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Sample records for guatemalan children 2001-2006

  1. Poly-helminth infection in east guatemalan school children

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    William C Sorensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soil transmitted helminths (STH remain a global public health concern in spite of occasional dosing campaigns. Aims: To determine baseline prevalence and intensity of STH infection in east Guatemalan school children, and describe the associated epidemiology of anemia, stunting, and wasting in this population. Setting and design: Ten schools in Izabal province (eastern Guatemala were identified, and 1,001 school children were selected for this study. Half of the schools were used as clinical testing sites (blood and stool. Materials and Methods: Anthropometric measures were collected from all children. Over 300 children were tested for anemia and 229 for helminth infection. Ova and parasite specimens were examined via Direct, Kato Katz, and McMaster techniques. Hemoglobin was measured from venipuncture following the hemacue system. Statistical analysis: Correlation between infection intensities and growth indicators were examined. Chi Square or t tests were used for bivariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed on significant variables from bivariate techniques. Results: Over two-thirds of school children were positive for infection by any STH. Prevalence of Hookworm was 30%; Ascaris, 52%; and Trichuris, 39%, most as low-intensity infection. Over half of the children were co-infected. In bivariate analysis, anemia was significantly associated with polyparasitism. Conclusions: For a Guatemalan child who experiences a unit decrease in hemoglobin, one expects to see a 24% increase in the odds of being infected with STH, controlling for age, sex, lake proximity, and growth characteristics. Infection with more than one STH, despite low intensity, led to a significant decrease in hemoglobin.

  2. [Analysis of rate, types and causes of uveitis in children hospitalized at Ophthalmology Clinic in Wroclaw in years 2001-2006].

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    Iwanejko, Małgorzata; Turno-Krecicka, Anna; Barć, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to analyse frequency, causes and type of uveitis at children hospitalized in Ophthalmology Clinic of Medical Academy in Wroclaw in years 2001-2006. Material from 64 (88 pairs) children's eyes was analyzed. There were 35 (54.7%) girls and 29 (45.3%) boys admitted to the Clinic with suspicion of uveitis. There were 17 (26.6%) children with uveitis anterior, 15 (23.4%) with pars planitis and 32 (50.0%) with uveitis posterior. The uveitis occurred in both eyes in 33.9%. Aetiology of uveitis was recognized at 30 (46.9%) patients, at 12 (16.6%) cases uveitis was related to systemic disease. At 22 (34.4%) ill children recognition of aetiology was not possible. The most often cause of uveitis anterior was juvenile chronic arthrosis inflammation and it occurred at 8 (47.1%) children--5 girls, and 3 boys. For the most patients 12 (80.0%), in case of pars planitis recognition of aetiology was impossible. Toxoplasmosis was the most often cause for uveitis posterior and it occurred at 14 (43.8%) children. Parasitic background is still considerable cause of uveitis among children. Juvenile chronic arthritis is the most often cause for uveitis anterior. In considerable amount of children cases, recognition of aetiology of uveitis was not possible.

  3. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)--incidence and etiologies at a regional Children's Hospital in 2001-2006.

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    Pomajzl, R J; Varman, M; Holst, A; Chen, A

    2009-12-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a serious health concern in children. HUS has primarily been linked to Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections, but non-O157 strains are gaining attention. Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure are the characteristics of the syndrome. This study investigated the incidence of HUS at a regional Children's Hospital between 2001 and 2006 by retrospective review. Cases of HUS were investigated for outcomes based on stool culture and an association of acute pancreatitis. A total of 44 cases were identified, of which 57% were female and 43% were male, with an age distribution of 13 months to 17 years and a median age of 3.44 years. Data revealed 13 cases in 2006 compared to two cases in 2001, with 84% of all illnesses occurring in the summer and fall seasons. The median duration of thrombocytopenia was eight days and 50% of all cases required dialysis. E. coli O157:H7 was the predominant pathogen; however, 53% of the cases had unknown etiology. This data may suggest a growing number of cases from 2001 to 2006 and a role for agents other than E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 caused longer intensive care unit (ICU) stay. No association between HUS and acute pancreatitis was found.

  4. Beliefs About Children’s Illness Among Rural Guatemalan Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    34 12The series of questions began: "Ahora quiero que hablemos de algo de lo que los ninos se enferman seguido: la diarrea o asientos. ^Por que les da... diarrea ?" or "Now I want to talk about something that children get sick from frequently: diarrhea. Why do children get diarrhea?" 13 The question...Sanford, and George Davey Smith (1995) " Diarrea infantil en la Nicaragua rural: creencia y practicas de salud tradicionales." Boletin de la Oficina

  5. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Edwin J. Asturias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated for evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae infection. Normally sterile body fluids were cultured, and antigen detection was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and pleural fluid. RESULTS: Of 1 203 children 1-59 months of age hospitalized over a 28-month period, 725 of them (60.3% had a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, 357 (29.7% of meningitis, 60 (5.0% of cellulitis, and 61 (5.1% of sepsis and other conditions. Hib was identified in 20.0% of children with meningitis and S. pneumoniae in 12.9%. The average annual incidence of Hib meningitis was 13.8 cases per 100 000 children under 5 years of age, and 32.4% of meningitides caused by Hib and 58.7% of S. pneumoniae meningitides occurred prior to 6 months of age. Case fatality rates were 14.1%, 37.0%, and 18.0%, respectively, for children with Hib, S. pneumoniae, and culture-negative and antigen-negative meningitis. Prior antibiotic therapy was common and was associated with significant reductions in CSF-culture-positive results for children with other evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in case detection, culture methods, and latex agglutination for antigen detection in CSF resulted in identification of Hib and S. pneumoniae as important causes of severe disease in Guatemalan children. Using a cutoff of > 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter in CSF would improve the sensitivity for detection of bacterial

  6. Quality Control in Primary Schools: Progress from 2001-2006

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    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings of research into the quality control (QC) of schools from 2001-2006. In 2001 several targets for QC were set and the progress of 939 primary schools is presented. Furthermore, using cluster analysis, schools are classified into four QC-types that differ in their focus on school (self) evaluation and school…

  7. Essential amino acid metabolism in infected/non-infected, poor, Guatemalan children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazariegos, M.; De Vettorazzi, C.; Solomons, N.W.; Caballero, B.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional methods used to evaluate protein metabolism left unanswered some of the relevant questions in public health in developing countries, such as growth retardation in children. Particularly, in developing countries, infection (clinical and subclinical) and malnutrition are still relevant problems, and the most important scientific issues for the application of stable isotope tracer methods are related to the impact of infection, such as the oxidative disposal of essential amino acids in well-nourished and malnourished children. The objectives of the present proposal are: (1) To simplify, make less expensive, less time-consuming, and less invasive, methods in clinical research on amino acid metabolism using stable-isotope tracers in children; and (2) To assess the effects of infection (clinical or subclinical) on whole-body protein turnover in children with and without malnutrition. The objectives involve the engineering and assessment of a portable instrument to be used in evaluations of protein oxidation in the developing world. Methodological issues such as intra- and inter-subject variability, which are of great importance for the interpretation of amino acid metabolism and protein turnover, will also be considered. 18 refs, 2 figs

  8. Essential amino-acid metabolism in infected/non-infected, poor, Guatemalan children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazariegos, M.; Solomons, N.W.; Vettorazzi, C.; Caballero, B.

    1996-01-01

    As mentioned above, it was our intention to develop and test a simplified version of the protocol to assess amino acid metabolism in children. With the combined efforts of a team of experts in the field, a generic protocol was developed as a mandate of the first CRP held at Boston in the fall of 1993. During the beginning of 1994, the final version of such a protocol was released to all the participants of the CRP meeting and arrangements were made in order to apply it and assess its usefulness in the field setting. Therefore, we have shifted our activities to apply, assess and adapt the generic protocol. We are now testing the protocol in the field to establish the variability parameters in both between and within individuals. After testing and refining the protocol, with the help of other groups in developed countries, by validation and/or comparative studies, we would be in a better position to recommend it as a tool to study amino acid metabolism in children in developing countries, whether to describe some specific profiles or to evaluate nutrition interventions. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  9. Guatemalan Linguistics Project

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    Linguistic Reporter, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The general goals of the Guatemalan technical institution, the Proyecto Linguistico Francisco Marroquin, are to: create a national technical resource institution in linguistics and Mayan languages; enable Indians to influence programs for their communities; and stimulate the study of Mayan languages and their use as communication medium. (SW)

  10. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis y neumonía en niños guatemaltecos: importancia de Haemophilus influenzae tipo b y de Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin J. Asturias; Monica Soto; Ricardo Menendez; Patricia L. Ramirez; Fabio Recinos; Remei Gordillo; Elizabeth Holt; Neal A. Halsey

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with ...

  11. Mercury in Indiana watersheds: retrospective for 2001-2006

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    Risch, Martin R.; Baker, Nancy T.; Fowler, Kathleen K.; Egler, Amanda L.; Lampe, David C.

    2010-01-01

    exceeded the 0.3 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) methylmercury criterion in 12.4 percent of the 1,731 samples. The median wet-weight concentration in the fish-tissue samples was 0.13 mg/kg, and the maximum was 1.07 mg/kg. A coarse-scale analysis of all fish-tissue data in each watershed and a fine-scale analysis of data within 5 kilometers (km) of the downstream end of each watershed showed similar results overall. Mercury concentrations in fish-tissue samples were highest in the White River watershed in southern Indiana and the Fall Creek watershed in central Indiana. In fish-tissue samples within 5 km of the downstream end of a watershed, the USEPA methylmercury criterion was exceeded by 45 percent of mercury concentrations from the White River watershed and 40 percent of the mercury concentration from the Fall Creek watershed. A clear relation between mercury concentrations in fish-tissue samples and methylmercury concentrations in water was not observed in the data from watersheds in Indiana. Average annual atmospheric mercury wet-deposition rates were mapped with data at 156 locations in Indiana and four surrounding states for 2001-2006. These maps revealed an area in southeastern Indiana with high mercury wet-deposition rates-from 15 to 19 micrograms per square meter per year (ug/m2/yr). Annual atmospheric mercury dry-deposition rates were estimated with an inferential method by using concentrations of mercury species in air samples at three locations in Indiana. Mercury dry deposition-rates were 5.6 to 13.6 ug/m2/yr and were 0.49 to 1.4 times mercury wet-deposition rates. Total mercury concentrations were detected in 96 percent of 402 samples of wastewater effluent from 50 publicly owned treatment works in the watersheds; the median concentration was 3.0 ng/L, and the maximum was 88 ng/L. When these concentrations were compared to Indiana water-quality criteria for mercury, 12 percent exceeded the 12-n

  12. Non-invasive measurement of carbon monoxide burden in Guatemalan children and adults following wood-fired temazcal (sauna-bath) use.

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    Lam, Nick; Nicas, Mark; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Thompson, Lisa M; Romero, Carolina; Smith, Kirk R

    2011-08-01

    The use of wood-fired steam baths, or temazcales, is a potentially dangerous source of CO exposure in Guatemalan Highland communities where adults and children use them regularly for bathing, relaxation, and healing purposes. Physical characteristics of children predispose them to absorb CO faster than adults, placing them at greater exposure and health risks. Efforts to quantify temazcal exposures across all age groups, however, have been hampered by the limitations in exposure measurement methods. In this pilot study we measured COHb levels in children and adults following use of the temazcal using three field-based, non-invasive CO measurement methods: CO-oximetry, exhaled breath, and by estimation of COHb using micro-environmental concentrations and time diaries. We then performed a brief comparison of methods. Average CO concentrations measured during temazcal use were 661 ± 503 ppm, approximately 10 times the 15 min WHO guideline. Average COHb levels for all participants ranged from 12-14% (max of 30%, min 2%), depending on the method. COHb levels measured in children were not significantly different from adults despite the fact that they spent 66% less time exposed. COHb measured by CO-oximetry and exhaled breath had good agreement, but precision of the former was affected substantially by random instrument error. The version of the field CO-oximeter device used in this pilot could be useful in screening for acute CO exposure events in children but may lack the precision for monitoring the burden from less extreme, but more day-to-day CO exposures (e.g. indoor solid fuel use). In urban settings, health effects in children and adults have been associated with chronic exposure to ambient CO concentrations much lower than measured in this study. Future research should focus on reducing exposure from temazcales through culturally appropriate modifications to their design and practices, and targeted efforts to educate communities on the health risks they pose

  13. SEROTYPES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA SSP IN CENTRAL THAILAND, 2001-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantip, Sirichote; Aroon, B.; Kanokwan, Tienmanee

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to elucidate the epidemiological trends and antimicrobial susceptibilities against Salmonella serovars among Thai patients and asymptomatic carriers during 2001-2006 in central Thailand. A total of 1,401 human and 260 non-human isolates from various sources were included...

  14. Formative research to develop a community-based intervention for chronic disease prevention in Guatemalan school-age children.

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    Letona, Paola; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Caballero, Benjamin; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2014-01-31

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCD) are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, even in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Recent trends in health promotion emphasize community-based interventions as an important strategy for improving health outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct formative research regarding the perceptions of NCD risk factors, their influencing factors, and community resources available to aid the development and implementation of a community-based intervention with school-age children. Focus group discussions (n = 18), home visits (n = 30), and individual semi-structured interviews (n = 26) were conducted in three urban communities in Guatemala with school-age children (10-12 years of age), teachers, parents, and local community members (i.e., school principals, school food kiosk vendors, religious leaders, authority representatives). All focus groups and interviews were transcribed verbatim for thematic analysis. Children, parents, and teachers have general knowledge about modifiable risk factors. Adults worried more about tobacco use, as compared to unhealthy diet and physical inactivity in children. Participants identified features at the intrapersonal (e.g., negative emotional state), interpersonal (e.g., peers as role models), and organizational and community levels (e.g., high levels of crime) that influence these risk factors in children. School committees, religious leaders, and government programs and activities were among the positive community resources identified. These findings should help researchers in Guatemala and similar LMIC to develop community-based interventions for NCD prevention in school-age children that are effective, feasible, and culturally acceptable.

  15. Efectos de la Ley 789 sobre la demanda laboral manufacturera colombiana 2001-2006

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Fernando Narváez Rubiano

    2015-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se estudian los impactos de un cambio institucionalcomo la reforma laboral del 2002 sobre la demanda laboral colombiana, con base en datos panel suministrados por la Encuesta Anual Manufacturera desagregada a cuatro dígitos CIUU para el periodo 2001-2006 y de acuerdo a los planteamientos teóricos de Hamermesh (1993). Adicionalmente, se estiman elasticidades y los resultados del ejercicio econométrico arrojan una elasticidad empleo producto de 0,57 y 0,61 de corto y larg...

  16. Illnesses and injuries related to total release foggers--eight states, 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-17

    Total release foggers (TRFs), sometimes called "bug bombs," are pesticide products designed to fill an area with insecticide and often are used in homes and workplaces to kill cockroaches, fleas, and flying insects. Most TRFs contain pyrethroid, pyrethrin, or both as active ingredients. TRFs also contain flammable aerosol propellants that can cause fires or explosions. The magnitude and range of acute health problems associated with TRF usage has not been described previously. This report summarizes illnesses and injuries that were associated with exposures to TRFs during 2001--2006 in eight states (California, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Washington) and were investigated by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) and state health departments participating in the SENSOR-Pesticides program. During 2001-2006, a total of 466 TRF-related illnesses or injuries were identified. These illnesses or injuries often resulted from inability or failure to vacate before the TRF discharged, reentry into the treated space too soon after the TRF was discharged, excessive use of TRFs for the space being treated, and failure to notify others nearby. The findings indicate that TRFs pose a risk for acute, usually temporary health effects among users and bystanders. To reduce the risk for TRF-related health effects, integrated pest management control strategies that prevent pests' access to food, water, and shelter need to be promoted and adopted. In addition, awareness of the hazards and proper use of TRFs need to be better communicated on TRF labels and in public media campaigns.

  17. SEROTYPES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA SSP IN CENTRAL THAILAND, 2001-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantip, Sirichote; Aroon, B.; Kanokwan, Tienmanee

    2010-01-01

    . Schwarzengrund, S. Choleraesuis, S. Anatum, S. Stanley, S. Rissen, and S. Typhimurium were the most resistant serovars observed. The invasive serovar, S. Choleraesuis was resistant to cefotaxime and norfloxacin. Antimicrobial resistance to cefotaxime, was observed in S. Agona, S. Rissen, S. Typhimurium, S......This study was carried out to elucidate the epidemiological trends and antimicrobial susceptibilities against Salmonella serovars among Thai patients and asymptomatic carriers during 2001-2006 in central Thailand. A total of 1,401 human and 260 non-human isolates from various sources were included....... The isolates were characterized using serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The most common serovars in patients submitting stool samples were S. Weltevreden, S. Stanley, S. Anatum, and S. Rissen. Significantly higher odds ratios were observed in blood samples versus stool sample for S...

  18. Summary report of Japan-US joint project. JUPITER-II. FuY 2001 - 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Kohyama, A.; Tanaka, S.; Muroga, T.; Namba, C.; Sze, D.K.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes the scientific accomplishments achieved through the JUPITER-II Japan-US Collaboration Program. The JUPITER-II collaboration (Japan-USA Program of Irradiation/Integration Test for Fusion Research -II) has been carried out through six years (2001-2006) under Phase 4 of the collaboration implemented by Amendment 4 of Annex I to the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology)-DOE (United States Department of Energy) Cooperation. This program followed the RTNS-II Program (Phase 1: 1982-1986), the FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase 2: 1987-1994) and the JUPITER Program (Phase 3: 1995-2000). The JUPITER-II collaboration was established to provide the scientific foundations for understanding the integrated behavior of blanket materials combinations operating under conditions characteristic of fusion reactors, including interactive neutron irradiation effects, high temperature coolant flow phenomena, heat and mass transport in blanket materials, and coolant chemistry and its interactions with surrounding materials. The scientific concept of this program is to study the key technology in macroscopic system integration for advanced blanket based on an understanding of the relevant mechanics at the microscopic level. The 44 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Efectos de la Ley 789 sobre la demanda laboral manufacturera colombiana 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Fernando Narváez Rubiano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estudian los impactos de un cambio institucionalcomo la reforma laboral del 2002 sobre la demanda laboral colombiana, con base en datos panel suministrados por la Encuesta Anual Manufacturera desagregada a cuatro dígitos CIUU para el periodo 2001-2006 y de acuerdo a los planteamientos teóricos de Hamermesh (1993. Adicionalmente, se estiman elasticidades y los resultados del ejercicio econométrico arrojan una elasticidad empleo producto de 0,57 y 0,61 de corto y largo plazo respectivamente; una elasticidad empleo-salario en el corto plazo de -0,78 y en el largo plazo de -0,98. Esto corrobora un elemento común de los trabajos empíricos, según el cual las elasticidades precios de los factores son mayores en el largo plazo. Los valores anteriores muestran que en el corto plazo la reforma tiene efectos negativos sobre la creación de empleos, mientras que en el largo plazo la reforma no tiene efectos sobre la demanda laboral manufacturera.

  20. Guatemaltequidad : Indians and Ladinos in the Guatemalan national imaginary

    OpenAIRE

    Montepeque, Axel O.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examines representations of Guatemaltequidad (Guatemalan national identity) in Guatemalan and U.S.-Guatemalan literature. It proposes that the dominant construction of Guatemala as a Ladino nation has functioned to silence, marginalize, and exploit the Mayan population and that Guatemalan authors have at critical historical moments used literature to reimagine the nation in order to rearticulate the place of the indigenous majority. The first chapter argues that 19th century...

  1. Dengue 1 diversity and microevolution, French Polynesia 2001-2006: connection with epidemiology and clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Elodie; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Roche, Claudine; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2009-08-04

    Dengue fever (DF) is an emerging infectious disease in the tropics and subtropics. Determinants of DF epidemiology and factors involved in severe cases-dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS)-remain imperfectly characterized. Since 2000, serotype 1 (DENV-1) has predominated in the South Pacific. The aim of this study was (i) to determine the origin and (ii) to study the evolutionary relationships of DENV-1 viruses that have circulated in French Polynesia (FP) from the severe 2001 outbreak to the recent 2006 epidemic, and (iii) to analyse the viral intra-host genetic diversity according to clinical presentation. Sequences of 181 envelope gene and 12 complete polyproteins of DENV-1 viruses obtained from human sera in FP during the 2001-2006 period were generated. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all DENV-1 FP strains belonged to genotype IV-"South Pacific" and derived from a single introduction event from South-East Asia followed by a 6-year in situ evolution. Although the ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous substitutions per site indicated strong negative selection, a mutation in the envelope glycoprotein (S222T) appeared in 2002 and was subsequently fixed. It was noted that genetic diversification was very significant during the 2002-2005 period of endemic DENV-1 circulation. For nine DF sera and eight DHF/DSS sera, approximately 40 clones/serum of partial envelope gene were sequenced. Importantly, analysis revealed that the intra-host genetic diversity was significantly lower in severe cases than in classical DF. First, this study showed that DENV-1 epidemiology in FP was different from that described in other South-Pacific islands, characterized by a long sustained viral circulation and the absence of new viral introduction over a 6-year period. Second, a significant part of DENV-1 evolution was observed during the endemic period characterized by the rapid fixation of S222T in the envelope protein that may reflect genetic drift or

  2. Dengue 1 diversity and microevolution, French Polynesia 2001-2006: connection with epidemiology and clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Descloux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever (DF is an emerging infectious disease in the tropics and subtropics. Determinants of DF epidemiology and factors involved in severe cases-dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS-remain imperfectly characterized. Since 2000, serotype 1 (DENV-1 has predominated in the South Pacific. The aim of this study was (i to determine the origin and (ii to study the evolutionary relationships of DENV-1 viruses that have circulated in French Polynesia (FP from the severe 2001 outbreak to the recent 2006 epidemic, and (iii to analyse the viral intra-host genetic diversity according to clinical presentation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequences of 181 envelope gene and 12 complete polyproteins of DENV-1 viruses obtained from human sera in FP during the 2001-2006 period were generated. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all DENV-1 FP strains belonged to genotype IV-"South Pacific" and derived from a single introduction event from South-East Asia followed by a 6-year in situ evolution. Although the ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous substitutions per site indicated strong negative selection, a mutation in the envelope glycoprotein (S222T appeared in 2002 and was subsequently fixed. It was noted that genetic diversification was very significant during the 2002-2005 period of endemic DENV-1 circulation. For nine DF sera and eight DHF/DSS sera, approximately 40 clones/serum of partial envelope gene were sequenced. Importantly, analysis revealed that the intra-host genetic diversity was significantly lower in severe cases than in classical DF. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: First, this study showed that DENV-1 epidemiology in FP was different from that described in other South-Pacific islands, characterized by a long sustained viral circulation and the absence of new viral introduction over a 6-year period. Second, a significant part of DENV-1 evolution was observed during the endemic period characterized by the rapid

  3. SOCIAL EXCLUSION: GUATEMALAN YOUTH WITHIN COFFEE PLANTATIONS AT SOCONUSCO CHIAPAS

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    Laura Itzel Ramírez-Ramos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mexico's southern border is the entry point for different migratory flows, mainly from Central America, these flows have taken place under socioeconomic contexts and conditions which demand the constant livelihood strategies pursuit from people. This paper is focused on the agricultural laborers from Guatemalan origin, within coffee plantation farms at the Soconusco, Chiapas. The main objective is arguing how the lack of access -or restricted access- to education and the precarious inclusion to work and migration, have positioned youth population of migrant laborers, from Guatemalan origin, into social processes of social exclusion and vulnerability. It is concluded that conditions generated from these processes, preclude the generation of different work expectations, the access to a higher quality of life and the social mobility in a men and woman development crucial stage. The exposed information comes from quantitative and qualitative research methods. A nonrandom survey was applied to 129 families; 20 semi-structured interviews for children and adolescents within farms and 25 to actors involved in the recognition and performance of the human rights of migrant children in the southern Mexican border area.

  4. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis y neumonía en niños guatemaltecos: importancia de Haemophilus influenzae tipo b y de Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Asturias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated for evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae infection. Normally sterile body fluids were cultured, and antigen detection was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and pleural fluid. RESULTS: Of 1 203 children 1-59 months of age hospitalized over a 28-month period, 725 of them (60.3% had a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, 357 (29.7% of meningitis, 60 (5.0% of cellulitis, and 61 (5.1% of sepsis and other conditions. Hib was identified in 20.0% of children with meningitis and S. pneumoniae in 12.9%. The average annual incidence of Hib meningitis was 13.8 cases per 100 000 children under 5 years of age, and 32.4% of meningitides caused by Hib and 58.7% of S. pneumoniae meningitides occurred prior to 6 months of age. Case fatality rates were 14.1%, 37.0%, and 18.0%, respectively, for children with Hib, S. pneumoniae, and culture-negative and antigen-negative meningitis. Prior antibiotic therapy was common and was associated with significant reductions in CSF-culture-positive results for children with other evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in case detection, culture methods, and latex agglutination for antigen detection in CSF resulted in identification of Hib and S. pneumoniae as important causes of severe disease in Guatemalan children. Using a cutoff of > 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter in CSF would improve the sensitivity for detection of bacterial

  5. Culture- and antigen-negative meningitis in Guatemalan children Meningitis negativa a pruebas antigénicas y de cultivo en niños guatemaltecos

    OpenAIRE

    Erica L. Dueger; Edwin J. Asturias; Neal A. Halsey

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare children with confirmed bacterial meningitis (CBM) and those with culture- and latex-negative meningitis (CLN). METHODS: Children 1 to 59 months of age admitted to three major referral hospitals in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated prospectively between 1 October 1996 and 31 December 2005. Bacterial cultures and latex agglutination antigen testing were performed on samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). RESULTS: The cas...

  6. Culture- and antigen-negative meningitis in Guatemalan children Meningitis negativa a pruebas antigénicas y de cultivo en niños guatemaltecos

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    Erica L. Dueger

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare children with confirmed bacterial meningitis (CBM and those with culture- and latex-negative meningitis (CLN. METHODS: Children 1 to 59 months of age admitted to three major referral hospitals in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated prospectively between 1 October 1996 and 31 December 2005. Bacterial cultures and latex agglutination antigen testing were performed on samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. RESULTS: The case-fatality rate was significantly higher in the 493 children with CBM than in the 528 children with CLN (27.6% and 14.9%, respectively; P OBJETIVO: Comparar los casos infantiles de meningitis bacteriana confirmada (MBC y meningitis negativa a pruebas de látex y de cultivo (MNLC. MÉTODOS: Se evaluaron los niños de 1 a 59 meses de edad ingresados en tres grandes hospitales de referencia de la Ciudad de Guatemala entre el 1 de octubre de 1996 y el 31 de diciembre de 2005 con signos clínicos de infección bacteriana. Se realizaron cultivos bacterianos y pruebas de aglutinación antigénica con látex en muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR. RESULTADOS: La tasa de letalidad fue significativamente mayor en los 493 niños con MBC que en los 528 niños con MNLC (27,6% y 14,9%, respectivamente; P < 0,001. Los niños con MBC tuvieron menor probabilidad de recibir antibióticos y mayor de sufrir convulsiones, choques o entrar en coma al ser ingresados que los niños con MNLC. Se observó un mayor porcentaje de manifestaciones clínicas de secuelas al alta hospitalaria en los 182 niños sobrevivientes con MBC que en los 205 sobrevivientes con MNLC estudiados entre octubre de 2000 y diciembre de 2005 (78,6% y 46,8%, respectivamente; P < 0,0001. Los factores de riesgo de muerte en los niños con MBC fueron: glucosa en LCR < 10 mg/dL, neutrófilos periféricos < 2 000 células/mm³, coma o choque al ingreso, y sepsis o neumonía concurrentes; solo el coma y el

  7. Strong Associations Exist among Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Biomarkers in the Circulating, Cellular and Urinary Anatomical Compartments in Guatemalan Children from the Western Highlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Soto-Méndez

    Full Text Available A series of antioxidant enzymes and non-enzymatic compounds act to protect cells from uncontrolled propagation of free radicals. It is poorly understood, though, to what extent and how their interaction is harmonized.To explore associative interactions among a battery of urinary and blood biomarkers of oxidative stress and enzymatic and non-enzymatic markers of the antioxidant defense system in children from low income households.For this cross-sectional descriptive study, urine, red cells, and plasma were sampled in 82 preschool children attending three daycare centers in Quetzaltenango Guatemala. The urinary oxidative stress biomarkers studied were F2-isoprostanes and 8-hydroxy-deoxy-guanosine. Red cell enzyme activities measured were: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Circulating non-enzymatic antioxidants selected were: retinol, tocopherols, β-carotene and coenzymes Q9 and Q10.In a Spearman rank-order correlation hemi-matrix, of 55 paired combinations of the 11 biomarkers, 28 (51% were significantly correlated among each other (p ≤ 0.05, with the strongest association being retinol and tocopherols (r = 0.697, p 0.5 to ≤ 0.10. F2-isoprostanes showed the greatest number of cross-associations, having significant interactions with 8 of the 10 remaining biomarkers. Goodness-of-fit modeling improved or maintained the r value for 24 of the significant interactions and for one of the 5 borderline associations. Multiple regression backward stepwise analysis indicated that plasma retinol, β-carotene and coenzyme Q10 were independent predictors of urinary F2-isoprostanes.Numerous significant associations resulted among biomarkers of oxidation and responders to oxidation. Interesting findings were the apparent patterns of harmonious interactions among the elements of the oxidation-antioxidation systems in this population.

  8. Violencia sexual en jóvenes de 10 a 19 años. cali, 2001-2006

    OpenAIRE

    Restrepo-Gutiérrez, Ana C.; Salcedo-Cifuentes, Mercedes; Bermúdez-Escobar, Amparo

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo Caracterizar la violencia sexual denunciada por jóvenes entre 10 a 19 años en Cali durante los años 2001 a 2006.Material y Métodos Se definió como presunta víctima denunciante de delito sexual a los jóvenes entre 10 a 19 años usuarios del servicio de Clínica Forense remitidopor autoridad competente durante los años 2001-2006 y se compararon variables de tiempo, lugar y persona de los delitos sexuales cometidos por un familiar (intrafamiliar) y por conocido no familiar o desconocido (...

  9. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-García Rodrigo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]. The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006.

  10. The Guatemalan Military: Transition from War to Peace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saenz, James

    2001-01-01

    ... to civilian control within a democracy. In December of 1996, the Guatemalan government and the insurgent representatives signed the final Peace Accord that brought an end to the country's thirty-six years of civil war...

  11. Social Emotional Learning in a Guatemalan Preschool Sample: Does Socioeconomic Status Moderate the Effects of a School-Based Prevention Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Amanda B.; Edstrom, Leihua; Mildon, Heather A.; Davila, Lesliann

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effectiveness of a universal social skills program and compared social emotional knowledge on individual skills interviews with 100 Guatemalan preschool children from resource rich (N?=?47) and resource poor (N?=?53) backgrounds. Participant ages ranged from 3- to 6-years-old. SEL was evaluated prior and subsequent to…

  12. Mycotoxin exposure among Guatemalans: Implications for public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatemala has the highest rate of stunting in the Pan American region and the fourth wordwide. It also has the highest liver cancer rate in this region, which is the same among male and females. Guatemalans of low socioeconomic status consume about 400g of corn/day as tortillas. Subsistence farmers ...

  13. Un análisis de la política de ciencia y tecnología en México (2001-2006)

    OpenAIRE

    Santos López Leyva; Lidyeth Azucena Sandoval Barraza

    2007-01-01

    El presente artículo parte de los enunciados de política de ciencia y tecnología en nuestro país establecidos en el Programa Especial de Ciencia y Tecnología PECyT (2001-2006). Pretende llevar a cabo un análisis del nivel de instrumentación de esos enunciados. Revisa, de manera central, tres dimensiones: el financiamiento a estas actividades donde resalta la inversión total en ciencia y tecnología; el porcentaje del PIB que el gobierno destina a estas actividades; y el porcentaje del mismo PI...

  14. Maya-American Children: A Biocultural View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogin, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Discusses social, economic, and political conditions that influence the growth and health of children of Guatemalan Maya immigrants to the United States. As of 2000, Maya-American children age 6-12 years were, on average, 11 centimeters taller, and also heavier, than their Guatemalan peers. The heaviness is probably due to sedentary lifestyles.…

  15. Dietary intakes and food sources of fatty acids in Guatemalan schoolchildren: A cross-sectional study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bermudez, Odilia I.

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background Consumption of healthy diets that contribute with adequate amounts of fat and fatty acids is needed for children. Among Guatemalan children, there is little information about fat intakes. Therefore, the present study sought to assess intakes of dietary fats and examine food sources of those fats in Guatemalan children. Methods The study subjects consisted of a convenience sample of 449 third- and fourth-grade schoolchildren (8-10 y), attending public or private schools in Quetzaltenango City, Guatemala. Dietary data was obtained by means of a single pictorial 24-h record. Results The percentages of total energy (%E) from total fat, saturated fat (SFA) and monounsaturated fat (MUFA) reached 29%E for total fat and 10%E for each SFA and MUFA, without gender differences. %E from fats in high vs. low-socio economic status (SES) children were significantly higher for boys, but not for girls, for total fat (p = 0.002) and SFA (p < 0.001). Large proportions of the children had low levels of intakes of some fatty acids (FA), particularly for n-3 FA, with >97% of all groups consuming less than 1%E from this fats. Fried eggs, sweet rolls, whole milk and cheese were main sources of total fat and, SFA. Whole milk and sweet bread were important sources of n-3 FA for high- and low-SES boys and girls, respectively. Fried plantain was the main source of n-3 FA for girls in the high-SES group. Fried fish, seafood soup, and shrimp, consumed only by boys in low amounts, were sources of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, which may explain the low intakes of these nutrients. Conclusions α-linolenic acid, EPA and DHA were the most limiting fatty acids in diets of Guatemalan schoolchildren, which could be partially explained by the low consumption of sources of these nutrients, particularly fish and seafood (for EPA and DHA). This population will benefit from a higher consumption of culturally acceptable foods that are rich in these limiting

  16. Variables in the Guatemalan Operational Environment That Affect Guatemalan Decision Makers Concerning Relations with the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-06

    of the civilian elite in Guatemala. These business organizations, loosely united in the organization Coordinadora de Asociaciones Comercials...state of seige and mobilization declared by Montt. Civil liberties, to include political activities, were restored. Victores declared that elections...Many political scientists have stressed the belief that the Guatemalan decision makers think of the Salvadoran civil war as their own civil war. (2

  17. Nostalgia por la tierra, nostalgia por el dolar: Guatemalan transnational lives and ideology of return migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J. Moran-Taylor

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the ideology of return among contemporary Guatemalan migrants living and working in the southwestern desert city of Phoenix in Arizona. In Phoenix’s metropolitan area, Guatemalans (both Ladino and Maya ethnic groups add to the city’s cultural mosaic, and at the same time, are vital agents for change in Guatemalan society. Little is known about the processes and patterns behind Guatemalan migration despite the fact that over 10 percent of Guatemala’s population currently resides in the United States. Most Guatemalans in Phoenix, regardless of their length of residence in the United States, express longings for return to their homeland. In part, this strong notion of return prevails because the Guatemalan community in the Phoenix metropolitan area is not cohesive.

  18. Dietary intakes and food sources of fat and fatty acids in Guatemalan schoolchildren: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Odilia I; Toher, Claire; Montenegro-Bethancourt, Gabriela; Vossenaar, Marieke; Mathias, Paul; Doak, Colleen; Solomons, Noel W

    2010-04-23

    Consumption of healthy diets that contribute with adequate amounts of fat and fatty acids is needed for children. Among Guatemalan children, there is little information about fat intakes. Therefore, the present study sought to assess intakes of dietary fats and examine food sources of those fats in Guatemalan children. The study subjects consisted of a convenience sample of 449 third- and fourth-grade schoolchildren (8-10 y), attending public or private schools in Quetzaltenango City, Guatemala. Dietary data was obtained by means of a single pictorial 24-h record. The percentages of total energy (%E) from total fat, saturated fat (SFA) and monounsaturated fat (MUFA) reached 29%E for total fat and 10%E for each SFA and MUFA, without gender differences. %E from fats in high vs. low-socio economic status (SES) children were significantly higher for boys, but not for girls, for total fat (p = 0.002) and SFA (p 97% of all groups consuming less than 1%E from this fats. Fried eggs, sweet rolls, whole milk and cheese were main sources of total fat and, SFA. Whole milk and sweet bread were important sources of n-3 FA for high- and low-SES boys and girls, respectively. Fried plantain was the main source of n-3 FA for girls in the high-SES group. Fried fish, seafood soup, and shrimp, consumed only by boys in low amounts, were sources of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, which may explain the low intakes of these nutrients. alpha-linolenic acid, EPA and DHA were the most limiting fatty acids in diets of Guatemalan schoolchildren, which could be partially explained by the low consumption of sources of these nutrients, particularly fish and seafood (for EPA and DHA). This population will benefit from a higher consumption of culturally acceptable foods that are rich in these limiting nutrients.

  19. "Alla en Guatemala": Transnationalism, Language, and Identity of a Pentecostal Guatemalan-American Young Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Lucila D.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the transnationalism of a Pentecostal Guatemalan-American young woman who is a second-generation immigrant. Amalia traveled to Guatemala from when she was six months old until her sophomore year in college. These visits to Guatemala have helped her maintain her Guatemalan language, culture, and identity in the larger Southern…

  20. Un análisis de la política de ciencia y tecnología en México (2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos López Leyva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo parte de los enunciados de política de ciencia y tecnología en nuestro país establecidos en el Programa Especial de Ciencia y Tecnología PECyT (2001-2006. Pretende llevar a cabo un análisis del nivel de instrumentación de esos enunciados. Revisa, de manera central, tres dimensiones: el financiamiento a estas actividades donde resalta la inversión total en ciencia y tecnología; el porcentaje del PIB que el gobierno destina a estas actividades; y el porcentaje del mismo PIB para investigación y desarrollo. Un elemento que resulta central para el impulso a este sector es la formación de recursos humanos, donde sobresale la promoción a los estudios de posgrado y la consolidación del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (SNI. Fortalecer un sector de ciencia y tecnología tiene como finalidad central mejorar la competitividad de un país o región, nuestra preocupación se enfoca en revisar la productividad de los investigadores mexicanos; el comportamiento del índice internacional de competitividad y el papel que ocupa México en este aspecto, por último, se hace una revisión de la balanza de pagos tecnológica de nuestro país.

  1. Global Ear. Werke 2001 - 2006

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Dresdenis muusikafestivalil "Global Ear" 23.3.03 esitusel Eesti heliloojate muusika: Helena Tulve "lumineux/opaque", Jaan Rääts "Meditation", Mirjam Tally "Aura", Mati Kuulberg "Sonate Nr.4", Mari Vihmand "Seitsmele"

  2. Caracterización instrumental del desplazamiento forzado en Colombia: hechos estilizados y la Encuesta Continua de Hogares (2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carolina Silva Arias

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Como una alternativa a la problemática que gira en torno a la dimensión real del desplazamiento forzado en Colombia, este artículo analiza el poder explicativo de la caracterización instrumental del desplazamiento forzado a partir de la Encuesta Continua de Hogares (ECH como un sistema alternativo de información. Este estudio gira en torno a la capacidad que tendría laECHde replicar, a nivel de microdatos, algunos patrones recurrentes detectados en múltiples estudios a comunidades desplazadas. Para esto, evaluamos algunos elementos particulares de la población desplazada, tales como su nivel educativo, patrones de género, tamaño y tasas de dependencia de las familias desplazadas, así como patrones de inserción laboral. En general, la caracterización del desplazamiento forzado a través de laECHpara el periodo 2001-2006, refleja patrones identificados en la literatura sobre el desplazamiento en Colombia; presenta perfiles empíricos similares a los encontrados en estudios muestrales y en sistemas de información sobre desplazamiento forzado. Adicionalmente, este sistema de información exhibe comportamientos diferenciales entre los migrantes económicos voluntarios e individuos desplazados (IDPs - Internally Displaced Individuals acorde con el análisis teórico de selección del migrante postulado por Borjas (1982. De esta manera, se evidenció entre los desplazados una alta proporción de menores de edad, así como una alta tasa de dependencia económica; además una dimensión de género ligada a la descomposición familiar, debido a que se encontró mayor proporción de hogares desplazados con jefatura femenina, así como mayor proporción de viudas, siendo las mujeres las que devengaron menores ingresos. El tratamiento empírico ofrece dos conclusiones destacables. La primera de ellas es reforzar la existencia de ciertos hechos estilizados en el perfil de los desplazados forzados en Colombia. La segunda es que la caracterizaci

  3. A trajetória do Banco do Brasil no período recente, 2001-2006: banco público ou banco estatal "privado"? The recent path of the bank of Brazil, 2001-2006: public bank or "private" state-owned bank?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Pereira de Andrade

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste texto é avaliar a performance do Banco do Brasil (BB no período 2001-2006, enfatizando os seguintes aspectos: O desempenho do BB correspondeu ao de um banco público tradicional que atua como um importante instrumento de governo para a promoção do desenvolvimento? Ou, ao invés disso, a trajetória recente do banco pode ser caracterizada pelo reforço de uma lógica privada de atuação? O texto procura levantar algumas questões relativas ao papel do Estado na atividade econômica, particularmente o papel que um grande banco estatal pode e deve ter para financiar o desenvolvimento em um país periférico (e desigual como o Brasil. A conclusão mais geral é que, desde meados dos anos 1980, o Banco do Brasil tem perdido crescentemente a função básica que costumava exercer como banco público.The purpose of this paper is to assess the performance of the Bank of Brazil (BB in the 2001-2006 period, with a focus on the following aspects: has the BB actually performed the role of a typical public bank, functioning as an important instrument to foster development in Brazil? Or, instead, has its recent path been characterised by the reinforcement of a private logic of behaviour? The paper aims at raising a few questions regarding the role of the state in the economic activity, particularly the role that a big state-owned bank can and must perform to finance development in a peripheral (and unequal country like Brazil. The general conclusion is that, since the mid-80s, the BB has increasingly lost the key function that it formerly exerted as a public bank. A distinct pattern of behaviour has emerged, characterised by the bank's transformation into a "more private, less public" institution.

  4. The Growth Attainment, Hematological, Iron Status and Inflammatory Profile of Guatemalan Juvenile End-Stage Renal Disease Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Casimiro de Almeida

    Full Text Available Stunting, anemia and inflammation are frequently observed in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD.To assess anthropometric, hematological and inflammatory data and to study their potential interrelationship in Guatemalan juveniles undergoing hemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD.54 juveniles 7-20 years of age were recruited in FUNDANIER, Guatemala City: 27 on HD and 27 PD. Hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin, serum transferrin receptor (sTfR, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and iron-binding capacity, white blood cell count (WBC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, as well as IL-6, IL-1 and TNF-α, weight and height were determined by standard methods. Hepcidin-25 (Hep-25 was assessed by weak cation exchange time-of-flight mass-spectrometry.92% and 55% of HD and PD children, respectively, were stunted and 95% and 85% were anemic. Among iron status biomarkers, serum ferritin was massively increased and significantly higher in the HD group compared to the PD group. Hep-25 was also greatly elevated in both groups. 41% of HD patients showed increments in three or more inflammatory biomarkers, while it was 2 or less in all PD subjects.The degree of stunting, the prevalence and severity of anemia in Guatemalan juvenile ESRD far exceed the national statistics for this low-income Central American country. Ferritin and Hep-25 concentrations were elevated, with the latter to an extraordinary magnitude. Additional biomarkers of inflammation not directly related to iron status were elevated as well. The role of both disease- and environment-related factors in combination best explains the magnitude of the biomarker abnormalities.

  5. Envenomation by a wild Guatemalan Beaded Lizard Heloderma horridum charlesbogerti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano-Sánchez, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The Guatemalan Beaded Lizard (Heloderma horridum charlesbogerti) is an endemic venomous lizard that inhabits southeastern Guatemala. Published reports of bites by Beaded Lizard are scarce. This is the first case report of a bite from Heloderma horridum charlesbogerti. A 24-year-old man was bitten on the left hand by a juvenile Heloderma horridum charlesbogerti. The lizard remained attached for approximately 15 seconds. The patient experienced severe local pain, dizziness, diaphoresis, vomiting, severe paresthesia in his left hand and arm, and hypotension (70/52 mm/Hg). He was treated with intravenous ketorolac, chlorpheniramine, methylprednisolone, antibiotics, ondansentron, and normal saline. Hematology tests revealed leukocytosis (12,600/mm3). Symptoms improved and the patient was discharged from hospital 24 hours after admission. The case reported here shows that bites by Heloderma produce severe clinical effects shortly after the bite. Management consists of waiting for the lizard to relax its bite pressure and using pliers to open lizard's mouth and pull out the bitten extremity, a careful manual search for teeth remnants, and supportive care. In our case, severe pain, unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics, was a major problem. Parethesias resolve quickly but pain may persist for up to 12 hours after the bite. A full recovery is expected.

  6. ANÁLISIS BIBLIOMÉTRICO DE LAS TESIS DE PREGRADO DE LA FACULTAD DE MEDICINA VETERINARIA DE LA UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL MAYOR DE SAN MARCOS EN EL PERIODO 2001-2006.

    OpenAIRE

    San Martín H., Felipe; Laboratorio de Bioquímica, Nutrición y Alimentación Animal, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Pacheco M., Josmel; Laboratorio de Bioquímica, Nutrición y Alimentación Animal, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2012-01-01

    Las tesis de pregrado tienen gran importancia en la actividad de investigación de la Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (FMV-UNMSM) por lo que se realizó el presente estudio, a fin de evaluar la actividad de investigación mediante un análisis bibliométrico de aquellas tesis que hayan sido sustentadas en el periodo 2001-2006. Se tomó en consideración las variables unidad académica, disciplina, especie animal, directores y jurado de tesis. Los datos ...

  7. Several 'problem nutrients' are identified in complementary feeding of Guatemalan infants with continued breastfeeding using the concept of 'critical nutrient density'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenaar, M; Hernández, L; Campos, R; Solomons, N W

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends nutritionally adequate complementary feeding (CF) through the introduction of indigenous foodstuffs and local foods while breastfeeding for at least 2 years. To determine the adequacy of the contribution of CF to the diets of Guatemalan infants at the 7th-12th month of life receiving high-intensity continued breastfeeding. Critical nutrient densities for CF were modelled using age- and sex-specific energy and protein requirements assuming children to be at the 50th weight percentile of local peers and 15th weight percentiles of the 2006 WHO standards. Nutrient requirements for the total diet were determined using the recommended nutrient intakes. Breast milk was assumed to provide 75% of total energy at the 7th-9th month and 50% at the 10th-12th month. Gaps between computed critical nutrient densities and the CF consumption of 128 Guatemalan infants based on data collected by means of three nonconsecutive 24-h quantitative intake recalls were examined. Locally consumed foods with nutrient densities above the modelled critical densities were identified. Observed non-breast milk complementation would result in total diets providing inadequate nutrient density for vitamin A, niacin and vitamin C in some age groups. Major gaps for calcium, iron and zinc were ubiquitous across all groups. Few foods commonly consumed among Guatemalan infants had adequate densities of 'problem nutrients'. The critical nutrient density concept is useful to evaluate the nutrient adequacy of the infant's diet. Fortified foods are essential sources of the main 'problem nutrients', namely calcium, iron and zinc, given that natural sources are scarce.

  8. Day-to-Day Variations in Iron, Zinc and Copper in Breast Milk of Guatemalan Mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; West, C.E.; Schümann, K.; Bulux-Hernandes, J.; Solomons, N.W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the within-subject and between-subject coefficients of variation (CV) of iron, zinc and copper concentrations in the milk of Guatemalan mothers. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in lactating women who had delivered a healthy infant 1 to 6 months previously in two

  9. Dietary characteristics of complementary foods offered to Guatemalan infants vary between urban and rural settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneman, A.; Hernandez, L.; Campos, R.; Vossenaar, M.; Solomons, N.W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare the dietary variety, diversity, and origins of complementary foods given to urban and rural Guatemalan infants in the second semester of life. Dietary intake from a total of 128 infants of both sexes, aged 6.0 to 12.0 months on admission, from

  10. Análisis de las innovaciones curriculares del bachillerato técnico en contabilidad y administración e instalaciones, equipos y máquinas eléctricas, Azuay-Ecuador 2001-2006

    OpenAIRE

    Cáceres Sánchez, Zoila Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    El tema de la tesis es Análisis de las Innovaciones Curriculares del Bachillerato Técnico en Contabilidad y Administración e Instalaciones y Máquinas Eléctricas, Azuay-Ecuador 2001-2006. En el primer capítulo se hace alusión a una breve reseña histórica sobre educación técnica, insertada en el modelo neoliberal, en una sociedad de mercado a partir de los 80, luego se hace referencia al tema de competencias que el nuevo ciudadano debe evidenciar para la vida y el campo laboral, además se ...

  11. ¿Selección positiva o negativa? Inserción de la migración interna y el desplazamiento forzado en el mercado laboral urbano de Colombia 2001-2006.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carolina Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analizan los determinantes socioeconómicos de la insetrión laboral de migrantes recientes y de desplazados fañados en las diez principales ciudades de Colombia utilizando información de la Encuesta Continua de Hogares (2001-2006. Se adapta el marco teórico de selección del migrante internacional de Borjas ( 1982, 1985, 1987, 1990 a los casos de migración interna voluntaria o involuntaria. Además, mediante la estimación de un modelo Logit para conocer la propensión a ocuparse y de ecuaciones mincerianas para determinar el nivel de ingreso laboral, ilustramos el proceso de selección positiva de los migrantes económicos recientes y sustentamos empíricamente los resultados teóricos esperados de selección negativa de la inserción laboral del desplazado forzado al mercado laboral urbano.

  12. IPNS progress report 2001-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzec, B.

    2006-11-27

    In August 1981, the proton beam from the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) was first delivered to the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering target and now, in June 2006, it is with great joy that we celebrate the impending 25th anniversary of this event. This edition of the IPNS Progress Report will focus on the development and scientific accomplishments of the past 5 years, since our last Progress Report, but with some mention of the 25 years of IPNS experience. It is appropriate at this anniversary date to recall some of the more significant historic events that have led to the present IPNS and discuss some of the plans that will lead to even more successes. Below is a brief chronology that captures some of the developments of IPNS: 8/4/81 - First beam delivered to the neutron scattering target; 6/10/84 - IPNS produced its one billionth neutron pulse; 1/10/85 - Installed world's first solid methane moderator; 6/30/87 - 1000th experiment performed at IPNS; 9/19/87 - IPNS produced its two billionth neutron pulse; 11/20/91 - 2000th experiment performed at IPNS; 4/17/04 - IPNS produced its eight billionth neutron pulse; and 8/19/05 - 7000th experiment performed at IPNS. During the past 5 years, several significant source and instrument developments have taken place. Most of these are discussed in more detail elsewhere in the report, but three of the ones most visible to users are mentioned here.

  13. Food variety, dietary diversity, and food characteristics among convenience samples of Guatemalan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Méndez, María José; Campos, Raquel; Hernández, Liza; Orozco, Mónica; Vossenaar, Marieke; Solomons, Noel W

    2011-01-01

    To compare variety and diversity patterns and dietary characteristics in Guatemalan women. Two non-consecutive 24-h recalls were conducted in convenience samples of 20 rural Mayan women and 20 urban students. Diversity scores were computed using three food-group systems.Variety and diversity scores and dietary origin and characteristics were compared between settings using independent t-test or Mann-Whitney-U-test. Dietary variety and diversity were generally greater in the urban sample when compared to the rural sample, depending on the number of days and food-group system used for evaluation.The diet was predominantly plant-based and composed of non-fortified food items in both areas.The rural diet was predominantly composed of traditional,non-processed foods. The urban diet was mostly based on non-traditional and processed items. Considerations of intervention strategies for dietary improvement and health protection for the Guatemalan countryside should still rely on promotion and preservation of traditional food selection.

  14. Circulating smallpox knowledge: Guatemalan doctors, Maya Indians and designing Spain's smallpox vaccination expedition, 1780-1803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Martha

    2010-12-01

    Drawing on the rich but mostly overlooked history of Guatemala's anti-smallpox campaigns in the 1780s and 1790s, this paper interweaves an analysis of the contribution of colonial medical knowledges and practical experiences with the construction and implementation of imperial science. The history of the anti-smallpox campaigns is traced from the introduction of inoculation in Guatemala in 1780 to the eve of the Spanish Crown-sponsored Royal Maritime Vaccination Expedition in 1803. The paper first analyses the development of what Guatemalan medical physician José Flores called his 'local method' of inoculation, tailored to material and cultural conditions of highland Maya communities, and based on his more than twenty years of experience in anti-smallpox campaigns among multiethnic populations in Guatemala. Then the paper probes the accompanying transformations in discourses about health through the anti-smallpox campaigns as they became explicitly linked to new discourses of moral responsibility towards indigenous peoples. With the launch of the Spanish Vaccination Expedition in 1803, anti-smallpox efforts bridged the New World, Europe and Asia, and circulated on a global scale via the enactment of imperial Spanish health policy informed, in no small part, by New World and specifically colonial Guatemalan experiences with inoculation in multiethnic cities and highland Maya towns.

  15. Influence of Food Packaging on Children's Energy-dense Snack ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This research will study the influence of food packaging on Guatemalan preschool and school-aged children's energy-dense snack (EDS) food preferences. In 2010 ... Based on lessons learned from the tobacco control movement, banning licensed characters on advertising will help decrease children's product recognition.

  16. Influence of Food Packaging on Children's Energy-dense Snack ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Childhood obesity is a major global public health concern. Rates of obese and overweight children have increased in low- and middle-income countries such as Guatemala. This research will study the influence of food packaging on Guatemalan preschool and school-aged children's energy-dense snack (EDS) food ...

  17. Greater years of maternal schooling and higher scores on academic achievement tests are independently associated with improved management of child diarrhea by rural Guatemalan mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Aimee L; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Stein, Aryeh D; Sellen, Daniel W; Merchant, Moeza; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2010-09-01

    Appropriate home management can alleviate many of the consequences of diarrhea including malnutrition, impaired development, growth faltering, and mortality. Maternal cognitive ability, years of schooling, and acquired academic skills are hypothesized to improve child health by improving maternal child care practices, such as illness management. Using information collected longitudinally in 1996-1999 from 466 rural Guatemalan women with children schooling, academic skills, and scores on the Raven's Progressive Matrices and an illness management index (IMI). Women scoring in the lowest and middle tertiles of academic skills scored lower on the IMI compared to women in the highest tertile (-0.24 [95% CI: -0.54, 0.07]; -0.30 [95% CI: -0.54, -0.06], respectively) independent of sociodemographic factors, schooling, and Raven's scores. Among mothers with less than 1 year of schooling, scoring in the lowest tertile on the Raven's Progressive Matrices compared to the highest was significantly associated with scoring one point lower on the IMI (-1.18 [95% CI: -2.20, -0.17]). Greater academic skills were independently associated with maternal care during episodes of infant diarrhea. Schooling of young girls and/or community based programs that provide women with academic skills such as literacy, numeracy and knowledge could potentially improve mothers' care giving practices.

  18. Stress during labor and delivery is associated with delayed onset of lactation among urban Guatemalan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajeda, Rubén; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2002-10-01

    A delayed onset of lactation (OL) is likely to have a negative influence on breast-feeding outcomes. Thus, it is important to identify risk factors for delayed OL. We examined prospectively the association between stress during labor and delivery and OL in a cohort of urban Guatemalan women. Healthy women (n = 136) were recruited during the first stage of labor in the labor unit of a social security hospital in Guatemala City. Women provided salivary samples for cortisol determinations 3.2 +/- 3.2 h before birth and 1.7 +/- 1.9 h and 17.1 +/- 4.7 h after delivery. At the same time points women were asked to respond to a 17-item psychosocial stress and anxiety questionnaire. Women were called daily until OL occurred. Primiparous women had higher antepartum and early postpartum cortisol levels that were twice as high as those among multiparous women (P stress during labor and/or delivery is likely to be a significant risk factor for delayed OL in urban Guatemala.

  19. Maternal and childhood nutrition and later blood pressure levels in young Guatemalan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Aimee L; Conlisk, Andrea J; Barnhart, Huiman X; Martorell, Reynaldo; Grajeda, Rubén; Stein, Aryeh D

    2005-08-01

    Low birth weight and subsequent rapid child growth are associated with later blood pressure levels. The role of maternal and child nutrition in this association remains unclear. We studied 450 men and women (ages 21-29 years) born during a randomized trial of protein-energy supplementation (Atole) vs low energy/no protein supplementation (Fresco) in pregnancy and early childhood in four rural Guatemalan villages from 1969 to 1977. Protein-energy supplementation was not associated with differences in blood pressure in adulthood (diastolic blood pressure (DBP): beta = 0.69 mm Hg, 95% confidence internal (CI) (20.82-2.19); P = 0.37; systolic blood pressure (SBP): beta = 0.17 mm Hg, 95% CI (21.68-2.02); P = 0.86). Within the Atole group, maternal height was associated with later SBP (0.22 mm Hg/cm, 95% CI (20.002-0.45); P = 0.05). No other associations between maternal nutritional status, birth size, child growth, or supplement intake were observed for adult blood pressure. Our data do not support the role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy, birth size, or early child growth in programming adult blood pressure. Likewise, we found no effect of protein-energy supplementation in pregnancy or in early childhood on blood pressure in young adults.

  20. "I am Maya, not Guatemalan, nor Hispanic"—the Belongingness of Mayas in Southern Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. Hiller

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the personal meanings and public expressions of home, ethnicity and belonging among Maya/Guatemalan immigrants living in South Florida, specifically from the viewpoints of seven biographies of first and second-generation Maya immigrants. Our examination of their narratives suggests why these immigrants actively resist a public mis-categorization of being part of the Hispanic community by emphasizing their indigenous heritage. As such, this study provides a new type of research regarding Maya immigrants and their "positioning" or their "self-localization" as indigenous peoples seeking refuge in the United States. These are narratives of Maya lives, most of them child survivors, who fled the genocide in Guatemala with their families and who have faced discrimination while living in the United States. What is unique about our study is its emphasis upon biography for portraying particular facets of ethnicity and indigeneity and the difficult processes of transnational migration faced by Maya peoples now living in Florida. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0903106

  1. Novel approaches to HIV prevention and sexual health promotion among Guatemalan gay and bisexual men, MSM, and transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Alonzo, Jorge; Mann, Lilli; Downs, Mario; Simán, Florence M; Andrade, Mario; Martinez, Omar; Abraham, Claire; Villatoro, Guillermo R; Bachmann, Laura H

    2014-08-01

    The burden of HIV is disproportionate for Guatemalan sexual minorities (e.g., gay and bisexual men, men who have sex with men [MSM], and transgender persons). Our bi-national partnership used authentic approaches to community-based participatory research (CBPR) to identify characteristics of potentially successful programs to prevent HIV and promote sexual health among Guatemalan sexual minorities. Our partnership conducted Spanish-language focus groups with 87 participants who self-identified as male (n=64) or transgender (n=23) and individual in-depth interviews with ten formal and informal gay community leaders. Using constant comparison, an approach to grounded theory, we identified 20 characteristics of potentially successful programs to reduce HIV risk, including providing guidance on accessing limited resources; offering supportive dialogue around issues of masculinity, socio-cultural expectations, love, and intimacy; using Mayan values and images; harnessing technology; increasing leadership and advocacy skills; and mobilizing social networks. More research is clearly needed, but participants reported needing and wanting programming and had innovative ideas to prevent HIV exposure and transmission.

  2. Forms and determinants of migration and HIV/AIDS-related stigma on the Mexican-Guatemalan border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Cesar; Aggleton, Peter; Pridmore, Pat

    2009-12-01

    In this study we examined the origins and consequences of HIV/AIDS-related stigma on the Mexican-Guatemalan border. To explore these issues, an inductive/deductive approach was taken. Data were collected using qualitative methods including nonparticipant observation, in-depth interviews, and informal conversation. Informants included Central American immigrants, locals, and contextual key informants. Findings reveal that gender, social class, and race/ ethnicity function as key determinants of HIV/AIDS-related stigma, but serve also as the basis around which migration-related stigma is constructed within this particular context. These issues need to be taken into account in addressing the vulnerability of mobile populations, as well as the stigma attached to migration and HIV/AIDS. To be effective, responses should be based in the social and contextual realities faced by migrants and mobile populations, and be part of a more general process of empowerment that improves their legal, social, economic, and health status.

  3. Violence Against Women and Asylum Seeking: Global Problems and Local Practices Applied to Guatemalan Women Immigrating for Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselyn Costantino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on broader discussions surrounding gender violence and immigration in the U.S., provides critical information on the historical context of extreme violence against women and femicide plaguing Central American societies today. Drawing on experiences of precedent setting cases of Guatemalan women, the authors offer suggestions for culturally specific treatment of and support for women who seek asylum in the U.S. out of justified fear for their and their family members’ lives should they return to their country of origin. The arguments presented are predicated on the belief that women worldwide share experiences of myriad forms of male domination and gender inequality which, however, play out differently on their bodies and lives in ways that must be accounted for in our attempt to offer them appropriate care and assist them in creating the tools they need to change their circumstances.

  4. Estado de nutrición de los refugiados guatemaltecos menores de seis años Nutritional status of Guatemalan refugees under six years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA RUIZ-ARREGUI

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Analizar los cambios del estado de nutrición de niños guatemaltecos menores de seis años, refugiados en México entre 1982 y 1996, así como describir los diferentes programas de ayuda alimentaria que se pusieron en marcha. Material y métodos. Se realizó un análisis comparativo de cuatro estudios antropométricos transversales llevados a cabo en Chiapas (1982 y 1989, Quintana Roo (1989 y Campeche y Quintana Roo (1996. Se obtuvieron prevalencias de desnutrición según los indicadores peso/edad y talla/edad. Se calculó la razón de momios de la prevalencia y los intervalos de confianza al 95%. Se describen los programas dirigidos a mejorar la nutrición y salud de la población durante el periodo. Resultados. En 1982 privaban altas tasas de desnutrición y de mortalidad entre estos niños refugiados. En 1989, después de su reubicación en Campeche y en Quintana Roo, había mejorado considerablemente la situación tanto de los reubicados como de los que permanecieron en Chiapas. Esa situación prevaleció hasta 1996. Conclusiones. Los programas emprendidos fueron eficaces para controlar la emergencia y prevenir nuevas situaciones de crisis. Sin embargo, sólo lograron sostener a la población refugiada en condiciones similares a las prevalentes en la población indígena mexicana.Objective. To determine changes in the nutritional status of Guatemalan refugee children under six years of age, who lived in México between 1982 and 1996, under various nutrition-related programs implemented during that period. Material and methods. A comparative analysis of 4 cross-sectional anthropometric studies performed in Chiapas (1982, 1989, Quintana Roo (1989 and Campeche and Quintana Roo in 1996. Malnutrition prevalence by weight/age and height/age indicators was calculated. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. The implemented programs to improve nutritional status and health conditions are described. Results. In 1982, high

  5. CRCP Trap effects on coralline habitats 2001-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is derived from a Coral Reef Conservation Program-funded project to access effects of trap fishing on coral reefs and associated habitats in Puerto...

  6. Vitamin D Status: United States, 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Vitamin D Status: United States, 2001–2006 Recommend on Facebook ... deficiency, inadequacy In 2001–2006, what was the vitamin D status of the U.S. population based on the ...

  7. Conception on corruption: 2001-2006: Effect of politization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasović Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article conception of corruption in the case of Serbia is analyzed on the ground of findings of two larger surveys done within the five years span, after the Fifth October (in 2001 and 2006. Analysis of data reveals that conception is formed under the great influence of politization and given divisions in society; thus it depends on the ways how people perceive and estimate actual economic and political processes and their actors. Under these conditions subjectivity of conception is at stake. Depending from what social structure they originate, estimations and attitudes on corruption are reflecting a disappointment in new power as well as opposition pressure on rulling regime, or resistance to changes of economic and political system. Most important differences between conceptions of corruptions could be find among partisans whether of old or new regime, i.e. "losers" and "winners" of transition. These social categories are in high correlation with actual socioeconomic standing and life age. Although toleration toward corruption is descendant, it could be noticed that actual and potential transitional winners (more educated, more wealthy, younger people and supporters of the new regime estimate state of corruption more positively, thus showing the signs of accustoming on it and even including signs of moral cynism. As for the losers, they are showing more sensitivity, what could be seen as an effect of their unfavorable economic position and corresponding resistance to the changes along with sharper critical attitude toward the actual power.

  8. [Pneumocystosis in Venezuelan patients: epidemiology and diagnosis (2001-2006)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizo, María Mercedes; Reviákina, Vera; Navas, Trina; Casanova, Karina; Sáez, Alejandro; Guevara, Rafael Napoleón; Cáceres, Ana María; Vera, Raúl; Sucre, Carlos; Arbona, Esther

    2008-12-31

    The objective of this work was to investigate the epidemiology of pneumocystosis in Venezuelan patients utilizing a retrospective study during a six year period. One hundred and twenty nine clinical samples collected from patients with AIDS, cancer and non-AIDS-non-cancer low respiratory tract infection patients were processed by direct immunofluorescence technique. Pneumocystosis was diagnosed in 30 patients with a general frequency of 23.3%, which varied according to the patient's group: 36.6% in AIDS patients, 38% in cancer patients, and 10.4% in non-AIDS-non-cancer low respiratory tract infection patients. This study demonstrated the existence of differences in pneumocystosis frequency related to the patient's underlying disease, and that the illness is an important health problem in immunocompromised patients in Venezuela. Pneumocystosis must be suspected in non-immunocompromised patients with signs and symptoms of low respiratory tract infection, and the study of this illness must include COPD and cancer patients. Direct immunofluorescence is a useful technique for pneumocystosis diagnosis, however, it requires an optimal sample and skilled personnel in the laboratory.

  9. Prevalence of mental disorder and associated factors in civilian Guatemalans with disabilities caused by the internal armed conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Rivera, Walter; Mari, Jair de Jesus; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter; Quintana, Maria Ines; Ferraz, Marcos Pacheco de Toledo

    2008-09-01

    The 34-year-long, Guatemalan war left at least 1,841 persons disabled in the country. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of mental disorders in individuals who acquired their disability as a result of the war, and to identify probable risk factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of a group of 99 civilians with a disability in Guatemala. Participants were selected from four civilian organizations serving disabled persons in the municipality of Nebaj, Quiche. The diagnostic instrument was the computerized version of the Composite International Diagnostic Instrument 2.1 (CIDI 2.1). Data were collected from 2002 to 2004. Of the 99 disabled persons who completed the interview, 44 had some type of lifetime psychiatric disorder. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was the most prevalent, with 34.34% (34 cases), followed by dysthymia, with 10.10% (10 cases), and depression, with 6.06% (6 cases). The traumatic events experienced during the conflict caused long-term psychological sequelae in people who were disabled as a result of the war. Increased exposure to traumatic events, being married, physical disability, illiteracy and advanced age were identified as probable risk factors for mental disorders .

  10. Energy contribution from non-breastmilk items in low-income Guatemalan infantsin their sixth month of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Vossenaar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the nature and energy contribution of complementary feeding in breastfed infants in their sixth month of life, and the prevalence of the use of bottles as a delivery method. Materials and methods. We recruited 156 breastfeeding infants at a health clinic in metropolitan Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. A previous-day recall was performed. Results. Sixty nine mothers (44% reported offering items other than breastmilk. The median contribution of energy from complementary foods among infants with mixed feeding (n=66 was 197 kcal/day (interquartile range [IQR] 49-353. The median energy contribution of formula or cow’s milk among consumers (n=39 was 212 kcal/day (IQR 84-394. Bottles were used on the previous day by 55 (80% of the 69 mothers not offering exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusions. Premature introduction of non-breastmilk items is commonly practiced in feeding Guatemalan infants. Adherence to the internationally recognized guidelines for early infant feeding should be an intervention priority for this population.

  11. Major challenges to scale up of visual inspection-based cervical cancer prevention programs: the experience of Guatemalan NGOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Anita Nandkumar; Rohloff, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Like many other low- and middle-income countries, Guatemala has adopted visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) as a low-resource alternative to the Pap smear for cervical cancer screening. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) introduced VIA to Guatemala in 2004, and a growing number of NGOs, working both independently and in collaboration with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health, employ VIA in cervical cancer prevention programs today. While much research describes VIA efficacy and feasibility in Latin America, little is known about NGO involvement with VIA programming or experiences with VIA outside the context of clinical trials and pilot projects in the region. To explore challenges faced by NGOs implementing VIA programs in Guatemala, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 36 NGO staff members involved with 20 VIA programs as direct service providers, program administrators, and training course instructors. Additionally, we collected data through observation at 30 NGO-sponsored cervical cancer screening campaigns, 8 cervical cancer prevention conferences, and 1 week-long NGO-sponsored VIA training course. Frequently highlighted challenges included staff turnover, concerns over training quality, a need for opportunities for continued supervision, and problems with cryotherapy referrals when immediate treatment for VIA-positive women was unavailable. Reducing staff turnover, budgeting to train replacement providers, standardizing training curricula, and offering continued supervision are key strategies to improve VIA service quality and program sustainability. Alternative training methods, such as on-the-job mentoring and course prerequisites of online learning, could help increase training time available for clinical supervision. Efforts should be made to ensure that VIA testing is coupled with immediate cryotherapy, that providers trained in VIA are also trained in cryotherapy, and that cryotherapy supplies and equipment are maintained. Where this is not

  12. Redução da desigualdade da distribuição de renda entre 2001 e 2006 nas macrorregiões brasileiras: tendência ou fenômeno transitório? 2001-2006 income distribution decreasing in the Brazilian regions: tendency or transitory phenomena?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Cacciamali

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é contribuir para o debate sobre a queda da desigualdade na distribuição domiciliar de renda no Brasil no início do século XXI. Assim, nessa diminuição, analisamos a participação relativa de três fontes de renda (trabalho, aposentadorias e pensões e transferências públicas nas cinco macrorregiões brasileiras - Norte (urbana, Nordeste, Centro-Oeste, Sudeste e Sul, entre os anos de 2001 e 2006. Para atingir os propósitos, estruturamos o texto em três seções. A primeira seção apresenta aspectos selecionados da literatura especializada brasileira sobre as causas da variação da desigualdade de renda. A segunda apresenta a técnica matemática de decomposição utilizada. Finalmente, na terceira seção, analisam-se os resultados empíricos para Brasil e cinco macrorregiões selecionadas. À guisa de conclusão, destacamos, dentre os resultados, a importância das transferências públicas de renda e, principalmente, as mudanças nos mercados de trabalho regionais para a diminuição do grau de desigualdade.The aim of this paper is to contribute to the debate on the decrease of the concentration degree of the family's income distribution in Brazil in the first five years of the XXI Century. On this purpose, we approach the phenomenon analyzing the importance of five types of income ( labor, property rents, donation, retirement and public cash transference in the five macro regions in Brazil - North, Northeast, Middle-West, Southeast, South, during the period 2001-2006.To reach the purposes, the text was structured in three parts. The first one highlights stylized facts on this decreasing from the Brazilian specialized literature. The second section presents the mathematical technique used to build the decomposition. Finally, in the third section we analyze the results obtained for the five macro regions. We detached, specially, the magnitude of the employment's creation and, secondarily, the public cash

  13. Women’s human agency and self-determination in Guatemalan tourism development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Usher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is often identified as a strategy to ameliorate the wellbeing of poor communities and their most vulnerable members – women and their children. Women’s ability to get involved in and benefit from tourism is, however, conditioned by traditional gender roles and consequent education handicaps. Development programs often target women to mitigate these disparities. Thispaper examines whether an intervention by the Peace Corps resulted in improved human agency and self-determination among indigenous Q’eqchi’ women in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. The paper reports the accomplishments and shortcomings of the intervention and elaborates on the practical and theoretical implications of the findings.

  14. Life-Course Body Mass Index Trajectories Are Predicted by Childhood Socioeconomic Status but Not Exposure to Improved Nutrition during the First 1000 Days after Conception in Guatemalan Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Nicole D; Martorell, Reynaldo; Mehta, Neil K; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Stein, Aryeh D

    2016-11-01

    Latin America has experienced increases in obesity. Little is known about the role of early life factors on body mass index (BMI) gain over the life course. The objective of this research was to examine the role of early life factors [specifically, nutrition supplementation during the first 1000 d (from conception to 2 y of age) and childhood household socioeconomic status (SES)] on the pattern of BMI gain from birth or early childhood through midadulthood by using latent class growth analysis. Study participants (711 women, 742 men) who were born in 4 villages in Guatemala (1962-1977) were followed prospectively since participating in a randomized nutrition supplementation trial as children. Sex-specific BMI latent class trajectories were derived from 22 possible measures of height and weight from 1969 to 2004. To characterize early life determinants of BMI latent class membership, we used logistic regression modeling and estimated the difference-in-difference (DD) effect of nutrition supplementation during the first 1000 d. We identified 2 BMI latent classes in women [low (57%) and high (43%)] and 3 classes in men [low (38%), medium (47%), and high (15%)]. Nutrition supplementation during the first 1000 d after conception was not associated with BMI latent class membership (DD test: P > 0.15 for men and women), whereas higher SES was associated with increased odds of high BMI latent class membership in both men (OR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.61) and women (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.45) for the highest relative to the lowest tertile. In a cohort of Guatemalan men and women, nutrition supplementation provided during the first 1000 d was not significantly associated with higher BMI trajectory. Higher childhood household SES was associated with increased odds of high BMI latent class membership relative to the poorest households. The pathways through which this operates still need to be explored. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction performance using Mexican and Guatemalan discrete typing unit I strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha; Reyes, Pedro Antonio; Mejia-Dominguez, Ana; López, Ruth; Matta, Vivian; Monteón, Victor M

    2011-12-01

    Thirteen Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from different geographic regions of Mexico and Guatemala belonging to discrete typing unit (DTU) I and a reference CL-Brener (DTU VI) strain were used to perform enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A panel of 57 Mexican serum samples of patients with chronic chagasic cardiopathy and asymptomatic infected subjects (blood bank donors) were used in this study. DNA from the above 14 T. cruzi strains were extracted and analyzed by PCR using different sets of primers designed from minicircle and satellite T. cruzi DNA. The chronic chagasic cardiopathy serum samples were easily recognized with ELISA regardless of the source of antigenic extract used, even with the CL-Brener TcVI, but positive serum samples from blood bank donors in some cases were not recognized by some Mexican antigenic extracts. On the other hand, PCR showed an excellent performance despite the set of primers used, since all Mexican and Guatemalan T. cruzi strains were correctly amplified. In general terms, Mexican, Guatemalan, and CL-Brener T. cruzi strains are equally good sources of antigen when using the ELISA test to detect Mexican serum samples. However, there are some strains with poor performance. The DTU I strains are easily detected using either kinetoplast or satellite DNA target designed from DTU VI strains.

  16. Some aspects of child-bearing and child-rearing in a Guatemalan ladino community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solien De Gonzalez, N L

    1963-01-01

    This paper offers descriptive data in the fields of ethnomedicine and ethnonutrition from a community of Ladino (non-Indian) in Guatemala. The data were taken from questionnaires obtained from 102 mothers on 506 living persons. Though no health facilities exist within the village, 3 midwives are in the village who deliver most of the children. (They charge the equivalent of $3.50-$5.00.) Most women deliver in the village, which is usually quite safe unless the complication of delayed expulsion of the placenta is present. No special dietary precautions are taken by the mother during pregnancy in this culture. Midwives are engaged around the 4th or 5th month of pregnancy, and the midwife makes monthly visits after that to feel the fetus's position and prescribe various herbal and patent medicines as required. Delivery position is usually kneeling or squatting. Women bathe 8 days after delivery, and sexual intercourse is resumed 2-3 weeks later. Nearly all women breast-feed their babies (only 3 of 506 infants were not breast-fed according to the survey). If the woman cannot breast-feed her child, a bottle method is used rather than another women's breast. Mothers nurse up to 2.5 years without cultural interference. There is a taboo against nursing while in another pregnancy term. Weaning is generally accomplished, therefore, by refusing the child the breast. The child's diet is suited to the devleopment of his or her teeth, with milk-soaked bread and gruel constituting the diet for the first 2-3 years, after which the child eats the same diet as adults. Sickness and disease in children in San Antonio are most frequently attributed by the villagers to worms; hence, the baby is force-fed oil upon birth to cleanse the infant of worms. Edema is also a serious child health problem. Various native medicines are described which are used to treat childhood illness in San Antonio.

  17. Migration, Remittances and Nutrition Outcomes of Left-Behind Children: A National-Level Quantitative Assessment of Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Davis

    Full Text Available Historically, Guatemalans have suffered high rates of poverty and malnutrition while nearly ten percent of their population resides abroad. Many Guatemalan parents use economic migration, mainly international migration to the United States, as a means to improve the human capital prospects of their children. However, as this investigation shows, the timing of migration events in relation to left-behind children's ages has important, often negative and likely permanent, repercussions on the physical development of their children. To illustrate these dynamics, this investigation uses an instrumental variables framework to disentangle the countervailing effects of Guatemalan fathers' absences due to migration from concomitant remittances on left-behind children's growth outcomes. Based on national-level data collected in 2000, the investigation reveals that the international migration of a father in the previous year is correlated with a 22.1% lower length/height-for-age z-score for the average left-behind child aged ≤ 3. In contrast, the receipt of remittance income has no influence on the physical stature of a child, which may indicate that migrant fathers with young children are not able to achieve economic success soon enough during their ventures abroad to fully ameliorate the harmful effects caused by their absences.

  18. Migration, Remittances and Nutrition Outcomes of Left-Behind Children: A National-Level Quantitative Assessment of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason; Brazil, Noli

    2016-01-01

    Historically, Guatemalans have suffered high rates of poverty and malnutrition while nearly ten percent of their population resides abroad. Many Guatemalan parents use economic migration, mainly international migration to the United States, as a means to improve the human capital prospects of their children. However, as this investigation shows, the timing of migration events in relation to left-behind children's ages has important, often negative and likely permanent, repercussions on the physical development of their children. To illustrate these dynamics, this investigation uses an instrumental variables framework to disentangle the countervailing effects of Guatemalan fathers' absences due to migration from concomitant remittances on left-behind children's growth outcomes. Based on national-level data collected in 2000, the investigation reveals that the international migration of a father in the previous year is correlated with a 22.1% lower length/height-for-age z-score for the average left-behind child aged ≤ 3. In contrast, the receipt of remittance income has no influence on the physical stature of a child, which may indicate that migrant fathers with young children are not able to achieve economic success soon enough during their ventures abroad to fully ameliorate the harmful effects caused by their absences.

  19. Correct names for some of the closest relatives of Carica papaya: A review of the Mexican/Guatemalan genera Jarilla and Horovitzia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernanda Antunes; Renner, Susanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Using molecular data, we recently showed that Carica papaya L. is sister to a Mexican/Guatemalan clade of two genera, Jarilla Rusby with three species and Horovitzia V.M. Badillo with one. These species are herbs or thin-stemmed trees and may be of interest for future genomics-enabled papaya breeding. Here we clarify the correct names of Jarilla heterophylla (Cerv. ex La Llave) Rusby and Jarilla caudata (Brandegee) Standl., which were confused in a recent systematic treatment of Jarilla (McVaugh 2001). We designate epitypes for both, provide weblinks to type specimens, a key to the species of Jarilla and Horovitzia, and notes on their habitats and distribution. PMID:24399895

  20. Correct names for some of the closest relatives of Carica papaya: A review of the Mexican/Guatemalan genera Jarilla and Horovitzia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carvalho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular data, we recently showed that Carica papaya L. is sister to a Mexican/Guatemalan clade of two genera, Jarilla Rusby with three species and Horovitzia V.M. Badillo with one. These species are herbs or thin-stemmed trees and may be of interest for future genomics-enabled papaya breeding. Here we clarify the correct names of J. heterophylla (Cerv. ex La Llave Rusby and J. caudata (Brandegee Standl., which were confused in a recent systematic treatment of Jarilla (McVaugh 2001. We designate epitypes for both, provide weblinks to type specimens, a key to the species of Jarilla and Horovitzia, and notes on their habitats and distribution.

  1. Guatemalan potato moth Tecia solanivora distinguish odour profiles from qualitatively different potatoes Solanum tuberosum L.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Miriam Frida; Birgersson, Göran; Witzgall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Guatemalan potato moth, Tecia solanivora, lay eggs in the soil nearby potato Solanum spp. and larvae feed on the tubers. We investigated the oviposition behaviour of T. solanivora females and the survival of larval offspring on healthy vs. stressed, i.e. light exposed and/or damaged potato tubers...... that volatiles guide the females to lay fewer eggs on stressed tubers that are of inferior quality for the larvae. We propose that volatiles, such as sesquiterpenes and aldehydes, mediate oviposition behaviour and are correlated with biosynthetically related, non-volatile compounds, such as steroidal....... In choice tests, females laid significantly more eggs in response to potato odour of healthy tubers and female oviposition preference correlated with higher larval survival. Survival of larvae was negatively correlated with the tuber content of the steroid glycoalkaloids α-solanine and α-chaconine: healthy...

  2. Migration, Remittances and Nutrition Outcomes of Left-Behind Children: A National-Level Quantitative Assessment of Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason; Brazil, Noli

    2016-01-01

    Historically, Guatemalans have suffered high rates of poverty and malnutrition while nearly ten percent of their population resides abroad. Many Guatemalan parents use economic migration, mainly international migration to the United States, as a means to improve the human capital prospects of their children. However, as this investigation shows, the timing of migration events in relation to left-behind children’s ages has important, often negative and likely permanent, repercussions on the physical development of their children. To illustrate these dynamics, this investigation uses an instrumental variables framework to disentangle the countervailing effects of Guatemalan fathers’ absences due to migration from concomitant remittances on left-behind children’s growth outcomes. Based on national-level data collected in 2000, the investigation reveals that the international migration of a father in the previous year is correlated with a 22.1% lower length/height-for-age z-score for the average left-behind child aged ≤ 3. In contrast, the receipt of remittance income has no influence on the physical stature of a child, which may indicate that migrant fathers with young children are not able to achieve economic success soon enough during their ventures abroad to fully ameliorate the harmful effects caused by their absences. PMID:27002528

  3. POSSIBILITIES FOR MONITORING GUATEMALAN POTATO TUBER MOTH TECIA SOLANIVORA (POVOLNY AND POTATO TUBERWORM PHTHORIMAEA OPERCULELLA (ZELLER BY PHEROMONE TRAPS IN ZONA 1 OF ECUADOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristina Kutinkova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Guatemalan moth (GTPM, Tecia solanivora Povolny (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, was first registered in Guatemala and most recently invaded and became a key pest of the potato, Solanum tuberosum L., in Central and South America. Larvae feed exclusively on potato tubers, in the field and in store. Tuber quality is much reduced and heavily infested tubers can no longer be used for human or animal consumption. Stocks can be totally destroyed in less than 3 months. The potato tuber moth (PTM, Phthorimaea operculella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, is one of the most damaging pests of potatoes in field and storage and is generally of greatest importance in warmer climates. After pest detection, synthetic sex pheromones are principally used to monitor population levels and trigger applications of chemicals or other control methods. In this article we described our results for using pheromone traps Delta VI of the company of Trécé Inc. USA for monitoring of the both pests in a Carchi province in Zona 1 in Ecuador. We give conclusions and recommendation for using these pheromone traps for detection and monitoring of these very important pests on Solanaceae crops.

  4. Evolution of analogical reasoning in children: follow-up from six to eleven years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fidel Abregú Tueros

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish the time and period of development of Analogical Reasoning (AR and evaluate its independence and performance with respect to the age. We performed a longitudinal cohort study of two age groups and six annual follow-up phases from each one (2000-2005, 2001-2006 in six to eleven years-old children in the city of Huanuco (Peru with a sample of 167 children (first stage, and N=121 (sixth stage. The Raven’s progressive matrices test, coloured version, was applied individually without time limits. Results indicate that AR development occurs in a constant and late way from seven to eleven years-old children, and also that there is independence between the ability of AR and the children age. We discuss the importance of knowledge in the relationships between analogies topics, adjusted to the age, as a mediating factor in the development of AR.

  5. Reducing indoor air pollution with a randomised intervention design - a presentation of the Stove Intervention Study in the Guatemalan Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Smith-Sivertsen m.fl

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Indoor air pollution from the burning of solid fuels (like wood and coal in simple stoves is a global problem especially affecting people living in poor rural areas of the world. When typically burnt on open fires, the resulting indoor pollution levels may be orders of magnitude higher than levels recommended by international guidelines. The most important health effects seem to be acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI in children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in women. So far, health risks from solid fuel use have only been studied with observational designs, often with poor assessment of exposures. Hence there is good reason to conduct a well-designed randomised intervention study.                                          In this randomised study, conducted in a poor rural community in Guatemala, indoor exposure burden in the intervention group is reduced by replacing open fires with new chimney stoves burning the same wood fuels. Participating households (n=534 all started the project with a child less than four months or a pregnant woman, and are being followed until the child reaches 18 months. At the end of follow-up, the control households receive their new stove. The main health outcome investigated is the incidence of ALRI in infants. Also, respiratory and cardiovascular health in women is studied. Preparations are also being made to study asthma/atopy in the children as they grow older. This study will define the relationship between exposure and disease more completely, quantify the impacts of reducing indoor air pollution and document the potential for prevention of ill-health that new stoves give. It is the first randomised controlled trial ever performed on health effects from combustion pollutants in normal populations.

  6. La accessibilidad de las webs de las universidades españolas. Balance 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribera, Mireia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the compliance of the web sites of Spanish universities with level A of the Web Content Access Guidelines (WCAG v. 1.0 in 2006, and compares the obtained results with those of 2001. On the positive side, in 2006 more use of alternatives to graphics was made, cascading style sheets and the use of Flash and PDF. In addition, more universities (10 in total complied 100 % with the WCAG at level A. On the negative side, the texts were of poorer quality than in 2001, and fewer complied with accessibility standards with respect to plans of study, which were usually automatically generated. An analysis was also made of the compliance of indicators with American standard 508 (which is not mandatory in Spain and five other usability indicators. No university complied 100 % with standard 508; compliance with the other indicators was 65 %. The results show that the level of accessibility remains low, similar in fact to the situation in 2001, but with large differences between universities. Indeed, the level of compliance is less than that which might be expected given the changes in Spanish law made to favour access to public web sites.

    El estudio analiza el nivel de cumplimiento que el año 2006 hacían las sedes web de las universidades españolas de las Pautas de accesibilidad al contenido de la web (WCAG, versión 1.0, en su nivel A. Los resultados del análisis se comparan con los obtenidos el año 2001. Por el lado positivo se observa una mayor implantación de las alternativas a gráficos, hojas de estilo CSS y de las alternativas a Flash y PDF; y que un número mayor de universidades (10 en total logra en 2006 un cumplimiento al 100 % del nivel A de las WCAG. Por el lado negativo se observa una peor calidad de los textos y un menor cumplimiento de las normas de accesibilidad, respecto a los resultados del año 2001, en las páginas de los planes de estudio, usualmente generadas de forma automática. El estudio, de forma complementaria, también analiza el nivel de seguimiento de los indicadores de la norma 508 de Estados Unidos y de otros 5 indicadores adicionales de usabilidad. En cuanto al cumplimiento de la norma 508, no obligatoria en España, ninguna universidad logra el 100 % de cumplimiento. Respecto a los otros indicadores el cumplimiento es de un 65 %. Como resultado global se constata que el nivel de accesibilidad sigue en niveles bajos, similar al del año 2001, y con grandes diferencias entre centros; estos resultados indican un nivel de cumplimiento menor del que cabría esperar por los cambios aplicados en la legislación española a favor de la accesibilidad de los sitios web.

  7. Spatial analysis of dengue fever in Guangdong Province, China, 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunxiao; Liu, Qiyong; Lin, Hualiang; Xin, Benqiang; Nie, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Guangdong Province is the area most seriously affected by dengue fever in China. In this study, we describe the spatial distribution of dengue fever in Guangdong Province from 2001 to 2006 with the objective of informing priority areas for public health planning and resource allocation. Annualized incidence at a county level was calculated and mapped to show crude incidence, excess hazard, and spatial smoothed incidence. Geographic information system-based spatial scan statistics was conducted to detect the spatial distribution pattern of dengue fever incidence at the county level. Spatial scan cluster analyses suggested that counties around Guangzhou City and Chaoshan Region were at increased risk for dengue fever (P dengue fever were found in Guangdong Province, which allowed intervention measures to be targeted for maximum effect.

  8. [Sexual violence amongst young people aged 10 to 19 years. Cali, 2001-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Gutiérrez, Ana C; Salcedo-Cifuentes, Mercedes; Bermúdez-Escobar, Amparo

    2009-12-01

    Characterising sexual violence reported by youngsters aged 10 to 19 in Cali between 2001 and 2006. COMPONENTS AND METHODS: Young people aged 10 to 19 who had been referred to a forensic clinic by a competent authority between 2001 and 2006 were defined as being presumed victims of sexual crimes. Variables of time, place and person subjected to sexual crime committed by a family member (intrafamily), an acquaintance or unknown public individual (extra family) were compared. There were 661 cases of presumed victims of sexual abuse from both sexes in the age-range being studied. The information was taken from the forensic clinic's patient records. Chi square and relative risk were used in the statistical analysis of the data so collected concerning frequency for presumed sexual victims aged 10 to 19 and analysing the relationships between variables. 83% of the cases in the study were female, 78% were students and more than 50% were 15 year-old minors. The aggressors were known in 78% of the cases. A significant association was found between involvement with the aggressor and the place where the incident occurred with a victim's age. The characteristics of sexual violence occurring in adolescents were constant and comparable with historical studies where family dynamics and organisation made such scene opportune for this type of violent act to be perpetrated.

  9. Risk factors for foot-and-mouth disease in Tanzania, 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allepuz, A; Stevenson, M; Kivaria, F; Berkvens, D; Casal, J; Picado, A

    2015-04-01

    We developed a model to quantify the effect of factors influencing the spatio-temporal distribution of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Tanzania. The land area of Tanzania was divided into a regular grid of 20 km × 20 km cells and separate grids constructed for each of the 12-month periods between 2001 and 2006. For each year, a cell was classified as either FMD positive or negative dependent on an outbreak being recorded in any settlement within the cell boundaries. A Bayesian mixed-effects spatial model was developed to assess the association between the risk of FMD occurrence and distance to main roads, railway lines, wildlife parks, international borders and cattle density. Increases in the distance to main roads decreased the risk of FMD every year from 2001 to 2006 (ORs ranged from 0.43 to 0.97). Increases in the distance to railway lines and international borders were, in general, associated with a decreased risk of FMD (ORs ranged from 0.85 to 0.99). Increases in the distance from a national park decreased the risk of FMD in 2001 (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.68-0.93) but had the opposite effect in 2004 (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.12). Cattle population density was, in general, positively associated with the risk of FMD (ORs ranged from 1.01 to 1.30). The spatial distribution of high-risk areas was variable and corresponded to endemic (2001, 2002 and 2005) and epidemic (2003, 2004 and 2006) phases. Roads played a dominant role in both epidemiological situations; we hypothesize that roads are the main driver of FMD expansion in Tanzania. Our results suggest that FMD occurrence in Tanzania is more related to animal movement and human activity via communication networks than transboundary movements or contact with wildlife. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. The French National Nutrition and Health Program: 2001-2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, Serge; Chat-Yung, Stacie; Chaulia, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Established in 2001-2005 then extended to 2010, the French National Nutrition and Health Program (PNNS) is a nutrition policy whose objective is to improve the health status of the population by acting on one of its major determinants, nutrition. Nine priority objectives focusing on diet, physical activity and nutritional status were determined. Program strategies are based on fundamental principles including food culture, pleasure, and gastronomy. This multidisciplinary program involves stakeholders from ministries, research and educational institutions, food industry, healthcare, and consumers. More than 75% of the public health actions planned were accomplished or in progress by the end of 2005, particularly those concerning nutrition communication, education, research and nutritional surveillance. Dietary guidelines were established and are now considered the official reference in France. Actions focusing on the healthcare system, economic actors and players and specific population groups need further development. The success of a public health program like the PNNS requires a combination of synergistic and complementary actions, measures, regulations and laws. A national study at the end of the PNNS will determine if objectives were achieved.

  11. The National Network of Libraries of Medicine's outreach to the public health workforce: 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdill, Keith W; Ruffin, Angela B; Stavri, P Zoë

    2007-07-01

    The paper provides an overview of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine's (NN/ LM's) outreach to the public health workforce from 2001 to 2006. NN/LM conducts outreach through the activities of the Regional Medical Library (RML) staff and RML-sponsored projects led by NN/LM members. Between 2001 and 2006, RML staff provided training on information resources and information management for public health personnel at national, state, and local levels. The RMLs also contributed significantly to the Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce collaboration. Data were extracted from telephone interviews with directors of thirty-seven NN/LM-sponsored outreach projects directed at the public health sector. A review of project reports informed the interviews, which were transcribed and subsequently coded for emergent themes using qualitative analysis software. Analysis of interview data led to the identification of four major themes: training, collaboration, evaluation of outcomes, and challenges. Sixteen subthemes represented specific lessons learned from NN/LM members' outreach to the public health sector. NN/LM conducted extensive information-oriented outreach to the public health workforce during the 2001-to-2006 contract period. Lessons learned from this experience, most notably the value of collaboration and the need for flexibility, continue to influence outreach efforts in the current contract period.

  12. Exposure of the bulgarian population from diagnostic radiology during 2001/2006 y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.; Ingilizova, K.

    2008-01-01

    Each Member State of the European Union is currently committed to produce national legislation, demonstrating conformity with the European Directive on medical exposures. According to the Directive, each country shall estimate the medical exposure of its population. For this purpose it is necessary to calculate the individual effective dose from each type of diagnostic radiology examination and the frequency of the examinations. The collective effective dose (CED) is disputable indicator for the medical exposures but it is a criterion for the level of the country on the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical exposure. The individual effective doses from each type of diagnostic radiology examination will depend on the patient's age, sex, weight, the number and type of images, the screening time and also the equipment used. Some mean values can be obtained through surveys of patient dose and compared with the national or European reference doses for 'standard sized' patients. The aim of this investigation is to assess the exposure of Bulgarian population undergoing diagnostic radiology examinations. The diagnostic radiology procedures are in 30 positions, distributed in 3 age groups: 0 - 17 y., 17 - 45 y. and over 45 y. For the assessment of the CED the generally accepted formula has been applied. The individual effective doses have been established on the basis of standard tablegrams for the radiographic diagnostic examinations and the results from the national research project 'Phare' in 2002. Presented data are: average number of examinations 3848.92x10 3 , frequency in thousands 500, annual effective individual dose 0.89 mSv/y and average annual collective effective dose - 3314.59 man.Sv/y. The mean effective dose per caput of population for medical exposures can then be compared with that of other countries having similar levels of health care. Comparisons can also be made with exposure of the population from other sources of radiation. The dynamics and tendencies of examinations of the highest frequency and dose burden over the last 5 years are studied and discussed. (authors)

  13. Dense Magnetized Plasmas. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2001-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The IAEA strives to promote the development and utilization of nuclear technologies offering research opportunities for the growth of industrial applications in various domains. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Dense Magnetized Plasmas (DMPs) was intended to coordinate the development of compact and low cost sources for the generation of charged particle beams, neutrons, X rays and plasma streams. Intense short bursts of neutrons are required for testing and calibrating neutron based diagnostics. Intense particle beams and plasma streams from DMP sources find applications in various research fields and technology, for instance, high heat load testing of candidate materials for the first wall of future fusion reactors. On-site detection of illicit and explosive materials using high rep-rate neutron bursts from compact DMP devices is of great interest. Soft and hard X ray beams produced from such sources have potential applications in biology and enzymology. The overall objective of this CRP was to stimulate and promote investigation of DMPs through synergistic international cooperation. Specific objectives were: (i) to coordinate complementary research efforts related to DMPs by experts in developed and developing Members States, (ii) to speed up the progress in DMP applications by sharing knowledge, expertise and costs, (iii) to promote technology transfer among Member States, and (iv) to contribute to knowledge preservation by involving additional scientists from developing Member States who are not yet experts in DMPs. The three major components of DMP devices are the driver (power supply, electrode system and its associated switch), the target and the target chamber. Engineering fields related to DMP system design include vacuum technology, radiation resistant material development, ablation hydrodynamics and neutronics. In each case, the integration of the components must account for the unique interfaces and constraints of the particular application. Therefore, while much of the technological development could be conducted in parallel, close coordination was deemed necessary for effective system integration. This CRP has helped accomplish this by giving broader exposure to the design challenges. This publication covers the discussion of crucial issues relevant to the design and construction of DMP devices held by the participants from eight Member States. This is an ongoing activity coordinated by the IAEA and continues to be of interest to the Member States. The vital issues in design and fabrication of the DMP devices and the main findings summarized in this report are technically valuable for the non-experts planning to initiate research on the topic in their own country. This report on the technical know-how will provide assistance for further progress in the application of this technology in developing countries.

  14. EPHT air quality (county PM2.5 and Ozone) indicators, 2001-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — The EPHT air quality indicator files are from a SAS program which calculates the air indicators as developed by CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Air...

  15. Seven children -- four alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconahay, M J

    1993-01-01

    The author reports her observations on the status of women, maternal and child health, and access to family planning services in parts of Guatemala. Her comments refer specifically to experiences in the Mezquital squatter settlement around the capital of Guatemala City, the town of Puerto Abajo 60 miles northwest of Mezquital, highland villages, and the Peten province to the North. Guatemala's population is doubling every 22 years. 10 million individuals currently inhabit the country, thus making it the most populous of Central American nations. Only 23% of Guatemalan women, however, use family planning facilities, far fewer than would like to, were services more widely available. This low rate of exposure to, and use of, contraception results in the largely expected high average of 6 children per woman in Guatemala. Guatemala is a Catholic and very conservative country; the government has not encouraged family planning and abortion is barely considered. Women in Guatemala need access to family planning services, but also education, employment, housing, and the opportunity to make productive contributions to the country. Further, single mothers and heads of households find it difficult to provide for the daily basic needs of the family, let alone worry about contraception. Basic health services protecting against preventable causes of morbidity such as cholera and intestinal worms must be provided before family sizes may be reduced and general development may take place.

  16. Effects of licensed characters on children's taste and snack preferences in Guatemala, a low/middle income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letona, P; Chacon, V; Roberto, C; Barnoya, J

    2014-11-01

    Marketing of high-energy, low-nutrient foods is one of the contributing factors to the obesity-promoting environment. Licensed characters are typically used to market these foods to children because they increase brand recognition and sales, and data suggest that they affect the taste and snack preferences of children in high-income countries, but it has not yet been explored in low/middle income countries (LMICs). We sought to examine how licensed characters on food packaging influence children's taste and snack preferences in Guatemala, a LMIC. One hundred twenty-one children (mean ± s.d. age, 7.4 ± 1.9 years) from four (two preschool and two elementary) public schools in Guatemala tasted three food types: potato chips, crackers and carrots. Each was presented in two identical packages, except that one had a licensed character and the other did not. Children tasted the foods (six total) in each package and answered whether they tasted the same or one tasted better. Snack preference was also evaluated. Children were significantly (Pprefer the taste of the foods inside the package with the licensed character compared with the one with no character (mean ± s.d., 0.24 ± 0.54). Most (66%) chose the food in the package with the character for a snack. Younger children (P prefer the taste of the food inside the package with the character. Licensed characters on food packaging influence Guatemalan children's taste and snack preferences. Given that these characters are typically used to promote high-energy, low-nutrient foods, their influence could contribute toward overconsumption of these foods and consequently increased risk of obesity in Guatemalan children. Therefore, public health advocates, in Guatemala and elsewhere, might explore restricting the use of licensed characters on food packaging as a public health strategy.

  17. La variedad, diversidad y características de la dieta en muestras de conveniencia de mujeres guatemaltecas Food variety, dietary diversity, and food characteristics among convenience samples of Guatemalan women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Soto-Méndez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar patrones y características de diversidad y variedad de la dieta de mujeres guatemaltecas. MATERIEL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizaron dos recordatorios de 24-horas en una muestra de conveniencia de 20 mujeres rurales y 20 estudiantes urbanas. Se calcularon puntajes de diversidad usando tres sistemas de grupos alimentarios. La variedad y diversidad, así como el origen y características de la dieta, se compararon entre ambos sitios. RESULTADOS: La variedad y diversidad en general fueron mayores en la muestra urbana en comparación con la muestra rural, dependiendo del número de días y del sistema de grupos de alimentos utilizados para la evaluación. La dieta rural fue predominantemente vegetal y compuesta de alimentos tradicionales no procesados. La dieta urbana estaba basada primordialmente en alimentos procesados. CONCLUSIÓN: Las consideraciones para crear estrategias de intervención para el mejoramiento de la dieta en el área rural dependen de la conservación de la selección de alimentos tradicionales.OBJECTIVE: To compare variety and diversity patterns and dietary characteristics in Guatemalan women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two non-consecutive 24-h recalls were conducted in convenience samples of 20 rural Mayan women and 20 urban students. Diversity scores were computed using three food-group systems.Variety and diversity scores and dietary origin and characteristics were compared between settings using independent t-test or Mann-Whitney-U-test. RESULTS: Dietary variety and diversity were generally greater in the urban sample when compared to the rural sample, depending on the number of days and food-group system used for evaluation.The diet was predominantly plant-based and composed of non-fortified food items in both areas.The rural diet was predominantly composed of traditional,non-processed foods. The urban diet was mostly based on non-traditional and processed items. CONCLUSION: Considerations of intervention strategies

  18. Impact of an Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment (ETAT)-based triage process in the paediatric emergency department of a Guatemalan public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, Heather L; Torres, Francisco; Vaides, Henry; Walsh, Michael T; Ishigami, Elise M; Cruz, Andrea T; Torrey, Susan B; Soto, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    Triage process implementation has been shown to be effective at improving patient outcomes. This study sought to develop, implement and assess the impact of an Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment (ETAT)-based emergency triage process in the paediatric emergency department (PED) of a public hospital in Guatemala. The study was a quality improvement comparison with a before/after design. Uptake was measured by percentage of patients with an assigned triage category. Outcomes were hospital admission rate, inpatient length of stay (LOS), and mortality as determined by two distinct medical record reviews for 1 year pre- and post-intervention: a random sample (RS) of all PED patients and records for all critically-ill (CI) children [serious diagnoses or admission to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)]. Demographics, diagnoses and disposition were recorded. The RS totalled 1027 (51.4% male); median ages pre- and post-intervention were 2.0 and 2.4 years, respectively. There were 196 patients in the CI sample, of whom 56.6% were male and one-third were neonates; median ages of the CI group pre- and post-intervention were 3.1 and 5.6 months, respectively. One year after implementation, 97.5% of medical records had been assigned triage categories. Triage categories (RS/CI) were: emergency (2.9%/54.6%), priority (47.6%/44.4%) and non-urgent (49.4%/1.0%). The CI group was more frequently diagnosed with shock (25%/1%), seizures (9%/0.5%) and malnutrition (6%/0.5%). Admission rates for the RS (8% vs 4%, P=0.01) declined after implementation. For the CI sample, admission rate to the PICU (47% vs 24%, P=0.002) decreased and LOS (7.3 vs 5.7 days, P=0.09) and mortality rates (12% vs 6%, P=0.15) showed trends toward decreasing post-implementation. Paediatric-specific triage algorithms can be implemented and sustained in resource-limited settings. Significant decreases in admission rates (both overall and for the PICU) and trends towards decreased LOS and mortality rates

  19. La prevención de la desnutrición en el oriente de Guatemala. Nuevos cuidados, mismas representaciones The prevention of desnutrition in the eastern of Guatemalan. New cares, the same representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Mariano Juárez

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Las múltiples retóricas que encierran los procesos de salud y enfermedad permiten construir los procesos patológicos de modos diversos. Los C'hortís del oriente de Guatemala mantienen una particular forma de construir la desnutrición infantil, en ocasiones muy diferente al modelo biomédico en aspectos como la etiología del trastorno o la responsabilidad del mismo. Desde una perspectiva netamente cualitativa, se realiza un repaso de las prácticas y representaciones sobre su prevención. La desnutrición infantil es, en este contexto, un trastorno social que se asocia de forma muy evidente a determinadas prácticas maternas y un modelo social y moral determinado, y se desliga de la carencia de alimentos, de forma que la prevención del trastorno pasa por modificar esos comportamientos maternos. Los intensos procesos de cambio social y la incipiente presencia del discurso alopático han introducido modificaciones en esa forma particular de concebir el padecimiento. No obstante, estos cambios han implantado nuevas prácticas sin apenas modificar las representaciones existentes, responsabilizando de nuevo a las madres, lo que pone de manifiesto las dificultades de un diálogo intercultural en salud entre cosmovisiones diferentes y las implicaciones de las intervenciones en salud en estos contextos, que deben prestar atención a los diferentes significados del padecimiento.The manifolds rhetoric’s that contain the health and disease process permit to construct the pathologies process of different ways. The C'hortís from eastern of Guatemalan have a particular manner of constructing the children’s desnutrition, sometimes very different from biomedical model, such as the aetiology or his responsibility. From a qualitative perspective, we have done a description of practices and representations about his prevention. The children’s desnutrition is, in this contexts, a social disorder associated with specified maternal practices and a moral

  20. Ambient Air Pollution Exposure and Respiratory, Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Mortality in Cape Town, South Africa: 2001?2006

    OpenAIRE

    Wichmann, Janine; Voyi, Kuku

    2012-01-01

    Little evidence is available on the strength of the association between ambient air pollution exposure and health effects in developing countries such as South Africa. The association between the 24-h average ambient PM10, SO2 and NO2 levels and daily respiratory (RD), cardiovascular (CVD) and cerebrovascular (CBD) mortality in Cape Town (2001–2006) was investigated with a case-crossover design. For models that included entire year data, an inter-quartile range (IQR) increase in PM1...

  1. Secondary Insults of Traumatic Brain Injury in CCATT Patients Returning from Iraq/Afghanistan: 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    neurosurgical nursing, 6th edition . Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Hickman, B.J. & Mehrer, R. (2001). Stress and the effects of air transport...Hickey, J. The clinical practice of neurological and neurosurgical nursing,( 6th ed., p. 371). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2.2.2...Research File Development The data were received from the Primary Investigator of the Wartime Critical Care Air Transport Database in an SPSS

  2. Expansion of HIV laboratory diagnostic services in Chennai, India 2001-2006: is the growth commensurate with the need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Srikrishnan

    Full Text Available To describe the changes in HIV services provided and the patient population utilizing voluntary counseling and testing (VCT services at private testing laboratories in Chennai, India in 2001 and 2006.In 2001, a cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted to assess the services provided and client population of 1,031 private laboratories. A subset of labs (9% that had been surveyed in 2001 were also studied in 2006.In 2001, significantly more high volume labs (>10 HIV tests per month offered HIV diagnostic tests than low volume labs (<10 HIV test per month (p<0.001. More high volume labs (20.0% provided pre-test counseling as part of HIV testing than low volume labs (11.1% (p = 0.003. Between 2001 and 2006, the number of labs that provided HIV diagnostic tests significantly increased, including ELISA (87.8% vs. 40.0%, Western Blot (84.4% vs. 13.3%, and Tridot (98.9% vs. 72.2% (p<0.001. Also the number of labs that reported greater than 10 women seeking HIV testing per month significantly increased from 14.5% to 79.0% (p = 0.006. More labs provided pre-test counseling in 2006 (34.4% than in 2001 (21.1% (p = 0.046.Though HIV diagnostic testing services have increasingly become available, counseling services have not expanded commensurately. Further outreach and education is necessary to expand comprehensive HIV VCT services in both urban and rural India.

  3. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raikamal Ghosh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004-2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004-2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera.

  4. INMIGRACIÓN Y PROPIEDAD DE LA VIVIENDA: LOS CASOS DE CALIFORNIA Y ESPAÑA, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián LÓPEZ COLÁS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.

  5. Acropora Presence/Absence in Surveyed Waters of Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands 2001-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — On May 9, 2006, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries Service) listed staghorn and elkhorn corals (Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata) as...

  6. Mental Disorders among Children and Adolescents Admitted to a French Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Laurent; Henry, Jean-Marc; Samuelian, Jean-Claude; Belzeaux, Raoul; Auquier, Pascal; Lancon, Christophe; Da Fonseca, David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of children and adolescents admitted to the psychiatric emergency department (ED) of a French public teaching hospital over a six-year study period (2001-2006). Data for all episodes of care in the psychiatric ED from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2006, delivered to adolescents aged less than 18 years were retrospectively analyzed. During the six-year study period, 335 episodes of care in the psychiatric ED were experienced by 264 different adolescents. They accounted for 2.0% of the 16,754 care episodes of the ED; 164 patients (62.1) were female and the average age was 16.5 (SD = 1.6). The neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders were the most frequent (25.4%) and concerned mainly anxiety disorders (15.2%). The frequency of the absence of psychiatric diagnosis (22.7%) was high. A total of 48 children and adolescents (18.2%) benefited from more than one episode of care. Several factors were associated to a higher number of visits to the ED: substance use, schizophrenia, disorders of adult personality and behaviour, disorders occurring in childhood and adolescence, and dual diagnosis. In conclusion, mental health disorders in children and adolescents are a serious problem associated with several potentially modifiable factors.

  7. Guatemalan obsidian source characterization by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriveau, G.W.; Nievens, M.

    A program was initiated to study the potential of TL measurements for the characterization of obsidian sources from Guatemala. Research to date was intended to answer three questions: (1) Is there intra-source consistency in TL glow curves. (2) Are the glow curves from each source significantly unique to allow discrimination. (3) Can one match artifact glow curves to source glow curves in cases of known provenance. Results are in agreement with neutron activation analysis

  8. Endocarditis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Streptococcus viridians - endocarditis - children; Candida - endocarditis - children; Bacterial endocarditis - children; Infective endocarditis - children; Congenital heart disease - endocarditis - ...

  9. English Proficiency, Threshold Language Policy and Mental Health Service Utilization among Asian-American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratani, Yumiko; Liu, Cindy H

    2015-10-01

    This paper explores the role of English proficiency, ethnicity, and California's threshold language policy in the rates of discontinuing mental health services among Asian-American children. We used data from the 2001-2006 Client and Services Information (CSI) System, which contains county-level information about service users in public mental health systems. Our data included 59,218 service users under the age of 18. We used logistic regression to determine the likelihood of discontinuing services, while controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. English-speaking Asians were 11% more likely than English-speaking Whites to discontinue mental health services. Non-English-speaking Asians were 50% significantly more likely to stay in services. The results also revealed some inter-ethnic variations in the discontinuation patterns; however, the patterns of mental health service utilization appear to be driven by the availability of mental health services in Asian-ethnic languages in county of residence. Further research is needed to understand the intake and referral processes that Asian children go through within the mental health service system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Learning Disabilities in Extremely Low Birth Weight Children and Neurodevelopmental Profiles at Preschool Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squarza, Chiara; Picciolini, Odoardo; Gardon, Laura; Giannì, Maria L; Murru, Alessandra; Gangi, Silvana; Cortinovis, Ivan; Milani, Silvano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    At school age extremely low birth weight (ELBW) and extremely low gestational age (ELGAN) children are more likely to show Learning Disabilities (LDs) and difficulties in emotional regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of LDs at school age and to detect neurodevelopmental indicators of risk for LDs at preschool ages in a cohort of ELBW/ELGAN children with broadly average intelligence. All consecutively newborns 2001-2006 admitted to the same Institution entered the study. Inclusion criteria were BW disabilities, genetic abnormalities, and/or a Developmental Quotient below normal limits (learning disabilities at school age was investigated through a parent-report questionnaire at children's age range 9-10 years. Neurodevelopmental profiles were assessed through the Griffiths Mental Development Scales at 1 and 2 years of corrected age and at 3, 4, 5, and 6 years of chronological age and were analyzed comparing two groups of children: those with LDs and those without. At school age 24 on 102 (23.5%) of our ELBW/ELGAN children met criteria for LDs in one or more areas, with 70.8% comorbidity with emotional/attention difficulties. Children with LDs scored significantly lower in the Griffiths Locomotor and Language subscales at 2 years of corrected age and in the Personal-social, Performance and Practical Reasoning subscales at 5 years of chronological age. Our findings suggest that, among the early developmental indicators of adverse school outcome, there is a poor motor experimentation, language delay, and personal-social immaturity. Cognitive rigidity and poor ability to manage practical situations also affect academic attainment. Timely detection of these early indicators of risk is crucial to assist the transition to school.

  11. Radiologic Manifestation of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children Admitted in Pediatric Ward-Massih Daneshvari Hospital: A 5-Year Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohmmad Reza Boloursaz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nDespite the extensive preventive and therapeutic measures present against tuberculosis (TB, this disease still remains as one of the important causes of mortality and morbidity in the world. Considering the high incidence of TB in children, rareness of its' clinical features and complexity of bacteriologic diagnosis in this age group paraclinical studies, especially radiologic evaluations, is useful for reaching a final diagnosis. This 5 year study was conducted in National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD, Massih Daneshvari Hospital, Tehran, Iran. This retrospective study was conducted on 70 children (43 (61% female and 27 (38.5% male aged between 5 months to 15 years old during a five year period (from 2001-2006 in pediatric ward. It was performed on children who were confirmed to have TB by various clinical, bacteriologic and radiologic features and tuberculin skin test. We studied the radiologic features of pulmonary TB in these children. Right lung involvement was observed in 65%, left lung 23% and bilateral involvement was detected in 12%. Also middle and superior lobes were the most common lobes affected. The commonest radiographic feature was hilar (mediastinal lymphadenopathy; 70% detected on chest x-ray (CXR and 85% on CTscan. Lymph nodes on right side were affected more; 25% were calcified. Also nodular infiltration of lung parenchyma was observed in 35% of CXRS and 61% of CTscans. This was followed by patchy consolidation detected in 25% and 35% of CXRs and CTscans respectively. We also observed that children <3yr. of age had the highest lymph node involvement but the least parenchymal lesions as compared to older children. It is concluded that primary TB is the most common form of pulmonary TB in children. This could be in the form of hilar lymphadenopathy with or without lung parenchymal involvement. Also radiologic features could provide valuable information in regard to diagnosis, treatment and

  12. Consequences of Teen Parents’ Child Care Arrangements for Mothers and Children*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Blalock, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Using the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001 - 2006; N ≈ 7900), we examined child care arrangements among teen parents from birth through prekindergarten. Four latent classes of child care arrangements at 9, 24, and 52 months emerged: “parental care,” “center care,” “paid home-based care,” and “free kin-based care.” Disadvantaged teen-parent families were overrepresented in the “parental care” class, which was negatively associated with children’s preschool reading, math, and behavior scores and mothers’ socioeconomic and fertility outcomes compared to some nonparental care classes. Nonparental care did not predict any negative maternal or child outcomes, and different care arrangements had different benefits for mothers and children. Time spent in nonparental care and improved maternal outcomes contributed to children’s increased scores across domains. Child care classes predicted maternal outcomes similarly in teen-parent and nonteen-parent families, but the “parental care” class predicted some disproportionately negative child outcomes for teen-parent families. PMID:23729861

  13. Association between health service use and diarrhoea management approach among caregivers of under-five children in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Pramesh Raj; Agho, Kingsley Emwinyore; Renzaho, Andre M N; Dibley, Michael; Raynes-Greenow, Camille

    2018-01-01

    Diarrhoea among children under-five is a serious public health problem in many developing countries, including Nepal. This study aimed to examine the association between health service utilization and diarrhoea management approaches among children under-five years in Nepal. The combined 2001, 2006 and 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) data sets were examined and the sample included 2,655 children aged 0-59 months who had diarrhoea 2-weeks prior to the each survey. Multilevel logistic regression analyses that adjust for clustering and sampling weight were used to examine the association between health service utilization and diarrhoea management approaches (Oral Rehydration Solution, increased fluids and/or continued feeding). The prevalence of extra fluids decreased significantly from 27% in 2001 to 15% in 2011 while that of ORS increased significantly from 32% in 2001 to 40% in 2011. The prevalence of continued feeding fluctuated between 83-89%. Multivariate analysis revealed that caregivers whose children received treatment or advice from health care providers during diarrhoea were 5.78 times more likely to treat diarrhoea with Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) [adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) 5.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.50, 7.44], 1.56 (aOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.19, 2.05) times more likely to offer extra fluids, and 2.25 (aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.50, 3.39) times more likely to use continued feeding than those who did not seek advice. Our findings indicate that health service utilization significantly improves diarrhoea management among under-five children. However, a broader national diarrhoeal disease control program to further reduce diarrhoea related morbidity and mortality in Nepal should focus on educating caregivers about the importance of the use of ORS as well as increase fluid intake to children under-five years with diarrhoea.

  14. Nuclear and isotopic techniques for the characterization of submarine groundwater discharge in coastal zones. Results of a coordinated research project 2001-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now recognized as an important pathway between land and sea. As such, this flow may contribute to the biogeochemical and other marine budgets of nearshore waters. These discharges typically display significant spatial and temporal variability, making direct assessments difficult. Groundwater seepage is patchy, diffuse, temporally variable, and may involve multiple aquifers. Thus, the measurement of its magnitude and associated chemical fluxes is a challenging enterprise. An initiative on SGD characterization was developed by the IAEA and UNESCO in 2000 as a 5-year plan to assess methodologies and importance of SGD for coastal zone management. The IAEA component included a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques for the Characterization of Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) in Coastal Zones, carried out jointly by the IAEA's Isotope Hydrology Section in Vienna and the Marine Environment Laboratory in Monaco, together with 9 laboratories from 8 countries. In addition to the IAEA, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) have provided support. This overall effort originally grew from a project sponsored by the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) who established a Working Group (112) on SGD. The activities included joint meetings (Vienna 2000, 2002, and 2005; Syracuse, Italy, 2001; and Monaco 2004), sampling expeditions (Australia 2000; Sicily 2001 and 2002; New York 2002; Brazil 2003; and Mauritius 2005), joint analytical work, data evaluation, and preparation of joint publications. The objectives of the CRP included the improvement of capabilities for water resources and environmental management of coastal zones; application of recently developed nuclear and isotopic techniques suitable for quantitative estimation of various components of SGD; understanding of the influence of SGD on coastal processes and on groundwater regimes; a better management of groundwater resources in coastal areas; and development of numerical models of SGD. This report examines several methodologies of SGD assessment, which were carried out during a series of five intercomparison experiments in different hydrogeological environments (coastal plains, karst, glacial till, fractured crystalline rocks and volcanic terrains). This report reviews the scientific and management significance of SGD, measurement approaches, and the results of the intercomparison experiments. We conclude that while SGD is essentially ubiquitous in coastal areas, the assessment of its magnitude at any one location is subject to enough variability that measurements should be made by a variety of techniques and over large enough spatial and temporal scales to capture the majority of these variable conditions

  15. Association of racial disparities in the prevalence of insulin resistance with racial disparities in vitamin D levels: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen K; Fiscella, Kevin; Winters, Paul; Martins, David; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2013-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that racial differences in vitamin D levels are associated with racial disparities in insulin resistance between blacks and whites. Among 3628 non-Hispanic black and white adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001 to 2006, we examined the association between race and insulin resistance using the homeostasis assessment model for insulin resistance. We conducted analyses with and without serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D). We adjusted for age, sex, educational level, body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Blacks had a lower mean serum 25(OH)D level compared with whites (14.6 [0.3] ng/mL vs 25.6 [0.4] ng/mL, respectively; P insulin resistance without controlling for serum 25(OH)D levels (OR, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.20). The association was not significant (OR, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-1.82) after accounting for serum 25(OH)D levels. The higher burden of insulin resistance in blacks compared with whites may be partially mediated by the disparity in serum 25(OH)D levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Trends in spatial patterns of heavy metal deposition on national park service lands along the Red Dog Mine haul road, Alaska, 2001-2006.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N Neitlich

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns of Zn, Pb and Cd deposition in Cape Krusenstern National Monument (CAKR, Alaska, adjacent to the Red Dog Mine haul road, were characterized in 2001 and 2006 using Hylocomium moss tissue as a biomonitor. Elevated concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn in moss tissue decreased logarithmically away from the haul road and the marine port. The metals concentrations in the two years were compared using Bayesian posterior predictions on a new sampling grid to which both data sets were fit. Posterior predictions were simulated 200 times both on a coarse grid of 2,357 points and by distance-based strata including subsets of these points. Compared to 2001, Zn and Pb concentrations in 2006 were 31 to 54% lower in the 3 sampling strata closest to the haul road (0-100, 100-2000 and 2000-4000 m. Pb decreased by 40% in the stratum 4,000-5,000 m from the haul road. Cd decreased significantly by 38% immediately adjacent to the road (0-100m, had an 89% probability of a small decrease 100-2000 m from the road, and showed moderate probabilities (56-71% for increase at greater distances. There was no significant change over time (with probabilities all ≤ 85% for any of the 3 elements in more distant reference areas (40-60 km. As in 2001, elemental concentrations in 2006 were higher on the north side of the road. Reductions in deposition have followed a large investment in infrastructure to control fugitive dust escapement at the mine and port sites, operational controls, and road dust mitigation. Fugitive dust escapement, while much reduced, is still resulting in elevated concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd out to 5,000 m from the haul road. Zn and Pb levels were slightly above arctic baseline values in southern CAKR reference areas.

  17. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and pressure measurements collected using moored buoy in the Indian Ocean from 2001-2006 (NODC Accession 0002733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements in the Equatorial Indian from 2001 to 2006 from the TRITON (TRIANGLE TRANS-OCEAN BUOY NETWORK); JAPAN AGENCY FOR MARINE-EARTH...

  18. The Effect of Deployment on the Rate of Major Depression and Substance Abuse in Active Duty Military from 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    DEFINITIONS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE, SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT Substance abuse, the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances , is a psychological...continued drinking despite recognition that an ulcer was made worse by alcohol consumption ). 12 An important component of the epidemiology of substance ...DEPLOYMENT ON THE RATE OF MAJOR DEPRESSION AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY FROM 2001–2006 by Melissa K. Burke March 2011 Thesis

  19. Predicting water quality by relating secchi-disk transparency and chlorophyll a measurements to Landsat satellite imagery for Michigan inland lakes, 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L.M.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The State of Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes; approximately 3,500 of these lakes are greater than 25 acres. The USGS, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), has been monitoring the quality of inland lakes in Michigan through the Lake Water Quality Assessment monitoring program. Approximately 100 inland lakes will be sampled per year from 2001 to 2015. Volunteers coordinated by MDEQ started sampling lakes in 1974, and continue to sample to date approximately 250 inland lakes each year through the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP), Michigan’s volunteer lakes monitoring program. Despite this sampling effort, it is still impossible to physically collect the necessary water-quality measurements for all 3,500 Michigan inland lakes. Therefore, a technique was used by USGS, modeled after Olmanson and others (2001), in cooperation with MDEQ that uses satellite remote sensing to predict water quality in unsampled inland lakes greater than 25 acres. Water-quality characteristics that are associated with water clarity can be predicted for Michigan inland lakes by relating sampled measurements of secchi-disk transparency (SDT) and chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl-a), to satellite imagery. The trophic state index (TSI) which is an indicator of the biological productivity can be calculated based on SDT measurements, Chl-a concentrations, and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations measured near the lake’s surface. Through this process, unsampled inland lakes within the fourteen Landsat satellite scenes encompassing Michigan can be translated into estimated TSI from either predicted SDT or Chl-a (fig. 1).

  20. The scientific production of full professors of the Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo: a view of the period of 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Suely Campos; Gattás, Gilka Jorge Figaro

    2009-01-01

    The scientific production of institutions of higher education, as well as the dissemination and use of this published work by peer institutions, can be assessed by means of quantitative and qualitative measurements. This type of analysis can also serve as the basis of further academic actions. Variables such as the type of evaluation, the number of faculty members and the decision to include or exclude researchers who are not professors are difficult to measure when comparing different schools and institutions. The purpose of this study was to assess the scientific production of tenured faculty from the Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina performed from 2001 to 2006. Medline/PubMed database was considered and the Impact factors (IFs--Journal Citation Report, 2006) and the number of generated citations (Web of Science/ISI Thomson) were also evaluated. The analysis of the scientific production of 66 full professors (level MS-6) revealed 1,960 scientific articles published in 630 scientific journals, of which 31.3% were Brazilian and 68.7% were from international sources. Among these, 47% of the articles were published in 62.9% of the journals with IFs above 10, although 16.4% of the journals did not have assigned IF values. We verified that 45% of the published articles received 9,335 citations (average of 11 + 17), with the majority of these (8,968 citations) appearing in international scientific journals. Our results indicate that it is possible to analyze the scientific production of a learning institution by the number of papers published by full professors, taking into account not only their academic position and influence, but also the fact that publication is an opportunity to stimulate joint projects with other members of the same institution.

  1. The scientific production of full professors of the faculdade de medicina da universidade de São Paulo: a view of the period of 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Campos Cardoso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The scientific production of institutions of higher education, as well as the dissemination and use of this published work by peer institutions, can be assessed by means of quantitative and qualitative measurements. This type of analysis can also serve as the basis of further academic actions. Variables such as the type of evaluation, the number of faculty members and the decision to include or exclude researchers who are not professors are difficult to measure when comparing different schools and institutions. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the scientific production of tenured faculty from the Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina performed from 2001 to 2006. METHODS: Medline/PubMed database was considered and the Impact factors (IFs - Journal Citation Report, 2006 and the number of generated citations (Web of Science/ISI Thomson were also evaluated. RESULTS: The analysis of the scientific production of 66 full professors (level MS-6 revealed 1,960 scientific articles published in 630 scientific journals, of which 31.3% were Brazilian and 68.7% were from international sources. Among these, 47% of the articles were published in 62.9% of the journals with IFs above 10, although 16.4% of the journals did not have assigned IF values. We verified that 45% of the published articles received 9,335 citations (average of 11 + 17, with the majority of these (8,968 citations appearing in international scientific journals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that it is possible to analyze the scientific production of a learning institution by the number of papers published by full professors, taking into account not only their academic position and influence, but also the fact that publication is an opportunity to stimulate joint projects with other members of the same institution.

  2. Inmigración y propiedad de la vivienda: los casos de California y España, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián LÓPEZ COLÁS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.

  3. Incidence of breast cancer in the five-year period (2001-2006 in patients treated surgically in the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Drljević

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is currently one of the most common malignant tumors of human race and at the same it is the most frequent cancer of female population. The war and post-war migrations of population have significantlychanged the demographic and age structure in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Absence of a National Cancer Register and a unique database on malignant diseases makes monitoring of breast cancer even more difficult.Theobjectiveof this retrospective study was to analyze the incidence of breast cancer in Zenica-Doboj Canton, to conduct a survey based on the age of patients in the five-year period starting from 1 January 2001 until 30 November 2005 and results of the study have been compared with 1990. All the patients were treated surgically with pre-surgical clinical examination, ultra-sound examination and mamography, and pathohistological verification of cancer and pathologically determined size of tumor. A total of 297 patients were treated out of the series of 583 breast surgeries.During this five-year survey a continuous increase of breast cancers in Zenica-Doboj Canton was noted.Therehas been an increased incidence of breast cancer in women aged 30-45, the average size of tumor has decreased, and there has been no change in the relationship between the pathohistological types of tumors and tendencies in surgical treatments to use breast conserving surgical methods. The program of early detection of breast cancer or screening of healthy women and search for “small” cancers (screening programs will enable a wider use of breast conserving surgical methods and it requires a more active involvement of the state and society.

  4. Effects of OEF/OIF Deployment Intensity on PTSD Diagnoses Among Still Active Population: Analysis of Enlisted and Officer Populations 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-31

    stress disorder in the general population. Findings of the epidemiologic catchment area survey. N Engl J Med, 317(26), 1630-1634. Hoge, C. W...2003). Use of mental health services by veterans with PTSD after the terrorist attacks of September 11. Am J Psychiatry, 160(9), 1684-1690. Rosenheck

  5. Building the Guatemalan Interagency Task Force Tecun Uman: Lessons Identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    but in June, the facilities were still being constructed and the soldiers and police were sleeping in tents. As of June, IATF Tecún Umán was...institutional vacuum, weed out corruption, and develop strong orga- nizations to counter the DTOs have been lacking. A change came with the election...in early 2014, but in June 2014, the facilities were still being constructed and the soldiers and police continued to sleep in tents. The

  6. The Reconstruction of Community and Identity among Guatemalan Returnees (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Anne Stølen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on anthropological fieldwork in the Petén,  Guatemala, this article focuses on the (reconstruction of community and identity among returned refugees. With a past marked by armed  conflict and violence, flight and life in exile,  return and resettlement, the returnees are in the  process of developing a new multi-ethnic community based on their common experiences as  well as on new forms of cooperative organization  that incorporate solidarity and equality to prevent the recurrence of the injustices of the past. The  paper discusses how their encounters in exile with  other people from a variety of ethnic groups and  with the international aid and solidarity organizations influenced them in the development of a  new community that is quite different from the  ones the returnees had left behind in Guatemala. It  also explores the processes whereby social identities are shaped and reformulated and how they are  linked with struggles over power on the one hand  and with livelihood practices on the other.  Resumen: La reconstrucción de la comunidad y de la identidad entre retornados  guatemaltecosCon base en investigación antropológica realizada  en Petén, Guatemala, este artículo se centra en la  (reconstrucción de las comunidades e identidades  de refugiados que han regresado a su lugar de  origen. Cargando un pasado de conflicto armado y  violencia, lucha y vida en exilio, los retornados  deben construir una nueva comunidad multiétnica, basada tanto en sus experiencias compartidas  como en nuevas formas de organización cooperativa que incluyen solidaridad e igualdad para  prevenir las injusticias del pasado. Este ensayo  debate sobre los encuentros de los retornados  durante el exilio con gente de otros grupos étnicos, con la ayuda internacional y organizaciones  de solidaridad, y sobre cómo esto los ha influenciado para desarrollar así una nueva comunidad  que es muy diferente a aquéllas que los retornados  habían dejado antes en Guatemala. También se  explora el proceso a través del cual las identidades  sociales son definidas y reformuladas, y cómo éstas están vinculadas a luchas de poder, por un  lado, y con las prácticas de subsistencia, por el  otro.

  7. The Guatemalan Military: Transition from War to Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    1992. Cerdas Cruz, Rodolfo. El Precio de Una Herencia. Fuerza Armadas, Democracia y Derechos Humanos en Centroamérica. San José: Instituto...Interamericano de Derechos Humanos , 1996. Cullather, Nick. Secret History, The CIA’s Classified Account of Its Operations in Guatemala, 1952-1954. Stanford

  8. Precursors to femicide: Guatemalan women in a vortex of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David; Torres, M Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Today women in Guatemala are killed at nearly the same rate as they were in the early 1980s when the civil war became genocidal. Yet the current femicide epidemic is less an aberration than a reflection of the way violence against women has become normalized in Guatemala. Used to re-inscribe patriarchy and sustain both dictatorships and democracies, gender-based violence morphed into femicide when peacetime governments became too weak to control extralegal and paramilitary powers. The naturalization of gender-based violence over the course of the twentieth century maintained and promoted the systemic impunity that undergirds femicide today. By accounting for the gendered and historical dimensions of the cultural practices of violence and impunity, we offer a re-conceptualization of the social relations that perpetuate femicide as an expression of post-war violence.

  9. Determinantes da estrutura de capital das companhias abertas no Brasil, México e Chile no período 2001-2006 Determinants of the capital structure of publicly-traded companies in Brazil, Mexico and Chile in the period 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Dias Bastos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo investiga os determinantes da estrutura de capital, utilizando a técnica de painel de dados estático, para uma amostra de 297 empresas, de diversos setores, pertencentes ao Brasil, México e Chile, no período entre 2001 e 2006, a fim de determinar a importância relativa dos fatores específicos da empresa. A partir de seis indicadores de nível de endividamento (contábil total e de curto e longo prazo, total a valor de mercado e financeiros onerosos de curto e longo prazo, foi evidenciado que os fatores específicos da firma: liquidez corrente, rentabilidade, market to book value e tamanho apresentaram os resultados mais significantes para a estrutura de capital das empresas dos três países. Dentre as quatro correntes teóricas analisadas (Trade off, Assimetria de informações, Pecking order e Agência, a teoria do Pecking order parece ser aquela que melhor explica os resultados obtidos para o Brasil e México. Para o Chile, além do Pecking order, a teoria do Trade off exerce forte influência sobre a estrutura de capital.The present study investigates the determinants of the capital structure, using the technique of static panel data, for a sample of 297 companies from several sectors in Brazil, Mexico and Chile, between 2001 and 2006, in order to determine the relative importance of the specific factors of the firm. Starting from six indicators of leverage ratio (total book-debt ratio, short-term and long-term book-debt ratio, total market-debt ratio and short-term and long-term financial-debt ratio, it was evidenced that the specific factors of the firm: current liquidity, profitability, market to book value and size presented the most significant results for the capital structure of the companies from the three countries. Among the four theoretical currents analyzed (Trade off, Asymmetry of information, Pecking order and Agency, the theory of Pecking order seems to be the one that best explains the results obtained for Brazil and Mexico. For Chile, besides the Pecking order, the theory of Trade off strongly influences the capital structure.

  10. Children's Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    A new field of children's learning is emerging. This new field differs from the old in recognizing that children's learning includes active as well as passive mechanisms and qualitative as well as quantitative changes. Children's learning involves substantial variability of representations and strategies within individual children as well as…

  11. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007679.htm Pancreatitis - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pancreatitis in children occurs when the pancreas becomes swollen ...

  12. Intussusception - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral infection Englarged lymph node in the intestine Polyp or tumor The reason for the problem is more likely to be found in older children. Intussusception can affect both children and adults. However, ...

  13. Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your child's health includes physical, mental and social well-being. Most parents know the basics of keeping children healthy, like offering ... for children to get regular checkups with their health care provider. These visits are a chance to ...

  14. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure disorder - children; Convulsion - childhood epilepsy; Medically refractory childhood epilepsy; Anticonvulsant - childhood epilepsy; Antiepileptic drug - childhood epilepsy; AED - childhood epilepsy

  15. Likeable children, uneasy children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Sally Dean

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in small-town schools with children of Muslim background whose families came to Denmark as United Nation refugees, the chapter explores how pedagogical ideologies of school-based peer sociability inflect children’s experiences of ‘being Muslim.’ Danish provincial schools......, with their permanent classes, emphasis on class-based sociability, and particular understandings of what constitutes religion, represent a particular context for children’s school experiences. An analysis of two contrasting cases reveals that participation in peer sociability in and beyond school tends to erase...

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  17. A pilot duplicate diet study on manganese, selenium and chromium intakes in institutionalised children and adolescents from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; Briones, Mercedes; Muros, José Joaquín; Seiquer, Isabel; Sánchez, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Guillermo; Giménez, Rafael

    2015-11-28

    Hidden hunger occurs in the presence of an otherwise nutritionally or energetically appropriate diet that is deficient in essential vitamins and minerals. Guatemala has the highest rate of child malnutrition in Latin America and the prevalence of hidden hunger is high. The aim of this study was to determine the Mn, Se and Cr dietary intakes in Guatemalan institutionalised children (4-14 years), a population group at high risk of mineral deficiency. For this purpose, the contents of Mn, Se and Cr were analysed in a duplicate diet (for 7 consecutive days) by electrothermal atomisation-atomic absorption spectrophotometry following acid digestion. Mn, Se and Cr intakes from the duplicate diets were in the range of 1·3-2·31 mg/d, 58·7-69·6 µg/d and 6·32-27·57 µg/d, respectively. Mn and Cr values were below current recommended daily intakes. A cereal- and legumes-based diet is habitually consumed by this population. Local vegetables, fruits and nutritional supplements are included daily, but the consumption of fish, meat, eggs and dairy products is very infrequent or negligible. Mean daily energy intake from the 7-d diet was 8418·2 kJ (2012 kcal), with a macronutrient energy distribution of carbohydrates 69·4 %, proteins 12·3 % and fats 18·3 %. Correlations between Mn, Se and Cr intakes and energy and other nutrient intakes were also evaluated. The present findings will help establish new nutritional strategies for this and similar population groups.

  18. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth ...

  19. uninfected children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To bridge the management gap between nutritional rehabilitation for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and chronic malnutrition, ... Chronically malnourished children with superimposed SAM benefit from the use of RUTF as much as children without ... France), an energy-dense lipid paste made of peanut butter, milk powder ...

  20. Street children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rončević Nevenka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to UNICEF, street child is any child under the age of 18 for whom the street has become home and/or source of income and which is not adequately protected or supervised by adult, responsible person. It has been estimated that there are between 100 and 150 million street children worldwide. Life and work on the street have long term and far-reaching consequences for development and health of these children. By living and working in the street, these children face the highest level of risk. Street children more often suffer from the acute illness, injuries, infection, especially gastrointestinal, acute respiratory infections and sexually transmitted diseases, inadequate nutrition, mental disorders, and drug abuse. They are more often victims of abuse, sexual exploitation, trafficking; they have higher rate of adolescent pregnancy than their peers from poor families. Street children and youth have higher rates of hospitalization and longer hospital stay due to seriousness of illness and delayed health care. Street children/youth are reluctant to seek health care, and when they try, they face many barriers. Street children are invisible to the state and their number in Serbia is unknown. Recently, some non­governmental organizations from Belgrade, Novi Sad and Nis have recognized this problem and tried to offer some help to street children, by opening drop­in centers, but this is not enough. To solve this problem, an engagement of the state and the whole community is necessary, and primary responsibility lies in health, social and educational sector. The best interests of the child must serve as a basic guideline in all activities aimed at improving health, quality of life and rights of children involved in the life and work in the street.

  1. Difficult Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Else

    The purpose of this paper is to put focus on families and children who have had contact to the social service department because of problems related children’s well-being, health or development. Problems that are recognized by the families themselves and by the authorities as problems that put...... the family in a poor position regarding the children’s well-being, health and development, but not so severe that the child is to be placed out of home. The paper concentrates attention on differences between families with and without contact to the social service department for reasons related to the child....... Especially on children and their development in social relations to children at the same age, on how the mothers experience their child and on the parent’s resources concerning health, education and job situation. The paper presents results from the first two data collections (1996 and 1999) in a prospective...

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  3. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  4. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 67 Revision 2 (FGE.67Rev2): Consideration of 28 furan-substituted compounds evaluated by JECFA at the 55th, 65th and 69th meetings (JECFA, 2001, 2006a, 2009b)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    on metabolism and toxicity. The present consideration concerns a group of 28 furan-substituted compounds evaluated by the JECFA. This revision of FGE.67 is due to new data on toxicity for 3-(-methyl-2-furyl) butanal [FL-no: 13.058] providing an appropriate NOAEL for the evaluation of candidate substance [FL...

  5. Comparison of serum cotinine concentration within and across smokers of menthol and nonmenthol cigarette brands among non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white U.S. adult smokers, 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Ralph S; Holiday, David B; Stellman, Steven D; Mowery, Paul D; Giovino, Gary A; Muscat, Joshua E; Eriksen, Michael P; Bernert, John T; Richter, Patricia A; Kozlowski, Lynn T

    2011-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is examining options for regulating menthol content in cigarettes. There are many pharmacologic properties of menthol that may facilitate exposure to tobacco smoke, and it has been suggested that the preference for menthol cigarettes in black smokers accounts for their higher cotinine levels. To assess cigarettes smoked per day-adjusted cotinine levels in relation to smoking a menthol or nonmenthol cigarette brand among non-Hispanic black and white U.S. adult smokers under natural smoking conditions. Serum cotinine concentrations were measured in 1,943 smokers participating in the 2001 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The effect of smoking a menthol brand on cigarettes smoked per day-adjusted serum cotinine levels in these two populations was modeled by adjusting for sex, age, number of smokers living in the home, body weight, time since last smoked, and FTC (Federal Trade Commission)-measured nicotine levels. The 8- or 12-digit Universal Product Code (UPC) on the cigarette label was used to determine the cigarette brand and whether it was menthol. Smoking a menthol cigarette brand versus smoking a nonmenthol cigarette brand was not associated (P ≥ 0.05) with mean serum cotinine concentration in either black or white smokers. The higher levels of cotinine observed in black smokers compared with white smokers are not explained by their higher preference for menthol cigarette brands. Further studies like ours are needed to improve our ability to understand health consequences of future changes in tobacco product design. ©2011 AACR

  6. Presencia de Hezbollah en la triple frontera, un desafío para las políticas de seguridad conjuntas de Argentina, Brasil y Paraguay (2001-2006)

    OpenAIRE

    Pulecio Henao, Juanita

    2016-01-01

    El grupo fundamentalista Hezbollah, nació en el Líbano y propagó su ideología por el mundo a finales del siglo XX y principios del siglo XXI. En el punto más álgido de su expansión, instaló una de sus células en el límite entre Argentina, Brasil y Paraguay, generando un riesgo para la región. Por esto, se hizo necesario crear políticas conjuntas de seguridad en la Triple Frontera con el fin de combatir la amenaza en la zona entre los años 2001 y 2006. Aunque teóricamente es necesario inst...

  7. Immigration and homeownership: the cases of California and Spain, Inmigración y propiedad de la vivienda: los casos de California y España, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda YÉPEZ MARTÍNEZ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the evolution of foreign homeownership in Spain between 2001 and 2006, seen as an indicator of integration of migrants in host countries. Other goals, derived from the former, are to determine the influence of nationality in the homeownership and to quantify the likelihood of foreigners to live under this form of tenure. Having modelled the socio-demographic variables between the years 2001 and 2006, the results show a lower propensity of foreign born people to live through ownership than nationals and, what is most important, that the Spanish residential system demands more efforts for foreigners so as to live in property than the Californian system.En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.

  8. Evaluación del impacto de la Reforma Mexicana de salud 2001-2006: un informe inicial Assessing the effect of the 2001-06 Mexican health reform: an interim report card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuela Gakidou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de 2001 se inicia en México un proceso de diseño, legislación e implementación de la Reforma Mexicana de Salud. Un componente clave de ésta fue la creación del Seguro Popular, que pretende extender la cobertura de aseguramiento médico por siete años a la población que no cuenta con seguridad social, la cual constituía en ese momento casi la mitad de la población total. La reforma incluyó cinco acciones: modificar la ley para garantizar el derecho a la protección a la salud para las familias afiliadas, lo cual al ser implantado completamente incrementará el gasto público en salud entre 0.8 y 1.0% del PIB; la creación de un paquete de servicios de salud explícito; la asignación de recursos a secretarías estatales de salud descentralizadas, proporcional al número de familias incorporadas; la división de los recursos federales destinados a los estados en fondos independientes para servicios de salud personales y no personales; así como la creación de un fondo para garantizar recursos cuando se presentan eventos catastróficos en salud. Mediante el uso del marco conceptual de los sistemas de salud de la OMS, se han examinado diversos conjuntos de datos para evaluar el impacto de esta reforma en distintas dimensiones del sistema de salud. Entre los principales hallazgos clave se encuentran que: la afiliación alcanza de manera preferente a las comunidades pobres y marginadas; el gasto federal no correspondiente a la seguridad social aumentó 38% de 2000 a 2005 en términos reales; ha mejorado la equidad del gasto público entre los estados; los afiliados al Seguro Popular presentan una mayor utilización de servicios, tanto a nivel ambulatorio como para pacientes externos y pacientes hospitalarios en comparación con los no asegurados; la cobertura efectiva de 11 intervenciones en salud ha mejorado entre 2000 y 2005; han disminuido las desigualdades en cobertura efectiva durante este periodo en todos los estados y deciles de ingresos; los gastos catastróficos para los afiliados al Seguro Popular son más bajos que los de los no asegurados, a pesar de que se haya incrementado su utilización en México. Este trabajo presenta algunas lecciones para México con base en esta evaluación provisional, así como algunas implicaciones potenciales para otros países que consideran desarrollar reformas en materia de salud.Since 2001, Mexico has been designing, legislating, and implementing a major health-system reform. A key component was the creation of Seguro Popular, which is intended to expand insurance coverage over seven years to uninsured people, nearly half the total population at the start of 2001. The reform included five actions: legislation of entitlement per family affiliated which, with full implementation, will increase public spending on health by 0.8-1.0% of gross domestic product; creation of explicit benefits packages; allocation of monies to decentralised state ministries of health in proportion to number of families affiliated; division of federal resources flowing to states into separate funds for personal and non-personal health services; and creation of a fund to protect families against catastrophic health expenditures. Using the WHO health-systems framework, a wide range of datasets to assess the effect of this reform on different dimensions of the health system was used. Key findings include: affiliation is preferentially reaching the poor and the marginalised communities; federal non-social security expenditure in real per-head terms increased by 38% from 2000 to 2005; equity of public-health expenditure across states improved; Seguro Popular affiliates used more inpatient and outpatient services than uninsured people; effective coverage of 11 interventions has improved between 2000 and 2005-06; inequalities in effective coverage across states and wealth deciles has decreased over this period; catastrophic expenditures for Seguro Popular affiliates are lower than for uninsured people even though use of services has increased. We present some lessons for Mexico based on this interim evaluation and explore implications for other countries considering health reforms.

  9. Children's Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1992-01-01

    Provides a sampling of citations in the ERIC database on children's rights. Includes human rights education, United Nations' conventions, state takeovers of local school districts, and federal law as it affects student rights. Covers child abuse, corporal punishment, child welfare, and child advocacy. (DK)

  10. Wild Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author, a Forest School Leader with Shropshire Wildlife Trust, shows how nature is the best teacher. She describes a new approach to out-of-classroom learning during which qualified leaders use simple challenges and achievable tasks to encourage child-initiated learning in the great outdoors. At Forest School, children are…

  11. Children's Stereotypes of Overweight Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Helen; Haddock, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the content, favourability and generality of perceptions held about overweight children. The research also addressed whether anti-fat biases change with age and whether they result from a strong association between overweight and bad behaviour, a weak association between overweight and good behaviour or…

  12. in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jabłońska-Jesionowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic rhinitis in children may have different causes, both local – with changes being present only in the nasalcavity – or systemic, with nasal congestion as one of the symptoms of a bigger clinical picture.Aim. the aim of this study was to draw attention to a very rare congenital cause of chronic rhinitis in children – which is hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.Material and methods. A 6-month-old boy was admitted to the department of pediatric otolaryngology of Warsaw medicalUniversity due to chronic nasal obstruction present from birth. Clinical investigation included anterior and posterior rhinoscopy and fiberoscopy of nasopharynx. the mri was also performed before admission. Complete blood count, serum iron level,serum thyroid hormones and level of igG, igA, igm were examined to exclude anaemia, ozaena and hypothyroidism. Antinuclear antibodies (AnA and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (AnCA tests were also ordered to exclude granulomatosiswith polyangiitis. next, a mucosal biopsy of the nasal cavity was performed to exclude primary ciliary dyskinesia. Allergic pricktests were also performed.Results. After genetic tests, hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was diagnosed.Conclusions. 1. every case of chronic nasal congestion in children requires not only adequate treatment, but also thoroughclinical investigation. 2. nasal obstruction may be due to local causes, systemic diseases and genetic disorders. 3. hypohidroticectodermal dysplasia is a very rare genetic disorder that causes severe, even life threatening symptoms, one of which is chronicrhinitis.

  13. Ptosis - infants and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blepharoptosis - children; Congenital ptosis; Eyelid drooping - children; Eyelid drooping - amblyopia; Eyelid drooping - astigmatism ... Ptosis in infants and children is often due to a problem with the muscle that raises the eyelid. A nerve problem in the eyelid can ...

  14. Treating Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children and Adolescents Go Back Treating Children and Adolescents Email Print + Share For the most part, the ... tailored, based upon the child's weight. Children and adolescents are moving through a period of physical and ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  16. Intestinal Polyps (in Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these inherited conditions. What are the symptoms of polyps? Children with polyps usually pass blood in the stools. ... to have another colonoscopy. Children that have several polyps, or children whose families have special polyposis syndromes, may need ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is ... this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ...

  18. Divorce: Helping Children Cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alicia S.; McBride, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Examines children's reactions to the divorce process and explores ways in which adults can promote growth and adjustment in children of divorce. Suggests ways in which parents, teachers, and counselors can help children. (RC)

  19. Hodgkin lymphoma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Hodgkin disease - children; Cancer - Hodgkin lymphoma - children; Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma ... of cancer is unknown. But, certain factors may play a role in ... Common early childhood infections also may increase the risk.

  20. Cow's milk and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milk and children; Cow's milk allergy - children; Lactose intolerance - children ... You may have heard that cow's milk should not be given to babies younger than 1 year old. This is because cow's milk doesn't provide enough of ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  5. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  6. Why Children Misbehave

    OpenAIRE

    Telep, Valya Goodwin, 1955-

    2009-01-01

    This series of lessons was prepared for parents like you - parents who want to do a better job of disciplining their children. The lessons were especially written for parents of preschool children, ages two to six, but some of the discipline methods are appropriate for older children, too. This lesson focuses on why children misbehavior.

  7. Children Solve Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bono, Edward

    A group of children were presented with several tasks, including the invention of a sleep machine and a machine to weigh elephants. The tasks were chosen to involve the children in coping with problems of a distinct character. A study of the children's drawings and interpretations shows that children's thinking ability is not very different from…

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. ... General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  9. Torture in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Jose

    2009-01-01

    This is a review article that studies the problem of torture in children. Torture in children is a significant worldwide problem, but there are no official or reliable independent statistics to measure the magnitude of the problem. The definition of torture in the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment applies to adults and children. The Convention on the Rights of the Child defines children as "every human being below the age of eighteen years". Torture in children happens during peace times and during political violence and war conflicts. The majority of torture victims happen during peace times. The high-risk groups are impoverished children living in the street, children deprived of parental care, children in conflict with the law, and children in detention. During political violence and war the high risk children are the children detained during political violence, child soldiers, children internally displaced in refugee camps, detained children during the war against terrorism and children tortured by peacekeeping forces. The perpetrators of torture in children are the members of the same forces that torture adults, generally the police, civil police, security guards trained by police, prison guards, and military forces. The paper identifies some preventive measure and develops recommendations for action at the local, national and international level.

  10. Tonsillectomies and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children and tonsillectomies ... many parents wonder if it is wise for children to have the tonsils taken out. Tonsillectomy may be recommended if your child has any of the following: Difficulty swallowing Obstructed ...

  11. Children and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Digest for health professionals Children and Dietary Supplements Share: September 2012 © Matthew Lester Research has shown that many children use herbs and other dietary supplements. However, there are little data available on their ...

  12. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients ... 15, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  13. Separation anxiety in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001542.htm Separation anxiety in children To use the sharing features on this page, ... to test their independence. To get over separation anxiety, children need to: Feel safe in their home. Trust ...

  14. Children and TV Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese TV Violence and Children No. 13; Updated December 2014 ... violent. Hundreds of studies of the effects of TV violence on children and teenagers have found that ...

  15. Cough in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Cough in children TTR Share | Cough in Children This article has been reviewed by ... MD, FAAAAI As a parent, hearing your child cough may make you feel uneasy. Yet an occasional ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  17. Controversial Books for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, La Vinia Jean

    1979-01-01

    Discusses children's books which have caused controversies pertaining to ethnic stereotyping, labeling, sex instruction, and offensive language, and maintains that controversy is beneficial in that it keeps librarians aware of children's interests. (FM)

  18. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  19. Traveling with children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not suit the child's needs. Small crackers, unsugared cereals, and string cheese make good snacks. Some children can eat fruit without problems. Cookies and sugared cereals make for sticky children. When flying with babies ...

  20. Cold medicines and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000942.htm Cold medicines and children To use the sharing features on ... children younger than age 4. About OTC Cold Medicines Cold medicines do not cure or shorten a ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look ... being recorded. Though nuclear imaging itself causes no pain, children may experience some discomfort from having to ...

  2. Children, Time, and Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkind, David; Rinaldi, Carla; Flemmert Jensen, Anne

    Proceedings from the conference "Children, Time, and Play". Danish University of Education, January 30th 2003.......Proceedings from the conference "Children, Time, and Play". Danish University of Education, January 30th 2003....

  3. Sleepwalking and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... event. It is most often triggered by poor sleep habits. In children, sleepwalking starts between ages 6 and 12. It occurs more often in boys than girls. Children outgrow ... to stick to a bedtime routine may help reduce the problem.

  4. ADHD in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips ADHD in Young Children Use recommended treatment first Language: ... The recommended first treatment for young children with ADHD is underused. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. ... are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does ...

  6. Children and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Divorce and Children No. 1; Updated December 2013 One out of every two marriages today ends in divorce and many divorcing families include children. Parents who ...

  7. Screen time and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000355.htm Screen time and children To use the sharing features on ... videos is considered unhealthy screen time. Current Screen Time Guidelines Children under age 2 should have no ...

  8. Exercise and activity - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm Exercise and activity - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Children should have many chances to play, run, bike, and play sports during the day. They should ...

  9. SLOVAK CHILDREN''S LITERATURE IN TRANSLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kniazkova V.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the main milestones of Slovak children's literature and how it is represented in the translation into foreign languages. The work of writers who have contributed to the development of children's literature most of all is analyzed in the article, as well as the work of the translators who have contributed to the promotion of Slovak literature abroad.

  10. Cholecystectomy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainsworth, Alan Patrick; Axelsen, Anne Reiss; Rasmussen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    It is recommended that children with typical clinical signs of biliary colic should be offered surgery if gallstones are present. The aim of this study was to describe a population of children having undergone cholecystectomy.......It is recommended that children with typical clinical signs of biliary colic should be offered surgery if gallstones are present. The aim of this study was to describe a population of children having undergone cholecystectomy....

  11. Children and grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lie about what is going on. Children are smart. They pick up on dishonesty and will wonder why you are lying. NOT force children who are afraid to go to funerals. Find other ways for your children to remember and honor the deceased. For example, you can light a candle, pray, float a balloon to the ...

  12. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAD - children; Anxiety disorder - children ... The cause of GAD is unknown. Genes may play a role. Children with family members who have an anxiety disorder also may be more likely to have one. Stress may be a factor in developing GAD. Things ...

  13. Children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H B

    1997-01-01

    Limited attention has been directed in the dental literature to the emotional, economic and associated consequences of divorces on children. A general introduction is provided on 1) the numbers of children involved in divorces in different single-parent population groups, with 2) emphasis on the emotional impact of divorce on children and 3) the potential significance for pediatric dental practices.

  14. Colorado Children's Budget 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Beverly; Baker, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget" presents and analyzes investments and spending trends during the past five state fiscal years on services that benefit children. The "Children's Budget" focuses mainly on state investment and spending, with some analysis of federal investments and spending to provide broader context of state…

  15. Children and the Nintendo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Suzanne M.

    The four reports contained in this document examine the effects of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), which entered the lives of many children in the United States in 1986. The first report discusses a study of children's interaction with the game hardware. The study of fourth- and fifth-grade students indicated that children's interaction…

  16. Kidney Cancer in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is Kidney Cancer in Children? Kidney (renal) tumors are very rare in children. Still, the three most common renal tumors found ... treatable and curable. What are the Types of Kidney Cancer in Children? Male urinary tract Medical Illustration Copyright © ...

  17. Children of Different Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva; Bundgaard, Helle

    2007-01-01

    an apparent paradox in daily practice where on the one hand staff attempt to mute differences between children on the assumption that all children are equal and should be treated as such, while on the other hand distinctions are in practice established when children behave in ways considered inappropriate...

  18. Nordic Children's Foodscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Barbro; Mäkelä, Johanna; Roos, Gun

    2009-01-01

    A study of the different food messages that children encounter and their own reflections of these messages was carried out among fifty-nine children from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.The children took photos of their "foodscapes," including school, home, shops, streets, cafés and restauran...

  19. Writing in Preliterate Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Jean Emile; Fayol, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Dictated words and pictures by 48 young French children, aged 3 to 6 years, demonstrated that young children have the capacity to produce graphics that exhibit some of the characteristics of writing. Developmental stages in children's recognition that their own efforts were not true writing were identified. (SLD)

  20. Constipation in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Merit M.; Boluyt, Nicole; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Prevalence of childhood constipation has been estimated at 0.7% to 29.6% in the general population worldwide; most children have no obvious aetiological factors. One third of children with chronic constipation continue to have problems beyond puberty. Half of children with chronic faecal impaction

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  2. Chisme across Borders: The Impact of Gossip in a Guatemalan Transnational Community

    OpenAIRE

    Jocelyn SKOLNIK; Sandra LAZO DE LA VEGA; Timothy STEIGENGA

    2012-01-01

    Entrevistas cualitativas realizadas en Jacaltenango (comunidad maya guatemalteca de emigrantes) y Júpiter (localidad de Florida que recibe inmigrantes jacaltecos) ilus tran el rol del chisme transnacional y sus efectos, condicionados por el género. Las esposas de los migrantes están sujetas a un riguroso escrutinio por parte de su familia y vecinos, quienes las acusan de ser infieles, criar mal a los niños y malgastar el dinero. Para evitar el chisme y sus posibles consecuencias, muchas mu...

  3. [Governance in Guatemalan municipal development councils: an analysis of actors and power relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Walter; Gómez-Sánchez, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    Decentralisation and other public policies have created public spaces for participation in most Latin-American countries where community representatives, together with municipal authorities and other public functionaries, decide on social investment plans, including health services and infrastructure. The municipal development council system constitutes such public space in Guatemala. This study analysed such system's governance in a sample of 6 rural municipalities. A descriptive design was used, applying qualitative and quantitative techniques to study three central categories: the strategic actors, the rules of the game and power asymmetry levels amongst actors. The findings revealed inconsistencies amongst the actors who had to participate according to the legal framework and those actors who actually did so in practice. Divergent interests were also identified for participating which affected the possibility of reaching consensus during decision-making. Analysing the rules of the game led to identifying formal and non-formal mechanisms favouring some actors' ability to influence decisions. Analysing power asymmetry levels led to identifying that community representatives had fewer power resources than institutional representatives (local government and other government organisations). Community representatives also face different barriers blocking their participation and perceive a lesser capacity to influence decision-making. Existing barriers and fewer power resources experienced by community representatives reduce their abilities to influence decision-making in municipal development councils.

  4. Sexual Attitudes and Behavior of Guatemalan Teenagers: Considerations for Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berganza, Carlos E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted 2 studies to explore prevalence of adolescence pregnancy in Guatemala and identify level of contraception. In first study found 89 percent of male and 38 percent of female adolescents (N=850) had experienced coitus. In the second study found pregnancy rate of minors (N=551) in a gynecology clinic was highest for adolescents aged 13-14.…

  5. Living in times of solidarity: fair trade and the fractured life worlds of Guatemalan coffee farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arce, A.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the social effects of fair trade transactions emerging from policies to expand the market around the globe. Focusing on the case of coffee farmers in Guatemala, it examines tensions that are created in local organisational networks linked to production, processing and

  6. Women's human agency and self-determination in Guatemalan tourism development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Usher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El turismo es a menudo identificado como una estrategia para mejorar el bienestar de las comunidades y sus miembros más vulnerables - las mujeres y sus hijos. La capacidad de las mujeres para participar y beneficiarse del turismo está condicionada por los tradicionales roles de género y consiguientes desventajas educacionales. Los programas de desarrollo a menudo intentan mitigar estas disparidades. Este artículo examina la intervención de los Cuerpos de Paz como resultado de la mejora en el desarrollo humano y la autodeterminación de las mujeres indígenas Q¿eqchi, en Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. El artículo trata los logros y deficiencias de esta intervención así como sus implicaciones prácticas y teóricas.

  7. Contribution of complementary foods to the total daily water needs of urban Guatemalan infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneman, A.; Campos, R.; Hernandez, L.; Palma, A.V.; Vossenaar, M.; Solomons, N.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Estimates of adequate intake (AI) for water only became available in 2005. The daily water AI for 6-12-month-old infants of both sexes is 800 mL. The present study aimed to estimate the water intake of urban infants receiving both breast milk and complementary feeding (CF) and to compare

  8. Differential Item Functioning and educational risk factors in Guatemalan reading assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortin Morales, A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined Differential Item Functioning (DIF) indicators for four variables that repeatedly have been demonstrated to constitute risk factors in primary school achievement in Guatemala. These factors are over-age of enrollment, urban/rural area of residence, ethnicity, and gender. We used scores

  9. Migration, violence, and safety among migrant sex workers: a qualitative study in two Guatemalan communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Jiménez, Teresita; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Silverman, Jay G; Morales-Miranda, Sonia; Goldenberg, Shira M

    2016-09-01

    Despite reports of high levels of violence among women migrants in Central America, limited evidence exists regarding the health and safety of migrant sex workers in Central America. This study is based on 16 months of field research (November 2012-February 2014), including ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, and focus groups conducted with 52 internal and international migrant female sex workers in Tecún Umán and Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, key transit and destination communities for both international and internal migrants. The analysis explored migration-related determinants of susceptibility to violence experienced by migrant sex workers across different phases of migration. Violence in home communities and economic considerations were key drivers of migration. Unsafe transit experiences (eg undocumented border crossings) and negative interactions with authorities in destination settings (eg extortion) contributed to migrant sex workers' susceptibility to violence, while enhanced access to information on immigration policies and greater migration and sex work experience were found to enhance agency and resilience. Findings suggest the urgent need for actions that promote migrant sex workers' safety in communities of origin, transit, and destination, and programmes aimed at preventing and addressing human rights violations within the context of migration and sex work.

  10. Microplate assay analysis of the distribution of organophosphate and carbamate resistance in Guatemalan Anopheles albimanus

    OpenAIRE

    Brogdon, W. G.; Beach, R. F.; Stewart, J. M.; Castanaza, L.

    1988-01-01

    Simple microplate assay methods for determining the frequency of insecticide resistance in single mosquitos were used to study the distribution and localization of organophosphate and carbamate resistance in field populations of Anopheles albimanus Weidemann in Guatemala, where such resistance, caused by heavy use of agricultural pesticides, has long been assumed to be widespread. Areas of complete susceptibility to organophosphates and carbamates were observed, as well as areas where the res...

  11. Leveraging Social Networks to Support Reproductive Health and Economic Wellbeing among Guatemalan Maya Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Alexandra S.; Luippold-Roge, Genevieve P.; Gurman, Tilly A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Maya women in Guatemala are disproportionately affected by poverty and negative reproductive health outcomes. Although social networks are valued in many Indigenous cultures, few studies have explored whether health education programmes can leverage these networks to improve reproductive health and economic wellbeing. Design: This…

  12. Differential Item Functioning and Educational Risk Factors in Guatemalan Reading Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro M. Fortin Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Examinamos indicadores de Funcionamiento Diferencial de Ítemes (FDI asociados a cuatro variables que han demostrado de manera repetida ser factores de riesgo para el logro escolar. Estos factores son el sobre-edad para el grado de matriculación, área de residencia urbana/rural, etnia y género. Para este estudio utilizamos los datos de las evaluaciones nacionales del tercer grado. Dado que en la literatura se reporta con frecuencia que los indicadores de FDI son inestables, utilizamos tres diferentes métodos para estimarlo (chi-cuadrado, Rasch, regresión logística y evaluamos su consistencia en datos de tres diferentes años de evaluaciones. Encontramos evidencia de FDI. Sin embargo, la eliminación de ítemes con FDI no cambió las diferencias entre grupos que se encontraron en las puntuaciones de las evaluaciones. Los hallazgos sugieren que los factores de riesgo educativo actúan de manera conjunta en esta población guatemalteca y que hay alguna interacción entre estos factores de riesgo para generar sesgo. Concluimos que será de beneficio tomar en cuenta múltiples variables de contexto asociadas al riesgo educativo de forma simultanea al analizar FDI y al desarrollar evaluaciones.

  13. Te Deum Cristiano Evangélico: ‘The Evangelical’ in Guatemalan Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Christensen Bjune

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Siendo el país con el mayor porcentaje de evangélicos en la región latinoamericana, Guatemala ha tenido ya varias experiencias con el desempeño político de evangélicos, la mayoría de los cuales han salido de sus cargos dejando dudosos legados. Sin embargo, durante los últimos años, representantes de la Iglesia Evangélica participan con mayor frecuencia directamente en la vida política, o como resultado de sus propias estrategias o por invitación por parte de la sociedad política. A pesar de la heterogeneidad de los evangélicos en Guatemala, el presente artículo sugiere que en la política nacional lo evangélico se puede definir como una sola categoría analítica, porque así lo definen tanto los mismos oficiales de la Iglesia Evangélica, como los políticos y otros miembros de la sociedad política. El artículo también investiga el perfil y el carácter de las alianzas y la cooperación iniciadas por los evangélicos, arguyendo que aquellas indican una sanción del status quo socio-político en Guatemala. English: As the country with the largest percentage of Evangelical Christians in the Latin American region, Guatemala has had several experiences with 'evangélicos 'in politics, most of whom have left office and positions with highly dubious legacies. Nevertheless, the last years have seen an increase in direct political participation by representatives of the Evangelical communities, both by internal strategies and by invitation. In this article it will be suggested that in spite of the heterogeneous character of Guatemala’s Evangelicals, in national politics ‘the Evangelical’ can be considered as 'one 'analytical category, defined as such both by official Evangelical representatives, as well as by other members of the political society. The article further examines the type and nature of the political cooperation and alliances entered as well as initiated by Evangelical representatives, arguing that these indicate an endorsement of Guatemala’s socio-political status quo.

  14. Intervention in churches damaged by earthquake in colonial guatemalan villages of Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alfredo Ubico Calderón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights some proposals that at that time the builders of the province of Guatemala formulated to extend the life of the temples of Indians villages damaged by earthquake in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The question raised of how they were operated temples damaged by earthquake in Cologne?, was answered using the historical method applied to architecture, it allowed through the study of ancient documents information that would explain the ways proposed to recover these spaces. Interventions essentially revolve around two major decisions, demolition and subsequent reconstruction or reinforcement, and sometimes both, so that the buildings could be used again.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Curriculum in International Marketing and Business between Peruvian and Guatemalan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestonjee, Daanish D.; Spillan, John E.; Song, Hongwei; Virzi, Nicholas D.

    2010-01-01

    Business education is important for economic development. A skilled workforce allows for greater advancements in productivity, the creation of new business opportunities, increased employment, and enhances the quality of life of the citizenry. With the changing international business environment it is important for academics and practitioners…

  16. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of essential oils extracted from Guatemalan medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew B; Cates, Rex G; Lawrence, Michael; Soria, J Alfonso Fuentes; Espinoza, Luis V; Martinez, Jose Vicente; Arbizú, Dany A

    2015-04-01

    Essential oils are prevalent in many medicinal plants used for oral hygiene and treatment of diseases. Medicinal plant species were extracted to determine the essential oil content. Those producing sufficient oil were screened for activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans. Plant samples were collected, frozen, and essential oils were extracted by steam distillation. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using a tube dilution assay for those species yielding sufficient oil. Fifty-nine of the 141 plant species produced sufficient oil for collection and 12 species not previously reported to produce essential oils were identified. Essential oil extracts from 32 species exhibited activity against one or more microbes. Oils from eight species were highly inhibitory to S. mutans, four species were highly inhibitory to C. albicans, and 19 species yielded MIC values less than the reference drugs. RESULTS suggest that 11 species were highly inhibitory to the microbes tested and merit further investigation. Oils from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (Lauraceae), Citrus aurantiifolia (Christm.) Swingle (Rutaceae), Lippia graveolens Kunth (Verbenaceae), and Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae) yielded highly significant or moderate activity against all microbes and have potential as antimicrobial agents. Teas prepared by decoction or infusion are known methods for extracting essential oils. Oils from 11 species were highly active against the microbes tested and merit investigation as to their potential for addressing health-related issues and in oral hygiene.

  17. First Guatemalan record of natural hybridisation between Neotropical species of the Lady's Slipper orchid (Orchidaceae, Cypripedioideae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szlachetko, D. L.; Kolanowska, Marta; Müller, F.; Vannini, J.; Rojek, J.; Gorniak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2017), č. článku e4162. ISSN 2167-8359 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : in-vitro * reproductive isolation * seed- germination * hybrid orchid * sample-size * dna * performance * nuclear * models * distributions * Cypripedium * Cypripediaceae * Hybridization * ENM analysis * Nuclear markers * Taxonomy * Irapeana Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.177, year: 2016

  18. Mexicanization: A Survival Strategy for Guatemalan Mayans in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xóchitl Castañeda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se analiza la “mexicanización”, una estrategia de sobrevivencia adoptada por mayas guatemaltecos durante el proceso migratorio y de establecimiento en Estados Unidos. El término describe las relaciones ambiguas de tales migrantes con los mexicanos. El papel simbólico de México está presente desde la fase preparatoria del proceso migratorio, en Guatemala o en los campamentos de refugiados en México, hasta el peligroso viaje hacia el norte, durante el cual los guatemaltecos intentan mezclarse con la sociedad mexicana para evitar ser deportados o extorsionados por las autoridades. Alentrar a Estados Unidos los guatemaltecos siguen utilizando la identidad mexicana, para asegurar así, si son detenidos, que los oficiales del INS los envíen solamente a la zona fronteriza del norte de México. Cuando los guatemaltecos se establecen en Estados Unidos, con frecuencia viven en comunidades dominadas por negocios, productos, alimentos, cultura y redes sociales mexicanas. La experiencia de la “mexicanización” varía según el género y la historia personal.

  19. Children's participation in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Danholt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Teledialogue is a combined research and design project aimed at improving communications between social workers and children under their custody living in foster care or youth institutions. While social workers are responsible for the welfare of placed children they are under heavy workload...... and often only communicate with children at biannual meetings - the minimum required by law. The purpose of Teledialogue is to use participatory methods to develop an IT-enabled concept for children and social workers to maintain communication between the biannual meetings. Social workers and children...... are thus the primary participants in this design process. This presentation describes the inclusion and participation of the placed children in Teledialogue. With an outset in Actor-Network Theory (ANT) two points are made: 1) that children were participating in shaping the design long before they were...

  20. Children and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, M

    1989-01-01

    Program developers in India's mass media are turning to the discipline of child development to increase their sensitivity to the special needs and capacities of child audiences. Children are particularly susceptible to having their thoughts, feelings, values, and behavior influenced by media programming. In India, radio is the medium with the greatest opportunity to communicate with children and programming for young people includes educational material, variety programs, quiz shows, drama, and live programs in which children participate. The 1st Children's Film Festival was held in India in 1952 and India participates in the International Center of Films for Children and Young People. Television enjoys popularity among children, illiterates, and the poor, but its potential to create social awareness, change behaviors, and raise the standard of living of the Indian people has not been fully realized. Drama is less able to reach large numbers of children, but offers children the opportunity to participate directly in the portrayal of different characters and emotions. Recently, the tradition of puppetry has been rivived and integrated into India's school curriculum. Finally, India is taking steps to expand the number of books available to children and the Government has established 2 trusts to support the publication of children's literature. Regardless of the form of media, it is important for parents to play a role in ensuring the appropriateness of the programming for the child and processing its content.

  1. Philippines: street children, children at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantoco, F G

    1993-01-01

    Almost 2 million of Manila's 2.5 million children younger than 15 years old live on or below the poverty line. 75,000 of these children live on the streets after having run away from home or being abandoned. They beg, steal, scavenge for food, and sell newspapers, cigarettes, and leis. About 20,000 of the street children prostitute themselves. It is these latter children and adolescents who are at particular risk of HIV infection. Studies in the Philippines indicate that 91% of reported HIV infections are among individuals aged 15-44, the male/female infection ratio is one to one, the transmission rate is 45%, and the most common mode of transmission is through heterosexual intercourse. The high incidence of child sexual abuse and child prostitution in the Philippines would suggest that there are a significant number of children and adolescents under age 15 who are infected with HIV. Caritas Manila has developed an information, education, and communication program for HIV/AIDS prevention focusing upon individuals who have direct influence upon and are in direct contact with people: clergy, religious and civic associations, educators, and social and health workers. Caritas has also to a limited extent reached out directly to populations at risk, while collaborating with human rights advocacy groups and networking with other children-oriented agencies in the interest of providing resources to street children. Efforts must be made to protect the rights of children and provide them with an environment conducive to their growth and development. The author notes how off-duty policemen in Manila help real estate developers forcibly eject the poor from their shelters to clear the way for the construction of new infrastructure without concern for the legal processes and requirements in the humane and peaceful relocation of the homeless poor. Many women and children are hurt and killed in the process. It has also been reported that off-duty policemen in Rio de Janeiro

  2. Children of alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oravecz

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The author briefly interprets the research – results, referring to the phenomenon of children of alcoholics, especially the psychological and psychopathological characteristics of children of alcoholics in adolescence and young adulthood. The author presents a screening study of adolescents. The sample contains 200 high school students at age 18. The aim of the survey was to discover the relationship between alcohol consumption of parents, PTSD - related psychopathological symptoms and reported life quality of their children. The study confirmed the hypothesis about a substantial correlation between high alcohol consumption of parents, higher psychopathological symptom - expression and lower reported life quality score of their children. Higher PTSD-related symptomatology in children of alcoholics is probably resulted by home violence, which is very often present in family of alcoholics. The article also evaluated the results regarding suicide ideation of children of alcoholics, which is definitely more frequent and more intense than in their peers living in non alcohol – dependent families.

  3. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Fever in Infants and ChildrenBecause young children are not ... Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants and Children Fever Fever in Infants and Children Foot Problems Genital ...

  4. Design for children's apps

    OpenAIRE

    MORANTE BONET, MIRIAM; Costa Ferrer, María; Rodríguez Calatayud, María Nuria

    2017-01-01

    Are children under 2 years old exposed to apps? Which ones? How often? What kind of apps would be best suited for small children based on their physical and cognitive development, the evolution of their play patterns and their ability to interact with mobile devices? How to design apps as appropriate as possible for children under 2 years old? These are some of the main questions that are answered through the research presented in this publication. An investigation that demonstra...

  5. Why Are Children Poor?

    OpenAIRE

    Victor R. Fuchs

    1986-01-01

    Data from the 1960, 1970, and 1980 Censuses of Population and the Current Population Surveys of 1980 and 1985 are used to describe and analyze the economic position of children with special emphasis on cross-section differences and variation over time in the incidence of poverty. Between 1959 and 1979 the income available to children tended to follow the same pattern as adult income, but between 1979 and 1984 the trends for children were very unfavorable. Poverty rose, average income fell, an...

  6. Domestic violence against children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihić Biljana D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author is analysing definitions and basic notions related to domestic violence against children, as one of the most serious forms of violence. The special chapter deals with effects of violence against children and causes of domestic violence against them. Also, the author is analysing different forms of social reaction and considering the problem of legal regulation of mandatory reporting domestic violence against children.

  7. Epilepsy surgery in children

    OpenAIRE

    Sita Jayalakshmi; Sudhindra Vooturi; Swapan Gupta; Manas Panigrahi

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In approximately 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with anticonvulsive drugs, and such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and majority are children. Epilepsy surgery in children, who have been carefully chosen, can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90%) reduction in seizures in approximately two-third of children with intractable seizures. In...

  8. Children with pervasive refusal.

    OpenAIRE

    Lask, B; Britten, C; Kroll, L; Magagna, J; Tranter, M

    1991-01-01

    Four children are described with a potentially life threatening condition manifested by profound and pervasive refusal to eat, drink, walk, talk, or care for themselves in any way over a period of several months. The multiplicity and severity of the symptoms in these children do not fit comfortably into any existing diagnostic category. Long term and highly skilled nursing and psychiatric care is required to help these children to recover. The possible causes of this syndrome are discussed.

  9. Domestic violence against children

    OpenAIRE

    Mihić Biljana D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the author is analysing definitions and basic notions related to domestic violence against children, as one of the most serious forms of violence. The special chapter deals with effects of violence against children and causes of domestic violence against them. Also, the author is analysing different forms of social reaction and considering the problem of legal regulation of mandatory reporting domestic violence against children.

  10. Gastrointestinal Polyps in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Chun Wang; Hung-Chang Lee; Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chuen-Bin Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal polyps are common in children. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, endoscopic findings, management, pathology, and recurrence of gastrointestinal polyps in children at Mackay Memorial Hospital. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 50 children with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyps managed at Mackay Memorial Hospital between January 1984 and April 2007. Demographic data; clinical features; polyp size...

  11. Conspicuous firesetting in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, J G

    1981-01-01

    The records of 79 children whose firesetting led to referral to a Children's Hearing (the Scottish equivalent of a juvenile court) were examined. All but one of the children were boys. They had very disturbed backgrounds, with much family disruption and absent or unemployed fathers. Firesetting was predominantly a group activity and the damage caused was extensive. Although the children frequently engaged in other offences, in over 90 per cent there was no recurrence of reported firesetting within the limited period of possible follow-up.

  12. [Kidney injuries in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doletskiĭ, S Ia; korol'kova, I A; Shanidze, V V

    1975-02-01

    Anatomo-topographic features of the kidneys in children mostly condition a great incidence of its damage, compared with adults. One hundred and fifty children with renal injuries were observed, 147 of them with closed injuries and 3 -- with open ones. In 10 cases a trauma of anomalously developed kidneys was noted. 124 children were treated conservatively, 26 children were operated upon, in 16 of them organ-preserving operations were performed, in 10 children -- nephrectomay. Late results were followed up in 51 children in terms from 6 months to 10 years (40 patients were treated conservatively and 11 -- were operated upon). As a result of the conducted control investigation all patients were subdivided into three groups: practically healthy children (25), children with roentgenoradiological changes on the part of the injured kidney but without signs of clinico-laboratory symptomatics (11) children with posttraumatic complications (15). An analysis of late results enabled to revise indications to surgery in an acute period of trauma in behalf of their extension.

  13. Spirometry in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Kana Ram

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory disorders are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children. Spirometry is a useful investigation for diagnosing and monitoring a variety of paediatric respiratory diseases, but it is underused by primary care physicians and paediatricians treating children with respiratory disease. We now have a better understanding of respiratory physiology in children, and newer computerised spirometry equipment is available with updated regional reference values for the paediatric age group. This review evaluates the current literature for indications, test procedures, quality assessment, and interpretation of spirometry results in children. Spirometry may be useful for asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital or acquired airway malformations and many other respiratory diseases in children. The technique for performing spirometry in children is crucial and is discussed in detail. Most children, including preschool children, can perform acceptable spirometry. Steps for interpreting spirometry results include identification of common errors during the test by applying acceptability and repeatability criteria and then comparing test parameters with reference standards. Spirometry results depict only the pattern of ventilation, which may be normal, obstructive, restrictive, or mixed. The diagnosis should be based on both clinical features and spirometry results. There is a need to encourage primary care physicians and paediatricians treating respiratory diseases in children to use spirometry after adequate training.

  14. Inhalant allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  16. Preparing Children for Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital or in the neighborhood. Learn more about: Feeding Tips Children's Special Needs Learn more about your child and ... Cardiac Catheterizations Heart Transplants Preparing Children for Surgery - Feeding Tips - Children's Special Needs Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known ... newborns, infants and older children. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  18. America's Children and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protection Agency Search Search America's Children and the Environment (ACE) Contact Us Share ACE presents key information ... of updates to ACE . America's Children and the Environment (ACE) America's Children and the Environment (ACE) is ...

  19. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  20. Strike Laws, Not Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Heather-Jane

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, a coalition of child advocacy groups, the Canadian Foundation for Children, Youth, and the Law, challenged Section 43 of Canada's criminal code, which permits "reasonable force" in disciplining children. The heavily debated issue turns on judges' varied interpretations. A court decision is expected by year's end. (MLH)

  1. Model Children's Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  2. Allergic rhinosinusitis in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    sent in persistent allergic rhinitis will eventually occur in the mucous mem- branes of the ostiomeatal units in the middle meati leading ultimately to allergic inflammation of the sinuses. The other important factor is that sinusi- tis may also occur as a result of viral infections in these allergic children as it does in normal children.

  3. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  5. Children's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Helping Children in Rural Areas Children's Mental Health Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Mental health in childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones, and learning healthy social skills and how to cope when ...

  6. Colorado Children's Budget 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Children's Budget 2010" is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are interested in better understanding how Colorado funds children's programs and services. It attempts to clarify often confusing budget information and describe where the state's investment trends are and where those trends will lead the…

  7. Counseling Abused Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    This guide on counseling abused children was written to help counselors meet the needs of children and adolescents and to provide ways of working with the child's family. Chapter 1 presents an overview of child maltreatment by identifying types of maltreatment (neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, and emotional abuse or neglect)…

  8. Constipation in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in up to one third of children at some stage during their development.1 Up to 25% of children who are referred ... a daily soft bowel action, which should be maintained for at least three months prior to gradual withdrawal while .... intervention as being effective in treatment.10. So what are the cornerstones of treatment?

  9. Teaching Our Homeless Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, George H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

  10. The Punishment of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, T. F.; Smagina, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of punishment including violence are perceived, first and foremost, as in the nature of family relations. The authors' survey focused on children's interaction with their parents, and the risk of violence is clearly present. Russian sociological research on violence against children within families shows a lack of consensus on what…

  11. Children's Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Sarah, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The federal government makes more than 200 distinct investments in children. These include traditional children's initiatives like education and child abuse and neglect prevention. They also include other investments that improve the lives of kids, like Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly Food Stamps). Following a…

  12. Latchkey Children and Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Karen

    Various agencies are attempting to meet the needs of latchkey children through programs run by parent alliances, community organizations, social service agencies, youth groups, schools, businesses, churches, and private day care centers. Studies of latchkey children during the past 15 years have concentrated on measuring the effects of self-care…

  13. Young Children as Curators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Alice

    2018-01-01

    Literature that addresses young children's learning in galleries and museums typically concentrates on what is already offered and discusses what has proven to be effective, or not, in accommodating their needs. This article offers insight into how objects can be explored with early years children at school, to create greater understanding of…

  14. Children, Divorce and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Janice M.

    1981-01-01

    An increasing number of children live in single-parent homes due to the rise in the divorce rate. Teachers must become aware of teaching and counseling approaches which will offset the negative effects of divorce on children and minimize the period of adjustment. (JN)

  15. Divorce and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittleson, Mark J.

    The traumatic effect of divorce on young children is discussed, noting the typical changes in behavior evidenced by children in such a situation. Suggestions are made on ways parents can cope with the child's emotional reactions and alleviate the stress that is natural when a marriage dissolves. (JD)

  16. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005). Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered. PMID:24800202

  17. Being Real for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    1995-01-01

    Because ready role models for today's children are media-created superheroes and celebrities of television and film, children need real-life role models who guide them into realistic personal and social pathways. As principal adult contacts, teachers can be such role models. Specific strategies for encouraging teachers in this role are presented.…

  18. Culture and Children's Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Butterworth, George; Newcombe, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined children's knowledge of cosmology in relation to the shape of the earth and the day-night cycle. Using explicit questioning involving a choice of alternative answers and 3D models, we carried out a comparison of children aged 4-9 years living in Australia and England. Though Australia and England have a close…

  19. Defending America's Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Marian Wright

    1989-01-01

    For imperative moral and practical reasons, our commitment to children must transcend political rhetoric and produce a continuum of programs beginning before birth and sustained until adulthood. Children need defenses against preventable infant mortality, childhood diseases, homelessness, unsafe childcare, and early sex and parenthood. Families…

  20. Children's participation in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström professor m.so., Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the 10 planning of/and participation in both education...

  1. Children's knowledge about medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna B.; Zimmer, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    of the path analytic model analyzed. Children, aged 7 and 10 years, and their primary caregivers were interviewed during 1992 and 1993. Recruiting was done at summer camps in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and environs, resulting in a convenience sample of 101 children, all white and middle class. Ordinary least...

  2. Horses Helping Children Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Louise B.; Lindsey, Allison

    2017-01-01

    A review of Animal-Assisted Therapy and related terms such as "Animal-Assisted Activities" is presented as an introduction to the exploration of additional equine applications with children. Animal-Assisted Therapy has been studied, but Animal-Assisted Activities with children facing normal developmental struggles has not received much…

  3. Adopted Children and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Adopted Children & Discipline Page Content Article Body Some parents are hesitant to discipline the child they have adopted. They may set fewer limits than they would for a birth child. They ...

  4. Dengue in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.M.; Groot, R. de

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and increasing incidence. The vast majority of dengue cases are children less than 15 years of age. Dengue causes a spectrum of illness from mild fever to severe disease with plasma leakage and shock. Infants and children with

  5. Poliomyelitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Koloskova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of poliomyelitis in children. The history of this disease and the current state of morbidity in Ukraine are considered. The features of the clinical pattern in children are described. Diagnostic criteria and treatment methods are presented.

  6. Gifted Children and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody…

  7. CHRONIC CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    E.G. Tsymbalova

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses questions of classification, anatomic and physiological peculiarities and pathogenetic aspects of chronic constipations forming in children. The problems of diagnostics of chronic constipation and its treatment with spasmolytics are analyzed.Key words: children, chronic constipation, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (2): 173–179)

  8. Monitoring asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L P; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Mäkelä, Mika J; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D; Szefler, Stanley J; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2015-04-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist in various combinations in different individuals, to date there is limited evidence on how to integrate these for optimal monitoring of children with asthma. The aims of this ERS Task Force were to describe the current practise and give an overview of the best available evidence on how to monitor children with asthma. 22 clinical and research experts reviewed the literature. A modified Delphi method and four Task Force meetings were used to reach a consensus. This statement summarises the literature on monitoring children with asthma. Available tools for monitoring children with asthma, such as clinical tools, lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammatory markers, are described as are the ways in which they may be used in children with asthma. Management-related issues, comorbidities and environmental factors are summarised. Despite considerable interest in monitoring asthma in children, for many aspects of monitoring asthma in children there is a substantial lack of evidence. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  9. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Renk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005. Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered.

  10. Children's bone health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. van der Sluis (Inge)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis can be divided in two main parts. In the first part (Chapter 2 to 5) bone mineral density, bone metabolism and body composition in healthy children and young adults have been evaluated, while in the second part (Chapter 6 to 10) these issues were studied in children

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  12. Hypercalcemic Disorders in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokes, Victoria J; Nielsen, Morten F; Hannan, Fadil M

    2017-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is defined as a serum calcium concentration that is greater than 2 standard deviations above the normal mean, which in children may vary with age and sex, reflecting changes in the normal physiology at each developmental stage. Hypercalcemic disorders in children may present...... with hypotonia, poor feeding, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, lethargy, polyuria, dehydration, failure to thrive and seizures. In severe cases renal failure, pancreatitis and reduced consciousness may also occur and older children and adolescents may present with psychiatric symptoms. The causes...... of hypercalcemia in children can be classified as parathyroid hormone (PTH)-dependent or PTH-independent, and may be congenital or acquired. PTH-independent hypercalcemia, i.e. hypercalcemia associated with a suppressed PTH, is commoner in children than PTH-dependent hypercalcemia. Acquired causes of PTH...

  13. Children with Usher syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental and behavioral disorders among adults with Usher syndrome have been discussed and reported in some case studies but no research has been reported on children with Usher syndrome. Methods: This article investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mental and behavioral...... disorders among 26 children, 3-17 years of age, with Usher syndrome. Results: Six of the 26 children were diagnosed with a mental or behavioral disorder (1 with schizophrenia and mild mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and severe mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and mild mental retardation......, 1 with mild mental retardation, and 2 with conduct disorder). Another 3 children had had a mental or behavioral disorder previously in their childhood. Conclusion: Even though vision impairment first manifests in late childhood, some children with Usher syndrome seem to develop mental and behavioral...

  14. Pesticides and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garry, Vincent F.

    2004-01-01

    Prevention and control of damage to health, crops, and property by insects, fungi, and noxious weeds are the major goals of pesticide applications. As with use of any biologically active agent, pesticides have unwanted side-effects. In this review, we will examine the thesis that adverse pesticide effects are more likely to occur in children who are at special developmental and behavioral risk. Children's exposures to pesticides in the rural and urban settings and differences in their exposure patterns are discussed. The relative frequency of pesticide poisoning in children is examined. In this connection, most reported acute pesticide poisonings occur in children younger than age 5. The possible epidemiological relationships between parental pesticide use or exposure and the risk of adverse reproductive outcomes and childhood cancer are discussed. The level of consensus among these studies is examined. Current concerns regarding neurobehavioral toxicity and endocrine disruption in juxtaposition to the relative paucity of toxicant mechanism-based studies of children are explored

  15. A Comparative Study of Behavior Problems among Left-Behind Children, Migrant Children and Local Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to estimate the prevalence of behavioral problems among left-behind children, migrant children and local children in China, and to compare the risks of behavioral problems among the three types of children. Data on 4479 children aged 6–16 used in this study were from a survey conducted in China in 2017. The school-age version of the Children Behavior Checklist was used to measure children’s behavioral problems. Descriptive analysis, correlation analysis, and logistic regressions were conducted. The prevalence of behavioral problems was 18.80% and 13.59% for left-behind children and migrant children, respectively, both of which were higher than that of local children. Logistic regression analysis showed that after adjustments for individual and environmental variables, the likelihood of total, internalizing and externalizing behavior problems for left-behind children and migrant children were higher than those for local children; left-behind children had a higher likelihood of internalizing problems than externalizing problems, while migrant children had a higher prevalence of externalizing problems. Left-behind children had a higher prevalence of each specific syndrome than migrant and local children. Both individual and environmental factors were associated with child behavioral problems, and family migration may contribute to the increased risks. Left-behind and migrant children were more vulnerable than local children to behavioral problems.

  16. Informational Books for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Mega Asri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ignorance of reading activity is a result of condition in which people are not accustomed to read because they are not familiar with the culture of writing. It is fueled by the entry of telecommunications technologies and broadcasting, especially children digital native generation. The ability to speak and communicate in children is very influential in the development of social interaction. Besides the language and communication skills are directly related to the process of thinking and developments in the search for solutions to problems in children. Informational books is one medium that can help the development of language and communication skills in children. Informational books can convey knowledge of all the things they want to know the child, about science, about everything that exists and happens around the child to see the writing in a language that has a characteristic and image. The method used is literature study and data collection techniques to conduct a study review of the relevant literature. Informational books children as a means of communication, various forms of media including books have a major influence in shaping attitudes and behavior of children. A wide variety of informational books that has developed its own current trend where its use on children in need of assistance.

  17. Equestrian injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alex G; Wiggins, Alexandra; Chen, Mike K; Kays, David W; Islam, Saleem; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Equestrian activities are regarded by some as high-risk sports, and our recent experience suggested this to be true. We undertook this study to review our experience with pediatric equestrian injuries. After institutional review board approval, we reviewed emergency department and hospital admissions for children 0 to 18 years, with equestrian trauma, over an 11-year period. There were 164 encounters with 135 girls and 29 boys. Most injuries (82%) occurred after falling or being thrown from the animal, and only 12% occurred during jumping or rodeo competitions. The remaining injuries were secondary to being trampled, kicked, or trapped under the animal. Eighty-seven children required hospital admission. Lacerations and contusions (58%) or orthopedic injuries (31%) were most common in the emergency department cohort. In the admission cohort, injury sites included orthopedic (34%), head (23%), abdomen (21%), and chest (11%). Multiple injuries occurred in 13%. A significant number of children required surgical interventions, including 19 orthopedic procedures, 4 laparotomies, 3 facial reconstructions, and 2 craniotomies. The average length of stay was nearly 4 days, with 60% of the children requiring intensive care admission. There were no deaths. One child was discharged to rehab, the rest were sent home. In our experience, more than one third of the children admitted after sustaining injuries in horse-related sports required surgical interventions. Children participating in equestrian activities are at risk for substantial injury, and pediatric care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when evaluating these children.

  18. Benign pneumatosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenton, L.Z.; Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Background. In pediatrics, pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is usually due to necrotizing enterocolitis in premature newborns. Beyond infancy, PI is uncommon. ''Benign pneumatosis'' is PI in patients with few or no symptoms that resolves with conservative management. Objective. Our goal was to better characterize benign PI in children. Our investigation focused on identifying underlying risk factors, symptoms at time of diagnosis, management and outcome. Materials and methods. Available medical records and radiographs of children with pneumatosis intestinalis from 1990 to 1998 were reviewed for underlying conditions, symptoms at time of radiographs, management and outcome. Results. Thirty-seven children (mean age 4 years) were included. Thirty-two children had identifiable risk factors. Twenty -five children were immunocompromised by their underlying conditions or therapeutic regimen. Thirty-five children were managed conservatively with resolution of PI. Two patients, however, required surgery and one patient died. Conclusion. Benign pneumatosis does occur in children. The majority have underlying risk factors, most commonly related to immunosuppression. Clinical deterioration is the most useful indicator for surgical intervention. In most patients PI resolves with conservative management. (orig.)

  19. Detention of Immigrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Julie M; Griffin, Marsha; Shapiro, Alan J

    2017-05-01

    Immigrant children seeking safe haven in the United States, whether arriving unaccompanied or in family units, face a complicated evaluation and legal process from the point of arrival through permanent resettlement in communities. The conditions in which children are detained and the support services that are available to them are of great concern to pediatricians and other advocates for children. In accordance with internationally accepted rights of the child, immigrant and refugee children should be treated with dignity and respect and should not be exposed to conditions that may harm or traumatize them. The Department of Homeland Security facilities do not meet the basic standards for the care of children in residential settings. The recommendations in this statement call for limited exposure of any child to current Department of Homeland Security facilities (ie, Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities) and for longitudinal evaluation of the health consequences of detention of immigrant children in the United States. From the moment children are in the custody of the United States, they deserve health care that meets guideline-based standards, treatment that mitigates harm or traumatization, and services that support their health and well-being. This policy statement also provides specific recommendations regarding postrelease services once a child is released into communities across the country, including a coordinated system that facilitates access to a medical home and consistent access to education, child care, interpretation services, and legal services. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Onychomycosis in Icelandic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurgeirsson, B; Kristinsson, K G; Jonasson, P S

    2006-08-01

    Onychomycosis is a rare disorder in children. Few studies exist on the incidence or prevalence of onychomycosis in children. To examine the epidemiology of childhood onychomycosis in Iceland during the period 1982-2000. Results from all mycological samples taken from children in Iceland from 1982 to 2000 were examined. Information about the requesting physician, unique social security number, date of birth, sex, results of culture and microscopy were registered. Growth of a dermatophyte was taken as an indication of a case of onychomycosis. During the period 1982-2000 a total of 493 samples from 408 Icelandic children, aged 0-17 years, were examined. Dermatophytes were cultured from 148 (30.0%) samples. During the period 1982-85, the mean annual incidence of positive cultures was 1.65 per 100,000, increasing to 21.30 per 100,000 for the years 1996-2000. Trichophyton rubrum was the dominating organism and was found in 102/148 cases positive for the growth of a dermatophyte. The incidence of positive dermatophyte cultures increased with age and was found in eight children aged 0-4, and in 57 children aged 10-14 years. Onychomycosis is rare in children, but increases with age. It seems that onychomycosis increased during the study period, but it is not clear if this was due to a true increase in the prevalence of onychomycosis or an increased awareness of onychomycosis, or both.

  1. Vesicoureteric reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameela A Kari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to identify the differences between primary and secondary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and the effect of associated bladder abnormalities on kidney function. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with VUR who were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. The review included results of radiological investigations and kidney function tests. We used Chi-square test for statistical analysis and paired t-test to compare group means for initial and last creatinine levels. Results: Ninety-nine children were included in this study. Twenty (20.2% had primary VUR, 11 had high-grade VUR, while 9 had low-grade reflux. All children with low-grade VUR had normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. Renal scars were present in 72% of the children with high-grade VUR. The mean creatinine levels (initial and last for both groups were normal. Seventy-nine (79.8% children had secondary VUR, which was due to posterior urethral valves (PUV (46.8%, neurogenic bladder caused by meningomyelocele (25.3%, non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNB (21.5%, or neurogenic bladder associated with prune belly syndrome (6.3%. Children with NNB, meningomyelocele and PUV had high creatinine at presentation with no considerable worsening of their kidney functions during the last visit. Renal scars were present in 49.4% of the children with secondary VUR. Conclusion: Children with primary VUR and normal bladder had good-functioning kidneys, while those with secondary VUR associated with abnormal bladder caused by NNB, spina bifida or PUV had abnormal kidney functions. DMSA scans were useful in predicting higher grades of VUR in children with primary reflux.

  2. Hearing Aid and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Fatahi

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop oral communication, hearing impaired infants and young children must be able to hear speech comfortably and consistently. To day children with all degrees of hearing loss may be condidates for some kinds of amlification. As children differ from adults, many Factors should be consider in hearing aid selection, evaluation and fitting. For example the child age when he or she is candidate for custom instruments? Do we consider programmable Hearing aid? Are multi memory instruments appropriate for them? What about directional microphones? What style of hearing aid do we select? In this paper such questions are Answered.

  3. RECURRENT CROUP IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Piskunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of examination of 1849 children, entering children's infectioushospitalofVladivostokwith the clinical picture of croup of viral etiology. The clinical features of primary and recurrent croup are described. Frequency of recurrent croup inVladivostokis 8%. Children with a recurrent croup had the burdened premorbid background, and also persistent herpetic infections (cytomegalic infection in 42,9% cases, cytomegalic infection in combination with the herpes simplex virus -1. Frequency of croups substantially rose in the period of epidemic of influenza.

  4. Tuberculosis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tania A

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single bacterial pathogen. The World Health Organization estimates that annually 1 million children have tuberculosis (TB) disease and many more harbor a latent form. Accurate estimates are hindered by under-recognition and challenges in diagnosis. To date, an accurate diagnostic test to confirm TB in children does not exist. Treatment is lengthy but outcomes are generally favorable with timely initiation. With the End TB Strategy, there is an urgent need for improved diagnostics and treatment to prevent the unnecessary morbidity and mortality from TB in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Testing children for allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, P A; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; O'B Hourihane, J

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases are common in childhood and can cause a significant morbidity and impaired quality-of-life of the children and their families. Adequate allergy testing is the prerequisite for optimal care, including allergen avoidance, pharmacotherapy and immunotherapy. Children with persisting...... or recurrent or severe symptoms suggestive for allergy should undergo an appropriate diagnostic work-up, irrespective of their age. Adequate allergy testing may also allow defining allergic trigger in common symptoms. We provide here evidence-based guidance on when and how to test for allergy in children based...

  6. Environmental Design for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mary, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The special issue of the journal, Children in Contemporary Society, contains 17 brief articles on environmental design for young handicapped and normal children. Articles have the following titles: "Introduction", "Environmental Design and Architecture", "Why Is Environmental Design Important to Young Children", "Children's Hospital National…

  7. Cohabitation and Children's Family Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Raley, R.; Wildsmith, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This study estimates how much children's family instability is missed when we do not count transitions into and out of cohabitation, and examines early life course trajectories of children to see whether children who experience maternal cohabitation face more family instability than children who do not. Using data from the 1995 National Survey of…

  8. Children and Grief. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Nancy

    Noting that the death of a loved one brings grief to children as well as adults, this Digest draws on research to examine how children respond to death and the role of parents and teachers in helping children cope with loss. The Digest delineates children's "tasks" during mourning that are essential to their adjustment to loss, such as…

  9. Seeing Children's Pleasure with Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Deb

    2010-01-01

    Children's relationship with food in early childhood programs is often a complex topic. Families have concerns about "picky eaters" and teachers feel pressure to make sure that children eat enough while in their care. Children bring snacks that teachers describe as junk food and believe this negatively impacts children's behavior. Foods marketed…

  10. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  11. Children's Literature on Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, James

    Children's literature is simple discussion of complicated issues. Neutron stars are discussed in several children's books. Using libraries in Chicago, I will review children's books on neutron stars and compare the literature to literature from scientific discussions of neutron stars on sites like the Chandra site, Hubble Space Telescope site and NASA site. The result will be a discussion of problems and issues involved in discussion of neutron stars. Do children's books leave material out? Do children's books discuss recent observations? Do children's books discuss anything discredited or wrong? How many children's books are in resources like World Cat, the Library of Congress catalog, and the Chicago Public Library catalog? Could children's books be useful to present some of your findings or observations or projects? Children's books are useful for both children and scientist as they present simplified discussion of topics, although sometimes issues are simplified too much.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including the: kidneys and bladder. bones. liver and ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  13. Secondhand Smoke and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smoking also is associated with neonatal death from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, the major cause of death ... fluid are the most common cause of children’s hearing loss. When they do not respond to medical treatment, ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... supplements and if he or she has any allergies. Also inform your doctor of any recent illnesses ...

  15. Building Resilience in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to succeed in life. That is why Kenneth Ginsburg, M.D., MS Ed, FAAP, a pediatrician specializing ... resilience in children, teens, and young adults. Dr. Ginsburg has identified seven “C”s of resilience, recognizing that “ ...

  16. Children in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløvgaard, Marius; Nielsen, Nina Odgaard; Sørensen, Thomas Lund

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of Greenlandic children's disease pattern and contacts to the health care system are sparse and have focused on the primary health care sector. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify the disease pattern and use of health care facilities of children aged 0-10 in two Greenlandic...... cohorts. METHODS AND DESIGN: In a retrospective, descriptive follow-up of the Ivaaq (The Greenland Child Cohort) and the CLEAR (climate changes, environmental contaminants and reproductive health) birth cohorts (total n=1,000), we reviewed medical records of children aged 6-10 in 2012 with residence...... in Nuuk or Ilulissat (n=332). Data on diseases and health care system contacts were extracted. Diagnoses were validated retrospectively. Primary health care contacts were reviewed for a random sample of 1:6. RESULTS: In 311 children with valid social security number, the total number of health care system...

  17. Headache in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soee, Ann Britt L; Skov, Liselotte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article is to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific multidisciplinary treatment programme for children with headache and to describe the concept and settings of the Children's Headache Clinic in Denmark. Method: All new patients were included and evaluations were conducted...... after six and 12 months. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments were offered by a team of specialists (physicians, headache nurses, a physiotherapist and a psychologist). Patients: The subjects comprised 169 children (mean age 11.7 (range 4-17), 91 females, 78 males), 39% of whom suffered...... from chronic headache (≥15 days/month). All children were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition; 20% had migraine, 34% tension-type headache, 27% mixed headache, 4% medication- overuse headache, and 15% were diagnosed with other types of headaches...

  18. Teaching minority children hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rheinländer, Thilde; Samuelsen, Helle; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Ethnic minority children in Vietnam experience high levels of hygiene- and sanitation-related diseases. Improving hygiene for minority children is therefore vital for improving child health. The study objective was to investigate how kindergarten and home environments influence...... the learning of hygiene of pre-school ethnic minority children in rural Vietnam. Design. Eight months of ethnographic field studies were conducted among four ethnic minority groups living in highland and lowland communities in northern Vietnam. Data included participant observation in four kindergartens and 20...... homes of pre-school children, together with 67 semi-structured interviews with caregivers and five kindergarten staff. Thematic analysis was applied and concepts of social learning provided inputs to the analysis. Findings. This study showed that poor living conditions with lack of basic sanitation...

  19. Giving Medicine to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Articulos en Espanol Giving Medicine to Children Share Tweet ... right medicine and the right amount More in Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos ...

  20. Treating Children as Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... her own style and needs, initially because of birth order and inborn traits, and later because of experiences. ... appropriately for their child's developmental age and needs. Birth order and family size also influence your children's development. ...

  1. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano T. DeMarco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of pediatric stone disease has evolved significantly over the last three decades. Prior to the introduction of shockwave lithotripsy (SWL in the 1980s, open lithotomy was the lone therapy for children with upper tract calculi. Since then, SWL has been the procedure of choice in most pediatric centers for children with large renal calculi. While other therapies such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL were also being advanced around the same time, PNL was generally seen as a suitable therapy in adults because of the concerns for damage in the developing kidney. However, recent advances in endoscopic instrumentation and renal access techniques have led to an increase in its use in the pediatric population, particularly in those children with large upper tract stones. This paper is a review of the literature focusing on the indications, techniques, results, and complications of PNL in children with renal calculi.

  2. Preschool Children with ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    Differences in behavioral, social, and school functioning of 58 preschool-age (3 -5 years) children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 36 normal controls were examined at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.

  3. Children and IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as: Calcium gylcerophosphate (Prelief) Yoga Relaxation techniques Pelvic floor physical therapy Oral IC therapies for children with IC include ... Prostatitis Constipation Endometriosis Fibromyalgia Irritable Bowel ... Polysulfate Sodium Bladder Instillations Immunosuppresants ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  5. Children with Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addition in elementary school cannot understand algebra in high school. The child, trying very hard to learn, becomes more and more frustrated, and develops emotional problems such as low self-esteem in the face of repeated failure. Some children ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) ... molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beforehand, especially if sedation is to be used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  8. Pityriasis Versicolor in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Miskeen

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available A six year survey revealed 132 cases of pityriasis versicolor in children below 10 years of age. This constituted 6.70/o of all cases of pityriasis versicol and 24.8 % of cutaneous

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... stool. Your child should also drink plenty of water to help flush the radioactive material from his ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ... with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  11. Healthy Environments for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BY POISONOUS FUMES! ...PLAYTIME ACCIDENTS... NO SWIMMING ...AND DROWNING!! 11 SO, WITH SO MANY DANGERS, WHAT CAN ... BE WELL VENTILATED! AND SMOKERS SHOULD AVOID SMOKING NEAR CHILDREN! WE MUST TAKE CARE TO PREVENT DISEASES ...

  12. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gastón

    2012-05-01

    Hypertensive crisis is rare in children and is usually secondary to an underlying disease. There is strong evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the genesis of hypertensive crisis. An important principle in the management of children with hypertensive crisis is to determine if severe hypertension is chronic, acute, or acute-on-chronic. When it is associated with signs of end-organ damage such as encephalopathy, congestive cardiac failure or renal failure, there is an emergent need to lower blood pressures to 25-30% of the original value and then accomplish a gradual reduction in blood pressure. Precipitous drops in blood pressure can result in impairment of perfusion of vital organs. Medications commonly used to treat hypertensive crisis in children are nicardipine, labetalol and sodium nitroprusside. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and recent developments in management of hypertensive crisis in children.

  13. Evacuation of Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larusdottir, Aldis Run

    Saving human lives is the highest priority in case of fire, according to fire codes around the world. Codes state that everyone should be able to escape to safety in case of fire. In order to design buildings that enable this the available safe egress time (ASET) must be held up against...... is to provide new data and information on children’s evacuation, which is a step towards including children in evacuation models and calculations. Little is known about children’s evacuation characteristics in fire compared to other parts of the population. In recent years there has been more focus on children......, indicating that an alarm with audio signal is preferable to a light signal only or no alarm at all. Children’s evacuation cannot be described using adults’ evacuation models throughout. Young children are slower than adults and travel speed increases with age. At the age of 12 years children can be described...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... computer aids in creating the images from the data obtained by the gamma camera. A probe is ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to help ... children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or hand. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. ... or hand. Children should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to the exam, but they may be given ...

  18. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... childhood. The pediatrician will most often draw the child's growth curve on a growth chart . Children with growth ... Most cases are not preventable. Review your child's growth chart ... child's growth rate, evaluation by a specialist is recommended.

  19. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including ...

  1. Parental Investments in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Esping-Andersen, Gösta

    This study examines parental time investment in their children, distinguishing between developmental and non-developmental care. Our analyses centre on three influential determinants: educational background, marital homogamy, and spouses’ relative bargaining power. We find that the emphasis on qu...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to ...

  3. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000505.htm Urinary tract infection - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection is an infection of the urinary tract. This ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... into the kidney (reflux). bone cancer, infections and trauma. gastrointestinal bleeding and motility. tumors and the spread of cancerous cells in the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid ...

  5. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... months to 1 year. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association recommend scheduling a ... age children and adolescents. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends scheduling regular dental checkups, with the most ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need sedation for the imaging. During this procedure, parents are usually allowed and often encouraged to stay ... discomfort from having to remain still during imaging. Parents are encouraged to stay with their children to ...

  7. Sexual Abuse of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1988-01-01

    Canadian reports and legislation are reviewed to highlight the school's role in prevention and reporting of suspicions of child sexual abuse. The vulnerability of handicapped children and child pornography are two areas of victimization emphasized. (Author/DB)

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be placed into the bladder, which may cause temporary discomfort. It is important that your child ... images are being recorded. Though nuclear imaging itself causes no pain, children may experience some discomfort from ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child is taking as well as vitamins and herbal supplements and if he or she has any ... What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... techniques for a variety of indications, and the functional information gained from nuclear medicine exams is often ...

  11. Talipes equinovarus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timaev M.Kh.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research goal of the review is to present data on etiology, prevalence, classification of different types TEN/ in children. Mechanisms of pathological foot type, indications for conservative and surgical methods of treatment have been analyzed.

  12. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000127.htm Epilepsy in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  13. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  16. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  17. Consumption and Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Ejrnæs, Mette

    2009-01-01

    supply. We develop two tests of the extreme hypothesis that only changes in family structure matter. We estimate effects of the numbers and ages of children on consumption. These estimates allow us to rationalize all of the increase in consumption without recourse to any of the causal mechanisms. Our...... estimates can be interpreted either as giving upper bounds on the effects of children or as evidence that the other causes are not important....

  18. Polyps in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Adolph, Vincent R.; Bernabe, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Children with polyps usually present with bleeding or pain. Most pediatric intestinal polyps are sporadic and are not associated with malignancy. Polyposis syndromes are also well described in children. Peutz–Jeghers syndrome is the most common hamartomatous polyposis condition. Although the polyps are not thought to be premalignant in most patients, there is an increased risk of other cancers. Familial adenomatous polyposis is also seen in childhood and is associated with a very high risk of...

  19. Children's participation in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Danholt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Teledialogue is a combined research and design project aimed at improving communications between social workers and children under their custody living in foster care or youth institutions. While social workers are responsible for the welfare of placed children they are under heavy workload...... that children’s participation unfolds throughout the entire project; it shapes funding proposals, research problems and design activities and is, in turn, itself being shaped by these....

  20. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  1. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  2. Illustration in children's literature

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Pascolati

    2017-01-01

    Since the origins of children's literature, the image plays an important role in the construction of the meanings of this literary text, but its participation in the children's book goes from mere coadjuvant to primacy in relation to the written word. In line with the growth of the publishing production of picture books, its presence in the classroom and theoretical-critical reflections about its contribution to literary reading, I develop here some ideas about different roles played by the i...

  3. Snoring in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasneek; Waters, Karen Ann

    2015-09-01

    Chronic snoring (≥4 nights per week) is not benign. Otherwise healthy children with chronic snoring and evidence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy can be referred directly for adenotonsillectomy. Snoring children snoring or without significant medical comorbidities can be managed with a combination of medical and surgical interventions listed herein. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  4. Symptomatic epilepsy in children

    OpenAIRE

    Еlaginykh E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Research goals were to evaluate the etiological structure of symptomatic epilepsy in children, age structure of period of disease manifestation, average length of latent period among children with different characters of lesions, dependence between frequency of seizures and character of lesion. Material and methods. A total of 180 case-records of patients with symptomatic epilepsy were analyzed by the next criteria: anamnesis, materials of electroencephalogram and neurovisualization. Results....

  5. Sleep disorders in children

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Paul; Dunne, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disorders may affect 20-30% of young children, and include excessive daytime sleepiness, problems getting to sleep (dysomnias), or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors, and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. Other risk factors include the child being the first born, having a difficult temperament or having had colic, and increased maternal responsiveness.

  6. Sleep disorders in children

    OpenAIRE

    Bruni, Oliveiero; Novelli, Luana

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disorders may affect between 20% and 30% of young children, and include problems getting to sleep (dyssomnias) or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. Other risk factors include the child being the first born, having a difficult temperament or having had colic, and increased maternal responsiveness.

  7. CHILDREN AS TARGET MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    SOMESFALEAN Vasilica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the reasons that lead marketers to give greater importance to children, how to explain this increased potential that children have on the existing market and strategies that marketers and companies use in order to reach this market. To this end we analyzed a series of articles, studies and research conducted on the subject, with implications in psychology, sociology, but especially in marketing. The results obtained show very interesting issues regard...

  8. Mobile telephony and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karipidis, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the possibility of adverse health effects related to radiofrequency (RF) radiation exposure from mobile phones and their associated base stations. Of particular public concern in this context are children. In its report the Independent Expert Group on Mobile Phones (IEGMP) recommended that the widespread use of mobile phones by children should be discouraged citing that children may be more vulnerable because of their developing nervous system, their greater absorption of energy in the tissue of the head and a longer lifetime of exposure. However, more recently the Health Council of the Netherlands disagreed with the IEGMP and concluded that there is no convincing scientific data to restrict children from using mobile phones. The World Health Organization states that none of there centre views have found that exposure to the RF fields form mobile phones or their base stations causes any adverse health consequence. However there has been limited scientific research specifically focussed on children. Future research will be required to address the issue of mobile telephony and children. Copyright (2004) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  9. To children with love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K T

    1995-01-01

    People debating population growth in India and why adults in India choose to bear so many children seem to either not understand or overlook that people in India like children; the more the better. Indeed, children interest every Indian, with new mothers receiving advice on baby care from all quarters. The child is king in India, spoiled, but generally well-behaved. It could be that children receive so much attention from many loving relatives that they do not need to act out in order to get attention. Having a child is the focus and meaning of married life. Without a child, life loses its color and joy. Moreover, childless couples face the insecurity of not having children to care for them once they grow old. The author notes her failure to observe children who were poorly adjusted and sad because they habitually shared a bed with their parents. As concerned individuals ponder the perils of global population growth, they might consider the merit of the Indian view on the subject.

  10. TUBERCULOSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB in children is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic despite it constituting 20% or more of all TB cases in many countries with high TB incidence. Childhood TB is a direct consequence of adult TB but remains overshadowed by adult TB because it is usually smear-negative. Infants and young children are more likely to develop life-threatening forms of TB than older children and adults due to their immature immune systems. Therefore, prompt diagnoses are extremely important although difficult since clinical and radiological signs of TB can be non-specific and variable in children. Despite undeniable advances in identifying definite, probable, or possible TB markers, pediatricians still face many problems when diagnosing TB diagnosis. Moreover, curing TB can be difficult when treatment is delayed and when multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens are the cause of the disease. In these cases, the prognosis in children is particularly poor because MDR-TB treatment and treatment duration remain unclear. New studies of diagnostic tests and optimal treatment in children are urgently needed with the final goal of developing an effective anti-TB vaccine.

  11. Heelys injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, D; Arjandas, M; Lim, K B L; Lee, E H

    2006-05-01

    Heelys, a type of shoes with stealth wheels, are extremely popular among children in Singapore. The widespread availability of cheap imitations has led to a proliferation of young users. Coupled with a total lack of safety equipment and instructions, these shoes can lead to significant injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and type of injuries sustained by children using Heelys. During a seven-month period from February to August 2004, all children treated at the Paediatric Orthopaedic Department of the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, were asked if the injury was sustained while "heeling". All the patients were reviewed by the authors. A total of 37 patients with significant injuries sustained while "heeling" were identified. Their radiographs and clinical charts were reviewed. The patients and/or their parents were also interviewed to obtain additional information. Upper limb injuries were by far the most common. Distal radius fractures and elbow injuries predominated. None of the children used safety gear. "Heeling" can lead to serious injuries despite the relatively low velocity involved. Children and their parents need to be educated on the use of safety gear.

  12. Children as digital rights agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    2016-01-01

    the role of the “adult world” is. We need to focus more on the active role that children and adolescents play, according to age, skills and various capacities, in identifying, reflecting upon and acting according to opportunities and challenges in relation to digital media and digital rights (Hartman et al...... 2007). The paper presents a model for analyzing the intersecting levels of children as agents in relation to digital risks and rights: Children as peer-to-peer agents. Children provide mutual practical guidance; experience sharing; advice. re. to risk and harm. Children as advocates/ politicians....... Children participate in youth parliaments; media councils; Safer Internet day; IGF; NGOs, Children as informants. Children contribute to research; media coverage; content providers; reporters (of negative content/ behavior The model is primarily supported by empirical data from the Net Children Go Mobile...

  13. Children at health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, H R

    1992-01-01

    In India, 69% of the children of the working class die, most of whom are child laborers. Economic pressure forces parents to make their children work. Employers want child workers because they can manipulate them and pay them low wages, thereby ensuring their viability. The caste system induces social inequality, inheritance invokes cultural inequality, and patriarchal socialization is responsible for gender inequality, all of which perpetuates exploitation of children by employers. In Sivakasi, an estimated 125,000 children make up the child labor force, comprising 30% of the entire labor force. 75% are from the lowest castes. 90% of child workers are girls because they are more obedient and accept even lower wages than boys, and girls need to save for their dowry. Girls often suffer verbal and physical abuse. Like their parents who were also child workers, child workers are illiterate and work long hours. A small rich elite in Sivakasi controls most of the trading and industrial capital, educational institutions, and voluntary organizations. Employers' agents give parents a loan and use their children's labor as security. Each day, they bring child workers to Sivakasi in factory buses from villages to work at least 12 hour days. They work under hazardous conditions, e.g., working with toxic chemicals. Coughing, sore throat, dizziness, methemoglobinemia, and anemia are common effects of ingestion or inhalation of chlorate dust. Inhalation of sulphur dust causes respiratory infections, eye infections, and chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma). Fires and explosions are common risks for working children. Factory management seldom undertake fire prevention measures. An extensive survey of the problem of child labor is needed in Sivakasi before systematic planning to protect children could be done. Overall development, especially agricultural development, is needed. Parents, employers, enforcement authorities, trade unions, and social groups need to be sensitized to the

  14. FERTILITY, CHILD LABOUR AND MIGRATION OF AGRICULTURAL DAY LABORERS (AS OF COFFEE IN THECROSS-BORDER SPACE MEXICO-GUATEMALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austreberta Nazar-Beutelspacher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chiapas as the border departments of Guatemala is characterized as an area of socio-economic backwardness. Since the twentieth century a significant flow of undocumented Guatemalan migrant families are temporarily employed in Mexican coffee plantations in the Soconusco region, mostly from the poorest and most marginalized rural sectors from the border Guatemalan departments. This paper estimates the marital Total Fertility Rate and explores the reproductive characteristics of Guatemalan agricultural laborers families. The Global marital fertility rate is high (5.65 children per woman on average at the end of their reproductive life with an increasing trend. It is argued that a high number of children in these families are functional for them, since they require the family labor for their survival. In this cross-border area are articulated by child labor, high fertility of Guatemalan rural migrants, due to the political and socioeconomic conditions of Guatemala, and the development needs of the agricultural export capital coffee in Mexico, permanently driven by the Mexican government.

  15. Sleep disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Karen A; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nixon, Gillian M

    2013-10-21

    Sleep disorders are very common in childhood and are often amenable to simple advice and parental education. Questions about sleep should be an integral part of every paediatric consultation. Children with underlying syndromes or complex medical conditions often have multiple sleep issues. Excessive sleepiness in children requires careful history-taking and consideration of specialised investigation. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common condition in childhood with important health implications. The high prevalence of OSA warrants rigorous attempts to identify children at higher risk and manage them appropriately. Adenotonsillectomy is a highly efficacious therapy for paediatric OSA. A current major issue is to improve ways of distinguishing mild from severe OSA before a child undergoes adenotonsillectomy, as those with more severe disease are at increased risk of postoperative complications and should undergo adenotonsillectomy in a tertiary centre. Children with obesity and other comorbid conditions are at increased risk of persisting OSA despite adenotonsillectomy. Topical (nasal) steroids and/or anti-inflammatory agents have a role in the non-surgical treatment of mild OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure and orthodontic interventions are treatment options for treatment of persisting OSA in children.

  16. Trichotillomania in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Novak, Jeroen; Iorizzo, Matilde; Grimalt, Ramon; Oranje, Arnold P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichotillomania is an often underdiagnosed condition. Little is known about trichotillomania in childhood. We aimed to analyze the characteristics of children with trichotillomania to increase information on this condition. Methods A retrospective study of an electronic database was performed in a tertiary children's hospital. Information from patients with trichotillomania was systematically classified under the categories ‘who’, ‘what’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, and ‘how’. Results A total of 33 patients had a diagnosis of trichotillomania (28 females, 5 males; peak age between 3 and 4 years). Scalp involvement was most common and nail biting was observed in 5 patients. Only 51.5% of patients had parents who noticed their child's hairpulling. Hair on or under the bed was the most common clue suggesting that hairpulling occurred. Triggering factors identified in 16 children included physical appearance, family-related issues, school-related issues, and concurrent illness. The noninvasive hair pull test was negative in all children. There was a high non-follow-up rate, and treatment outcomes varied. Conclusion A set of 6 specific questions, based on the ‘5Ws and 1H’ principle, facilitates the gathering of important information on children with unexplained nonscarring hair loss and helps clinicians be cognizant of possible outcomes of trichotillomania. This will be especially useful to clinicians who are not familiar with this elusive condition. PMID:27172263

  17. Preputial retraction in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Abhinav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess preputial retractability in children at various ages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty boys attending the hospital were included in the study. Children with hypospadias or history of preputial manipulation were excluded. Preputial anatomy was studied and subjects were classified into five groups as described by Kayaba et al . RESULTS: The prepuce could not be retracted at all so as to make even the external urethral meatus visible in 61.4% children aged 0-6 months while this decreased to only 0.9% in children aged 10-12 years. At the other end of the spectrum, while prepuce could not be fully retracted in any child below 6 months, it could be done in about 60% in the age group of 10-12 years. CONCLUSION Preputial nonseparation is the major cause of preputial nonretraction in the pediatric age group. Prepuce spontaneously separates from the glans as age increases and true phimosis is rare in children. Surgical intervention should be avoided for nonseparation of prepuce.

  18. Playground injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeini, Hassan Sadeghi; Lindqvist, Kent; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Mirlohi, Amir Hossein; Dalal, Koustuv

    2011-06-24

    Rapid urbanization and unplanned population development can be detrimental to the safety of citizens, with children being a particularly vulnerable social group. In this review, we assess childhood playground injuries and suggest safety mechanisms which could be incorporated into playground planning. Inclusion criteria were "children" as the focus group, "playground" as the main field of study, and "unintentional injury" and "safety" as the concepts of study. The keywords used for the PubMed search were "playground", "children", and "injury". Initially we 182 articles. After screening according to inclusion criteria, 86 articles were found, and after reading the abstracts and then the full text, 14 articles were finally included for analysis. The papers reviewed included four case-control studies, three case studies, three descriptive studies, two interventional studies, one retrospective study, one cross-sectional study, and one systematic review. Playground-related fractures were the most common accidents among children, underscoring the importance of safety promotion and injury prevention in playgrounds, lowrisk equipment and playing hours (week days associated with higher risk), implementation of standards, preventing falls and fall-related fractures, and addressing concerns of parents about unsafe neighborhoods. With the exception of one study, all of the reviewed papers had not implemented any practical safety plan. Safe engineering approaches were also ignored. We recommend a systematic safety approach based on the "safety circle" which includes three main areas, ie, equipment, environment, and children.

  19. Marketing foods to children: a comparison of nutrient content between children's and non-children's products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, Amelia; Roberts, Caireen; Madden, Angela M; Rennie, Kirsten L

    2013-12-01

    The predominance of marketing of products high in fat, sugar and/or salt to children has been well documented and implicated in the incidence of obesity. The present study aimed to determine whether foods marketed to children in UK supermarkets are nutritionally similar to the non-children's equivalent, focusing on food categories that may be viewed as healthier options. Nutritional data were collected on yoghurts (n 147), cereal bars (n 145) and ready meals (n 144) from seven major UK supermarkets and categorised as children's or non-children's products based on the characteristics, promotional nature or information on the product packaging. Fat, sugar and salt content was compared per 100 g and per recommended portion size. UK. Per 100 g, children's yoghurts and cereal bars were higher in total sugars, fat and saturated fat than the non-children's; this was significant for all except sugar and total fat in cereal bars. Per portion these differences remained, except for sugars in yoghurts. Conversely children's ready meals were significantly lower in these nutrients per portion than non-children's, but not when expressed per 100 g. Children's yoghurts and ready meals had significantly lower sodium content than non-children's both per portion and per 100 g. Significant differences between the nutritional composition of children's and non-children's products were observed but varied depending on the unit reference. A significant number of products marketed towards children were higher in fat, sugar and salt than those marketed to the general population.

  20. Terrorism, Trauma and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjai, M M; Chandrashekhar, N; Raju, Uma; Jog, S S; Arora, P

    2005-10-01

    Terrorist attacks, armed conflict and all forms of catastrophe, tax our ability to cope, understand and respond to the situation. Children are more vulnerable. 16 children, victims of a terrorist attack in an army residential camp were managed for their physical injuries and evaluated for psychological trauma. All patients recovered from physical injuries, except one baby of two months, who died due to severe chest trauma. 5 children presented with Acute Stress Reaction. 3 recovered well and two, showed persistent poor scholastic performance even after one year. A terrorist attack, not only results in physiscal scars but also causes psychological trauma, which requires emotional support and needs to be followed up on a long term basis.

  1. Spinal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.; Carty, H.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  2. [Cataract surgery in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, S

    2000-01-01

    Cataract extraction in children has improved and became more popular over the past few decades but, due to particular features of children's eyes, still remains controversial--especially regarding the intraocular lens implantation. In contrast to adults, indications for cataract surgery in children are much more difficult to determine. Since subjective visual acuity cannot be obtained, greater reliance must be placed on the morphology and location of the lens opacity, and the behavior of the child. Forced preferential looking and visual evoked potentials can be helpful, but they should not be the only criteria. In management of pediatric cataract, correction of postoperative aphakia is still an incompletely resolved problem. Conventionally, optical correction is achieved by spectacles or contact lenses. The power of both spectacles and contact lenses can be readily adjusted to compensate for ocular growth. The success of both depends significantly on parental compliance and the child's acceptance. Hutchinson reported that 44% children with aphakia stopped wearing glasses or contact lenses 2 months after surgery. Contact lens wearing can also result in a number of corneal complications, including infectious keratitis, corneal vascularization and hypoxic corneal ulceration. IOL implantation is theoretically superior to glasses and contact lenses since it provides almost immediate optical correction which is much more reliable because it does not depend on parental or child's compliance. Still, there are many controversies about IOL implantation in infants and young children like IOL-size, material, IOL power calculation, prevention and management of secondary cataract, as well as long term safety of IOLs in children's eyes. Although short-term anatomic results after cataract extraction and primary IOL implantation in children are excellent and stable, long-term follow-up is necessary to answer questions about the long-term safety of implants in children's eyes. A

  3. Illustration in children's literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Pascolati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the origins of children's literature, the image plays an important role in the construction of the meanings of this literary text, but its participation in the children's book goes from mere coadjuvant to primacy in relation to the written word. In line with the growth of the publishing production of picture books, its presence in the classroom and theoretical-critical reflections about its contribution to literary reading, I develop here some ideas about different roles played by the illustration in children's literature. To do so, I analyze some books in which the images have a preponderant role in the narrative progression, the construction of characters and the revelation of the child's perspective on the world.

  4. Thinking of the children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Universal Children's Day is organized each year by the United Nations Children's Fund to draw attention to the desperate plight of millions of babies and young people throughout the world. The date this year in most countries is 2 October. Despite all the efforts of UNICEF and other agencies including the IAEA, it is estimated that there are still 300 000 000 children who either cannot find enough food to stave off hunger, or who cannot obtain the protein which will keep them healthy and alert. Many advances have been made in helping to make crops more abundant, in developing protein content of foods and in dealing with the diseases arising from malnutrition. Our photograph was taken in Jamaica, where investigations into malnutrition and its effects are being made by the UK Medical Research Council under an IAEA research contract

  5. Environmental Protection Agency, Protecting Children's Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agency Search Search Contact Us Share Protecting Children's Environmental Health Children are often more vulnerable to pollutants ... during development. Learn more about children's health, the environment, and what you can do. Basic Information Children ...

  6. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  7. Restorative Justice in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Katrin; Jensen, Keith; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-06-29

    An important, and perhaps uniquely human, mechanism for maintaining cooperation against free riders is third-party punishment. Our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, will not punish third parties even though they will do so when personally affected. Until recently, little attention has been paid to how punishment and a sense of justice develop in children. Children respond to norm violations. They are more likely to share with a puppet that helped another individual as opposed to one who behaved harmfully, and they show a preference for seeing a harmful doll rather than a victim punished. By 6 years of age, children will pay a cost to punish fictional and real peers, and the threat of punishment will lead preschoolers to behave more generously. However, little is known about what motivates a sense of justice in children. We gave 3- and 5-year-old children--the youngest ages yet tested--the opportunity to remove items and prevent a puppet from gaining a reward for second- and third-party violations (experiment 1), and we gave 3-year-olds the opportunity to restore items (experiment 2). Children were as likely to engage in third-party interventions as they were when personally affected, yet they did not discriminate among the different sources of harm for the victim. When given a range of options, 3-year-olds chose restoration over removal. It appears that a sense of justice centered on harm caused to victims emerges early in childhood and highlights the value of third-party interventions for human cooperation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary school children\\'s perspectives on common diseases and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Existing school health programmes in Uganda target children above five years for de-worming, oral hygiene and frequent vaccination of girls of reproductive age. Objective:To assess primary school children\\'s perspectives on common diseases they experience and medicines used in order to suggest reforms ...

  9. Connecting Children's Stories to Children's Literature: Meeting Diversity Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Amour, Melissa J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a method for increasing elementary school children's multicultural awareness by sharing their own written stories in the context of multicultural children's literature. Describes how classroom activities can promote multicultural awareness through by allowing children to practice democracy, analyze the circumstances of one's life;…

  10. Profiles of Children: 1970 White House Conference on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This book of charts of comparative statistics was compiled to help the 1970 White House Conference on Children evaluate past efforts to improve the well-being of America's children. First, it presents data about aspects of the world into which American children are born, such as population, urbanization, income levels, incidence of disease,…

  11. Immigration Enforcement Practices Harm Refugee Children and Citizen-Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Luis H.

    2018-01-01

    Aggressive immigration enforcement hurts the very youngest children. Refugee and U.S.-born children of undocumented immigrants experience many childhood adversities, compromising their development and health. Refugee children flee traumatizing violence in their home countries, face grueling migrations, and are harmed further by being held in…

  12. Impact of the Children's Television Act on Children's Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Sandra; Kotler, Jennifer; Kuhl, Alison; Riboli, Michael

    The impact of the Children's Television Act, which requires broadcasters to provide educational and informational programs for children, was examined by having 141 second through sixth graders watch 16 popular and unpopular television programs and then assess the motivational appeal of, and children's learning from, these programs. Popular and…

  13. LACTASE DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article is the lactase deficiency in children. The most frequent clinical manifestations — diarrhea and flatulence —are not specific to this pathology. Symptoms, typical for the majority of the diseases nosologies of the digestive system, lack of timely laboratory diagnosis, and, often, lack of pediatricians awareness about the specifics of this disease are the cause of lactase deficiency under-diagnostics. The article describes in detail the physiopathological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and dietary correction of lactase deficiency, the data concerning the prevalence of this disease are cited.Key words: lactose, lactase deficiency, children, health food.

  14. Hepatic tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, J T

    2001-02-01

    Although they account for only 1% to 4% of solid tumors in children, hepatic tumors and pseudotumors offer a diagnostic challenge to the clinician seeing only an occasional case. Metastatic lesions such as neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, and lymphoma are the most common neoplasm seen in the liver, but 10 distinct primary tumors and pseudotumors of the liver occur with some regularity, and a few others may be seen rarely, including leiomyosarcoma, rhabdoid tumor, and endodermal sinus tumor. Five of these neoplasms--hepatoblastoma, infantile hemangio-endothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree--occur only in children and are the major focus of the article.

  15. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with an increased number of days lost from school, exacerbations and days in hospital. Furthermore, children with uncontrolled asthma have more frequent contacts with the health-care system. Recent...... have been developed. They are all based on various questionnaires, but their validation has been difficult because we have no golden standard to compare with. It seems as if the tests are most valuable when they suggest that the disease is poorly controlled because a large proportion of children...

  16. Children and chiropractic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Hestbaek, Lise

    2009-01-01

    care profession has convincingly assumed the responsibility of spinal and musculoskeletal health for children. Considering the magnitude of the challenges ahead for both researchers and clinicians, this may be a good opportunity for doctors of chiropractic to take responsibility and engage...... in a determined effort to bring forward evidence-based strategies for prevention of spinal pain and other musculoskeletal problems. Chiropractors may play a significant role in finding and implementing evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies aimed at infants, children, and adolescents....

  17. When cities move children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant Klinker, Charlotte; Schipperijn, Jasper; Toftager, Mette

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel method to assess context-specific physical activity patterns using accelerometer and GPS. The method efficiency is investigated by providing descriptive results on the use of domains and subdomains, and assessing how much of children's and adolescents' daily activity...... time can be classified by these domains and subdomains. Four domains and 11 subdomains were defined as important contexts for child and adolescent behaviour. During weekdays (n=367) and weekend days (n=178) the majority of children and adolescents spent time in active transport, urban green space...

  18. Trichotillomania in Iranian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Tarighati

    1986-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports trichotillomania in eight Iranian children (7 girls and 1 boy .It is rarely seen in children and adolescents. Although some subjects are psychiatrically normal, but some suffer from depressive disorder, neurosis, or personality problems. Separation from key figure, denial of femininity/and inadequate mother-child relationship play important roles either in the etiology of trichotillomania or psychiatric disorders. Finally therapeutic interventi.ons according to the cultural factors were mentioned. Associate Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Tehran Univer sity. Formerly, chief, Child Psychiatric Dept. Roozbeh Hospital Teheran University, Medical School.

  19. Hematogenous osteomyelitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Halken, S; Damholt, V

    1986-01-01

    In a 10-year period, 31 children, including 9 infants, were treated for hematogenous osteomyelitis. Fifteen children were treated closed and 16 open. Thirteen of 14 positive cultures were Staphylococcus aureus. Three recurrences could possibly have been prevented by a more aggressive primary...... approach. At follow-up after 5 (1-12) years, 3 neonates had developed severe growth disturbances despite optimal initial treatment. Acceptable results were obtained with antibiotic therapy for 6 weeks or more. We recommend ampicillin and a penicillinase-resistant penicillin, unless bacterial resistance...

  20. Optics and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Manuel F M; De Campos, J Ayres; Lira, Madalena; Franco, Sandra; Vazquez-Dorrio, Jose B

    2011-01-01

    Light and Optics are subjects that 'naturally' attracts the interest and sympathy of children even from very early ages. In this communication, we present a series of experiments and support material designed in this hands-on perspective, to be used to introduce the study of light and optics to kindergarten and early basic school students. Our hands-on investigative approach leads the students, aged 4 to 10 years, to observe the experiment and discover themselves, in a critical and active way, different aspects of light and optics. Preparing funny eye catching situations and experiments predispose the children to work, effectively, enjoying themselves while building up their self-confidence.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sedation or anesthesia is to be used. In general, children who have recently been ill will not ... for several hours prior to the exam. In general, children who have recently been ill will not ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to be used. In general, children who have recently been ill will not be sedated or anesthetized. ... to the exam. In general, children who have recently been ill will not be sedated or anesthetized. ...

  3. CONCLUSIONS Urban Children and Adolescents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CONCLUSIONS Urban Children and Adolescents. Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity and measures of regional (central) adiposity. High prevalence of markers of dysmetabolic state in urban adolescents. ~10% prevalence of dysglycemia in overweight / obese school children.

  4. Helping Grieving Children and Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... renewed grief. Understanding how children and teens view death It is helpful to know how children understand ... or her. Expressing your emotions can encourage your son or daughter to share his or her own ...

  5. Children's knowledge of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Nobes, Gavin; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2011-03-01

    Children everywhere are fascinated by the sky, stars and Sun. Emerging evidence from cultures throughout the world suggests that even young children can acquire knowledge of the Earth and its place in the Universe.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body ... children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and ...

  7. Snacks and sweetened drinks - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosing healthy snacks and drinks for your children can be hard. There are many options. ... Encourage children to drink a lot of water. Avoid sodas, sport drinks, and flavored waters. Stay away from drinks made with sugar or ...

  8. Understanding ADHD: Symptoms in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Symptoms In Children Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... hyperactivity, and impulsivity are the key behaviors of ADHD. It is normal for all children to be ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray ... Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related ...

  10. Parenting School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life. For some children, however, school may cause frustration and stress. Learning disabilities can interfere with the ... money. It may also require parental patience and tolerance as children experiment with different programs before finding ...

  11. Children and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from studies of adults were applied to children. Today, the National Institutes of Health requires that children ... with protecting the public against unfair and deceptive business practices. A key area of its work is ...

  12. Children's experiences of domestic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Callaghan, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the key findings of a two year project focused on children's experiences of domestic violence. It draws on 107 interviews with children in Greece, Italy, Spain and the UK. The paper explores children's capacity to articulate their experiences, and highlights that they are not 'witnesses' to intimate partner violence, but experience it directly and make meaning of it, as members of a family affected by violence. I argue that children need to be recognised as direct victims...

  13. Growth delay in homeless children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierman, A H; Dreyer, B P; Quinn, L; Shulman, S; Courtlandt, C D; Guzzo, R

    1991-11-01

    This study compared the growth of homeless children with National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) standards and with growth of age-matched domiciled children of similar income level. Homeless children (n = 167) had lower height percentiles when compared with domiciled children (n = 167; P less than .001) and when compared with NCHS standards (P less than .001). The weight-height percentiles of homeless children did not differ from NCHS standards; however, domiciled children had higher weight-heights when compared with the homeless (P less than .001) and with NCHS standards (P less than .001). After controlling via regression analysis for the effects of potentially confounding factors that affect growth, it was found that homeless children from larger families and with single mothers accounted for the lower height percentiles observed. After controlling for confounding factors, domiciled children still had increased weight-height percentiles when compared with the homeless group. Duration of homelessness was not associated with decreased height or weight-height among homeless children. Homeless children in this study exhibited a pattern of stunting without wasting which is characteristic of poor children experiencing moderate, chronic nutritional stress. They exhibited a greater degree of nutritional stress than domiciled children at a similar income level and than that reported in other groups of poor children in the United States. Preexisting social factors in the families of homeless children were important in explaining the observed growth abnormalities. Further exploration of the associations between social characteristics of homeless children and their families and the growth of these children is warranted.

  14. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  15. Young Children's Concepts of Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Douglas H.; Swaminathan, Sudha; Hannibal, Mary Anne Zeitler; Sarama, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Investigates, by conducting individual clinical interviews of 97 children ages 3 to 6, the criteria preschool children use to distinguish members of a class of shapes from other figures, emphasizing identification and descriptions of shapes and reasons for these identifications. Concludes that young children initially form schemas on the basis of…

  16. Interpretive Reproduction in Children's Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at children's play from the perspective of interpretive reproduction, emphasizing the way children create their own unique peer cultures, which he defines as a set of routines, artifacts, values, and concerns that children engage in with their playmates. The article focuses on two types of routines in the peer culture of preschool…

  17. Anger communication in deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieffe, C.J.; Meerum Terwogt, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how deaf children express their anger towards peers and with what intentions. Eleven-year-old deaf children (n = 21) and a hearing control group (n = 36) were offered four vignettes describing anger-evoking conflict situations with peers. Children were asked how they

  18. Young Children's Understanding of Denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Keith; Theakston, Anna; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although a fair amount is known about young children's production of negation, little is known about their comprehension. Here, we focus on arguably the most complex basic form, denial, and how young children understand denial, when it is expressed in response to a question with gesture, single word, or sentence. One hundred twenty-six children in…

  19. Children's Responses to Literary Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Mary Vance

    This study undertook to determine (1) whether teaching sixth grade children elements of style would increase their pleasure in listening to "The Hobbit," (2) whether children who learned the most about style would respond the most positively to Tolkien's style, and (3) what children's preferences would be for selected examples of Tolkien's style.…

  20. How Healthy Are Our Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Blum, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The past century has seen vast improvements in our children's health. The infectious diseases that once killed huge numbers of children have largely been conquered. Infant mortality has also fallen markedly, although the United States lags behind other industrialized nations in this and other measures of children's health. Accidents and injuries…

  1. SPECIAL SCHOOL FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    POTTS, ALFRED M.

    MANY CHANGES HAVE OCCURRED IN MIGRANT CHILDREN OVER THE 5 YEARS THE SPECIAL SCHOOL HAS BEEN IN OPERATION. MOST NOTABLE IS THAT THE CHILDREN ARE MUCH CLEANER AND BETTER BEHAVED. THE CHILDREN ARE ISSUED COMBS, TOOTHBRUSHES, TOWELS, AND SOAP. STUDENTS SHOWER THREE TIMES EACH WEEK AND PERFORM A DAILY ROUTINE OF BRUSHING TEETH AND COMBING HAIR. MILK…

  2. Fostering Children's Interests in Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekies, Kristi S.; Sheavly, Marcia Eames

    2007-01-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in children's gardens and attention to the positive benefits of gardening for children, little is known about the ways in which young people actually form interests in gardening. Using a sample of 9- and 10-year-old children at a school garden site in New York State, this study examined the ways in which…

  3. Voicing children's critique and utopias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Mia; Lind, Unni

    , designed to accommodate children's participation through graphic illustrations of young children's critique and utopias. The study is informed by a commitment to democratic participation and processes (Reason and Bradbury 2001, Gunnarsson et al. 2016). Ethical guidelines implied dialogues and discussions......, children's voice, critique and utopias, pedagogical work...

  4. The Rebirth of Children's Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that recent theoretical and methodological advances have sparked renewed interest in studying children's learning. Describes consistent and interesting findings regarding how children learn and intriguing proposals regarding mechanisms underlying learning. Argues that increasing the focus on children's learning promises practical…

  5. Reported Hyperphagia in Foster Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, Janet M.

    1991-01-01

    Foster children (age 0-14, n=190) referred for mental health evaluations were compared to a subsample of 10 children identified as hyperphagic. These children displayed hyperactivity and poor impulse control, interpersonal skills, and communication skills. Mothers exhibited a high incidence of drug/alcohol abuse. Hyperphagia should alert…

  6. Parent Perceptions of Children's Fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Borgers, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    Examined fears of fifth grade students and ways in which their parents perceived the fears. Responses from 66 students and 47 parents suggest that children have more fears than parents think they have. Children reported concerns over accidents, nuclear war, and death, while parents expected children to have more fears about scary movies, the dark,…

  7. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  8. Salmonella Sepsis in African Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with both Salmonella typhiand non-typhi salmonella. (NTS) is common among children in many African countries. Salmonella typhi predominates among older children and adults with the typical localising features of enteric fever. Nontyphoid salmonellae species are more often reported among children under 5 ...

  9. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  11. Chronic Candidiasis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Laura; Dolen, William K

    2017-05-01

    Healthy children may develop candidal infections as the result of exposure to antibiotics or corticosteroids, but chronic candidiasis in children after the newborn period is unusual. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) refers to a group of conditions characterized by recurrent or persistent infections with Candida species, particularly Candida albicans. CMC is a phenotype observed in a spectrum of immunologic disorders, some with endocrinologic and autoimmune features. CMC can arise secondary to inherited or acquired T cell deficiencies, but in children is largely due to inborn errors impairing the dectin pathway and IL-17 immunity. We review the current understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and discuss the immunologic pathways by which the immune system handles Candida. We highlight the historical and recent knowledge of CMC in children, emphasizing recent insights into basic science aspects of the dectin pathway, IL-17 signaling, consequences of AIRE gene defects, and clinical aspects of inheritance, and features that distinguish the different syndromes. The clinical phenotype of CMC has many underlying genetic causes. Genetic testing is required for definitive diagnosis.

  12. Lawnmower injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Nora

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Power lawnmowers can pose significant danger of injury to both the operator and the bystander, from direct contact with the rotary blades or missile injury. Our objective was to review our experience with paediatric lawnmower-associated trauma, and the safety recommendations available to operators of power lawnmowers. METHODS: The patient cohort comprised paediatric (<16 years of age) patients treated for lawnmower-associated trauma, by the plastic surgery service, between 1996 and 2003. These patients were identified retrospectively. Age at the time of injury, location and extent of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained, treatment instituted and clinical outcome were recorded. Brochures and instruction manuals of six lawnmower manufacturers were reviewed, and safety recommendations noted. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were identified. The majority of injuries occurred from direct contact with the rotary blades (93%); the remaining child sustained a burn injury. Fourteen children (93%) required operative intervention. Seven patients (46%) sustained injuries resulting in amputation, two of whom had major limb amputations. All children, except the burns patient, underwent wound debridement and received antibiotic therapy. Reconstructive methods ranged from primary closure to free tissue transfer. Many patients required multiple procedures. In all instruction manuals, instructions to keep children and pets indoors or out of the yard when mowing were found. CONCLUSIONS: Lawnmower injuries can be devastating, particularly in children. Many victims have lasting deformities as a result of their injuries. Awareness of and stringent adherence to safety precautions during use of power lawnmowers can prevent many of these accidents.

  13. Hydatid Cysts in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HussamHassan

    Hydatid Cysts in Children. Ismail M. Tantawy. Pediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Zagazig University Hospital, Zgazig, Egypt. Background/Purpose: Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by a parasite, echinococcus granulosus, characterized by cystic lesion in the liver, lungs and rarely in other parts of ...

  14. Chiropractic and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Hestbæk, Lise

    2010-01-01

    of problems were identified: the lack of research in general and the lack of research using the appropriate study designs and methodology in particular. Therefore, we discuss the meager research noted in the areas of chiropractic care in children and the clinical consequences this should have...

  15. Acute mastoiditis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Kristian; Høstmark, Karianne; Hansen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of acute otitis media may lead to more complications. This study evaluates changes in incidence, the clinical and microbiological findings, the complications and the outcome of acute mastoiditis in children in a country employing conservative guidelines in treating acute...

  16. INTERSECTIONAL DISCRIMINATION AGAINST CHILDREN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbøl, Camilla Ida

    This paper adds a perspective to existing research on child protection by engaging in a debate on intersectional discrimination and its relationship to child protection. The paper has a twofold objective, (1) to further establish intersectionality as a concept to address discrimination against ch...... children, and (2) to illustrate the importance of addressing intersectionality within rights-based programmes of child protection....

  17. Headaches in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children: Practice healthy behaviors. Behaviors that promote general good health also may help prevent headaches for your child. These lifestyle measures include getting plenty of sleep, staying physically active, eating healthy meals and snacks, drinking four to eight glasses of water daily, ...

  18. Local anaesthesia for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankenmolen, F.W.A.; Baart, J.A.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    Needless to say, children tend to dread local anaesthesia. The dentist may deal with this in various ways. He/she must win the trust of the child, speak in a manner the child understands, use an injection technique that is effective and does not cause the child any pain and know and prevent

  19. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaemia is a worldwide health problem affecting developed and developing countries. Children <5 years of age and women of child-bearing age are the most vulnerable. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) ranked 15th and 14th in the global disability-adjusted life-years in. 1990 and 2010, respectively.[1] Globally, the ...

  20. Chesed Children's Clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children are seen by volunteer doctors in private consultation rooms and are dispensed medication from the clinic's primary care pharmacy, as required. Those needing hospitalisation are transferred to local referral hospitals through partnership with a local advanced paramedic who is actively involved in the management ...

  1. Fingertip replantation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautel, G

    2000-11-01

    Despite common unfavorable mechanisms, fingertip replantation is a rewarding procedure in children. Cosmetic final results are usually better than those obtained by local or pedicled flaps. The success rate and the sensory reinnervation are also better than what can be expected in adult patients.

  2. Helping Children Manage Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Maggie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes interventions used to enhance coping and stress management to children and adolescents. Argues that the model of stress upon which the intervention is based dictates the intervention. Implications are discussed of the acceptance of an extended Lazarus/Folkman model for interventions in schools. (CFR)

  3. Children's Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Tips - español (Spanish) PDF National Institute of Nursing Research Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance - English PDF ... a Glance - español (Spanish) PDF National Institute of Nursing Research Palliative Care for Children: Support for the Whole ...

  4. Orbital cellulitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Woods, Charles R; Benjamin, Daniel K; Givner, Laurence B; Shetty, Avinash K

    2006-08-01

    To review the epidemiology and management of orbital cellulitis in children. The medical records of children orbital cellulitis and confirmed by computed tomography scan were reviewed. A literature search for additional studies for systematic review was also conducted. Forty-one children with orbital cellulitis were identified. The mean age was 7.5 years (range, 10 months to 16 years), and 30 (73%) were male (male:female ratio = 2.7). All cases of orbital cellulitis were associated with sinusitis; ethmoid sinusitis was present in 40 (98%) patients. Proptosis and/or ophthalmoplegia was documented in 30 (73%), and 34 (83%) had subperiosteal and/or orbital abscesses. Twenty-nine (71%) had surgical drainage and 12 (29%) received antibiotic therapy only. The mean duration of hospitalization was 5.8 days. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 21 days. Orbital cellulitis occurs throughout childhood and in similar frequency among younger and older children. It is twice as common among males as females. Selected cases of orbital cellulitis, including many with subperiosteal abscess, can be treated successfully without surgical drainage.

  5. Intracerebral hemorrhage in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ihab Zidan

    2012-04-01

    Apr 1, 2012 ... was as follow: good recovery in 14(47%), fair recovery in. 7(23%), poor recovery in 7(23%), and death in two patients. (7%) (Table 4). 4. Discussion. This study focuses on ICH in children. We included all chil- dren presenting with ICH regardless the etiology (traumatic or non-traumatic). This did not match ...

  6. BAD TIMES, SLIMMER CHILDREN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés-Obrero, Cristina; Jiménez-Martín, Sergi; Vall-Castello, Judit

    2016-11-01

    Although the majority of the literature has confirmed that recessions are beneficial for adults' health and babies' outcomes at delivery, this effect should not necessarily be the same for children. In this paper, we study the effect of business cycle conditions on infant underweight, overweight, and obesity. We exploit eight waves of repeated cross-sectional data (1987-2012) of the Spanish National Health Survey for children aged 2-15 and use the regional unemployment rate of the trimester of the interview as a proxy for the business cycle phase at the local level. We find that an increase in the unemployment rate is associated with lower obesity incidence, especially for children under 6 years old and over 12 years old. However, economic shocks also proof to have potentially negative consequences as they increase the prevalence of infant underweight for the same age groups. Moreover, we show that the possible mechanisms through which the cycle is impacting infant obesity is the nutritional composition of the children's diet, as well as, increases in the frequency of exercise. We provide some evidence that suggests that the impact of business cycle conditions on infant weight disorders have little objective health consequences in the short run. However, the potential long-term effects may become important as underweight during childhood is associated with worse outcomes later in life. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Allergic rhinosinusitis in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    inflammatory oede- ma present in persis- tent allergic rhinitis will eventually occur in the mucous mem- branes of the ostiomeatal units in the middle meati leading ultimately to allergic ... most children over the age of 6 months. These are excellent tests .... flax oil or fatty fish is of a high omega 3 and essential amino acid.

  8. Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... services to help you and your child. Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a child’s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting ...

  9. Discrimination Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochocki, Thomas E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Examined the learning performance of 192 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children on either a two or four choice simultaneous color discrimination task. Compared the use of verbal reinforcement and/or punishment, under conditions of either complete or incomplete instructions. (Author/SDH)

  10. Designing Maps for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Barbara S.

    In 1964 World Book wanted to be able to say that more than 1,000 maps being made for the encyclopedia were designed to be appropriate and useful for children between the ages of nine and fourteen. However, there was virtually no research on which such a program could be based. This paper briefly reviews research projects in this area started in…

  11. Children, mobility, and space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pia; Mikkelsen, Miguel Romero; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the potentials of a mixed methods approach to the study of children’s mobility patterns. The methodology presented here combined ethnographic fieldwork with global positioning system technology and an interactive questionnaire that children completed via mobile phone. This ...

  12. Children's Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news and announcements in our newsletter: Children’s Tumor Foundation 120 Wall Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10005-3904 1-800-323-7938 info@ctf.org © Children's Tumor Foundation - All rights reserved Privacy Policy

  13. Assessing Children's Multiplicative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Chris; Hurrell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicative thinking is a "big idea" of mathematics that underpins much of the mathematics learned beyond the early primary school years. This paper reports on a current study that utilises an interview tool and a written quiz to gather data about children's multiplicative thinking. The development of the tools and some of the…

  14. Children's Conceptions of Jesus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Karen; Freathy, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a recent study investigating young children's (aged 10-11) conceptions of Jesus in England. The overall picture revealed by the study is that whilst there was a general assent amongst pupils in our sample towards an ethical and humanistic conception of the historical Jesus, there was less of a consensus about…

  15. Sports Injuries in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Timothy N.

    1991-01-01

    A literature review revealed an absence of well-controlled studies concerning the prevention of sports injuries in children. A checklist outlines some causes of the overuse syndrome, including (1) training errors; (2) the nature of playing surfaces; (3) muscle imbalance; (4) anatomic malalignments; (5) construction of shoes; and (6) various…

  16. Prevent Children's Sports Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Lyle J.

    1983-01-01

    Children who actively take part in sports are susceptible to special injury risks because their bodies are still growing. Parents should keep both the child's individual physical and emotional makeup and the demands of the sport in mind when selecting an activity. Proper training methods and equipment are discussed. (PP)

  17. Children and transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2003-12-09

    This issue of the 'Sustainable Transportation Monitor', published by the Centre for Sustainable Transportation located in Mississauga, Ontario, reports on key findings from a project involving children and transportation in the Halton and Peel regions of Ontario, recently completed by the Centre. Excerpts from the report summarized in this issue include data on children's travel in Halton and Peel, and a discussion on possible contribution of transport practices to the growing incidence of obesity among Canadian children. Results of the study indicate that until about age 18, travel by children on schooldays is dominated by the journey to and from school. School bus is the choice of 28 per cent, and passenger car by 23 per cent among 11-to-14- year-olds; the share of travel by car is larger for older young people and also likely larger among 6-to-10-year-olds. Physical inactivity has been highlighted as the contributing factor to excess body weight and obesity in this, and other studies. Data collected for this study corroborates the findings of other studies by showing a positive correlation between obesity and transport energy use in 18 affluent countries, suggesting that a high level of use of motorized transport contributes to inactivity and body weight gain. Several alternate means of transportation, with the potential to combat obesity, are proposed. 46 refs.

  18. Children of Sex Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia; Baird, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Outlines three major differentiating categories of children who were sexually abused by sex rings: level of fear, ability to trust, and disclosure confusion. Addresses denial and resistance regarding child sexual exploitation by a ring among practitioners in the child welfare system. (Author/BB)

  19. Children's Ecology Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussenhop, Martha

    Selected for this listing of children's books are fiction and non-fiction books which add to an understanding of ecology, broadly considered here as the study of the interrelationships of organisms to each other and their environment. General ecology, natural resources, man and his environment, evolution and adaptation, appreciation, survival,…

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both imaging exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  1. Media Violence and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look ... to make a diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. ... result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the ...

  3. The cost of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Leif Jonas

    , the opportunity cost of two children is estimated to 28-29 per cent of full income, which in monetary units is close to estimated income difference between women employed in the public and private sector. The opportunity cost of fatherhood is generally positive, but only significantly positive for men born...

  4. Atrial Fibrillation in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Atrial Fibrillation in Children Updated:Oct 18,2016 Does your ... arrhythmia. This content was last reviewed July 2016. Atrial Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ...

  6. Children's Advertisement Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Andrew; Beard, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores primary school children's ability to engage with "the power of the text" by tackling persuasive writing in the form of an advertisement. It is eclectically framed within genre theory and rhetorical studies and makes use of linguistic tools and concepts. The paper argues that writing research has not built upon earlier…

  7. sexually abused children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sexually abused children are anxiety disorders, depression, increased aggression and disturbance in sexual behaviour and gender roles. An American study found significantly higher rates .... counterparts with post-admission disclosure, this difference was not ... sense of psychic loneliness and internal crisis which follows.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related ...

  9. Death, Children, and Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robin L.

    The books listed in this annotated bibliography are intended to help children understand the reality of death and deal with the mystery and emotions that accompany it. Each entry indicates the genre and reading level of the book and provides a brief description of the attitude toward death that it conveys. The selections include fables, fantasy,…

  10. Abdominal tuberculosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heda Melinda Nataprawira

    2001-06-01

    supported the diagnosis. There was no positive results of acid fast bacilli and culture done for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirate as well as ascitic fuid. Peritonitis tuberculosis was most commonly diagnosed (80.0%, followed by mesenterial/nodal tuberculosis (20.0%. All of the children followed (60.0% responded well to the drugs therapy.

  11. Children Learning by Themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfurth, Marion A.; Winer, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes Vitrine 2001, an innovative computer-based learning environment at the Quebec Centre for Research in Educational Computing. Highlights program responses to educational software deficiencies; teachers' limitations in providing appropriate pedagogical support; and the need for support materials to help children get the most out of their…

  12. Endogenous uveitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J C

    1979-07-01

    Endogenous uveitis, with its ocular sequalae, accounts for a significant number of blind children in the world today. Even though these children are asymptomatic by ophthalmic history, they usually present with ocular pathology compatible with chronic intraocular inflammation. Although loss of vision is invariably due to cataract formation, fluorescein angiogram, binocular indirect ophthalmoloscopy, and fundus contact lens examination often reveal pathology of the optic nerve and retina, accounting for a significant degree of visual loss. While actual etiologic agents are usually not identified in the majority of children, toxoplasmosis, sarcoidosis, and childhood arthropathies occur with such high frequency that mention is made of these diseases. Conventional surgical procedures for ocular sequalae such as cataract and glaucoma, are known to yield poor results. Corticosteroids administered either topically, periocularly, or systemically appear to be of value in the treatment of these diseases, although control studies have not been done. Efforts to lessen the visual morbidity in these children should begin by a cross-fertilization of information between primary care physicians, pediatricians, and ophthalmologists.

  13. On Children and Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotz, Ignacio L.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the deleterious effects of television on children's behavior, focusing on television as a medium of communication, and not on the quality of its programming. The criticisms include distortion and mediation of reality, interference with creative and social development, unidirectionality, violence, and inducement toward passivity. (ED)

  14. Violence in Children's Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Sue

    A British 12-year-old boy died while imitating the heroic leaps of the cartoon character Batman. Tragic incidents stemming from cartoon imitation such as this one occur with alarming frequency. Still, many people choose to ignore violence in children's cartoons. Even some experts don't recognize that cartoons may be harmful. Researcher Wilbur…

  15. Bruxism in allergic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, M B

    1980-01-01

    A study of bruxism (tooth grinding) was conducted at the University of Miami School of Medicine, at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida, and at the Sleep Disorders Center, Mount Sinai MEdical Center, Miami Beach, Florida. A threefold incidence of this pernicious oral habit in allergic children was disclosed as compared to nonallergic children. Dental literature stresses psychogenic factors, occlusal maladjustments, systemic conditions, and occupational pursuits which do not pertain to most children. Allergy is rarely considered. Nocturnal bruxism may be initiated reflexly by increased negative pressures in the tympanic cavities from intermittent allergic edema of the mucosa of the Eustachian tubes. Embryologic, anatomic, and neurological relationships between the muscles of the eardrum, Eustachian tubes, and jaws have a primordial, common ancestry. Chronic middle ear disturbances may promote reflex action to the jaws by stimulating the trigeminal nuclei in the brain. Sleep studies at Mount Sinai Medical Center on allergic, bruxing children have produced some interesting but incomplete results. We are attempting to develop sophisticated devices for monitoring abnormal tubal function which may be the crux of the bruxism problem.

  16. Social anxiety in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avakyan, Tamara V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of research on social anxiety in orphaned children are presented in this article. The goal of this study was to identify the relationship between depressive states, anxiety states, characteristics of the situation at school, and fear of social evaluation in orphaned children. The differences in these parameters between orphaned children and children living with their families were also studied. The sample consisted of 123 teenagers. The main group comprised 57 orphans from an orphanage near the Moscow region, aged 10 to 16 years old. The control group comprised 66 students from a general school, aged 10 to 15 years old, and all living with their families. Differences were found in the parameters studied. The orphans were characterized by higher levels of social and general anxiety. On the one hand, they strove for the attention and approval of adults, but, on the other hand, they were more worried than their peers who lived with their families about the impression they made on others. They were afraid of receiving a negative evaluation.

  17. DYSLIPIDEMIA FEATURES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Turkinа

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientific and practical data about various lipid metabolism disorders (dyslipidemia in children are discussed. Spectra lipids, phospholipids and lipoproteins in blood serum and erythrocyte membranes are presented. Characteristics of dyslipidemia and hypolipidemia, classification of hyperlipidemia, a description of acetonemic vomiting syndrome are given. Basic principles of dyslipidemia treatment as well as therapy of obesity associated with dyslipidemia are described.

  18. DYSLIPIDEMIA FEATURES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Turkinа

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientific and practical data about various lipid metabolism disorders (dyslipidemia in children are discussed. Spectra lipids, phospholipids and lipoproteins in blood serum and erythrocyte membranes are presented. Characteristics of dyslipidemia and hypolipidemia, classification of hyperlipidemia, a description of acetonemic vomiting syndrome are given. Basic principles of dyslipidemia treatment as well as therapy of obesity associated with dyslipidemia are described.

  19. Educating Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Frances A.

    Based in part on a study of 20 school systems judged to have outstanding programs of pupil services and special education, the manual presents varying philosophies of education for the handicapped and considers the nature and incidence of handicaps. Special programs and services for handicapped children are described, and information is provided…

  20. Coblation adenotonsillectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Trinidade, Aaron; Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Supriya, Mrinal; Kubba, Haytham

    2012-09-01

    To determine re-admission rate for post-tonsillectomy pain; the primary and secondary post-tonsillectomy bleeding rate; the percentage requiring control of post-tonsillectomy bleeding in children undergoing coblation tonsillectomy. A descriptive study. Royal Hospital for Sick Children (Yorkhill Hospital) between 2004 and 2006. All patients who underwent tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy by coblation technique. Patients were identified from operation theatre log book and electronic data base of theatre activity. The hospital case notes were reviewed retrospectively to collect data, regarding demographics, indication and type of surgery, grade of operating surgeon, duration of hospital stay, re-attendance and re-admission, and management of complications. A total of 106 children; males (n = 53, 50%), females (n = 53, 50%) with a mean age 6.3 years underwent surgery using coblation technique. Thirty-one percent had a tonsillectomy while 69% underwent an adenotonsillectomy. Of these, 48% had history of recurrent tonsillitis, 43% had obstructive sleep apnoea and 9% suffered predominantly from obstructive symptoms. Eighty-two percent of patients were discharged on the first postoperative day. Only one patient had primary bleeding requiring re-operation. After discharge, 7 patients (6.7%) were re-admitted with secondary bleeding, 3 (2.8%) of whom were taken back to theatre to control the bleeding under general anaesthesia. Coblation tonsillectomy is a useful technique in having a low primary and secondary bleeding rates in children undergoing tonsillectomy and adenotonsillectomy.

  1. How Children Grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The discussion of genetic and environmental factors in the growth of children from infancy to adolescence focuses on intrauterine life, the effects of nutrition, hormones, illness, and emotion in the childhood years, and obesity and puberty in adolescents. Described are processes, such as amniocentesis, for monitoring the physiology chemistry of…

  2. Sleep disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Oliveiero; Novelli, Luana

    2010-09-27

    Sleep disorders may affect between 20% and 30% of young children, and include problems getting to sleep (dyssomnias), or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for dyssomnias in children? What are the effects of treatments for parasomnias in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 28 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antihistamines; behavioural therapy plus antihistamines, plus benzodiazepines, or plus chloral and derivatives; benzodiazepines alone; exercise; extinction and graduated extinction; 5-hydroxytryptophan; light therapy; melatonin; safety/protective interventions for parasomnias; scheduled waking (for parasomnias); sleep hygiene; and sleep restriction.

  3. Gastrointestinal polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Lee, Hung-Chang; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chuen-Bin

    2009-10-01

    Gastrointestinal polyps are common in children. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, endoscopic findings, management, pathology, and recurrence of gastrointestinal polyps in children at Mackay Memorial Hospital. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 50 children with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyps managed at Mackay Memorial Hospital between January 1984 and April 2007. Demographic data; clinical features; polyp size, number and location; endoscopic findings; management; pathology; and information on recurrences were extracted from the clinical records. The distribution of polyps in the 50 patients included gastric (4 patients), duodenal (2), ileocecal (4) and colorectal polyps (40). All patients with gastric polyps presented with vomiting, and three of the four patients with ileocecal polyps presented with intussusception. The mean age of the 40 patients with colorectal polyps was 6.8 years. The majority of those polyps were in the rectosigmoid colon; 36 patients presented with hematochezia. Solitary polyps were identified in 33 patients and multiple polyps were identified in seven patients. Most of the colorectal polyps were less than 2cm in diameter. Histologically, the most frequent type was juvenile polyp. Gastrointestinal polyps in children are usually benign. Pediatricians treating a child with a gastrointestinal polyp should pay attention to the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, the extraintestinal manifestations and long-term risk for malignancy.

  4. Gastrointestinal Polyps in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Wang

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: Gastrointestinal polyps in children are usually benign. Pediatricians treating a child with a gastrointestinal polyp should pay attention to the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, the extraintestinal manifestations and long-term risk for malignancy.

  5. Monitoring asthma in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, Marille W.; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L. P.; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Makela, Mika J.; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L.; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Carlsen, Karin C. Lodrup

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist

  6. Homeless Families and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Baker, Linda Schuurmann

    1996-01-01

    Available data on homeless families and children are reviewed, focusing on definitions of homelessness and the most common methods used to estimate the size of the homeless population. Trends in the duration of homelessness and the numbers of families at risk of losing housing are discussed. (SLD)

  7. Children's Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivanova, K. N.; Lebedev, M. V.; Sivak, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Why do children learn in different ways: some are good students who show interest and zeal, while others are lazy and have to be taught against their will? Why do schools have over- and underachievers? Of course, there are a multitude of reasons. But almost 50 years ago it was shown using large data sets that families with high socioeconomic…

  8. Children in the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Magda Cordell; And Others

    This book of charts documents the current situation of children in the less developed regions of the world. Data on population distribution by age and sex, urban growth, social and economic conditions, life expectancy, mortality, health and disease, nutrition, medical care, education, youth participation in the labor force of selected countries…

  9. Children's First Word Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braine, Martin D. S.

    1976-01-01

    This monograph presents a descriptive analysis of the syntactic patterns in 16 corpora of word combinations from 11 infants learning either English (six children), Samoan, Finnish, Hebrew, or Swedish. The mean utterance lengths range up to about 1.7 morpehmes. There are both reanalyses of corpora in the literature and new corpora. The data…

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your body. Hybrid imaging techniques (PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  11. The Children's House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Lili E.

    2013-01-01

    Lili Peller's "The Children's House" essay begins where Maria Montessori left off in her description of space articulations. Peller does not name Montessori specifically as she always had a desire to become independent in her own right as a neo-Freudian child analyst. But the Haus Der Kinder founded in summer of 1922 suggests a total…

  12. Preschool Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Akgül, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine preschool teachers' perspectives about children's school readiness. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study as a mixed method research. Data, in the quantitative aspects of the research, were collected through the use of "School Readiness Form" developed by Boz (2004)…

  13. Furniture injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin H; Adams, Susan; Holland, Andrew J A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence, type and severity of furniture-related injuries in children in the Sydney region. Retrospective analysis of presentations to the emergency departments of two paediatric tertiary hospitals in Sydney over a 4-year period from January 2000 to December 2003 with furniture-related injuries. Deaths of children because of furniture-related injuries reported to the Coroner, from 2000-2002, were also reviewed. The main outcome measures were circumstances of injury, type and number of injuries, morbidity, and mortality. 52 children presented with furniture-related injuries. The median age was 2.5 years (range 9 months-15 years), with a male-to-female ratio of 3:2. Falling televisions accounted for 22 (42%) of the injuries. Median Injury Severity Score was 1 (range 1-25). One child died. The most common regions injured were the limbs and the head. Thirty-one children (60%) required medical imaging, 28 (54%) required admission to hospital and 6 were allowed home in under 12 h. Of the 22 patients admitted for longer than 12 h, 14% required intensive care. Median length of stay was 1 day (range 0-15 days). Eighteen patients (35%) suffered scarring or long-term limitations as a result of their injuries. From 2000 to 2002 there were four additional deaths in NSW because of furniture-related injuries, two because of a falling television. Furniture-related injuries represent a cause of serious trauma and death in Australian children. There remains a need for the stability and security of televisions and large furniture items to be improved.

  14. Preventing gun injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossen, Eric J; Lewis, Brenna; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    Firearms are involved in the injury and death of a large number of children each year from both intentional and unintentional causes. Gun ownership in homes with children is common, and pediatricians should incorporate evidence-based means to discuss firearms and protect children from gun-related injuries and violence. Safe storage of guns, including unloaded guns locked and stored separately from ammunition, can decrease risks to children, and effective tools are available that pediatricians can use in clinical settings to help decrease children's access to firearms. Furthermore, several community-based interventions led by pediatricians have effectively reduced firearm-related injury risks to children. Educational programs that focus on children's behavior around guns have not proven effective. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2015. All rights reserved.

  15. Eosinophilic colitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Horowska-Ziaja, Sabina; Kajor, Maciej; Więcek, Sabina; Chlebowczyk, Wojciech; Woś, Halina

    2017-02-01

    Eosinophilic colitis, which is a rare form of eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, occurs as primary and secondary allergic eosinophilic colitis of the gastrointestinal tract infection, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis. The diagnosis is based on a significant amount of eosinophils in the inflammatory infiltrate of the colon wall. To analyze the clinical picture taking into account comorbidities and endoscopic picture in children with eosinophilic colitis. The test group consisted of 43 children, the average age - 12.1 years diagnosed with eosinophilic colitis (according to the Whitington scale) hospitalized in the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Pediatrics of the Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. Testing for food allergies, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, gastrointestinal diseases and parasitic diseases was performed in the group of children and the analysis concerned the intensity of eosinophilic infiltration of the colon mucosa with the severity of clinical symptoms, endoscopic picture, the presence of inflammatory bowel disease, and food allergy. Half of the tested children suffered from isolated eosinophilic colitis but the rest of them had eosinophilic infiltrate with inflammatory bowel disease more often, however, the Crohn's disease. The endoscopic image was uncharacteristic, and grade III in the Whitington scale was predominant in the histopathological examination, in most cases located in the entire large intestine. The higher level of total IgE was found in less than half of the patients and it did not correlate with the severity of eosinophilic infiltration. It was shown that the severity of eosinophilic infiltration correlated with exacerbation of clinical symptoms, endoscopic image, and the presence of inflammatory bowel disease. The higher level of antibodies of ASCA and ANCA was found in approximately 20% of the children with isolated eosinophilic colitis and 63% of children with Crohn's disease

  16. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stąpor, Natalia; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the state of reduced tissue sensitivity to insulin. The frequency of this occurrence is increasing dramatically in developed countries. Both, environmental and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Sedentary lifestyle and the excessive calorie intake cause the substantial increase of the fat issue, leading to overweight and obesity. Insulin resistance occurs physiologically during puberty, but it is also a pathological condition predisposing children to develop abnormal glucose tolerance, diabetes, hypertension and polycystic ovary syndrome among girls. More frequent occurrence of metabolic syndrome can be observed among children born small for gestational age (SGA). The article presents the current views on risk factors, etiology, diagnosis and consequences insulin resistance and disorders of glucose tolerance. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  17. Polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Vincent R; Bernabe, Kathryn

    2008-11-01

    Children with polyps usually present with bleeding or pain. Most pediatric intestinal polyps are sporadic and are not associated with malignancy. Polyposis syndromes are also well described in children. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is the most common hamartomatous polyposis condition. Although the polyps are not thought to be premalignant in most patients, there is an increased risk of other cancers. Familial adenomatous polyposis is also seen in childhood and is associated with a very high risk of malignant transformation as well as extracolonic adenomas and malignancy. The diagnosis and management of sporadic juvenile polyps, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis, as well as rarer conditions associated with intestinal polyps are reviewed in this article.

  18. Fabry disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Rasmussen, AK

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, multiorgan disease. The most serious complications involve the kidney, brain and heart. This study aims to assess the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using agalsidase-beta in children with Fabry disease. We carried out a nationwide, descriptive and observational...... retrospective cohort study of 10 children (9-16 years at baseline), who underwent regular systematic investigations for 1-8 years after initiation of ERT with agalsidase-beta (Fabryzyme®, Genzyme). Ophthalmological, echocardiographic abnormalities and hypohidrosis were found at baseline and during the follow......-up period. Serious kidney, heart or brain involvement had not developed at the last follow-up examination. For the majority of the patients improvements were found concerning headache, acroparaesthesias and gastrointestinal pain during the follow-up period. The level of energy and physical activity also...

  19. Children's velo-mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Trine Agervig; Nielsen, Thomas Sick; Olafsson, Anton Stahl

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable mobilities play a dominate role in low carbon futures and cycling is an integral element. Children are heirs of transport cultures and crucial for future sustainable mobility. Moreover cycling is important for children’s independent mobility and geographical experience. Dominating...... approaches in transport research, including cycling, understand travel behaviour individualistic and lack to grasp the relational complexities, which are inevitable when considering children’s mobilities. Furthermore has children’s cycling largely been studied as independent mobility and active school travel....... How cycling is learned and constituted, and how cycling skills are consolidated, extended and turned into a stabilized practice remains unstudied. Drawing on in-depth interview data from the region of Copenhagen, Denmark, among families with children (N=20) the paper provides new insights into how...

  20. Intelligence in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Nader

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial results of an investigation are presented whose primary objective is to adapt and to standardize the neurocognitive assessment battery C.A.S. of Das and Naglieri (1997 in a child sample. The test is an operationalization of a non traditional intelligence model (PASS that considers the intelligent behaviors as a group of four cognitive basic processes (planning, attention, simultaneous and successive processing. The objectives of this work are to obtain the psychometric properties of the instrument and also, to analyze if differences exist according to sex and age. The study type is crosswise - transactional. It was administered the CAS to 150 children residents in Buenos Aires among the ages of 6 to 12 years (population general non consultant and the WISC-III to a sample of 50 children

  1. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  2. Stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Bahakim, Hassan M.; Kurban, Khadija M.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Nasir, Ali A.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khoja, Waleed A.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the causes, pathogenesis, and risk factors. The Retrospective Study Group (RSG) included children with stroke who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology, or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period July 1992 to February 2001. The Prospective Study Group (PSG) included those seen between February 2001 and March 2003. During the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, 117 children (61 males and 56 females, aged one month-12 years) were evaluated; the majority (89%) of these were Saudis. The calculated annual hospital frequency rate of stroke was 27.1/100,000 of the pediatric (1month-12 years) population The mean age at onset of the initial stroke in the 104 Saudi children was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) median and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). Large-vessel infarcts (LVI, 51.9%) were more common than small-vessel lacunar lesions (SVLL, 19.2%). Five patients (4.8%) had combined LVI and SVLL. Intracranial hemorrhage was less common (18.2%), whereas sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 6 (5.8%) patients. A major risk factor was identified in 94 of 104 (89.4%) Saudi children. Significantly more hematologic disorders and coagulopathies were identified in the PSG compared to the RSG (p=0.001), reflecting a better yield following introduction of more comprehensive hematologic and cogulation laboratory tests during the prospective study period. Hematologic disorders were the most common risk factor (46.2%); presumed perinatal ischemic cerebral injury was risk factor in 23 children (22.1) and infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system in 18 (17.3%). Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying cause in 7 patients (6.7%) and

  3. Choosing children: intergenerational justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyal, Len; McLean, Sheila

    2005-03-01

    In this discussion, we argue that the concept of intergenerational justice, usually used in environmental matters, is applicable to reproductive decisions also. Additionally, we propose that this permits certain reproductive choices to be made prior to conception or during the pregnancy, and that these choices should not be confined to clinical concerns. In particular, we argue that consideration of the interests of future children should be viewed from the perspective of objective well-being. That being the case, decisions about the sex of future offspring can, in terms of intergenerational justice, be legitimate. We do not argue that every reproductive choice is legitimate; for example it would not be legitimate deliberately to choose characteristics that prevent future children from potentially successful participation in social life.

  4. Demystifying Septoplasty in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septum deviation in children may alter the early physiologic process of breathing, causing obligatory oral breathing and consequently changing craniofacial development and even intellect. Because of these consequences, septoplasty should be performed as early as possible. Materials and Methods The retrospective study reviewed the results of septoplasty in 40 children under 12 years old who had follow-up after surgery for a maximum period of 7 years. The research was submitted to the ethics committee and approved with protocol number 10331912.0.0000.0058. Results Forty patients underwent septoplasty, 39 (97.5% had cauterization of inferior turbinate and associated procedure, 20 (50% had adenotonsillectomy, and 17 (42.5% had adenoidectomy. Conclusion Nasal septum deviation should be corrected early to provide the harmonious growth of the face and to enable normal development of the child, without the occurrence of nasal deformity.

  5. Sleep problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Katrina; Hiscock, Harriet

    2015-12-01

    Childhood sleep problems are common, and frequently reduce the wellbeing and functioning of both child and family. The majority of childhood sleep problems are behavioural in origin. This article outlines the aetiology and features of sleep difficulties in children, from infants to teenagers, and provides a corresponding 'toolkit' of evidence-based behavioural management strategies. Childhood behavioural sleep problems manifest across age groups as various forms of difficulty initiating and/or maintaining sleep. These difficulties are often amenable to home-based behavioural interventions, which can be taught to parents and, de-pending on their developmental stage, the child or adolescent. Sustaining the intervention for sufficient sleep duration can be challenging for families. Community health practitioners play a central role in tailoring the explanation of management strategies to families and children or adolescents. Sleep diaries and education materials from evidence-based websites can assist the practitioner and family in achieving successful diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Ethnicity and children's diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette Ljungdalh; Krasnik, Allan; Holm, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This study explores concerns and dilemmas connected with diet, health and child-feeding in families with ethnic minority background. The aim is to contribute to better targeting of dietary advice to ethnic minority parents in Denmark. Four focus group interviews were carried out with mothers...... of children between 4 months and 2 and a half years who were descendants of Turkish or Pakistani immigrants. The focus groups investigated: (1) everyday feeding practices; (2) values and concerns behind food choice; (3) social and cultural norms influencing feeding and eating practices; (4) experienced...... those related to ethnicity that are sometimes more important in determining food habits. The present study found that child-feeding practices were shaped by two main aims: (1) securing and improving child health; and (2) ensuring multi-cultural eating competence in children. The results confirm...

  7. Idiopathic megarectum in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, P P; Pinfield, A; Stringer, M D

    2001-02-01

    There is scant information about the management of idiopathic megarectum in childhood. Children with idiopathic megarectum referred to a single institution between 1994 and 1998 were identified prospectively. Those with Hirschsprung's disease or an anorectal malformation were excluded. The remaining patient group, 22 boys and 7 girls, had a median age of 8.0 years (range 3.5-14.0 y). Median duration of symptoms prior to referral was 2.0 years (range 0.4-11 y). Chronic soiling was the dominant complaint in 28/29 (97%) cases. 23 children had received regular stimulant laxatives for periods ranging from 1 month to 11 years, and 9 children had been treated with regular enemas. The degree of megarectum assessed by both abdominal palpation and plain radiography was: grade 1 (below umbilical level) n=6; grade 2 (at umbilical level) n=15; and grade 3 (above umbilical level) n=8. Hirschsprung's disease was specifically excluded by rectal biopsy in all cases and no patient had evidence of spinal dysraphism. Three boys with massive megarectums and intractable symptoms were treated by a staged Duhamel sigmoid pull-through with excellent functional results. Fifteen patients (52%) were treated by a single manual evacuation under general anaesthesia followed by a daily Bisacodyl 5-10 mg suppository. After a median follow-up of 16 months, 13 continue to respond well with a daily bowel action and no soiling (4 of the 13 have discontinued treatment and remain well). The remaining 11 patients (38%) have continued conventional treatment with oral laxatives but with limited success. Idiopathic megarectum is poorly described in children. It is more common in boys and is often resistant to laxative therapy alone. After appropriate preparation, treatment with stimulant suppositories can be effective. Surgery has a valuable role in selected patients with a massive megarectum.

  8. Benefits for handicapped children

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of long-term care benefits within the CERN Health Insurance Scheme requires the coordination of the benefits foreseen for handicapped children. Measures were adopted by the Management following the recommendation made by the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 March 2003. A document clarifying these measures is available on the Web at the following address: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/soc/Social_affairs/social_affairs.asp Social Affairs Service 74201

  9. PHARYNGITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Polunina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory disease of the throat — is a widespread pathology in childhood. The complex treatment of pharyngitis often includes solutions for gargling, sprays, tablets for sucking, hard candy or lozenges containing a variety of anti-inflammatory components. Their use reduces the severity of pain and the time treatment, but does not preclude the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for systemic effects. Key words: pharyhgitis, sore throat, treatment, children (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 106–108.

  10. Lead poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapul, Heda; Laraque, Danielle

    2014-08-01

    There is no safe lead level in children. Primary prevention is the most effective way to bring about the complete removal of lead from the environment and eliminate lead poisoning as a public health concern. The National Lead Information Center can be reached via the Internet at www.epa.gov/lead and www.hud.gov/lead, or via phone at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

  11. EPILEPSY SURGERY IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    S. Faraji rad; F. Ashrafzadeh; M. Faraji

    2009-01-01

    AbstractObjectiveIn the majority of patients with intractable epilepsy, seizures can be well controlled with appropriate medication. However, current estimates indicate that some of patients with epilepsy are refractory to all forms of medical therapy. The surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy in children has  evolved with advances in technical innovations. These medically intractable patients are candidates for surgical treatment in an attempt to achieve better seizure control. The defi...

  12. Hypercalcemic Disorders in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokes, Victoria J; Nielsen, Morten F; Hannan, Fadil M

    2017-01-01

    with hypotonia, poor feeding, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, lethargy, polyuria, dehydration, failure to thrive and seizures. In severe cases renal failure, pancreatitis and reduced consciousness may also occur and older children and adolescents may present with psychiatric symptoms. The causes...... caused by parathyroid tumors, which may give rise to primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) or tertiary hyperparathyroidism, which usually arises in association with chronic renal failure and in the treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets. Acquired causes of PTH-dependent hypercalcemia in neonates include...

  13. Dental radiology for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation

  14. Night terrors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feferman, I

    1988-12-01

    Night terrors are a bizarre sleep disorder that affects young children. The child partially awakes during the night agitated, afraid and terrified, and cannot be consoled. These events, which may be related to emotional turmoil, are self-limiting. Psychiatric evaluation is indicated in certain cases, and drug therapy is almost never necessary. Parents should be reassured that night terrors are not dangerous and do not reflect any serious pathology.

  15. Night Terrors in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Feferman, Irv

    1988-01-01

    Night terrors are a bizarre sleep disorder that affects young children. The child partially awakes during the night agitated, afraid and terrified, and cannot be consoled. These events, which may be related to emotional turmoil, are self-limiting. Psychiatric evaluation is indicated in certain cases, and drug therapy is almost never necessary. Parents should be reassured that night terrors are not dangerous and do not reflect any serious pathology.

  16. Appendiceal ascariasis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Wani, Imtiaz; Maqbool, Muddasir; Amin, Abid; Shah, Firdous; Keema, Arshad; Singh, Jang; Kitagawa, Maki; Nazir, Mir

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The propensity of Ascaris lumbricoides to wander leads to varied surgical complications in the abdomen. Wandering A lumbricoides may sometimes reach the vermiform appendix and its presence there may remain silent or incite pathology. Our aim was to study ascariadial appendicitis. METHODS: Over a period of 3 years, we identified children who were found to have appendiceal ascariasis during surgery for different intestinal complications due to ascariasis. We studied the relationship...

  17. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  18. Gastrointestinal scintigraphy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Milk scans are by far the commonest GI study we perform. All babies regurgitate to a greater or lesser extent and there is no clear distinction between normal and abnormal. In addition gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is not the only cause of regurgitation; regurgitation may be due to abnormal oesophageal transit, GOR or slow gastric emptying. The milk scan can detect and quantify these abnormalities. It may also detect pulmonary aspiration if this occurs during the study period. Short bowel syndrome, soiling and a constipation are the commonest indications for small and large bowel transit studies. Children with feeding difficulties and short bowel syndrome often have a segment at which hold up occurs while most children with soiling have normal or even rapid transit through small and large bowel. Ingestion of caustic substances by young children is a frequent cause of presentation at paediatric emergency centers and about 20% of these patients have significant oesophageal injury requiring ongoing therapy to prevent stricture formation. A 99m Tc sucralfate swallow is an accurate method for assessing the oesophageal injury and may be used to document healing. The methods for labeling sucralfate and performing the scan are simple. Meckel's scans are useful but require careful preparation of the patient and attention to detail. GI bleeding studies with colloid or labeled red blood cells are often requested but I find accurate localization of the bleeding site extremely difficult. (author)

  19. Hypothyroidism in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Karwowska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of a child from early foetal life. They have an impact on the development of the central nervous system, both prenatally and up to the age of 3 years, and regulate growth and most metabolic processes. Their importance has led to the introduction of screening for congenital hypothyroidism, which has been conducted in Poland for over 40 years. The diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism necessitates immediate levothyroxine implementation and strict treatment monitoring. Thanks to iodine prophylaxis, children in Poland do not require additional iodine administration. An isolated increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration without clinical signs of hypothyroidism and with negative antithyroid antibodies does not require treatment, but only monitoring of thyroidstimulating hormone levels. Children with positive antithyroid antibodies, genetic syndromes that predispose to hypothyroidism and history of thyroid irradiation require more frequent controls. The recommendations for suspected hypothyroidism presented in this article are based on the European Thyroid Association guidelines from 2014 on the management of subclinical hypothyroidism in children and pregnant women.

  20. Children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, C L

    2001-01-01

    The rapidly changing nature and demographics of divorce in United States within the past 30 years has spawned an epidemic that affects more than one half of the families in the United States. I performed a MEDLINE-assisted review of the medical literature searching with the key words "divorce" and "children." In addition, a Web search was conducted using Webferret with the same key words. The past view of divorce as a short-term family crisis must mature into a longitudinal view of the effects of divorce. Divorce affects children according to their coping mechanisms in their own stages of development. Many problems and concerns previously attributed to divorce have their roots in the period of family interaction before the divorce and in the ongoing conflicts in many families after the divorce itself. Because family physicians are objective observers with whom the family comes into regular contact, they must be able to assist families through the transitions of divorce and to intervene on behalf of the children to help them through this stressful life event with the fewest detrimental effects possible. Counseling, group therapy, and divorce mediation have been assessed as effective tools for intervention.