaces. Detailed investigations about the molecular recognition at interfaces can result in a better understanding of life science, and further guide us in developing new biomaterials and medicines. In order to mimic complicated molecular-recognition systems observed in nature that adapt to changes in their environment, combining host-guest chemistry and surface science is critical for fabricating the next generation of multifunctional biointerfaces with efficient stimuli-responsiveness and good biocompatibility. In this Account, we will summarize some recent progress on multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces and biosurfaces fabricated by cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and highlight their potential applications including drug delivery, bioelectrocatalysis, and reversible adsorption and resistance of peptides, proteins, and cells. In addition, these biointerfaces and biosurfaces demonstrate efficient response toward various external stimuli, such as UV light, pH, redox chemistry, and competitive guests. All of these external stimuli can aid in mimicking the biological stimuli evident in complex biological environments

  18. Biological hydrogen production from probiotic wastewater as substrate by selectively enriched anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, D.; Sreekanth, D.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500072, Andhra Pradesh (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Biohydrogen production from probiotic wastewater using mixed anaerobic consortia is reported in this paper. Batch tests are carried out in a 5.0 L batch reactor under constant mesophillic temperature (37 C). The maximum hydrogen yield 1.8 mol-hydrogen/mol-carbohydrate is obtained at an optimum pH of 5.5 and substrate concentration 5 g/L. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 168 ml/h. The hydrogen content in the biogas is more than 65% and no significant methane is observed throughout the study. In addition to hydrogen, acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol are found to be the main by-products in the metabolism of hydrogen fermentation. (author)

  19. Critical guest concentration and complete tuning pattern appearing in the binary clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, J.H.; Lee, H. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Kim, D.Y. [SK Engineering and Construction, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Hanwha Chemical R and D Center, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.W. [Kongju National Univ., Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates, or gas hydrates, are stabilized by van der Waals interaction between a guest molecule and a host framework. Because of their property, they are a potential resource in the exploitation of natural gas hydrates, as a material for the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), as a means of storage and transportation of natural gas, as well as hydrogen storage. Clathrate hydrate research can be divided into two categories that emphasize either macroscopic or microscopic approaches. However, these two approaches need to be closely linked for a better understanding of the structures and processes involving both natural phenomena and hydrates for industrial processes. Details on the molecular scale that concern the less usual properties of clathrate hydrates remain unknown. This paper presented the results of a study that reported on the existence of a critical guest concentration (CGC) and established the complete tuning pattern that occurred in the binary hydrates, including water-soluble hydrate formers (promoters) and water-insoluble guests. The paper presented the experimental procedures, including formation of the methane (CH{sub 4}) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) binary hydrate; a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus; and formation of the CH{sub 4} and t-BuNH{sub 2} binary hydrate. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic measurements and thermodynamic measurements were also presented. It was concluded that the CGC value appeared to primarily depend on the chemical nature of a liquid guest component participating in the binary hydrate formation. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  20. Highly Selective TiN-Supported Highly Dispersed Pt Catalyst: Ultra Active toward Hydrogen Oxidation and Inactive toward Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junming; Tang, Haibo; Tian, Xinlong; Hou, Sanying; Li, Xiuhua; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2018-01-31

    The severe dissolution of the cathode catalyst, caused by an undesired oxygen reduction reaction at the anode during startup and shutdown, is a fatal challenge to practical applications of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. To address this important issue, according to the distinct structure-sensitivity between the σ-type bond in H 2 and the π-type bond in O 2 , we design a HD-Pt/TiN material by highly dispersing Pt on the TiN surface to inhibit the unwanted oxygen reduction reaction. The highly dispersed Pt/TiN catalyst exhibits excellent selectivity toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. With a Pt loading of 0.88 wt %, our catalyst shows excellent hydrogen oxidation reaction activity, close to that of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and much lower oxygen reduction reaction activity than the commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. The lack of well-ordered Pt facets is responsible for the excellent selectivity of the HD-Pt/TiN materials toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. Our work provides a new and cost-effective solution to design selective catalysts toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions, making the strategy of using oxygen-tolerant anode catalyst to improve the stability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells during startup and shutdown more affordable and practical.

  1. Selective Hydrogenation of m-Dinitrobenzene to m-Nitroaniline over Ru-SnOx/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Series catalysts of Ru-SnOx/Al2O3 with varying SnOx loading of 0–3 wt% were prepared, and their catalytic activity and selectivity have been discussed and compared for the selective hydrogenation of m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB to m-nitroaniline (m-NAN. The Ru-SnOx/Al2O3 catalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR and desorption (H2-TPD. Under the modification of SnOx, the reaction activity increased obviously, and the best selectivity to m-NAN reached above 97% at the complete conversion of m-DNB. With the increasing of the SnOx loading, the amount of active hydrogen adsorption on the surface of the catalyst increased according to the H2-TPD analysis, and the electron transferred from Ru to SnOx species, as determined by XPS, inducing an electron-deficient Ru, which is a benefit for the absorption of the nitro group. Therefore, the reaction rate and product selectivity were greatly enhanced. Moreover, the Ru-SnOx/Al2O3 catalyst presented high stability: it could be recycled four times without any loss in activity and selectivity.

  2. A grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of hydrogen technologiess in Life Cycle Sustainability perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzardo, Alessandro; Ren, Jingzheng; Mazzi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of the best renewable energy technology (including hydrogen) using a life cycle sustainability perspective. The traditional grey relational analysis has been modified to better address...... the issue of uncertainty. The proposed methodology allows multi-person to participate in the decision-making process and to give linguistic evaluation on the weights of the criteria and the performance of the alternative technologies. In this paper, twelve hydrogen production technologies have been assessed...... using the proposed methodology, electrolysis of water technology by hydropower has been considered to be the best technology for hydrogen production according to the decision-making group....

  3. Multi-component transport in polymers: hydrocarbon / hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membrane; Transport multi-composants dans les polymeres: separation hydrocarbures / hydrogene par membrane a selectivite inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauviel, G.

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogen separation by reverse selectivity membranes is investigated. The first goal is to develop materials showing an increased selectivity. Silicone membranes loaded with inorganic fillers have been prepared, but the expected enhancement is not observed. The second goal is to model the multi- component transport through rubbers. Indeed the permeability model is not able to predict correctly permeation when a vapour is present. Thus many phenomena have to be considered: diffusional inter-dependency, sorption synergy, membrane swelling and drag effect. The dependence of diffusivities with the local composition is modelled according to free-volume theory. The model resolution allows to predict the permeation flow-rates of mixed species from their pure sorption and diffusion data. For the systems under consideration, the diffusional inter-dependency is shown to be preponderant. Besides, sorption synergy importance is pointed out, whereas it is most often neglected. (author)

  4. Ion source parameters and hydrogen scrambling in the ECD of selectively deuterated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchateau, Magalie; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Robine, Ophélie

    2014-01-01

    (the ability to obtain deuterium levels of individual residues). An essential prerequisite for this approach is that the level of hydrogen scrambling is negligible. The occurrence of hydrogen scrambling depends critically on the extent of vibrational excitation in the mass spectrometer. In particular......, the desolvation process in the electrospray ion source is likely to induce scrambling at standard operating conditions. Consequently, finding experimental conditions that minimize hydrogen scrambling to a negligible level is thus pivotal for the application of electron-based fragmentation in HDX-MS/MS experiments...

  5. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2001-01-01

    This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction

  6. A study on hydrogen deflagration for selected severe accident sequences in Ringhals 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, V.; Moeller, E. [SwedPower AB (Sweden)

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we have investigated the most important severe accident sequences in Ringhals 3, a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR, concerning hydrogen generation and containment pressure at hydrogen deflagration. In order to analyze the accident sequences and to calculate the hydrogen production, the computer code MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) was used. Six accident sequences were studied, where four were LOCA cases and two transients. MAAP gives the evolution of the accident and particularly the pressure in the containment and the production of hydrogen as a function of time. The pressure peaks at deflagration were calculated by the method AICC-Adiabatic Isochoric Complete Combustion. The results from these calculations are conservative for two reasons. Adiabatic combustion means that the heat losses to structures in the containment are neglected. The combustion is also assumed to occur once and all available hydrogen is burned. The maximum pressure in five analysed cases was compared with the failure pressure of the containment. In the LOCA case, 373 kg hydrogen was burned and the resulting peak pressure in the containment was 0,53 MPa. In the transient, where 720 kg hydrogen was burned, the peak pressure was 0,69 MPa. This is the same as the failure pressure of the containment. Finally, in the conservative case, 980 kg hydrogen was burned and the resulting peak pressure 0,96 MPa. However, it should be noted that these conclusions are conservative from two points of view. Firstly a more realistic (than AICC) calculation of the peak pressure would give a lower value than 0,69 MPa. Secondly, there is conservatism in the evaluation of the failure pressure. (au)

  7. Selective N-alkylation of amines using nitriles under hydrogenation conditions: facile synthesis of secondary and tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Takashi; Fujita, Yuki; Mizusaki, Tomoteru; Betsuin, Sae; Takamatsu, Haruki; Maegawa, Tomohiro; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2012-01-14

    Nitriles were found to be highly effective alkylating reagents for the selective N-alkylation of amines under catalytic hydrogenation conditions. For the aromatic primary amines, the corresponding secondary amines were selectively obtained under Pd/C-catalyzed hydrogenation conditions. Although the use of electron poor aromatic amines or bulky nitriles showed a lower reactivity toward the reductive alkylation, the addition of NH(4)OAc enhanced the reactivity to give secondary aromatic amines in good to excellent yields. Under the same reaction conditions, aromatic nitro compounds instead of the aromatic primary amines could be directly transformed into secondary amines via a domino reaction involving the one-pot hydrogenation of the nitro group and the reductive alkylation of the amines. While aliphatic amines were effectively converted to the corresponding tertiary amines under Pd/C-catalyzed conditions, Rh/C was a highly effective catalyst for the N-monoalkylation of aliphatic primary amines without over-alkylation to the tertiary amines. Furthermore, the combination of the Rh/C-catalyzed N-monoalkylation of the aliphatic primary amines and additional Pd/C-catalyzed alkylation of the resulting secondary aliphatic amines could selectively prepare aliphatic tertiary amines possessing three different alkyl groups. According to the mechanistic studies, it seems reasonable to conclude that nitriles were reduced to aldimines before the nucleophilic attack of the amine during the first step of the reaction.

  8. Comparative environmental impact and efficiency assessment of selected hydrogen production methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbilen, Ahmet, E-mail: Ahmet.Ozbilen@uoit.ca; Dincer, Ibrahim, E-mail: Ibrahim.Dincer@uoit.ca; Rosen, Marc A., E-mail: Marc.Rosen@uoit.ca

    2013-09-15

    The environmental impacts of various hydrogen production processes are evaluated and compared, considering several energy sources and using life cycle analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen produced by thermochemical water decomposition cycles are more environmentally benign options compared to conventional steam reforming of natural gas. The nuclear based four-step Cu–Cl cycle has the lowest global warming potential (0.559 kg CO{sub 2}-eq per kg hydrogen production), mainly because it requires the lowest quantity of energy of the considered processes. The acidification potential results show that biomass gasification has the highest impact on environment, while wind based electrolysis has the lowest. The relation is also investigated between efficiency and environmental impacts. -- Highlights: • Environmental performance of nuclear-based hydrogen production is investigated. • The GWP and AP results are compared with various hydrogen production processes. • Nuclear based 4-step Cu–Cl cycle is found to be an environmentally benign process. • Wind-based electrolysis has the lowest AP value.

  9. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2017-01-18

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  10. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  11. Activation of the C-H bond: catalytic hydroxylation of hydrocarbons by new cobaltic alkylperoxydic complexes; selective and catalytic cycloalkane dehydrogenation in presence of uranium for hydrogen transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazi, E.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to improve efficiency and selectivity of chemical reactions for alkane transformations. In the first part decomposition of hydroperoxides and hydrocarbon hydroxylation by cobalt complexes is studied. In the second part cycloalkanes are dehydrogenated into aromatics with a Pt catalyst, trapping hydrogen by uranium. Uranium hydride UH 3 can yield very pure hydrogen at reasonable temperature [fr

  12. Enhancing the stability of copper chromite catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of furfural using ALD overcoating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Lei, Yu; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Zhang, Guanghui; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Sollberger, Fred; Ribeiro, Fabio; Akatay, M. Cem; Stach, Eric A.; Dumesic, James A.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    2014-08-01

    The stability of a gas-phase furfural hydrogenation catalyst (CuCr2O4 center dot CuO) was enhanced by depositing a thin Al2O3 layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Based on temperature-programed reduction (TPR) measurements, the reduction temperature of Cu was raised significantly, and the activation energy for furfural reduction was decreased following the ALD treatment. Thinner ALD layers yielded higher furfural hydrogenation activities. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy studies indicated that Cu1+/Cu-0 are the active species for furfural reduction.

  13. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  14. Stable and Inert Cobalt Catalysts for Highly Selective and Practical Hydrogenation of C≡N and C═O Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Topf, Christoph; Radnik, Jörg; Kreyenschulte, Carsten; Lund, Henrik; Schneider, Matthias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; He, Lin; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Novel heterogeneous cobalt-based catalysts have been prepared by pyrolysis of cobalt complexes with nitrogen ligands on different inorganic supports. The activity and selectivity of the resulting materials in the hydrogenation of nitriles and carbonyl compounds is strongly influenced by the modification of the support and the nitrogen-containing ligand. The optimal catalyst system ([Co(OAc)2/Phen@α-Al2O3]-800 = Cat. E) allows for efficient reduction of both aromatic and aliphatic nitriles including industrially relevant dinitriles to primary amines under mild conditions. The generality and practicability of this system is further demonstrated in the hydrogenation of diverse aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic ketones as well as aldehydes, which are readily reduced to the corresponding alcohols.

  15. Bridging the Gap: From Model Surfaces to Nanoparticle Analogs for Selective Oxidation and Steam Reforming of Methanol and Selective Hydrogenation Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Matthew B.

    Most industrial catalysts are very complex, comprising of non-uniform materials with varying structures, impurities, and interaction between the active metal and supporting substrate. A large portion of the ongoing research in heterogeneous catalysis focuses on understanding structure-function relationships in catalytic materials. In parallel, there is a large area of surface science research focused on studying model catalytic systems for which structural parameters can be tuned and measured with high precision. It is commonly argued, however, that these systems are oversimplified, and that observations made in model systems do not translate to robust catalysts operating in practical environments; this discontinuity is often referred to as a "gap." The focus of this thesis is to explore the mutual benefits of surface science and catalysis, or "bridge the gap," by studying two catalytic systems in both ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and near ambient-environments. The first reaction is the catalytic steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The SRM reaction is a promising route for on-demand hydrogen production. For this catalytic system, the central hypothesis in this thesis is that a balance between redox capability and weak binding of reaction intermediates is necessary for high SRM activity and selectivity to carbon dioxide. As such, a new catalyst for the SRM reaction is developed which incorporates very small amounts of gold (liquid-phase, stirred-tank batch reactor under a hydrogen head pressure of approximately 7 bar. Palladium alloyed into the surface of otherwise inactive copper nanoparticles shows a marked improvement in selectivity when compared to monometallic palladium catalysts with the same metal loading. This effect is attributed hydrogen spillover onto the copper surface. In summary, the development of new, highly active and selective catalysts for the methanol steam reforming reaction and for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes

  16. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  17. Hydrogen Oxidation-Selective Electrocatalysis by Fine Tuning of Pt Ensemble Sites to Enhance the Durability of Automotive Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Su-Won; Park, Shin-Ae; Kim, Tae-June; Kim, Jun-Hyuk; Pak, Gi-Woong; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-02-08

    A simple, inexpensive approach is proposed for enhancing the durability of automotive proton exchange membrane fuel cells by selective promotion of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and suppression of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the anode in startup/shutdown events. Dodecanethiol forms a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the surface of Pt particles, thus decreasing the number of Pt ensemble sites. Interestingly, by controlling the dodecanethiol concentration during SAM formation, the number of ensemble sites can be precisely optimized such that it is sufficient for the HOR but insufficient for the ORR. Thus, a Pt surface with an SAM of dodecanethiol clearly effects HOR-selective electrocatalysis. Clear HOR selectivity is demonstrated in unit cell tests with the actual membrane electrode assembly, as well as in an electrochemical three-electrode setup with a thin-film rotating disk electrode configuration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Highly Selective Continuous Flow Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde to Cinnamyl Alcohol in a Pt/SiO2 Coated Tube Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel continuous flow process for selective hydrogenation of α, β-unsaturated aldehyde (cinnamaldehyde, CAL to the unsaturated alcohol (cinnamyl alcohol, COL has been reported in a tube reactor coated with a Pt/SiO2 catalyst. A 90% selectivity towards the unsaturated alcohol was obtained at the aldehyde conversion of 98.8%. This is a six-fold improvement in the selectivity compared to a batch process where acetals were the main reaction products. The increased selectivity in the tube reactor was caused by the suppression of acid sites responsible for the acetal formation after a short period on stream in the continuous process. In a fixed bed reactor, it had a similar acetal suppression phenomenon but showed lower product selectivity of about 47–72% due to mass transfer limitations. A minor change in selectivity and conversion caused by product inhibition was observed during the 110 h on stream with a turnover number (TON reaching 3000 and an alcohol production throughput of 0.36 kg gPt−1 day−1 in the single tube reactor. The catalysts performance after eight reaction cycles was fully restored by calcination in air at 400 °C. The tube reactors provide an opportunity for process intensification by increasing the reaction rates by a factor of 2.5 at the reaction temperature of 150 °C compared to 90 °C with no detrimental effects on catalyst stability or product selectivity.

  19. Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol in the Presence of a Recyclable Cobalt/SBA-15 Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemar, Maïté; Ciotonea, Carmen; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Royer, Sébastien; Ungureanu, Adrian; Dragoi, Brindusa; Dumitriu, Emil; Jérôme, François

    2015-06-08

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol was performed in the presence of a Co/SBA-15 catalyst. High selectivity (96 %) at a conversion higher than 95 % is reported over this catalytic system. As the conversion of furfural to furfuryl alcohol occurs over metallic Co sites, the effect of reduction temperature, H2 pressure, and reaction temperature were studied. Optimum reaction conditions were: 150 °C, 1.5 h, 2.0 MPa of H2 . The catalyst was recyclable, and furfuryl alcohol was recovered with a purity higher than 90 %. The effect of the solvent concentration was also studied. With a minimum of 50 wt % of solvent, the selectivity to furfuryl alcohol and the conversion of furfural remained high (both over 80 %). Likewise, the activity of the catalyst is maintained even in pure furfural, which confirms the real potential of the proposed catalytic system. This catalyst was also used in the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to produce γ-valerolactone selectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Temperature dependent selective detection of hydrogen and acetone using Pd doped WO3/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Anand, Kanica; Kohli, Nipin; Kaur, Amanpreet; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2018-06-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and Pd doped WO3 nanocomposites were fabricated by employing electrostatic interactions between poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) modified Pd doped WO3 nanostructures and graphite oxide (GO) and studied for their gas sensing application. XRD, Raman, FTIR, FESEM-EDX, TEM, TGA, XPS and Photoluminescence techniques were used for characterization of as-synthesized samples. Gas sensing studies revealed that the sensor with optimized doping of 1.5 mol% Pd and 1 wt% GO shows temperature dependent selectivity towards hydrogen and acetone. The role of WO3, Pd and RGO has been discussed in detail for enhanced sensing performance.

  1. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  3. Guest Speakers in School-Based Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Madsen, Nikki; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2014-01-01

    This study, using data from a statewide survey (n = 332), examined teachers' practices regarding the inclusion of guest speakers to cover sexuality content. More than half of teachers (58%) included guest speakers. In multivariate analyses, teachers who taught high school, had professional preparation in health education, or who received…

  4. The benefit of guest loyalty programmes | La Rose | Research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the literature review of this research, the following aspects are discussed: a loyalty programme and its use; the sort of loyalty programmes; the effects of a loyalty programme; and the wishes and needs of a leisure guest. Surveys were divided among 46 leisure guests of Apollo Hotels and Resorts in order to collect data on ...

  5. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  6. Hydrogen evolution from water splitting on nanocomposite photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Shangguan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic production of H2 in one step is potentially one of the most promising ways for the conversion and storage of solar energy. The paper overviews our recent studies on the photocatalysts splitting water into hydrogen under irradiation. The attention was mainly focused on the promotion effects of nanosized modifications in the interlayer and surface of photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution with visible light. The photocatalytic activity depended significantly on modification techniques, such as loading, proton exchange, and intercalation. The formation of a "nest" on the particle surface promoted a uniform distribution and strong combination of the nanosized particles on the surface of catalysts. By the methods of intercalation and pillaring as well as by selecting both host and guest, a large variety of molecular designed host–guest systems were obtained. Cadmium sulfide (CdS-intercalated composites showed higher activity and stability. This activity of K4Ce2M10O30 (M=Ta, Nb evolving H2 under visible light irradiation was enhanced by the incorporation of Pt, RuO2 and NiO as co-catalysts. Especially, the nanosized NiOx (Ni–NiO double-layer structure greatly prompted the photocatalytic H2 evolution significantly.

  7. Science in the schoolhouse: an uninvited guest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J; Tankersley, Melody

    2004-01-01

    Science and scientific thinking have not made a substantial impact on educational practice. In this discussion, we examine the relationship between science and education and delineate four reasons for characterizing science as an uninvited guest in schools: (a) Science is not highly regarded in society; (b) good science and bad science are often mistaken for one another; (c) the amount of current data is overwhelming; and (d) science is not easy for those who practice it (researchers), those who translate it (teacher educators), or those who consume it (teachers). We suggest several strategies to improve this relationship, including promoting standards of educational practice, emphasizing the role of teacher educators as translators of the research base into classroom practice, and linking student outcomes with the use of effective instructional practices.

  8. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides......Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated...

  9. Selective production of oxygenates from CO2 hydrogenation over mesoporous silica supported Cu-Ga nanocomposite catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-11-23

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to oxygenates (methanol and dimethyl ether (DME)) was investigated over bifunctional supported copper catalysts promoted with gallium (Ga). Supported Cu-Ga nanocomposite catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H2 temperature programmed reduction. In comparison with Cu-SBA-15 based catalysts, Ga promoted catalysts prepared by the urea deposition method (CuGa/SBA-15-UDP) was found active and selective for CO2 hydrogenation to oxygenates. The use of Ga as the promoter showed increased acidic sites as confirmed by the NH3-TPD, Pyridine-IR and 2,6-lutidine-IR studies. The favorable effect of Ga on CO2 conversion and selectivity to oxygenate may come from the strong interaction of Ga with silica, which is responsible for the enhanced metal surface area, formation of nanocomposite and metal dispersion. Notably, incorporation of Ga to Cu/SiO2 showed a several-fold higher rate for methanol formation (13.12 mol/gCu·sec) with a reasonable rate for the DME formation (2.15 mol/gCu·sec) as compared to those of Cu/SiO2 catalysts.

  10. A Combined Fuzzy-AHP and Fuzzy-GRA Methodology for Hydrogen Energy Storage Method Selection in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytac Yildiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to select the most appropriate Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES method for Turkey from among the alternatives of tank, metal hydride and chemical storage, which are determined based on expert opinions and literature review. Thus, we propose a Buckley extension based fuzzy Analytical Hierarchical Process (Fuzzy-AHP and linear normalization based fuzzy Grey Relational Analysis (Fuzzy-GRA combined Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM methodology. This combined approach can be applied to a complex decision process, which often makes sense with subjective data or vague information; and used to solve to solve HES selection problem with different defuzzification methods. The proposed approach is unique both in the HES literature and the MCDM literature.

  11. A malonitrile-functionalized metal-organic framework for hydrogen sulfide detection and selective amino acid molecular recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiwei; Feng, Xiao; Guo, Yuexin; Chen, Didi; Li, Rui; Ren, Xiaoqian; Jiang, Xin; Dong, Yuping; Wang, Bo

    2014-03-01

    A novel porous polymeric fluorescence probe, MN-ZIF-90, has been designed and synthesized for quantitative hydrogen sulfide (H2S) fluorescent detection and highly selective amino acid recognition. This distinct crystalline structure, derived from rational design and malonitrile functionalization, can trigger significant enhancement of its fluorescent intensity when exposed to H2S or cysteine molecules. Indeed this new metal-organic framework (MOF) structure shows high selectivity of biothiols over other amino acids and exhibits favorable stability. Moreover, in vitro viability assays on HeLa cells show low cytotoxicity of MN-ZIF-90 and its imaging contrast efficiency is further demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy studies. This facile yet powerful strategy also offers great potential of using open-framework materials (i.e. MOFs) as the novel platform for sensing and other biological applications.

  12. Microwave-Assisted Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol Employing a Green and Noble Metal-Free Copper Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Pedro N; de Almeida, João M A R; Carvalho, Yuri; Priecel, Peter; Falabella Sousa-Aguiar, Eduardo; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A

    2016-12-20

    Green, inexpensive, and robust copper-based heterogeneous catalysts achieve 100 % conversion and 99 % selectivity in the conversion of furfural to furfuryl alcohol when using cyclopentyl-methyl ether as green solvent and microwave reactors at low H 2 pressures and mild temperatures. The utilization of pressurized microwave reactors produces a 3-4 fold increase in conversion and an unexpected enhancement in selectivity as compared to the reaction carried out at the same conditions using conventional autoclave reactors. The enhancement in catalytic rate produced by microwave irradiation is temperature dependent. This work highlights that using microwave irradiation in the catalytic hydrogenation of biomass-derived compounds is a very strong tool for biomass upgrade that offers immense potential in a large number of transformations where it could be a determining factor for commercial exploitation. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hydrogen-bond-driven electrophilic activation for selectivity control: scope and limitations of fluorous alcohol-promoted selective formation of 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles and mechanistic insight for rationale of selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebolu, Rajesh; Kommi, Damodara N; Kumar, Dinesh; Bollineni, Narendra; Chakraborti, Asit K

    2012-11-16

    Hydrogen-bond-driven electrophilic activation for selectivity control during competitive formation of 1,2-disubstituted and 2-substituted benzimidazoles from o-phenylenediamine and aldehydes is reported. The fluorous alcohols trifluoroethanol and hexafluoro-2-propanol efficiently promote the cyclocondensation of o-phenylenediamine with aldehydes to afford selectively the 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles at rt in short times. A mechanistic insight is invoked by NMR, mass spectrometry, and chemical studies to rationalize the selectivity. The ability of the fluorous alcohols in promoting the reaction and controlling the selectivity can be envisaged from their better hydrogen bond donor (HBD) abilities compared to that of the other organic solvents as well as of water. Due to the better HBD values, the fluorous alcohols efficiently promote the initial bisimine formation by electrophilic activation of the aldehyde carbonyl. Subsequently the hydrogen-bond-mediated activation of the in situ-formed bisimine triggers the rearrangement via 1,3-hydride shift to form the 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles.

  14. Selective hydrogenation of furfural to cyclopentanone over Cu-Ni-Al hydrotalcite-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongyan; Zhou, Minghao; Zeng, Zuo; Xiao, Guomin; Xiao, Rui [Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-04-15

    A series of Cu-Ni-Al hydrotalcites derived oxides with a (Cu+Ni)/Al mole ratio of 3 with varied Cu/Ni mole ratio (from 0.017 to 0.5, with a Cu ratio of 0.0125 to 0.25) were prepared by co-precipitation method, then applied to the hydrogenation of furfural in aqueous. Their catalytic performance for liquid phase hydrogenation of furfural to prepare cyclopentanone was described in detail, considering reaction temperature, catalyst composition, reaction time and so on. The yield of cyclopentanone was influenced by the mole ratio of Cu-Ni-Al based heterogeneous catalyst and depended on the reaction conditions. The yield of cyclopentanone was up to 95.8% when the reaction was carried out under 413 K with H{sub 2} pressure of 40 bar for 8 h. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR)

  15. Determination of nickel in hydrogenated fats and selected chocolate bars in Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnalova, Lucie; Bucek, Pavel; Vobornik, Petr; Dohnal, Vlastimil

    2017-02-15

    Nickel is a metal that can be present in products containing hardened edible oils, possibly as leftover catalyst from the vegetable oil hardening process. Nickel may cause toxic effects including the promotion of cancer and contact allergy. In this work, nickel content was determined in hydrogenated vegetable fats and confectionery products, made with these fats, available on the Czech market using newly developed method combining microwave digestion and graphite furnace AAS. While concentrations of 0.086±0.014mg.kg(-1) or less were found in hydrogenated vegetable fats, the Ni content in confectionery products was significantly higher, varying between 0.742±0.066 and 3.141±0.217mg.kg(-1). Based on an average consumer basket, daily intake of nickel from vegetable fats is at least twice as low as intake from confectionery products. Based on results, the levels of nickel in neither vegetable fats nor confectionery products, do not represent a significant health risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective Hydrogenation of Biomass-derived Furfural over Supported Ni3Sn2 Alloy: Role of Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A highly active and selective hydrogenation of biomass-derived furfural into furfuryl alcohol was achieved using supported single phase Ni3Sn2 alloy catalysts. Various supports such as active carbon (AC, g-Al2O3, Al(OH3, ZnO, TiO2, ZrO2, MgO, Li-TN, and SiO2 have been employed in order to understand the role of the support on the formation of Ni3Sn2 alloy phase and its catalytic performance. Supported Ni3Sn2 alloy catalysts were synthesised via a simple hydrothermal treatment of the mixture of aqueous solution of nickel chloride hexahydrate and ethanol solution of tin(II chloride dihydrate in presence of ethylene glycol at 423 K for 24 h followed by H2 treatment at 673 K for 1.5 h, then characterised by using ICP-AES, XRD, H2- and N2-adsorption. XRD profiles of samples showed that the Ni3Sn2 alloy phases are readily formed during hydrothermal processes and become clearly observed at 2θ = 43-44o after H2 treatment. The presence of Ni3Sn2 alloy species that dispersed on the supports is believed to play a key role in highly active and selective hydrogenation of biomass-derived furfural towards furfuryl alcohol. Ni3Sn2 on TiO2 and ZnO supports exhibited much lower reaction temperature to achieved >99% yield of furfuryl alcohol product compared with other supports. The effects of loading amount of Ni-Sn, reaction conditions (temperature and time profile on the activity and selectivity towards the desired product are systematically discussed. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 10th November 2015; Revised: 31st December 2015; Accepted: 5th January 2016 How to Cite: Rodiansono, R., Astuti, M.D., Khairi, S., Shimazu, S. (2016. Selective Hydrogenation of Biomass-derived Furfural over Supported Ni3Sn2 Alloy: Role of Supports. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 1-9. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.393.1-9 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.393.1-9

  17. Solubility measurements of hydrogen in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and the effect of carbon dioxide and a selected catalyst on the hydrogen solubility in the ionic liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, V.A.; Kühne, E.; Shariati - Sarabi, A.; Peters, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    The high pressure phase behavior of a binary mixture containing hydrogen (H-2) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4]) is studied by measuring bubble-point pressures at different temperatures for three compositions with hydrogen mole fractions of 5, 7.5 and 10 mol%. Since

  18. Promotion Effect of Alkali Metal Hydroxides on Polymer-Stabilized Pd Nanoparticles for Selective Hydrogenation of C–C Triple Bonds in Alkynols

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoshvili, Linda Zh.; Bykov, Alexey V.; Khudyakova, Tatiana E.; Lagrange, Thomas; Héroguel, Florent; Luterbacher, Jeremy S.; Matveeva, Valentina G.; Sulman, Esther M.; Dyson, Paul J.; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2017-01-01

    Postimpregnation of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) stabilized within hyper-cross-linked polystyrene with sodium or potassium hydroxides of optimal concentration was found to significantly increase the catalytic activity for the partial hydrogenation of the C–C triple bond in 2-methyl-3-butyn-2-ol at ambient hydrogen pressure. The alkali metal hydroxide accelerates the transformation of the residual Pd(II) salt into Pd(0) NPs and diminishes the reaction induction period. In addition, the selectivity t...

  19. Thermodynamic Analysis of the Selective Reduction of a Nickeliferous Limonitic Laterite Ore by Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R.; Pickles, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    Nickeliferous limonitic laterite ores are becoming increasingly attractive as a source of metallic nickel as the costs associated with recovering nickel from the sulphide ores increase. Unlike the sulphide ores, however, the laterite ores are not amenable to concentration by conventional mineral processing techniques such as froth flotation. One potential concentrating method would be the pyrometallurgical solid state reduction of the nickeliferous limonitic ores at relatively low temperatures, followed by beneficiation via magnetic separation. A number of reductants can be utilized in the reduction step, and in this research, a thermodynamic model has been developed to investigate the reduction of a nickeliferous limonitic laterite by hydrogen. The nickel recovery to the ferronickel phase was predicted to be greater than 95 % at temperatures of 673-873 K. Reductant additions above the stoichiometric requirement resulted in high recoveries over a wider temperature range, but the nickel grade of the ferronickel decreased.

  20. Platinum containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films as selective solar absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Yung-Hsiang; Brahma, Sanjaya; Tzeng, Y.H.; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated a double-cermet structured thin film in which an a-C:H thin film was used as an anti-reflective (AR) layer and two platinum-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films were used as the double cermet layers. A reactive co-sputter deposition method was used to prepare both the anti-reflective and cermet layers. Effects of the target power and heat treatment were studied. The obtained films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorptance and emittance of the as deposited and annealed films were determined using UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. We show that the optical absorptance of the resulting double-cermet structured thin film is as high as 96% and remains to be 91% after heat treatment at 400 °C, indicating the thermal stability of the film

  1. Selective vibrational pumping of molecular hydrogen via gas phase atomic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Capitelli, Mario

    2009-12-31

    Formation of rovibrational excited molecular hydrogen from atomic recombination has been computationally studied using three body dynamics and orbiting resonance theory. Each of the two methods in the frame of classical mechanics, that has been used for all of the calculations, appear complementary rather than complete, with similar values in the low temperature region, and predominance of three body dynamics for temperatures higher than about 1000 K. The sum of the two contributions appears in fairly good agreement with available data from the literature. Dependence of total recombination on the temperature over pressure ratio is stressed. Detailed recombination toward rovibrational states is presented, with large evidence of importance of rotation in final products. Comparison with gas-surface recombination implying only physiadsorbed molecules shows approximate similarities at T = 5000 K, being on the contrary different at lower temperature.

  2. The guest-worker in Western Europe--an obituary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, S

    1986-01-01

    The significance of guest workers is examined for six Western European countries. It is found that "the dynamics of the migratory process led to family reunification and settlement, against the original intentions of the workers, employers and states concerned. The recruitment of guest-workers stopped after 1974, but many migrants stayed on, becoming permanent ethnic minorities, in a situation of economic and social crisis. It is argued that guest-worker systems inevitably lead to permanent migration in the long run, and that it is better to plan for orderly settlement through appropriate policies." excerpt

  3. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krischan, J.; Makaruk, A.; Harasek, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Alkaline oxidative scrubbing proved for biogas desulfurization ► Effect of operating conditions on hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency. ► Minimization of caustic and oxidant consumption. ► Process control via pH, redox potential and conductivity measurement. ► Investigation of long-term behavior of pilot plant operation. - Abstract: Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H 2 S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H 2 S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H 2 S with H 2 O 2 , high H 2 S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO 2 absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180 m 3 /h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H 2 S contents in the crude gas.

  4. Hydrogen purification by selective methanation of CO in CO/CO2/H2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Mette; Johannessen, Tue; Livbjerg, Hans

    down through the reactor and inside the catalyst pellets/particles. The small particles, which have a rather high effectiveness factor with respect to methanation of CO, have a high CO selectivity, whereas the larger pellets have very low selectivity even at high CO inlet concentrations. Negative...... of reaction kinetics and pore diffusion is crucial for interpreting the experimental data. We have found that the selectivity decreases by increasing the reactor temperature or catalyst particle size and when the CO inlet concentration is reduced. As a result, the selectivity drops significantly...... in an integral reactor operating at high CO-conversion. The lower limit of CO concentration in the outlet is determined by the quasi-equilibrium between CO removal and CO production from CO2....

  5. Amorphous infinite coordination polymer microparticles: a new class of selective hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, You-Moon; Heo, Jungseok; Mirkin, Chad A [Department of Chemistry, International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL (United States); Armatas, Gerasimos S [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Kanatzidis, Mercouri G [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2008-06-04

    A new class of micrometer-sized amorphous infinite coordination particles is selectively prepared from the coordination chemistry of a metallo-salen building block and Zn{sup 2+} ions. The particles show moderately high H{sub 2} uptake and almost no N{sub 2} adsorption, even though they are amorphous and do not have the well-defined channels typically used to explain such selectivity in metal-organic framework systems. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Importance of location and exterior of city hotels as elements of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepavčević Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Business practices and attitudes of tourists show that hospitality represents the primary factor in the development of urban tourism. It is considered that, besides the exclusive appearance, there is no business success for hotel properties without a proper location. It is known that a typical tourist would like to be close enough to tourist attractions, to be able to reach them on foot. This paper deals with the importance of location and exterior of urban hotels on guests decision on the selection and overall satisfaction with hotel products. The survey was conducted in the hotels two largest urban centers in Serbia (Belgrade and Novi Sad. The aim of the research is an insight into the real impact of location and exterior when assessing the guest satisfaction. Descriptive statistical analysis, t-test and regression analysis were used for statistical data processing.

  7. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischan, J; Makaruk, A; Harasek, M

    2012-05-15

    Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H(2)S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H(2)S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H(2)S with H(2)O(2), high H(2)S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO(2) absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180m(3)/h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H(2)S contents in the crude gas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective Hydrogen Atom Abstraction through Induced Bond Polarization: Direct α-Arylation of Alcohols through Photoredox, HAT, and Nickel Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilton, Jack; Christensen, Melodie; DiRocco, Daniel A; Ruck, Rebecca T; Davies, Ian W; MacMillan, David W C

    2018-05-04

    The combination of nickel metallaphotoredox catalysis, hydrogen atom transfer catalysis, and a Lewis acid activation mode, has led to the development of an arylation method for the selective functionalization of alcohol α-hydroxy C-H bonds. This approach employs zinc-mediated alcohol deprotonation to activate α-hydroxy C-H bonds while simultaneously suppressing C-O bond formation by inhibiting the formation of nickel alkoxide species. The use of Zn-based Lewis acids also deactivates other hydridic bonds such as α-amino and α-oxy C-H bonds. This approach facilitates rapid access to benzylic alcohols, an important motif in drug discovery. A 3-step synthesis of the drug Prozac exemplifies the utility of this new method. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fluid phase equilibria of the reaction mixture during the selective hydrogenation of 2-butenal in dense carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musko, Nikolai; Jensen, Anker Degn; Baiker, Alfons

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase behaviour and composition is of paramount importance for understanding multiphase reactions. We have investigated the effect of the phase behaviour in the palladium-catalysed selective hydrogenation of 2-butenal to saturated butanal in dense carbon dioxide. The reactions were...... cell. The results of the catalytic experiments showed that small amounts of carbon dioxide added to the system significantly decrease the conversion, whereas at higher loadings of CO2 the reaction rate gradually increases reaching a maximum. The CPA calculations revealed that this maximum is achieved...... performed using a 5wt% Pd on activated carbon in custom-designed high pressure autoclaves at 323K. The Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state was employed to model the phase behaviour of the experimentally studied systems. CPA binary interaction parameters were estimated based on the experimental...

  10. Efficient Pd@MIL-101(Cr) hetero-catalysts for 2-butyne-1,4-diol hydrogenation exhibiting high selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Dongdong

    2017-01-05

    Pd@MIL-101(Cr) hetero-catalysts have been successfully prepared using the metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) approach, by choosing [Pd(η-CH)(η-CH)] as a volatile precursor, and the hydrothermally stable metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Cr) as a support. The prepared Pd@MIL-101(Cr) hetero-catalysts characterized with various analytical techniques, exhibited highly monodispersed immobilized Pd nanoparticles in the MIL-101(Cr) cavities, while retaining the pristine crystallinity and porosity. The intact hybrid Pd@MIL-101(Cr) has been demonstrated to be an efficient catalyst for 2-butyne-1,4-diol hydrogenation with excellent activity, stability and selectivity (2-butene-1,4-diol (>94%)).

  11. Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South Africa on the path towards universal health coverage. Mark Blecher, Anban Pillay, Walaiporn Patcharanarumol, Warisa Panichkriangkrai, Viroj Tangcharoensathien, Yot Teerawattananon, Supasit Pannarunothai, Jonatan Davén ...

  12. Development of selective colorimetric probes for hydrogen sulfide based on nucleophilic aromatic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pearce, Taylor F; Hansen, Ryan J; Zakharov, Lev N; Pluth, Michael D

    2013-07-05

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important biological signaling molecule and an important environmental target for detection. A major challenge in developing H2S detection methods is separating the often similar reactivity of thiols and other nucleophiles from H2S. To address this need, the nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reaction of H2S with electron-poor aromatic electrophiles was developed as a strategy to separate H2S and thiol reactivity. Treatment of aqueous solutions of nitrobenzofurazan (7-nitro-1,2,3-benzoxadiazole, NBD) thioethers with H2S resulted in thiol extrusion and formation of nitrobenzofurazan thiol (λmax = 534 nm). This reactivity allows for unwanted thioether products to be converted to the desired nitrobenzofurazan thiol upon reaction with H2S. The scope of the reaction was investigated using a Hammett linear free energy relationship study, and the determined ρ = +0.34 is consistent with the proposed SN2Ar reaction mechanism. The efficacy of the developed probes was demonstrated in buffer and in serum with associated submicromolar detection limits as low as 190 nM (buffer) and 380 nM (serum). Furthermore, the sigmoidal response of nitrobenzofurazan electrophiles with H2S can be fit to accurately quantify H2S. The developed detection strategy offers a manifold for H2S detection that we foresee being applied in various future applications.

  13. A Different Guest Worker Story: Roma Guest Workers – a Transnational Minority in Transmigration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Banić-Grubišić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available he paper considers the ambiguity of the term ‘guest worker’, based on the example of economic migrants who belong to the Roma population. Over the last fifty years, members of the Roma minority have migrated to Western European countries for different reasons (economic, political and social reasons, and there is no official data on the precise number of Roma who have migrated abroad, whether permanently or temporarily. It is possible to establish a number of categories of Roma immigrants who reside permanently or temporarily in Western European countries. These are: the so-called “classic guest workers” who, through legal or illegal means went to work abroad in the 60’s and 70’s, and mostly settled permanently in the host countries; Roma refugees from Kosovo and/or asylum seekers who left the country during the wars in the 90’s, and who were returned to Serbia after the signing of the Readmission treaty; and those Roma who represent occasional economic migrants: people who, after Serbia was put on the white Schengen list (the liberalization of the visa policy for citizens of Serbia, spend three months at a time working abroad. Even though these three categories of Roma workers have different reasons for migrating from and returning to Serbia, the majority of the population perceives them as a unified, distinct whole – as guest workers. The paper is the result of fieldwork conducted in South-Eastern Serbia, in the village of Minicevo.

  14. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  15. A novel core–shell nanocomposite Ni–Ca@mSiO_2 for benzophenone selective hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xue; Feng, Wenhui; Chu, Xiaoning; Chu, Hailong; Niu, Libo; Bai, Guoyi

    2017-01-01

    A novel core–shell nanocomposite Ni–Ca@mSiO_2 was first prepared by a modified Stöber method in this paper. It has a core–shell structure with Ni (about 8 nm in diameter) and Ca as the cores and mesoporous silica as the outer shell, as proven by the transmission electron microscopy. This nanocomposite exhibited good catalytic performance in the selective hydrogenation of benzophenone, with 96.1% conversion and 94.9% selectivity for benzhydrol under relatively mild reaction conditions. It was demonstrated that addition of small amounts of alkaline Ca can not only markedly improve the dispersion of the active species but also tune the acid–base property of this nanocomposite, resulting in the efficient suppression of benzhydrol dehydration to achieve a high selectivity. Furthermore, the core–shell nanocomposite Ni–Ca@mSiO_2 can be recycled four runs without appreciable loss of its initial activity, more stable than the traditional supported nanocatalyst Ni–Ca/mSiO_2. It was suggested that the outer mesoporous silica shell of Ni–Ca@mSiO_2 can prevent both the aggregation and the leaching of the active Ni species, accounting for its relatively good stability.

  16. A novel core–shell nanocomposite Ni–Ca@mSiO{sub 2} for benzophenone selective hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xue; Feng, Wenhui; Chu, Xiaoning; Chu, Hailong; Niu, Libo; Bai, Guoyi, E-mail: baiguoyi@hotmail.com [Hebei University, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Hebei Province, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science (China)

    2017-02-15

    A novel core–shell nanocomposite Ni–Ca@mSiO{sub 2} was first prepared by a modified Stöber method in this paper. It has a core–shell structure with Ni (about 8 nm in diameter) and Ca as the cores and mesoporous silica as the outer shell, as proven by the transmission electron microscopy. This nanocomposite exhibited good catalytic performance in the selective hydrogenation of benzophenone, with 96.1% conversion and 94.9% selectivity for benzhydrol under relatively mild reaction conditions. It was demonstrated that addition of small amounts of alkaline Ca can not only markedly improve the dispersion of the active species but also tune the acid–base property of this nanocomposite, resulting in the efficient suppression of benzhydrol dehydration to achieve a high selectivity. Furthermore, the core–shell nanocomposite Ni–Ca@mSiO{sub 2} can be recycled four runs without appreciable loss of its initial activity, more stable than the traditional supported nanocatalyst Ni–Ca/mSiO{sub 2}. It was suggested that the outer mesoporous silica shell of Ni–Ca@mSiO{sub 2} can prevent both the aggregation and the leaching of the active Ni species, accounting for its relatively good stability.

  17. Mechanism of host-guest complexation by cucurbituril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, César; Hudgins, Robert R; Nau, Werner M

    2004-05-12

    The factors affecting host-guest complexation between the molecular container compound cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) and various guests in aqueous solution are studied, and a detailed complexation mechanism in the presence of cations is derived. The formation of the supramolecular complex is studied in detail for cyclohexylmethylammonium ion as guest. The kinetics and thermodynamics of complexation is monitored by NMR as a function of temperature, salt concentration, and cation size. The binding constants and the ingression rate constants decrease with increasing salt concentration and cation-binding constant, in agreement with a competitive binding of the ammonium site of the guest and the metal cation with the ureido carbonyl portals of CB6. Studies as a function of guest size indicate that the effective container volume of the CB6 cavity is approximately 105 A(3). It is suggested that larger guests are excluded for two reasons: a high activation barrier for ingression imposed by the tight CB6 portals and a destabilization of the complex due to steric repulsion inside. For example, in the case of the nearly spherical azoalkane homologues 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (DBH, volume ca. 96 A(3)) and 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO, volume ca. 110 A(3)), the former forms the CB6 complex promptly with a sizable binding constant (1300 M(-1)), while the latter does not form a complex even after several months at optimized complexation conditions. Molecular mechanics calculations are performed for several CB6/guest complexes. A qualitative agreement is found between experimental and calculated activation energies for ingression as a function of both guest size and state of protonation. The potential role of constrictive binding by CB6 is discussed.

  18. Penerapan Aplikasi Web Di Hotel Arinda Guest House Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Mubarok

    2017-09-01

    Abstract Hotel was a thriving industry very fast with the advent of the information technology. One factor that can provide comfort is the existence of the information rapid to a reservation hotel. Several problems that ordinarily encountered hotel management and customers as it tough for rapid information, do check in and the payment of requiring guests come to the hotel, include families in village records the guest log and make a report manually.In writing thesis this, writer build a application of hotel by adopting information technology. The model used to the development of software is the method waterfall, which begins with analysis needs adapted to systems are go at the hotel arinda guest house, design system and software, coding, testing, and implementation.So that this research produce information system a reservation hotel web-based. Of interface ease of use user and showing functionality that can be used to at the check in , the hotel , faster information and save time prospective guest on do reservations , efficient in recording the guest log and reports.   Keywords: Website, Aplication, Hotel Arinda Guest House, checked in, Waterfall.

  19. Ni–Sn-Supported ZrO2 Catalysts Modified by Indium for Selective CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol

    KAUST Repository

    Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa

    2018-04-02

    Ni and NiSn supported on zirconia (ZrO2) and on indium (In)-incorporated zirconia (InZrO2) catalysts were prepared by a wet chemical reduction route and tested for hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol in a fixed-bed isothermal flow reactor at 250 °C. The mono-metallic Ni (5%Ni/ZrO2) catalysts showed a very high selectivity for methane (99%) during CO2 hydrogenation. Introduction of Sn to this material with the following formulation 5Ni5Sn/ZrO2 (5% Ni-5% Sn/ZrO2) showed the rate of methanol formation to be 0.0417 μmol/(gcat·s) with 54% selectivity. Furthermore, the combination NiSn supported on InZrO2 (5Ni5Sn/10InZrO2) exhibited a rate of methanol formation 10 times higher than that on 5Ni/ZrO2 (0.1043 μmol/(gcat·s)) with 99% selectivity for methanol. All of these catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, CO2-temperature-programmed desorption, and density functional theory (DFT) studies. Addition of Sn to Ni catalysts resulted in the formation of a NiSn alloy. The NiSn alloy particle size was kept in the range of 10–15 nm, which was evidenced by HRTEM study. DFT analysis was carried out to identify the surface composition as well as the structural location of each element on the surface in three compositions investigated, namely, Ni28Sn27, Ni18Sn37, and Ni37Sn18 bimetallic nanoclusters, and results were in agreement with the STEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy results. Also, the introduction of “Sn” and “In” helped improve the reducibility of Ni oxide and the basic strength of catalysts. Considerable details of the catalytic and structural properties of the Ni, NiSn, and NiSnIn catalyst systems were elucidated. These observations were decisive for achieving a highly efficient formation rate of methanol via CO2 by the H2 reduction process with high methanol selectivity.

  20. A Room with a Viewpoint Revisited: Descriptive Norms and Hotel Guests' Towel Reuse Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E.

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal prox...

  1. Double level selection in a constitutional dynamic library of coordination driven supramolecular polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Marzio; Tessarolo, Jacopo; Casarin, Maurizio; Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Quici, Silvio; Armelao, Lidia

    2014-07-21

    A constitutional dynamic library (CDL) of Cu(II) metallo-supramolecular polygons has been studied as a bench test to examine an interesting selection case based on molecular recognition. Sorting of the CDL polygons is achieved through a proper guest that is hosted into the triangular metallo-macrocycle constituent. Two selection mechanisms are observed, a guest induced path and a guest templated self-assembly (virtual library approach). Remarkably, the triangular host can accommodate several guests with a degree of selectivity ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(4) for all possible guest pairs. A double level selection operates: guests drive the CDL toward the triangular polygon, and, at the same time, this is able to pick a specific guest from a set of competitive molecules, according to a selectivity-affinity correlation. Association constants of the host-guest systems have been determined. Guest competition and exchange studies have been analyzed through variable temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Molecular structures and electronic properties of the triangular polygon and of the host-guest systems also have been studied by means of all electrons density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations including dispersive contributions. DFT outcomes ultimately indicate the dispersive nature of the host-guest interactions, while TDDFT results allow a thorough assignment of the host and host-guests spectral features.

  2. A solid-contact pH-selective electrode based on tridodecylamine as hydrogen neutral ionophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Guo, Yixuan; Li, Shangjin; Xu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The solid-state pH electrode has the potential possibility to be used in many extreme situations with satisfactory accuracy and low cost. But its performance is affected by the solid electrolyte, preparation process, and the structure of the sensitive membrane, etc. In this work, the relationships between these factors and the characteristic of the prepared electrode were verified by controlling the preparation conditions with a variety of electrochemical methods. Firstly, the solid electrolyte poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) was electrochemically deposited on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) substrate by a potentiostatic method in an aqueous solution containing 0.01 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and 0.1 M polystyrene sulfonic (PSS) acid as the supporting electrolyte. The PEDOT films were then characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the 0.1 M NaNO3 aqueous solution in order to obtain the optimized polymerization potential and charges where the PEDOT film would have a higher redox capacitance. Finally, the pH electrode was prepared by coating the SPCE/PEDOT(PSS) with a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane containing tridodecylamine as hydrogen ionophore manually, and experiments were carried out to study the effect of the usage of PVC per square millimeter on the response time and stability of the electrode to optimize the PVC film thickness. The potentiometric response of the pH electrode was studied in the buffer solutions with pH ranging from 5.00 to 10.81 by the open-circuit potential (OCP) method. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the electrode is  -55.7  ±  0.5 mV pH-1 (r 2  >  0.9980) at room temperature (24  ±  1 °C) with pH ranging from 2.00-10.50, approximating to the theoretical nernstian slope (-59.16 mV pH-1),and the response time was less than 10 s. Moreover, it has low impedance, high accuracy and potential stability as well as some

  3. A solid-contact pH-selective electrode based on tridodecylamine as hydrogen neutral ionophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Guo, Yixuan; Li, Shangjin; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The solid-state pH electrode has the potential possibility to be used in many extreme situations with satisfactory accuracy and low cost. But its performance is affected by the solid electrolyte, preparation process, and the structure of the sensitive membrane, etc. In this work, the relationships between these factors and the characteristic of the prepared electrode were verified by controlling the preparation conditions with a variety of electrochemical methods. Firstly, the solid electrolyte poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) was electrochemically deposited on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) substrate by a potentiostatic method in an aqueous solution containing 0.01 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and 0.1 M polystyrene sulfonic (PSS) acid as the supporting electrolyte. The PEDOT films were then characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the 0.1 M NaNO3 aqueous solution in order to obtain the optimized polymerization potential and charges where the PEDOT film would have a higher redox capacitance. Finally, the pH electrode was prepared by coating the SPCE/PEDOT(PSS) with a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane containing tridodecylamine as hydrogen ionophore manually, and experiments were carried out to study the effect of the usage of PVC per square millimeter on the response time and stability of the electrode to optimize the PVC film thickness. The potentiometric response of the pH electrode was studied in the buffer solutions with pH ranging from 5.00 to 10.81 by the open-circuit potential (OCP) method. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the electrode is  −55.7  ±  0.5 mV pH −1 ( r 2   >  0.9980) at room temperature (24  ±  1 °C) with pH ranging from 2.00–10.50, approximating to the theoretical nernstian slope (−59.16 mV pH −1 ),and the response time was less than 10 s. Moreover, it has low impedance, high accuracy and potential stability

  4. The synthesis and host-guest applications of synthetic receptor molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osner, Zachary R.

    2011-12-01

    Host-guest chemistry involves the complimentary binding between two molecules. Host molecules have been synthesized to bind negative, positive, and neutral molecules such as proteins and enzymes, and have been used as optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, supramolecular catalysts, and in the pharmaceutical industry as anti-cancer agents.1 The field of nanoscience has exploited guest-host interactions to create optical sensors with colloidal gold and Dip-Pen nanolithography technologies. Gold nanoparticles, have been functionalized with DNA, and have been developed as a selective colorimetric detection system, that upon binding turns the solution from a red to blue in color.2 Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) 1 is a common supramolecular scaffold that has been previously employed in guest-host chemistry, and the construction of CTV involves the cyclic trimerization of veratryl alcohol via the veratryl cation.3 Due to the rigid bowl shaped structure of CTV, CTV has been shown to act as a host molecule for fullerene-C60.4 Lectin binding receptor proteins are a specific class of proteins found in bacteria, viruses, plants, and animals that can bind to complimentary carbohydrates. It is these lectins that are believed to be responsible for cell-cell interactions and the formation of biofilms in pathenogenic bacteria.5 P. aeruginosa is a pathenogenic bacterium, shown to have a high resistance to many antibiotics, which can form biofilms in human lung tissue, causing respiratory tract infections in patients with compromised immune systems. 5 I will exploit guest-host interactions to create synthetic supramolecular and carbohydrate receptor molecules to that will be of use as biological sensing devices via self-assembled monolayers on solid surfaces and nanoparticle technologies. *Please refer to dissertation for references/footnotes.

  5. A nanoscale Zr-based fluorescent metal-organic framework for selective and sensitive detection of hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanping; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Ke; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been commonly viewed as a gas signaling molecule in various physiological and pathological processes. However, the highly efficient H2S detection still remains challenging. Herein, we designed a new robust nano metal-organic framework (MOF) UiO-66-CH=CH2 as a fluorescent probe for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of biological H2S. UiO-66-CH=CH2 was prepared by heating ZrCl4 and 2-vinylterephthalic acid via a simple method. UiO-66-CH=CH2 displayed fluorescence quenching to H2S and kept excellent selectivity in the presence of biological relevant analytes especially the cysteine and glutathione. This MOF-based probe also exhibited fast response (10 s) and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 6.46 μM which was within the concentration range of biological H2S in living system. Moreover, this constructed MOF featured water-stability, nanoscale (20-30 nm) and low toxicity, which made it a promising candidate for biological H2S sensing.

  6. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krischan, J., E-mail: jutta_krischan@hotmail.com [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Getreidemarkt 9/166, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Makaruk, A., E-mail: aleksander.makaruk@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Getreidemarkt 9/166, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Harasek, M., E-mail: michael.harasek@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Getreidemarkt 9/166, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline oxidative scrubbing proved for biogas desulfurization Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of operating conditions on hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minimization of caustic and oxidant consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process control via pH, redox potential and conductivity measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of long-term behavior of pilot plant operation. - Abstract: Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H{sub 2}S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H{sub 2}S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H{sub 2}S with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, high H{sub 2}S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO{sub 2} absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180 m{sup 3}/h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H{sub 2}S contents in the crude gas.

  7. Using Gas-Phase Guest-Host Chemistry to Probe the Structures of b Ions of Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Árpád; Harrison, Alex G.; Paizs, Béla

    2012-12-01

    Middle-sized b n ( n ≥ 5) fragments of protonated peptides undergo selective complex formation with ammonia under experimental conditions typically used to probe hydrogen-deuterium exchange in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Other usual peptide fragments like y, a, a*, etc., and small b n ( n ≤ 4) fragments do not form stable ammonia adducts. We propose that complex formation of b n ions with ammonia is characteristic to macrocyclic isomers of these fragments. Experiments on a protonated cyclic peptide and N-terminal acetylated peptides fully support this hypothesis; the protonated cyclic peptide does form ammonia adducts while linear b n ions of acetylated peptides do not undergo complexation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the proton-bound dimers of all-Ala b 4 , b 5 , and b 7 ions and ammonia indicate that the ionizing proton initially located on the peptide fragment transfers to ammonia upon adduct formation. The ammonium ion is then solvated by N+-H…O H-bonds; this stabilization is much stronger for macrocyclic b n isomers due to the stable cage-like structure formed and entropy effects. The present study demonstrates that gas-phase guest-host chemistry can be used to selectively probe structural features (i.e., macrocyclic or linear) of fragments of protonated peptides. Stable ammonia adducts of b 9 , b 9 -A, and b 9 -2A of A8YA, and b 13 of A20YVFL are observed indicating that even these large b-type ions form macrocyclic structures.

  8. Hollow ZSM-5 encapsulated Pt nanoparticles for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhe; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Dan; Sun, Qiang; Li, Xuebing

    2018-05-01

    Pt nanoparticles were successfully encapsulated in hollow ZSM-5 single crystals by tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH) hydrothermal treatment with an "dissolution-recrystallization" process. The prepared Pt/hollow ZSM-5 (Pt/h-ZSM-5re) sample exhibited the best activity and a maximum NO conversion of 84% can be achieved at 90 °C with N2 selectivity of 92% (GHSV = 50,000 h-1). Meanwhile, Pt/h-ZSM-5re catalyst exhibited excellent SO2, H2O resistance and durability, which was related to the stabilization of Pt active sites by hollow structure during H2-SCR. It was found that the increase of NO2 concentration in the feed gas mixture led to an activity decline. In addition, the H2-SCR reaction routes over Pt/hollow ZSM-5 catalyst at different temperature were investigated.

  9. Aluminium and hydrogen ions inhibit a mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    The tension-dependent activity of mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in excised plasmalemmal patches from onion bulb scale epidermis is modulated by pH in the physiologically meaningful range between 4.5 and 7.2. It is rapidly lowered by lowering pH and rapidly raised by raising pH. Channel activity is effectively inhibited by low levels of aluminium ions and activity can be partially restored by washing for a few minutes. We suggest that under normal conditions the sensitivity of the mechanosensory channels to pH of the wall free space plays important roles in regulation of plant activities such as growth. We further suggest that, when levels of acid and aluminium ions in the soil solution are high, they might inhibit similar sensory channels in cells of the root tip, thus contributing critically to the acid soil syndrome.

  10. Nanoporous spongy graphene: Potential applications for hydrogen adsorption and selective gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostoglou, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikolaos.kostoglou@stud.unileoben.ac.at [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Constantinides, Georgios [Research Unit for Nanostructured Materials Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Cyprus University of Technology, 3036 Lemesos (Cyprus); Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Agia Paraskevi Attikis, 15310 Athens (Greece); Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Li, Yuanqing; Liao, Kin [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ryzhkov, Vladislav [Nanotube Production Department, Fibrtec Incorporation, TX, 75551 Atlanta (United States); Mitterer, Christian [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Rebholz, Claus, E-mail: claus@ucy.ac.cy [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, a nanoporous (pore width ~ 0.7 nm) graphene-based sponge-like material with large surface area (~ 350 m{sup 2}/g) was synthesized by wet chemical reduction of graphene oxide in combination with freeze-drying. Surface morphology and elemental composition were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Surface chemistry was qualitatively examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, while the respective structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Textural properties, including Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, micropore volume and surface area as well as pore size distribution, were deduced from nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption data obtained at 77 K and up to 1 bar. Potential use of the spongy graphene for gas storage and separation applications was preliminarily assessed by low-pressure (0–1 bar) H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} sorption measurements at different temperatures (77, 273 and 298 K). The adsorption capacities for each gas were evaluated up to ~ 1 bar, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption for CO{sub 2} (28–33 kJ/mol) and CH{sub 4} (30–38 kJ/mol) were calculated using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, while the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas selectivity (up to 95:1) was estimated using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). - Highlights: • Nanoporous sponge produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and freeze-drying • Characterization performed using SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR, BET and XRD methods • Gas storage performance evaluated towards H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption up to 1 bar • CO{sub 2} over CH{sub 4} gas selectivity estimated between 45 and 95 at 273 K using the IAST model.

  11. Nanoporous spongy graphene: Potential applications for hydrogen adsorption and selective gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostoglou, Nikolaos; Constantinides, Georgios; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Li, Yuanqing; Liao, Kin; Ryzhkov, Vladislav; Mitterer, Christian; Rebholz, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a nanoporous (pore width ~ 0.7 nm) graphene-based sponge-like material with large surface area (~ 350 m"2/g) was synthesized by wet chemical reduction of graphene oxide in combination with freeze-drying. Surface morphology and elemental composition were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Surface chemistry was qualitatively examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, while the respective structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Textural properties, including Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, micropore volume and surface area as well as pore size distribution, were deduced from nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption data obtained at 77 K and up to 1 bar. Potential use of the spongy graphene for gas storage and separation applications was preliminarily assessed by low-pressure (0–1 bar) H_2, CO_2 and CH_4 sorption measurements at different temperatures (77, 273 and 298 K). The adsorption capacities for each gas were evaluated up to ~ 1 bar, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption for CO_2 (28–33 kJ/mol) and CH_4 (30–38 kJ/mol) were calculated using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, while the CO_2/CH_4 gas selectivity (up to 95:1) was estimated using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). - Highlights: • Nanoporous sponge produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and freeze-drying • Characterization performed using SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR, BET and XRD methods • Gas storage performance evaluated towards H_2, CO_2 and CH_4 adsorption up to 1 bar • CO_2 over CH_4 gas selectivity estimated between 45 and 95 at 273 K using the IAST model

  12. A rod-packing microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2014-11-13

    Self-assembly of a trigonal building subunit with diaminotriazines (DAT) functional groups leads to a unique rod-packing 3D microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF-3). This material shows permanent porosity and demonstrates highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at ambient temperature and pressure.

  13. A rod-packing microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng; He, Yabing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Weng, Linhong; Wang, Hailong; Krishna, Rajamani A A; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; O'Keeffe, Michael A.; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of a trigonal building subunit with diaminotriazines (DAT) functional groups leads to a unique rod-packing 3D microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF-3). This material shows permanent porosity and demonstrates highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at ambient temperature and pressure.

  14. A rationally designed amino-borane complex in a metal organic framework: A novel reusable hydrogen storage and size-selective reduction material

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xinbo

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino-borane complex inside a stable metal organic framework was synthesized for the first time. It releases hydrogen at a temperature of 78 °C with no volatile contaminants and can be well reused. Its application as a size-selective reduction material in organic synthesis was also demonstrated. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  15. Performance of polydimethylsiloxane membrane contactor process for selective hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Ebrahim; Bayrakdar, Alper; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Çalli, Bariş

    2017-03-01

    H 2 S in biogas affects the co-generation performance adversely by corroding some critical components within the engine and it has to be removed in order to improve the biogas quality. This work presents the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane contactor for selective removal of H 2 S from the biogas. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of different pH of absorption liquid, biogas flowrate and temperature on the absorption performances. The results revealed that at the lowest loading rate (91mg H 2 S/m 2 ·h) more than 98% H 2 S and 59% CO 2 absorption efficiencies were achieved. The CH 4 content in the treated gas increased from 60 to 80% with nearly 5% CH 4 loss. Increasing the pH (7-10) and loading rate (91-355mg H 2 S/m 2 ·h) enhanced the H 2 S absorption capacity, and the maximum H 2 S/CO 2 and H 2 S/CH 4 selectivity factors were 2.5 and 58, respectively. Temperature played a key role in the process and lower temperature was beneficial for intensifying H 2 S absorption performance. The highest H 2 S fluxes at pH 10 and 7 were 3.4g/m 2 ·d and 1.8g/m 2 ·d with overall mass transfer coefficients of 6.91×10 -6 and 4.99×10 -6 m/s, respectively. The results showed that moderately high H 2 S fluxes with low CH 4 loss may be achieved by using a robust and cost-effective membrane based absorption process for desulfurization of biogas. A tubular PDMS membrane contactor was tested for the first time to remove H 2 S from biogas under slightly alkaline conditions and the suggested process could be a promising for real scale applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen by anaerobic mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yafeng; Wan, Jingjing; Han, Sheng; Zhang, Shicheng; Luo, Gang

    2016-02-01

    A new method for the conversion of CO to H2 was developed by anaerobic mixed culture in the current study. Higher CO consumption rate was obtained by anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) compared to waste activated sludge (WAS) at 55 °C and pH 7.5. However, H2 was the intermediate and CH4 was the final product. Fermentation at pH 5.5 by AGS inhibited CH4 production, while the lower CO consumption rate (50% of that at pH 7.5) and the production of acetate were found. Fermentation at pH 7.5 with the addition of chloroform achieved efficient and selective conversion of CO to H2. Stable and efficient H2 production was achieved in a continuous reactor inoculated with AGS, and gas recirculation was crucial to increase the CO conversion efficiency. Microbial community analysis showed that high abundance (44%) of unclassified sequences and low relative abundance (1%) of known CO-utilizing bacteria Desulfotomaculum were enriched in the reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  18. Terpsichorean Architecture: Guest Editor’s Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Mitchell

    2011-09-01

    light to form and how we hear ourselves live in that form.’ This special issue, guest edited by Tony Mitchell, University of Technology Sydney, contains papers that discuss a wide range of different modes and forms of music and music writing in all fields, and in many parts of the world, from a perspective of history, performance, and architecture (including ‘natural’ architectural forms.

  19. Guest editorial - Networked collaboration, sharing and response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Skundberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available  This issue of Seminar.net contains three articles that were written in connection with a Norwegian e-learning conference titled “Networked collaboration, sharing and response”. The conference was held in Mars 2008 in Trondheim, and the presentations from the conference is available (in norwegian language at http://www.nvu.no. Networked collaboration was chosen as a theme because collaboration is important to achieve learning, according to the social-constructivistic pedagogy that has a strong standing in Norway, but how should this occur on the net? Sharing of content, as in digital learning resources, is a phenomenon with increasing popularity as described in the OECD-report “Giving Knowledge for Free”. But to achieve reuse of content, not only publishing it, it is important with a networked community where the plethora of information can be sorted with relevance to specific topics. Response is about guiding, coaching and tutoring. In what ways may resources and tools be used to move in the direction of solving Bloom’s two sigma problem/challenge? The first article, by Morten Flate Paulsen, shows how cooperative learning can be implemented successfully so that students have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The second article, by Carl F. Dons, shows how student teachers can be prepared to deal with pupils who have a wide range of experiences of the digital world. The third and last article, by Kristin Dale, is sharing experiences with multiple choice-tests to give midterm responses to students. In addition, this issue has a commentary article by Rune Krumsvik discussing the need to develop new practices for teachers and students on the background of the digital developments. The conference and articles covers three big themes. It may be difficult to find more important issues, apart from finding money and time to support its development. Olav Skundberg, guest editorAssociate professor

  20. Total Quality Management Implementation and Guest Satisfaction in Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Knežević

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management (TQM has become a modern system of constant improvement of the quality of all company activities. The purpose of this study is to measure the expectations and satisfaction of the guests concerning the attribute quality of the hotel product. Furthermore obtained results were compared in such a way as to analyse particularly the reviews of hotels which have implemented TQM and have the ISO 9001 certificates with reviews from hotels which have not implemented TQM and do not have the ISO 9001 certificates. The conducted analysis included 55 hotels in Serbia belonging to the 4- and 5-star categories, i.e. 1308 guests who have stayed in them. The results show that between the observed groups of guests there are fewer differences in expectations than in perception, and that generally speaking guests who have stayed in the hotels that have implemented TQM are more satisfied. The biggest difference concerning the guest satisfaction with the quality of service in the observed hotels is noticeable in relation to the employees and the value-for-money.

  1. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  2. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  3. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.; Schreiber, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300-360°C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N2 gas. Results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  4. Thermally stable single atom Pt/m-Al2O3 for selective hydrogenation and CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zailei

    2017-07-27

    Single-atom metal catalysts offer a promising way to utilize precious noble metal elements more effectively, provided that they are catalytically active and sufficiently stable. Herein, we report a synthetic strategy for Pt single-atom catalysts with outstanding stability in several reactions under demanding conditions. The Pt atoms are firmly anchored in the internal surface of mesoporous Al2O3, likely stabilized by coordinatively unsaturated pentahedral Al3+ centres. The catalyst keeps its structural integrity and excellent performance for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene after exposure to a reductive atmosphere at 200 °C for 24 h. Compared to commercial Pt nanoparticle catalyst on Al2O3 and control samples, this system exhibits significantly enhanced stability and performance for n-hexane hydro-reforming at 550 °C for 48 h, although agglomeration of Pt single-atoms into clusters is observed after reaction. In CO oxidation, the Pt single-atom identity was fully maintained after 60 cycles between 100 and 400 °C over a one-month period.

  5. Importance of satisfaction and guests experience in hotel business organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Srđan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotel companies which operate in today's competitive environment must constantly work on improving their products and services, at the request of their guests. Customer satisfaction is the key to retaining existing and attracting new guests. To achieve this goal, managers in the hotel organizations have become aware of the fact that the quality of staying in hotel represent unique experience for tourists. Lot of papers are dealing with the exploration of this topic, it only proves its importance nowadays. However, insufficient attention is paid to the simultaneous study of experience of guests and their satisfaction through the offered models (indexes that are created for this purpose. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of these issues and identify their potential symbiosis.

  6. Guest Controlled Nonmonotonic Deep Cavity Cavitand Assembly State Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Du; Barnett, J Wesley; Gibb, Bruce C; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2017-11-30

    Octa-acid (OA) and tetra-endo-methyl octa-acid (TEMOA) are water-soluble, deep-cavity cavitands with nanometer-sized nonpolar pockets that readily bind complementary guests, such as n-alkanes. Experimentally, OA exhibits a progression of 1:1 to 2:2 to 2:1 host/guest complexes (X:Y where X is the number of hosts and Y is the number of guests) with increasing alkane chain length from methane to tetradecane. Differing from OA only by the addition of four methyl groups ringing the portal of the pocket, TEMOA exhibits a nonmonotonic progression of assembly states from 1:1 to 2:2 to 1:1 to 2:1 with increasing guest length. Here we present a systematic molecular simulation study to parse the molecular and thermodynamic determinants that distinguish the succession of assembly stoichiometries observed for these similar hosts. Potentials of mean force between hosts and guests, determined via umbrella sampling, are used to characterize association free energies. These free energies are subsequently used in a reaction network model to predict the equilibrium distributions of assemblies. Our models accurately reproduce the experimentally observed trends, showing that TEMOA's endo-methyl units constrict the opening of the binding pocket, limiting the conformations available to bound guests and disrupting the balance between monomeric complexes and dimeric capsules. The success of our simulations demonstrate their utility at interpreting the impact of even simple chemical modifications on supramolecular assembly and highlight their potential to aid bottom-up design.

  7. The websites of Japanese Ryokan and eWOM: their impacts on guests' expectation and experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Jimura, Takamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The research aims to investigate the impacts of the websites of ryokan and e-WordOf-Mouth (eWOM) available at the websites of Japanese e-travel agents on the guests' expectation for and experience at ryokan. The research stems from interpretivism and mainly adopts an inductive approach. Netnography is selected as a research strategy. The top three ryokan in terms of sales ranking are chosen. eWOM about these three are analysed, focusing on the impacts of websites and eWOM in developing the gu...

  8. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  9. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene from crude C{sub 4} cracker stream with a solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer (SCILL). DSC and solubility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangartz, T.; Korth, W.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In petroleum as well as in fine chemical industry, selective catalytic hydrogenation is an important reaction. The selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene (BD) to butene (trans-,1- and cis-butene) from the crude C4 steam cracker fraction represents one example, but under today's technical conditions undesired butane forms inevitably in relevant amounts. To increase the butene yield, the concept of Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL) was employed. The SCILL catalyst, in contrast to the uncoated catalyst, yielded a remarkably high selectivity to butenes (S{sub butenes} > 99 %) even at high residence times or at high hydrogen partial pressure. Nearly no butane (S{sub butane} {approx} 0 %) was analytically detected. We expected that due to different solubility, the poorer soluble compounds discharged from the ionic liquid and, thus, caused the shift in selectivity to a great extent. Temperature dependent solubility measurements in the used ionic liquid ([DMIM][DMP]) revealed that the order of increasing solubility is 1,3-butadiene > butenes > butane which matches the assumption. However, since differences in solubility cannot explain this SCILL effect satisfyingly, ionic liquids are expected to affect the surface of the catalyst (side-specific ligand-type effect). Investigations using spectroscopic methods (e.g. FTIR) confirmed this suggestion. (orig.)

  10. Predicting Complexation Thermodynamic Parameters of β-Cyclodextrin with Chiral Guests by Using Swarm Intelligence and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckhana Lawtrakul

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO and Support Vector Machines (SVMs approaches are used for predicting the thermodynamic parameters for the 1:1 inclusion complexation of chiral guests with β-cyclodextrin. A PSO is adopted for descriptor selection in the quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR of a dataset of 74 chiral guests due to its simplicity, speed, and consistency. The modified PSO is then combined with SVMs for its good approximating properties, to generate a QSPR model with the selected features. Linear, polynomial, and Gaussian radial basis functions are used as kernels in SVMs. All models have demonstrated an impressive performance with R2 higher than 0.8.

  11. Highly sensitive and selective determination of hydrogen sulfide by resonance light scattering technique based on silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yangfang; Chen, Shu; Long, Yunfei

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a green approach to prepare DNA-templated silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) from the direct reaction between Ag + and ascorbic acid in the presence of DNA and sodium hydroxide. The Ag-NPs showed strong resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity property. Then, the interaction between hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and Ag-NPs was studied by measuring their RLS spectra. The results showed that there is a strong interaction between Ag-NPs and H 2 S, which resulted in a decrease in the size of Ag-NPs and a decrease in the RLS intensity of the Ag-NPs solution at the wavelength of 467 nm. The results demonstrated that the RLS technique offers a sensitive and simple tool for investigating the interaction between Ag-NPs and H 2 S, which can be applied to detect H 2 S with high sensitivity and selectivity without complex readout equipment. The linear range for H 2 S determination was found to be the range from 5.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -7  mol L -1 , and the detection limit (3σ/k) was 2.8 × 10 -9  mol L -1 . Moreover, the proposed method was applied for the determination of H 2 S in natural water samples with satisfactory results. Graphical abstract The application of Ag-NPs in H 2 S detection.

  12. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Motsoaledi | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A Motsoaledi. Abstract. No abstract ...

  13. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. AM Meyers. Abstract. No abstract.

  14. The paradoxical path towards the memorable guest experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ambrosio, Luigi; Madsen, Jan Halberg

    This paper examines the design of hospitality and tourism experiences staged for international tourists in the emerging Italian destination Campi Flegrei on the Bay of Naples. In particular, this case focuses on the paradox that Campi Flegrei (CF) hospitality providers around the Lake Avernus face...... in the conceptualisation of the guest experience in the context of a non-DMO governed destination....

  15. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and increased retention.Service quality is fundamental component which produce higher levels of guest satisfaction, which in turn lead to higher sales revenue.The main purpose of this study was to examine the quality dimensions that affect guest satisfaction in restaurant industry. Food and beverage quality, the quality of service delivery, physical environment and price fairness are analyzed as a key components of restaurant experience. The results could be helpful tool for restaurant managers to invest their resources more efficiently, making changes to crucial quality attributes that elicit the guests’ satisfaction level. A management approach focused on guest satisfaction can improve restaurant business performance.

  16. A light controlled cavitand wall regulates guest binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Orion B; Sather, Aaron C; Rebek, Julius

    2011-01-14

    Here we report a cavitand with a photochemical switch as one of the container walls. The azo-arene switch undergoes photoisomerization when subjected to UV light producing a self-fulfilled cavitand. This process is thermally and photochemically reversible. The reported cavitand binds small molecules and these guests can be ejected from the cavitand through this photochemical process.

  17. Guest Editorial | Frade | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial. Nelia Frade. Abstract. Tutoring and ...

  18. SANS contrast variation on a dendrimer host-guest complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppinger, R.; Mortensen, K.; Meijer, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was used to study the configurational changes in an oligoethyleneoxy-functionalized poly(propyleneimine) dendrimer (host) when forming complexes with rose bengal (guest). Guinier fits to the scattering data recorded at max. contrast indicated a

  19. Guest-responsive structural adaptation of a rationally-designed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adaptability of the TB core to undergo subtle structural changes in response to the guest that is included. The structural ... we report the design, synthesis and inclusion behaviour of a novel ..... Based on a rational design, we have shown from ...

  20. Forward by Guest Editors | Potgieter | African Journal on Conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal on Conflict Resolution. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Forward by Guest Editors. Cheryl Potgieter, Paulus ...

  1. Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle cell disorder. Charles Wambele. Abstract. No Abstract. Discovery and Innovation Vol. 18(1) 2006: 1-4. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v18i1.15718.

  2. Selective Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid with Well-Defined Complexes of Ruthenium and Phosphorus-Nitrogen PN3-Pincer Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yupeng

    2016-04-22

    An unsymmetrically protonated PN3-pincer complex in which ruthenium is coordinated by one nitrogen and two phosphorus atoms was employed for the selective generation of hydrogen from formic acid. Mechanistic studies suggest that the imine arm participates in the formic acid activation/deprotonation step. A long life time of 150 h with a turnover number over 1 million was achieved. Grabbing hold: A PN3-pincer complex was employed for the selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. Mechanistic studies suggest the imine arm participates in the formic acid activation/deprotonation step. A long life time of 150 h with a turnover number over 1 million was achieved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The CH/π hydrogen bond: Implication in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, M.

    2012-06-01

    The CH/π hydrogen bond is the weakest extreme of hydrogen bonds that occurs between a soft acid CH and a soft base π-system. Implication in chemistry of the CH/π hydrogen bond includes issues of conformation, crystal packing, and specificity in host/guest complexes. The result obtained by analyzing the Cambridge Structural Database is reviewed. The peculiar axial preference of isopropyl group in α-phellandrene and folded conformation of levopimaric acid have been explained in terms of the CH/π hydrogen bond, by high-level ab initio MO calculations. Implication of the CH/π hydrogen bond in structural biology is also discussed, briefly.

  4. Selective production of oxygenates from CO2 hydrogenation over mesoporous silica supported Cu-Ga nanocomposite catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa; Bhatte, Kushal Deepak; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Saih, Youssef; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to oxygenates (methanol and dimethyl ether (DME)) was investigated over bifunctional supported copper catalysts promoted with gallium (Ga). Supported Cu-Ga nanocomposite catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction

  5. Quality of customer service: perceptions from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel L. Frater

    2007-01-01

    With data collected from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica, West Indies, the purposes of this study were to: (1) delineate unique dimensions of customer service perceptions among guests and (2) report the finding of a study that measured guests' perceptions of the quality of customer service in all-inclusive resorts. The study asked the following research...

  6. Field-induced detrapping in disordered organic semiconducting host-guest systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottaar, J.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    In a disordered organic semiconducting host-guest material, containing a relatively small concentration of guest molecules acting as traps, the charge transport may be viewed as resulting from carriers that are detrapped from the guest to the host. Commonly used theories include only detrapping due

  7. The role of tin-promoted Pd/MWNTs via the management of carbonaceous species in selective hydrogenation of high concentration acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, Elaheh; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Rashidzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of highly active tin-promoted catalysts by polyol method for selective hydrogenation of high concentration of acetylene. ► A positive change in the catalytic activities of tin-promoted catalysts results from distinct geometric and electronic effects. ► Change in the coverage of acetylenic overlayers for different temperature regions corresponds to the change of the number of isolated adsorption sites. ► The isolated adsorption sites are responsible for the enhancement of selectivity to ethylene with increased temperatures, via the management of the carbonaceous species over the catalyst surface. - Abstract: In the present study, Pd/MWNTs are synthesized using polyol process and modified by tin as a promoter for selective hydrogenation of high concentrated acetylene feedstock. Polyol method results in highly dispersed nanoparticles with a depletion of particle size for tin-promoted Pd catalysts as characterized by TEM. Tin promoter plays a considerable role in hydrogenation of pure acetylene stream. This is attributed to formation of Pd 2 Sn structural phase, confirmed by XRD and TPR techniques, composed mainly of intermetallic species. Catalytic behavior of tin-promoted Pd catalysts is affected by geometric and electronic factors which are more pronounced in the case of Sn/Pd = 0.25. A discontinuity in Arrhenius plots for the Sn-promoted catalysts is appeared, which seems to be due to a kinetic factor as a result of change in acetylene coverage on Pd metallic ensembles at low and high temperature ranges. Higher selectivity of the catalysts to ethylene is attributed to the presence of more isolated adsorption sites on the catalyst surface originated from both intermetallic compounds confirmed by XPS and the ones formed via the carbonaceous species upon the acetylene hydrogenation reaction.

  8. Study of the selective abstration reaction of the hydrogen atom in the radiolysis and photolysis of alkane mixture at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, S.M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The occurence of the selective abstraction reaction of the solute hydrogen atom by hydrogen atom produced during radiolysis or photolysis of the systems such as neopentane/cyclo-hexane/HI, neopentane/2,3 dimethylbutane, n-pentane/HI/cyclo-hexane and cyclo-hexane/HI/n-pentane, at 77 K is studied. Experiments have been undertaken on the kinetics nature of the active species, the H atom, during radiolysis and photolysis of the neopentane/cyclo-hexane/HI system at 77 K, presenting competitive reactions. Studies have also been made on the occurrence of the selective abstraction reaction in inverted systems, in which the concentrations of the components of a system are so much altered that the solute becomes the solvent and vice-versa, in the other system. By means of photolysis at 77 K, it has been observed that for the two systems constitued by the cyclo-hexane and n-pentane the selective abstraction reaction occurs. However, for radiolysis of that same two systems it has been observed that only the hydrogen atom abstraction reaction corresponding to the solvent occurs. (Author) [pt

  9. Selective hydrogenation of acetylene on SiO{sub 2} supported Ni-In bimetallic catalysts: Promotional effect of In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanjun; Chen, Jixiang, E-mail: jxchen@tju.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A suitable Ni/In ratio remarkably enhanced the acetylene conversion, the selectivity to ethylene and the catalyst stability. Display Omitted - Highlights: • There was a promotional effect of In on the performance of Ni/SiO{sub 2}. • A suitable Ni/In ratio was required for good performance of Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2}. • Both geometrical and electronic effects of In contributed to good performance. • Ni/SiO{sub 2} deactivation is mainly owing to phase change from Ni to nickel carbide. • The carbonaceous deposit was the main reason for Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2} deactivation. - Abstract: Ni/SiO{sub 2} and the bimetallic Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Ni/In ratios were tested for the selective hydrogenation of acetylene, and their physicochemical properties before and after the reaction were characterized by means of N{sub 2}-sorption, H{sub 2}-TPR, XRD, TEM, XPS, H{sub 2} chemisorption, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}-TPD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, FT-IR of adsorbed pyridine, and TG/DTA and Raman. A promotional effect of In on the performance of Ni/SiO{sub 2} was found, and Ni{sub x}In/SiO{sub 2} with a suitable Ni/In ratio gave much higher acetylene conversion, ethylene selectivity and catalyst stability than Ni/SiO{sub 2}. This is ascribed to the geometrical isolation of the reactive Ni atoms with the inert In ones and the charge transfer from the In atoms to Ni ones, both of which are favorable for reducing the adsorption strength of ethylene and restraining the C−C hydrogenolysis and the polymerizations of acetylene and the intermediate compounds. On the whole, Ni{sub 6}In/SiO{sub 2} and Ni{sub 10}In/SiO{sub 2} had better performance. Nevertheless, with increasing the In content, the selectivity to the C4+ hydrocarbons tended to increase due to the enhanced catalyst acidity because of the charge transfer from the In atoms to Ni ones. As the Lewis acid ones, the In sites could promote the polymerization. The catalyst deactivation was also analyzed

  10. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  11. Guest editorial: Pharmacology of male sexual behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, Marcel D; Olivier, Berend

    The introduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the mid 1980s has led not only to an increased attention to antidepressant-induced sexual side effects, but also to a paradigm shift in the theory of premature ejaculation (PE). Because of their ejaculation delaying effects,

  12. Can we beat the biotin-avidin pair?: cucurbit[7]uril-based ultrahigh affinity host-guest complexes and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Dinesh; Khedkar, Jayshree K; Park, Kyeng Min; Kim, Kimoon

    2015-12-07

    The design of synthetic, monovalent host-guest molecular recognition pairs is still challenging and of particular interest to inquire into the limits of the affinity that can be achieved with designed systems. In this regard, cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), an important member of the host family cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n], n = 5-8, 10, 14), has attracted much attention because of its ability to form ultra-stable complexes with multiple guests. The strong hydrophobic effect between the host cavity and guests, ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions of guests with CB portals helps in cooperative and multiple noncovalent interactions that are essential for realizing such strong complexations. These highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited in many applications including affinity chromatography, biomolecule immobilization, protein isolation, biological catalysis, and sensor technologies. In this review, we summarize the progress in the development of high affinity guests for CB[7], factors affecting the stability of complexes, theoretical insights, and the utility of these high affinity pairs in different challenging applications.

  13. Modeling Perceived Quality, Customer Satisfaction and Probability of Guest Returning to the Destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Blagojevic Popovic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the hotel industry, it is a well-known fact that, despite of quality and variety of services provided, there is a low probability that the guests will return. This research is focused on identifying the basic factors of the hotel offer, which could determine the influence on the correlation between the guests’ satisfaction and the probability of their return. The objective of the article is to explore the relationship between the guests’ satisfaction with the quality hotel services in total (including the tourist offer of the place and the probability of his return to the same destination. The questionnaire method was applied in the survey, and the data were analysed based on factor analysis. Thereafter, the model for forecasting the probability of the guests returning to the destination was established, by using the example of Montenegrin tourism. The model represents a defined framework for the guest’s decision-making process. It identifies two main characteristics of guest experiences: satisfaction and rated quality (of the destination’s overall hotel service and tourist offer. The same model evaluates the impact of the above factors on the probability of the guests’ returning to the same destination. The starting hypothesis was the existence of a high degree of correlation between the guests’ satisfaction (with the destination’s hotel services and tourist offer and the probability of returning to the selected Montenegrin destinations. The research confirmed the above-mentioned hypothesis. The results have revealed that there are significant differences in perceived quality, i.e. satisfaction between the target groups of Eastern and Western European tourists

  14. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Technical University, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have recently received considerable attention because of their high specific micropore volume and the ability to store gas molecules exceeding the storage capacity of traditional adsorbents. A variety of differences in the MOFs structures makes it difficult to analyze the influence of different factors on hydrogen uptake capabilities in MOFs. We have investigated the influence of the minor structural changes of the MOFs on their hydrogen storage capacity. The influence of the incorporated metal was shown for following isostructural compounds: Cu{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2} (BTC=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) and Mo{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}; Zn{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}DABCO and Co{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}DABCO (BDC=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, DABCO=1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). Our research interest is directed also towards the discovery of new MOFs, as well as adjusting the pore dimensions of MOFs, using different building blocks, solvent and solvent mixtures, in order to improve gas uptake and adsorption properties. Magnesium-based MOFs were found with the same network topology, very small pore size and selective adsorption behaviour. They show a guest-induced reversible structure transformation due to the flexibility of the Mg{sub 3}-cluster and the organic linkers. This effect could be used for fitting the pore sizes and for the increase of gas sorption capability in Mg contained MOFs after all. The hydrogen adsorption was also studied in several Al-based IRMOFs.

  15. Selective detection of acetone and hydrogen sulfide for the diagnosis of diabetes and halitosis using SnO(2) nanofibers functionalized with reduced graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Jin; Jang, Bong-Hoon; Lee, Seo-Jin; Min, Byoung Koun; Rothschild, Avner; Kim, Il-Doo

    2014-02-26

    Sensitive detection of acetone and hydrogen sulfide levels in exhaled human breath, serving as breath markers for some diseases such as diabetes and halitosis, may offer useful information for early diagnosis of these diseases. Exhaled breath analyzers using semiconductor metal oxide (SMO) gas sensors have attracted much attention because they offer low cost fabrication, miniaturization, and integration into portable devices for noninvasive medical diagnosis. However, SMO gas sensors often display cross sensitivity to interfering species. Therefore, selective real-time detection of specific disease markers is a major challenge that must be overcome to ensure reliable breath analysis. In this work, we report on highly sensitive and selective acetone and hydrogen sulfide detection achieved by sensitizing electrospun SnO2 nanofibers with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets. SnO2 nanofibers mixed with a small amount (0.01 wt %) of RGO nanosheets exhibited sensitive response to hydrogen sulfide (Rair/Rgas = 34 at 5 ppm) at 200 °C, whereas sensitive acetone detection (Rair/Rgas = 10 at 5 ppm) was achieved by increasing the RGO loading to 5 wt % and raising the operation temperature to 350 °C. The detection limit of these sensors is predicted to be as low as 1 ppm for hydrogen sulfide and 100 ppb for acetone, respectively. These concentrations are much lower than in the exhaled breath of healthy people. This demonstrates that optimization of the RGO loading and the operation temperature of RGO-SnO2 nanocomposite gas sensors enables highly sensitive and selective detection of breath markers for the diagnosis of diabetes and halitosis.

  16. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-06-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142 m2 g-1 were demonstrated to be an excellent supports for loading small-size Pt nanoparticles. Superior furfural hydrogenation activity in water with complete conversion of furfural and high selectivity of furfuryl alcohol (>99%) was observed for g-C3N4 nanosheets supported Pt catalysts. The large specific surface area, uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and the stronger furfural adsorption ability of nanosheets contributed to the considerable catalytic performance. The reusability tests showed that the novel Pt catalyst could maintain high activity and stability in the furfural hydrogenation reaction.

  17. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-06-22

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142 m(2) g(-1) were demonstrated to be an excellent supports for loading small-size Pt nanoparticles. Superior furfural hydrogenation activity in water with complete conversion of furfural and high selectivity of furfuryl alcohol (>99%) was observed for g-C3N4 nanosheets supported Pt catalysts. The large specific surface area, uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and the stronger furfural adsorption ability of nanosheets contributed to the considerable catalytic performance. The reusability tests showed that the novel Pt catalyst could maintain high activity and stability in the furfural hydrogenation reaction.

  18. Diatomite-supported Pd-M (M=Cu, Co, Ni) bimetal nanocatalysts for selective hydrogenation of long-chain aliphatic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changliang; Zhang, Hongye; Zhao, Yanfei; Chen, Sha; Liu, Zhimin

    2012-11-15

    Diatomite supported Pd-M (M=Cu, Co, Ni) bimetal nanocatalysts with various metal compositions were prepared and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that the metal nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on the support, and their size was centered around 8 nm with a relatively narrow size distribution. The catalysts were used to catalyze hydrogenation of long-chain aliphatic esters, including methyl palmitate, methyl stearate, and methyl laurate. It was indicated that the all diatomite-supported Pd-based bimetal catalysts were active to the selective hydrogenation of long-chain esters to corresponding alcohols at 270°C, originated from the synergistic effect between the metal particles and the diatomite support. For the selective hydrogenation of methyl palmitate, Pd-Cu/diatomite with metal loading of 1% and Pd/Cu=3 displayed the highest performance, giving a 1-hexadecanol yield of 82.9% at the substrate conversion of 98.8%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The development of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a highly selective probe for the detection and quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Rudnicki-Velasquez, Paweł Błażej; Krzymiński, Karol; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Niedziałkowski, Paweł; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2017-01-01

    1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF) has been developed as a selective probe for the detection and quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide in samples containing different reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS). DPBF is a fluorescent probe which, for almost 20 years, was believed to react in a highly specific manner toward some reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen and hydroxy, alkyloxy or alkylperoxy radicals. Under the action of these individuals DPBF has been rapidly transformed to 1,2-dibenzoylbenzene (DBB). In order to check if DPBF can act as a unique indicator of the total amount of different RNOS, as well as oxidative stress caused by an overproduction of these individuals, a series of experiments was carried out, in which DPBF reacted with peroxynitrite anion, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorite anion, and anions commonly present under biological conditions, namely nitrite and nitrate. In all cases, except for hydrogen peroxide, the product of the reaction is DBB. Only under the action of H 2 O 2 9-hydroxyanthracen-10(9H)-one (oxanthrone) is formed. This product has been identified with the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). A linear relationship was found between a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of DPBF and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of concentrations of 0.196-3.941 mM. DPBF responds to hydrogen peroxide in a very specific way with the limits of detection and quantitation of 88 and 122.8 μM, respectively. The kinetics of the reaction between DBBF and H 2 O 2 was also studied.

  20. Development of nickel membranes deposited on ceramic materials by electroless plating: studies of the hydrogen perm-selectivity properties at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, J.

    2008-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to synthesize nickel based membranes by electroless plating on materials such as alumina-α, alumina-γ and zirconia with various textures and to determine their hydrogen perm-selectivity at high temperatures. The synthesis of metal films of high purity (≥ 99% mass Ni) resulting from the choice of hydrazine with its dual role of reducing and complexing agent has revealed that the diameter of pores on the surface support has an impact on the quality of metal adherence. The various contributions of hydrogen transport through these composite membranes at low temperatures (Knudsen and surface diffusion) and at high temperatures (Knudsen and activated diffusion) was established. At its implementation in a membrane reactor (reaction of propane dehydrogenation), the layer of nickel showed a very good resistance to coking. (author)

  1. GUEST SERVICES QUALITY ASSESMENT IN TOURISM, USING AN ATTRIBUTES SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA LUMINITA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is considered that a weakness of the Romanian tourism offer is the quality of guest services. In this paper we established as an objective to examine in detail the importance given by the consumers to the components of guest service quality and their perceived performance, based on the three pillars of service quality: the material base (equipments, staff training and staff behavior. The emphasis is on the investigation regarding staff training and behaviour, taking into account the multiple attributes SERVQUAL scale. On the basis of this work lies a survey done in March-April 2010 on the population of Oradea, on a sample of 1060 people. Results confirm the importance granted to staff in ensuring quality of tourism services and their perceived relatively weak performance.

  2. Usability of Security Management:Defining the Permissions of Guests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew; Stajano, Frank

    Within the scenario of a Smart Home, we discuss the issues involved in allowing limited interaction with the environment for unidentified principals, or guests. The challenges include identifying and authenticating guests on one hand and delegating authorization to them on the other. While the technical mechanisms for doing so in generic distributed systems have been around for decades, existing solutions are in general not applicable to the smart home because they are too complex to manage. We focus on providing both security and usability; we therefore seek simple and easy to understand approaches that can be used by a normal computer-illiterate home owner, not just by a trained system administrator. This position paper describes ongoing research and does not claim to have all the answers.

  3. Computational Calorimetry: High-Precision Calculation of Host–Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present a strategy for carrying out high-precision calculations of binding free energy and binding enthalpy values from molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. The approach is used to calculate the thermodynamic profiles for binding of nine small molecule guests to either the cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) or β-cyclodextrin (βCD) host. For these systems, calculations using commodity hardware can yield binding free energy and binding enthalpy values with a precision of ∼0.5 kcal/mol (95% CI) in a matter of days. Crucially, the self-consistency of the approach is established by calculating the binding enthalpy directly, via end point potential energy calculations, and indirectly, via the temperature dependence of the binding free energy, i.e., by the van’t Hoff equation. Excellent agreement between the direct and van’t Hoff methods is demonstrated for both host–guest systems and an ion-pair model system for which particularly well-converged results are attainable. Additionally, we find that hydrogen mass repartitioning allows marked acceleration of the calculations with no discernible cost in precision or accuracy. Finally, we provide guidance for accurately assessing numerical uncertainty of the results in settings where complex correlations in the time series can pose challenges to statistical analysis. The routine nature and high precision of these binding calculations opens the possibility of including measured binding thermodynamics as target data in force field optimization so that simulations may be used to reliably interpret experimental data and guide molecular design. PMID:26523125

  4. Ni–Sn-Supported ZrO2 Catalysts Modified by Indium for Selective CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol

    KAUST Repository

    Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa; Samal, Akshaya Kumar; Enakonda, Linga Reddy; Harb, Moussab; Gevers, Lieven; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Saih, Youssef; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    Ni and NiSn supported on zirconia (ZrO2) and on indium (In)-incorporated zirconia (InZrO2) catalysts were prepared by a wet chemical reduction route and tested for hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol in a fixed-bed isothermal flow reactor at 250 °C

  5. Highly Selective Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to γ-Valerolactone Over Ru/ZrO2 Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filiz, B.C.; Gnanakumar, E.S.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Gengler, R.; Rudolf, P.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    We studied the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid over zirconia supported ruthenium catalysts. Four different Ru/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by different pre-treatments and using different zirconium supports (ZrOx(OH)4−2x and ZrO2). Although the final compositions of the catalysts are the

  6. Highly Selective Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to gamma-Valerolactone Over Ru/ZrO2 Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filiz, Bilge Coskuner; Gnanakumar, Edwin S.; Martinez-Arias, Arturo; Gengler, Regis; Rudolf, Petra; Rothenberg, Gadi; Shiju, N. Raveendran

    We studied the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid over zirconia supported ruthenium catalysts. Four different Ru/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by different pre-treatments and using different zirconium supports (ZrOx(OH)(4-2x) and ZrO2). Although the final compositions of the catalysts are the

  7. Journalism Education 2016 Vol 5(2): Guest Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler-Watt, Karen

    2016-01-01

    “It’s the story that matters! Teaching journalism’s storytellers” Special Edition of Journalism Education Guest Editor: Karen Fowler-Watt, Bournemouth University, UK. Storytelling is the journalist’s craft skill. Shaped by the tenets of objectivity and accuracy, the news narrative informs the debate and brings us the human stories. If journalism is a craft, then the story is the journalist’s work of art. In a rapidly changing landscape of technological revolution, shifting business models and...

  8. Complaint Speech Act of Hotel and Restaurant Guests

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawan, I Nengah; Putra Yadnya, Ida Bagus; Puspani, Ida Ayu Made

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at analyzing how complaint speech act of hotel and restaurant guests are performed and responded based on categories of speech acts and how they are performed considering the aspects of acts: locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary. The method and technique of collecting data in this study is documentation method in which the data were collected using the technique of note taking and were qualitatively analyzed. The findings show that complaint of hotel and restaura...

  9. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Snježana Gagić; Dragan Tešanović; Ana Jovičić

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and inc...

  10. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  11. Multifunctional guest-host particles engineered by reversal nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Uh-Myong; Kaban, Burhan; Tomita, Andreea; Krekić, Kristijan; Klintuch, Dieter; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Ehresmann, Arno; Holzinger, Dennis; Hillmer, Hartmut

    2018-03-01

    Particulate polymeric microfibers with incorporated europium(III)oxide (Eu2O3) nanoparticles were introduced as a magneto-photoluminescent multifunctional material fabricated via reversal nanoimprint lithography. To specifically address the volume properties of these guest-host particles, the guest, Eu2O3, was milled down to an average particle size of 350 nm in diameter and mixed with the host-polymer, AMONIL®, before in situ hardening in the imprint stamp. The variation of the fabrication process parameters, i.e. delay time, spin coating speed, as well as the concentration of Eu2O3 nanoparticles was proven to have a significant impact on both the structure quality and the stamp release of the microfibers with respect to the formation of a thinner residual layer. Structural characterization performed by SEM revealed optimum fabrication process parameters for a homogeneous spatial distribution of Eu2O3 nanoparticles within the microfibers while simultaneously avoiding the formation of undesired agglomerates. The magneto-photoluminescent properties of Eu2O3 nanoparticles, i.e. a red emission at 613 nm and a paramagnetic response, were found to be superimposed to the optic and the diamagnetic behaviors of AMONIL®. The results imply that guest-host interdependence of these properties can be excluded and that the suggested technique enables for specific tailoring of particulate multifunctional materials with focus on their volume properties.

  12. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  13. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported PdIr bimetal catalyst for selective hydrogenation, and the significant promotional effect of Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Huang, Chao; Yang, Fan [The Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Yang, Xu [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Du, Li [The Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Liao, Shijun, E-mail: chsjliao@scut.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: A mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) supported bimetal catalyst, PdIr/MSN, was prepared by a facile impregnation and hydrogen reduction method. The strong promotional effect of Ir was observed and thoroughly investigated. At the optimal molar ratio of Ir to Pd (N{sub Ir}/N{sub Pd} = 0.1), the activity of PdIr{sub 0.1}/MSN was up to eight times and 28 times higher than that of monometallic Pd/MSN and Ir/MSN, respectively. The catalysts were characterized comprehensively by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and hydrogen temperature programmed reduction, which revealed that the promotional effect of Ir may be due to the enhanced dispersion of active components on the MSN, and to the intensified Pd–Ir electronic interaction caused by the addition of Ir. - Highlights: • Mesoporous nanoparticles were synthesized and used as support for metal catalyst. • PdIr bimetallic catalyst exhibited significantly improved hydrogenation activity. • The strong promotion of Ir was recognized firstly and investigated intensively. • PdIr exhibits 18 times higher activity than Pd to the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. - Abstract: A mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) supported bimetal catalyst, PdIr/MSN, was prepared by a facile impregnation and hydrogen reduction method. The strong promotional effect of Ir was observed and thoroughly investigated. At the optimal molar ratio of Ir to Pd (N{sub Ir}/N{sub Pd} = 0.1), the activity of PdIr{sub 0.1}/MSN was up to eight times and 28 times higher than that of monometallic Pd/MSN and Ir/MSN, respectively. The catalysts were characterized comprehensively by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and hydrogen temperature programmed reduction, which revealed that the promotional effect of Ir may be due to the enhanced dispersion of active components on the MSN, and to the intensified Pd–Ir electronic interaction

  14. Guest editor's introduction: Energy homeostasis in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Energy homeostasis is achieved through neuroendocrine and metabolic control of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Traditionally, these controls have been studied in an unrealistic and narrow context. The appetite for food, for example, is most often assumed to be independent of other motivations, such as sexual desire, fearfulness, and competition. Furthermore, our understanding of all aspects of energy homeostasis is based on studying males of only a few species. The baseline control subjects are most often housed in enclosed spaces, with continuous, unlimited access to food. In the last century, this approach has generated useful information, but all the while, the global prevalence of obesity has increased and remains at unprecedented levels (Ogden et al., 2013, 2014). It is likely, however, that the mechanisms that control ingestive behavior were molded by evolutionary forces, and that few, if any vertebrate species evolved in the presence of a limitless food supply, in an enclosed 0.5 × 1 ft space, and exposed to a constant ambient temperature of 22+2 °C. This special issue of Hormones and Behavior therefore contains 9 review articles and 7 data articles that consider energy homeostasis within the context of other motivations and physiological processes, such as early development, sexual differentiation, sexual motivation, reproduction, seasonality, hibernation, and migration. Each article is focused on a different species or on a set of species, and most vertebrate classes are represented. Energy homeostasis is viewed in the context of the selection pressures that simultaneously molded multiple aspects of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. This approach yields surprising conclusions regarding the function of those traits and their underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Tunable and selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol and cyclopentanone over Pt supported on biomass-derived porous heteroatom doped carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuyun; Zhang, Bo; Fei, Benhua; Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Junyi; Mu, Xindong

    2017-09-21

    The search for and exploitation of efficient catalytic systems for selective conversion of furfural into various high value-added chemicals remains a huge challenge for green synthesis in the chemical industry. Here, novel Pt nanoparticles supported on bamboo shoot-derived porous heteroatom doped carbon materials were designed as highly active catalysts for controlled hydrogenation of furfural in aqueous media. The porous heteroatom doped carbon supported Pt catalysts were endowed with a large surface area with a hierarchical porous structure, a high content of nitrogen and oxygen functionalities, a high dispersion of the Pt nanoparticles, good water dispersibility and reaction stability. Benefiting from these features, the novel Pt catalysts displayed a high activity and controlled tunable selectivity for furfural hydrogenation to produce furfuryl alcohol and cyclopentanone in water. The product selectivity could be easily modulated by controlling the carbonization temperature of the porous heteroatom doped carbon support and the reaction conditions (temperature and H 2 pressure). Under mild conditions (100 °C, 1 MPa H 2 ), furfuryl alcohol was obtained in water with complete conversion of the furfural and an impressive furfuryl alcohol selectivity of >99% in the presence of Pt/NC-BS-500. A higher reaction temperature, in water, favored rearrangement of the furfural (FFA) with Pt/NC-BS-800 as the catalyst, which resulted in a high cyclopentanone yield of >76% at 150 °C and 3 MPa H 2 . The surface properties and pore structure of the heteroatom doped carbon support, adjusted using the carbonization temperature, might determine the interactions between the Pt nanoparticles, carbon support and catalytic reactants in water, which in turn could have led to a good selectivity control. The effect of different reaction temperatures and reaction times on the product selectivity was also explored. Combined with exploration of the distribution of the reaction products, a

  16. Managing Guest as an Asset: a Conceptual Review in the Context of Accommodation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Suhartanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of a customer as an asset of business in the accommodation industry. The purpose of this article is to examine the value of guests as a firm asset and to propose a model for managing guests as an asset in the context of accommodation services. A guest is considered an asset due to its role in providing revenue to the accommodation firm. Because of this role, the accommodation guest needs to be managed appropriately. This article argues that guest service evaluation (i.e. service quality, perceived value, and guest satisfaction and service loyalty are important factors in the development of guest lifetime value. The proposed model of managing guests as an asset consists of marketing instruments, service evaluation, guest loyalty, and financial outcomes provides a comprehensive guide on how accommodation firms can manage the lifetime value of their guests. Finally, as there are limited studies examining this issue, future research should test the proposed model.

  17. Simultaneous removal of selected oxidized contaminants in groundwater using a continuously stirred hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Siqing; Liang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyin; Shen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory trial was conducted for evaluating the capability of a continuously stirred hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor to simultaneously reduce nitrate (NO(3-)-N), sulfate (SO4(2-)), bromate (BrO3-), hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and parachloronitrobenzene (p-CNB). The reactor contained two bundles of hollow fiber membranes functioning as an autotrophic biofilm carrier and hydrogen pipe as well. On the condition that hydrogen was supplied as electron donor and diffused into water through membrane pores, autohydrogenotrophic bacteria were capable of reducing contaminants to forms with lower toxicity. Reduction occurred within 1 day and removal fluxes for NO(3-)-N, SO4(2-), BrO3-, Cr(VI), and p-CNB reached 0.641, 2.396, 0.008, 0.016 and 0.031 g/(day x m2), respectively after 112 days of continuous operation. Except for the fact that sulfate was 37% removed under high surface loading, the other four contaminants were reduced by over 95%. The removal flux comparison between phases varying in surface loading and H2 pressure showed that decreasing surface loading or increasing H2 pressure would promote removal flux. Competition for electrons occurred among the five contaminants. Electron-equivalent flux analysis showed that the amount of utilized hydrogen was mainly controlled by NO(3-)-N and SO4(2-) reduction, which accounted for over 99% of the electron flux altogether. It also indicated the electron acceptor order, showing that nitrate was the most prior electron acceptor while suIfate was the second of the five contaminants.

  18. Smart protein biogate as a mediator to regulate competitive host-guest interaction for sensitive ratiometric electrochemical assay of prion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Jiawan; Xiong, Erhu; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jinhua

    2015-11-01

    A novel competitive host-guest strategy regulated by protein biogate was developed for sensitive and selective analysis of prion protein. The methylene blue (MB)-tagged prion aptamer (MB-Apt) was introduced to the multiwalled carbon nanotubes-β-cyclodextrins (MWCNTs-β-CD) composites-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode through the host-guest interaction between β-CD and MB. In the absence of prion, MB-Apt could be displaced by ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FCA) due to its stronger binding affinity to β-CD, resulting in a large oxidation peak of FCA. However, in the presence of prion, the specific prion-aptamer interaction drove the formation of protein biogate to seal the cavity of β-CD, which hindered the guest displacement of MB by FCA and resulted in the oxidation peak current of MB (IMB) increased and that of FCA (IFCA) decreased. The developed aptasensor showed good response towards the target (prion protein) with a low detection limit of 160 fM. By changing the specific aptamers, this strategy could be easily extended to detect other proteins, showing promising potential for extensive applications in bioanalysis.

  19. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142?m2 g?1 were demonstrated to...

  20. A novel peptide-based fluorescence chemosensor for selective imaging of hydrogen sulfide both in living cells and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Jiang; Di, Cuixia; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Hong; Su, Pingru; Xu, Cong; Zhou, Panpan; Ge, Yushu; Liu, Dan; Liu, Weisheng; Tang, Yu

    2017-06-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) plays an important role as a signaling compound (gasotransmitter) in living systems. However, the development of an efficient imaging chemosensor of H 2 S in live animals is a challenging field for chemists. Herein, a novel peptide-based fluorescence chemosensor L-Cu was designed and synthesized on the basis of the copper chelating with the peptide ligand (FITC-Ahx-Ser-Pro-Gly-His-NH 2 , L), and its H 2 S sensing ability has been evaluated both in living cells and zebrafish. The peptide backbone and Cu 2+ -removal sensing mechanism are used to deliver rapid response time, high sensitivity, and good biocompatibility. After a fast fluorescence quench by Cu 2+ coordinated with L, the fluorescence of L is recovered by adding S 2- to form insoluble copper sulfide in aqueous solution with a detection limit for hydrogen sulfide measured to be 31nM. Furthermore, the fluorescence chemosensor L-Cu showed excellent cell permeation and low biotoxicity to realize the intracellular biosensing, L-Cu has also been applied to image hydrogen sulfide in live zebrafish larvae. We expect that this peptide-based fluorescence chemosensor L-Cu can be used to study H 2 S-related chemical biology in physiological and pathological events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Separation of radionuclides using host-guest materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, V.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the development of complex procedure with using commercially available sorbents to separate anthropogenic actinides 237 Np, 241 Am, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu and their determination in the liquid radioactive wastes by using alpha spectrometry. Abilities of using commercially available sorbent AnaLig(R)Pu-02 gel from IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. were tested, this product belongs to host-guest materials based on molecular recognition technology. This material is capable of selectively capturing actinides in oxidation state IV. To adjust the oxidation state of 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu was used NaNO 2 . Pu(IV) forms in the medium of nitric acid complexes, [Np(NO 3 ) 6 ] - , which are captured on the column. For the second monitored radionuclide, neptunium is typical valence V, Np(V) in the concentrated nitric acid produces strong complexes, [Np(NO 3 ) 6 ] - , which are capable of the sorption on the column of AnaLig(R)Pu-02 gel. The most common state of americium in aqueous solutions is III. Whereas in this oxidation state, americium do not form complexes in 8 mol·dm -3 nitric acid is the result of the flow-through. On the base of experimental obtained results, solution of 0.1 mol·dm -3 NH 4 I in 9 mol·dm -3 HCl was selected for elution of plutonium. Neptunium was eluted from the column using 9 mol·dm -3 of HCl with addition of 0.5 cm 3 TiCl 3 . Optimizing conditions for the separation procedure was performed by using model solution of radioactive waste which was prepared according to the chemical composition of radioactive concentrate from NPP Mochovce and NPP Bohunice. The effect of the concentration of Fe 3+ , the effect of the concentration of the HCl, the effect of the concentration of the solution of NH 4 I and the effect of the volume of this solution to the yields of 238 Pu were studied. And also was studied the effect of 9 mol·dm -3 of HCl and the effect of volume of 15 % TiCl 3 to the yields of 237 Np. Sorbent DGA(R) Resin from

  2. Sulfate Recognition by Persistent Crystalline Capsules with Rigidified Hydrogen Bonding Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custelcean, Radu; Remy, Priscilla; Jiang, Deen; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    electivity is a fundamental property of pervasive importance in chemistry and biology as reflected in phenomena as diverse as membrane transport, catalysis, sensing, adsorption, complexation, and crystallization. Although the key principles of complementarity and preorganization governing the binding interactions underlying such phenomena were delineated long ago, truly profound selectivity has proven elusive by design in part because synthetic molecular architectures are neither maximally complementary for binding target species nor sufficiently rigid. Even if a host molecule possesses a high degree of complementarity for a guest species, it all too often can distort its structure or even rearrange its conformation altogether to accommodate competing guests. One approach taken by researchers to overcome this challenge has been to devise extremely rigid molecules that bind species within complementary cavities. Although examples have been reported to demonstrate the principle, such cases are not generally of practical utility, because of inefficient synthesis and often poor kinetics. Alternatively, flexible building blocks can be employed, but then the challenge becomes one of locking them in place. Taking a cue from natural binding agents that derive their rigidity from a network of molecular interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, we present herein an example of a crystalline, self-assembled capsule that binds sulfate by a highly complementary array of rigidified hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). Although covalent or self-assembled capsules have been previously employed as anion hosts, they typically lack the strict combination of complementarity and rigidity required for high selectivity. Furthermore, the available structural data for these systems is either restricted to a limited number of anions of similar size and shape, or varies significantly from one anion to another, which hampers the rationalization of the observed selectivity. We have been employing

  3. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  4. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Bradić; Ljiljana Kosar; Bojana Kalenjuk

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores) given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in...

  5. Driving Forces Controlling Host-Guest Recognition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Francesca; Altarsha, Muhannad; Dumarçay, Florence; Kevern, Gwendal; Barth, Danielle; Marsura, Alain; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2016-02-24

    The formation of supramolecular host-guest complexes is a very useful and widely employed tool in chemistry. However, supramolecular chemistry in non-conventional solvents such as supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ), one of the most promising sustainable solvents, is still in its infancy. In this work, we explored a successful route to the development of green processes in supercritical CO2 by combining a theoretical approach with experiments. We were able to synthesize and characterize an inclusion complex between a polar aromatic molecule (benzoic acid) and peracetylated-β-cyclodextrin, which is soluble in the supercritical medium. This finding opens the way to wide, environmental friendly, applications of scCO2 in many areas of chemistry, including supramolecular synthesis, reactivity and catalysis, micro and nano-particle formation, molecular recognition, as well as enhanced extraction processes with increased selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Rational Design of Multifunctional Gold Nanoparticles via Host-Guest Interaction for Cancer-Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Luo, Guo-Feng; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Hong, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Xin; Cheng, Yin-Jia; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-12

    A versatile gold nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanocomposite AuNP@CD-AD-DOX/RGD was constructed flexibly via host-guest interaction for targeted cancer chemotherapy. The pH-sensitive anticancer prodrug AD-Hyd-DOX and the cancer-targeted peptide AD-PEG8-GRGDS were modified on the surface of AuNP@CD simultaneously, which endowed the resultant nanocomposite with the capability to selectively eliminate cancer cells. In vitro studies indicated that the AuNP@CD-AD-DOX/RGD nanocomposite was preferentially uptaken by cancer cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Subsequently, anticancer drug DOX was released rapidly upon the intracellular trigger of the acid microenvirenment of endo/lysosomes, inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. As the ideal drug nanocarrier, the multifunctional gold nanoparticles with the active targeting and controllable intracellular release ability hold the great potential in cancer therapy.

  7. Tuning the synthesis of platinum-copper nanoparticles with a hollow core and porous shell for the selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangshuang; Yang, Nating; Wang, Shibin; Sun, Yuhan; Zhu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol.Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03894h

  8. Tweens on the Internet - communication in virtual guest books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnBritt Enochsson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available  Today digital communication is a natural part of young people’s social life. It has increased drastically during the last few years, and there are still a lot of questions about what this means, and how this new media affects communication. This study focuses on young people of 11-13, i.e.the age between children and teenagers, also called tweens. In a large study, the overall aim is to see what communication in the Internet community LunarStorm means to them in their social life. This particular paper reports on the content of the asynchronous communication in the participants’ digital guest books, which is one of the main channels for communication between the participants. A group of 15 tweens from a small village in Sweden were studied when communicating in Sweden’s largest Internet community, LunarStorm. The research method used was what is usually described as cyber ethnography. The contributions in the participants’ digital guest books are not written by the guest book owners themselves, which means that the focus is on the collective aspects of this communication, and not from a specific children’s point of view. Qualitative analyses were made of the content of 947 contributions in the participants’ guest books in order to make a statistical analysis. Most of the participants’ communication was between friends in the same geographical neighbourhood concerning how things are going, what to do, when to meet and similar things. The contributions were divided into three categories: (1 Social chat (2 Chain letters, and (3 Messages incomprehensible to outsiders. The information-category was divided into three sub-categories depending on the emotions expressed. 44% of the total messages were considered as emotionally neutral information, 39% as kind or encouraging, and also with an aim to sort things out, and 6% of the total messages contained insults and elements of anger. Among the younger users of the Internet community

  9. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  10. The hotel comment card: a motivator of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred W. Ogle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This   paper   explores   the   traditional   pen   and   paper   hotel   comment   card   (HCC   from   the  guests’  perspective  to  gain  an  insight  and  to  improve  its  effectiveness.  The  HCC  has  long  been   the  predominant  method  of  soliciting  guest  feedback.  Although  electronic  methods  of  collection  are  now  available  the  HCC  has  a  sense  of  familiarity,  has  general  acceptance,  and   is   widely   employed.   Initially,   a   literature   review   of   the   hotel   comment   card   is  provided.  Then,  the  study  explores  how  frequent  guests  categorize  HCC  attributes.  These  attributes  are  then  extended  to  include  evaluation  criteria  identified  in  the  literature  and  desired  by  hotel  managers.    The  extended  evaluation  criterion  is  then  used  to  explore  how  frequent  hotel  guests  believe  that  future  HCCs  may  motivate  guests  to  provide  feedback   and   assist   in   the   co-­creation   of   value.   The   overall   finding   is   that   the   HCCs   design   and  execution  can  be  improved.

  11. Investigation of the host-guest complexation between 4-sulfocalix[4]arene and nedaplatin for potential use in drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Sherif Ashraf; Ponte, Fortuna; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K.; Russo, Nino; Sicilia, Emilia; Shoeib, Tamer

    2018-03-01

    Macromolecules including macrocyclic species have been reported to have the potential to encapsulate biologically active compounds such as drugs through host-guest complexation to increase their solubility, stability and bioavailability. In this paper the first experimental and theoretical investigation of the complexation between nedaplatin, a second generation antineoplastic drug, and p-4-sulfocalix[4]arene, a macromolecule possessing a bipolar amphiphilic structure with good biocompatibility and relatively low haemolytic toxicity for potential use as a drug delivery system is presented. Data from 1H NMR, UV, Job's plot analysis, HPLC and DFT calculations are detailed and suggest the formation of a 1:1 complex. The stability constant of the complex was experimentally estimated to be 3.6 × 104 M- 1 and 2.1 × 104 M- 1 which correspond to values of - 6.2 and - 5.9 kcal mol- 1, respectively for the free energy of complexation while the interaction free energy is calculated to be - 4.9 kcal mol- 1. The formed species is shown to be stabilised in solution through hydrogen bonding between the host and the guest which may allow for this strategy to be effective for potential use in drug delivery.

  12. A CATALYST, A PROCESS FOR SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ACETYLENE TO ETHYLENE AND A METHOD FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF THE CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A catalyst comprising a mixture of metal A selected from the group of Fe, Co and Ni and metal B selected from the group of Zn and Ga, and a support material, wherein the two metals are present in an intermetallic composition; A method for the manufacture of the catalyst; and the use of above...

  13. Fine-Tuned Intrinsically Ultramicroporous Polymers Redefine the Permeability/Selectivity Upper Bounds of Membrane-Based Air and Hydrogen Separations

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Raja

    2015-08-20

    Intrinsically ultramicroporous (<7 Å) polymers represent a new paradigm in materials development for membrane-based gas separation. In particular, they demonstrate that uniting intrachain “rigidity”, the traditional design metric of highly permeable polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs), with gas-sieving ultramicroporosity yields high-performance gas separation membranes. Highly ultramicroporous PIMs have redefined the state-of-the-art in large-scale air (e.g., O2/N2) and hydrogen recovery (e.g., H2/N2, H2/CH4) applications with unprecedented molecular sieving gas transport properties. Accordingly, presented herein are new 2015 permeability/selectivity “upper bounds” for large-scale commercial membrane-based air and hydrogen applications that accommodate the substantial performance enhancements of recent PIMs over preceding polymers. A subtle balance between intrachain rigidity and interchain spacing has been achieved in the amorphous microstructures of PIMs, fine-tuned using unique bridged-bicyclic building blocks (i.e., triptycene, ethanoanthracene and Tröger’s base) in both ladder and semiladder (e.g., polyimide) structures.

  14. Binding of chemical warfare agent simulants as guests in a coordination cage: contributions to binding and a fluorescence-based response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christopher G P; Piper, Jerico R; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-07

    Cubic coordination cages act as competent hosts for several alkyl phosphonates used as chemical warfare agent simulants; a range of cage/guest structures have been determined, contributions to guest binding analysed, and a fluorescent response to guest binding demonstrated.

  15. A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach to Promote Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Guo, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement has become a big challenge in higher education, especially when distance learning is getting more and more popular. Guest lecturing is a popular method to bring relevance to the classroom and engage in students. Ground on the theory of constructivism, this paper introduces a student-centered guest lecturing that allows students…

  16. PPII propensity of multiple-guest amino acids in a proline-rich environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2011-07-07

    There has been considerable debate about the intrinsic PPII propensity of amino acid residues in denatured polypeptides. Experimentally, this scale is based on the behavior of guest amino acid residues placed in the middle of proline-based hosts. We have used classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with replica-exchange methods to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the conformational equilibria of proline-based host oligopeptides with multiple guest amino acids including alanine, glutamine, valine, and asparagine. The tracked structural characteristics include the secondary structural motifs based on the Ramachandran angles and the cis/trans isomerization of the prolyl bonds. In agreement with our recent study of single amino acid guests, we did not observe an intrinsic PPII propensity in any of the guest amino acids in a multiple-guest setting. Instead, the experimental results can be explained in terms of (i) the steric restrictions imposed on the C-terminal guest amino acid that is immediately followed by a proline residue and (ii) an increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds due to the presence of guest residues. In terms of the latter, we found that the more guests added to the system, the larger the increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds, which results in an effective increase in the PPII content of the peptide.

  17. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  18. Flow injection determination of choline in milk hydrolysates by an immobilized enzyme reactor coupled to a selective hydrogen peroxide amperometric sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Sandra [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Quinto, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agroambientali, Chimica e Difesa Vegetale, Universita degli Studi di Foggia, Via Napoli 25, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palmisano, Francesco [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)]. E-mail: palmisano@chimica.uniba.it

    2007-07-02

    A choline oxidase (ChO) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) prepared by glutaraldehyde coupling of the enzyme on aminopropyl modified controlled pore glass beads is described. The ChO-IMER was coupled, in a flow injection configuration system, to an interference free hydrogen peroxide amperometric sensor based on a Pt surface modified by an overoxidized polypyrrole film. The resulting analytical device responds selectively to choline and displays a sensitivity of 46.9 {+-} 0.2 {mu}C mM{sup -1} and a limit of detection, calculated at a signal-to-noise ratio equal to 3, of 7 {mu}M. Sensitivity remains constant for about 20 days and then starts to slowly deteriorate and after 2 months a 70% of the initial sensitivity was still retained. The application to choline determination in milk hydrolysates is demonstrated. Short- and long-term drift observed in the analytical response can be corrected by a bracketing technique.

  19. Tuning the synthesis of platinum-copper nanoparticles with a hollow core and porous shell for the selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangshuang; Yang, Nating; Wang, Shibin; Sun, Yuhan; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-07

    Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol.

  20. Effects of selected electron transport chain inhibitors on 24-h hydrogen production by Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Elizabeth H; Chaplen, Frank W R; Ely, Roger L

    2011-02-01

    One factor limiting biosolar hydrogen (H(2)) production from cyanobacteria is electron availability to the hydrogenase enzyme. In order to optimize 24-h H(2) production this study used Response Surface Methodology and Q2, an optimization algorithm, to investigate the effects of five inhibitors of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Over 3 days of diurnal light/dark cycling, with the optimized combination of 9.4 mM KCN (3.1 μmol 10(10) cells(-1)) and 1.5 mM malonate (0.5 μmol 10(10) cells(-1)) the H(2) production was 30-fold higher, in EHB-1 media previously optimized for nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and carbon (C) concentrations (Burrows et al., 2008). In addition, glycogen concentration was measured over 24 h with two light/dark cycling regimes in both standard BG-11 and EHB-1 media. The results suggest that electron flow as well as glycogen accumulation should be optimized in systems engineered for maximal H(2) output. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Controlling the Host-Guest Interaction Mode through a Redox Stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Alévêque, Olivier; Levillain, Eric; Allain, Magali; Aragó, Juan; Ortí, Enrique; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2017-12-18

    A proof-of-concept related to the redox-control of the binding/releasing process in a host-guest system is achieved by designing a neutral and robust Pt-based redox-active metallacage involving two extended-tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligands. When neutral, the cage is able to bind a planar polyaromatic guest (coronene). Remarkably, the chemical or electrochemical oxidation of the host-guest complex leads to the reversible expulsion of the guest outside the cavity, which is assigned to a drastic change of the host-guest interaction mode, illustrating the key role of counteranions along the exchange process. The reversible process is supported by various experimental data ( 1 H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-FTICR, and spectroelectrochemistry) as well as by in-depth theoretical calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A Pyrene- and Phosphonate-Containing Fluorescent Probe as Guest Molecule in a Host Polymer Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Marchand-Brynaert

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available New host-guest materials have been prepared by incorporation of a home-made organic probe displaying a pyrene motif and a phosphonate function into a regular amphiphilic copolymer. Using powder X-Ray diffraction, photoluminescence and FT-IR spectroscopy, we have been able to study the non-covalent interactions between the host matrix and the guest molecule in the solid state. Interestingly, we have shown that the matrix directs the guest spatial localization and alters its properties. Thanks to the comparison of pyrene vs. N-pyrenylmaleimide derivatives, the influence of the chemical nature of the guest molecules on the non-covalent interactions with the host have been studied. In addition, using polyethylene glycol as a reference host, we have been able to evidence a true matrix effect within our new insertion materials. The phosphonated guest molecule appears to be a novel probe targeting the hydrophilic domain of the host copolymer.

  3. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bohner

    Full Text Available Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204, descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room" and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous. Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  4. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  5. A highly sensitive hydrogen sensor with gas selectivity using a PMMA membrane-coated Pd nanoparticle/single-layer graphene hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Juree; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Pyo, Soonjae; Kim, Jongbaeg; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-02-18

    A polymer membrane-coated palladium (Pd) nanoparticle (NP)/single-layer graphene (SLG) hybrid sensor was fabricated for highly sensitive hydrogen gas (H2) sensing with gas selectivity. Pd NPs were deposited on SLG via the galvanic displacement reaction between graphene-buffered copper (Cu) and Pd ion. During the galvanic displacement reaction, graphene was used as a buffer layer, which transports electrons from Cu for Pd to nucleate on the SLG surface. The deposited Pd NPs on the SLG surface were well-distributed with high uniformity and low defects. The Pd NP/SLG hybrid was then coated with polymer membrane layer for the selective filtration of H2. Because of the selective H2 filtration effect of the polymer membrane layer, the sensor had no responses to methane, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen dioxide gas. On the contrary, the PMMA/Pd NP/SLG hybrid sensor exhibited a good response to exposure to 2% H2: on average, 66.37% response within 1.81 min and recovery within 5.52 min. In addition, reliable and repeatable sensing behaviors were obtained when the sensor was exposed to different H2 concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 2%.

  6. A fluorogenic molecular nanoprobe with an engineered internal environment for sensitive and selective detection of biological hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung; Seo, Young Hun; Kim, Youngsun; Heo, Jeongyun; Jang, Woo-Dong; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sehoon

    2017-02-14

    A nanoreactor approach based on the amphiphilic assembly of various molecules offers a chance to finely engineer the internal reaction medium to enable highly selective and sensitive detection of H 2 S in biological media, being useful for microscopic imaging of cellular processes and in vitro diagnostics with blood samples.

  7. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  8. STRATEGIC MARKETING ALTERNATIVES AT AGRO-TOURISM GUEST HOUSE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta-Andreea ANDREIANA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, tourists started to turn away from the mass tourism and consider the alternative one. Therefore, various forms of tourism were born, among which the rural tourism, to be regarded from two perspectives: it contributes to local and regional development and brings benefits to tourism by creating a new, higher quality holiday concept. This requires the participation of local authorities in the preparing of area development strategies, involving the inhabitants and local traders. By following up the dramatic condition of the Romanian tourism, the insufficient development of the rural tourism and the low involvement degree of the local authorities, we proposed an assessment and recommended strategic marketing alternatives for the improvement of the current condition of the agro tourism guest houses.

  9. Understanding hospitality house guests' needs: a brief case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mary Katherine Waibel

    2011-08-01

    A.E. Kazak's (2006) call to develop theory-driven and empirically supported programs aimed at strengthening the competencies of families affected by pediatric illness applies to both medical and nonmedical facilities and institutions that care for pediatric patients and their loved ones. M.K.W. Duncan and A. Blugis (in press, this issue) note that despite the intuitive and practical nature of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, no theory translates into an infallible understanding of any individual guest's needs or a program of universally applied best practice standards for meeting those needs. Using Maslow's theory as a framework, this brief report describes the complexity and fluidity of one mother's needs during her stay at a hospitality house following the birth of her premature twin babies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Communication of Slovenian Tourism Workers with Italian guests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Gomzi Praprotnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For an Italian guest, getting to know Slovenia as a tourist destination is inevitably connected with getting to know the Slovenian cuisine. Italians are a nation eagerly developing the culture of food, and therefore the gastronomic offer in a certain environment and at a certain time is for them often the basis for a comprehensive perception of the said destination. A good offer, a suitable marketing and an attractive presentation of typical Slovenian dishes play an important role in getting to know natural and cultural heritage as they can widen the knowledge about people and places, eliminate prejudice and strengthen intercultural cooperation. Kind and professional staff, knowledge of the language, civilisation, cultural habits, and differences may be the factors contributing to the assertion of local products and services, and to educating the users of restaurant and tourism services.

  11. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  12. Host–Guest Chirality Interplay: A Mutually Induced Formation of a Chiral ZMOF and Its Double-Helix Polymer Guests

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaolong

    2016-01-12

    A novel homochiral zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF), [(Cu4I4) (dabco)2]·[Cu2(bbimb)]·3DMF (JLU-Liu23, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-octane, H2bbimb =1,3-bis(2-benzimidazol)benzene, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), has been successfully constructed to host unprecedented DNA-like [Cu2(bbimb)]n polymers with double-helicity. The host-guest chirality interplay permitted the induced formation of an unusual gyroid MOF with homochirality and helical channels in the framework for the first time, JLU-Liu23. Importantly, the enantiomeric pairs (23P, 23M) can be promoted and isolated in the presence of appropriate chiral inducing agents, affording enantioselective separation of chiral molecules as well as small gas molecules. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  13. High Sensitive and Selective Sensing of Hydrogen Peroxide Released from Pheochromocytoma Cells Based on Pt-Au Bimetallic Nanoparticles Electrodeposited on Reduced Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxia Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high sensitive and selective hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 sensor was successfully constructed with Pt-Au bimetallic nanoparticles (Pt-Au NPs/reduced graphene sheets (rGSs hybrid films. Various molar ratios of Au to Pt and different electrodeposition conditions were evaluated to control the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Pt-Au bimetallic nanoparticles. Upon optimal conditions, wide linear ranges from 1 µM to 1.78 mM and 1.78 mM to 16.8 mM were obtained, with a detection limit as low as 0.31 µM. Besides, due to the synergetic effects of the bimetallic NPs and rGSs, the amperometric H2O2 sensor could operate at a low potential of 0 V. Under this potential, not only common anodic interferences induced from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine, but also the cathodic interference induced from endogenous O2 could be effectively avoided. Furthermore, with rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC 12 as model, the proposed sensor had been successfully used in the detection of H2O2 released from the cancer cells. This method with wide linear ranges and excellent selectivity can provide a promising alternative for H2O2 monitoring in vivo in the fields of physiology, pathology and diagnosis.

  14. The energy dependence of selective hydrogen atom abstraction by H(D) atoms in the photolysis of neopentane - ethane mixtures at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Fueki, K.

    1980-01-01

    Selective hydrogen - atom - abstraction reaction by H or D atom has been studied in a neo C 5 H 12 - C 2 H 6 (less than 1 mol %) mixture at 77 K by ESR spectroscopy. The H (or D) atom produced by the photolysis of HI (or DI) reacts with neo - C 2 H 12 and C 2 H 6 to form neo - C 5 H 11 and C 2 H 5 radicals. In order to obtain H atoms with different kinetic energies, the photolysis was performed with different lights of 313, 254 and 229 nm. The selective formation of the C 2 H 5 radical by the reaction of the H (or D) atom with C 2 H 6 becomes more effective with the decrease in the energy of the H (or D) atom. The formation of the neo - C 5 H 11 radical by the reaction of the H (or D) atom with neo - C 2 H 12 becomes more effective with the increase in the energy of the H (or D) atom. (A.R.H.) [pt

  15. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-01

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu2) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H2O/DMSO (4:1 v/v, 1.0 mmol L- 1 HEPES buffer solution pH 7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO42 - determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46 μmol L- 1, respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu2 complex to detect HPO42 - in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO42 - over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P2O5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu2 + and HPO42 - as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output.

  16. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-05

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu 2 ) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H 2 O/DMSO (4:1v/v, 1.0mmolL -1 HEPES buffer solution pH7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO 4 2- determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3 lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46μmolL -1 , respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu 2 complex to detect HPO 4 2- in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO 4 2- over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P 2 O 5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu 2+ and HPO 4 2- as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, B.; Wang, L. L.; Du, L.; Pan, Y.; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Du, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, B.

    2016-05-11

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Perception of service quality in agrotourism accommodations: Impact on guest loyalty and re-visit intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryssoula Chatzigeorgiou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development of a conceptual model that demonstrates the dynamic nature of the relationship between service quality and guest satisfaction in the agrotourism accommodation sector, based on theories derived from social psychology and previous research in the marketing, management, and services literature. The model was tested using sample data from guests of four different agrotourism firms, and was modified because of empirical results. The final model improves understanding of the relationship between service quality and guest satisfaction because these constructs were examined from the process perspective of an agrotourism accommodation experience; it portrays service quality and satisfaction in the context of a complete system.

  20. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bradić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in business tourism segment.

  1. Get Your Hotel Operations Team Onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Doug

    2018-01-01

    As hospitality industry trainers know, using symbols and models can help trainees grasp abstract concepts and make seemingly-complex paradigms easy to understand. Seems like is a good time for the hotel industry to update its model, so let’s get your team onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service. When you think about it, a tricycle is a perfect model for a positive guest experience. For one, it has three wheels, just like the three components of a memorable guest stay. The back wheels repres...

  2. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pez, Guido Peter [Allentown, PA; Cooper, Alan Charles [Macungie, PA; Scott, Aaron Raymond [Allentown, PA

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  3. Resistance of tumor cells to hydrogen peroxide as a factor of selection of highly metastatic cell variants in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichman, G.I.; Vendrov, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the theory that tumor cells which catabolize H 2 O 2 more actively may possibly have selected advantages in vivo (of different origin). The authors tested the sensitivity to H 2 O 2 of parental cells of strain STHE (which did not progress in vivo) and 17 of its daughter variants isolated from lung tissue of experimental animals at different stages of formation of metastases (before and after their formation) and differing in metastatic activity. Intact cells were placed into test tube No. 6 of each series. After 30 min of exposure at 20 0 C, cells treated with H 2 O 2 and intact cells were washed out by centrifugation, and resuspended in nutritive medium containing 10% bovine serum and 3 H-thymidine, and each sample was diffused at a volume of 2.0 ml of cell suspension in each of three scintillation vials. The proliferative pool of cells in each sample was determined according to incorporation (for 22 h at 37 0 C) of 3 H-thymidine into cell nuclei. Data concerning incorporation of 3 H-thymidine was expressed for each sample of cells in percentages in relation to corresponding intact control (incorporation of label in a control culture of intact cells was taken as 100%). Each cell variant was investigated repeatedly in two-three more experiments

  4. Dual Mechanism of an Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT)-FRET-Based Fluorescent Probe for the Selective Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Xu, Xiaoyi; Qiao, Dan; Yin, Zheng; Shang, Luqing

    2017-12-14

    A dual-mechanism intramolecular charge transfer (ICT)-FRET fluorescent probe for the selective detection of H 2 O 2 in living cells has been designed and synthesized. This probe used a coumarin-naphthalimide hybrid as the FRET platform and a boronate moiety as the recognition group. Upon the addition of H 2 O 2 , the probe exhibited a redshifted (73 nm) fluorescence emission, and the ratio of fluorescence intensities at λ=558 and 485 nm (F 558 /F 485 ) shifted notably (up to 100-fold). Moreover, there was a good linearity (R 2 =0.9911) between the ratio and concentration of H 2 O 2 in the range of 0 to 60 μm, with a limit of detection of 0.28 μm (signal to noise ratio (S/N)=3). This probe could also detect enzymatically generated H 2 O 2 . Importantly, it could be used to visualize endogenous H 2 O 2 produced by stimulation from epidermal growth factor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  6. Electron impact ionization of size selected hydrogen clusters (H2)N: ion fragment and neutral size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J Peter

    2008-05-21

    Clusters consisting of normal H2 molecules, produced in a free jet expansion, are size selected by diffraction from a transmission nanograting prior to electron impact ionization. For each neutral cluster (H2)(N) (N=2-40), the relative intensities of the ion fragments Hn+ are measured with a mass spectrometer. H3+ is found to be the most abundant fragment up to N=17. With a further increase in N, the abundances of H3+, H5+, H7+, and H9+ first increase and, after passing through a maximum, approach each other. At N=40, they are about the same and more than a factor of 2 and 3 larger than for H11+ and H13+, respectively. For a given neutral cluster size, the intensities of the ion fragments follow a Poisson distribution. The fragmentation probabilities are used to determine the neutral cluster size distribution produced in the expansion at a source temperature of 30.1 K and a source pressure of 1.50 bar. The distribution shows no clear evidence of a magic number N=13 as predicted by theory and found in experiments with pure para-H2 clusters. The ion fragment distributions are also used to extract information on the internal energy distribution of the H3+ ions produced in the reaction H2+ + H2-->H3+ +H, which is initiated upon ionization of the cluster. The internal energy is assumed to be rapidly equilibrated and to determine the number of molecules subsequently evaporated. The internal energy distribution found in this way is in good agreement with data obtained in an earlier independent merged beam scattering experiment.

  7. Cluster analysis as a tool of guests segmentation by the degree of their demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damijan Mumel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors demonstrate the use of cluster analysis in finding out (ascertaining the homogenity/heterogenity of guests as to the degree of their demand. The degree of guests’ demand is defined according to the importance of perceived service quality components measured by SERVQUAL, which was adopted and adapted, according to the specifics of health spa industry in Slovenia. Goals of the article are: (a the identification of the profile of importance of general health spa service quality components, and (b the identification of groups of guests (segments according to the degree of their demand in the research in 1991 compared with 1999. Cluster analysis serves as useful tool for guest segmentation since it reveals the existence of important differences in the structure of guests in the year 1991 compared with the year 1999. The results serve as a useful database for management in health spas.

  8. Motivations of farm tourism hosts and guests in the South West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    rich and varied landscape, long tradition of farming and ... of visitors who stay at your farm / establishment? 2 How would .... walks, and the children all loved the animals. .... During the short time .... Guests relive happy memories of past times.

  9. Structural transitions and guest/host complexing of liquid crystal helical nanofilaments induced by nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanim; Ryu, Seong Ho; Tuchband, Michael; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-02-01

    A lamellar liquid crystal (LC) phase of certain bent-core mesogenic molecules can be grown in a manner that generates a single chiral helical nanofilament in each of the cylindrical nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. By introducing guest molecules into the resulting composite chiral nanochannels, we explore the structures and functionality of the ordered guest/host LC complex, verifying the smectic-like positional order of the fluidic nematic LC phase, which is obtained by the combination of the LC organization and the nanoporous AAO superstructure. The guest nematic LC 4'- n -pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl is found to form a distinctive fluid layered ordered LC complex at the nanofilament/guest interface with the host 1,3-phenylene bis[4-(4-nonyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate], where this interface contacts the AAO cylinder wall. Filament growth form is strongly influenced by mixture parameters and pore dimensions.

  10. Influence of adsorption thermodynamics on guest diffusivities in nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Published experimental data, underpinned by molecular simulations, are used to highlight the strong influence of adsorption thermodynamics on diffusivities of guest molecules inside ordered nanoporous crystalline materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and zeolitic imidazolate

  11. The "third option": Oscilliatory migrations of retired guest workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonijević Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is focused on new migration tendencies of retired guest workers. This paper represents one part of a study conducted during 2014 in eastern Serbia and Vienna regarding life strategies of retired labor migrants. In domestic (Serbian social sciences this subject was neglected, but recently it has attracted global social scientific attention with an idea of interdisciplinary merge of migration and age studies. To the day, global literature has only covered retired migrant laborers return to their home countries, but recent studies show changes in migration tendencies of retired laborers of many different nationalities, who have spent their work age in Western Europe. These new migration patterns were called “oscillatory movement” or as a new, alternative “third option”. They are only a form of seasonal and circular migrations which present the most dominant fashion of modern migrant mobility in Europe. Therefore we wanted to see what is the situation with labor migrants from Serbia – do they return to Serbia once they retire or not, and what are their reasons for choosing to live on “two addresses”. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177035: Antropološko proučavanje Srbije – od kulturnog nasleđa do modernog društva

  12. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  13. Hydrogen recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  14. Selective hydrogen detection at high temperature by using yttria-stabilized zirconia-based sensor with coupled metal-oxide-based sensing electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Mami; Anggraini, Sri Ayu; Fujio, Yuki; Breedon, Michael; Plashnitsa, Vladimir V.; Miura, Norio

    2012-01-01

    A selective and sensitive hydrogen (H 2 ) sensor capable of working at a high operating temperature was developed by using a pair of metal-oxide-based SEs formed on a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) tube, operating as a mixed-potential type sensor. The utilization of SnO 2 (+30 wt.% YSZ) electrode together with NiO-TiO 2 electrode configured as a combined-type sensor, successfully diminished the response of the examined interfering gases (especially propene), while maintaining high response toward H 2 at an operating temperature of 600 °C under humid operating conditions. The developed sensor exhibited quick response to 100 ppm H 2 , as the 90% response time was observed to be 9 s. The sensing performance of the combined-type sensor was barely affected by changes in water vapor concentration within the range of 1–4 vol.%, suggesting the resilience of the sensor to function in realistic working conditions. This sensor exhibited a linear relationship between sensitivity and H 2 concentration on a logarithmic scale.

  15. Relationship between the cohesion of guest particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Sharad; Gengenbach, Thomas; Millington-Smith, Doug; Armstrong, Brian; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects cohesion of small surface-engineered guest binder particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - a model pharmaceutical binder - was spray-dried with varying l-leucine feed concentrations to create small surface-engineered binder particles with varying cohesion. These spray-dried formulations were characterised by their particle size distribution, morphology and cohesion. Interactive mixtures were produced by blending these spray-dried formulations with paracetamol. The resultant blends were visualised under scanning electron microscope to confirm formation of interactive mixtures. Surface coverage of paracetamol by guest particles as well as the flow behaviour of these mixtures were examined. The flow performance of interactive mixtures was evaluated using measurements of conditioned bulk density, basic flowability energy, aeration energy and compressibility. With higher feed l-leucine concentrations, the surface roughness of small binder particles increased, while their cohesion decreased. Visual inspection of the SEM images of the blends indicated that the guest particles adhered to the surface of paracetamol resulting in effective formation of interactive mixtures. These images also showed that the low-cohesion guest particles were better de-agglomerated that consequently formed a more homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol compared with high-cohesion formulations. The flow performance of interactive mixtures changed as a function of the cohesion of the guest particles. Interactive mixtures with low-cohesion guest binder particles showed notably improved bulk flow performance compared with those containing high-cohesion guest binder particles. Thus, our study suggests that the cohesion of guest particles dictates the flow performance of interactive mixtures. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogen storage in double clathrates with tert-butylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pinnelli S R; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sum, Amadeu K; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-06-18

    The first proof-of-concept of the formation of a double tert-butylamine (t-BuNH(2)) + hydrogen (H(2)) clathrate hydrate has been demonstrated. Binary clathrate hydrates with different molar concentrations of the large guest t-BuNH(2) (0.98-9.31 mol %) were synthesized at 13.8 MPa and 250 K, and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. A structural transformation from sVI to sII of t-BuNH(2) hydrate was clearly observed under hydrogen pressures. Raman spectroscopic data suggested that the hydrogen molecules occupied the small cages and had similar occupancy to hydrogen in the double tetrahydrofuran (THF) + H(2) clathrate hydrate. The hydrogen storage capacity in this system was approximately 0.7 H(2) wt % at the molar concentration of t-BuNH(2) close to the sII stoichiometry.

  17. Estrogen Replacement Therapy in Ovariectomized Nonpregnant Ewes Stimulates Uterine Artery Hydrogen Sulfide Biosynthesis by Selectively Up-Regulating Cystathionine β-Synthase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Thomas J; Zhang, Hong-hai; Sheibani, Lili; Karim, Muntarin; Jia, Jason; Magness, Ronald R; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Chen, Dong-bao

    2015-06-01

    Estrogens dramatically dilate numerous vascular beds with the greatest response in the uterus. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent vasodilator and proangiogenic second messenger, which is synthesized from L-cysteine by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). We hypothesized that estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) selectively stimulates H2S biosynthesis in uterine artery (UA) and other systemic arteries. Intact and endothelium-denuded UA, mesenteric artery (MA), and carotid artery (CA) were obtained from ovariectomized nonpregnant ewes (n = 5/group) receiving vehicle or estradiol-17β replacement therapy (ERT). Total RNA and protein were extracted for measuring CBS and CSE, and H2S production was determined by the methylene blue assay. Paraffin-embedded UA rings were used to localize CBS and CSE proteins by immunofluorescence microscopy. ERT significantly stimulated CBS mRNA and protein without altering CSE mRNA or protein in intact and denuded UA. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopic analyses showed CBS and CSE protein localization in endothelium and smooth muscle and confirmed that ERT stimulated CBS but not CSE protein expression in UA endothelium and smooth muscle. ERT also stimulated CBS, but not CSE, mRNA and protein expression in intact and denuded MA but not CA in ovariectomized ewes. Concomitantly, ERT stimulated UA and MA but not CA H2S production. ERT-stimulated UA H2S production was completely blocked by a specific CBS but not CSE inhibitor. Thus, ERT selectively stimulates UA and MA but not CA H2S biosynthesis by specifically up-regulating CBS expression, implicating a role of H2S in estrogen-induced vasodilation and postmenopausal women's health.

  18. Incommensurate host-guest structures in compressed elements: Hume—Rothery effects as origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyareva, V F

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of the incommensurate structure in the element Ba under pressure 15 years ago was followed by findings of a series of similar structures in other compressed elements. Incommensurately modulated structures of the host-guest type consist of a tetragonal host structure and a guest structure. The guest structure forms chains of atoms embedded in the channels of host atoms so that the axial ratio of these subcells along the c axis is not rational. Two types of the host-guest structures have been found so far: with the host cells containing 8 atoms and 16 atoms; in these both types the guest cells contain 2 atoms. These crystal structures contain a non-integer number of atoms in their unit cell: tI11* in Bi, Sb, As, Ba, Sr, Sc and tI19* in Na, K, Rb. We consider here a close structural relationship of these host-guest structures with the binary alloy phase Au 3 Cd 5 -tI32. This phase is related to the family of the Hume-Rothery phases that is stabilized by the Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interaction. From similar considerations for alkali and alkaline-earth elements a necessary condition for structural stability emerges in which the valence electrons band overlaps with the upper core electrons and the valence electron count increases under compression. (paper)

  19. Exploring Environmental Awareness and Behavior among Guests at Hotels That Apply Water-Saving Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Gabarda-Mallorquí

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate guest profiles at a hotel that has created a best-practices water management model to determine how different types of guests contribute to saving water during their stay. To do this, we analyzed levels of environmental awareness and pro-environmental behavior among the guests. Information was gathered through 648 structured surveys with guests at Hotel Samba in the Spanish seaside resort of Lloret de Mar between September 2015 and August 2016. Cluster analysis revealed four profiles of guests with different sociodemographic characteristics and different levels of awareness and proactivity in relation to water conservation. We combined our findings to develop a framework that illustrates how the two dimensions of environmental awareness and pro-environmental behavior are related in this setting. This article provides new insights into how hotel guests’ environmental awareness and engagement can influence a hotel’s water-saving efforts. These insights should help hotel operators to devise new, guest-centered strategies for saving water.

  20. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  1. Force and Stress along Simulated Dissociation Pathways of Cucurbituril-Guest Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Vega, Camilo; Gilson, Michael K

    2012-03-13

    The field of host-guest chemistry provides computationally tractable yet informative model systems for biomolecular recognition. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to study the forces and mechanical stresses associated with forced dissociation of aqueous cucurbituril-guest complexes with high binding affinities. First, the unbinding transitions were modeled with constant velocity pulling (steered dynamics) and a soft spring constant, to model atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. The computed length-force profiles yield rupture forces in good agreement with available measurements. We also used steered dynamics with high spring constants to generate paths characterized by a tight control over the specified pulling distance; these paths were then equilibrated via umbrella sampling simulations and used to compute time-averaged mechanical stresses along the dissociation pathways. The stress calculations proved to be informative regarding the key interactions determining the length-force profiles and rupture forces. In particular, the unbinding transition of one complex is found to be a stepwise process, which is initially dominated by electrostatic interactions between the guest's ammoniums and the host's carbonyl groups, and subsequently limited by the extraction of the guest's bulky bicyclooctane moiety; the latter step requires some bond stretching at the cucurbituril's extraction portal. Conversely, the dissociation of a second complex with a more slender guest is mainly driven by successive electrostatic interactions between the different guest's ammoniums and the host's carbonyl groups. The calculations also provide information on the origins of thermodynamic irreversibilities in these forced dissociation processes.

  2. N-acetylglyoxylic amide bearing a nitrophenyl group as anion receptors: NMR and X-ray investigations on anion binding and selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-10-01

    N-Nitrophenylglyoxylic amides 1 and 2 in presence of tetrabutylammonium cation (TBA) act as receptors for anions HSO4-, Cl-, Br- and NO3- as investigated by NMR studies. The receptors formed 1:1 host-guest complexes in solution. X-ray structure of 1 along with TBA that bind a chloride anion is reported. Molecule 1 showed the highest selectivity for HSO4- anion over others measured. X-ray structure of the bound Cl- revealed a pocket containing the anion making strong (Nsbnd H⋯Cl) and weak hydrogen bonds (Csbnd H⋯Cl) that contribute to the recognition of the chloride anion. Nsbnd H and Csbnd H hydrogen bonds resulted in a relatively strong binding for chloride ions.

  3. Study on luminescence characteristics of blue OLED with phosphor-doped host-guest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Liu, Fei; Zheng, Xin; Chen, Ai; Xie, Jia-feng; Zhang, Wen-xia

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we design and fabricate phosphor-doped host-guest structure organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), where the blue-ray iridium complex electrophosphorescent material FIrpic acts as object material. Properties of the device can be accommodated by changing the host materials, dopant concentration and thickness of the light-emitting layer. The study shows that the host material N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene (mCP) has a higher triplet excited state energy level, which can effectively prevent FIrpic triplet excited state energy backtracking to host material, thus the luminous efficiency is improved. When mCP is selected as the host material, the thickness of the light-emitting layer is 30 nm and the dopant concentration is 8 wt%, the excitons can be effectively confined in the light-emitting region. As a result, the maximum current efficiency and the maximum brightness of the blue device can reach 15.5 cd/A and 7 196.3 cd/m2, respectively.

  4. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  5. Hydrogen production by several cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dhruv; Kumar, H.D. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Dept. of Botany)

    1992-11-01

    Twenty species belonging to eleven genera of nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria were screened for production of hydrogen. Only one species each of Nostoc and Anabaena showed light-and nitrogenase-dependent aerobic hydrogen production. The highest rate of aerobic hydrogen production was recorded in Anabaena sp. strain CA. When incubated anaerobically under 99% Ar + 1% CO[sub 2], all the tested strains produced hydrogen. Nickel supplementation completely abolished hydrogen production both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, except in Anabaena sp. strain CA, where only the rate of production was decreased. Species of Plectonema, Oscillatoria and Spirulina showed methyl viologen-dependent (hydrogenase-dependent) hydrogen production. Other physiological activities were also studied with a view to selecting a suitable organism for large-scale production of hydrogen. (author)

  6. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-2. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan); Morita, Kenji [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    This report will present additional data to those included in the previous report of this series. These new data are on the hydrogen (deuterium) trapping properties of graphite materials. The units on the data on hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and surface recombination coefficients have been updated to adopt the SI unit system. Also, the graphic representations of previously compiled data on hydrogen (deuterium) retention have been improved for better understanding. For the sake of completeness, this report will present all these data in the improved format. (author)

  7. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  8. Theoretical model estimation of guest diffusion in Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Bin

    2015-08-11

    Characterizing molecule diffusion in nanoporous matrices is critical to understanding the novel chemical and physical properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this paper, we developed a theoretical model to fastly and accurately compute the diffusion rate of guest molecules in a zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8). The ideal gas or equilibrium solution diffusion model was modified to contain the effect of periodical media via introducing the possibility of guests passing through the framework gate. The only input in our model is the energy barrier of guests passing through the MOF’s gate. Molecular dynamics (MD) methods were employed to gather the guest density profile, which then was used to deduce the energy barrier values. This produced reliable results that require a simulation time of 5 picoseconds, which is much shorter when using pure MD methods (in the billisecond scale) . Also, we used density functional theory (DFT) methods to obtain the energy profile of guests passing through gates, as this does not require specification of a force field for the MOF degrees of freedom. In the DFT calculation, we only considered one gate of MOFs each time; as this greatly reduced the computational cost. Based on the obtained energy barrier values we computed the diffusion rate of alkane and alcohol in ZIF-8 using our model, which was in good agreement with experimental test results and the calculation values from standard MD model. Our model shows the advantage of obtaining accurate diffusion rates for guests in MOFs for a lower computational cost and shorter calculation time. Thus, our analytic model calculation is especially attractive for high-throughput computational screening of the dynamic performance of guests in a framework.

  9. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  10. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  11. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century

  12. Structural changes and intermolecular interactions of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, S; Hirai, H; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yagi, T

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate were performed using a diamond anvil cell under conditions of 0.1-44.2 GPa and at room temperature. Also, high pressure Raman studies of solid hydrogen were performed in the pressure range of 0.1-43.7 GPa. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for hydrogen hydrate revealed that a known high-pressure structure, filled ice Ic structure, of hydrogen hydrate transformed to a new high-pressure structure at approximately 35-40 GPa. A comparison of the Raman spectroscopy of a vibron for hydrogen molecules between hydrogen hydrate and solid hydrogen revealed that the extraction of hydrogen molecules from hydrogen hydrate occurred above 20 GPa. Also, the Raman spectra of a roton revealed that the rotation of hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate was suppressed at around 20 GPa and that the rotation recovered under higher pressure. These results indicated that remarkable intermolecular interactions in hydrogen hydrate between neighboring hydrogen molecules and between guest hydrogen molecules and host water molecules might occur. These intermolecular interactions could produce the stability of hydrogen hydrate.

  13. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  14. Synthesis of nano-sized hydrogen phosphate-imprinted polymer in acetonitrile/water mixture and its use as a recognition element of hydrogen phosphate selective all-solid state potentiometric electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Taher; Atayi, Khalil

    2018-02-01

    Herein, a new recipe is introduced for the preparation of hydrogen phosphate ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nano-IIP) in acetonitrile/water (63.5:36.5) using phosphoric acid as the template. The nano-IIP obtained was used as the recognition element of a carbon paste potentiometric sensor. The IIP electrode showed a Nernstian response to hydrogen phosphate anion; whereas, the non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-based electrode had no considerable sensitivity to the anion. The presence of both methacrylic acid and vinyl pyridine in the IIP structure, as well as optimization of the functional monomers-template proportion, was found to be important to observe the sensing capability of the IIP electrode. The nano-IIP electrode showed a dynamic linear range of 1 × 10 -5 -1 × 10 -1  mol L-1, Nernstian slope of 30.6 ± (0.5) mV decade -1 , response time of 25 seconds, and detection limit of 4.0 × 10 -6  mol L -1 . The utility of the electrodes was checked by potentiometric titration of hydrogen phosphate with La 3+ solution. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems for nanomedicine and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zilong; Song, Nan; Menz, Ryan; Pingali, Bharadwaj; Yang, Ying-Wei; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic macrocyclic host compounds can interact with suitable guest molecules via noncovalent interactions to form functional supramolecular systems. With the synergistic integration of the response of molecules and the unique properties at the nanoscale, nanoparticles functionalized with the host-guest supramolecular systems have shown great potentials for a broad range of applications in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this review article, we focus on the applications of the nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems in nanomedicine and healthcare, including therapeutic delivery, imaging, sensing and removal of harmful substances. A large number of examples are included to elucidate the working mechanisms, advantages, limitations and future developments of the nanoparticle-supramolecule systems in these applications.

  16. Magnetic ordering in TCNQ-based metal–organic frameworks with host–guest interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan; Saber, Mohamed R.; Prosvirin, Andrey P.; Reibenspies, Joseph H.; Sun, Lei; Ballesteros-Rivas, Maria; Zhao, Hanhua; Dunbar, Kim R. (MIT); (TAM)

    2015-09-03

    Host–guest interactions between the aromatic molecules benzene, toluene, aniline and nitrobenzene and the redox-active TCNQ-based metal–organic framework (MOF), Fe(TCNQ)(4,4'-bpy) (1) (TCNQ = 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane), have been found to modulate spontaneous magnetization behaviours at low temperatures. An analogous MOF, Mn(TCNQ)(4,4'-bpy) (2) with isotropic Mn(II) ions as well as the two-dimensional compound Fe(TCNQ)(DMF)2·2DMF (3·2DMF), were also prepared as models for studying the effects of single-ion magnetic anisotropy and structural distortion on spin canting. The results indicate guest-dependent long range magnetic ordering occurs at low temperatures, which correlates with the electrostatic and steric effects of the incorporated aromatic guests.

  17. The educational attainment of the children of the Danish ”guest worker” immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Vibeke; Smith, Nina

    This paper analyses the educational attainment of young first generation immigrants in Denmark who are children of the ‘guest workers’ who immigrated from Turkey, Pakistan and Ex-Yugoslavia in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Beside the traditional intergenerational transmission mechanism, we...... analyse potential immigrant-specific factors as language proficiency, attending mother-tongue courses and expectations concerning out or return migration from Denmark. The results show that intergenerational transmission effects are strong among ‘guest worker’ immigrants, especially among men. Other...... important factors are Danish language proficiency, age at first marriage and a number variables reflecting parents’ and own attitudes concerning education, marriage and family. However, the ‘guest worker’ immigrants are not a homogenous group. The analyses reveal large differences between Turkish, Pakistani...

  18. Carbohydrate-Based Host-Guest Complexation of Hydrophobic Antibiotics for the Enhancement of Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daham; Joo, Sang-Woo; Shinde, Vijay Vilas; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2017-08-08

    Host-guest complexation with various hydrophobic drugs has been used to enhance the solubility, permeability, and stability of guest drugs. Physical changes in hydrophobic drugs by complexation have been related to corresponding increases in the bioavailability of these drugs. Carbohydrates, including various derivatives of cyclodextrins, cyclosophoraoses, and some linear oligosaccharides, are generally used as host complexation agents in drug delivery systems. Many antibiotics with low bioavailability have some limitations to their clinical use due to their intrinsically poor aqueous solubility. Bioavailability enhancement is therefore an important step to achieve the desired concentration of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections. Antibiotics encapsulated in a complexation-based drug delivery system will display improved antibacterial activity making it possible to reduce dosages and overcome the serious global problem of antibiotic resistance. Here, we review the present research trends in carbohydrate-based host-guest complexation of various hydrophobic antibiotics as an efficient delivery system to improve solubility, permeability, stability, and controlled release.

  19. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  20. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  2. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  3. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes. 2. Effects of molecular properties of guests and surface functionalities of dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Cheng, Yiyun; Wu, Qinglin; Zhao, Libo; Xu, Tongwen

    2009-08-06

    The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is investigated by NMR techniques, including (1)H NMR and 2D-NOESY studies. The effects of molecular properties of drug molecules (protonation ability and spatial steric hindrance of charged groups) and surface functionalities of dendrimers (positively charged amine groups and negatively charged carboxylate groups) on the host-guest interactions are discussed. Different interaction mechanisms between dendrimers and drug molecules are proposed on the basis of NMR results. Primary amine- and secondary amine-containing drugs preferentially bind to negatively charged dendrimers by strong electrostatic interactions, whereas tertiary amine and quaternary ammonium-containing drugs have weak binding ability with dendrimers due to relatively low protonation ability of the tertiary amine group and serious steric hindrance of the quaternary ammonium group. Positively charged drugs locate only on the surface of negatively charged dendrimers, whereas negatively charged drugs locate both on the surface and in the interior cavities of positively charged dendrimers. The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is promising for the development of new drug delivery systems.

  4. Methanol, ethanol and hydrogen sensing using metal oxide and metal (TiO2–Pt) composite nanoclusters on GaN nanowires: a new route towards tailoring the selectivity of nanowire/nanocluster chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluri, Geetha S; Motayed, Abhishek; Davydov, Albert V; Oleshko, Vladimir P; Bertness, Kris A; Sanford, Norman A; Mulpuri, Rao V

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for tailoring the selectivity of chemical sensors using semiconductor nanowires (NWs) decorated with metal and metal oxide multicomponent nanoclusters (NCs). Here we present the change of selectivity of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanocluster-coated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire sensor devices on the addition of platinum (Pt) nanoclusters. The hybrid sensor devices were developed by fabricating two-terminal devices using individual GaN NWs followed by the deposition of TiO 2 and/or Pt nanoclusters (NCs) using the sputtering technique. This paper present the sensing characteristics of GaN/(TiO 2 –Pt) nanowire–nanocluster (NWNC) hybrids and GaN/(Pt) NWNC hybrids, and compare their selectivity with that of the previously reported GaN/TiO 2 sensors. The GaN/TiO 2 NWNC hybrids showed remarkable selectivity to benzene and related aromatic compounds, with no measurable response for other analytes. Addition of Pt NCs to GaN/TiO 2 sensors dramatically altered their sensing behavior, making them sensitive only to methanol, ethanol and hydrogen, but not to any other chemicals we tested. The GaN/(TiO 2 –Pt) hybrids were able to detect ethanol and methanol concentrations as low as 100 nmol mol −1 (ppb) in air in approximately 100 s, and hydrogen concentrations from 1 µmol mol −1 (ppm) to 1% in nitrogen in less than 60 s. However, GaN/Pt NWNC hybrids showed limited sensitivity only towards hydrogen and not towards any alcohols. All these hybrid sensors worked at room temperature and are photomodulated, i.e. they responded to analytes only in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) light. We propose a qualitative explanation based on the heat of adsorption, ionization energy and solvent polarity to explain the observed selectivity of the different hybrids. These results are significant from the standpoint of applications requiring room-temperature hydrogen sensing and sensitive alcohol monitoring. These results demonstrate the tremendous potential

  5. Methanol, ethanol and hydrogen sensing using metal oxide and metal (TiO(2)-Pt) composite nanoclusters on GaN nanowires: a new route towards tailoring the selectivity of nanowire/nanocluster chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluri, Geetha S; Motayed, Abhishek; Davydov, Albert V; Oleshko, Vladimir P; Bertness, Kris A; Sanford, Norman A; Mulpuri, Rao V

    2012-05-04

    We demonstrate a new method for tailoring the selectivity of chemical sensors using semiconductor nanowires (NWs) decorated with metal and metal oxide multicomponent nanoclusters (NCs). Here we present the change of selectivity of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanocluster-coated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire sensor devices on the addition of platinum (Pt) nanoclusters. The hybrid sensor devices were developed by fabricating two-terminal devices using individual GaN NWs followed by the deposition of TiO(2) and/or Pt nanoclusters (NCs) using the sputtering technique. This paper present the sensing characteristics of GaN/(TiO(2)-Pt) nanowire-nanocluster (NWNC) hybrids and GaN/(Pt) NWNC hybrids, and compare their selectivity with that of the previously reported GaN/TiO(2) sensors. The GaN/TiO(2) NWNC hybrids showed remarkable selectivity to benzene and related aromatic compounds, with no measurable response for other analytes. Addition of Pt NCs to GaN/TiO(2) sensors dramatically altered their sensing behavior, making them sensitive only to methanol, ethanol and hydrogen, but not to any other chemicals we tested. The GaN/(TiO(2)-Pt) hybrids were able to detect ethanol and methanol concentrations as low as 100 nmol mol(-1) (ppb) in air in approximately 100 s, and hydrogen concentrations from 1 µmol mol(-1) (ppm) to 1% in nitrogen in less than 60 s. However, GaN/Pt NWNC hybrids showed limited sensitivity only towards hydrogen and not towards any alcohols. All these hybrid sensors worked at room temperature and are photomodulated, i.e. they responded to analytes only in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) light. We propose a qualitative explanation based on the heat of adsorption, ionization energy and solvent polarity to explain the observed selectivity of the different hybrids. These results are significant from the standpoint of applications requiring room-temperature hydrogen sensing and sensitive alcohol monitoring. These results demonstrate the tremendous potential for

  6. Phase changes induced by guest orientational ordering of filled ice Ih methane hydrate under high pressure and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, H; Tanaka, T; Yagi, T; Matsuoka, T; Ohishi, Y; Ohtake, M; Yamamoto, Y

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed with filled ice Ih structure of methane hydrate under pressure and temperature conditions of 2.0 to 77.0 GPa and 30 to 300 K, respectively, using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. Distinct changes in the axial ratios of the host framework were revealed by In-situ X-ray diffractometry. Splitting in the CH vibration modes of the guest methane molecules, which was previously explained by the orientational ordering of the guest molecules, was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The pressure and temperature conditions at the split of the vibration modes agreed well with those of the axial ratio changes. The results indicated that orientational ordering of the guest methane molecules from orientational disordered-state occurred at high pressures and low temperatures, and that this guest ordering led to the axial ratio changes in the host framework. Existing regions of the guest disordered-phase and the guest ordered-phase were roughly estimated by the X-ray data. In addition, above the pressure of the guest-ordered phase, another high pressure phase was developed at a low-temperature region. The deuterated-water host samples were also examined and isotopic effects on the guest ordering and phase changes were observed.

  7. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  8. Anion-selective interaction and colorimeter by an optical metalloreceptor based on ruthenium(II) 2,2'-biimidazole: hydrogen bonding and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Mo, Hao-Jun; Chen, Jin-Can; Niu, Yan-Li; Zhong, Yong-Rui; Zheng, Kang-Cheng; Ye, Bao-Hui

    2007-08-06

    A new anion sensor [Ru(bpy)2(H2biim)](PF6)2 (1) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and H2biim = 2,2'-biimidazole) has been developed, in which the Ru(II)-bpy moiety acts as a chromophore and the H2biim ligand as an anion receptor via hydrogen bonding. A systematic investigation shows that 1 is an eligible sensor for various anions. It donates protons for hydrogen bonding to Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, HSO4-, H2PO4-, and OAc- anions and further actualizes monoproton transfer to the OAc- anion, changing color from yellow to orange brown. The fluoride ion has a high affinity toward the N-H group of the H2biim ligand for proton transfer, rather than hydrogen bonding, because of the formation of the highly stable HF2- anion, resulting in stepwise deprotonation of the two N-H fragments. These processes are signaled by vivid color changes from yellow to orange brown and then to violet because of second-sphere donor-acceptor interactions between Ru(II)-H2biim and the anions. The significant color changes can be distinguished visually. The processes are not only determined by the basicity of anion but also by the strength of hydrogen bonding and the stability of the anion-receptor complexes. The design strategy and remarkable photophysical properties of sensor 1 help to extend the development of anion sensors.

  9. Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

  10. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  11. Impact of Industry Guest Speakers on Business Students' Perceptions of Employability Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, L.; Sibson, R.; Roepen, D.; Meakins, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insights into the perceptions and expectations of Australian undergraduate business students (n=150) regarding the incorporation of guest speakers into the curriculum of a leadership unit focused on employability skills development. The authors adopted a mixed methods approach. A survey was conducted, with quantitative results…

  12. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Inorganic Materials: Encapsulating Guest Lanthanide Oxides in Chiral Silica Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masumi; Liu, Xin-Ling; Tsunega, Seiji; Nakajima, Erika; Abe, Shunsuke; Nakashima, Takuya; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Jin, Ren-Hua

    2018-05-02

    Recently, circularly polarized luminescence (CPL)-active systems have become a very hot and interesting subject in chirality- and optics-related areas. The CPL-active systems are usually available by two approaches: covalently combining a luminescent centre to chiral motif or associating the guest of luminescent probe to a chiral host. However, all the chiral components in CPL materials were organic, although the luminescent components were alternatively organics or inorganics. Herein, the first totally inorganic CPL-active system by "luminescent guest-chiral host" strategy is proposed. Luminescent sub-10 nm lanthanide oxides (Eu 2 O 3 or Tb 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles (guests) were encapsulated into chiral non-helical SiO 2 nanofibres (host) through calcination of chiral SiO 2 hybrid nanofibres, trapping Eu 3+ (or Tb 3+ ). These lanthanide oxides display circular dichroism (CD) optical activity in the ultraviolet wavelength and CPL signals around at 615 nm for Eu 3+ and 545 nm for Tb 3+ . This work has implications for inorganic-based CPL-active systems by incorporation of various luminescent guests within chiral inorganic hosts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Charge transport in disordered organic host-guest systems: effects of carrier density and electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yimer, Y.Y.; Bobbert, P.A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate charge transport in disordered organic host–guest systems with a bimodal Gaussian density of states (DOS). The energy difference between the two Gaussians defines the trap depth. By solving the Pauli master equation for the hopping of charge carriers on a regular lattice with site

  14. Charge transport in disordered organic host-guest systems: effects of carrier density and electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yimer, Y.Y.; Bobbert, P.A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate charge transport in disordered organic host–guest systems with a bimodal Gaussian density of states. The energy difference between the peaks of the two Gaussians defines the trap depth. By solving the Pauli master equation for the hopping of charge carriers on a regular lattice we

  15. Inquiry about key dimensions of service qualities and guests satisfaction in restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrovski Darko D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of marketing experts in catering, restaurants especially, have recently been preoccupied by measuring the service quality. Business in competitive and turbulent surrounding requires that restaurants continually improve their products, which is based on guests specific demands and wishes. Comprehension of how consumers see catering offer and research on factors that determine consumers satisfaction are the key for achieving business aims. The aim of this study is an identification of key components of service qualities which restaurants and their influence on guests satisfaction offer. Measures of descriptive statistics, explorative factor and multiple regressive analysis were used in order to achieve the aims of the research. The facts were collected by using the survey. Results of the research highlight 3 key elements of the service quality that restaurants offer and those are: professionalism of personnel, understanding of guests, paying individual attention and meeting specific demands. The first two components include attributes that evince statistically important influence on guests satisfaction. Finds of conducted survey help managers and restaurateurs determine factors they will focus on during the making marketing strategy which will supply high level of consumers satisfaction on one side, and long-term profitability on the other side.

  16. Molecular Recognition of Vesicles : Host-Guest Interactions Combined with Specific Dimerization of Zwitterions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, Jens; Fenske, Tassilo; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Wibbeling, Birgit; Schmuck, Carsten; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of beta-cyclodextrin vesicles can be induced by an adamantyl-substituted zwitterionic guanidiniocarbonylpyrrole carboxylate guest molecule (1). Upon addition of 1 to the cyclodextrin vesicles at neutral pH, the vesicles aggregate (but do not fuse), as shown by using UV/Vis and

  17. Edit What do guests value most in Airbnb accommodations? An application of the hedonic pricing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Dogru

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Private rooms, entire homes, laundry, free parking, kitchens - these are just some of the amenities that Airbnb guests are looking for in accommodations. Using data from the Greater Boston Area, Dr. Dogru and Osman Pekin uncover how these amenities affect Airbnb nightly rates.

  18. Edit What do guests value most in Airbnb accommodations? An application of the hedonic pricing approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Dogru; Osman Pekin

    2017-01-01

    Private rooms, entire homes, laundry, free parking, kitchens - these are just some of the amenities that Airbnb guests are looking for in accommodations. Using data from the Greater Boston Area, Dr. Dogru and Osman Pekin uncover how these amenities affect Airbnb nightly rates.

  19. Synthesis of C3-symmetric tri(alkylamino) guests and their interaction with cyclodextrins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednaříková, T.; Tošner, Z.; Horský, Jiří; Jindřich, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, 1-2 (2015), s. 141-152 ISSN 0923-0750 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cyclodextrin * supramolecular interactions * C3-symmetric guests Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.253, year: 2015

  20. Do the COX-2 inhibitors still have a role to play? : guest editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do the COX-2 inhibitors still have a role to play? : guest editorial. A Beeton. Abstract. No Abstract Available Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia Vol.11(2) 2005: 55-60. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics ...

  1. Energy-cascade organic photovoltaic devices incorporating a host-guest architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, S Matthew; Holmes, Russell J

    2015-02-04

    In planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs), broad spectral coverage can be realized by incorporating multiple molecular absorbers in an energy-cascade architecture. Here, this approach is combined with a host-guest donor layer architecture previously shown to optimize exciton transport for the fluorescent organic semiconductor boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) when diluted in an optically transparent host. In order to maximize the absorption efficiency, energy-cascade OPVs that utilize both photoactive host and guest donor materials are examined using the pairing of SubPc and boron subnaphthalocyanine chloride (SubNc), respectively. In a planar heterojunction architecture, excitons generated on the SubPc host rapidly energy transfer to the SubNc guest, where they may migrate toward the dissociating, donor-acceptor interface. Overall, the incorporation of a photoactive host leads to a 13% enhancement in the short-circuit current density and a 20% enhancement in the power conversion efficiency relative to an optimized host-guest OPV combining SubNc with a nonabsorbing host. This work underscores the potential for further design refinements in planar heterojunction OPVs and demonstrates progress toward the effective separation of functionality between constituent OPV materials.

  2. Innkeeper's Liability for Loss Suffered by Guests:Drake v Dow

    OpenAIRE

    Du Plessis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Drake v Dow is concerned with the issue of strict liability attributed to innkeepers for loss suffered by guests. The case also contains an entertaining foray into the historical development of the law of delict in Scotland and may therefore be of interest to legal historians.

  3. Unanticipated guest motion during a phase transition in a ferroelastic inclusion compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Mark D; Peterson, Matthew L; Pate, Kevin L; Dinkelmeyer, Brian D; Brown, Michael E

    2002-03-13

    Urea inclusion compounds (UICs) have been used as tools to understand ferroelastic domain switching and molecular recognition during crystal growth. Although the vast majority of UICs contain helical arrangements of host H-bonds, those containing guests with the formula X(CH(2))(6)Y (X, Y = Br, Cl, CN, NC) adopt an alternative P2(1)/n packing mode in which the host molecules exist as stacked loops of urea hexamers. Such structures may be further separated into two classes, ones distorted away from hexagonal symmetry along [100] (Br(CH(2))(6)Br, Br(CH(2))(6)Cl, and Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl) and those distorted along [001] (e.g. NC(CH(2))(6)CN). In each of these systems, guests exist as equilibrium mixtures of gauche conformers whose populations control the direction and magnitude of the observed distortion. Such UICs are potentially ferroelastic, but the n-glide requires that domains are not related by a simple rotation-translation mechanism as in the helical systems. Ferroelastic (degenerate) domain reorientation would necessitate a large-scale reorganization of the urea framework and rupture of numerous H-bonds. Coupled with distortions of 2 to 10%, this mechanism-based barrier to domain switching has precluded observation of this phenomenon. To prepare ferroelastic UICs with minimal distortions from hexagonal symmetry, attempts were made to form solid solutions of UICs containing guests from the two classes. This failed, however: solid solution formation of the stacked loop form is usually possible within a series (e.g. with Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl and Br(CH(2))(6)Br), but not between series (e.g. Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl and NC(CH(2))(6)CN). Crystals of Cl(CH(2))(6)CN/urea, in which a single guest contains substituents from each class, are distorted along [001] by only 0.5% from hexagonal symmetry at 298 K and exhibit ferroelastic domain reorientation at high forces. At -66 degrees C, Cl(CH(2))(6)CN/urea undergoes a topotactic phase transition that is unexpectedly nontopochemical. The

  4. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-1. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    A summary on the recent activities of the plasma-wall interactions database task group at the National Institute for Fusion Science is presented in this report. These activities are focused on the compilation of literature data on the key parameters related to wall recycling characteristics that affect dynamic particle balance during plasma discharges and also on-site tritium inventory. More specifically, in this task group a universal fitting formula has been proposed and successfully applied to help compile hydrogen implantation-induced retention data. Also, presented here are the data on hydrogen diffusion and surface recombination coefficients, both critical in modeling dynamic wall recycling behavior. Data compilation has been conducted on beryllium, carbon, tungsten and molybdenum, all currently used for plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion experiments. (author)

  5. Palladium nanoparticles supported on fibrous-structured silica nanospheres (KCC-1): An efficient and selective catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of alkenes

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin; Sarawade, Pradip; Albert, Matthias; D'Elia, Valerio; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Kö hler, Klaus; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    An efficient palladium catalyst supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, providing excellent yields of the corresponding products with remarkable chemoselectivity. Comparison (high-resolution TEM, chemisorption) with analogous mesoporous (MCM-41, SBA-15) silica-supported Pd nanocatalysts prepared under identical conditions, demonstrates the advantage of employing the fibrous KCC-1 morphology versus traditional supports because it ensures superior accessibility of the catalytically active cores along with excellent Pd dispersion at high metal loading. This morphology ultimately leads to higher catalytic activity for the KCC-1-supported nanoparticles. The protocol developed for hydrogenation is advantageous and environmentally benign owing to the use of HCOOH as a source of hydrogen, water as a solvent, and because of efficient catalyst recyclability and durability. The recycled catalyst has been analyzed by XPS spectroscopy and TEM showing only minor changes in the oxidation state of Pd and in the morphology after the reaction, thus confirming the robustness of the catalyst.

  6. Palladium nanoparticles supported on fibrous-structured silica nanospheres (KCC-1): An efficient and selective catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of alkenes

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin

    2015-01-09

    An efficient palladium catalyst supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, providing excellent yields of the corresponding products with remarkable chemoselectivity. Comparison (high-resolution TEM, chemisorption) with analogous mesoporous (MCM-41, SBA-15) silica-supported Pd nanocatalysts prepared under identical conditions, demonstrates the advantage of employing the fibrous KCC-1 morphology versus traditional supports because it ensures superior accessibility of the catalytically active cores along with excellent Pd dispersion at high metal loading. This morphology ultimately leads to higher catalytic activity for the KCC-1-supported nanoparticles. The protocol developed for hydrogenation is advantageous and environmentally benign owing to the use of HCOOH as a source of hydrogen, water as a solvent, and because of efficient catalyst recyclability and durability. The recycled catalyst has been analyzed by XPS spectroscopy and TEM showing only minor changes in the oxidation state of Pd and in the morphology after the reaction, thus confirming the robustness of the catalyst.

  7. Effects of atomic hydrogen on the selective area growth of Si and Si1-xGex thin films on Si and SiO2 surfaces: Inhibition, nucleation, and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, T.W.; Lam, A.M.; Ma, P.F.; Engstrom, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Supersonic molecular beam techniques have been used to study the nucleation of Si and Si 1-x Ge x thin films on Si and SiO 2 surfaces, where Si 2 H 6 and GeH 4 have been used as sources. A particular emphasis of this study has been an examination of the effects of a coincident flux of atomic hydrogen. The time associated with formation of stable islands of Si or Si 1-x Ge x on SiO 2 surfaces--the incubation time--has been found to depend strongly on the kinetic energy of the incident molecular precursors (Si 2 H 6 and GeH 4 ) and the substrate temperature. After coalescence, thin film morphology has been found to depend primarily on substrate temperature, with smoother films being grown at substrate temperatures below 600 deg. C. Introduction of a coincident flux of atomic hydrogen has a large effect on the nucleation and growth process. First, the incubation time in the presence of atomic hydrogen has been found to increase, especially at substrate temperatures below 630 deg. C, suggesting that hydrogen atoms adsorbed on Si-like sites on SiO 2 can effectively block nucleation of Si. Unfortunately, in terms of promoting selective area growth, coincident atomic hydrogen also decreases the rate of epitaxial growth rate, essentially offsetting any increase in the incubation time for growth on SiO 2 . Concerning Si 1-x Ge x growth, the introduction of GeH 4 produces substantial changes in both thin film morphology and the rate nucleation of poly-Si 1-x Ge x on SiO 2 . Briefly, the addition of Ge increases the incubation time, while it lessens the effect of coincident hydrogen on the incubation time. Finally, a comparison of the maximum island density, the time to reach this density, and the steady-state polycrystalline growth rate strongly suggests that all thin films [Si, Si 1-x Ge x , both with and without H(g)] nucleate at special sites on the SiO 2 surface, and grow primarily via direct deposition of adatoms on pre-existing islands

  8. Guest editorial preface : Special Issue on Advances in Computer Entertainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Romão, Teresa; Cheok, Adrian D.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Creative Interfaces and Computer Graphics contains a selection of papers from ACE 2012, the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment (Nijholt et al., 2012). ACE is the leading scientific forum for dissemination of

  9. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  10. Nurses as 'guests'--a study of a concept in light of Jacques Derrida's philosophy of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresland, Stina; Lutzén, Kim; Norberg, Astrid; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Määttä, Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    As revealed in previous empirical research, nurses describe their position in home-based nursing care (HBNC) as that of 'guests' in the patient's home. Such a description is problematic as 'guests' might not be considered to belong to the realm of professionalism. As Jacques Derrida's work on hospitality has received wide publicity, sparking theoretical and philosophical discussion about host and guest, the aim of this study was to explore how the concept 'guests' can be understood in the light of Derrida's philosophy of hospitality. The study revealed that (a) guest must be considered a binary concept; and (b) hospitality should be regarded as an exchange of giving and receiving between a host and a guest. The present study demonstrated that it is important to reflect on the meaning of the concepts used by nurses in HBNC. Further theoretical and empirical exploration of the concept 'hospitality' would be fruitful, i.e. what is patients' understanding of 'hospitality' and 'hostility' related to nurses' descriptions of themselves as 'guests' in the patient's home. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E T (guest), lies higher than that of the host, E T (host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E T (guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E T (guest)>E T (host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E T (guest) to E T (host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again

  12. Recruiting Future Engineers Through Effective Guest Speaking In Elementary School Classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Young

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, the author describes how engineers can increase the number of future engineers by volunteering as guest speakers in the elementary school classroom. The paper is divided into three main subjects. First, the importance of engineers speaking directly with young students is discussed. Next, several best practice techniques for speaking with young students are described. Finally, information on getting started as a guest speaker is presented, and a list of resources available to guest speakers is provided. The guest engineer speaking to an elementary school audience (ages 6-11) performs a critical role in encouraging young students to pursue a career in engineering. Often, he or she is the first engineer these students meet in person, providing a crucial first impression of the engineering career field and a positive visual image of what an engineer really looks like. A dynamic speaker presenting a well-delivered talk creates a lasting, positive impression on students, influencing their future decisions to pursue careers in engineering. By reaching these students early in life, the guest speaker will help dispel the many prevailing stereotypes about engineers which discourage so many students, especially young women, from considering this career. The guest speaker can ensure young students gain a positive first impression of engineers and the engineering career field by following some best practice techniques in preparing for and delivering their presentation. The author, an electrical engineer, developed these best practice techniques over the past 10 years while presenting over 350 talks on engineering subjects to elementary school students as a volunteer speaker with the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory’s Speakers Bureau. Every engineer can make a meaningful contribution toward reversing the predicted shortfall of future engineers by volunteering to speak with young students at the elementary school level. Elementary school

  13. 镍催化剂催化硝基苯一步全加氢制备环己胺的研究%The highly selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene tocyclohexylamine over Ni/carbon catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何杰; 鲁新环; 景润; 胡傲; 赵亚榕; 陶佩佩; 夏清华

    2018-01-01

    采用微波加热浸渍法制备生物炭负载的Ni催化剂,催化剂XRD、TEM和XPS对催化剂进行表征.10%Ni/CSC-Ⅱ催化剂在硝基苯选择性加氢制环己胺反应中表现出很好的活性,在200℃,2.0 MPa H2,100 mg氢氧化锂的条件下,硝基苯的转化率为100%,目标产物环己胺选择性高达96.7%.结果表明微波加热有助于提高催化剂的活性.%Biocarbon supported Ni catalysts have been prepared by facile impregnation of Ni species by microwave-heating and used for selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine.These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.For the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, 10% Ni/CSC-II exhibits the best catalytic activity to achieve 100%conversion of nitrobenzene and 96 .7% selectivity of cyclohexylamine under reaction conditions of 200℃, 2.0 MPa H2 and 100 mg LiOH.The results show that microwave heating can improve the activity of the catalyst.

  14. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  15. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey's continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta 2 H (δ 2 H) and as delta 18 O (δ 18 O), respectively. The values of δ 2 H and δ 18 O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of δ 2 H and δ 18 O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively

  16. Selective heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of ketone (C═O) to alcohol (OH) by magnetite nanoparticles following Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Tariq; Balouch, Aamna; Rajar, Kausar; Sirajuddin; Brohi, Imdad Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and effectively employed as heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation of ketone moiety to alcohol moiety by NaBH4 under the microwave radiation process. The improvement was achieved in percent recovery of isopropyl alcohol by varying and optimizing reaction time, power of microwave radiations and amount of catalyst. The catalytic study revealed that acetone would be converted into isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 99.5% yield in short period of reaction time, using 10 μg of magnetite NPs (Fe3O4). It was observed that the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, followed second-order of reaction and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic mechanism, which elucidated that both reactants get adsorb onto the surface of silica coated magnetite nanocatalyst to react. Consequently, the rate-determining step was the surface reaction of acetone and sodium borohydride. The current study revealed an environment friendly conversion of acetone to IPA on the basis of its fast, efficient, and highly economical method of utilization of microwave irradiation process and easy catalyst recovery.

  17. Carbon material for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlinos, Athanasios; Steriotis, Theodore; Stubos, Athanasios; Miller, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to carbon based materials that are employed for hydrogen storage applications. The material may be described as the pyrolysis product of a molecular precursor such as a cyclic quinone compound. The pyrolysis product may then be combined with selected transition metal atoms which may be in nanoparticulate form, where the metals may be dispersed on the material surface. Such product may then provide for the reversible storage of hydrogen. The metallic nanoparticles may also be combined with a second metal as an alloy to further improve hydrogen storage performance.

  18. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z., E-mail: val@physics.utah.edu

    2014-11-15

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E{sub T}(guest), lies higher than that of the host, E{sub T}(host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E{sub T}(guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E{sub T}(guest)>E{sub T}(host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E{sub T}(guest) to E{sub T}(host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again.

  19. "You Want Your Guests to Be Happy in This Business": Hoteliers' Decisions to Adopt Voluntary Smoke-Free Guest-Room Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Malone, Ruth E

    2018-01-01

    To explore why some hotels have implemented 100% smoke-free policies voluntarily, the perceived consequences of doing so, and media responses. Qualitative study of hotel management and quantitative content analysis of media coverage of smoke-free hotels. Hotels and media based in the United States. Eleven representatives of 5 independent and 4 chain hotels. Other data included 265 news items about smoke-free hotels. We conducted 30-minute semi-structured interviews with hotel representatives and analyzed the data using qualitative content analysis. We also searched 3 online news databases for news items about hotels in our study, and collaboratively coded retrieved items; we analyzed the content and slant of news items. Business considerations, including guest requests, competitor action, and cost savings, were the primary motivations for implementing 100% smoke-free guest-room policies. Health concerns played a minimal role. Hotels received positive feedback from customers and employees. Media coverage was favorable, emphasizing positive aspects of going smoke-free; the overall slant of news items was positive or neutral. However, few hotels marketed the change. Since hotel customers and employees are likely to experience long periods of smoke exposure and smoke-free hotels appear to be so well received, it may be timely to pursue policies making all hotels smoke-free.

  20. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  1. Sensitive and Specific Guest Recognition through Pyridinium-Modification in Spindle-Like Coordination Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, Nagarajan; Dai, Feng-Rong; Chen, Zhong-Ning

    2018-05-02

    An elaborately designed pyridinium-functionalized octanuclear zinc(II) coordination container 1-Zn was prepared through the self-assembly of Zn 2+ , p-tert-butylsulfonylcalix[4]arene, and pyridinium-functionalized angular flexible dicarboxylate linker (H 2 BrL1). The structure was determined by a single-crystal X-ray diffractometer. 1-Zn displays highly sensitive and specific recognition to 2-picolylamine as revealed by drastic blueshifts of the absorption and emission spectra, ascribed to the decrease of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character of the container and the occurrence of intermolecular charge transfer between the host and guest molecules. The intramolecular charge transfer plays a key role in the modulation of the electronic properties and is tunable through endo-encapsulation of specific guest molecules. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Optimization of the host–guest system within an OLED using different models of mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adames Prada, Rosana, E-mail: rdadamesp@unal.edu.co; Ardila Vargas, Angel Miguel, E-mail: amardilav@unal.edu.co

    2014-12-15

    To optimize the host–guest system of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), it were performed simulations by doping a small molecule organic semiconductor (acting as host) with the transition organometallic complex known as Ir(ppy){sub 2}(acac) (acting as a guest). The simulation was carried out using simOLED with different mobility models: the Pool–Frenkel Model (PFM), the Extended Gaussian Disorder Model (EGDM) and Extended Correlated Disorder Model (ECDM), with the aim to determine the magnitude of some parameters like temperature, applied electric field, film thickness and charge carrier density that improve the electrical and optical properties of OLEDs with a more simplified structure like ITO/CBP/CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 2}(acac)/TPBi/LiF/Al.

  3. Knowledge of Deaths in Hotel Rooms Diminishes Perceived Value and Elicits Guest Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Jesse M; Curtin, Emma R; Jong, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Guest deaths are an inevitable aspect of the hospitality industry. In Study 1, participants read a vignette in which the previous guest died of natural causes, suicide, or homicide. Those who learned of a death (a) saw the room as less valuable, (b) opted to stay in a more basic room in which no death occurred, despite both rooms being offered for free, and (c) anticipated feeling uneasy when imagining an overnight stay. In Study 2, we investigated the persistence of this bias. Perceived room value and anticipatory well-being can be expected to return to baseline levels only many years after the death event. Similar to "stigmatized properties" in real estate, these data confirm an irrational and recalcitrant cognitive bias surrounding consumers' views of death-affected hotel rooms.

  4. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Praveen, E-mail: pmalik100@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar 144011, Punjab (India); Raina, K.K. [Liquid Crystal Group, Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India)

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that approx1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  5. Dissociation behavior of pellet shaped mixed gas hydrate samples that contain propane as a guest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Taro; Sakamoto, Yasuhide; Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Komai, Takeshi; Haneda, Hironori; Yoon, Ji-Ho; Ohga, Kotaro

    2006-01-01

    The dissociation kinetics of mixed gas hydrates that contain propane as a guest molecule have been investigated. The mixed gas hydrates used in this work were artificially prepared using the binary gas mixture of methane-propane and the ternary gas mixture of methane-ethane-propane. The crystal structures and the guest compositions of the mixed hydrates were clearly identified by using Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography. The dissociation rates of the gas hydrates observed under several isothermal and isobaric conditions were discussed with an analytical model. The isobaric conditions were achieved by pressurizing with mixed gases using buffer cylinders, which had similar compositions to those of the initial gases used for synthesizing each hydrate sample. Interestingly, the calculated result agreed well with the experimentally observed results only when the composition of the vapor phase was assumed to be identical with that of the hydrate phase instead of the bulk (equilibrium) gas composition

  6. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Praveen; Raina, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that ∼1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  7. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T.; Henriksen, Niel M.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by non-optimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery. PMID:26181208

  8. Porphyrinic supramolecular daisy chains incorporating pillar[5]arene-viologen host-guest interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Fathalla, Maher; Strutt, Nathan; Srinivasan, Sampath; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Hartlieb, Karel J.; Bakr, Osman; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-01-01

    A porphyrin functionalised with pillar[5]arene and a viologen at its 5- and 15-meso positions assembles in a head-to-tail manner, producing linear supramolecular daisy chains in dichloromethane. At high concentrations, it forms an organogel which has been investigated by electron microscopy and rheological measurements, paving the way for the preparation of other functional supramolecular assemblies which harness viologen"⊂" pillararene host-guest interactions.

  9. Dielectric relaxation of guest molecules in a clathrate structure of syndiotactic polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Osamu; Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2012-12-13

    Structure and dynamics of semicrystalline polymer films composed of syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) and 2-butanone were examined through X-ray diffraction, polarized FTIR, and dielectric relaxation measurements. The X-ray and FTIR measurements revealed its crystal structure to be δ-clathrate containing 2-butanone molecules inside. The carbonyl group of 2-butanone in the crystal was found to orient preferentially parallel to the ac plane of the crystal through the polarized ATR FTIR measurements. Dielectric measurements were also conducted on these film samples to see only the relaxation dynamics of 2-butanone thanks to the high dielectric intensity of 2-butanone compared to sPS. Two relaxation modes denoted by slow and fast modes appeared. The former was assigned to the motion of 2-butanone molecules entrapped in the cavities of the crystalline (δ-form) and the latter to those in the amorphous region. We focused on the slow mode in order to elucidate the specific dynamics of the guest molecule confined in the crystalline region. The relaxation time of the slow mode was about 4 orders of magnitude longer than that of liquid 2-butanone. This suggests that the dynamics of guest molecules is highly restricted due to the high barrier to conformational and/or orientational change of the guest molecule in the cavity of δ-crystal. Furthermore, the dielectric intensity Δε of the slow mode was much smaller than the one calculated from that of bulk liquid 2-butanone and the guest concentration in the crystalline region (the intensity was only 10% of the estimated value from the bulk liquid data). This result also indicates that the free rotational motion of 2-butanone molecules is restricted inside the crystal. This will be consistently related to the weak uniplanar orientation of the carbonyl group of 2-butanone parallel to the ac plane revealed by the X-ray and polarized ATR FTIR measurements.

  10. The metaphor of nurse as guest with ethical implications for nursing and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2005-10-01

    Current healthcare advertising and customer relations terminology acknowledge that healthcare providers, including nurses, are to act as hosts for persons who enter into healthcare agencies and institutions. Indeed, much has been written aligning nursing and other healthcare services with consumer-oriented roles of the hospitality service industry commonly associated with hotels and restaurants. From a human becoming perspective, this article discusses possible ethical, administrative, and practice implications of nurses acting as guests entering into the lives of those we serve.

  11. Porphyrinic supramolecular daisy chains incorporating pillar[5]arene-viologen host-guest interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Fathalla, Maher

    2015-05-18

    A porphyrin functionalised with pillar[5]arene and a viologen at its 5- and 15-meso positions assembles in a head-to-tail manner, producing linear supramolecular daisy chains in dichloromethane. At high concentrations, it forms an organogel which has been investigated by electron microscopy and rheological measurements, paving the way for the preparation of other functional supramolecular assemblies which harness viologen"⊂" pillararene host-guest interactions.

  12. Molecular binding thermodynamics of spherical guests by β-cyclodextrins bearing aromatic substituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Wang, Li-Hua; Mao, Wen-Zhao; Liu, Yu, E-mail: yuliu@nankai.edu.cn

    2014-01-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different conformation of β-CD derivatives. • Enthalpy gain. • High binding ability. - Abstract: The molecular binding behaviors of two β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) derivatives bearing 1,2,3-triazole moieties, i.e. mono-6-deoxy-6-{4-(8-oxymethylquinolino)[1,2,3]triazolyl}-β-CD (1) and mono-6-deoxy-6-{4-(8-oxymethylnaphthol)[1,2,3]triazolyl}-β-CD (3), and their analogs without 1,2,3-triazole moieties, i.e. mono-6-deoxy-6-(8-oxymethylquinolino)-β-CD (2) and mono-6-deoxy-6-(8-oxymethylnaphthol)-β-CD (4) toward spherical guests (±)-borneol and (±)-camphor were investigated to elucidate how substituent moiety of host affects the binding abilities by 2D NMR as well as microcalorimetric titrations in aqueous phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.20) at 298.15 K. The binding modes of host–guest interactions obtained from 2D NMR displayed that host CDs without triazole moieties gave better induce-fit efficiency between hosts and guests, leading to stronger binding abilities. Thermodynamically, the inclusion complexation was driven by enthalpy with the stoichiometry of 1:1. Another factor contributed to the enhanced binding abilities was the enthalpy gain with the smaller entropy loss.

  13. Paramagnetic NMR investigation of dendrimer-based host-guest interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, the host-guest behavior of poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers bearing amine, hydroxyl, or carboxylate surface functionalities were investigated by paramagnetic NMR studies. 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPO derivatives were used as paramagnetic guest molecules. The results showed that TEMPO-COOH significantly broaden the ¹H NMR peaks of amine- and hydroxyl-terminated PAMAM dendrimers. In comparison, no paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE was observed between TEMPO-NH₂, TEMPO-OH and the three types of PAMAM dendrimers. The PRE phenomenon observed is correlated with the encapsulation of TEMPO-COOH within dendrimer pockets. Protonation of the tertiary amine groups within PAMAM dendrimers plays an important role during this process. Interestingly, the absence of TEMPO-COOH encapsulation within carboxylate-terminated PAMAM dendrimer is observed due to the repulsion of TEMPO-COO- anion and anionic dendrimer surface. The combination of paramagnetic probes and ¹H NMR linewidth analysis can be used as a powerful tool in the analysis of dendrimer-based host-guest systems.

  14. Hotel guest's $14.5 million jury verdict set aside on appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-20

    A Missouri Court of Appeals judge reversed a $14.5 million judgement against [name removed] Inc., which had been held liable for the beating and sexual assault of a guest in its hotel. The guest, identified as [name removed], had requested an upgrade to a concierge room, to increase her safety, but the hotel did not fill her request. When [name removed] opened her hotel room door the next morning, an assailant attacked, beat and raped her. The assailant escaped hotel security, but was later apprehended. The initial case against [name removed] and the assailant resulted in a $22.5 million judgement for [name removed] Both parties appealed. [Name removed] prevailed in its argument that the initial trial judge misinstructed the jury, and that [name removed] was unable to show clear and convincing evidence that the hotel's willful or conscious disregard for guest safety caused the situation. However, the court ruled against [name removed] on the basis of [name removed]'s fear-of-AIDS claim, because of her exposure to the virus.

  15. Synthesis and Guest Recognition of Switchable Pt-Salphen Based Molecular Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorien Benda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular tweezers are artificial receptors that have an open cavity generated by two recognition units pre-organized by a spacer. Switchable molecular tweezers, using a stimuli-responsive spacer, are particularly appealing as prototypes of the molecular machines that combine mechanical motion and allosteric recognition properties. In this present study, the synthesis of switchable molecular tweezers composed of a central terpyridine unit substituted in 4,4″ positions by two Pt(II-salphen complexes is reported. The terpyridine ligand can be reversibly converted upon Zn(II coordination from a free ‘U’-shaped closed form to a coordinated ‘W’ open form. This new substitution pattern enables a reverse control of the mechanical motion compared to the previously reported 6,6″ substituted terpyridine-based tweezers. Guest binding studies with aromatic guests showed an intercalation of coronene in the cavity created by the Pt-salphen moieties in the closed conformation. The formation of 1:1 host-guest complex was investigated by a combination of NMR studies and DFT calculations.

  16. Defined Host-Guest Chemistry on Nanocarbon for Sustained Inhibition of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Misra, Santosh K; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Ostadhossein, Alireza; Daza, Enrique; Tiwari, Saumya; Mittal, Shachi; Gryka, Mark C; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-08-22

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT-3) is known to be overexpressed in cancer stem cells. Poor solubility and variable drug absorption are linked to low bioavailability and decreased efficacy. Many of the drugs regulating STAT-3 expression lack aqueous solubility; hence hindering efficient bioavailability. A theranostics nanoplatform based on luminescent carbon particles decorated with cucurbit[6]uril is introduced for enhancing the solubility of niclosamide, a STAT-3 inhibitor. The host-guest chemistry between cucurbit[6]uril and niclosamide makes the delivery of the hydrophobic drug feasible while carbon nanoparticles enhance cellular internalization. Extensive physicochemical characterizations confirm successful synthesis. Subsequently, the host-guest chemistry of niclosamide and cucurbit[6]uril is studied experimentally and computationally. In vitro assessments in human breast cancer cells indicate approximately twofold enhancement in IC 50 of drug. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence imaging demonstrate efficient cellular internalization. Furthermore, the catalytic biodegradation of the nanoplatforms occur upon exposure to human myeloperoxidase in short time. In vivo studies on athymic mice with MCF-7 xenograft indicate the size of tumor in the treatment group is half of the controls after 40 d. Immunohistochemistry corroborates the downregulation of STAT-3 phosphorylation. Overall, the host-guest chemistry on nanocarbon acts as a novel arsenal for STAT-3 inhibition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Defined Host–Guest Chemistry on Nanocarbon for Sustained Inhibition of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Misra, Santosh K.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Ostadhossein, Alireza; Daza, Enrique; Tiwari, Saumya; Mittal, Shachi; Gryka, Mark C.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT-3) is known to be overexpressed in cancer stem cells. Poor solubility and variable drug absorption are linked to low bioavailability and decreased efficacy. Many of the drugs regulating STAT-3 expression lack aqueous solubility; hence hindering efficient bioavailability. A theranostics nanoplatform based on luminescent carbon particles decorated with cucurbit[6]uril is introduced for enhancing the solubility of niclosamide, a STAT-3 inhibitor. The host–guest chemistry between cucurbit[6]uril and niclosamide makes the delivery of the hydrophobic drug feasible while carbon nanoparticles enhance cellular internalization. Extensive physicochemical characterizations confirm successful synthesis. Subsequently, the host–guest chemistry of niclosamide and cucurbit[6]uril is studied experimentally and computationally. In vitro assessments in human breast cancer cells indicate approximately twofold enhancement in IC50 of drug. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence imaging demonstrate efficient cellular internalization. Furthermore, the catalytic biodegradation of the nanoplatforms occur upon exposure to human myeloperoxidase in short time. In vivo studies on athymic mice with MCF-7 xenograft indicate the size of tumor in the treatment group is half of the controls after 40 d. Immunohistochemistry corroborates the downregulation of STAT-3 phosphorylation. Overall, the host–guest chemistry on nanocarbon acts as a novel arsenal for STAT-3 inhibition. PMID:27545321

  18. Host-Guest Interaction of Cucurbit[8]uril with N-(3-Aminopropyl)cyclohexylamine: Cyclohexyl Encapsulation Triggered Ternary Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu; Wang, Chuan-Zeng; Tian, Mengkui; Tao, Zhu; Ni, Xin-Long; Prior, Timothy J; Redshaw, Carl

    2018-01-15

    The host-guest interaction of a series of cyclohexyl-appended guests with cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8]) was studied by ¹H NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structure revealed that two cycloalkane moieties can be simultaneously encapsulated in the hydrophobic cavity of the Q[8] host to form a ternary complex for the first time.

  19. Host-Guest Interaction of Cucurbit[8]uril with N-(3-Aminopropylcyclohexylamine: Cyclohexyl Encapsulation Triggered Ternary Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The host-guest interaction of a series of cyclohexyl-appended guests with cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8] was studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structure revealed that two cycloalkane moieties can be simultaneously encapsulated in the hydrophobic cavity of the Q[8] host to form a ternary complex for the first time.

  20. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  1. QUALITY MEASUREMENT IN RESTAURANT INDUSTRY FROM THE MARKETING PERSPECTIVE: A COMPARISON OF GUESTS' AND MANAGERS' QUALITY PERCEPTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kukanja, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Restaurant quality management, as a fairly new area of research, requires frequent and critical academic monitoring. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of several quality attributes for the restaurant industry. However, up until now no study has compared both ¬– restaurant managers` and guests' quality perceptions from the marketing mix (7P) perspective. This paper analyses differences in quality perceptions between managers and guests. Two samples – 207 valid questionnaires obt...

  2. Cucurbit[8]uril-Containing Multilayer Films for the Photocontrolled Binding and Release of a Guest Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Henning; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Schönhoff, Monika

    2016-03-15

    The powerful host-guest chemistry of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) was employed to obtain photoresponsive polyelectrolyte multilayer films for the reversible and photocontrolled binding and release of an organic guest molecule. For this purpose, we designed and synthesized a polyelectrolyte with azobenzene side groups. Then, CB[8] was associated with the azo side group to obtain a supramolecular host-guest complex that was further used as building block in order to prepare photoresponsive and CB[8]-containing polyelectrolyte multilayer films. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and a dissipative quartz crystal microbalance are employed to monitor the formation of the host-guest complex and the layer-by-layer self-assembly of the multilayer films, respectively. We demonstrate that the photoresponsive properties of the azo side groups are maintained before and after host-guest complexation with CB[8] in solution and within the multilayer films, respectively. A guest molecule was then specifically included as second binding partner into the CB[8]-containing multilayer films. Subsequently, the release of the guest was performed by UV light irradiation due to the trans-cis isomerization of the adjacent azo side groups. Re-isomerization of the azo side groups was achieved by VIS light irradiation and enabled the rebinding of the guest into CB[8]. Finally, we demonstrate that the photocontrolled binding and release within CB[8]-containing multilayer films can reliably and reversibly be performed over a period of more than 2 weeks with constant binding efficiency. Therefore, we expect such novel type of photosensitive films to have promising future applications in the field of stimuli-responsive nanomaterials.

  3. Catalysts for selective hydrogenation of furfural derived from the double complex salt [Pd(NH 3 ) 4 ](ReO 4 ) 2 on γ-Al 2 O 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Simon T.; Lamb, H. Henry

    2017-06-01

    The double complex salt [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 was employed as precursor of supported bimetallic catalysts for selective hydrogenation of furfural. Direct reduction of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 in flowing H2 at 400 °C yields bimetallic nanoparticles 1–2 nm in size that exhibit significant interaction between the metals, as evidenced by temperature-programmed hydride decomposition (complete suppression of β-PdHx formation), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Pd K and Re LIII edges (PdRe distance = 2.72 Å), and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In contrast, calcination of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 at 350 °C in air and subsequent reduction in H2 at 400 °C results in metal segregation and formation of large (>50 nm) supported Pd particles; Re species cover the Pd particles and γ-Al2O3 support. A PdRe 1:2 catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation and calcination using HReO4 and [Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2 has a similar morphology. The catalyst derived by direct reduction of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 exhibits remarkably high activity for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol (FAL) at 150 °C and 1 atm. Suppression of H2 chemisorption via elimination of Pd threefold sites, as evidenced by CO diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, correlates with increased FAL selectivity.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopic and gravimetric study of some Hofmann-CBA-Type Host and host-guest compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aytekin, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, similar to Hofmann type M(C 4 H 7 NH 2 ) 2 Ni(CN) 4 (M=Ni or Co) host and M(C 4 H 7 NH 2 ) 2 Ni(CN) 4 .nG (M=Ni or Co; G=benzene, 1,2-, 1,3-dichlorobenzene; n=the number of guest) hostguest compounds were obtained chemically. The infrared spectra of these compounds were recorded with FT-IR spectrometer in the spectroscopic region of 4000cm-1-400cm-1. From these spectra the vibrational wave numbers of ligand molecule, Ni(CN) 4 2 - ion and guest molecules were determined. The absorption and the liberation processes of the guest molecules in the host compounds were examined at room temperature by gravimetric method. Otherwise, it was seen that the molecular structure was supported by making instrumental analysis of host and some host-guest compounds. By analysing the structures of host and host-guest compounds were found to be similar to those of Hofmann type compounds, ligand molecule cyclobutylamine were coordinated to M metal atom from cyclobutylamine's nitrogen atom, the guest molecules were imprisoned in the structural cavities between the sheets

  5. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  6. Simultaneous purification and storage of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Weber, R.; Carlson, E. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Specially coated magnesium particles have been shown to selectively absorb hydrogen from a hydrogen-rich gas stream such as reformate. These coated magnesium particles can store the absorbed hydrogen as required and subsequently deliver pure hydrogen, just as uncoated magnesium particles can. These coated magnesium particles could be used in a device that accepts a steady stream of reformate, as from a methane reformer, stores the selectively absorbed hydrogen indefinitely, and delivers purified hydrogen on demand. Unfortunately, this coating (magnesium nitride) has been shown to degrade over a period of several weeks, so that the magnesium within evidences progressively lower storage capacity. The authors are investigating two other coatings, one of which might be applicable to hydridable metals other than magnesium, to replace magnesium nitride.

  7. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  8. Structure of selected basic zinc/copper (II) phosphate minerals based upon near-infrared spectroscopy--implications for hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Reddy, B Jagannadha; Palmer, Sara J; Keeffe, Eloise C

    2011-03-01

    The NIR spectra of reichenbachite, scholzite and parascholzite have been studied at 298 K. The spectra of the minerals are different, in line with composition and crystal structural variations. Cation substitution effects are significant in their electronic spectra and three distinctly different electronic transition bands are observed in the near-infrared spectra at high wavenumbers in the 12,000-7600 cm(-1) spectral region. Reichenbachite electronic spectrum is characterised by Cu(II) transition bands at 9755 and 7520 cm(-1). A broad spectral feature observed for ferrous ion in the 12,000-9000 cm(-1) region both in scholzite and parascholzite. Some what similarities in the vibrational spectra of the three phosphate minerals are observed particularly in the OH stretching region. The observation of strong band at 5090 cm(-1) indicates strong hydrogen bonding in the structure of the dimorphs, scholzite and parascholzite. The three phosphates exhibit overlapping bands in the 4800-4000 cm(-1) region resulting from the combinations of vibrational modes of (PO(4))(3-) units. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective Production of 2-Methylfuran by Gas-Phase Hydrogenation of Furfural on Copper Incorporated by Complexation in Mesoporous Silica Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Gómez, Carmen Pilar; Cecilia, Juan A; Moreno-Tost, Ramón; Maireles-Torres, Pedro

    2017-04-10

    Copper species have been incorporated in mesoporous silica (MS) through complexation with the amine groups of dodecylamine, which was used as a structure-directing agent in the synthesis. A series of Cu/SiO 2 catalysts (xCu-MS) with copper loadings (x) from 2.5 to 20 wt % was synthesized and evaluated in the gas-phase hydrogenation of furfural (FUR). The most suitable catalytic performance in terms of 2-methylfuran yield was obtained with an intermediate copper content (10 wt %). This 10Cu-MS catalyst exhibits a 2-methylfuran yield higher than 95 mol % after 5 h time-on-stream (TOS) at a reaction temperature of 210 °C with a H 2 /FUR molar ratio of 11.5 and a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 1.5 h -1 . After 14 h TOS, this catalyst still showed a yield of 80 mol %. In all cases, carbonaceous deposits on the external surface were the cause of the catalyst deactivation, although sintering of the copper particles was observed for higher copper loadings. This intermediate copper loading (10 wt %) offered a suitable balance between resistance to sintering and tendency to form carbonaceous deposits. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Selective encapsulation by Janus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei, E-mail: wel208@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Ruth, Donovan; Gunton, James D. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    We employ Monte Carlo simulation to examine encapsulation in a system comprising Janus oblate spheroids and isotropic spheres. More specifically, the impact of variations in temperature, particle size, inter-particle interaction range, and strength is examined for a system in which the spheroids act as the encapsulating agents and the spheres as the encapsulated guests. In this picture, particle interactions are described by a quasi-square-well patch model. This study highlights the environmental adaptation and selectivity of the encapsulation system to changes in temperature and guest particle size, respectively. Moreover, we identify an important range in parameter space where encapsulation is favored, as summarized by an encapsulation map. Finally, we discuss the generalization of our results to systems having a wide range of particle geometries.

  11. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    - the visual model - running on the client. They claim a number of benefits from this approach, including better predictability and consistency. Wolfgang Broll discusses the SmallView system which is an attempt to provide a toolkit for DVEs. One of the key features of SmallView is a sophisticated application level protocol, DWTP, that provides support for a variety of communication models. The final paper, by Chris Greenhalgh, discusses the MASSIVE system which has been used to explore the notion of awareness in the 3D space via the concept of `auras'. These auras define an area of interest for users and support a mapping between what a user is aware of, and what data update rate the communications infrastructure can support. We hope that this selection of papers will serve to provide a clear introduction to the distributed system issues faced by the DVE community and the approaches they have taken in solving them. Finally, we wish to thank Hubert Le Van Gong for his tireless efforts in pulling together all these papers and both the referees and the authors of the papers for the time and effort in ensuring that their contributions teased out the interesting distributed systems issues for this special issue. † E-mail address: rodger@arch.sel.sony.com

  12. Guest Editor's Introduction: Special section on dependable distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Christof

    1999-09-01

    tolerate. One wants to tolerate as many failure classes as needed to satisfy the stochastic requirements of the protocol [1] while still maintaining a sufficient performance. Since clients of a protocol have different requirements with respect to the performance/fault-tolerance trade-off, one would like to be able to customize protocols such that one can select an appropriate performance/fault-tolerance trade-off. In this special section Hiltunen et al describe how one can compose protocols from micro-protocols in their Cactus system. They show how a group RPC system can be tailored to the needs of a client. In particular, they show how considering additional failure classes affects the performance of a group RPC system. References [1] Cristian F 1991 Understanding fault-tolerant distributed systems Communications of ACM 34 (2) 56-78 [2] Heimerdinger W L and Weinstock C B 1992 A conceptual framework for system fault tolerance Technical Report 92-TR-33, CMU/SEI [3] Laprie J C (ed) 1992 Dependability: Basic Concepts and Terminology (Vienna: Springer)

  13. Selective and regular localization of accessible Pt nanoparticles inside the walls of an ordered silica: Application as a highly active and well-defined heterogeneous catalyst for propene and styrene hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Boualleg, Malika

    2011-12-01

    We describe here an original methodology related to the "build-the-bottle-around-the-ship" approach yielding a highly ordered silica matrix containing regularly distributed Pt nanoparticles (NPs) located inside the silica walls, Pt@{walls}SiO2. The starting colloidal solution of crystalline Pt nanoparticles was obtained from Pt(dba)2 (dba = dibenzylidene acetone) and 3-chloropropylsilane. The resulting nanoparticles (diameter: 2.0 ± 0.4 nm determined by HRTEM) resulted hydrophilic. The NPs present in the THF colloidal solution were incorporated inside the walls of a highly ordered 2D hexagonal mesoporous silica matrix via sol-gel process using a templating route with tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS, as the silica source, and block copolymer (EthyleneOxide) 20(PropyleneOxide)70(EthyleneOxide)20 (Pluronic P123) as the structure-directing agent. Low-temperature calcination of the crude material at 593 K led to the final solid Pt@{walls}SiO2. Characterization by IR, HRTEM, BF-STEM and HAADF-STEM, SAXS, WAXS, XRD, XPS, H2 chemisorption, etc. of Pt@{walls}SiO2 confirmed the 2D hexagonal structuration and high mesoporosity (870 m2/g) of the material as well as the presence of stable 2-nm-sized crystalline Pt(0) NPs embedded inside the walls of the silica matrix. The material displayed no tendency to NPs sintering or leaching (Pt loading 0.3 wt.%) during its preparation. Pt@{walls}SiO2 was found to be a stable, selective and highly active hydrogenation catalyst. The catalytic performances in propene hydrogenation were tested under chemical regime conditions in a tubular flow reactor (278 K, propene/H2/He = 20/16/1.09 cm3/min, P tot = 1 bar) and were found superior to those of an homologous solid containing Pt NPs along its pore channels Pt@{pores}SiO2 and to those of a classical industrial catalysts Pt/Al2O3, (TOF = 2.3 s-1 vs. TOF = 0.90 and 0.92 s-1, respectively, calculated per surface platinum atoms). Pt@{walls}SiO2 also catalyzes fast and selective styrene

  14. Selective and regular localization of accessible Pt nanoparticles inside the walls of an ordered silica: Application as a highly active and well-defined heterogeneous catalyst for propene and styrene hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Boualleg, Malika; Norsic, Sé bastien; Baudouin, David; Sayah, Reine; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra; Basset, Jean-Marie; Candy, Jean Pierre; Dé lichè re, Pierre; Pelzer, Katrin; Veyre, Laurent; Thieuleux, Chloé

    2011-01-01

    We describe here an original methodology related to the "build-the-bottle-around-the-ship" approach yielding a highly ordered silica matrix containing regularly distributed Pt nanoparticles (NPs) located inside the silica walls, Pt@{walls}SiO2. The starting colloidal solution of crystalline Pt nanoparticles was obtained from Pt(dba)2 (dba = dibenzylidene acetone) and 3-chloropropylsilane. The resulting nanoparticles (diameter: 2.0 ± 0.4 nm determined by HRTEM) resulted hydrophilic. The NPs present in the THF colloidal solution were incorporated inside the walls of a highly ordered 2D hexagonal mesoporous silica matrix via sol-gel process using a templating route with tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS, as the silica source, and block copolymer (EthyleneOxide) 20(PropyleneOxide)70(EthyleneOxide)20 (Pluronic P123) as the structure-directing agent. Low-temperature calcination of the crude material at 593 K led to the final solid Pt@{walls}SiO2. Characterization by IR, HRTEM, BF-STEM and HAADF-STEM, SAXS, WAXS, XRD, XPS, H2 chemisorption, etc. of Pt@{walls}SiO2 confirmed the 2D hexagonal structuration and high mesoporosity (870 m2/g) of the material as well as the presence of stable 2-nm-sized crystalline Pt(0) NPs embedded inside the walls of the silica matrix. The material displayed no tendency to NPs sintering or leaching (Pt loading 0.3 wt.%) during its preparation. Pt@{walls}SiO2 was found to be a stable, selective and highly active hydrogenation catalyst. The catalytic performances in propene hydrogenation were tested under chemical regime conditions in a tubular flow reactor (278 K, propene/H2/He = 20/16/1.09 cm3/min, P tot = 1 bar) and were found superior to those of an homologous solid containing Pt NPs along its pore channels Pt@{pores}SiO2 and to those of a classical industrial catalysts Pt/Al2O3, (TOF = 2.3 s-1 vs. TOF = 0.90 and 0.92 s-1, respectively, calculated per surface platinum atoms). Pt@{walls}SiO2 also catalyzes fast and selective styrene

  15. Synthesis and anion binding studies of tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors: Proton transfer-induced selectivity for hydrogen sulfate over sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, Maryam Emami; Johnson, Corey R; Basaran, Ismet; Nafis, Aemal; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Hossain, Md Alamgir

    2015-01-01

    Tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors, tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)urea ( L1 ) and tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)thiourea ( L2 ), have been synthesized and their anion binding properties have been investigated for halides and oxoanions. As investigated by 1 H NMR titrations, each receptor binds an anion with a 1:1 stoichiometry via hydrogen-bonding interactions (NH⋯anion), showing the binding trend in the order of F - > H 2 PO 4 - > HCO 3 - > HSO 4 - > CH 3 COO - > SO 4 2- > Cl - > Br - > I in DMSO- d 6 . The interactions of the receptors were further studied by 2D NOESY, showing the loss of NOESY contacts of two NH resonances for the complexes of F - , H 2 PO 4 - , HCO 3 - , HSO 4 - or CH 3 COO - due to the strong NH⋯anion interactions. The observed higher binding affinity for HSO 4 - than SO 4 2- is attributed to the proton transfer from HSO 4 - to the central nitrogen of L1 or L2 which was also supported by the DFT calculations, leading to the secondary acid-base interactions. The thiourea receptor L2 has a general trend to show a higher affinity for an anion as compared to the urea receptor L1 for the corresponding anion in DMSO- d 6 . In addition, the compound L2 has been exploited for its extraction properties for fluoride in water using a liquid-liquid extraction technique, and the results indicate that the receptor effectively extracts fluoride from water showing ca. 99% efficiency (based on L2 ).

  16. A sensitive and selective sensor for biothiols based on the turn-on fluorescence of the Fe-MIL-88 metal-organic frameworks-hydrogen peroxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng Juan; Jiang, Jun Ze; Li, Yuan Fang

    2015-12-21

    Herein, we present a novel strategy based on a "turn-on" fluorescence system made up of metal-organic frameworks Fe-MIL-88 and H2O2 for detecting biothiols in human serum. The nonfluorescent Fe-MIL-88 gives weak fluorescence in the presence of H2O2. Interestingly, it was found that biothiols such as glutathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy) could induce fluorescence turn-on of the Fe-MIL-88/H2O2 system. Under optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity exhibited a good linear relationship in the range from 50 nM-10 μM for GSH (r = 0.994), 50 nM-10 μM for Cys (r = 0.990), and 50 nM-10 μM (r = 0.992) for Hcy; the detection limits of GSH, Cys and Hcy were 30 nM, 40 nM, and 40 nM respectively. Mechanism investigation reveals that biothiols could associate with Fe-MIL-88 via hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction followed by redox reaction between biothiols and Fe(3+) present in the Fe-MIL-88, Fe(3+) was thus reduced to Fe(2+), and then Fe(2+) could efficiently catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 to yield ˙OH radicals through the Fenton reaction. Besides, biothiols were able to reduce H2O2 to produce ˙OH radicals directly. Thus the Fe-MIL-88 as well as biothiols could cooperatively contribute to the activation of H2O2 to generate higher amounts of ˙OH radicals, which in turn oxidize the free ligand terephthalic acid (BDC) outside or within the Fe-MIL-88 structure to strongly fluorescent hydroxylated terephthalic acid (OHBDC), thereby turning on the fluorescence.

  17. Materials for Hydrogen Storage in Nanocavities: Design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, E. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del IPN, Unidad Legaria, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion (Mexico)

    2009-11-15

    The adsorption potential for a given adsorbate depends of both, material surface and adsorbate properties. In this contribution the possible guest-host interactions for H{sub 2} within a cavity or on a surface are discussed considering the molecule physical properties. Five different interactions contribute to the adsorption forces for this molecule: 1) quadrupole moment interaction with the local electric field gradient; 1) electron cloud polarization by a charge center; 3) dispersive forces (van der Waals); 4) quadrupole moment versus quadrupole moment between neighboring H{sub 2} molecules, and, 5) H{sub 2} coordination to a metal center. The relative importance of these five interactions for the hydrogen storage in nanocavities is discussed from experimental evidences in order to extract materials design criteria for molecular hydrogen storage. (author)

  18. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  19. USULAN PERBAIKAN PROSES BISNIS DENGAN KONSEP BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING (STUDI KASUS : PERMATA GUEST HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswara Adhitya Wardhana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Permata Guest House Semarang merupakan usaha bisnis yang bergerak di bidang jasa penginapan. Perkembangan skala bisnis Permata Guest House yang pesat tidak disertai dengan penataan dan pengelolaan proses bisnis (Business Process yang memadai, mengakibatkan banyak kemunculan keluhan dari stakeholder, yaitu dari pelanggan (customer, dan kalangan internal karyawan. Key Performance Indicator (KPI yang digunakan dalam penelitian terhadap Permata Guest House ini adalah KPI yang diturunkan dari Critical Success Factor (CSF. Pengukuran kinerja dilakukan dengan berdasarkan indikator performansi (Performance Indicator yang telah ditentukan pada observasi awal beserta ukuran dan target yang dicapai untuk tiap indikatornya. Dari hasil observasi awal didapatkan selisih indikator moral kerja dan loyalitas sebesar 20%, komplain keramahtamahan sebesar 16,67%, komplain penampilan dan sikap sebesar 16,67%, tingkat okupansi marketing sales sebesar 30%, dan kepuasan layanan sebesar 77,78%. Berdasarkan analisis pengukuran kinerja dan proses bisnis telah didapatkan faktor-faktor yang menyebabkan kinerja proses bisnis belum sesuai target, salah satu penyelesaian untuk dapat memperbaiki kinerja adalah dengan merancang ulang proses bisnis dengan menggunakan metode Business Process Reengineering (BPR. Dari hasil BPR perlu dilakukan peninjauan kembali (rethinking, perancangan ulang (redesign, dan evaluasi (retool terhadap model kinerja bisnis. Hasil dari rekayasa ulang proses bisnis berupa pembakuan usulan proses bisnis, penyusunan visi misi perusahaan, perancangan struktur organisasi dan job description, serta penyusunan Standart Operating Procedure Kata Kunci  : critical success factor, key performance indicator, business process reengineering   Abstract Permata Guest House Semarang is a business engaged in the lodging services. The development of business scale rapid Permata Guest House is not accompanied by the administration and management of business processes are

  20. A general equilibrium model of guest-worker migration: the source-country perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djajic, S; Milbourne, R

    1988-11-01

    "This paper examines the problem of guest-worker migration from an economy populated by identical, utility-maximizing individuals with finite working lives. The decision to migrate, the rate of saving while abroad, as well as the length of a migrant's stay in the foreign country, are all viewed as part of a solution to an intertemporal optimization problem. In addition to studying the microeconomic aspects of temporary migration, the paper analyses the determinants of the equilibrium flow of migrants, the corresponding domestic wage, and the level of welfare enjoyed by a typical worker. Effects of an emigration tax are also investigated." excerpt

  1. Leadership Lessons Learned From Being A Guest When The Hotel Was Overbooked

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Earlier this month I observed a difficult situation playing out at hotel where I was a guest, and it provided an invaluable reminder of just how important effective leadership is when things go wrong in the hotel business. The story is that I was traveling back from a trip to the Middle East where I had taken my college age daughter to practice the Arabic she is learning at University. To split up 16 hours of flying time, I planned for us to stay overnight in Rome, Italy at a hotel I had ...

  2. Guest Editorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s, progress in fuel cell and battery research evolved mainly around materials development, empirical approaches, and efforts focusing mostly separately on either the microscale (electrodes and electrolytes) or the macroscale (systems, thermodynamics, and balance......-of-plant). Since the 2000s, with the advent of more powerful computing and modeling resources, and the general progress in the field, it has seen a shift to the merging of scales, the possibility of 3D probing and quantification with fuel cell stacks and battery packs becoming the focal point. In parallel...

  3. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Henry Morin; Shiguo Lian; Xin Wang; David Llewellyn-Jones

    2010-01-01

    I..IntroductionConsumers and consumer electronics are increasingly using the Internet for distribution of multimedia content, including digital versions of books, articles, music, video, games, software and images. The ease with which multimedia contents can be copied and redistributed makes the Internet well suited for unauthorized copying, modification and redistribution. The rapid adoption of new technologies such as high-bandwidth connections, wireless networks, and peer-to-peer networks ...

  4. Guest Editorial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    ohannesburg (South Africa) and Edith Cowan ... This work is licensed to the publisher under the Creative Commons Attributions License 3.0 ... education, has been a long and arduously thought ... pregnancy and birthing leave us wondering how this.

  5. Guest Editorial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    these life-worlds. In our first manuscript, Meltdown in the Midst of. Beauty, we find an existential crisis of sorts between the blurry lines of partaking as a participant but also being a researcher in an early childhood artist's studio. Learning to listen to the children's ideas and go with them on a learning journey is paramount to.

  6. Guest Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For example, on the basis of observed spectra one can perform ... can give us information about the kinematical properties of emission gas. Condi- .... and plasmas in technology, such as laser welding and piercing of metals and light sources ...

  7. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Bamond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This volume of HLRC is dedicated to the emergent and rapidly growing interest in English Medium Instruction as a major driver in the internationalization of higher education. It focuses on sharing knowledge and experience in CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning and EMI (English Medium Instruction from different universities in Eastern and European countries as a means to reflect and improve upon teaching and learning. As editors, we would like to kick this volume off with a review of one of the most comprehensive and relevant publications on the topic in recent times, The Higher Education Language Landscape: Ensuring Quality in English Language Degree Programmes, (2013.  Following the book review is a short question and answer section with its authors and renowned experts in the field, David Marsh, Victor Pavón Vázquez, and María Jesús Frigols Martín. We would like to extend our gratitude to all three for providing us with their insights, which are, no doubt, of great use to higher education institutions considering embarking upon or improving English-taught degree programs.

  8. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Shiguo Lian; Chu-Sing Yang; Stefanos Gritzalis

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia Information Networking and Security include a number of related topics such as information networking, communication, security and sharing services, etc., Significant attention has been paid in the past years to design flexible and powerful solutions to this field, as the rapid development of communication technology, utilizing network to realize global communications has become the trend of information exchange. Although the Internet has reached great success in contributing to ...

  9. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Ai Lin Teo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This section contains upgraded papers originally published at The CIB W099 International Conference on "Modelling and Building Health and Safety”, which was organised and hosted by the Department of Building, National University of Singapore (NUS. It was held on 10 -11 September 2012 at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Center, Singapore.  The focal objectives of this section are to explore the integration and application of new techniques, technologies and strategies towards attaining verifiable improvements in occupational safety and health in construction.

  10. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Teixeira; Anna Tzanakaki; Davide Careglio; Miroslaw Klinkowski

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of communication networks is driven by a huge increase of end user traffic and bandwidth demands due to the recent massive deployment of broadband access technologies as well as the outburst of new network applications and emerging service oriented applications. The observed trends are accompanied by the advances in optical technologies which have enabled the development of long‐distance and high‐capacity transmission systems. Nowadays the role of optics in communication network...

  11. Guest Editorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jiabing; Xu, Lie; Flynn, Damian

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, renewable energy, in particular wind and solar energy, has experienced one of the most substantial growths of any power generation source. At present, in many areas across the world, wind and solar energy are providing substantial proportions of the total electrical demand......, rising to over 50% in certain regions. However, many renewable energy sources, e.g. modern variable speed wind turbines and photovoltaic systems, are significantly different from conventional thermal and hydropower generating technologies, since they synchronize to the electricity grid via power...... electronics converters, and so are not directly responsive to system frequency transients. As a result, there are significant challenges for maintaining a reliable and secure power system, particularly in areas with high penetration of wind/solar energy. On the other hand, flexible control strategies can give...

  12. Non-Porous Iron(II)-Based Sensor: Crystallographic Insights into a Cycle of Colorful Guest-Induced Topotactic Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Santiago; Feltham, Humphrey L C; Brooker, Sally

    2016-11-21

    Materials capable of sensing volatile guests at room temperature by an easily monitored set of outputs are of great appeal for development as chemical sensors of small volatile organics and toxic gases. Herein the dinuclear iron(II) complex, [Fe II 2 (L) 2 (CH 3 CN) 4 ](BF 4 ) 4 ⋅2 CH 3 CN (1) [L=4-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(3-pyridazinyl)-5-pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole], is shown to undergo reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformations upon exposure to vapors of different guests: 1 (MeCN)⇌2 (EtOH)→3 (H 2 O)⇌1 (MeCN). Whilst 1 and 2 remain dimetallic, SCSC to 3 involves conversion to a 1D polymeric chain (due to a change in L bridging mode), which, remarkably, can undergo SCSC de-polymerization, reforming dimetallic 1. Additionally, SC-XRD studies of two ordered transient forms, 1TF3 and 2TF3, confirm that guest exchange occurs by diffusion of the new guests into the non-porous lattices as the old guests leave. These reversible SCSC events also induce color and magnetic responses. Indeed dark red 1 is spin crossover active (T 1/2 ↓ 356 K; T 1/2 ↑ 369 K), whilst orange 2 and yellow 3 remain high spin. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  14. The 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold for subtype selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands. Part 1: the influence of different hydrogen bond acceptor systems on alkyl and (hetero)aryl substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Christoph; Tomassoli, Isabelle; Munoz, Lenka; Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L; Gündisch, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    3,7-Diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane is a naturally occurring scaffold interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). When one nitrogen of the 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold was implemented in a carboxamide motif displaying a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) functionality, compounds with higher affinities and subtype selectivity for α4β2(∗) were obtained. The nature of the HBA system (carboxamide, sulfonamide, urea) had a strong impact on nAChR interaction. High affinity ligands for α4β2(∗) possessed small alkyl chains, small un-substituted hetero-aryl groups or para-substituted phenyl ring systems along with a carboxamide group. Electrophysiological responses of selected 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane derivatives to Xenopus oocytes expressing various nAChR subtypes showed diverse activation profiles. Compounds with strongest agonistic profiles were obtained with small alkyl groups whereas a shift to partial agonism/antagonism was observed for aryl substituents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Host-guest complexes between cucurbit[n]urils and acetanilides having aminopropyl units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaki-Sogo, Mireia; Montes-Navajas, Pedro; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2013-06-01

    2-(Propylamino)acetamide of aniline (1a), and bis-2-(propylamino)acetamide of ortho- (1b) and para-(1c) phenylenediamine form host-guest complexes with CB[6], CB[7] and CB[8] as evidenced by the variations in the (1)H NMR spectroscopy chemical shifts and observation in MALDI-TOF-MS and ESI-MS of ions at the corresponding mass. Binding constants for the 1:1 complexes were estimated from fluorescence titrations and were in the range 10(5)-10(6)M(-1). Models based on molecular mechanics for these supramolecular complexes are provided. In spite of the different geometries arising from the ortho- or para-substitution, phenylenediamides form complexes of similar strength in which the hydrophobic alkyl chains are accommodated inside the host cavity. Formation of these host-guest complexes in the solid state was also achieved by modifying an aminopropyl silica with chloroacetanilides and preparing three silica having analogues of compounds 1a-c anchored to the solid particles. Titrations showed, however, that these solids can adsorb a large percentage of CBs by unselective interactions that are not related to the formation of inclusion complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of host relaxation and dynamics on guest molecule dynamics in H2/tetrahydrofuranhydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Vanessa K; Shoko, Elvis; Kearley, Gordon J

    2011-01-01

    We use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to obtain classically the effects of H2O cage motions on the potential-energy surface (PES) of encapsulated H2 in the H2/tetrahydrofuran-hydrate system. The significant differences between the PES for the H2 in rigid and flexible cages that we find will influence calculation of the quantum dynamics of the H2. Part of these differences arises from the relaxation of the H2O cage around the classical H2, with a second part arising from the coupling of both translational and rotational motions of H2 with the H20 cage. We find that isotopic substitution of 2H for 1H of the H2O cage affects the coupling, which has implications for experiments that require the use of 2H2O, including inelastic neutron scattering that uses 2H2O cages in order to focus on the H2 guest dynamics. Overall, this work emphasizes the importance of taking into account cage dynamics in any approach used to understand the dynamics of H2 guests in porous framework materials.

  17. Thermosensitive Triterpenoid-Appended Polymers with Broad Temperature Tunability Regulated by Host-Guest Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jie; Gao, Yuxia; Li, Ying; Yan, Qiang; Hu, Jun; Ju, Yong

    2017-09-05

    Thermoresponsive water-soluble polymers are of great importance since they typically show a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in aqueous media. In this research, the LCST change in broad temperature ranges of copolymers composed of natural glycyrrhetinic acid (GA)-based methacrylate and N,N'-dimethylacrylamides (DMAs) was investigated as a function of the concentration and the content of GA pendants. By complexation of GA pendants with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), a side-chain polypseudorotaxane was obtained, which exhibited a significant increase in the LCST of copolymers. Moreover, the precisely reversible control of the LCST behavior was realized through adding a competing guest molecule, sodium 1-admantylcarboxylate. This work illustrates a simple and effective approach to endow water-soluble polymers with broad temperature tunability and helps us further understand the effect of a biocompatible host-guest complementary β-CD/GA pair on the thermoresponsive process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Caged Molecular Glues as Photoactivatable Tags for Nuclear Translocation of Guests in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisaka, Akio; Mogaki, Rina; Okuro, Kou; Aida, Takuzo

    2018-02-21

    We developed dendritic caged molecular glues ( Caged Glue-R) as tags for nucleus-targeted drug delivery, whose multiple guanidinium ion (Gu + ) pendants are protected by an anionic photocleavable unit (butyrate-substituted nitroveratryloxycarbonyl; BA NVOC). Negatively charged Caged Glue-R hardly binds to anionic biomolecules because of their electrostatic repulsion. However, upon exposure of Caged Glue-R to UV light or near-infrared (NIR) light, the BA NVOC groups of Caged Glue-R are rapidly detached to yield an uncaged molecular glue ( Uncaged Glue-R) that carries multiple Gu + pendants. Because Gu + forms a salt bridge with PO 4 - , Uncaged Glue-R tightly adheres to anionic biomolecules such as DNA and phospholipids in cell membranes by a multivalent salt-bridge formation. When tagged with Caged Glue-R, guests can be taken up into living cells via endocytosis and hide in endosomes. However, when the Caged Glue-R tag is photochemically uncaged to form Uncaged Glue-R, the guests escape from the endosome and migrate into the cytoplasm followed by the cell nucleus. We demonstrated that quantum dots (QDs) tagged with Caged Glue-R can be delivered efficiently to cell nuclei eventually by irradiation with light.

  19. Binding behaviors of p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene with gemini guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Guo, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Yu

    2013-02-14

    A dozen of homoditopic cations, possessing different spacer lengths and rigidities, as well as sizes, shapes, and charges of terminal groups, were synthesized as candidate gemini guests for the complexation of p-sulfonatocalix[4]arenes (SC4A). The 12 gemini guests are divided into five species according to the different terminal groups: imidazolium (G1-G3), pyridinium (G4-G6), quinolinium (G7), viologen (G8-G11), and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DBO, G12). Their binding structures and stoichiometries with SC4A were examined by NMR spectroscopy, which is helpful to construct diverse highly ordered assemblies. The obtained results show that the length of the linkers, as well as the charge numbers on the end groups have a pronounced effect on the binding stoichiometry, whereas the size and shape of the terminal groups have no significant influence. Furthermore, both the stability constants and thermodynamic parameters of SC4A with the terminal subunits were determined by the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, which are valuable to understand the binding behavior, giving quantitatively deep insight.

  20. A host-guest-recognition-based electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hao; Li, Hui; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2012-05-15

    A sensitive electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection is presented based on the host-guest recognition technique. In this sensing protocol, a 15 based thrombin aptamer (ab. TBA) was dually labeled with a thiol at its 3' end and a 4-((4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)azo) benzoic acid (dabcyl) at its 5' end, respectively, which was previously immobilized on one Au electrode surface by AuS bond and used as the thrombin probe during the protein sensing procedure. One special electrochemical marker was prepared by modifying CdS nanoparticle with β-cyclodextrins (ab. CdS-CDs), which employed as electrochemical signal provider and would conjunct with the thrombin probe modified electrode through the host-guest recognition of CDs to dabcyl. In the absence of thrombin, the probe adopted linear structure to conjunct with CdS-CDs. In present of thrombin, the TBA bond with thrombin and transformed into its special G-quarter structure, which forced CdS-CDs into the solution. Therefore, the target-TBA binding event can be sensitively transduced via detecting the electrochemical oxidation current signal of Cd of CdS nanoparticles in the solution. Using this method, as low as 4.6 pM thrombin had been detected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stable catalyst layers for hydrogen permeable composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, J. Douglas; Wolden, Colin A

    2014-01-07

    The present invention provides a hydrogen separation membrane based on nanoporous, composite metal carbide or metal sulfide coated membranes capable of high flux and permselectivity for hydrogen without platinum group metals. The present invention is capable of being operated over a broad temperature range, including at elevated temperatures, while maintaining hydrogen selectivity.

  2. Recent advances on membranes and membrane reactors for hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; Fernandez Gesalaga, E.; Corengia, P.; Sint Annaland, van M.

    2013-01-01

    Membranes and membrane reactors for pure hydrogen production are widely investigated not only because of the important application areas of hydrogen, but especially because mechanically and chemically stable membranes with high perm-selectivity towards hydrogen are available and are continuously

  3. Cations form sequence selective motifs within DNA grooves via a combination of cation-pi and ion-dipole/hydrogen bond interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mikaela; Dunlap, Tori; Dourlain, Elizabeth; Grant, Bryce; McFail-Isom, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The fine conformational subtleties of DNA structure modulate many fundamental cellular processes including gene activation/repression, cellular division, and DNA repair. Most of these cellular processes rely on the conformational heterogeneity of specific DNA sequences. Factors including those structural characteristics inherent in the particular base sequence as well as those induced through interaction with solvent components combine to produce fine DNA structural variation including helical flexibility and conformation. Cation-pi interactions between solvent cations or their first hydration shell waters and the faces of DNA bases form sequence selectively and contribute to DNA structural heterogeneity. In this paper, we detect and characterize the binding patterns found in cation-pi interactions between solvent cations and DNA bases in a set of high resolution x-ray crystal structures. Specifically, we found that monovalent cations (Tl⁺) and the polarized first hydration shell waters of divalent cations (Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺) form cation-pi interactions with DNA bases stabilizing unstacked conformations. When these cation-pi interactions are combined with electrostatic interactions a pattern of specific binding motifs is formed within the grooves.

  4. Multiple Authorship in Scientific Manuscripts: Ethical Challenges, Ghost and Guest/Gift Authorship, and the Cultural/Disciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Dobránszki, Judit

    2016-10-01

    Multiple authorship is the universal solution to multi-tasking in the sciences. Without a team, each with their own set of expertise, and each involved mostly in complementary ways, a research project will likely not advance quickly, or effectively. Consequently, there is a risk that research goals will not be met within a desired timeframe. Research teams that strictly scrutinize their modus operandi select and include a set of authors that have participated substantially in the physical undertaking of the research, in its planning, or who have contributed intellectually to the ideas or the development of the manuscript. Authorship is not an issue that is taken lightly, and save for dishonest authors, it is an issue that is decided collectively by the authors, usually in sync with codes of conduct established by their research institutes or national ministries of education. Science, technology and medicine (STM) publishers have, through independent, or sometimes coordinated efforts, also established their own sets of guidelines regarding what constitutes valid authorship. However, these are, for the greater part, merely guidelines. A previous and recent analysis of authorship definitions indicates that the definitions in place regarding authorship and its validity by many leading STM publishers is neither uniform, nor standard, despite several of them claiming to follow the guidelines as set forward by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors or ICMJE. This disparity extends itself to ghost and guest authorship, two key authorship-related issues that are examined in this paper to assess the extent of discrepancies among the same set of STM publishers and what possible influence they might have on publishing ethics.

  5. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  6. Supramolecular dendritic pi-conjugated systems: synthesis of glycinylurea functionalized pi-conjugated diphenylanthracene guests and their complexation with dendritic hosts. Part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Precup, F.S.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Meijer, E.W.; Hubca, G.

    2007-01-01

    Glycinylurea functionalized p-conjugated diphenylanthracene guests (DPA guests) that bind to adamantyl urea modified dendritic hosts were synthesized and fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR) and MALDI-TOF-MS. The resulting supramolecular assemblies have been investigated with

  7. LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHULTZ, K.R.; BROWN, L.C.; BESENBRUCH, G.E.; HAMILTON, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY. The ''Hydrogen Economy'' will reduce petroleum imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, current commercial hydrogen production processes use fossil fuels and releases carbon dioxide. Hydrogen produced from nuclear energy could avoid these concerns. The authors have recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-splitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen and to select one for further detailed consideration. The authors selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle, In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this paper

  8. Enhancement of Wound Healing in Normal and Diabetic Mice by Topical Application of Amorphous Polyphosphate. Superior Effect of a Host–Guest Composite Material Composed of Collagen (Host and Polyphosphate (Guest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner E.G. Müller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of polyphosphate (polyP microparticles on wound healing was tested both in vitro and in a mice model in vivo. Two approaches were used: pure salts of polyphosphate, fabricated as amorphous microparticles (MPs, consisting of calcium and magnesium salts of polyP, “Ca–polyp-MPs” and “Mg–polyp-MPs”, and host–guest composite particles, prepared from amorphous collagen (host and polyphosphate (guest, termed “col/polyp-MPs”. Animal experiments with polyP on healing of excisional wounds were performed using both normal mice and diabetic mice. After a healing period of 7 days “Ca–polyp-MP” significantly improved re-epithelialization in normal mice from 31% (control to 72% (polyP microparticle-treated. Importantly, in diabetic mice, particularly the host–guest particles “col/polyp-MP”, increased the rate of re-epithelialization to ≈40% (control, 23%. In addition, those particles increased the expression of COL-I and COL-III as well as the expression the α-smooth muscle actin and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We propose that “Ca–polyp-MPs”, and particularly the host–guest “col/polyp-MPs” are useful for topical treatment of wounds.

  9. Molecular recognition: Comparative study of a tunable host-guest system by using a fluorescent model system and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry on dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittelkow, M.; Nielsen, C.B.; Broeren, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Host-guest interactions between the periphery of adamantylurea-functionalized dendrimers (host) and ureido acetic acid derivatives (guest) were shown to be specific, strong and spatially well-defined. The binding becomes stronger when using phosphonic or sulfonic acid derivatives. In the present...... work we have quantified the binding constants for the host-guest interactions between two different host motifs and six different guest molecules. The host molecules, which resemble the periphery of a poly(propylene imine) dendrimer, have been fitted with an anthracene-based fluorescent probe. The two...... host motifs differ in terms of the length of the spacer between a tertiary amine and two ureido functionalities. The guest molecules all contain an acidic moiety (either a carboxylic acid, a phosphonic acid, or a sulfonic acid) and three of them also contain an ureido moiety capable of forming multiple...

  10. Hydrogen Station Cost Estimates: Comparing Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator Results with other Recent Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report compares hydrogen station cost estimates conveyed by expert stakeholders through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculation (HSCC) to a select number of other cost estimates. These other cost estimates include projections based upon cost models and costs associated with recently funded stations.

  11. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  12. The solar-hydrogen economy: an analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Warren D.

    2007-09-01

    The 20th Century was the age of the Petroleum Economy while the 21st Century is certainly the age of the Solar-Hydrogen Economy. The global Solar-Hydrogen Economy that is now emerging follows a different logic. Under this new economic paradigm, new machines and methods are once again being developed while companies are restructuring. The Petroleum Economy will be briefly explored in relation to oil consumption, Hubbert's curve, and oil reserves with emphasis on the "oil crash". Concerns and criticisms about the Hydrogen Economy will be addressed by debunking some of the "hydrogen myths". There are three major driving factors for the establishment of the Solar-Hydrogen Economy, i.e. the environment, the economy with the coming "oil crash", and national security. The New Energy decentralization pathway has developed many progressive features, e.g., reducing the dependence on oil, reducing the air pollution and CO II. The technical and economic aspects of the various Solar-Hydrogen energy options and combinations will be analyzed. A proposed 24-hour/day 200 MWe solar-hydrogen power plant for the U.S. with selected energy options will be discussed. There are fast emerging Solar Hydrogen energy infrastructures in the U.S., Europe, Japan and China. Some of the major infrastructure projects in the transportation and energy sectors will be discussed. The current and projected growth in the Solar-Hydrogen Economy through 2045 will be given.

  13. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  14. Structural elucidation of dendritic host-guest complexes by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, T.; Pieterse, K.; Broeren, M.A.C.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Hilbers, P.A.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    2007-01-01

    The multiple monovalent binding of adamantyl-urea poly(propyleneimine) dendrimers with carboxylic acid-urea guests was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to better understand the structure and behavior of the dynamic multivalent complex in solution. The

  15. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Moehl, Thomas; Harms, Hauke; Chavhan, Sudam; Tena-Zaera, Ramon; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Graetzel, Michael; Tetreault, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive

  16. Investigating the relative influences of molecular dimensions and binding energies on diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this article is to investigate the relative influences of molecular dimensions and adsorption binding energies on unary diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The investigations are based

  17. Host-Guest Interaction between Corona[n]arene and Bisquaternary Ammonium Derivatives for Fabricating Supra-Amphiphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingda; Guo, Qing-Hui; Feng, Yuanning; Xu, Jiang-Fei; Wei, Yuhan; Li, Zhibo; Wang, Mei-Xiang; Zhang, Xi

    2017-06-13

    The interactions between a host, water-soluble corona[n]arene (S6-CAP), and a series of guests, bisquaternary ammonium derivatives (CnDAs), in water, were investigated. The host and guest can form 1:1 host-guest complex. Their binding constants decrease as the alkyl length of CnDAs increases, which can be tunable ranging from 10 3 to 10 6 M -1 . The binding processes are mainly entropy-driven, while the enthalpy changes also play an important role in enhancing the host-guest interactions. In addition, a supra-amphiphile was fabricated with S6-CAP and a normal surfactant bearing bisquaternary ammonium (C4R). The S6-CAP·C4R complex forms micellar aggregates in water, and the system possesses better assembling activity and dilution stability than its building block C4R. This study enriches the families of supra-amphiphiles with a new architecture, and employing such a supra-amphiphile in biofunctional materials is highly anticipated.

  18. Host-guest interaction of styrene and ethylbenzene in MIL-53 studied by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenhui; Li, Jing; Tang, Jing; Deng, Feng

    Solid-state NMR was utilized to explore the host-guest interaction between adsorbate and adsorbent at atomic level to understand the separation mechanism of styrene (St) and ethylbenzene (EB) in MIL-53(Al). 13 C- 27 Al double-resonance NMR experiments revealed that the host-guest interaction between St and MIL-53 was much stronger than that of EB adsorption. In addition, 13 C DIPSHIFT experiments suggested that the adsorbed St was less mobile than EB confined inside the MIL-53 pore. Furthermore, the host-guest interaction model between St, EB and MIL-53 was established on the basis of the spatial proximities information extracted from 2D 1 H- 1 H homo-nuclear correlation NMR experiments. According to the experimental observation from solid-state NMR, it was found that the presence of π-π interaction between St and MIL-53 resulted in the stronger host-guest interaction and less mobility of St. This work provides direct experimental evidence for understanding the separation mechanism of St and EB using MIL-53 as an adsorbent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid-state {sup 2}H NMR investigations in guest-host systems and plastic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibay, J.A.V.

    2004-07-01

    Variable temperature {sup 2}H NMR investigations have been carried out to study the molecular behavior of perdeuterated benzene and pyridine in the inclusion compound with tris-(1,2-dioxyphenyl)-cyclotriphosphazene. Here, a comprehensive variable temperature {sup 2}H NMR study is presented comprising line shape studies and relaxation experiments. The experimental data clearly indicate the presence of highly mobile guest species. Sample cooling gives rise to characteristic line shape effects that can be attributed to a slow-down of the rotational motion. Additional {sup 2}H NMR measurements were performed on the plastic crystal 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane where highly mobile species were observed. A quantitative analysis of the experimental data is achieved by appropriate computer simulations taking into account various molecular motions for each studied system. The analysis of these theoretical data give rise to the kinetic parameters that are in the order of related systems. (orig.)

  20. Stability of guest molecules in urea canal complexes by canal polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    It was found that various organic materials are attracted into urea canal by hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA) and long chain compounds. This means that materials which does not form complex by itself are induced in canal by HDDA and long chain compounds. To include with stability perfumes, insecticides, attractants and repellents in urea canal, leaf alcohol was used as a model compound for guest molecules in the canal. The leaf alcohol from the canal released gradually over many days and the release was inhibited for 15 days by long chain compounds and for 30 days by polymerized HDDA after irradiation. After releasing, the leaf alcohol in the canal remained 25 % stable for long chain compounds and 40 % for polymerized HDDA. The dose required for stabilization of leaf alcohol in the urea canal by canal polymerization of HDDA was 30 kGy. (author)

  1. Reconciling the discrepancies between crystallographic porosity and guest access as exemplified by Zn-HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldblyum, Jeremy I; Liu, Ming; Gidley, David W; Matzger, Adam J

    2011-11-16

    There are several compounds for which there exists a disconnect between porosity as predicted by crystallography and porosity measured by gas sorption analysis. In this paper, the Zn-based analogue of Cu(3)(btc)(2) (HKUST-1), Zn(3)(btc)(2) (Zn-HKUST-1; btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) is investigated. Conventional analysis of Zn-HKUST-1 by powder X-ray diffraction and gas sorption indicates retention of crystalline structure but negligible nitrogen uptake at 77 K. By using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, a densified surface layer preventing the entry of even small molecular species into the crystal framework is revealed. The material is shown to have inherent surface instability after solvent removal, rendering it impermeable to molecular guests irrespective of handling and processing methods. This previously unobserved surface instability may provide insight into the failure of other microporous coordination polymers to exhibit significant porosity despite crystal structures indicative of regular, interconnected, microporous networks.

  2. Growth mode transition of tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates in the guest/host concentration boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabase, Yuichiro; Nagashima, Kazushige

    2009-11-19

    Clathrate hydrates are known to form a thin film along a guest/host boundary. We present here the first report of tetrahydrofuran (THF) clathrate hydrate formation in a THF/water concentration boundary layer. We found that the THF-water system also forms a hydrate film separating the guest/host phases. The lateral growth rate of the film increases as supercooling increases. The thickness of the film at the growth tip decreases as supercooling and the lateral growth rate increase. These tendencies are consistent with reports of experiments for other hydrates and predictions of heat-transfer models. After film formation and slight melting, two types of growth modes are observed, depending on temperature T. At T = 3.0 degrees C, the film slowly thickens. The thickening rate is much lower than the lateral growth rate, as reported for other hydrates. At T agglomerate of small polycrystalline hydrates forms in each phase. Grain boundaries in the film and pore spaces in the agglomerate act as paths for permeation of each liquid. Timing when continuous nucleation starts is dominantly controlled by the time of initiation of liquid permeation through the film. Digital particle image velocimetry analysis of the agglomerate shows that it expands not by growth at the advancing front but rather by continuous nucleation in the interior. Expansion rates of the agglomerate tend to be higher for the cases of multipermeation paths in the film and the thinner film. We suppose that the growth mode transition to continuous nucleation is caused by the memory effect due to slight melting of the hydrate film.

  3. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  4. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  5. "I’m a poor lonesome cowboy and a long way from home…": Serbian Documentary Films about Guest Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Krstić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will analyze Serbian documentary films about guest workers dating from the last decade of the 20th and the first decade of the 21st century, using the perspective of visual anthropology. I question the popular cultural notions about guest workers in films Весеље у Ждрелу (A Celebration in Zdrelo by author Kamenko Katic, Звона позне јесени (The Bells of Late Autumn by author Zoran Milenovic, Кад је Милорад удавао ћерку (When Milorad Gave His Daughter in Marriage by author Vladimir Milisavljevic, Странац тамо, странац овде (A Foreigner There, a Foreigner Here by author Sandra Mandic and 242 метра живота (242 Meters of Life by author Novica Savic. The films deal with a number of issues: the economic aspects of guest workers’ lives, their liminal character, the issues of the second and third generations of guest workers, going away "temporarily" to work, and religious rituals. Even though the films were made recently, they all follow the lives of Vlach and Serbian, or rather Yugoslav guest workers who left to find temporary work abroad in Western Europe in the 1960’s and 1970’s. This serves the purpose of avoiding to deal with contemporary reasons for emigrating from Serbia and thus the possible critiques of current regimes or policies in power at the time the films were made.

  6. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  7. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  9. Hydrogen in semiconductors II

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Norbert H; Weber, Eicke R; Nickel, Norbert H

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  10. Effect of hydrogen coverage on hydrogenation of o-cresol on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C.; Wang, Sanwu

    2018-06-01

    The conversion of phenolics over metal catalysts is an important process for upgrading biofuels. With density functional calculations, hydrogenation of o-cresol on the hydrogen-covered Pt(111) surface was investigated. The results show that the coverage of hydrogen plays a significant role in the reaction rate while it does not affect the reaction selectivity. The reaction barriers of the hydrogenation process leading to the formation of both 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (the intermediate product) and 2-methyl-cyclohexanol (the final product) at high H coverages (∼1 ML) are found to be smaller by 0.14-0.69 eV than those at lower H coverages (∼1/25 ML). After both hydrogen and cresol are adsorbed on Pt(111) from their initial gas phase state, the reaction energy of each hydrogenation step on the surface is also dependent on the hydrogen coverage. On the H-covered Pt(111) surface, most steps of hydrogenation involve exothermic reactions when the hydrogen coverage is high while they are endothermic reactions at low hydrogen coverages. The differences in reaction rate and reaction energy between high and low H coverages can be understood with the coverage-dependent bonding strength and configurations.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide as a sustainable energy carrier: Electrocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide and the fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal–oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  12. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  13. Solar and Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadirgan, F.; Beyhan, S.; Oezenler, S.

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the only sustainable and environmentally friendly energy is the solar energy and hydrogen energy, which can meet the increasing energy demand in the future. Solar Energy may be used either for solar thermal or for solar electricity conversion. Solar thermal collectors represent a wide-spread type of system for the conversion of solar energy. Radiation, convection and conduction are strongly coupled energy transport mechanisms in solar collector systems. The economic viability of lower temperature applications of solar energy may be improved by increasing the quantity of usable energy delivered per unit area of collector. This can be achieved by the use of selective black coatings which have a high degree of solar absorption, maintaining high energy input to the solar system while simultaneously suppressing the emission of thermal infrared radiation. Photovoltaic solar cells and modules are produced for: (1) large scale power generation, most commonly when modules are incorporated as part of a building (building integrated photovoltaic s) but also in centralised power stations, (2) supplying power to villages and towns in developing countries that are not connected to the supply grid, e.g. for lighting and water pumping systems, (3) supplying power in remote locations, e.g. for communications or weather monitoring equipment, (4) supplying power for satellites and space vehicles, (5) supplying power for consumer products, e.g. calculators, clocks, toys and night lights. In hydrogen energy systems, Proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cells are promising candidates for applications ranging from portable power sources (battery replacement applications) to power sources for future electric vehicles because of their safety, elimination of fuel processor system, thus, simple device fabrication and low cost. Although major steps forward have been achieved in terms of PEMFC design since the onset of research in this area, further

  14. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  15. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is mobile and can easily move through the material). Hydrogen diffuses ... The determination of the relationship of light-enhanced hydrogen motion to ... term is negligible, and using the thermodynamic relation given below f(c) = kBT .... device-applications problematic but the normal state can be recovered by a thermal an-.

  16. Selective Preference of Parallel DNA Triplexes Is Due to the Disruption of Hoogsteen Hydrogen Bonds Caused by the Severe Nonisostericity between the G*GC and T*AT Triplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunaseelan Goldsmith

    Full Text Available Implications of DNA, RNA and RNA.DNA hybrid triplexes in diverse biological functions, diseases and therapeutic applications call for a thorough understanding of their structure-function relationships. Despite exhaustive studies mechanistic rationale for the discriminatory preference of parallel DNA triplexes with G*GC & T*AT triplets still remains elusive. Here, we show that the highest nonisostericity between the G*GC & T*AT triplets imposes extensive stereochemical rearrangements contributing to context dependent triplex destabilisation through selective disruption of Hoogsteen scheme of hydrogen bonds. MD simulations of nineteen DNA triplexes with an assortment of sequence milieu reveal for the first time fresh insights into the nature and extent of destabilization from a single (non-overlapping, double (overlapping and multiple pairs of nonisosteric base triplets (NIBTs. It is found that a solitary pair of NIBTs, feasible either at a G*GC/T*AT or T*AT/G*GC triplex junction, does not impinge significantly on triplex stability. But two overlapping pairs of NIBTs resulting from either a T*AT or a G*GC interruption disrupt Hoogsteen pair to a noncanonical mismatch destabilizing the triplex by ~10 to 14 kcal/mol, implying that their frequent incidence in multiples, especially, in short sequences could even hinder triplex formation. The results provide (i an unambiguous and generalised mechanistic rationale for the discriminatory trait of parallel triplexes, including those studied experimentally (ii clarity for the prevalence of antiparallel triplexes and (iii comprehensive perspectives on the sequence dependent influence of nonisosteric base triplets useful in the rational design of TFO's against potential triplex target sites.

  17. Safe Detection System for Hydrogen Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Robert A. [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beshay, Manal [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    Hydrogen is an "environmentally friendly" fuel for future transportation and other applications, since it produces only pure ("distilled") water when it is consumed. Thus, hydrogen-powered vehicles are beginning to proliferate, with the total number of such vehicles expected to rise to nearly 100,000 within the next few years. However, hydrogen is also an odorless, colorless, highly flammable gas. Because of this, there is an important need for hydrogen safety monitors that can warn of hazardous conditions in vehicles, storage facilities, and hydrogen production plants. To address this need, IOS has developed a unique intrinsically safe optical hydrogen sensing technology, and has embodied it in detector systems specifically developed for safety applications. The challenge of using light to detect a colorless substance was met by creating chemically-sensitized optical materials whose color changes in the presence of hydrogen. This reversible reaction provides a sensitive, reliable, way of detecting hydrogen and measuring its concentration using light from low-cost LEDs. Hydrogen sensors based on this material were developed in three completely different optical formats: point sensors ("optrodes"), integrated optic sensors ("optical chips"), and optical fibers ("distributed sensors") whose entire length responds to hydrogen. After comparing performance, cost, time-to-market, and relative market need for these sensor types, the project focused on designing a compact optrode-based single-point hydrogen safety monitor. The project ended with the fabrication of fifteen prototype units, and the selection of two specific markets: fuel cell enclosure monitoring, and refueling/storage safety. Final testing and development of control software for these markets await future support.

  18. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  19. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  20. Wind to Hydrogen in California: Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonia, O.; Saur, G.

    2012-08-01

    This analysis presents a case study in California for a large scale, standalone wind electrolysis site. This is a techno-economic analysis of the 40,000 kg/day renewable production of hydrogen and subsequent delivery by truck to a fueling station in the Los Angeles area. This quantity of hydrogen represents about 1% vehicle market penetration for a city such as Los Angeles (assuming 0.62 kg/day/vehicle and 0.69 vehicles/person) [8]. A wind site near the Mojave Desert was selected for proximity to the LA area where hydrogen refueling stations are already built.