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Sample records for growth factor-a inhibiting

  1. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm 3 within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm 3 for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature

  2. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor A and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α maximizes the effects of radiation in sarcoma mouse models through destruction of tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G; Simon, M Celeste; Yoon, Sam S

    2015-03-01

    To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm(3) within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm(3) for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Menaquinone analogs inhibit growth of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlievert, Patrick M; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Mueller, Elizabeth A; Spaulding, Adam R; Vu, Bao G; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N; Kohler, Petra L; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gram-positive bacteria cause serious human illnesses through combinations of cell surface and secreted virulence factors. We initiated studies with four of these organisms to develop novel topical antibacterial agents that interfere with growth and exotoxin production, focusing on menaquinone analogs. Menadione, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and coenzymes Q1 to Q3 but not menaquinone, phylloquinone, or coenzyme Q10 inhibited the growth and to a greater extent exotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae at concentrations of 10 to 200 μg/ml. Coenzyme Q1 reduced the ability of S. aureus to cause toxic shock syndrome in a rabbit model, inhibited the growth of four Gram-negative bacteria, and synergized with another antimicrobial agent, glycerol monolaurate, to inhibit S. aureus growth. The staphylococcal two-component system SrrA/B was shown to be an antibacterial target of coenzyme Q1. We hypothesize that menaquinone analogs both induce toxic reactive oxygen species and affect bacterial plasma membranes and biosynthetic machinery to interfere with two-component systems, respiration, and macromolecular synthesis. These compounds represent a novel class of potential topical therapeutic agents.

  4. Hyper-accurate ribosomes inhibit growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusala, T; Andersson, D; Ehrenberg, M; Kurland, C G

    1984-11-01

    We have compared both in vivo and in vitro translation by ribosomes from wild-type bacteria with those from streptomycin-resistant (SmR), streptomycin-dependent (SmD) and streptomycin-pseudo-dependent (SmP) mutants. The three mutant bacteria translate more accurately and more slowly in the absence of streptomycin (Sm) than do wild-type bacteria. In particular, the SmP bacteria grow at roughly half the rate of the wild-type in the absence of Sm. The antibiotic stimulates both the growth rate and the translation rate of SmP bacteria by approximately 2-fold, but it simultaneously increases the nonsense suppression rate quite dramatically. Kinetic experiments in vitro show that the greater accuracy and slower translation rates of mutant ribosomes compared with wild-type ribosomes are associated with much more rigorous proofreading activities of SmR, SmD and SmP ribosomes. Sm reduces the proofreading flows of the mutant ribosomes and stimulates their elongation rates. The data suggest that these excessively accurate ribosomes are kinetically less efficient than wild-type ribosomes, and that this inhibits mutant growth rates. The stimulation of the growth of the mutants by Sm results from the enhanced translational efficiency due to the loss of proofreading, which more than offsets the loss of accuracy caused by the antibiotic.

  5. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Recently, high-quality data were published on the algal growth inhibition caused by 50 non-polar narcotic compounds, of which 39 were liquid compounds with defined water solubility. In the present study, the toxicity data for these liquids were applied to challenge the chemical activity range...... for baseline toxicity. First, the reported effective concentrations (EC50) were divided by the respective water solubilities (Swater), since the obtained EC50/Swater ratio essentially equals the effective chemical activity (Ea50). The majority of EC50/Swater ratios were within the expected chemical activity...... solubility in the applied dataset. On an environmental risk assessment level, predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for baseline toxicity could even be set as a percentage of saturation, which can easily be extended to mixtures. However, EC50 values well below 1% of liquid saturation can still occur...

  6. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bin; Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Wu, Bin; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. → mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. → Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). → Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  7. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  8. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    Unitless chemical activity, expressing the energetic level of a compound relative to its energetic level in pure liquid [0-1], has proven useful to quantify the effective exposure to hydrophobic organic compounds through both aerial and aqueous media. Several studies have linked toxicity to chemi......Unitless chemical activity, expressing the energetic level of a compound relative to its energetic level in pure liquid [0-1], has proven useful to quantify the effective exposure to hydrophobic organic compounds through both aerial and aqueous media. Several studies have linked toxicity...... to chemical activity, as opposed to e.g. the total concentration. Baseline toxicity (narcosis) for neutral hydrophobic organic compounds has been shown to initiate in the narrow chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0.1. This presentation focuses on linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity...... with the aims to (1) further challenge the current chemical activity range for baseline toxicity, and (2) extend the utilisation of the chemical activity concept across compounds and species. The first part of the presentation focuses on results from a recently published study, in which toxicity data for 39 non...

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factors: A comparison between invertebrates and vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipryushina, Yulia O; Yakovlev, Konstantin V; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-12-01

    This review aims to summarize recent data concerning the structure and role of the members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) families in the context of early development, organogenesis and regeneration, with a particular emphasis on the role of these factors in the development of invertebrates. Homologs of VEGF and/or VEGFR have been found in all Eumetazoa, in both Radiata and Bilateria, where they are expressed in the descendants of different germ layers and play a pivotal role in the development of animals with and without a vascular system. VEGF is a well-known angiogenesis regulator, but this factor also control cell migration during neurogenesis and the development of branching organs (the trachea) in invertebrate and vertebrate species. A possible explanation for the origin of Vegf/Vegfr in the animal kingdom and a pathway of Vegf/Vegfr evolution are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor, a biomarker of macroangiopathy in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konya, Hiroyuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Satani, Kahori; Matsutani, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Taku; Yano, Yuzo; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Miyagawa, Jun-Ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-10-15

    Atherosclerotic involvements are an essential causal element of prospect in diabetes mellitus (DM), with carotid atherosclerosis (CA) being a common risk-factor for prospective crisis of coronary artery diseases (CAD) and/or cerebral infarction (CI) in DM subjects. From another point of view, several reports have supplied augmenting proof that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has a physiopathological part in DM involvements. HGF has been a mesenchymal-derived polyphenic factor which modulates development, motion, and morphosis of diverse cells, and has been regarded as a humor intermediator of epithelial-mesenchymal interplays. The serum concentrations of HGF have been elevated in subjects with CAD and CI, especially during the acute phase of both disturbances. In our study with 89 type 2 DM patients, the association between serum concentrations of HGF and risk-factors for macrovascular complications inclusive of CA were examined. The average of serum HGF levels in the subjects was more elevated than the reference interval. The serum HGF concentrations associated positively with both intimal-media thickness (IMT) (r = 0.24, P = 0.0248) and plaque score (r = 0.27, P = 0.0126), indicating a relationship between the elevated HGF concentrations and advancement of CA involvements. Multivariate statistical analysis accentuated that serum concentrations of HGF would be associated independently with IMT (standardized = 0.28, P = 0.0499). The review indicates what is presently known regarding serum HGF might be a new and meaningful biomarker of macroangiopathy in DM subjects.

  11. Timing of growth inhibition following shoot inversion in Pharbitis nil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, A. M.; Cline, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Shoot inversion in Pharbitis nil results in the enhancement of ethylene production and in the inhibition of elongation in the growth zone of the inverted shoot. The initial increase in ethylene production previously was detected within 2 to 2.75 hours after inversion. In the present study, the initial inhibition of shoot elongation was detected within 1.5 to 4 hours with a weighted mean of 2.4 hours. Ethylene treatment of upright shoots inhibited elongation in 1.5 hours. A cause and effect relationship between shoot inversion-enhanced ethylene production and inhibition of elongation cannot be excluded.

  12. Dihydrotestosterone inhibits hair growth in mice by inhibiting insulin-like growth factor-I production in dermal papillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Harada, Naoaki; Okajima, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production in dermal papillae was increased and hair growth was promoted after sensory neuron stimulation in mice. Although the androgen metabolite dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibits hair growth by negatively modulating growth-regulatory effects of dermal papillae, relationship between androgen metabolism and IGF-I production in dermal papillae is not fully understood. We examined whether DHT inhibits IGF-I production by inhibiting sensory neuron stimulation, thereby preventing hair growth in mice. Effect of DHT on sensory neuron stimulation was examined using cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from mice. DHT inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from cultured DRG neurons. The non-steroidal androgen-receptor antagonist flutamide reversed DHT-induced inhibition of CGRP release. Dermal levels of IGF-I and IGF-I mRNA, and the number of IGF-I-positive fibroblasts around hair follicles were increased at 6h after CGRP administration. DHT administration for 3weeks decreased dermal levels of CGRP, IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA in mice. Immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I and the number of proliferating cells in hair follicles were decreased and hair re-growth was inhibited in animals administered DHT. Co-administration of flutamide and CGRP reversed these changes induced by DHT administration. These observations suggest that DHT may decrease IGF-I production in dermal papillae by inhibiting sensory neuron stimulation through interaction with the androgen receptor, thereby inhibiting hair growth in mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Triphala and its active constituent chebulinic acid are natural inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor-a mediated angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lu

    Full Text Available Triphala churna (THL is a combination of three fruits that has been used for many years in India for the treatment of various diseases. There are now reports which indicate that THL can inhibit growth of malignant tumors in animals. However, the mechanisms by which THL mediates its anti-tumor actions are still being explored. Because vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF induced angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cancer, we therefore investigated whether tumor inhibitory effects of THL or its active constituents are through suppression of VEGF actions. We herein report that THL and chebulinic (CI present in THL can significantly and specifically inhibit VEGF induced angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2 phosphorylation. These results are of clinical significance as these inexpensive and non-toxic natural products can be used for the prevention and treatment of diseases where VEGF induced angiogenesis has an important role.

  14. Hyper-accurate ribosomes inhibit growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusala, T; Andersson, D; Ehrenberg, M; Kurland, C G

    1984-01-01

    We have compared both in vivo and in vitro translation by ribosomes from wild-type bacteria with those from streptomycin-resistant (SmR), streptomycin-dependent (SmD) and streptomycin-pseudo-dependent (SmP) mutants. The three mutant bacteria translate more accurately and more slowly in the absence of streptomycin (Sm) than do wild-type bacteria. In particular, the SmP bacteria grow at roughly half the rate of the wild-type in the absence of Sm. The antibiotic stimulates both the growth rate a...

  15. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  16. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  17. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Dahl Steffensen, Karina

    conditions such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on prognosis. Materials and methods: Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels......Background: Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic...

  18. Recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from ethanol-induced growth inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker-Caprioglio, H M; Rodriguez, R J; Parks, L W

    1985-01-01

    Ethanol caused altered mobility of the lipophilic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene in plasma membrane preparations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because lipids had been shown to protect yeast cells against ethanol toxicity, sterols, fatty acids, proteins, and combinations of these were tested; however, protection from growth inhibition was not seen. Ethanol-induced, prolonged lag periods and diminished growth rates in S. cerevisiae were reduced by an autoconditioning of the medium by the in...

  19. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Joji; Bell-Loncella, Elisabeth T; Purazo, Marc L; Lu, Yifeng; Dorchak, Jesse; Clancy, Rebecca; Slavik, Julianna; Cutler, Mary Lou; Shriver, Craig D

    2016-02-12

    Previous studies suggest that certain transition metal complexes, such as cisplatin, are efficacious for treating various cancer types, including ovarian, lung, and breast. In order to further evaluate ruthenium (Ru) complexes as potential anti-cancer agents, we synthesized and evaluated Ru-arene complexes. Two complexes with the general formula [Ru (η (6)-p-cym) (N-N) Cl](+) were tested for their abilities to inhibit cancer cells. The complex with o-phenylenediamine as the N-N ligand (o-PDA) significantly inhibited growth of breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, SKBR-3, and SUM149), lymphoma (Raji), melanoma (Bowes), and osteosarcoma (HT1080); however, the complex with o-benzoquinonediimine (o-BQDI) was ineffective except for SUM149. In contrast, o-PDA failed to inhibit growth of human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A. Treatment of MDA-MBA-231 cells with o-PDA resulted in a significant reduction of productions of PDGF-AA, GM-CSF, and VEGF-A proteins at the transcriptional levels. Finally, we demonstrated that o-PDA synergistically inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell growth with cyclophosphamide but not doxorubicin or paclitaxel. These results suggest that Ru-arene complexes are promising anti-cancer drugs that inhibit progression and metastasis by blocking multiple processes for breast and other types of cancer.

  20. Inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma growth using survivint34a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-dose systemic administration was continuously used. The HSurvivinT34A plasmid (5 g/one) complexed with a cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) significantly inhibited tumour growth in our model. We observed microvessel density degradation by CD31 immunohistochemistry and apoptotic cell increase by TUNEL ...

  1. Self-inhibiting growth of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langen, Peter Lang; Solgaard, Anne Munck; Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2012-01-01

    -line are augmented by one where an intermediate ice sheet configuration is coupled back to the GCM. Forcing the ISM with GCM fields corresponding to the ice-free state leads to extensive regrowth which, however, is halted when the intermediate recoupling step is included. This inhibition of further growth is due...

  2. Inhibiting Aspergillus flavus growth and degrading aflatoxin B1 by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a type of toxin produced by Aspergillus flavus, which has a negative effect on animal production and economic profits. In order to inhibit A. flavus growth and degrade aflatoxin, the optimal proportion of beneficial microbes such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala were selected.

  3. Inhibition of growth and mycotoxins formation in moulds by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... extracts (chloroform, hexane and methanol) had no activity on the microbial growth. Mycotoxins formation in Aspergillus flavus was inhibited by the ethanolic extracts at the concentration of 5%. Key Words: Algae, antimicrobial, minimal inhibitory concentration, moulds. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.3(1) 2004: 71-75 ...

  4. Inhibition of placenta growth factor with TB-403

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    targeting angiogenesis. AREAS COVERED: The data are obtained by searching in the PubMed database. The search terms used included antiangiogenic therapy, TB-403 (RO5323441), placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFR-1 (Flt-1). We review preclinical data concerning the function and inhibition of PlGF...... and summarize data on expression of PlGF in cancer patients. Data from early-phase clinical trials of TB-403 (RO5323441), a monoclonal antibody inhibiting PlGF, are discussed. Future development strategies, therapeutic potentials and limitations of TB-403 are further evaluated. EXPERT OPINION: There are some...... conflicting data on the function of PlGF and the importance of its role in primary tumor growth. Data from some preclinical models of PlGF inhibition and early-phase clinical trials with TB-403 are, however, promising, although the true potential of the drug is yet to be determined. Further clinical...

  5. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonami, Hiroshi [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan); Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  6. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Inhibition of seed germination and root growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Daohui [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China); Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.edu

    2007-11-15

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50 mg/L for radish, and about 20 mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. - Engineered nanoparticles can inhibit the seed germination and root growth.

  7. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  8. Growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Bech Hansen, T.; Garrido, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study elucidates the mechanisms by which a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Methods and Results: Listeria monocytogenes was exposed to live cultures of a bacteriocin-negative variant of C. piscicola A9b in co-culture, in a diffusion...... chamber system, and to a cell-free supernatant. Suppression of maximum cell density (0-3.5 log units) of L. monocytogenes was proportional to initial levels of C. pisciola (10(3)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)). Cell-to-cell contact was not required to cause inhibition. The cell-free C. piscicola supernatant caused...... a decrease in L. monocytogenes maximum cell density, which was abolished by glucose addition but not by amino acid, vitamin or mineral addition. The fermentate also gave rise to a longer lag phase and a reduction in growth rate. These effects were independent of glucose and may have been caused by acetate...

  9. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26876617

  10. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Dahl Steffensen, Karina

    Background: Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic...... conditions such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on prognosis. Materials and methods: Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels...... were measured in 229 tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were...

  11. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Steffensen, Karina Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic conditions...... such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses, we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on breast cancer prognosis. Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels were measured in 229...... tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were analyzed using the Luminex...

  12. Inhibition of fibroblasts reduced head and neck cancer growth by targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Lancaster, William; Hart, Justin; Hartman, Yolanda E; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2012-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a complex disease process involving interactions with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We further investigated these relationships by suppressing stromal cell growth through the inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Preclinical investigation. HNSCC cell lines (FADU, OSC19, Cal27, SCC1, SCC5, SCC22A), fibroblast (HS27), and endothelial cells (human umbilical vascular endothelial cell) were cultured individually or in coculture. Proliferation was assessed following treatment with a range of physiologic concentrations of FGFR inhibitor PD173074. Mice bearing established HNSCC xenografts were treated with PD173074 (12 mg/kg), and tumor histology was analyzed for stromal composition, proliferation (Ki67 staining), and apoptosis (TUNEL [terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling] staining). In vitro, inhibition of FGFR with PD173074 dramatically reduced proliferation of fibroblasts and endothelial cells compared to untreated controls. However, HNSCC cell proliferation was not affected by inhibition of FGFR. When cocultured with fibroblasts, HNSCC cells proliferation increased by 15% to 80% (P fibroblast-enhanced tumor cell growth was suppressed by FGFR inhibition. Additionally, treatment of mice bearing HNSCC xenografts with PD173074 resulted in significant growth inhibition (P < .001). Additionally, those tumors from mice treated with PD173074 had a smaller stromal component, decreased proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Targeting the FGFR pathway in head and neck cancer acts through the stromal components to decrease HNSCC growth in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Inhibition of growth of Trichophyton tonsurans by Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J; Mauch, A; Galle, S; Murphy, P; Arendt, E K; Coffey, A

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to identify antifungal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and characterize their activity against the dermatophyte Trichophyton tonsurans. A total of 165 different LAB were isolated and initially screened for anti-Penicillium expansum activity. Five strains, which exhibited strong inhibitory activity, were then tested against the dermatophyte T. tonsurans DSM12285, where they also caused inhibition as observed by large fungal clearing on agar surface. The strongest inhibition was seen with Lactobacillus reuteri R2. When freeze-dried cell-free supernatant powder from this strain was incorporated in culture medium at concentrations >1%, growth of fungal colony was inhibited. Conidia germination was also inhibited under these conditions as determined by microscopy. The anti-T. tonsurans activity of Lact. reuteri R2 was not affected neither by heat treatment nor by proteolytic treatment using pronase E and proteinase K, indicating that the responsible agent(s) were nonproteinaceous in nature. Lactobacillus reuteri R2 was identified as having strong inhibitory activity against the dermatophyte T. tonsurans DSMZ12285. LAB are naturally associated with many foods and are well recognized for their biopreservative properties. The use of these and/or their products may well provide alternative safe approaches for the inhibition of dermatophytic fungi. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. [Inhibition effect of 6-gingerol on hair growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Ya-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Jiang, Jin-Dou; Li, Ze-Hua; Hu, Zhi-Qi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effect of 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo. Firstly, Hair follicles were co-cultured with 3 different concentration of 6-gingerol for 5 days and hair elongation in three groups was measured. Secondly, The proliferative effect of 6-gingerol on DPCs was measured using MTT assay. Thirdly, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in DPCs were measured using Western blotting. In vivo study, the influence of 6-gingerol on hair growth in C57BL/6 rats was measured through topical application of 6-gingerol on the dorsal skin of each animal. The length of hair shaft in 20 microg/ml 6-Gingerol group (0.50 +/- 0.08 mm) is less than 0 microg/ml (0.66 +/- 0.19) mm and 10 microg/ml (0.64 +/- 0.03) mm 6-Gingerol group (P growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased obviously. In vivo study, the hair length and density decreased a lot after using 1 mg/ml 6-gingerol. 6-Gingerol can suppress human hair shaft elongation because it has pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs via increasing Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. It might inhibit hair growth by prolonging the telogen stage in vivo.

  15. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  16. Exogenous ethylene inhibits sprout growth in onion bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufler, Gebhard

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Exogenous ethylene has recently gained commercial interest as a sprouting inhibitor of onion bulbs. The role of ethylene in dormancy and sprouting of onions, however, is not known. Methods A cultivar (Allium cepa ‘Copra’) with a true period of dormancy was used. Dormant and sprouting states of onion bulbs were treated with supposedly saturating doses of ethylene or with the ethylene-action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). Initial sprouting was determined during storage at 18 °C by monitoring leaf blade elongation in a specific size class of leaf sheaths. Changes in ATP content and sucrose synthase activity in the sprout leaves, indicators of the sprouting state, were determined. CO2 and ethylene production of onion bulbs during storage were recorded. Key results Exogenous ethylene suppressed sprout growth of both dormant and already sprouting onion bulbs by inhibiting leaf blade elongation. In contrast to this growth-inhibiting effect, ethylene stimulated CO2 production by the bulbs about 2-fold. The duration of dormancy was not significantly affected by exogenous ethylene. However, treatment of dormant bulbs with 1-MCP caused premature sprouting. Conclusions Exogenous ethylene proved to be a powerful inhibitor of sprout growth in onion bulbs. The dormancy breaking effect of 1-MCP indicates a regulatory role of endogenous ethylene in onion bulb dormancy. PMID:18940850

  17. Griseofulvin inhibits the growth of adrenocortical cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramann, E L; Willenberg, H S; Hildebrandt, B; Müller-Mattheis, V; Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A; Haase, M

    2013-04-01

    Supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy are associated with a malignant phenotype of tumor cells. Centrosomal clustering is a mechanism used by cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes to solve the threatening problem of multipolar spindles. Griseofulvin is an antifungal substance that interferes with the microtubule apparatus and inhibits centrosomal clustering. It has also been demonstrated that griseofulvin inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. However, it is not yet known whether treatment with griseofulvin inhibits growth of adrenocortical tumor cells. We studied the viability and antiproliferative effects of griseofulvin on cultured NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells using Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]-thymidine assays. For the detection of apoptosis we used a caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy techniques. We observed that incubation with griseofulvin for 24-48 h leads to a decrease in the viability and proliferation of NCI-H295R cells in a dose-dependent manner. Significant effects could be observed after incubation with griseofulvin as measured by Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]dT- uptake assays. Apoptosis of NCI-H295R cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 4.5-fold after incubation with griseofulvin 40 μM for 24 h as shown by caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy. With regard to new treatment strategies for adrenocortical cancer, griseofulvin, and possibly other agents, which interfere with the microtubule apparatus and inhibit centrosomal clustering, may turn out to be interesting targets for further research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. N and P addition inhibits growth of rich fen bryophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Riis, Tenna

    2016-01-01

    vernicosus and paludella squarrosa) rich fen bryophytes were grown in mixed culture and subjected to rainwater or groundwater and three levels of N (0, 1 and 3 mg N L-1) and P (0, 0.05 and 0.1 mg P NL-1). All species responded negatively to higher N-levels and three of four species responded negatively...... to rainwater and higher P-levels. C. cuspidata had highest relative growth rate in all treatments, and the infrequently occurringrare species had lower relative growth rate and were more negatively affected by high levels of N than the frequently occurringcommon species. A negative effect of rainwater seemed...... to be caused by higher background levels of N in rainwater compared to groundwater rather than a pH-effect per se. We found a negative effect of high initial bryophyte density in three of four species indicating density dependent inhibition between species.We suggest that maintenance of oligotrophic conditions...

  19. Limonene inhibits Candida albicans growth by inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Archana; Zore, Gajanan; Kodgire, Santosh; Kazi, Rubina; Mulange, Shradha; Patil, Rajendra; Shelar, Amruta; Santhakumari, Bayitigeri; Kulkarni, Mahesh; Kharat, Kiran; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2017-10-09

    Anti-Candida potential of limonene was evaluated against planktonic growth, biofilm (adhesion, development and maturation) and morphogenesis of Candida albicans in this study. Limonene is a major constituent of citrus oil and most frequently used terpene in food and beverage industry due to its pleasant fragrance, nontoxic, and is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) flavoring agent as well as treatment option in many gastrointestinal diseases.Limonene exhibited excellent anti-Candida activity and was equally effective against planktonic growth of C. albicans isolates differentially susceptible to FLC (N = 35). Limonene inhibited morphogenesis significantly at low concentration. However, it showed stage dependent activity against biofilm formation, that is, it was more effective against adhesion followed by development and maturation. Limonene also exhibited excellent synergy with FLC against planktonic and biofilm growth. SWATH-MS analysis led to identification of limonene responsive proteins that provided molecular insight of its anti-Candida activity. Proteomic analysis revealed upregulation of proteins involved in cell wall glucan synthesis (Kre6); oxidative stress (Rhr2, Adh7 and Ebp1); DNA damage stress (Mbf1 and Npl3); nucleolar stress (Rpl11, Rpl7, Rpl29, Rpl15) and down regulation of cytoskeleton organization (Crn1, Pin3, Cct8, Rbl2), and so forth, in response to limonene. Limonene mediated down regulation of Tps3 indicates activation of caspase (CaMca1) and induction of apoptosis in C. albicans. These results suggest that limonene inhibits C. albicans growth by cell wall/membrane damage induced oxidative stress that leads to DNA damage resulting into modulation of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis through nucleolar stress and metacaspase dependent pathway. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in chondrosarcoma using the smoothened inhibitor IPI-926 directly inhibits sarcoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Veronica T; Nadesan, Puviindran; Ali, S Amanda; Wang, Chang Ye Yale; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Wei, Qingxia; Keilty, John; Proctor, Jennifer; Wang, Lauren W; Apte, Suneel S; McGovern, Karen; Alman, Benjamin A; Wunder, Jay S

    2014-05-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibition in cancer has been evaluated in both the ligand-independent and ligand-dependent settings, where Hh signaling occurs either directly within the cancer cells or within the nonmalignant cells of the tumor microenvironment. Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor of cartilage in which there is ligand-dependent activation of Hh signaling. IPI-926 is a potent, orally delivered small molecule that inhibits Hh pathway signaling by binding to Smoothened (SMO). Here, the impact of Hh pathway inhibition on primary chondrosarcoma xenografts was assessed. Mice bearing primary human chondrosarcoma xenografts were treated with IPI-926. The expression levels of known Hh pathway genes, in both the tumor and stroma, and endpoint tumor volumes were measured. Gene expression profiling of tumors from IPI-926-treated mice was conducted to identify potential novel Hh target genes. Hh target genes were studied to determine their contribution to the chondrosarcoma neoplastic phenotype. IPI-926 administration results in downmodulation of the Hh pathway in primary chondrosarcoma xenografts, as demonstrated by evaluation of the Hh target genes GLI1 and PTCH1, as well as inhibition of tumor growth. Chondrosarcomas exhibited autocrine and paracrine Hh signaling, and both were affected by IPI-926. Decreased tumor growth is accompanied by histopathologic changes, including calcification and loss of tumor cells. Gene profiling studies identified genes differentially expressed in chondrosarcomas following IPI-926 treatment, one of which, ADAMTSL1, regulates chondrosarcoma cell proliferation. These studies provide further insight into the role of the Hh pathway in chondrosarcoma and provide a scientific rationale for targeting the Hh pathway in chondrosarcoma.

  1. Differential vascular endothelial growth factor A protein expression between small hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis correlates with serum vascular endothelial growth factor A and alpha-fetoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Stefano Ginanni; Morini, Sergio; Liguori, Francesca; Carotti, Simone; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Burza, Maria Antonella; Siciliano, Maria; Molinaro, Antonio; Cantafora, Alfredo; Blotta, Ida; Merli, Manuela; Berloco, Pasquale; Rossi, Massimo; Attili, Adolfo Francesco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    Drugs with antivascular endothelial growth factor A (anti-VEGF-A) action are under clinical evaluation with encouraging results in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The relative VEGF-A protein expression in non-advanced HCC and in the cirrhotic non-tumoral tissue in the same patient, a variable that could be important for treatment efficacy, has been investigated with conflicting results, only using the cirrhotic tissue surrounding the neoplasm (CS). We measured, for the first time, VEGF-A expression in non-advanced HCC and in the respective CS and cirrhotic tissue at a distance from the tumour (CD), in 24 patients who underwent liver transplantation. VEGF-A protein was more expressed (Pprotein expression in HCC was higher than in the corresponding CD in 83% of cases and AFP and serum VEGF-A corrected for the platelet count positively correlated with the differential VEGF-A protein expression between HCC and CD. Our data provide a rationale for clinical trials involving anti-VEGF-A treatments in patients with non-advanced HCC, and suggest that serum AFP and VEGF-A are variables to be taken into account in these studies.

  2. p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells and its expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors promoting cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Sophie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p8 is a stress-induced protein with multiple functions and biochemically related to the architectural factor HMG-I/Y. We analyzed the expression and function of p8 in pancreatic cancer-derived cells. Methods Expression of p8 was silenced in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and BxPc-3 by infection with a retrovirus expressing p8 RNA in the antisense orientation. Cell growth was measured in control and p8-silenced cells. Influence on p8 expression of the induction of intracellular pathways promoting cellular growth or growth arrest was monitored. Results p8-silenced cells grew more rapidly than control cells transfected with the empty retrovirus. Activation of the Ras→Raf→MEK→ERK and JNK intracellular pathways down-regulated p8 expression. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 up-regulates expression of p8. Conversely, p38 or TGFβ-1 induced p8 expression whereas the specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 down-regulated p8 expression. Finally, TGFβ-1 induction was in part mediated through p38. Conclusions p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. p8 expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors that promote cell growth. These results suggest that p8 belongs to a pathway regulating the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

  3. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Algal growth inhibition test results of 425 organic chemical substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Christensen, Anne Munch; Nyholm, Niels

    2018-01-01

    values were corrected accordingly. The model helped to identify substances, where the calculated water concentration was too uncertain. Substances covering a wide range of physical-chemical properties and different modes of action were tested. Median effect concentrations (EC50) lower than 1000 mg/L were......The toxicity towards the algal species Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata of 425 organic chemical substances was tested in a growth inhibition test. Precautions were taken to prevent loss of the compounds from the water phase and the test system (closed test system, low biomass, shorter test duration......, silanized glass) and to keep pH constant by applying a higher alkalinity. Chemical phase distribution was modelled taking ionization, volatilisation, and adsorption to glass and biomass into consideration. If the modelled water concentration was below 90% of the nominal concentration the calculated EC...

  5. Argos inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling by ligand sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daryl E; Nappi, Valerie M; Reeves, Gregory T; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lemmon, Mark A

    2004-08-26

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has critical functions in development and in many human cancers. During development, the spatial extent of EGFR signalling is regulated by feedback loops comprising both well-understood activators and less well-characterized inhibitors. In Drosophila melanogaster the secreted protein Argos functions as the only known extracellular inhibitor of EGFR, with clearly identified roles in multiple stages of development. Argos is only expressed when the Drosophila EGFR (DER) is activated at high levels, and downregulates further DER signalling. Although there is ample genetic evidence that Argos inhibits DER activation, the biochemical mechanism has not been established. Here we show that Argos inhibits DER signalling without interacting directly with the receptor, but instead by sequestering the DER-activating ligand Spitz. Argos binds tightly to the EGF motif of Spitz and forms a 1:1 (Spitz:Argos) complex that does not bind DER in vitro or at the cell surface. Our results provide an insight into the mechanism of Argos function, and suggest new strategies for EGFR inhibitor design.

  6. Linear ubiquitin chain induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhoushuai; Jiang, Wandong; Wang, Guifen; Sun, Ying; Xiao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of PCNA fused at either terminus with ubiquitin (Ub) lacking two C-terminal glycine residues induces translesion DNA synthesis which resembles synthesis mediated by PCNA monoubiquitination. PCNA fused with Ub containing the C-terminal Gly residues at the C-terminus can be further polyubiquitinated in a Gly-dependent manner, which inhibits cell proliferation and induces ATR-dependent replication checkpoint. In this study, we surprisingly found that PCNA fused to a head-to-tail linear Ub chain induces apoptosis in a Ub chain length-dependent manner. Further investigation revealed that the apoptotic effect is actually induced by the linear Ub chain independently from PCNA, as the Ub chain fused to GFP or an epitope tag still efficiently induces apoptosis. It is revealed that the artificial linear Ub chain differs from endogenously encoded linear Ub chains in that its Ubs contain a Ub-G76S substitution, making the Ub chain resistant to cleavage by deubiquitination enzymes. We demonstrated in this study that ectopic expression of the artificial Ub chain alone in cultured human cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, making the linear Ub chain a putative anti-cancer agent.

  7. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia inhibits the growth of breast carcinoma and downregulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, GUIHUA; XU, DERONG; CHAI, QIN; TAN, XIAOLANG; ZHANG, YU; GU, NING; TANG, JINTIAN

    2014-01-01

    The application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) with nanoparticles has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in several animal models. However, the feasibility of using MFH in vivo to treat breast cancer is uncertain, and the mechanism is unclear. In the present study, it was observed that the intratumoral administration of MFH induced hyperthermia significantly in rats with Walker-265 breast carcinomas. The hyperthermia treatment with magnetic nanoparticles inhibited tumor growth in vivo and promoted the survival of the tumor-bearing rats. Furthermore, it was found that MFH treatment downregulated the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor tissue, as observed by immunohistochemistry. MFH treatment also decreased the gene expression of VEGF and its receptors, VEGF receptor 1 and 2, and inhibited angiogenesis in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results indicate that the application of MFH with nanoparticles is feasible for the treatment of breast carcinoma. The MFH-induced downregulation of angiogenesis may also contribute to the induction of an anti-tumor effect. PMID:24765139

  8. E-cadherin homophilic ligation inhibits cell growth and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of other cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2007-01-01

    growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-cadherin protein attached to microspheres. We find that E-cadherin ligation alone reduces the frequency...... of cells entering the S phase, demonstrating that E-cadherin ligation directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. E-cadherin binding to beta-catenin is required for cell growth inhibition, but beta-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity is not involved in growth inhibition resulting from...... homophilic binding. Neither E-cadherin binding to p120-catenin nor beta-catenin binding to alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, is required for growth inhibition. E-cadherin ligation also inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated growth signaling by a beta...

  9. Kaempferol inhibits Entamoeba histolytica growth by altering cytoskeletal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Verónica; Díaz-Martínez, Alfredo; Soto, Jacqueline; Marchat, Laurence A; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2015-11-01

    The flavonoid kaempferol obtained from Helianthemum glomeratum, an endemic Mexican medicinal herb used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, has been shown to inhibit growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in vitro; however, the mechanisms associated with this activity have not been documented. Several works reported that kaempferol affects cytoskeleton in mammalian cells. In order to gain insights into the action mechanisms involved in the anti-amoebic effect of kaempferol, here we evaluated the effect of this compound on the pathogenic events driven by the cytoskeleton during E. histolytica infection. We also carried out a two dimensional gel-based proteomic analysis to evidence modulated proteins that could explain the phenotypical changes observed in trophozoites. Our results showed that kaempferol produces a dose-dependent effect on trophozoites growth and viability with optimal concentration being 27.7 μM. Kaempferol also decreased adhesion, it increased migration and phagocytic activity, but it did not affect erythrocyte binding nor cytolytic capacity of E. histolytica. Congruently, proteomic analysis revealed that the cytoskeleton proteins actin, myosin II heavy chain and cortexillin II were up-regulated in response to kaempferol treatment. In conclusion, kaempferol anti-amoebic effects were associated with deregulation of proteins related with cytoskeleton, which altered invasion mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Aurapten, a coumarin with growth inhibition against Leishmania major promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napolitano H.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several natural compounds have been identified for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Among them are some alkaloids, chalcones, lactones, tetralones, and saponins. The new compound reported here, 7-geranyloxycoumarin, called aurapten, belongs to the chemical class of the coumarins and has a molecular weight of 298.37. The compund was extracted from the Rutaceae species Esenbeckia febrifuga and was purified from a hexane extract starting from 407.7 g of dried leaves and followed by four silica gel chromatographic fractionation steps using different solvents as the mobile phase. The resulting compound (47 mg of shows significant growth inhibition with an LD50 of 30 µM against the tropical parasite Leishmania major, which causes severe clinical manifestations in humans and is endemic in the tropical and subtropical regions. In the present study, we investigated the atomic structure of aurapten in order to determine the existence of common structural motifs that might be related to other coumarins and potentially to other identified inhibitors of Leishmania growth and viability. This compound has a comparable inhibitory activity of other isolated molecules. The aurapten is a planar molecule constituted of an aromatic system with electron delocalization. A hydrophobic side chain consisting of ten carbon atoms with two double bonds and negative density has been identified and may be relevant for further compound synthesis.

  11. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  12. Triiodothyronine inhibits transcription from the human growth hormone promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, A; Louette, J; Voz, M L; Tixier-Vidal, A; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1990-07-09

    Three DNA constructs, the natural human growth hormone gene (hGH-hGH) its 500 bp promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene (hGH-CAT), and its structural part linked to the herpes virus thymidine kinase promoter (TK-hGH) were introduced into rat pituitary GC cells by DEAE-dextran transfection. Transient expression was followed as a function of triiodothyronine (T3) concentration. The hGH-CAT expression was specifically inhibited by T3 following a typical dose-response curve while hGH-GH gene expression was not significantly modified. The transient expression of TK-hGH increased as a function of T3 concentration. These results indicate that T3 exerts two opposite effects on hGH gene expression. First, it down-regulates expression by acting on the promoter; second, it up-regulates expression by acting on the structural part of the gene. These action could be due to regulation of transcription and mRNA stabilization, respectively.

  13. Muricholic acids inhibit Clostridium difficile spore germination and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Francis

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Clostridium difficile have increased steadily over the past several years. While studies on C. difficile virulence and physiology have been hindered, in the past, by lack of genetic approaches and suitable animal models, newly developed technologies and animal models allow these processes to be studied in detail. One such advance is the generation of a mouse-model of C. difficile infection. The development of this system is a major step forward in analyzing the genetic requirements for colonization and infection. While important, it is equally as important in understanding what differences exist between mice and humans. One of these differences is the natural bile acid composition. Bile acid-mediated spore germination is an important step in C. difficile colonization. Mice produce several different bile acids that are not found in humans. These muricholic acids have the potential to impact C. difficile spore germination. Here we find that the three muricholic acids (α-muricholic acid, β-muricholic acid and ω-muricholic acid inhibit C. difficile spore germination and can impact the growth of vegetative cells. These results highlight an important difference between humans and mice and may have an impact on C. difficile virulence in the mouse-model of C. difficile infection.

  14. Compounds in a particular production lot of tryptic soy broth inhibit Staphylococcus aureus cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus Newman strain and several methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates were grown on agar plates prepared with conventional lots of tryptic soy broth (TSB). Cell growth of these strains was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of a particular product lot (lot A), whereas the cell growth of S. aureus RN4220 strain and several other MRSA clinical isolates was not inhibited. The cell growth of a strain of S. epidermidis was also inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A, whereas the cell growth of Bacillus subtilis, Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli was not inhibited. Although cell growth of the Newman strain was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A that was autoclaved in stainless steel or glass containers, cell growth inhibition was not observed when the medium was autoclaved in polypropylene containers. Compounds that inhibited the cell growth of the Newman strain were extracted from a polypropylene tube that was preincubated with liquid medium prepared from TSB of lot A. These findings suggest that polypropylene-binding compounds in TSB of lot A inhibited the cell growth of S. aureus Newman strain, some MRSA clinical isolates, and S. epidermidis.

  15. Mechanism of inhibited growth of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D L; Odame-Darkwah, J K

    1994-04-01

    Physiological studies were conducted in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of inhibition of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. Inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii occurred in media supplemented with 1% glucose, indicating that glucose utilization by the latter bacterium was not responsible for growth inhibition of the former bacterium. The medium pH in which P. shermanii inhibited the growth of B. pumilus was 4.3. Propionic acid was positively identified in the culture medium in which B. pumilus was inhibited by P. shermanii. The presence of propionic acid and a low medium pH may account for the inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii. Sodium lactate concentrations of 0.8-1.0% were essential for the continuous growth of and propionic acid production by P. shermanii. Thus, use of P. shermanii to inhibit B. pumilus in foods would likely require a lactate source.

  16. Amylase inhibits Neisseria gonorrhoeae by degrading starch in the growth medium.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, M R; Gregory, W W; Bruns, D E; Zakowski, J J

    1983-01-01

    Highly purified salivary alpha-amylase inhibited the growth of fresh isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on GC agar base medium supplemented with 2% IsoVitaleX (BBL Microbiology Systems). Hydrolysis of starch in the medium by amylase resulted in a negative starch-iodine test. However, purified amylase did not inhibit gonococcal growth on agar plates that contained hemoglobin (chocolate agar). This effect was not caused by inhibition of amylase, since amylase activity was the same in the presenc...

  17. Inhibition of somatotroph growth and growth hormone biosynthesis by activin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; González-Manchón, C; Potter, E

    1990-01-01

    Activin-A, a homodimeric protein composed of two inhibin beta A-subunits, was first isolated from gonadal fluids based upon its ability to stimulate FSH secretion and biosynthesis, but was also observed to suppress GH secretion. The present report describes the effects of activin on the biosynthe......Activin-A, a homodimeric protein composed of two inhibin beta A-subunits, was first isolated from gonadal fluids based upon its ability to stimulate FSH secretion and biosynthesis, but was also observed to suppress GH secretion. The present report describes the effects of activin...... the effect of activin on FSH secretion, did not reverse the effect of activin on GH biosynthesis. Treatment of somatotrophs with activin for 3 days completely inhibited the growth-promoting effect of GRF on somatotrophs. However, no effect of activin on GRF-stimulated expression of the c-fos protooncogene...... was observed. These data demonstrate that activin, in addition to its stimulatory effect on FSH secretion, is able to inhibit both expression of GH and growth of somatotropic cells....

  18. Regorafenib inhibits colorectal tumor growth through PUMA-mediated apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongshi; Wei, Liang; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Regorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor targeting the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, has recently been approved for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanisms of action of regorafenib in CRC cells have been unclear. We investigated how regorafenib suppresses CRC cell growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. Experimental Design We determined whether and how regorafenib induces the expression of PUMA, a p53 target and a critical mediator of apoptosis in CRC cells. We also investigated whether PUMA is necessary for the killing and chemosensitization effects of regorafenib in CRC cells. Furthermore, xenograft tumors were used to test if PUMA mediates the in vivo antitumor, antiangiogenic and chemosensitization effects of regorafenib. Results We found that regorafenib treatment induces PUMA in CRC cells irrespective of p53 status through the NF-κB pathway following ERK inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. Upregulation of PUMA is correlated with apoptosis induction in different CRC cell lines. PUMA is necessary for regorafenib-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. Chemosensitization by regorafenib is mediated by enhanced PUMA induction through different pathways. Furthermore, deficiency in PUMA abrogates the in vivo antitumor, antiangiogenic and chemosensitization effects of regorafenib. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a key role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of regorafenib in CRC cells. They suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of regorafenib sensitivity, and also provide a rationale for manipulating the apoptotic machinery to improve the therapeutic efficacy of regorafenib and other targeted drugs. PMID:24763611

  19. Depletion of Pokemon gene inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth through inhibition of H-ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-Le; Tian, De-An; Xu, Xiang-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription repressor which plays a critical role in cell transformation and malignancy. However, little is known about its effect on the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in human HCC tissues and the biological behavior of Pokemon in HCC cells in which it is overexpressed. We also explored the expression of potential downstream cofactors of Pokemon. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the expression of Pokemon in tissues of 30 HCC patients. We then examined cell proliferation or apoptosis and β-catenin or H-ras expression in Pokemon-depleted HepG(2) cells using DNA vector-based RNA interference technology. Pokemon was markedly expressed in 22/30 (73.3%) HCC tissues, with expression levels higher than in adjacent normal liver tissues (p Pokemon inhibited proliferation of HepG(2) or induced apoptosis. Also, H-ras expression decreased to a large extent. Pokemon exerts its oncogenic activity in the development of HCC by promoting cancer cell growth and reducing apoptosis, and the effect may be mediated by H-ras. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Brannick, Katherine E., E-mail: kbran@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Wang2@covance.com; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  1. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor, a determinant of airspace homeostasis in the murine lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Calvi

    Full Text Available The alveolar compartment, the fundamental gas exchange unit in the lung, is critical for tissue oxygenation and viability. We explored hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, a pleiotrophic cytokine that promotes epithelial proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and resistance to apoptosis, as a candidate mediator of alveolar formation and regeneration. Mice deficient in the expression of the HGF receptor Met in lung epithelial cells demonstrated impaired airspace formation marked by a reduction in alveolar epithelial cell abundance and survival, truncation of the pulmonary vascular bed, and enhanced oxidative stress. Administration of recombinant HGF to tight-skin mice, an established genetic emphysema model, attenuated airspace enlargement and reduced oxidative stress. Repair in the TSK/+ mouse was punctuated by enhanced akt and stat3 activation. HGF treatment of an alveolar epithelial cell line not only induced proliferation and scattering of the cells but also conferred protection against staurosporine-induced apoptosis, properties critical for alveolar septation. HGF promoted cell survival was attenuated by akt inhibition. Primary alveolar epithelial cells treated with HGF showed improved survival and enhanced antioxidant production. In conclusion, using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function maneuvers, we show that HGF signaling is necessary for alveolar homeostasis in the developing lung and that augmentation of HGF signaling can improve airspace morphology in murine emphysema. Our studies converge on prosurvival signaling and antioxidant protection as critical pathways in HGF-mediated airspace maintenance or repair. These findings support the exploration of HGF signaling enhancement for diseases of the airspace.

  3. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Andy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. Results THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression

  4. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, Jean-San; Du, Jia-Ling; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Sun, Andy; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Wang, Won-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL) can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in cancer cells. Finally, our results show that THL

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor A-stimulated signaling from endosomes in primary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Odell, Adam F; Latham, Antony M; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2014-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is a multifunctional cytokine that stimulates blood vessel sprouting, vascular repair, and regeneration. VEGF-A binds to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs) and stimulates intracellular signaling leading to changes in vascular physiology. An important aspect of this phenomenon is the spatiotemporal coordination of VEGFR trafficking and intracellular signaling to ensure that VEGFR residence in different organelles is linked to downstream cellular outputs. Here, we describe a series of assays to evaluate the effects of VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling from intracellular compartments such as the endosome-lysosome system. These assays include the initial isolation and characterization of primary human endothelial cells, performing reverse genetics for analyzing protein function; methods used to study receptor trafficking, signaling, and proteolysis; and assays used to measure changes in cell migration, proliferation, and tubulogenesis. Each of these assays has been exemplified with studies performed in our laboratories. In conclusion, we describe necessary techniques for studying the role of VEGF-A in endothelial cell function. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  7. Mixed metal oxide nanoparticles inhibit growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into THP-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Jafari

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although Ag NPs exhibited low cytotoxicity, they were unable to inhibit Mtb growth in vitro. ZnO NPs exhibited strong anti-Mtb activity and inhibited bacterial growth, but exhibited high cytotoxicity to human macrophage cells. By mixing Ag and ZnO NPs at a ratio of 8ZnO/2Ag, we acquired a mixture that exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Mtb and no cytotoxic effects on THP-1 cells, resulting in inhibition of both in vitro and ex vivo Mtb growth [Figure 1],[Figure 2],[Figure 3], [Table 1],[Table 2],[Table 3].{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Figure 3} {Table 1}{Table 2}{Table 3}

  8. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  9. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  10. Bismuth(III) deferiprone effectively inhibits growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Larry L; Lyle, Daniel A; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Granat, Alex S; Khurshid, Ali N; Kherbik, Nada; Hider, Robert; Lin, Henry C

    2016-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis in humans and there is an interest in inhibiting the growth of these sulfide-producing bacteria. This research explores the use of several chelators of bismuth to determine the most effective chelator to inhibit the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. For our studies, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was grown with nitrate as the electron acceptor and chelated bismuth compounds were added to test for inhibition of growth. Varying levels of inhibition were attributed to bismuth chelated with subsalicylate or citrate but the most effective inhibition of growth by D. desulfuricans was with bismuth chelated by deferiprone, 3-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridone. Growth of D. desulfuricans was inhibited by 10 μM bismuth as deferiprone:bismuth with either nitrate or sulfate respiration. Our studies indicate deferiprone:bismuth has bacteriostatic activity on D. desulfuricans because the inhibition can be reversed following exposure to 1 mM bismuth for 1 h at 32 °C. We suggest that deferiprone is an appropriate chelator for bismuth to control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria because deferiprone is relatively nontoxic to animals, including humans, and has been used for many years to bind Fe(III) in the treatment of β-thalassemia.

  11. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesper, M.J.; Cross, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 μM) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 μM. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of [ 3 H]IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of [ 3 H]IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H + secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth

  12. Phytoplankton growth inhibited by the toxic and bacterivorous ciliate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, F.L.; Peperzak, L.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous marine ciliate Uronema marinum is mainly bacterivorous. It was therefore surprising that in a ciliate-contaminated experiment the growth rate of the phytoplankton species Emiliania huxleyi was significantly reduced. As U. marinum does not ingest E. huxleyi cells, their growth

  13. On the occurrence of growth inhibiting substances in rye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, G.W.

    1967-01-01

    The cause of the decreased food intake and lower growth rate of animals fed on rye was investigated. With rats it was proved that the causative agent was soluble in petroleum ether and acetone. The growth inhibitor was identified as a mixture of 5-n-alkyl resorcinols with odd numbered side-chains of

  14. Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibits Neuropeptide Mediated Growth of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dai, Jie

    2000-01-01

    ...), a cell-surface peptidase which inactivates active peptides and reduces local concentrations of peptide available for receptor binding and signal transduction, in the growth inhibition of androgen-independent (Al) prostate cancer...

  15. Inhibition of telomerase activity and cell growth by free and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, the telomerase activity of the nanoliposomal punicalagin-treated cells was significantly inhibited in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: Punicalagin shows a novel mechanism of anti-telomerase activity, particularly in the nanoliposomal form, and may provide a basis for the future development of ...

  16. Inhibition of growth and mycotoxins formation in moulds by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    methanolic extract for all strains. This may complement the explanation of the hypothesis developed for the ethanolic extract, which may suggest that the partial inhibition is due to a partial extraction of the active compounds, which are more extractable, by ethanol than by methanol. This is only broadly studied on the crude.

  17. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1-100μg/ml) for 24-96 hr to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24-96 hr of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydorxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. PMID:25701202

  18. Ergosterol peroxide inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth through multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weiwei; Pan, Meihong; Liu, Hui; Tian, Hequn; Ye, Qing; Liu, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Ergosterol peroxide (EP), a sterol derived from medicinal mushrooms, has been reported to exert antitumor activity in several tumor types. However, the role of EP toward ovarian cancer cells has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the cytotoxicity of EP in various cell lines representing high-grade serous ovarian cancer and low-grade serous ovarian cancer, respectively. Although EP showed no significant inhibition of the viability of normal ovarian surface epithelial cells, it impaired the proliferation and invasion capacities of tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further figured out key modulators involved in its antitumor effects by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and Western blot. The nuclear β-catenin was down-regulated upon EP treatment, subsequently reducing the Cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression levels. Meanwhile, the protein level of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 was up-regulated in EP treated cells, whereas Src kinase activity was inhibited. Both activation of SHP2 phosphatase and inhibition of Src kinase decreased the phosphorylation level of transducer and activator of STAT3 protein, which was implicated in oncogenesis. On the other hand, EP remarkably inhibited the expression and secretion of VEGF-C, implying its involvement in counteracting tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, EP treatment showed comparable cytotoxic effect with β-catenin knock-down or STAT3 inhibition. Taken together, our results demonstrated that EP showed antitumor effects toward ovarian cancer cells through both β-catenin and STAT3 signaling pathways, making it a promising candidate for drug development.

  19. Ergosterol peroxide inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth through multiple pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan W

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Weiwei Tan,1,* Meihong Pan,1,* Hui Liu,1 Hequn Tian,1 Qing Ye,1 Hongda Liu2 1Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang, Weifang, Shandong, China; 2Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Ergosterol peroxide (EP, a sterol derived from medicinal mushrooms, has been reported to exert antitumor activity in several tumor types. However, the role of EP toward ovarian cancer cells has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the cytotoxicity of EP in various cell lines representing high-grade serous ovarian cancer and low-grade serous ovarian cancer, respectively. Although EP showed no significant inhibition of the viability of normal ovarian surface epithelial cells, it impaired the proliferation and invasion capacities of tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further figured out key modulators involved in its antitumor effects by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and Western blot. The nuclear β-catenin was down-regulated upon EP treatment, subsequently reducing the Cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression levels. Meanwhile, the protein level of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 was up-regulated in EP treated cells, whereas Src kinase activity was inhibited. Both activation of SHP2 phosphatase and inhibition of Src kinase decreased the phosphorylation level of transducer and activator of STAT3 protein, which was implicated in oncogenesis. On the other hand, EP remarkably inhibited the expression and secretion of VEGF-C, implying its involvement in counteracting tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, EP treatment showed comparable cytotoxic effect with β-catenin knock-down or STAT3 inhibition. Taken together, our results demonstrated that EP showed antitumor effects toward ovarian cancer cells through both β-catenin and STAT3 signaling pathways, making it a

  20. Cell binding and growth inhibition by hexachlorophene of decanoate and their reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, B C; Freese, E

    1978-01-01

    More than 80% of the hexachlorophene added to a Bacillus subtilis culture binds to the cells. Complete growth inhibition requires 6 x 10(5) molecules bound per cell. In contrast, more than 99% decanoate remains in solution and 3.8 x 10(7) molecules bound per cell are needed to inhibit growth. Centrifugation and resuspension of cells in growth medium removes only decanoate, whereas the addition of 1% bovine serum albumin to the growth medium removes both inhibitors from their binding sites on the cells. The addition of untreated cells to a hexachlorophene-treated culture enables the hexachlorophene molecules to redistribute among all the cells with the result that the inhibited cells can resume growth.

  1. Two genetically separable phases of growth inhibition induced by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, B. M.; Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High fluence-rate blue light (BL) rapidly inhibits hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis, as in other species, after a lag time of 30 s. This growth inhibition is always preceded by the activation of anion channels. The membrane depolarization that results from the activation of anion channels by BL was only 30% of the wild-type magnitude in hy4, a mutant lacking the HY4 BL receptor. High-resolution measurements of growth made with a computer-linked displacement transducer or digitized images revealed that BL caused a rapid inhibition of growth in wild-type and hy4 seedlings. This inhibition persisted in wild-type seedlings during more than 40 h of continuous BL. By contrast, hy4 escaped from the initial inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and grew faster than wild type for approximately 30 h. Wild-type seedlings treated with 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, a potent blocker of the BL-activated anion channel, displayed rapid growth inhibition, but, similar to hy4, these seedlings escaped from inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and phenocopied the mutant for at least 2.5 h. The effects of 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid and the HY4 mutation were not additive. Taken together, the results indicate that BL acts through HY4 to activate anion channels at the plasma membrane, causing growth inhibition that begins after approximately 1 h. Neither HY4 nor anion channels appear to participate greatly in the initial phase of inhibition.

  2. Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ceci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ellagic acid (EA is a polyphenolic compound that can be found as a naturally occurring hydrolysis product of ellagitannins in pomegranates, berries, grapes, green tea and nuts. Previous studies have reported the antitumor properties of EA mainly using in vitro models. No data are available about EA influence on bladder cancer cell invasion of the extracellular matrix triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A, an angiogenic factor associated with disease progression and recurrence, and tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we have investigated EA activity against four different human bladder cancer cell lines (i.e., T24, UM-UC-3, 5637 and HT-1376 by in vitro proliferation tests (measuring metabolic and foci forming activity, invasion and chemotactic assays in response to VEGF-A and in vivo preclinical models in nude mice. Results indicate that EA exerts anti-proliferative effects as a single agent and enhances the antitumor activity of mitomycin C, which is commonly used for the treatment of bladder cancer. EA also inhibits tumor invasion and chemotaxis, specifically induced by VEGF-A, and reduces VEGFR-2 expression. Moreover, EA down-regulates the expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1, an immune checkpoint involved in immune escape. EA in vitro activity was confirmed by the results of in vivo studies showing a significant reduction of the growth rate, infiltrative behavior and tumor-associated angiogenesis of human bladder cancer xenografts. In conclusion, these results suggest that EA may have a potential role as an adjunct therapy for bladder cancer.

  3. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Steffensen, Karina Dahl

    2012-01-01

    such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses, we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on breast cancer prognosis. Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels were measured in 229...

  4. Continuous delivery of propranolol from liposomes-in-microspheres significantly inhibits infantile hemangioma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo XN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaonan Guo,1,* Xiaoshuang Zhu,1,* Dakan Liu,1 Yubin Gong,1 Jing Sun,2 Changxian Dong1 1Department of Hemangioma and Vascular Malformation, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To reduce the adverse effects and high frequency of administration of propranolol to treat infantile hemangioma, we first utilized propranolol-loaded liposomes-in-microsphere (PLIM as a novel topical release system to realize sustained release of propranolol.Methods: PLIM was developed from encapsulating propranolol-loaded liposomes (PLs in microspheres made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid-b-poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA. The release profile of propranolol from PLIM was evaluated, and its biological activity was investigated in vitro using proliferation assays on hemangioma stem cells (HemSCs. Tumor inhibition was studied in nude mice bearing human subcutaneous infantile hemangioma.Results: The microspheres were of desired particle size (~77.8 µm and drug encapsulation efficiency (~23.9% and achieved sustained drug release for 40 days. PLIM exerted efficient inhibition of the proliferation of HemSCs and significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis factors (vascular endothelial growth factor-A [VEGF-A] and basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] in HemSCs. Notably, the therapeutic effect of PLIM in hemangioma was superior to that of propranolol and PL in vivo, as reflected by significantly reduced hemangioma volume, weight, and microvessel density. The mean hemangioma weight of the PLIM-treated group was significantly lower than that of other groups (saline =0.28 g, propranolol =0.21 g, PL =0.13 g, PLIM =0.03 g; PLIM vs saline: P<0.001, PLIM vs propranolol: P<0.001, PLIM vs PL: P<0.001. The mean microvessel density of

  5. Amylase inhibits Neisseria gonorrhoeae by degrading starch in the growth medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, M R; Gregory, W W; Bruns, D E; Zakowski, J J

    1983-12-01

    Highly purified salivary alpha-amylase inhibited the growth of fresh isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on GC agar base medium supplemented with 2% IsoVitaleX (BBL Microbiology Systems). Hydrolysis of starch in the medium by amylase resulted in a negative starch-iodine test. However, purified amylase did not inhibit gonococcal growth on agar plates that contained hemoglobin (chocolate agar). This effect was not caused by inhibition of amylase, since amylase activity was the same in the presence or absence of blood products. Moreover, survival of N. gonorrhoeae in buffered saline was not affected by amylase. These results suggest that amylase inhibited the growth of N. gonorrhoeae on GC agar base plates by hydrolyzing starch.

  6. Inhibition of Microbial Growth by Fatty Amine Catalysts from Polyurethane Foam Test Tube Plugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John A.; Wnuk, Richard J.; Martin, Delano G.

    1975-01-01

    When polyurethane foam test tube plugs are autoclaved, they release volatile fatty amines that inhibit the growth of some microorganisms. The chemical structures of these amines were determined by the use of a gas chromatographmass spectrometer. They are catalysts used to produce the foam. The problem of contaminating growth media with toxic substances released from polymeric materials is discussed. PMID:1096816

  7. Spatiotemporal variability of urban growth factors: A global and local perspective on the megacity of Mumbai

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafizadeh Moghadam, H; Helbich, M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530349

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of megacities requires special attention among urban planners worldwide, and partic-ularly in Mumbai, India, where growth is very pronounced. To cope with the planning challenges this willbring, developing a retrospective understanding of urban land-use dynamics and the underlying

  8. Inhibition of Growth of Fungi Isolated From Deteriorating Melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of extracts of Punica granatum and Cymbopogon citratus on Aspergillus nivale, Rhizopus stolonifer , Mucor mucido and Aspergillus fumigatus isolated from deteriorating melon seed using radial growth technique. Phytochemical screening revealed that extracts the plants ...

  9. Inhibition of Growth of Fungi Isolated From Deteriorating Melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Abstract. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of extracts of Punica granatum and. Cymbopogon citratus on Aspergillus nivale, Rhizopus stolonifer , Mucor mucido and. Aspergillus fumigatus isolated from deteriorating melon seed using radial growth technique. Phytochemical screening revealed that extracts the ...

  10. Inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-one plants were screened for fungicidal effects on conidial germination and mycelial growth of Corynespora cassiicola. Out of this, 5 plants (Ageratum conyzoides, Centrosema pubescene, Emilia coccinea, Ocimum basilicum and Solanum torvum) were selected for evaluation of concentration effects. Treatment in O.

  11. Inhibition of Tetrahymena pyriformis growth by Aliphatic Alcohols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Quantitative Structure- Activity Relationship (QSAR) study was undertaken to evaluate the relative toxicity of a mixed series of 21 (linear and branched-chain) alcohols and 9 normal aliphatic amines in term of the 50% inhibitory growth concentration (IGC50) of Tetrahymena pyriformis. The applied simple linear regression ...

  12. Bryostatin I inhibits growth and proliferation of pancreatic cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of bryostatin I on proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells as well as tumor growth in mice tumor xenograft model. Methods: Activation of NF-κB was evaluated by preparing nuclear material extract using nuclear extract kit (Carlsbad, CA, USA) followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ...

  13. Proximity-Dependent Inhibition of Growth of Mannheimia haemolytica by Pasteurella multocida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Dassanayake, Rohana P.; Kugadas, Abirami; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Call, Douglas R.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. haemolytica has been isolated by culture less frequently than the other bacteria. We hypothesized that the growth of M. haemolytica is inhibited by other bacteria in the lungs of BHS. The objective of this study was to determine whether P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica. Although in monoculture both bacteria exhibited similar growth characteristics, in coculture with P. multocida there was a clear inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica. The inhibition was detected at mid-log phase and continued through the stationary phase. When cultured in the same medium, the growth of M. haemolytica was inhibited when both bacteria were separated by a membrane that allowed contact (pore size, 8.0 μm) but not when they were separated by a membrane that limited contact (pore size, 0.4 μm). Lytic bacteriophages or bactericidal compounds could not be detected in the culture supernatant fluid from monocultures of P. multocida or from P. multocida-M. haemolytica cocultures. These results indicate that P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica by a contact- or proximity-dependent mechanism. If the inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica by P. multocida occurs in vivo as well, it could explain the inconsistent isolation of M. haemolytica from the lungs of pneumonic BHS. PMID:22798357

  14. Isoliquiritigenin Induces Autophagy and Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yuan Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is one of the commonest gynecologic malignancies, which has a poor prognosis for patients at the advanced stage. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL, an active flavonoid component of the licorice plant, previously demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and tumor suppressive effects. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of ISL on human ovarian cancer in vitro using the human ovarian cancer cell lines, OVCAR5 and ES-2, as model systems. Our results show that ISL significantly inhibited the viability of cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that ISL induced G2/M phase arrest. Furthermore, the expression of cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, LC3B-II, and Beclin-1 levels were increased in western blot analysis. To clarify the role of autophagy and apoptosis in the effect of ISL, we used the autophagy inhibitor—3-methyladenine (3-MA to attenuate the punctate fluorescence staining pattern of the p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, red fluorescence and LC3 (green fluorescence proteins after ISL treatment, and 3-MA inhibited the cytotoxicity of ISL. These findings provide new information about the link between ISL-induced autophagy and apoptosis and suggest that ISL is a candidate agent for the treatment of human ovarian cancer.

  15. Inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2007-12-26

    The inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate produced by papain action was studied. The ice crystal growth was monitored by thermal cycling between -14 and -12 degrees C at a rate of one cycle per 3 min. It is shown that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides in the molecular weight range of about 2000-5000 Da exhibited the highest inhibitory activity on ice crystal growth in ice cream mix, whereas fractions containing peptides greater than 7000 Da did not inhibit ice crystal growth. The size distribution of gelatin peptides formed in the hydrolysate was influenced by the pH of hydrolysis. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for producing peptides with maximum ice crystal growth inhibitory activity was pH 7 at 37 degrees C for 10 min at a papain to gelatin ratio of 1:100. However, this may depend on the type and source of gelatin. The possible mechanism of ice crystal growth inhibition by peptides from gelatin is discussed. Molecular modeling of model gelatin peptides revealed that they form an oxygen triad plane at the C-terminus with oxygen-oxygen distances similar to those found in ice nuclei. Binding of this oxygen triad plane to the prism face of ice nuclei via hydrogen bonding appears to be the mechanism by which gelatin hydrolysate might be inhibiting ice crystal growth in ice cream mix.

  16. Sumoylation Inhibits the Growth Suppressive Properties of Ikaros.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostol Apostolov

    Full Text Available The Ikaros transcription factor is a tumor suppressor that is also important for lymphocyte development. How post-translational modifications influence Ikaros function remains partially understood. We show that Ikaros undergoes sumoylation in developing T cells that correspond to mono-, bi- or poly-sumoylation by SUMO1 and/or SUMO2/3 on three lysine residues (K58, K240 and K425. Sumoylation occurs in the nucleus and requires DNA binding by Ikaros. Sumoylated Ikaros is less effective than unsumoylated forms at inhibiting the expansion of murine leukemic cells, and Ikaros sumoylation is abundant in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells, but not in healthy peripheral blood leukocytes. Our results suggest that sumoylation may be important in modulating the tumor suppressor function of Ikaros.

  17. Lobaplatin inhibits growth of gastric cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chu-Yang; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Tian, Lei; Ye, Ming; Yang, Xin-Ying; Xiao, Xiu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the anti-cancer effect of lobaplatin on human gastric cancer cells, and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODS: The human gastric cancer cell lines MKN-28, AGS and MKN-45 were used. The cytotoxicity of lobaplatin was detected using an MTS cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis using Annexin V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The expression of apoptosis-regulated genes was examined at the protein level using Western blot. RESULTS: Lobaplatin inhibited the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells and induced apoptosis, which may be associated with the up-regulation of Bax expression, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, p53 expression and the reduction of Bcl-2 expression. CONCLUSION: The cytotoxicity of lobaplatin may be due to its ability of inducing apoptosis of gastric cancer cells, which would support the potential use of lobaplatin for the therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:25516654

  18. Growth Arrest on Inhibition of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Is Mediated by Noncoding RNA GAS5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mourtada-Maarabouni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated decay is a key RNA surveillance mechanism responsible for the rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature termination codons and hence prevents the synthesis of truncated proteins. More recently, it has been shown that nonsense-mediated decay also has broader significance in controlling the expression of a significant proportion of the transcriptome. The importance of this mechanism to the mammalian cell is demonstrated by the observation that its inhibition causes growth arrest. The noncoding RNA growth arrest specific transcript 5 (GAS5 has recently been shown to play a key role in growth arrest induced by several mechanisms, including serum withdrawal and treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Here we show that inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay in several human lymphocyte cell lines causes growth arrest, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of GAS5 in these cells significantly alleviates the inhibitory effects observed. These observations hold true for inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay both through RNA interference and through pharmacological inhibition by aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamycin and G418. These studies have important implications for ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity caused by gentamycin and for the proposed use of NMD inhibition in treating genetic disease. This report further demonstrates the critical role played by GAS5 in the growth arrest of mammalian cells.

  19. Spatiotemporal variability of urban growth factors: A global and local perspective on the megacity of Mumbai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafizadeh-Moghadam, Hossein; Helbich, Marco

    2015-03-01

    The rapid growth of megacities requires special attention among urban planners worldwide, and particularly in Mumbai, India, where growth is very pronounced. To cope with the planning challenges this will bring, developing a retrospective understanding of urban land-use dynamics and the underlying driving-forces behind urban growth is a key prerequisite. This research uses regression-based land-use change models - and in particular non-spatial logistic regression models (LR) and auto-logistic regression models (ALR) - for the Mumbai region over the period 1973-2010, in order to determine the drivers behind spatiotemporal urban expansion. Both global models are complemented by a local, spatial model, the so-called geographically weighted logistic regression (GWLR) model, one that explicitly permits variations in driving-forces across space. The study comes to two main conclusions. First, both global models suggest similar driving-forces behind urban growth over time, revealing that LRs and ALRs result in estimated coefficients with comparable magnitudes. Second, all the local coefficients show distinctive temporal and spatial variations. It is therefore concluded that GWLR aids our understanding of urban growth processes, and so can assist context-related planning and policymaking activities when seeking to secure a sustainable urban future.

  20. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Song, Jie [Shrewsbury, MA; Lee, Seung-Wuk [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  1. Inhibition of fungal growth with extreme low oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1998-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of foods is effectively controlled by removal of oxygen from the package, especially if this is combined with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. However, great uncertainty exist on just how low the residual oxygen levels in the package must be especially when carbon dioxide...... for sequential removal of samples. Fungal metabolites were detected by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC).All fungi were unaffected by reduction of oxygen levels to 1.0%, whereas already at 0.5% growth of the fruit spoilage fungi Alternaria infectoria and Botrytis cineria were reduced by 25%. Most...

  2. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  3. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression in non-small cell lung cancer patients: relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Barbara; Pappot, Helle; Holmstav, Julie

    2009-01-01

    elements in neoplastic cells and their microenvironment have recently been and are continuously developed including drugs inhibiting the angiogenic system. Angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) seem to play key......BACKGROUND: The majority of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are diagnosed with advanced inoperable disease. While treatment with conventional chemotherapy has improved during the last decade the 5 years survival is still modest. Novel drugs, which selectively target aberrant...

  5. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK signaling prevents growth of canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas J; Nickoloff, Brian J; Dykema, Karl J; Boguslawski, Elissa A; Krivochenitser, Roman I; Froman, Roe E; Dawes, Michelle J; Baker, Laurence H; Thomas, Dafydd G; Kamstock, Debra A; Kitchell, Barbara E; Furge, Kyle A; Duesbery, Nicholas S

    2013-09-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare neoplasm of endothelial origin that has limited treatment options and poor five-year survival. As a model for human angiosarcoma, we studied primary cells and tumorgrafts derived from canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA), which is also an endothelial malignancy with similar presentation and histology. Primary cells isolated from HSA showed constitutive extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. The mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor CI-1040 reduced ERK activation and the viability of primary cells derived from visceral, cutaneous, and cardiac HSA in vitro. HSA-derived primary cells were also sensitive to sorafenib, an inhibitor of B-Raf and multireceptor tyrosine kinases. In vivo, CI-1040 or PD0325901 decreased the growth of cutaneous cell-derived xenografts and cardiac-derived tumorgrafts. Sorafenib decreased tumor size in both in vivo models, although cardiac tumorgrafts were more sensitive. In human angiosarcoma, we noted that 50% of tumors stained positively for phosphorylated ERK1/2 and that the expression of several MEK-responsive transcription factors was upregulated. Our data showed that MEK signaling is essential for the growth of HSA in vitro and in vivo and provided evidence that the same pathways are activated in human angiosarcoma. This indicates that MEK inhibitors may form part of an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of canine HSA or human angiosarcoma, and it highlights the use of spontaneous canine cancers as a model of human disease.

  6. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Altered expression of platelet factor 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor correlates with the inhibition of tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabeta, Peace; Pepper, Michael S

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we describe the effects of Taxol on endothelioma cell growth and migration in vitro and on vascular tumor growth in vivo. The effects of Taxol on endothelioma cell growth were determined using the crystal violet assay, while cell migration was measured using the xCELLIgence Real-Time Cell Analysis system. To study the effects of Taxol on tumor growth, mice were inoculated with endothelioma cells to induce vascular tumor development and were treated with the drug. At termination, tissue samples from Taxol-treated and control mice were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological examination, while blood samples were collected for hematological analysis, as well as for the analysis of the expression of angiogenic markers. In vitro, Taxol inhibited cell growth and migration. The drug also inhibited vascular tumor growth in mice, and this correlated with a recovery of mice from thrombocytopenia. Array analysis of blood samples from mice revealed that there was an increase in the expression of platelet factor 4 and a suppression of the proangiogenic molecule basic fibroblast growth factor in Taxol-treated animals. Our findings suggest that Taxol may have potential in the treatment of vascular tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The relationship between serum vascular endothelial growth factor A and microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T F; Jensen, L H; Spindler, K-L G

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to analyse the relationship between serum VEGF-A and the MSI status of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). METHOD: In the study, 249 patients with CRC were divided into a test cohort of 83 patients and a validation cohort of 166. MSI was determined using immunohistochemistry. Tumours......AIM: It has been suggested that colorectal neoplasms with or without microsatellite instability (MSI) can stimulate angiogenesis in different ways. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system is essential for the angiogenetic process and the growth of malignant tumours. The aim...

  9. mTOR inhibitors block Kaposi sarcoma growth by inhibiting essential autocrine growth factors and tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Lucas, Amy; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Ling; Eason, Anthony; Chavakula, Veenadhari; Hilton, Isaac B; Tamburro, Kristen M; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2013-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma originates from endothelial cells and it is one of the most overt angiogenic tumors. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are endemic, Kaposi sarcoma is the most common cancer overall, but model systems for disease study are insufficient. Here, we report the development of a novel mouse model of Kaposi sarcoma, where KSHV is retained stably and tumors are elicited rapidly. Tumor growth was sensitive to specific allosteric inhibitors (rapamycin, CCI-779, and RAD001) of the pivotal cell growth regulator mTOR. Inhibition of tumor growth was durable up to 130 days and reversible. mTOR blockade reduced VEGF secretion and formation of tumor vasculature. Together, the results show that mTOR inhibitors exert a direct anti-Kaposi sarcoma effect by inhibiting angiogenesis and paracrine effectors, suggesting their application as a new treatment modality for Kaposi sarcoma and other cancers of endothelial origin. ©2012 AACR.

  10. Tempol inhibits growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2012-03-01

    A stable nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-osyl (Tempol) is widely used as an antioxidant in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of Tempol on the growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell cycle and cell death. Tempol dose-dependently decreased the growth of As4.1 cells with an IC50 of ~1 mM at 48 h. DNA flow cytometry analysis and BrdU staining indicated that Tempol induced S phase arrest, which is accompanied by a downregulation of cyclin A. Tempol also induced apoptotic cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆Ψm), an activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Furthermore, Tempol increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MEK and JNK inhibitors significantly attenuated a growth inhibition in Tempol-treated As4.1 cells. In conclusion, Tempol inhibited the growth of As4.1 cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Tempol also activated ERK and JNK signaling, which was responsible for cell growth inhibition. Our present data provide useful information for the toxicological effects of Tempol in juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell growth inhibition and cell death.

  11. Predicting the dynamics of bacterial growth inhibition by ribosome-targeting antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Philip; Doležal, Jakub; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how antibiotics inhibit bacteria can help to reduce antibiotic use and hence avoid antimicrobial resistance—yet few theoretical models exist for bacterial growth inhibition by a clinically relevant antibiotic treatment regimen. In particular, in the clinic, antibiotic treatment is time-dependent. Here, we use a theoretical model, previously applied to steady-state bacterial growth, to predict the dynamical response of a bacterial cell to a time-dependent dose of ribosome-targeting antibiotic. Our results depend strongly on whether the antibiotic shows reversible transport and/or low-affinity ribosome binding (‘low-affinity antibiotic’) or, in contrast, irreversible transport and/or high affinity ribosome binding (‘high-affinity antibiotic’). For low-affinity antibiotics, our model predicts that growth inhibition depends on the duration of the antibiotic pulse, and can show a transient period of very fast growth following removal of the antibiotic. For high-affinity antibiotics, growth inhibition depends on peak dosage rather than dose duration, and the model predicts a pronounced post-antibiotic effect, due to hysteresis, in which growth can be suppressed for long times after the antibiotic dose has ended. These predictions are experimentally testable and may be of clinical significance.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor...

  13. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  14. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 6-Gingerol inhibits hair shaft growth in cultured human hair follicles and modulates hair growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Yabin; Wang, Wenjun; Du, Benjun; Xiao, Shun-e; Hu, Yijue; Hu, Zhiqi

    2013-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. 6-Gingerol suppressed hair growth in hair follicles in culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol in vitro may reflect a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were obtained in vivo. The results of this study showed that 6-gingerol does not have the ability to promote hair growth, on the contrary, can suppress human hair growth via its inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs in vitro, and can cause prolongation of telogen phase in vivo. Thus, 6-gingerol rather than being a hair growth stimulating drug, it is a potential hair growth suppressive drug; i.e. for hair removal.

  16. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that activation of MAPK pathways by sulforaphane is unlikely to mediate sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Sulforaphane did not generate significant levels of intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with thiol reducers, but not ROS scavengers, prevented sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Furthermore, diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent, enhanced both growth inhibition and cell death induced by sulforaphane, suggesting that the effect of sulforaphane on cell growth may be related to oxidation of protein thiols or change in cellular redox status. Our data indicate that supplementation with thiol-reducing agents should be avoided when sulforaphane is used to treat cancer.

  17. Bee Venom Promotes Hair Growth in Association with Inhibiting 5α-Reductase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seeun; Erdogan, Sedef; Hwang, Dahyun; Hwang, Seonwook; Han, Eun Hye; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia is an important issue that can occur in people of all ages. Recent studies show that bee venom can be used to treat certain diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, neuralgia, and multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of bee venom on alopecia, which was measured by applying bee venom (0.001, 0.005, 0.01%) or minoxidil (2%) as a positive control to the dorsal skin of female C57BL/6 mice for 19 d. Growth factors responsible for hair growth were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis using mice skins and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs). Bee venom promoted hair growth and inhibited transition from the anagen to catagen phase. In both anagen phase mice and dexamethasone-induced catagen phase mice, hair growth was increased dose dependently compared with controls. Bee venom inhibited the expression of SRD5A2, which encodes a type II 5α-reductase that plays a major role in the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, bee venom stimulated proliferation of hDPCs and several growth factors (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and 7) in bee venom-treated hDPCs dose dependently compared with the control group. In conclusion, bee venom is a potentially potent 5α-reductase inhibitor and hair growth promoter.

  18. Phytochemical analysis of Binahong (Anredera Cordifolia) leaves extract to inhibit In Vitro growth of Aeromonas Hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, Mohammad; Ginting, Prita Yulianti Anasta Br; Lesmana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Binahong (Anredera cordifolia) is one of the medicinal plants commonly used to treat the disease of living organisms. The secondary metabolite of A. cordifolia leaves has been shown antibacterial activity. This study aimed to investigate the secondary metabolite of A. cordifolia leaves showing antibacterial and analysis the effectiveness of antibacterial to inhibit the growth of bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila. A paper disc soaked in a solution of A. cordifolia leaves extract was used to test in vitro at a concentration of 0% (w/v), 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, and positive control of antibiotic (oxytetracycline), respectively. The extracts then placed on a tryptone soy agar (TSA) medium containing bacteria A. hydrophila and incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. In vitro test showed that A. cordifolia leaves extract inhibited the growth of bacteria A. hydrophila with an inhibition area around the paper disc. The inhibition growth of A. hydrophila increased with the increasing of extract concentration. Bacterial growth was inhibited in the diameter zone of A. hydrophila under different levels of the extracts were 0 mm (0 % negative control), 8.4 mm (0.2 %), 9.4 mm (0.4 %), 10.5 mm (0.6 %), 11.9 mm (0.8 %), 27.5 mm (positive control), respectively. Phytochemical screening of A. cordifolia leaves extract indicated that the extracts contained flavonoid, phenol, saponin, alkaloid, triterpenoid, and β-sitosterol. Our in vitro study demonstrated the inhibition growth of A. hydrophila that caused the disease of motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS).

  19. Auxin-Induced Ethylene Triggers Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and Growth Inhibition1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Hauke; Grossmann, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at high concentration and the synthetic auxins 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinmerac), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and naphthalene acetic acid, were investigated in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root treated with 0.5 mm IAA, shoot epinasty and inhibition of root and shoot growth developed during 24 h. Concomitantly, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase activity, and ACC and ethylene production were transiently stimulated in the shoot tissue within 2 h, followed by increases in immunoreactive (+)-abscisic acid (ABA) and its precursor xanthoxal (xanthoxin) after 5 h. After 24 h of treatment, levels of xanthoxal and ABA were elevated up to 2- and 24-fold, relative to control, respectively. In plants treated with IAA, 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid, levels of ethylene, ACC, and ABA increased in close correlation with inhibition of shoot growth. Aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine and cobalt ions, which inhibit ethylene synthesis, decreased ABA accumulation and growth inhibition, whereas the ethylene-releasing ethephon promoted ABA levels and growth inhibition. In accordance, tomato mutants defective in ethylene perception (never ripe) did not produce the xanthoxal and ABA increases and growth inhibition induced by auxins in wild-type plants. This suggests that auxin-stimulated ethylene triggers ABA accumulation and the consequent growth inhibition. Reduced catabolism most probably did not contribute to ABA increase, as indicated by immunoanalyses of ABA degradation and conjugation products in shoot tissue and by pulse experiments with [3H]-ABA in cell suspensions of G. aparine. In contrast, studies using inhibitors of ABA biosynthesis (fluridone, naproxen, and tungstate), ABA

  20. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Nuccitelli

    Full Text Available We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF. We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth.

  1. Genetic selection of peptide aptamers that interact and inhibit both Small protein B and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus,the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti

  2. Nonselective matrix metalloproteinase but not tumor necrosis factor-a inhibition effectively preserves the early critical colon anastomotic integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Magnus S.; Andersen, Thomas L.; Andersen, Line

    2011-01-01

    Increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal anastomotic leakage. Tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) induces MMPs and may influence anastomosis repair....

  3. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits growth of mouse ovarian antral follicles through an oxidative stress pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: weiwang2@illinois.edu; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbasava2@illinois.edu; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-01-15

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer that has been shown to inhibit growth of mouse antral follicles, however, little is known about the mechanisms by which DEHP does so. Oxidative stress has been linked to follicle growth inhibition as well as phthalate-induced toxicity in non-ovarian tissues. Thus, we hypothesized that DEHP causes oxidative stress and that this leads to inhibition of the growth of antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice (age 31–35 days) were cultured with vehicle control (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) ± N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant at 0.25–1 mM). During culture, follicles were measured daily. At the end of culture, follicles were collected and processed for in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays to measure the presence of free radicals or for measurement of the expression and activity of various key antioxidant enzymes: Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT). The results indicate that DEHP inhibits the growth of follicles compared to DMSO control and that NAC (0.25–1 mM) blocks the ability of DEHP to inhibit follicle growth. Furthermore, DEHP (10 μg/ml) significantly increases ROS levels and reduces the expression and activity of SOD1 compared to DMSO controls, whereas NAC (0.5 mM) rescues the effects of DEHP on ROS levels and SOD1. However, the expression and activity of GPX and CAT were not affected by DEHP treatment. Collectively, these data suggest that DEHP inhibits follicle growth by inducing production of ROS and by decreasing the expression and activity of SOD1. -- Highlights: ► DEHP inhibits growth and increases reactive oxygen species in ovarian antral follicles in vitro. ► NAC rescues the effects of DEHP on the growth and reactive oxygen species levels in follicles. ► DEHP decreases the expression and activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, which can be rescued by NAC, in antral

  4. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) for 18–96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36 μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96 h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18 h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Genistein exposure alters expression of cell cycle regulators. • Genistein exposure alters sex steroid hormones. • Genistein exposure alters expression of steroidogenic enzymes.

  5. In vivo inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in tobacco ovary tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Post fertilization growth of tobacco ovary tissues treated with inhibitors of polyamine (PA) biosynthesis was examined in relation to endogenous PA titers and the activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17). DL-alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), specific, irreversible ("suicide") inhibitors of ODC and ADC in vitro, were used to modulate PA biosynthesis in excised flowers. ODC represented >99% of the total decarboxylase activity in tobacco ovaries. In vivo inhibition of ODC with DFMO resulted in a significant decrease in PA titers, ovary fresh weight and protein content. Simultaneous inhibition of both decarboxylases by DFMO and DFMA produced only a marginally greater depression in growth and PA titers, indicating that ODC activity is rate-limiting for PA biosynthesis in these tissues. Paradoxically, DFMA alone inhibited PA biosynthesis, not as a result of a specific inhibition of ADC, but primarily through the inactivation of ODC. In vivo inhibition of ODC by DFMA appears to result from arginase-mediated hydrolysis of this inhibitor to urea and DFMO, the suicide substrate for ODC. Putrescine conjugates in tobacco appear to function as a storage form of this amine which, upon hydrolysis, may contribute to Put homeostasis during growth.

  6. Growth inhibition of shrimp pathogens by isolated gastrointestinal microflora of Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seehanat, S.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The useful bacteria which were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man, cultivated in earthen pond at Maha Sarakham province, Thailand, consisted of 14 isolates of Bacillus (B1 – B14 and 18 isolates of Lactic acid bacteria (LA1 – LA18. The abilities of all isolated bacteria on growth inhibition of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied by paperdisc plate method. The results showed that the Bacillus B2 and B5 were unable to inhibit the growth of all of the tested pathogens. Bacillus B1, B10 and B12 were capable of inhibiting the growth of 3 of 4 tested pathogen strains. Although all of the isolated lactic acid bacteria (LA1 –LA18 could not inhibit the E. coli growth, all of them could inhibit the growth of B. cereus. The isolated lactic acid bacteria which were capable of inhibiting the growth of 3 tested pathogen strains (excluded E. coli were LA12 , LA13 , LA14 , LA15 , LA16 , LA17 and LA18. In order to select the high potential strain of bacteria for using as probiotics, Bacillus B1 , B3 , B4 , B10 and B12 and lactic acid bacteria LA12 , LA13 , LA14 , LA15 , LA16 , LA17 and LA18 were tested for their growth abilities in various growth conditions. The tested growth conditions included various concentrations of the bile salt and salt (NaCl and various pH and temperatures. The results revealed that Bacillus B1 and B10 and lactic acid bacteria LA13 , LA16 and LA18 exhibited high potential for using as probiotics. The results of biochemical test for identification of these high potential strains showed that Bacillus B1 and B10 were possibly B. licheniformis and B. thuringiensis respectively. The lactic acid bacteria LA13 , LA16 and LA18 were possibly the same strain and belonged to the genus Pediococcus.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor...... (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...

  8. Hepatitis A complicated with acute renal failure and high hepatocyte growth factor: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Shinji; Shibata, Michihiko; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Honma, Yuichi; Hiura, Masaaki; Abe, Shintaro; Harada, Masaru

    2015-08-28

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory data showed severe liver injury and that the patient was positive for immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies. He was also complicated with severe renal dysfunction and had an extremely high level of serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Therefore, he was diagnosed with severe acute liver failure with acute renal failure (ARF) caused by HAV infection. Prognosis was expected to be poor because of complications by ARF and high serum HGF. However, liver and renal functions both improved rapidly without intensive treatment, and he was subsequently discharged from our hospital on the 21(st) hospital day. Although complication with ARF and high levels of serum HGF are both important factors predicting poor prognosis in acute liver failure patients, the present case achieved a favorable outcome. Endogenous HGF might play an important role as a regenerative effector in injured livers and kidneys.

  9. Determining the suitability of Lactobacilli antifungal metabolites for inhibiting mould growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina W. Yang; Carol A. Clausen

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, public concern about indoor mould growth has increased dramatically in the United States. In this study, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are known to produce antimicrobial compounds important in the biopreservation of food, were evaluated to determine if the same antimicrobial properties can be used to inhibit mould fungi that typically colonize wood...

  10. Inhibition of phospholipase C disrupts cytoskeletal organization and gravitropic growth in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Zornitza; Barton, Deborah; Armour, William J; Li, Min Y; Liao, Li-Fen; McKellar, Heather L; Pethybridge, Kylie A; Marc, Jan

    2010-10-01

    The phospholipase protein superfamily plays an important role in hormonal signalling and cellular responses to environmental stimuli. There is also growing evidence for interactions between phospholipases and the cytoskeleton. In this report we used a pharmacological approach to investigate whether inhibiting a member of the phospholipase superfamily, phospholipase C (PLC), affects microtubules and actin microfilaments as well as root growth and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Inhibiting PLC activity using the aminosteroid U73122 significantly inhibited root elongation and disrupted root morphology in a concentration-dependent manner, with the response being saturated at 5 μM, whereas the inactive analogue U73343 was ineffective. The primary root appeared to lose growth directionality accompanied by root waving and formation of curls. Immunolabelling of roots exposed to increasingly higher U73122 concentrations revealed that the normal transverse arrays of cortical microtubules in the elongation zone became progressively more disorganized or depolymerized, with the disorganization appearing within 1 h of incubation. Likewise, actin microfilament arrays also were disrupted. Inhibiting PLC using an alternative inhibitor, neomycin, caused similar disruptions to both cytoskeletal organization and root morphology. In seedlings gravistimulated by rotating the culture plates by 90°, both U73122 and neomycin disrupted the normal gravitropic growth of roots and etiolated hypocotyls. The effects of PLC inhibitors are therefore consistent with the notion that, as with phospholipases A and D, PLC likewise interacts with the cytoskeleton, alters growth morphology, and is involved in gravitropism.

  11. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. Submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, and an induction of apoptosis in cancerous colon HCT11...

  12. In-vitro inhibition of growth of some seedling blight inducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. subtilis in culture also inhibited the mycelia growth of all tested pathogenic fungi with inhibitory zones of between 40.0% to 57.8%. The inhibitory activities of the compost-inhabiting microbes might partly be responsible for the efficacy of compost in reducing seedling blight diseases of crops. (African Journal of ...

  13. Growth inhibition of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells on the feeders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl4

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be propagated in vitro on the feeders of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In this study, we found growth inhibition of mESCs cultured on embryonic fibroblast feeders derived from different livestock animals. Under the same condition, mESCs derived from mouse embryonic fibroblast ...

  14. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 oncogene by staurosporine and rotenone involves enhanced cell death. ANTÓNIO PEDRO GONÇALVES, ARNALDO VIDEIRA, VALDEMAR MÁXIMO and PAULA SOARES. J. Biosci. 36(4), September 2011, 639-648, © Indian Academy of Sciences.

  16. Metformin enhances tamoxifen-mediated tumor growth inhibition in ER-positive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ji; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Wenchao; Guo, Yan; Chen, Suning; Zhong, Cuiping; Xue, Yan; Zhang, Yuan; Lai, Xiaofeng; Wei, Yifang; Yu, Shentong

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine therapy drug used to treat breast cancer, is designed to interrupt estrogen signaling by blocking the estrogen receptor (ER). However, many ER-positive patients are low reactive or resistant to tamoxifen. Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with noteworthy anti-cancer effects. We investigated whether metformin has the additive effects with tamoxifen in ER-positive breast cancer therapy. The efficacy of metformin alone and in combination with tamoxifen against ER-positive breast cancer was analyzed by cell survival, DNA replication activity, plate colony formation, soft-agar, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and nude mice model assays. The involved signaling pathways were detected by western blot assay. When metformin was combined with tamoxifen, the concentration of tamoxifen required for growth inhibition was substantially reduced. Moreover, metformin enhanced tamoxifen-mediated inhibition of proliferation, DNA replication activity, colony formation, soft-agar colony formation, and induction of apoptosis in ER-positive breast cancer cells. In addition, these tamoxifen-induced effects that were enhanced by metformin may be involved in the bax/bcl-2 apoptotic pathway and the AMPK/mTOR/p70S6 growth pathway. Finally, two-drug combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. The present work shows that metformin and tamoxifen additively inhibited the growth and augmented the apoptosis of ER-positive breast cancer cells. It provides leads for future research on this drug combination for the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer

  17. Fungi & Health: can polysaccharides from the fungus inonotus obliquus (CHAGA) inhibit tumor growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wold, C. W.; Corthay, A.; Kjeldsen, Christian

    Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) – a white rot fungus found on birch trees in the northern hemisphere –has been used in traditional medicine in Europe and Asia for centuries. Native peoples have made use of Chaga by brewing it as a tea to treat gastro-intestinal problems, to heal wounds and even to treat...... cancer. The last few decades, studies have found Chaga to contain biologically active substances such as polysaccharides, triterpenoids, polyphenols and melanin. In vivo effects such as tumor growth inhibition have been observed in mice receiving various Chaga extracts. The main hypothesis behind...... the tumor inhibiting effect is two-fold: i) fungal polysaccharides may inhibit tumor growth indirectly by activating certain immune cells such as macrophages and ii) triterpenoids and other steroids from Chaga may give a direct cytotoxic effect against cancer cells. While triterpenoids from Chaga have been...

  18. Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

    2013-10-16

    Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed.

  19. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Faraone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001 and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control.

  20. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ionizing radiation activates vascular endothelial growth factor-A transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyounji; Kim, Kwang Seok; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lim, Young Bin [Radiation Cancer Biology Team, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an essential paracrine factor for developmental and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF also exerts its effects in an autocrine manner in VEGF-producing cells. For instance, autocrine VEGF signaling occurs in tumor cells and contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, such as in the function of cancer stem cells and tumor initiation, which are independent of angiogenesis. In addition to tumors cells, non-transformed cells also express VEGF. For example, a VEGF dependent intracellular autocrine mechanism is crucial for the survival of hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoiesis. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a novel treatment modality for early primary cancer and oligometastatic disease. SBRT delivers high-dose hypofractionated radiation, such as 20-60 Gy, to tumors in a single fraction or 2-5 fractions. As VEGF is a critical regulator of functional integrity and viability of vascular endothelial cells, we examined whether high-dose irradiation alters VEGF signaling by measuring the expression levels of VEGFA transcript. It is generally believed that endothelial cells do not produce VEGF in response to radiation. In present study, however, we provide the first demonstration of transcriptional regulation of VEGFA in human vascular endothelial cells by IR treatment. Irradiation with doses higher than 10 Gy in a single exposure triggers up-regulation of VEGFA transcription within 2 hours in HUVECs, whereas irradiation with 10 Gy does not alter VEGFA levels. Our data have shown that high-dose irradiation triggers immediate transactivation of VEGFA in human vascular endothelial cells.

  2. Growth Inhibition by Bupivacaine Is Associated with Inactivation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigh, Mushtaq Ahmad; Showkat, Mehvish; Bashir, Basharat; Bashir, Asma; Hussain, Mahboob ul; Andrabi, Khurshid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Bupivacaine is an amide type long acting local anesthetic used for epidural anesthesia and nerve blockade in patients. Use of bupivacaine is associated with severe cytotoxicity and apoptosis along with inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. Although inhibition of Erk, Akt, and AMPK seemingly appears to mediate some of the bupivacaine effects, potential downstream targets that mediate its effect remain unknown. S6 kinase 1 is a common downstream effector of several growth regulatory pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation known to be affected by bupivacaine. We have accordingly attempted to relate the growth inhibitory effects of bupivacaine with the status of S6K1 activity and we present evidence that decrease in cell growth and proliferation by bupivacaine is mediated through inactivation of S6 kinase 1 in a concentration and time dependent manner. We also show that ectopic expression of constitutively active S6 kinase 1 imparts substantial protection from bupivacaine induced cytotoxicity. Inactivation of S6K1 though associated with loss of putative mTOR mediated phosphorylation did not correspond with loss of similar phosphorylations in 4EBP1 indicating that S6K1 inhibition was not mediated through inactivation of mTORC1 signaling pathway or its down regulation. PMID:24605337

  3. Growth inhibition by nitrocompounds of selected uric acid-utilizing microorganisms isolated from poultry manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W K; Anderson, R C; Ratliff, A L; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the potential ability of nitrocompounds to reduce ammonia volatilization by inhibiting uric acid-utilizing microorganisms. Experiment I was conducted to evaluate the effects of nitrocompounds on the growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms isolated from poultry manure during six-hour incubation. There were five treatments: (1) control, (2) 50 mM nitroethane, (3) 50 mM nitroethanol, (4) 50 mM nitropropanol, and (5) 50 mM nitropropionic acid. Optical density values of nitrocompounds were significantly lower than that of control at two, four, and six hours. Plate counts of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms after six-hour incubation exhibited that nitrocompounds greatly reduced the growth of these microorganisms except for the nitroethane (P nitrocompounds on growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms compared to non-nitrocompounds such as ethanol, propanol, and propionic acid. Experiments II and III consisted of seven treatments: (1) control, (2) nitroethanol, (3) nitropropanol, (4) nitropropionic acid, (5) ethanol, (6) propanol, and (7) propionic acid. The incubation times of Experiments II and III were 6 and 24 h, respectively. The nitrocompounds were significantly more successful in inhibiting growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms compared to those non-nitrocompounds. These results suggest that nitrocompounds exhibit potential to reduce ammonia volatilization in poultry manure by inhibiting growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms.

  4. Farnesol inhibits translation to limit growth and filamentation in C. albicans and S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkechi E. Egbe

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast where the capacity to switch between yeast and filamentous growth is critical for pathogenicity. Farnesol is a quorum-sensing sesquiterpene alcohol that, via regulation of specific signalling and transcription components, inhibits filamentous growth in C. albicans. Here we show that farnesol also inhibits translation at the initiation step in both C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. In contrast to fusel alcohols, that target the eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B, farnesol affects the interaction of the mRNA with the small ribosomal subunit leading to reduced levels of the 48S preinitiation ribosomal complex in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, farnesol targets a different step in the translation pathway than fusel alcohols to elicit a completely opposite physiological outcome by negating filamentous growth.

  5. D-Tagatose inhibits the growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasibul, Khaleque; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Ogawa, Takaaki; Waki, Junpei; Tada, Ayano; Yoneda, Saori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Miyake, Minoru; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2018-01-01

    Dental caries is an important global health concern and Streptococcus mutans has been established as a major cariogenic bacterial species. Reports indicate that a rare sugar, D-tagatose, is not easily catabolized by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans GS-5 were examined. Monitoring S. mutans growth over a 24 h period revealed that D-tagatose prolonged the lag phase without interfering with the final cell yield. This growth retardation was also observed in the presence of 1% sucrose, although it was abolished by the addition of D-fructose. S. mutans biofilm formation was significantly inhibited by growth in sucrose media supplemented with 1 and 4% D-tagatose compared with that in a culture containing sucrose alone, while S. mutans formed granular biofilms in the presence of this rare sugar. The inhibitory effect of D-tagatose on S. mutans biofilm formation was significantly more evident than that of xylitol. Growth in sucrose media supplemented with D-tagatose significantly decreased the expression of glucosyltransferase, exo-β-fructosidase and D-fructose-specific phosphotransferase genes but not the expression of fructosyltransferase compared with the culture containing sucrose only. The activity of cell-associated glucosyltransferase in S. mutans was inhibited by 4% D-tagatose. These results indicate that D-tagatose reduces water-insoluble glucan production from sucrose by inhibiting glucosyltransferase activities, which limits access to the free D-fructose released during this process and retards the growth of S. mutans. Therefore, foods and oral care products containing D-tagatose are anticipated to reduce the risk of caries by inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation. PMID:29115611

  6. Tumor stromal vascular endothelial growth factor A is predictive of poor outcome in inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias-Pulido, Hugo; Chaher, Nabila; Gong, Yun; Qualls, Clifford; Vargas, Jake; Royce, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a highly angiogenic disease; thus, antiangiogenic therapy should result in a clinical response. However, clinical trials have demonstrated only modest responses, and the reasons for these outcomes remain unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prognostic value of protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), one of the main targets of antiangiogenic therapy, and its receptors (VEGF-R1 and -R2) in IBC tumor specimens. Specimens from IBC and normal breast tissues were obtained from Algerian patients. Tumor epithelial and stromal staining of VEGF-A, VEGF-R1, and VEGF-R2 was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis in tumors and normal breast tissues; this expression was correlated with clinicopathological variables and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) duration. From a set of 117 IBC samples, we evaluated 103 ductal IBC tissues and 25 normal specimens. Significantly lower epithelial VEGF-A immunostaining was found in IBC tumor cells than in normal breast tissues (P <0.01), cytoplasmic VEGF-R1 and nuclear VEGF-R2 levels were slightly higher, and cytoplasmic VEGF-R2 levels were significantly higher (P = 0.04). Sixty-two percent of IBC tumors had high stromal VEGF-A expression. In univariate analysis, stromal VEGF-A levels predicted BCSS and DFS in IBC patients with estrogen receptor-positive (P <0.01 for both), progesterone receptor-positive (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03), HER2+ (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03), and lymph node involvement (P <0.01 for both). Strikingly, in a multivariate analysis, tumor stromal VEGF-A was identified as an independent predictor of poor BCSS (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.0; 95% CI: 2.0-12.3; P <0.01) and DFS (HR: 4.2; 95% CI: 1.7-10.3; P <0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that tumor stromal VEGF-A expression is a valuable prognostic indicator of BCSS and DFS at diagnosis and can therefore be used to

  7. Potential mechanisms for the inhibition of tumor cell growth by manganese superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K H; Rodriguez, A M; Carrico, P M; Melendez, J A

    2001-06-01

    Studies from many laboratories have shown that overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits the growth of numerous tumor cell types. The inhibition of tumor cell growth can be attributed to the increase in the steady-state levels of H2O2 as a result of the increased dismuting activity of MnSOD. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of MnSOD enhances the activity of the superoxide (O2*-)-sensitive enzyme aconitase, decreases the intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio, and dose-dependently inhibits pyruvate carboxylase activity. Thus, alterations in the steady-state concentrations of mitochondrial O2*- and H2O2 as a result of MnSOD overexpression can alter the metabolic capacity of the cell leading to inhibition of cell growth. Furthermore, we propose that MnSOD overexpression can modulate the activity of nitric oxide (*NO) by preventing its reaction with O2*-. This hypothesis suggests that the redox environment of the mitochondria can be altered to favor the activity of *NO rather than peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and may explain the enhanced toxicity of *NO-generating compounds toward MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. These findings indicate that therapeutic strategies targeted at overexpressing MnSOD in tumor tissue may be more effective when used in combination with agents that deplete the oxidant-buffering and enhance the *NO-generating capacity of the tumor and host, respectively.

  8. The Involvement of Gibberellins in 1,8-Cineole-Mediated Inhibition of Sprout Growth in Russet Burbank Tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The involvement of gibberellins in 1,8-cineole-mediated inhibition of tuber sprout growth was investigated in non-dormant field- and greenhouse-grown tubers of Russet Burbank. Continuous exposure of tubers to cineole in the vapor-phase resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of sprout growth. Comp...

  9. Dual IGF-I/II-neutralizing antibody MEDI-573 potently inhibits IGF signaling and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jin; Chesebrough, Jon W; Cartlidge, Susan A; Ricketts, Sally-Ann; Incognito, Leonard; Veldman-Jones, Margaret; Blakey, David C; Tabrizi, Mohammad; Jallal, Bahija; Trail, Pamela A; Coats, Steven; Bosslet, Klaus; Chang, Yong S

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF), IGF-I and IGF-II, are small polypeptides involved in regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, and transformation. IGF activities are mediated through binding and activation of IGF-1R or insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A). The role of the IGF-1R pathway in promoting tumor growth and survival is well documented. Overexpression of IGF-II and IR-A is reported in multiple types of cancer and is proposed as a potential mechanism for cancer cells to develop resistance to IGF-1R-targeting therapy. MEDI-573 is a fully human antibody that neutralizes both IGF-I and IGF-II and inhibits IGF signaling through both the IGF-1R and IR-A pathways. Here, we show that MEDI-573 blocks the binding of IGF-I and IGF-II to IGF-1R or IR-A, leading to the inhibition of IGF-induced signaling pathways and cell proliferation. MEDI-573 significantly inhibited the in vivo growth of IGF-I- or IGF-II-driven tumors. Pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated inhibition of IGF-1R phosphorylation in tumors in mice dosed with MEDI-573, indicating that the antitumor activity is mediated via inhibition of IGF-1R signaling pathways. Finally, MEDI-573 significantly decreased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in IGF-driven tumor models, highlighting the potential utility of (18)F-FDG-PET as a noninvasive pharmacodynamic readout for evaluating the use of MEDI-573 in the clinic. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the inhibition of IGF-I and IGF-II ligands by MEDI-573 results in potent antitumor activity and offers an effective approach to selectively target both the IGF-1R and IR-A signaling pathways.

  10. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Forbes

    Full Text Available Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD; sodium fluoride (FD; stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1; or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC, a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices.

  11. Inhibition of growth of Ulva expansa (chlorophyta) by ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobe, C.W.; Murphy, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 290-320 nm) on the growth rate of the intertidal marine alga Ulva expansa (Setch.) S ampersand G. (Chlorophyta). Segments of thallus collected from a natural population were grown in outdoor seawater tanks. Combinations of UV-B-opaque screens, UV-B transparent screens, and UV-B lamps were used to investigate the effects of solar UV-B and solar plus supplemental UV-B on the growth of these segments. Growth was measured by changes in segment surface area, damp weight, and dry weight. Growth rates of segments were inhibited under both solar UV-B and solar plus supplemental UV-B treatments. Growth rates were also inhibited by high levels of photosynthetically active radiation, independent of UV-B fluence. These results indicate that increases in UV-B resulting from further ozone depletion will have a negative impact on the growth of this alga. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Fluoro-sorafenib (Regorafenib) effects on hepatoma cells: growth inhibition, quiescence and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Brian I.; Cavallini, Aldo; Lippolis, Catia; D’Alessandro, Rosalba; Messa, Caterina; Refolo, Maria Grazia; Tafaro, Angela

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the growth-inhibitory properties of the potent multi-kinase antagonist Regorafenib (Fluoro-Sorafenib), which was synthesized as a more potent Sorafenib, a Raf inhibitor and to determine whether similar mechanisms were involved, human hepatoma cell lines were grown in the presence or absence of Regorafanib and examined for growth inhibition. Western blots were performed for Raf targets, for apoptosis and autophagy. Regorafenib inhibited growth of human Hep3B, PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Multiple signaling pathways were altered, including MAP kinases phospho-ERK and phospho-JNK and its target phospho-c-Jun. There was evidence for apoptosis by FACS, cleavage of caspases and increased Bax levels; as well as induction of autophagy, as judged by increased Beclin-1 and LC3 (II) levels. Prolonged drug exposure resulted in cell quiescence. Full growth recovery occurred after drug removal, unlike with doxorubicin chemotherapy. Regorafenib is a potent inhibitor of cell growth. Cells surviving Regorafenib treatment remain viable, but quiescent and capable of regrowth following drug removal. The reversibility of tumor cell growth suppression after drug removal may have clinical implications. PMID:22777740

  13. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I and growth inhibition of human cancer cell lines by an oleanane from Junellia aspera (Verbenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungitore, C R; Padron, J M; Leon, L G; Garcia, C; Ciuffo, G M; Martin, V S; Tonn, C E

    2007-05-15

    DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases are enzymes that play a crucial role in DNA metabolism events such as replication, transcription, recombination, and chromosome segregation during mitosis. Thus, DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases inhibitors could be expected to have antitumor effects. Naturally occurring triterpenoids isolated from Junellia aspera (Gillies & Hook; Moldenke) (Verbenaceae) were assayed for human DNA topoisomerase I and Taq DNA polymerase inhibitory activities. Maslinic acid (2) and its diacetyl derivative (7) showed human DNA topoisomerase I inhibitory activity with IC50 values in the range of 76-80 microM and growth inhibition against various human solid tumour cell lines with GI50 values in the range of 5-18 microM. The triterpene frames could be used for screening new inhibitors of the enzyme, and computer-simulated drug design using the frame and pocket structure of enzyme may in theory be a possible approach to develop new inhibitors.

  14. Ginger inhibits cell growth and modulates angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jennifer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc is a natural dietary component with antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. The ginger component [6]-gingerol has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects through mediation of NF-κB. NF-κB can be constitutively activated in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and may contribute towards increased transcription and translation of angiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ginger on tumor cell growth and modulation of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Methods The effect of ginger and the major ginger components on cell growth was determined in a panel of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. Activation of NF-κB and and production of VEGF and IL-8 was determined in the presence or absence of ginger. Results Ginger treatment of cultured ovarian cancer cells induced profound growth inhibition in all cell lines tested. We found that in vitro, 6-shogaol is the most active of the individual ginger components tested. Ginger treatment resulted in inhibition of NF-kB activation as well as diminished secretion of VEGF and IL-8. Conclusion Ginger inhibits growth and modulates secretion of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells. The use of dietary agents such as ginger may have potential in the treatment and prevention of ovarian cancer.

  15. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany))

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  16. Methyl anthranilate and γ-decalactone inhibit strawberry pathogen growth and achene Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Alan H; Evans, Shane Alan; Folta, Kevin M

    2013-12-26

    Plant volatile compounds have been shown to affect microbial growth and seed germination. Here two fruity volatiles found in strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa ), γ-decalactone ("peachlike" aroma) and methyl anthranilate ("grapelike" aroma), were tested for effects on relevant pathogens and seedling emergence. Significant growth reduction was observed for Botrytis cinerea , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , Colletotrichum acutatum , Phomopsis obscurans , and Gnomonia fragariae at 1 mM γ-decalactone or methyl anthranilate, and 5 mM γ-decalactone or methyl anthranilate supplemented medium resulted in complete cessation of fungal growth. Phytophthora cactorum was especially sensitive to 1 mM γ-decalactone, showing complete growth inhibition. Bacteriostatic effects were observed in Xanthamonas cultures. Postharvest infestations on store-bought strawberries were inhibited with volatile treatment. The γ-decalactone volatile inhibited strawberry and Arabidopsis thaliana germination. These findings show that two compounds contributing to strawberry flavor may also contribute to shelf life and suggest that γ-decalactone may play an ecological role by preventing premature germination.

  17. KAEMPFEROL, A FLAVONOID COMPOUND FROM GYNURA MEDICA INDUCED APOPTOSIS AND GROWTH INHIBITION IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELL

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Xiaofang; Zuo, Jiangcheng; Tan, Chao; Xian, Sheng; Luo, Chunhua; Chen, Sai; Yu, Liangfang; Luo, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has been shown to induce cancer cell apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in several tumors. Previously we have conducted a full investigation on the chemical constituents of Gynura medica, kaempferol and its glycosides are the major constituents of G. medica. Here we investigated the growth inhibition and apoptosis induction effect of kaempferol extracted from G. medica. Materials and Methods: The inhibition effects of kaempferol were evaluated by...

  18. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yihui [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 150 Haping Road, 150081 Harbin (China); Tang, Qingchao [Cancer Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, 150086 Harbin (China); Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 150 Haping Road, 150081 Harbin (China); Wang, Xishan, E-mail: wxshan12081@163.com [Cancer Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, 150086 Harbin (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3′-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  19. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yihui; Tang, Qingchao; Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong; Wang, Xishan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3′-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

  20. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  1. Oridonin inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through blocking the Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixin Xia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens with potent anticancer activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of oridonin to inhibit growth and metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Methods: The effect of oridonin on proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays in human breast cancer cells. The inhibitive effect of oridonin in vivo was determined by using xenografted nude mice. In addition, the expression of Notch receptors (Notch 1–4 was detected by western blot. Results: Oridonin inhibited human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, oridonin significantly induced human breast cancer cells apoptosis. Furthermore, the oridonin treatment not only inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, but more significantly, decreased the expression of Notch 1-4 protein. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the inhibitive effect of oridonin is likely to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signaling pathway and the resulting increased apoptosis.

  2. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahren, B.

    1987-01-01

    It is known that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits iodide uptake in the thyroid follicular cells and lowers plasma levels of thyroid hormones upon infusion into sheep and ewes. In this study, the effects of EGF on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion were investigated in the mouse. Mice were pretreated with 125 I and thyroxine; the subsequent release of 125 I is an estimation of thyroid hormone secretion. It was found that basal radioiodine secretion was not altered by intravenous injection of EGF (5 micrograms/animal). However, the radioiodine secretion stimulated by both TSH (120 microU/animal) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 5 micrograms/animal) were inhibited by EGF (5 micrograms/animal). At a lower dose level (0.5 microgram/animal), EGF had no influence on stimulated radioiodine secretion. In conclusion, EGF inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

  3. The inhibition of crystal growth of mirabilite in aqueous solutions in the presence of phosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavouraki, A. I.; Koutsoukos, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of sodium sulfate decahydrate (Mirabilite) has been known to cause serious damages to structural materials both of modern and of historical buildings. Methods which can retard or completely suppress the development of mirabilte crystals are urgently needed especially as remedies or preventive measures for the preservation of the built cultural heritage. In the present work we present results on the effect of the presence of phosphonate compounds on the kinetics of crystal growth from aqueous supersaturated solutions at 18 °C using the seeded growth technique. The phosphonate compounds tested differed with respect to the number of ionizable phosphonate groups and with respect to the number of amino groups in the respective molecules. The crystal growth process was monitored by the temperature changes during the exothermic crystallization of mirabilite in the stirred supersaturated solutions. The crystal growth of mirabilite in the presence of: (1-hydroxyethylidene)-1, 1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), amino tri (methylene phosphonic acid) (ATMP), hexamethylenediaminetetra (methylene)phosphonic acid (HTDMP), and diethylene triamine penta(methylene phosphonic acid)(DETPMP) over a range of concentrations between 0.1-5% w/w resulted in significant decrease of the rates of mirabilite crystal growth. All phosphonic compounds tested reduced the crystallization rates up to 60% in comparison with additive-free solutions. The presence of the test compounds did not cause changes of the mechanism of crystal growth which was surface diffusion controlled, as shown by the second order dependence of the rates of mirabilite crystal growth on the relative supersaturation. The excellent fit of the measured rates to a kinetic Langmuir-type model suggested that the activity of the tested inhibitors could be attributed to the adsorption and subsequent reduction of the active crystal growth sites of the seed crystals. In all cases, the inhibitory activity was reduced with

  4. Nanoprodrugs of NSAIDs Inhibit the Growth of U87-MG Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Seop Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several recent reports have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs inhibit the growth of various malignant cells suggesting their application as anticancer agents. In this study, we prepared six nanometer-sized prodrugs (nanoprodrugs of NSAIDs, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and naproxen through the spontaneous emulsification mechanism using monomeric and dimeric derivatives of the NSAIDs. We evaluated their effect on the proliferation of U87-MG glioma cells by cell counting, WST-1 cell proliferation reagent, and propidium iodide incorporation. The two ibuprofen nanoprodrugs inhibited the cell growth more potently than the indomethacin nanoprodrugs, whereas the naproxen nanoprodrugs did not show any significant effect. Remarkably, ibuprofen did not show any effect at an equimolar concentration. Approximately, 4.4% of the ibuprofen nanoprodrugs was found in the cell, whereas no ibuprofen could be detected suggesting that the superior effect of the nanoprodrugs can be attributed to the efficient cellular uptake of the nanoprodrugs.

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and mice gastric mucosa colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori drug-resistant strains and non-compliance to therapy are the major causes of H. pylori eradication failure. For some bacterial species it has been demonstrated that fatty acids have a growth inhibitory effect. Our main aim was to assess the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to inhibit H. pylori growth both in vitro and in a mouse model. The effectiveness of standard therapy (ST in combination with DHA on H. pylori eradication and recurrence prevention success was also investigated. The effects of DHA on H. pylori growth were analyzed in an in vitro dose-response study and n in vivo model. We analized the ability of H. pylori to colonize mice gastric mucosa following DHA, ST or a combination of both treatments. Our data demonstrate that DHA decreases H. pylori growth in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA inhibits H. pylori gastric colonization in vivo as well as decreases mouse gastric mucosa inflammation. Addition of DHA to ST was also associated with lower H. pylori infection recurrence in the mouse model. In conclusion, DHA is an inhibitor of H. pylori growth and its ability to colonize mouse stomach. DHA treatment is also associated with a lower recurrence of H. pylori infection in combination with ST. These observations pave the way to consider DHA as an adjunct agent in H. pylori eradication treatment.

  6. Differential oxidative and antioxidative response of duckweed Lemna minor toward plant growth promoting/inhibiting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Kuroda, Masashi; Morikawa, Masaaki; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria colonizing the plant rhizosphere are believed to positively or negatively affect the host plant productivity. This feature has inspired researchers to engineer such interactions to enhance crop production. However, it remains to be elucidated whether rhizobacteria influences plant oxidative stress vis-a-vis other environmental stressors, and whether such influence is associated with their growth promoting/inhibiting ability. In this study, two plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) and two plant growth-inhibiting bacteria (PGIB) were separately inoculated into axenic duckweed (Lemna minor) culture under laboratory conditions for 4 and 8 days in order to investigate their effects on plant oxidative stress and antioxidant activities. As previously characterized, the inoculation of PGPB and PGIB strains accelerated and reduced the growth of L. minor, respectively. After 4 and 8 days of cultivation, compared to the PGPB strains, the PGIB strains induced larger amounts of O 2 •- , H 2 O 2 , and malondialdehyde (MDA) in duckweed, although all bacterial strains consistently increased O 2 •- content by two times more than that in the aseptic control plants. Activities of five antioxidant enzymes were also elevated by the inoculation of PGIB, confirming the severe oxidative stress condition in plants. These results suggest that the surface attached bacteria affect differently on host oxidative stress and its response, which degree correlates negatively to their effects on plant growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  8. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling antagonizes serous ovarian cancer growth in a primary xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K McCann

    Full Text Available Recent evidence links aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh signaling with the pathogenesis of several cancers including medulloblastoma, basal cell, small cell lung, pancreatic, prostate and ovarian. This investigation was designed to determine if inhibition of this pathway could inhibit serous ovarian cancer growth.We utilized an in vivo pre-clinical model of serous ovarian cancer to characterize the anti-tumor activity of Hh pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and a clinically applicable derivative, IPI-926. Primary human serous ovarian tumor tissue was used to generate tumor xenografts in mice that were subsequently treated with cyclopamine or IPI-926.Both compounds demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity as single agents. When IPI-926 was used in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatinum (T/C, no synergistic effect was observed, though sustained treatment with IPI-926 after cessation of T/C continued to suppress tumor growth. Hh pathway activity was analyzed by RT-PCR to assess changes in Gli1 transcript levels. A single dose of IPI-926 inhibited mouse stromal Gli1 transcript levels at 24 hours with unchanged human intra-tumor Gli1 levels. Chronic IPI-926 therapy for 21 days, however, inhibited Hh signaling in both mouse stromal and human tumor cells. Expression data from the micro-dissected stroma in human serous ovarian tumors confirmed the presence of Gli1 transcript and a significant association between elevated Gli1 transcript levels and worsened survival.IPI-926 treatment inhibits serous tumor growth suggesting the Hh signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and may hold promise as a novel therapeutic target, especially in the maintenance setting.

  9. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Xiu Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tang, Xiuwen, E-mail: xiuwentang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup −/−} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  10. Algal growth inhibition test in filled, closed bottles for volatile and sorptive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Nyholm, Niels; Verbruggen, Eric M. J.

    2000-01-01

    , and the resulting dissolved CO2 concentration supported maximum algal growth rates without pH drift for algal densities up to 4 mg dry weight/L. Two-day toxicity tests with kerosene were performed with this new test design and compared with an open bottle test and with a closed bottle test with headspace. Exposure...... concentrations of the volatile fraction of kerosene decreased by 99% in the open test, by 77% in the closed flask test with headspace, and by 16% in the filled closed bottle test. Algal growth inhibition was observed at much lower additions of kerosene in the new test design because of the improved maintenance...

  11. Modulation of Host Immunity by Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Virulence Factors: A Synergic Inhibition of Both Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Canedo-Marroquín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and high rates of hospitalizations in children and in the elderly worldwide. Symptoms of hRSV infection include bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The lung pathology observed during hRSV infection is due in part to an exacerbated host immune response, characterized by immune cell infiltration to the lungs. HRSV is an enveloped virus, a member of the Pneumoviridae family, with a non-segmented genome and negative polarity-single RNA that contains 10 genes encoding for 11 proteins. These include the Fusion protein (F, the Glycoprotein (G, and the Small Hydrophobic (SH protein, which are located on the virus surface. In addition, the Nucleoprotein (N, Phosphoprotein (P large polymerase protein (L part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex, the M2-1 protein as a transcription elongation factor, the M2-2 protein as a regulator of viral transcription and (M protein all of which locate inside the virion. Apart from the structural proteins, the hRSV genome encodes for the non-structural 1 and 2 proteins (NS1 and NS2. HRSV has developed different strategies to evade the host immunity by means of the function of some of these proteins that work as virulence factors to improve the infection in the lung tissue. Also, hRSV NS-1 and NS-2 proteins have been shown to inhibit the activation of the type I interferon response. Furthermore, the hRSV nucleoprotein has been shown to inhibit the immunological synapsis between the dendritic cells and T cells during infection, resulting in an inefficient T cell activation. Here, we discuss the hRSV virulence factors and the host immunological features raised during infection with this virus.

  12. Transactivation of the TIEG1 confers growth inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-susceptible hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Chan, Chu-Yan; Lu, Gang; Lin, Marie CM; He, Ming-Liang; Li, Ji-Cheng; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) in TGF-β-induced growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: Human hepatocyte and HCC cell lines with varied susceptibilities to TGF-β1 were tested by methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT) assay. The expression changes of Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, Smad7, TIEG1 and TIEG2 gene following treatment with TGF-β1 in a TGF-β-sensitive hepatocyte cell line (MIHA), a TGF-β-sensitive hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) and two TGF-β-insensitive hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Bel7404) were examined. SiRNA targeting TIEG1 was transfected into Hep3B cells and the sensitivity of cells to TGF-β1 was examined. Overexpression of TIEG1 was induced by lentiviral-mediated transduction in TGF-β1-resistant hepatoma cell lines (Bel7404 and HepG2). MTT assay and 4’,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole staining were used to identify cell viability and apoptosis, respectively. The expression level of stathmin was measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western-blotting analysis, and stathmin promoter activity by TIEG1 was monitored by a luciferase reporter gene system. RESULTS: TIEG1 was significantly upregulated by TGF-β1 in the TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cell line, Hep3B, but not in the resistant cell lines. The suppression of TIEG1 by siRNAs decreased the sensitivity of Hep3B cells to TGF-β1, whereas the overexpression of TIEG1 mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis in TGF-β1-resistant HCC cell lines, which resembled those of TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cells treated with TGF-β1. Our data further suggested that stathmin was a direct target of TIEG1, as stathmin was significantly downregulated by TIEG1 overexpression, and stathmin promoter activity was inhibited by TIEG1 in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that transactivation of TIEG1 conferred growth inhibition of TGF-β-susceptible human HCC cells. PMID:22563190

  13. Zebularine inhibits the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Zebularine (Zeb) is a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor to that has an anti-tumor effect. Here, we evaluated the anti-growth effect of Zeb on A549 lung cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC50 of approximately 70 µM at 72 h. Cell cycle analysis indicated that Zeb induced an S phase arrest in A549 cells. Zeb also induced A549 cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm ), Bcl-2 decrease, Bax increase, p53 increase and activation of caspase-3 and -8. In contrast, Zeb mildly inhibited the growth of human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF) normal cells and lead to a G1 phase arrest. Zeb did not induce apoptosis in HPF cells. In relation to ROS level, Zeb increased ROS level in A549 cells and induced glutathione (GSH) depletion. The well-known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevented the death of Zeb-treated A549 cells. Moreover, Zeb increased the level of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in A549 cells. While the overexpression of TrxR1 attenuated death and ROS level in Zeb-treated A549 cells, the downregulation of TrxR1 intensified death and ROS level in these cells. In conclusion, Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The inhibition was influenced by ROS and TrxR1 levels. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that act...

  15. Growth inhibition of human cancer cells in vitro by T-type calcium channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Yeol; Park, Seong Jun; Park, Sung Jun; Lee, Min Joo; Rhim, Hyewhon; Seo, Seon Hee; Kim, Ki-Sun

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the preliminary biological results that novel T-type calcium channel blockers inhibit the growth of human cancer cells by blocking calcium influx into the cell, based on unknown mechanism on the cell cycle responsible for cellular proliferation. Among the selected compounds from compound library, compound 9c (KYS05041) was identified to be nearly equipotent with Cisplatin against some human cancers in the micromolar range.

  16. Radix Astragali and Tanshinone Help Carboplatin Inhibit B16 Tumor Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinyi; Xu, Haiming; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiuying

    2016-08-01

    Excessive UV radiation causes increased melanoma incidence. Postoperation chemotherapy will destroy lymphocytes and compromise immune response. Immunodepression is also detected in patients with cancers. Previous studies suggested that polysaccharide-protein complexes manifested immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. Radix Astragali (RA) extract is a product of polysaccharide-protein complexes, which has been used in the treatment of a variety of diseases because of its low toxicity to the host. Tanshinone (TA) is a derivative of phenanthrenequinone isolated from Danshen, which is suggested to inhibit tumor growth by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. Carboplatin (CA) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug in melanoma treatment. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of RA and TA will help CA better inhibit the B16 cell growth. The study will test that the efficacy of growth inhibition of tumor cell produced by CA + RA + TA is better than CA + RA or CA + TA. The B16 tumor cells were injected to Swiss-Hauschka (ICR) mice subcutaneously. Twenty-four hours later, mice received CA intraperitoneally, CA + RA (RA were administered gastrically at the dosage of 10 g/kg body weight), CA + TA (TA were administered gastrically at the dosage of 0.5 g/kg body weight), or no treatment (model group). Tumor weight, volume, latency, incidence, the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) in spleen, and natural killer (NK), and cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) activities were measured and compared among different groups. Compared with mice treated with CA + RA, CA + TA, or CA alone, the mice treated with CA + RA + TA showed (1) significantly smaller tumor weight and tumor volume; (2) significantly longer tumor latency; (3) significantly lower tumor incidence; and (4) significantly increased percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) in spleen and increased activities of NK and CTL. Combination of RA and TA can help CA produce more effective inhibition on B16 cell growth. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Methylthioadenosine (MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. Methods To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. Results In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Conclusions MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment.

  18. Inhibition of the Growth of Plasmodium falciparum in Culture by Stearylamine-Phosphatidylcholine Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulam Mustafa Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effect of stearylamine (SA in liposomes on the viability of Plasmodium falciparum in culture by studying the inhibition of incorporation of [3H]-hypoxanthine in the nucleic acid of parasites. Stearylamine in liposomes significantly inhibits the growth of the parasites depending on the phospholipids composition. The maximum inhibition was observed when SA was delivered through Soya phosphatidylcholine (SPC liposomes. The chain length of alkyl group and density of SA in liposomes play a significant role in inhibiting the growth of the parasites. Incorporation of either cholesterol or Distearylphosphatidylethanolamine−Methoxy-Polyethylene glycol-2000 (DSPE-mPEG-2000 in Soya phosphatidylcholine-stearylamine (SPC-SA liposomes improves the efficacy. Intraerythrocytic entry of intact SPC-SA liposomes into infected erythrocytes was visualized using fluorescent microscopy. No hemolysis was observed in uninfected erythrocytes, and slight hemolysis was noted in infected erythrocytes at high concentrations of SPC-SA liposomes. Overall, our data suggested SA in SPC-liposomes might have potential application in malaria chemotherapy.

  19. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TNF-α or IL-1β induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. → CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-α or IL-1β-induced EC proliferation. → Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-α or IL-1β. → Capillary formation induced by TNF-α or IL-1β is enahced in the CD26 -/- mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  20. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasawa, Wataru [Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kei [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko [Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, Box 100278, Room MSB M410A, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  1. Calorimetric determination of inhibition of ice crystal growth by antifreeze protein in hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T N; Carpenter, J F

    1993-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and cryomicroscopy were used to investigate the effects of type I antifreeze protein (AFP) from winter flounder on 58% solutions of hydroxyethyl starch. The glass, devitrification, and melt transitions noted during rewarming were unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Isothermal annealing experiments were undertaken to detect the effects of AFP-induced inhibition of ice crystal growth using calorimetry. A premelt endothermic peak was detected during warming after the annealing procedure. Increasing the duration or the temperature of the annealing for the temperature range from -28 and -18 degrees C resulted in a gradual increase in the enthalpy of the premelt endotherm. This transition was unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Annealing between -18 and -10 degrees C resulted in a gradual decrease in the premelt peak enthalpy. This process was inhibited by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Cryomicroscopic examination of the samples revealed that AFP inhibited ice recrystallization during isothermal annealing at -10 degrees C. Annealing at lower temperatures resulted in minimal ice recrystallization and no visible effect of AFP. Thus, the 100 micrograms/ml AFP to have a detectable influence on thermal events in the calorimeter, conditions must be used that result in significant ice growth without AFP and visible inhibition of this process by AFP. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:7690257

  2. Survivin inhibits anti-growth effect of p53 activated by aurora B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Joong-Seob; Oh, Se-Yeong; Kwak, Sungwook; Jin, Xun; Sohn, Jin-Young; Song, Min-Keun; Sohn, Young-Woo; Lee, Soo-Yeon; Pian, Xumin; Lee, Jang-Bo; Chung, Yong Gu; Choi, Young Ki; You, Seungkwon; Kim, Hyunggee

    2005-01-01

    Genomic instability and apoptosis evasion are hallmarks of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms governing these processes remain elusive. Here, we found that survivin, a member of the apoptosis-inhibiting gene family, and aurora B kinase, a chromosomal passenger protein, were co-overexpressed in the various glioblastoma cell lines and tumors. Notably, exogenous introduction of the aurora B in human BJ cells was shown to decrease cell growth and increase the senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity by activation of p53 tumor suppressor. However, aurora B overexpression failed to inhibit cell proliferation in BJ and U87MG cells transduced with dominant-negative p53 as well as in p53 -/- mouse astrocytes. Aurora B was shown to increase centrosome amplification in the p53 -/- astrocytes. Survivin was shown to induce anchorage-independent growth and inhibit anti-proliferation and drug-sensitive apoptosis caused by aurora B. Overexpression of both survivin and aurora B further accelerated the proliferation of BJ cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that survivin should accelerate tumorigenesis by inhibiting the anti-proliferative effect of p53 tumor suppressor that is activated by aurora B in normal and glioblastoma cells containing intact p53

  3. Probiotic Lactobacillus sp. inhibit growth, biofilm formation and gene expression of caries-inducing Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfi, Reham; Abd El-Rahman, Ola A; Zafer, Mai M; Ashour, Hossam M

    2018-03-01

    Streptococcus mutans contributes significantly to dental caries, which arises from homoeostasic imbalance between host and microbiota. We hypothesized that Lactobacillus sp. inhibits growth, biofilm formation and gene expression of Streptococcus mutans. Antibacterial (agar diffusion method) and antibiofilm (crystal violet assay) characteristics of probiotic Lactobacillus sp. against Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) were evaluated. We investigated whether Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 393), Lactobacillus reuteri (ATCC 23272), Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 14917) or Lactobacillus salivarius (ATCC 11741) inhibit expression of Streptococcus mutans genes involved in biofilm formation, quorum sensing or stress survival using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Growth changes (OD600) in the presence of pH-neutralized, catalase-treated or trypsin-treated Lactobacillus sp. supernatants were assessed to identify roles of organic acids, peroxides and bacteriocin. Susceptibility testing indicated antibacterial (pH-dependent) and antibiofilm activities of Lactobacillus sp. against Streptococcus mutans. Scanning electron microscopy revealed reduction in microcolony formation and exopolysaccharide structural changes. Of the oral normal flora, L. salivarius exhibited the highest antibiofilm and peroxide-dependent antimicrobial activities. All biofilm-forming cells treated with Lactobacillus sp. supernatants showed reduced expression of genes involved in exopolysaccharide production, acid tolerance and quorum sensing. Thus, Lactobacillus sp. can inhibit tooth decay by limiting growth and virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  4. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase links oxidative PPP, lipogenesis and tumour growth by inhibiting LKB1-AMPK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruiting; Elf, Shannon; Shan, Changliang; Kang, Hee-Bum; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Lu; Hitosugi, Taro; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Shuai; Seo, Jae Ho; Xie, Jianxin; Tucker, Meghan; Gu, Ting-Lei; Sudderth, Jessica; Jiang, Lei; Mitsche, Matthew; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Wu, Shaoxiong; Li, Yuancheng; Mao, Hui; Chen, Peng R; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Georgia Zhuo; Hurwitz, Selwyn J; Lonial, Sagar; Arellano, Martha L; Khoury, Hanna J; Khuri, Fadlo R; Lee, Benjamin H; Lei, Qunying; Brat, Daniel J; Ye, Keqiang; Boggon, Titus J; He, Chuan; Kang, Sumin; Fan, Jun; Chen, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) contributes to tumour growth, but the precise contribution of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), the third enzyme in this pathway, to tumorigenesis remains unclear. We found that suppression of 6PGD decreased lipogenesis and RNA biosynthesis and elevated ROS levels in cancer cells, attenuating cell proliferation and tumour growth. 6PGD-mediated production of ribulose-5-phosphate (Ru-5-P) inhibits AMPK activation by disrupting the active LKB1 complex, thereby activating acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and lipogenesis. Ru-5-P and NADPH are thought to be precursors in RNA biosynthesis and lipogenesis, respectively; thus, our findings provide an additional link between the oxidative PPP and lipogenesis through Ru-5-P-dependent inhibition of LKB1-AMPK signalling. Moreover, we identified and developed 6PGD inhibitors, physcion and its derivative S3, that effectively inhibited 6PGD, cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth in nude mice xenografts without obvious toxicity, suggesting that 6PGD could be an anticancer target.

  5. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei; Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI 50 ) concentration of 2.35 μM. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  6. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  7. Ultrasound-mediated interferon β gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-β genes both in vitro and in vivo. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon β (IFN-β) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-β in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-β genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-β gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-β gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  8. Targeting tumor multicellular aggregation through IGPR-1 inhibits colon cancer growth and improves chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, N; Pearson, B E; Bondzie, P A; Meyer, R D; Lavaei, M; Belkina, A C; Chitalia, V; Rahimi, N

    2017-09-18

    Adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucially important for survival of normal epithelial cells as detachment from ECM triggers specific apoptosis known as anoikis. As tumor cells lose the requirement for anchorage to ECM, they rely on cell-cell adhesion 'multicellular aggregation' for survival. Multicellular aggregation of tumor cells also significantly determines the sensitivity of tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics. In this report, we demonstrate that expression of immunoglobulin containing and proline-rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) is upregulated in human primary colon cancer. Our study demonstrates that IGPR-1 promotes tumor multicellular aggregation, and interfering with its adhesive function inhibits multicellular aggregation and, increases cell death. IGPR-1 supports colon carcinoma tumor xenograft growth in mouse, and inhibiting its activity by shRNA or blocking antibody inhibits tumor growth. More importantly, IGPR-1 regulates sensitivity of tumor cells to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin/adriamycin by a mechanism that involves doxorubicin-induced AKT activation and phosphorylation of IGPR-1 at Ser220. Our findings offer novel insight into IGPR-1's role in colorectal tumor growth, tumor chemosensitivity, and as a possible novel anti-cancer target.

  9. [Growth inhibition of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood by tabletop dry ice cooler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yumi; Kimura, Bon; Fujii, Tateo; Tokunaga, Yoshinori; Matsubayashi, Megumi; Aikawa, Yasushi

    2005-10-01

    Tabletop dry ice coolers (three types; dome model, cap model and tripod model), which are used in kitchens and hotel banquet halls to refrigerate fresh seafood, were investigated to determine whether growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was inhibited by their use. On TSA plates containing 1.8% NaCl and fresh seafood (fillets of squid, pink shrimp and yellowtail), V. parahaemolyticus (O3:K6, TDH+) inoculated at 4 to 5 log CFU/sample and left at ambient temperature (25 degrees C) grew by 1.0 to 2.8 orders in 4 hours. In contrast, with tabletop coolers no significant increase in viable count occurred in 3 to 4 hours, confirming that tabletop coolers inhibited the growth of V. parahaemolyticus. The temperature in each tabletop cooler was kept below 10 degrees C for 80 to 135 min, though the CO2 gas concentration in them remained high for only a short time (0 to 75 min). It was presumed that the refrigeration function mainly contributed to growth inhibition. Our results indicate that tabletop dry ice coolers are helpful for prevention of food-borne disease due to V. parahaemolyticus in food-service locations, such as kitchens and banquet halls.

  10. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin

  11. Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon inhibit axonal growth by interfering with the morphogenic activity of acetylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE -/- ) versus wild type (AChE +/+ ) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE +/+ DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE -/- DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE -/- DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wild type response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs

  12. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human keloid cell characterization and inhibition of growth with human Wharton's jelly stem cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Subramanian, Arjunan; Srinivasan, Akshaya; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-05-01

    Keloids are firm rubbery growths that grow beyond the boundaries of human wounds and their treatment has met with limited success. Their properties and growth behavior have not been properly characterized and it has been suggested that a benign neoplastic stem cell-like phenotype in an altered cytokine microenvironment drives their uncontrolled cell proliferation. Modification of the stem cell niche may be an attractive approach to its prevention. We studied the growth behavior, stemness, and tumorigenic characteristics of keloid cells in prolonged culture. Since human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) secrete high levels of cytokines and have anti-tumorigenic properties we explored its role on the inhibition of keloid growth in vitro. Keloid cells grew readily in both adherent and sphere culture and expressed high levels of mesenchymal CD and tumor-associated fibroblast (TAF) markers up to passage 10. When they were exposed to repeat doses of hWJSC conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) and lysate (hWJSC-CL) every 72 h up to 9 days their growth was inhibited with a reduction in CD and TAF marker expression. On Days 3, 6, and 9 treated keloid cells showed linear decreases in cell proliferation (BrdU), increases in Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL-positive cells, interruptions of the cell cycle and inhibition of migration in scratch-wound assays. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR confirmed a significant downregulation of TAF and anti-apoptotic-related gene (SURVIVIN) expression and upregulation of autophagy-related (BAX, ATG5, ATG7, BECLIN-1) gene expression. The results suggest that hWJSCs or molecules secreted by them may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of keloids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-12-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pH(i)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pH(i), was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pH(i) recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pH(i), and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pH(i) upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport.

  15. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A; Cimino, Patrick J; Gianino, Scott M; Gutmann, David H

    2015-06-01

    Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma-bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma-associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1-optic pathway glioma clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  16. Dynamic light scattering study of inhibition of nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals by osteopontin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R de Bruyn

    Full Text Available We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN, which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN's ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation.

  17. Systematic characterization of artificial small RNA-mediated inhibition of Escherichia coli growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noro, Emiko; Mori, Masaru; Makino, Gakuto; Takai, Yuki; Ohnuma, Sumiko; Sato, Asako; Tomita, Masaru; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Kanai, Akio

    2017-02-01

    A new screening system for artificial small RNAs (sRNAs) that inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli was constructed. In this system, we used a plasmid library to express RNAs of ∼120 nucleotides, each with a random 30-nucleotide sequence that can recognize its target mRNA(s). After approximately 60,000 independent colonies were screened, several plasmids that inhibited bacterial growth were isolated. To understand the inhibitory mechanism, we focused on one sRNA, S-20, that exerted a strong inhibitory effect. A time-course analysis of the proteome of S-20-expressing E. coli and a bioinformatic analysis were used to identify potential S-20 target mRNAs, and suggested that S-20 binds the translation initiation sites of several mRNAs encoding enzymes such as peroxiredoxin (osmC), glycyl-tRNA synthetase α subunit (glyQ), uncharacterized protein ygiM, and tryptophan synthase β chain (trpB). An in vitro translation analysis of chimeric luciferase-encoding mRNAs, each containing a potential S-20 target sequence, indicated that the translation of these mRNAs was inhibited in the presence of S-20. A gel shift analysis combined with the analysis of a series of S-20 mutants suggested that S-20 targets multiple mRNAs that are responsible for inhibiting E. coli growth. These data also suggest that S-20 acts like an endogenous sRNA and that E. coli can utilize artificial sRNAs.

  18. Dental composite materials containing carolacton inhibit biofilm growth of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Christian; Barg, Andree; Rheinberg, Anke; Conrads, Georg; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2013-11-01

    Caries adjacent to restorations is one of the main causes for restoration replacement. Antimicrobial substances incorporated into dental materials would potentially be able to reduce secondary caries initiation and progression. This study investigated biofilm growth of Streptococcus mutans UA159 on the surface of composite materials containing the biomolecule carolacton compared to materials containing chlorhexidine (CHX) and triclosan. Biofilm inhibition was investigated by counting colony forming units (CFU), viability staining (Life/Dead), and real-time quantitative PCR. First, the antimicrobial substances were added to the cultivation medium at 2.5 μg/ml (0.0002%) and 0.25 μg/ml (0.00002%). CHX eliminated bacterial growth and biofilm formation completely. Triclosan was effective at 2.5 μg/ml, but at 0.25 μg/ml biofilm mass and viability were unchanged, yet the number of CFU increased due to disruption of cell chains and biofilm aggregates. Carolacton had a limited effect on biofilm growth and mass, but reduced viability significantly. When incorporated into composite materials carolacton (25 μg/ml resp. 0.002%, w/w) had no adverse effect on physical/mechanical properties and retained its biofilm inhibiting effect. Life/Dead staining revealed a reduction of biofilm viability of up to 64%. CFUs were reduced by 98% and qPCR demonstrated a mean inhibition of 87%. In contrast, materials containing CHX or triclosan showed an insignificant effect on biofilm formation, even at a 100 fold increased concentration (0.2%). The anti-biofilm activity of composite material containing carolacton was stable over a period of 42 days. Carolacton incorporated into dental filling material has a strong biofilm-inhibiting effect on S. mutans and is therefore potentially able to prevent secondary caries formation. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings.

  20. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks.

  1. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinelt, Thomas; Phan, T.; Behrens, S.

    2015-01-01

    contribute to sustainable aquaculture. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of 6 commercial PAA products with different molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios to reduce bacterial growth of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri and to determine effective concentrations and exposure times. All...... products reduced colony-forming units (CFUs) of A. salmonicida and Y. ruckeri. Products with higher molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios inhibited growth better than products with lower molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios at the same PAA concentration; this indicates that H2O2 is not the driving force in the reduction of A....... salmonicida and Y. ruckeri growth by PAA in vitro. The practical application of the products with high molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios should be prioritized if these pathogens are diagnosed...

  2. Inhibition of nucleation and growth of ice by poly(vinyl alcohol) in vitrification solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Inada, Takaaki; Funakoshi, Kunio; Lu, Shu-Shen

    2009-08-01

    Control of ice formation is crucial in cryopreservation of biological substances. Successful vitrification using several additives that inhibit ice nucleation in vitrification solutions has previously been reported. Among these additives, here we focused on a synthetic polymer, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and investigated the effects of PVA on nucleation and growth of ice in 35% (w/w) aqueous 1,2-propanediol solution by using a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) system equipped with a cryomicroscope. First, the freezing temperature of the solution was measured using the DSC system, and then the change in ice fraction in the solution during cooling was evaluated based on images obtained using the cryomicroscope, at different concentrations of PVA between 0% and 3% (w/w). Based on the ice fraction, the change in residual solution concentration during cooling was also evaluated and then plotted on the state diagram of aqueous 1,2-propanediol solution. Results indicated that, when the partially glassy and partially frozen state was intentionally allowed, the addition of PVA effectively inhibited not only ice nucleation but also ice growth in the vitrification solution. The effect of PVA on ice growth in the vitrification solution was explained based on kinetic limitations mainly due to mass transport. The interfacial kinetics also might limit ice growth in the vitrification solution only when the ice growth rate decreased below a critical value. This coincides with the fact that PVA exhibits a unique antifreeze activity in the same manner as antifreeze proteins when ice growth rate is lower than a critical value.

  3. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Hesketh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP, cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection.

  4. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Shu-Cheng; Guo, Wei; Tao, Ze-Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression

  5. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Department of Zoology, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Singh, Harminder Pal, E-mail: hpsingh_01@yahoo.com [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani [Department of Botany, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 {mu}W cm{sup -2}; 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at {>=}2 h), and radicle and plumule growths ({>=}1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  6. Effective inhibition of bacterial respiration and growth by CuO microspheres composed of thin nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Shams Tabrez; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Ahamed, Maqusood; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2013-11-01

    This study describes the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of copper oxide micro-spheres composed of thin sheets (CuOMSs-Ths). Microscopic observations of synthesized CuOMSs-Ths revealed the clusters of thin sheets arranged in small flower like micro-spheres. Diameter of each micro-sphere was determined in the range of 2-3 μm, whereas the size of each sheet was ∼ 80 nm. These micro-flowers like nanostructures were synthesized using copper nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide via solution process. The CuOMSs-Ths exhibited a broad-spectrum anti-bacterial activity involving significant growth inhibition of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus. The IC50 values of these engineered NPs against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and M. luteus were determined to be 195, 200, 131 and 184 μg/ml, respectively. Also, the respiration of Gram+ ve organisms (M. luteus and S. aureus) was inhibited significantly (p value growth inhibition occurred at a much greater concentration of 100 μg/ml. The results explicitly demonstrated anti-microbial activity of CuOMSs-Ths with a higher level of toxicity against the Gram+ ve vis-a-vis Gram- ve bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii in Experimentally Contaminated Powdered Infant Formula by Kefir Supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kang, Il-Byeong; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Hong-Seok; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Kefir is a type of fermented milk containing lactic and acetic acid bacteria and yeast. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against Cronobacter sakazakii in powdered infant formula (PIF). In a spot-on-lawn test, the growth of 20 C. sakazakii strains, including 10 clinical and 10 food isolates, was completely inhibited in the presence of kefir supernatant. Significant differences in the diameters of inhibition zones were observed upon treatment with kefir compared with the results for Lactobacillus kefiri and Candida kefyr culture supernatants or solutions of lactic and acetic acid and ethyl alcohol in the agar well diffusion test (P kefir supernatant to 1 ml of nutrient broth completely inhibited the growth of C. sakazakii, as evaluated by spectrophotometry. The antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant in experimentally contaminated PIF was also tested; we found no viable C. sakazakii cells remaining in PIF rehydrated with 30% kefir supernatant solution for 1 h, demonstrating that the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against C. sakazakii could be applied in real food samples.

  8. Effect of some fungicides against the growth inhibition of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycelial compatibility groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalili Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary, the causal agent of Sclerotinia stem rot, is one of the most important pathogens of Brassica napus L. in northern Iran. In this study, 13 mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs of the fungus were identified among 31 isolates sampled from four regions of Mazandaran province, Iran. Effective fungicides are useful in the integrated management of the disease. So, the effect of tebuconazole, propiconazole, cyproconazole, and Rovral-TS at five doses (0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 ppm was studied on the growth inhibition of S. sclerotiorum as in vitro tests. Maximum inhibition (100% of S. sclerotiorum mycelial growth was obtained by the highest dose (1 ppm of all tested fungicides, as well as by the doses of 0.1 and 0.01 ppm of propiconazole, cyproconazole, and tebuconazole. In this investigation, the reaction of S. sclerotiorum isolates belonging to different MCGs was evaluated against tebuconazole, propiconazole, cyproconazole, and Rovral-TS at their EC50 ranges. The results revealed that there was high variation of S. sclerotiorum MCGs against different fungicides. The inhibition percentage varied between 4.29% and 71.72%.

  9. Inhibition of E. coli Growth by Nanodiamond and Graphene Oxide Enhanced by Luria-Bertani Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Jira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanodiamonds (NDs and graphene oxide (GO are modern carbon-based nanomaterials with promising features for the inhibition of microorganism growth ability. Here we compare the effects of nanodiamond and graphene oxide in both annealed (oxidized and reduced (hydrogenated forms in two types of cultivation media—Luria-Bertani (LB and Mueller-Hinton (MH broths. The comparison shows that the number of colony forming unit (CFU of Escherichia coli is significantly lowered (45% by all the nanomaterials in LB medium for at least 24 h against control. On the contrary, a significant long-term inhibition of E. coli growth (by 45% in the MH medium is provided only by hydrogenated NDs terminated with C-HX groups. The use of salty agars did not enhance the inhibition effects of nanomaterials used, i.e. disruption of bacterial membrane or differences in ionic concentrations do not play any role in bactericidal effects of nanomaterials used. The specific role of the ND and GO on the enhancement of the oxidative stress of bacteria or possible wrapping bacteria by GO nanosheets, therefore isolating them from both the environment and nutrition was suggested. Analyses by infrared spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering corroborate these conclusions.

  10. Inhibition of E. coli Growth by Nanodiamond and Graphene Oxide Enhanced by Luria-Bertani Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jira, Jaroslav; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kriha, Vitezslav; Artemenko, Anna; Matolínová, Iva; Skakalova, Viera; Stenclova, Pavla; Kromka, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) and graphene oxide (GO) are modern carbon-based nanomaterials with promising features for the inhibition of microorganism growth ability. Here we compare the effects of nanodiamond and graphene oxide in both annealed (oxidized) and reduced (hydrogenated) forms in two types of cultivation media-Luria-Bertani (LB) and Mueller-Hinton (MH) broths. The comparison shows that the number of colony forming unit (CFU) of Escherichia coli is significantly lowered (45%) by all the nanomaterials in LB medium for at least 24 h against control. On the contrary, a significant long-term inhibition of E. coli growth (by 45%) in the MH medium is provided only by hydrogenated NDs terminated with C-H X groups. The use of salty agars did not enhance the inhibition effects of nanomaterials used, i.e. disruption of bacterial membrane or differences in ionic concentrations do not play any role in bactericidal effects of nanomaterials used. The specific role of the ND and GO on the enhancement of the oxidative stress of bacteria or possible wrapping bacteria by GO nanosheets, therefore isolating them from both the environment and nutrition was suggested. Analyses by infrared spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering corroborate these conclusions.

  11. Curcumin inhibits transforming growth factor β induced differentiation of mouselung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishun Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key event in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin on TGFβ induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts and explore the underlying mechanism. Mouse lung fibroblasts were cultured and treated with TGFβ2 and curcumin or rosiglitazone. Cell vitality was examined by MTT assay. The secretion of collagen-1 was assessed by ELISA. α smooth muscle actin (αSMA was visualized by immunofluorescence technique. The expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ and platelet derived growth factor R β (PDGFRβ was detected by PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that curcumin and rosiglitazone inhibited the proliferation and TGFβ induced differentiation of mouse lung fibroblasts. In addition, curcumin and rosiglitazone inhibited collagen-1 secretion and αSMA expression in mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, curcumin and rosiglitazone upregulated PPARγ and downregulated PDGFRβ expression in mouse lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study reveals novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits TGFβ2 driven differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Curcumin could potentially be used for effective treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  12. CytoregR inhibits growth and proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells via induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanhi M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is one of the devastating neovascular diseases that incapacitate so many people the world over. Recent reports from the National Cancer Institute indicate some significant gain therapy and cancer management as seen in the increase in the 5-year survival rate over the past two decades. Although near-perfect cure rate have been reported in the early-stage disease, these data reveal high recurrence rate and serious side effects including second malignancies and fatalities. Most of the currently used anticancer agents are only effective against proliferating cancer cells. Thus attention has been focused on potential anti-cancer agents capable of killing cancer cells independent of the cell cycle state, to ensure effective elimination of most cancer cells. The objective of this study was to test the chemosensitivity and potential mechanism of action of a novel cancer drug, CytoregR, in a panel of human cancer cells. Methods the study was performed using a series of bioassays including Trypan blue exclusion, MTS Growth inhibition, LDH-cytotoxicity, TUNEL-Terminal DNA fragmentation Apoptosis Assay, and the Caspase protease CPP32 activity assays. Results CytoregR induced significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth in all the cells; with significant differences in chemosensitivity (P < 0.05 between the target cells becoming more apparent at 48 hr exposure. CytoregR showed no significant effect on normal cells relative to the tumor cells. Growth inhibition in all the cells was due to induction of apoptosis at lower concentrations of cytoregR (> 1:300. CytoregR-induced caspase protease-3 (CPP32 activation significantly and positively correlated with apoptosis induction and growth inhibition; thus implicating CPP32 as the principal death pathway in cytoregR-induced apoptosis. Conclusion CytoregR exerted a dose-and time-dependent growth inhibitory effect in all the target cells through induction of apoptosis via the

  13. Growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae, B. subtilis, and E. coli by lignocellulosic and fermentation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana P C; Verheijen, Peter J T; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the effect of several inhibiting components on three potential hosts for the bio-based production of methyl propionate, namely, wild-type Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, and evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae IMS0351. The inhibition by the lignocellulose-derived products 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, vanillin, and syringaldehyde and the fermentation products 2-butanol, 2-butanone, methyl propionate, and ethyl acetate has been assessed for these strains in defined medium. Multiple screenings were performed using small-scale cultures in both shake flasks and microtiter plates. Technical drawbacks revealed the limited applicability of the latter in this study. The microbial growth was characterized by means of a lag-time model, and the inhibitory thresholds were determined using product-inhibition models. The lignocellulose-derived products were found to be highly inhibitory, and none of the strains could grow in the presence of 2.0 g L -1 of product. From the fermentation products tested, methyl propionate had the most severe impact resulting in complete inhibition of all the strains when exposed to concentrations in the range of 12-18 g L -1 . In general, S. cerevisiae and B. subtilis were comparatively more tolerant than E. coli to all the fermentation products, despite E. coli's lower sensitivity towards vanillin. The results suggest that, overall, the strains investigated have good potential to be engineered and further established as hosts for the bio-based production of methyl esters.

  14. Hydroxytyrosol inhibits cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Han, Zhiyang; Ma, Yong; Song, Ruipeng; Pei, Tiemin; Zheng, Tongsen; Wang, Jiabei; Xu, Dongsheng; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Hongchi; Liu, Lianxin

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a type of digestive tumor that is associated with a high rate of mortality due to the difficulty of early diagnosis and the resistance of this tumor type to chemotherapy. Hydroxytyrosol (HT), which is derived from virgin olive oil (VOO), has recently been reported to inhibit the proliferation of various types of human cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HT on CCA. The antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of HT on CCA were evaluated in the human CCA cell lines TFK-1 and KMBC and the human gallbladder cancer cell line GBS-SD. We also assessed this effect in vivo. We found that 75 µM HT inhibited the proliferation of the TFK-1, KMBC and GBS-SD cell lines. However, 200 µM HT treatment did not affect the proliferation of the human bile duct cell line HIBEpiC. More importantly, HT (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) markedly inhibited the growth of CCA xenografts in mice. G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were observed using flow cytometry and western blotting, and we also noted a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phospho-ERK, with no changes in total-ERK, during treatment with HT. The present study showed that HT induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that HT, which possesses excellent biocompatibility and few side-effects, could be developed as a novel agent against CCA.

  15. Irisin inhibition of growth hormone secretion in cultured tilapia pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Anji; Li, Xin; Jiang, Quan

    2017-01-05

    Irisin, the product of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) gene, is well-documented to be a regulator of energy metabolism. At present, not much is known about its biological function in non-mammalian species. In this study, a full-length tilapia FDNC5 was cloned and its tissue expression pattern has been confirmed. Based on the sequence obtained, we produced and purified recombinant irisin which could induce uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) gene expression in tilapia hepatocytes. Further, the rabbit polyclonal irisin antiserum was produced and its specificity was confirmed by antiserum preabsorption. In tilapia pituitary cells, irisin inhibited growth hormone (GH) gene expression and secretion and triggered rapid phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 MAPK. Furthermore, irisin-inhibited GH mRNA expression could be prevented by inhibiting PI3K/Akt, MEK1/2, and p38 MAPK, respectively. Apparently, fish irisin can act directly at the pituitary level to inhibit GH transcript expression via multiple signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cytostatic versus cytocidal activities of chloroquine analogues and inhibition of hemozoin crystal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Alexander P; Alumasa, John N; Sherlach, Katy S; Jacobs, Lauren M; Nickley, Katherine B; Brower, Jonathan P; de Dios, Angel C; Roepe, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    We report an improved, nonhazardous, high-throughput assay for in vitro quantification of antimalarial drug inhibition of β-hematin (hemozoin) crystallization performed under conditions that are more physiological relative to previous assays. The assay uses the differential detergent solubility of crystalline and noncrystalline forms of heme and is optimized via the use of lipid catalyst. Using this assay, we quantify the effect of pH on the crystal growth-inhibitory activities of current quinoline antimalarials, evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of different lipids, and test for a possible correlation between hemozoin inhibition by drugs versus their antiplasmodial activity. Consistent with several previous reports, we found a good correlation between hemozoin inhibition potency versus cytostatic antiplasmodial potency (50% inhibitory concentration) for a series of chloroquine (CQ) analogues. However, we found no correlation between hemozoin inhibition potency and cytocidal antiplasmodial potency (50% lethal dose) for the same drugs, suggesting that cellular targets for these two layers of 4-aminoquinoline drug activity differ. This important concept is also explored further for QN and its stereoisomers in the accompanying paper (A. P. Gorka, K. S. Sherlach, A. C. de Dios, and P. D. Roepe, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:365-374, 2013).

  17. Isothermal microcalorimetry - A quantitative method to monitor Trypanosoma congolense growth and growth inhibition by trypanocidal drugs in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysin, M; Braissant, O; Gillingwater, K; Brun, R; Mäser, P; Wenzler, T

    2018-03-16

    Trypanosoma congolense is a protozoan parasite that is transmitted by tsetse flies, causing African Animal Trypanosomiasis, also known as Nagana, in sub-Saharan Africa. Nagana is a fatal disease of livestock that causes severe economic losses. Two drugs are available, diminazene and isometamidium, yet successful treatment is jeopardized by drug resistant T. congolense. Isothermal microcalorimetry is a highly sensitive tool that can be used to study growth of the extracellular T. congolense parasites or to study parasite growth inhibition after the addition of antitrypanosomal drugs. Time of drug action and time to kill can be quantified in a simple way by real time heat flow measurements. We established a robust protocol for the microcalorimetric studies of T. congolense and developed mathematical computations in R to calculate different parameters related to growth and the kinetics of drug action. We demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of the method exemplary with the two standard drugs, diminazene aceturate and isometamidium chloride. The method and the mathematical approach can be translated to study other pathogenic or non-pathogenic cells if they are metabolically active and grow under axenic conditions. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Protopanaxatirol type ginsenoside Re promotes cyclic growth of hair follicles via inhibiting transforming growth factor β signaling cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Sunchang; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-02-19

    Ginsenosides, the major bio-active ingredients included in Panax ginseng, have been known for the hair growth activity and used to treat patients who suffer from hair loss; however, the detailed mechanisms of this action are still largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for hair growth promoting effect of ginsenoside Re (GRe) in vitro and in vivo. Different doses of minoxidil and GRe were administered topically to the back regions of nude mice for up to 45 days, and hair shaft length and hair cycles were determined for hair promoting activities. Topical treatment of GRe significantly increased the hair shaft length and hair existent time, which was comparable to the action of minoxidil. We also demonstrated that GRe stimulated hair shaft elongation in the ex vivo cultures of vibrissa hair follicles isolated from C57BL/6 mouse. Systemic transcriptome analysis by next generation sequencing demonstrated that TGF-β-pathway related genes were selectively down-regulated by treatment of GRe in vivo, and the same treatment suppressed TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of ERK in HeLa cells. The results clearly indicated that GRe is the effective constituent in the ginseng on hair promotion via selective inhibition of the hair growth phase transition related signaling pathways, TGF-β signaling cascades. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. In-vitro growth characteristics of commercial probiotic strains and their potential for inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...

  20. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  1. Isthmin is a novel secreted angiogenesis inhibitor that inhibits tumour growth in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Ke, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yong; Ho-Yuet Cheng, Grace; Irwan, Ishak Darryl; Sulochana, K N; Potturi, Padma; Wang, Zhengyuan; Yang, He; Wang, Jingyu; Zhuo, Lang; Kini, R Manjunatha; Ge, Ruowen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Anti-angiogenesis represents a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various malignancies. Isthmin (ISM) is a gene highly expressed in the isthmus of the midbrain–hindbrain organizer in Xenopus with no known functions. It encodes a secreted 60 kD protein containing a thrombospondin type 1 repeat domain in the central region and an adhesion-associated domain in MUC4 and other proteins (AMOP) domain at the C-terminal. In this work, we demonstrate that ISM is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. Recombinant mouse ISM inhibited endothelial cell (EC) capillary network formation on Matrigel through its C-terminal AMOP domain. It also suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induced in vivo angiogenesis in mouse. It mitigated VEGF-stimulated EC proliferation without affecting EC migration. Furthermore, ISM induced EC apoptosis in the presence of VEGF through a caspase-dependent pathway. ISM binds to αvβ5 integrin on EC surface and supports EC adhesion. Overexpression of ISM significantly suppressed mouse B16 melanoma tumour growth through inhibition of tumour angiogenesis without affecting tumour cell proliferation. Knockdown of isthmin in zebrafish embryos using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides led to disorganized intersegmen-tal vessels in the trunk. Our results demonstrate that ISM is a novel endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor with functions likely in physiological as well as pathological angiogenesis. PMID:19874420

  2. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Patenge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA. Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function.

  3. Combination therapy with gefitinib and doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth in transgenic mice with adrenal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Kumi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Akamizu, Takashi; Maitani, Yoshie

    2013-01-01

    Highly relevant mouse models of human neuroblastoma (NB) are needed to evaluate new therapeutic strategies against NB. In this study, we characterized transgenic mice with bilateral adrenal tumors. On the basis of information from the tumoral gene expression profiles, we examined the antitumor effects of unencapsulated and liposomal doxorubicin (DXR), alone and in combination with gefitinib, on adrenal NB. We showed that intravenous injection of unencapsulated or liposomal DXR alone inhibited tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, liposomal DXR did not exhibit greater antitumor effect than unencapsulated DXR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the adrenal tumor vasculature with abundant pericyte coverage was a less leaky structure for liposomes. Combination therapy with unencapsulated or liposomal DXR plus gefitinib strongly suppressed tumor growth and delayed tumor regrowth than treatment with unencapsulated or liposomal DXR alone, even at a lower dose of DXR. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analysis revealed that gefitinib treatment increased blood flow in the tumor, indicating that gefitinib treatment changes the tumor vascular environment in a manner that may increase the antitumor effect of DXR. In conclusion, the combination of gefitinib and DXR induces growth inhibition of adrenal NBs in transgenic mice. These findings will provide helpful insights into new treatments for NB

  4. Hypoxia inhibits growth, proliferation, and increases response to chemotherapy in retinoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Tripathy, Arushi; Yu, Wayne; Eberhart, Charles G; Asnaghi, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Retinoblastoma is a malignant tumor of the retina and the most frequent intraocular cancer in children. Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is a common phenomenon in advanced retinoblastomas, but its biological effect on retinoblastoma growth is not clearly understood. Here we studied how hypoxia altered retinoblastoma gene expression and modulated growth and response to chemotherapy. The hypoxic marker lysyl oxidase (LOX) was expressed in 8 of 12 human retinoblastomas analyzed by immunohistochemistry, suggesting that a hypoxic microenvironment is present in up to two thirds of the cases. WERI Rb1 and Y79 retinoblastoma lines were exposed to 1% or 5% pO 2 , cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), or to normoxia (21% pO 2 ) for up to 8 days. Both 1% and 5% pO 2 inhibited growth of both lines by more than 50%. Proliferation was reduced by 25-50% when retinoblastoma cells were exposed to 1% vs 21% pO 2 , as determined by Ki67 assay. Surprisingly, Melphalan, Carboplatin, and Etoposide produced greater reduction in growth and survival of hypoxic cells than normoxic ones. Gene expression profile analysis of both lines, exposed for 48 h to 1%, 5%, or 21% pO 2 , showed that glycolysis and glucose transport were the most up-regulated pathways, whereas oxidative phosphorylation was the most down-regulated pathway in hypoxia as compared to normoxia. These data support a role for hypoxia in suppressing growth, proliferation, and enhancing response of retinoblastoma cells to chemotherapy, possibly by impairing energy production through activation of glycolysis and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Targeting glucose metabolism or enhancing delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to hypoxic regions may improve treatment of advanced retinoblastomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Inhibition of rhodiola on the growth of EVC-304 cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiu-lan; Yang, Feng; Chen, Rong-hua; Ga, Bu; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Shi-fu; Zhang, Jing-ling

    2006-07-01

    To observe the effect of rhodiola on human umbilical vein endothelial cell line EVC-304. EVC-304 was cultured and divided into two groups: control group and rhodiola-treated group. Three days after treatment, cell survival rate-drug concentration curve was obtained by counting the survival cells, and cells in each group were stained by Wright's stain and observed under microscope. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The survival cells in rhodiola-treated group was much less than those in control group. More cells in rhodiola-treated group stayed in G(1) phase while less in S phase when compared with those in control group by FCM. Rhodiola can inhibit the growth of human endothelial cell line EVC-304, perhaps through inhibiting the proliferation of the cells. This may lay the foundation for the mechanism study and clinical application of rhodiola in prevention of pulmonary artery hypertension.

  6. 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth through regulating VEGF-Src-FAK signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengfu, He; Hu, Zhang; Huiwen, Miao; Zhijun, Li [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Jiaojie, Zhou [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xiaoyi, Yan, E-mail: xiaoyiyan163@163.com [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xiujun, Cai, E-mail: xiujuncaomaj@163.com [Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-08-21

    The search for safe, effective and affordable therapeutics against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other lung cancers is important. Here we explored the potential effect of 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a novel extract from Inula britannica-F, on angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth. We demonstrated that ABL dose-dependently inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, and capillary structure formation of cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). In vivo, ABL administration suppressed VEGF-induced new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs. For the mechanism investigations, we found that ABL largely inhibited VEGF-mediated activation of Src kinase and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of A549 NSCLC cells with ABL resulted in cell growth inhibition and Src-FAK in-activation. Significantly, administration of a single dose of ABL (12 mg/kg/day) remarkably suppressed growth of A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vivo microvessels formation and Src activation were also significantly inhibited in ABL-treated xenograft tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that ABL suppresses angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth possibly via regulating the VEGFR-Src-FAK signaling. - Highlights: • 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. • ABL inhibits VEGF-induced HUVEC migration, proliferation, capillary tube formation. • ABL inhibits VEGF-mediated activation of Src and FAK in HUVECs. • ABL inhibits growth and Src-FAK activation in A549 cells. • ABL administration inhibits A549 tumor angiogenesis and growth in nude mice.

  7. Diclofenac Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer by Modulation of VEGF Levels and Arginase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac tre...

  8. Inhibition of Ice Growth and Recrystallization by Zirconium Acetate and Zirconium Acetate Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahy, Ortal; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Guy, Shlomit; Braslavsky, Ido

    2013-01-01

    The control over ice crystal growth, melting, and shaping is important in a variety of fields, including cell and food preservation and ice templating for the production of composite materials. Control over ice growth remains a challenge in industry, and the demand for new cryoprotectants is high. Naturally occurring cryoprotectants, such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs), present one solution for modulating ice crystal growth; however, the production of AFPs is expensive and inefficient. These obstacles can be overcome by identifying synthetic substitutes with similar AFP properties. Zirconium acetate (ZRA) was recently found to induce the formation of hexagonal cavities in materials prepared by ice templating. Here, we continue this line of study and examine the effects of ZRA and a related compound, zirconium acetate hydroxide (ZRAH), on ice growth, shaping, and recrystallization. We found that the growth rate of ice crystals was significantly reduced in the presence of ZRA and ZRAH, and that solutions containing these compounds display a small degree of thermal hysteresis, depending on the solution pH. The compounds were found to inhibit recrystallization in a manner similar to that observed in the presence of AFPs. The favorable properties of ZRA and ZRAH suggest tremendous potential utility in industrial applications. PMID:23555701

  9. Growth Factor Inhibiting PKC Sensor in E-coli Environment Using Classification Technique and ANN Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. BASAK

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinease C plays an important role in angiogenesis and apoptosis in cancer. During the phase of angiogenesis the growth factor is up regulated where as during apoptosis the growth factor is down regulated. For down regulation of growth factor the pH environment of intra-cellular fluid has a specific range in the alkaline medium. Protein kinease C along with E-coli through interaction of Selenometabolite is able to maintain that alkaline environment for the apoptosis of the cancer cell with inhibition of the growth factor related to antioxidant/oxidant ratio. The present paper through implementation of Artificial Neural Network and Decision Tree has focused on metastasis linked with Capacitance Relaxation phenomena and down regulation of growth factor (VGEF. In this paper a distributed neural network has been applied to a data mining problem for classification of cancer stages inorder to have proper diagnosis of patient with PKC sensor. The Network was trained off line using 270 patterns each of 6 inputs. Using the weight obtained during training, fresh patterns were tested for accuracy in diagnosis linked with the stages of cancer.

  10. Combination of imatinib and clotrimazole enhances cell growth inhibition in T47D breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawi, Tarek M K; Sadik, Nermin A H; Fahim, Sally A; Shouman, Samia A

    2015-05-25

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used as targeted cancer therapy. However, mono-targeting by IM does not always achieve full tumor eradication and thus it is recommended to combine IM with other anticancer agents. Clotrimazole (CLT) is an antifungal azole derivative with promising anticancer effects due to inhibiting the activity of glycolytic enzymes. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of combining CLT with IM on breast cancer cell line in an attempt to establish effective new combination. T47D human breast cancer cell line was treated with different concentrations of IM and/or CLT for 48 h. IM-CLT interaction was determined by isobologram equation and combination index. Cell viability was confirmed by measuring LDH activity. As indicators of glycolysis inhibition, the expression of hexokinase-2 (HK-2) and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1) plus the activity of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) were determined. In addition, glucose consumption and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production were measured. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia inducible factor-α (HIF-α) were also determined as they are modulators for glycolysis. This study demonstrated that IM or CLT synergistically inhibited cell growth in T47D as shown by combination and dose reduction indices. The combination of 15 μM IM and 20 μM CLT significantly decreased glucose consumption, activity of both PK and intracellular LDH, while increased leaked LDH, VEGF and NO in the medium compared to each drug alone. Furthermore the combination decreased gene expression of HK-2, PFK-1 and ATP content compared to the control. In conclusion, the synergistic effect of CLT on IM cytotoxicity in T47D cell line maybe mediated through inhibition of glycolysis and increasing both NO and VEGF. Further studies are required to confirm the efficiency and safety of this combination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  11. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojun [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Ji [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Feng [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Lin, Yanting [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei [Department of Interventional Therapy, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Jiang, Jiaji, E-mail: jiang_jjcn@yahoo.com.cn [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  12. Lactose inhibits the growth of Rhizobium meliloti cells that contain an actively expressed Escherichia coli lactose operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Timblin, C R; Kahn, M L

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 made the cells sensitive to the addition of the beta-galactosides lactose, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and lactobionic acid. Growth stopped when the beta-galactoside was added and viability decreased modestly during the next few hours, but little cell lysis was observed and the cells appeared normal. Protein synthesis was not inhibited. Growth was inhibited only when beta-galactosidase expression was greater than 16...

  13. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  14. Inhibition of uropathogenic biofilm growth on silicone rubber in human urine by lactobacilli--a teleologic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velraeds, M M; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Busscher, H J; Reid, G; van der Mei, H C

    2000-12-01

    The ability of three Lactobacillus strains to inhibit the adhesion and growth of naturally occurring uropathogens on silicone rubber was investigated in human urine. The importance of biosurfactant production by Lactobacillus in discouraging uropathogen growth was determined in relation to the binding affinities of the lactobacilli for silicone rubber. L. fermentum B54 markedly inhibited uropathogen growth on the silicone rubber disks after 8 days for all five men included in the study, albeit to various extents ranging from 77% to 100%. In urine from women, however, this inhibition was less clear, as it was absent for two of the four women participating in this study. L. casei rhamnosus 36 completely discouraged uropathogen growth on the disks after 8 days for three of the four women, whereas its effect in urine from men was less pronounced (inhibition ranged from 48% to 100% and was absent for one man). L. casei rhamnosus ATCC 7469T was the least inhibitory Lactobacillus strain tested and inhibition was absent for a number of both male and female participants, possibly as a result of the low binding affinity of this strain for silicone rubber and of its inability to release biosurfactants. We conclude that the inhibition of uropathogen growth is dependent on the Lactobacillus strain involved, and for L. fermentum B54 it was demonstrated to be sex-related. Hence, inhibition must be considered a multifactorial process.

  15. Effect of trapping vascular endothelial growth factor-A in a murine model of dry eye with inflammatory neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jin Woo; Choi, Jin A; Shin, Eun Young; La, Tae Yoon; Jee, Dong Hyun; Chung, Yeon Woong; Cho, Yang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether trapping vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) would suppress angiogenesis and inflammation in dry eye corneas in a murine corneal suture model. We established two groups of animals, one with non-dry eyes and the other with induced dry eyes. In both groups, a corneal suture model was used to induce inflammation and neovascularization. Each of two groups was again divided into three subgroups according to the treatment; subgroup I (aflibercept), subgroup II (dexamethasone) and subgroup III (phosphate buffered saline, PBS). Corneas were harvested and immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare the extents of neovascularization and CD11b+ cell infiltration. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the expression of inflammatory cytokines and VEGF-A in the corneas. Trapping VEGF-A with aflibercept resulted in significantly decreased angiogenesis and inflammation compared with the dexamethasone and PBS treatments in the dry eye corneas (all P eyes. The anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of VEGF-A trapping were stronger than those of dexamethasone in both dry eye and non-dry eye corneas (all P eye group. Compared with non-dry eye corneas, dry eye corneas have greater amounts of inflammation and neovascularization and also have a more robust response to anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic agents after ocular surface surgery. Trapping VEGF-A is effective in decreasing both angiogenesis and inflammation in dry eye corneas after ocular surface surgery.

  16. Endogenous Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) Maintains Endothelial Cell Homeostasis by Regulating VEGF Receptor-2 Transcription*

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Guangqi; Cao, Ying; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Dutta, Shamit; Wang, Enfeng; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is one of the most important factors controlling angiogenesis. Although the functions of exogenous VEGF-A have been widely studied, the roles of endogenous VEGF-A remain unclear. Here we focused on the mechanistic functions of endogenous VEGF-A in endothelial cells. We found that it is complexed with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) and maintains a basal expression level for VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling activation. Endogenous VEGF-A also controls expression of key endothelial specific genes including VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and vascular endothelial cadherin. Of importance, endogenous VEGF-A differs from exogenous VEGF-A by regulating VEGFR-2 transcription through mediation of FoxC2 binding to the FOX:ETS motif, and the complex formed by endogenous VEGF-A with VEGFR-2 is localized within the EEA1 (early endosome antigen 1) endosomal compartment. Taken together, our results emphasize the importance of endogenous VEGF-A in endothelial cells by regulating key vascular proteins and maintaining the endothelial homeostasis. PMID:22167188

  17. Pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase activation promotes medulloblastoma cell migration and invasion through induction of vascular endothelial growth factor A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Jamison

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating that activation of the pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress adapts tumor cells to the tumor microenvironment and enhances tumor angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A. Recent studies suggest that VEGF-A can act directly on certain tumor cell types in an autocrine manner, via binding to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2, to promote tumor cell migration and invasion. Although several reports show that PERK activation increases VEGF-A expression in medulloblastoma, the most common solid malignancy of childhood, the role that either PERK or VEGF-A plays in medulloblastoma remains elusive. In this study, we mimicked the moderate enhancement of PERK activity observed in tumor patients using a genetic approach and a pharmacologic approach, and found that moderate activation of PERK signaling facilitated medulloblastoma cell migration and invasion and increased the production of VEGF-A. Moreover, using the VEGFR2 inhibitor SU5416 and the VEGF-A neutralizing antibody to block VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling, our results suggested that tumor cell-derived VEGF-A promoted medulloblastoma cell migration and invasion through VEGFR2 signaling, and that both VEGF-A and VEGFR2 were required for the promoting effects of PERK activation on medulloblastoma cell migration and invasion. Thus, these findings suggest that moderate PERK activation promotes medulloblastoma cell migration and invasion through enhancement of VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling.

  18. Traditional preparations of kava (Piper methysticum) inhibit the growth of human colon cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbond, L S; Negrin, A; Kulakowski, D M; Wu, H-A; Antonetti, V; Jalees, F; Law, W; Roller, M; Redenti, S; Kennelly, E J; Balick, M J

    2017-01-15

    Epidemiological studies indicate there is low incidence of colon cancer in the South Pacific islands, including Fiji, West Samoa, and Vanuatu. Cancer incidence has been shown to be inversely associated with kava (Piper methysticum G. Forst.) ingestion. Hypothesis/Purpose: Kava prepared traditionally will inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. This investigation entails preparation and analysis of kava extracts and study of the growth inhibitory activity of the extracts, alone and combined with hibiscus. We will prepare kava as in Micronesia - as a water extract, high in particulate content, alone or combined with sea hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus L.) - and examine the components and growth inhibitory activity. We obtained ground kava prepared in the traditional way from lateral roots and sea hibiscus mucilage and sap from different sources in Micronesia, and prepared water extracts (unfiltered, as well as filtered, since in traditional use the kava beverage contains a high particulate content) and partitions. We used the MTT assay to determine the growth inhibitory activity of the preparations on colon and breast cancer cells and nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells. LC-MS analysis was used to examine the components of the kava and sea hibiscus extracts and partitions. Traditional preparations of kava inhibit the growth of breast and colon cancer cells. Among the kava preparations, the order of decreasing activity was Fiji(2), Fiji(1), Hawaii; the unfiltered preparations from Fiji were more active than the filtered. Phytochemical analysis indicated that filtering reduced most kavalactone and chalcone content. For example, for Fiji(2), the ratio of dihydromethysticin in filtered/unfiltered kava was 0.01. Thus, for the extracts from Fiji, growth inhibitory activity correlates with the content of these compounds. Unfiltered and filtered kava from Fiji(1) were more active on malignant than nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells. Since kava is prepared in

  19. The motor protein KIF14 inhibits tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Fang Hung

    Full Text Available The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively, and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001. The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11 and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas.

  20. Andrographolide inhibits growth of acute promyelocytic leukaemia cells by inducing retinoic acid receptor-independent cell differentiation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikam, Shiamala D; Manikam, Shiamala T; Stanslas, Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The growth inhibiting potential of andrographolide was evaluated in three acute promyelocytic leukaemia cell line models (HL-60, NB4 and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-resistant NB4-R2). In elucidating the mechanisms of growth inhibition, a special emphasis was placed on assessing the induction of differentiation and apoptosis by andrographolide in the primary acute promyelocytic leukaemia NB4 cells. The compound was 2- and 3-fold more active in inhibiting the growth of HL-60 and NB4-R2 cells compared with NB4 cells, respectively. At IC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the cells (compared with medium only treated control cells) is inhibited; 4.5 microM) the compound exhibited strong cell-differentiating activity in NB4 cells, similar to ATRA (IC50 1.5 microM). In the presence of a pure retinoic acid receptor antagonist AGN193109, the growth inhibition of NB4 cells by ATRA was reversed, whereas the activity of andrographolide was not affected. This clearly suggested that andrographolide's cell differentiating activity to induce growth inhibition of NB4 cells most likely occurred via a retinoic acid receptor-independent pathway. At higher concentration (2xIC50), andrographolide was an efficient inducer of apoptosis in NB4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest andrographolide and its derivatives, apparently with a novel cell differentiating mechanism and with ability to induce apoptosis, might be beneficial in the treatment of primary and ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

  1. The Cephalostatins. 24. Isolation, Structure, and Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition of Cephalostatin 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, George R; Xu, Jun-Ping; Chapuis, Jean-Charles; Melody, Noeleen

    2015-06-26

    For the purpose of advancing knowledge of the structural variations available in the natural cephalostatins contained in the marine worm Cephalodiscus gilchristi, the isolation and structure of the 20th member (1) has been accomplished (10(-7) % yield). In turn cephalostatin 20 (1) proved to be enough for an initial SAR study comprising six important human cancer cell lines. A parallel objective was aimed at the possible discovery of a natural cephalostatin with a more accessible structure for total synthesis and/or synthetic modifications, but with powerful cancer cell growth inhibition.

  2. Effects of end-product inhibition of Cellulomonas uda anaerobic growth on cellobiose chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermoun, Z; Gaudin, C; Belaich, J P

    1988-01-01

    Cellulomonas uda was grown anaerobically in a chemostat with 3.33 and 11.41 mM cellobiose in the feed medium at dilution rates varying from 0.017 to 0.29/h. Unusual results obtained were analyzed by using curves simulating the steady-state biomass. This unusual behavior could be accounted for by a classical growth model taking end-product inhibition into account. Acetate has been identified to be the major inhibitor in the experimental conditions used. Parameters calculated from experimental observations gave theoretical curves of biomass production versus dilution rate which fitted the experimental points very well. PMID:3131311

  3. Glucagon Amyloid-like Fibril Morphology Is Selected via Morphology-Dependent Growth Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.B.; Otzen, D.; Christiansen, Gunna

    2007-01-01

    Protein Structure and Biophysics, Novo Nordisk A/S, Novo Nordisk Park, DK-2760 Malov, Denmark, Centre for Insoluble Protein Structures (inSPIN), Department of Life Sciences, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 49, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark, and Institute of Medical Microbiology and Immunology...... twisted fibril seeds cannot grow at high concentrations. We conclude that there exists a morphology-dependent mechanism for inhibition of glucagon fibril growth. Light scattering experiments indicate that glucagon is mainly monomeric below 1 mg/mL and increasingly trimeric above this concentration. We...

  4. [Inhibition of aflatoxin production and fungal growth on stored corn by allyl isothiocyanate vapor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kiyoshi; Ose, Ayaka; Takai, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Misao; Nishioka, Chikako; Ohzu, Yuji; Odano, Masayoshi; Sekiyama, Yasushi; Mizukami, Yuichi; Nakamura, Nobuya; Ichinoe, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) vapor treatment with a commercial mustard seed extract (Wasaouro(®)) in controlling aflatoxin-producing fungi on stored corn. The concentration of AIT in the closed container peaked at 54.6 ng/mL on the 14th day and remained at 21.8 ng/mL on the 42nd day. AIT inhibited visible growth of aflatoxigenic molds in unsterilized corn and in sterilized corn inoculated with various aflatoxigenic fungi. However, fungi such as Aspergillus glaucus group, A. penicillioides and A. restrictus were detected by means of culture methods.

  5. Crystal growth of fluoridated hydroxyapatites inhibited in the presence of gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, M; Takahashi, J; Kumura, H

    1989-12-01

    Three types of fluoridated hydroxyapatites were synthesized in the presence of low concentrations of gelatin solution. The crystallinity of gelatin-free fluoridated hydroxyapatites increased at high degree of fluoridation, after it showed complex behavior at lower fluoride content. However, increasing of gelatin concentration in the solution, the crystallinity decreased, especially at high fluoride content. Chemical analysis and a- and c-axis dimensions showed no significant difference among those series, and gelatin contents in the precipitates were negligible when compared with the supplied amounts. These results suggest that gelatin may inhibit the crystal growth of fluoridated apatites only as a surrounding factor, overcoming the promoting action of fluoride.

  6. Bioactivity of Benthic and Picoplanktonic Estuarine Cyanobacteria on Growth of Photoautotrophs: Inhibition versus Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana R. Lopes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding potential biochemical interactions and effects among cyanobacteria and other organisms is one of the main keys to a better knowledge of microbial population structuring and dynamics. In this study, the effects of cyanobacteria from benthos and plankton of estuaries on other cyanobacteria and green algae growth were evaluated. To understand how the estuarine cyanobacteria might influence the dynamics of phytoplankton, experiments were carried out with the freshwater species Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella sp., and the marine Synechocystis salina and Nannochloropsis sp. exposed to aqueous and organic (70% methanol crude extracts of cyanobacteria for 96 h. The most pronounced effect observed was the growth stimulation. Growth inhibition was also observed for S. salina and M. aeruginosa target-species at the highest and lowest concentrations of cyanobacterial extracts. The methanolic crude extract of Phormidium cf. chalybeum LEGE06078 was effective against S. salina growth in a concentration-dependent manner after 96 h-exposure. All of the cyanobacterial isolates showed some bioactivity on the target-species growth, i.e., inhibitory or stimulating effects. These results indicate that the analyzed cyanobacterial isolates can potentially contribute to blooms’ proliferation of other cyanobacteria and to the abnormal growth of green algae disturbing the dynamic of estuarine phytoplankton communities. Since estuaries are transitional ecosystems, the benthic and picoplanktonic estuarine cyanobacteria can change both freshwater and marine phytoplankton succession, competition and bloom formation. Furthermore, a potential biotechnological application of these isolates as a tool to control cyanobacteria and microalgae proliferation can be feasible. This work is the first on the subject of growth responses of photoautotrophs to cyanobacteria from Atlantic estuarine environments.

  7. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  8. Allelopathy in two species of Chenopodium -inhibition of germination and seedling growth of certain weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of washed leaf and inflorescence material of Chenopodium ambrosioides and C. murale, decaying leaves and inflorescences, and field soils collected beneath Chenopodium plants were examined in terms of the inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth of five weeds, viz. Abutilon indicum, Cassia sophera var. purpurea, C. tora, Evolvulus numularius and Tephrosia hamiltonii. The allelopathic pattern varied in each of the two test species and this depended on the type of test matter. However, the germination as well as the root and hypocotyl growth of A. indicum and E. nummularius were more hampered by phytotoxins or inhibitors from Chenopodium than were the other weeds. Since the leaf and inflorescence of Chenopodium formed the source of inhibitors, the respective plant-parts from the two species were chemically analysed and the presence of three terpenes (p-cymene, ascaridole and aritazone from C. ambrosioides and an organic acid (oxalic acid from C. murale were implicated in the allelopathic effect.

  9. The resveratrol analogue trimethoxystilbene inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing multipolar cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Percario, Zulema; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2017-03-01

    Natural compounds are extensively studied for their potential use in traditional and non-traditional medicine. Several natural and synthetic Resveratrol analogues have shown interesting biological activities in the field of cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we have focused on the ability of Resveratrol and two methoxylated derivatives (Trimethoxystilbene and Pterostilbene) to inhibit human cancer cell growth particularly analyzing their ability to interfere with tubulin dynamics at mitosis. We show that Trimethoxystilbene, differently from Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, alters microtubule polymerization dynamics in HeLa cells specifically inducing multipolar spindles and mitotic arrest coupled to a reduction of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic death by mitotic catastrophe. This work demonstrates that the structural modification of Rsv causes substantial changes in the mechanism of action of the derivatives. The presence of three extra methyl groups renders Trimethoxy very efficient in impairing cell proliferation by inducing mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. CHIP is a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and inhibits tumor growth through targeting EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxiao; Yang, Jingxuan; Xu, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Cao, Zhe; Zhou, Li; You, Lei; Shu, Hong; Lu, Zhaohui; Li, Huihua; Li, Min; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2014-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is involved in protein quality control and mediates several tumor-related proteins in many cancers, but the function of CHIP in pancreatic cancer is not known. Here we show that CHIP interacts and ubiquitinates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for proteasome-mediated degradation in pancreatic cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the activation of EGFR downstream pathways. CHIP suppressed cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth, invasion and migration, as well as enhanced apoptosis induced by erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. The expression of CHIP was decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues or sera. Low CHIP expression in tumor tissues was correlated with tumor differentiation and shorter overall survival. These observations indicate that CHIP serves as a novel tumor suppressor by down-regulating EGFR pathway in pancreatic cancer cells, decreased expression of CHIP was associated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24722501

  11. New class of additives to inhibit tree growth in solid extruded cable insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devins, J C; Rzad, S J; Reed, C W; Bartosh, D K; Stines, T W

    1976-03-01

    There is now substantial evidence that in many dielectric failures of solid polyolefinic and other polymeric materials the final disruption may be preceded by the long-time progressive development of a three-dimensional pattern of irregular, sometimes (though not always) carbonized hollow channels diverging from a central stem, and that the ultimate failure follows one of these channels. These minute channels are referred to as ''trees'' and the phenomenon as ''treeing.'' Research conducted from May to Sept. 1975 on techniques for evaluating tree growth and on the development of additives to inhibit tree growth in solid extruded polymeric insulation for electric cables is reported. (LCL)

  12. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  13. Tracing and inhibiting growth of Staphylococcus aureus in barbecue cheese production after product recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, S; Zurfluh, K; Stephan, R

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most prevalent causes of foodborne intoxication worldwide. It is caused by ingestion of enterotoxins formed by Staphylococcus aureus during growth in the food matrix. Following a recall of barbecue cheese due to the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins in Switzerland in July 2015, we analyzed the production process of the respective dairy. Although most cheese-making processes involve acidification to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria, barbecue cheese has to maintain a pH >6.0 to prevent undesired melting of the cheese. In addition, the dairy decided to retain the traditional manual production process of the barbecue cheese. In this study, therefore, we aimed to (1) trace Staph. aureus along the barbecue cheese production process, and (2) develop a sustainable strategy to inhibit growth of Staph. aureus and decrease the risk of staphylococcal food poisoning without changing the traditional production process. To this end, we traced Staph. aureus in a step-wise blinded process analysis on 4 different production days using spa (Staphylococcus protein A gene) typing, DNA microarray profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. We subsequently selected a new starter culture and used a model cheese production including a challenge test assay to assess its antagonistic effect on Staph. aureus growth, as well as its sensory and technological implications. We detected Staph. aureus in 30% (37/124) of the collected samples taken from the barbecue cheese production at the dairy. This included detection of Staph. aureus in the final product on all 4 production days, either after enrichment or using quantitative detection. We traced 2 enterotoxigenic Staph. aureus strains (t073/CC45 and t282/CC45) colonizing the nasal cavity and the forearms of the cheesemakers to the final product. In the challenge test assay, we were able to show that the new starter culture inhibited growth of Staph. aureus while meeting

  14. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Andy; Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-07-25

    We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection. IMPORTANCE During infections, pathogenic bacteria can release nucleotides into the cells of their eukaryotic hosts. These nucleotides are recognized as signals that contribute to the initiation of defensive immune responses that help the infected

  15. Thermal treatment and leaching of biochar alleviates plant growth inhibition from mobile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel V. Gale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses of plant responses to biochar boast positive average effects of between 10 and 40%. Plant responses, however, vary greatly across systems, and null or negative biochar effects are increasingly reported. The mechanisms responsible for such responses remain unclear. In a glasshouse experiment we tested the effects of three forestry residue wood biochars, applied at five dosages (0, 5, 10, 20, and 50 t/ha to a temperate forest drystic cambisol as direct surface applications and as complete soil mixes on the herbaceous pioneers Lolium multiflorum and Trifolium repens. Null and negative effects of biochar on growth were found in most cases. One potential cause for null and negative plant responses to biochar is plant exposure to mobile compounds produced during pyrolysis that leach or evolve following additions of biochars to soil. In a second glasshouse experiment we examined the effects of simple leaching and heating techniques to ameliorate potentially phytotoxic effects of volatile and leachable compounds released from biochar. We used Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS to qualitatively describe organic compounds in both biochar (through headspace extraction, and in the water leachates (through direct injection. Convection heating and water leaching of biochar prior to application alleviated growth inhibition. Additionally, growth was inhibited when filtrate from water-leached biochar was applied following germination. SPME-GC-MS detected primarily short-chained carboxylic acids and phenolics in both the leachates and solid chars, with relatively high concentrations of several known phytotoxic compounds including acetic acid, butyric acid, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and benzoic acid. We speculate that variable plant responses to phytotoxic organic compounds leached from biochars may largely explain negative plant growth responses and also account for strongly species

  16. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ≤ 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes.

  17. Blockade of S100A3 activity inhibits murine hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, W; Deng, Q; Yu, X L; Yuan, Y S; Gao, J; Li, J J; Zhou, L; Xia, P; Han, G Y Q; Han, W; Yu, Y

    2015-10-28

    Using mouse gene expression microarray analysis, we obtained dynamic expression profiles of the whole genome in a depilation-induced hair growth mouse model. S100A3 expression increased during the anagen phase and returned to normal during the telogen phase. The effects of S100A3 blockade on the hair growth cycle were examined in mice after subcutaneous injection of an anti-mouse S100A3 antibody. Protein localization of S100A3 was confined to the hair shafts during the anagen phase and the sebaceous glands during the telogen phase. S100A3 blockade delayed hair follicle entry into the anagen phase, decreased hair elongation, and reduced the number of hair follicles in the subcutis, which correlated with the downregulated expression of hair growth induction-related genes in vivo. The present study demonstrates that anti-S100A3 antibody inhibits mouse hair growth, suggesting that S100A3 can be used as a target for hair loss treatment.

  18. Inhibition of rat pituitary growth hormone (GH) release by subclinical levels of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camoratto, A.M.; White, L.M.; Lau, Y.S.; Moriarty, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Lead toxicity has been associated with short stature in children. Since growth hormone is a major regulator of growth, the effects of chronic exposure to subclinical lead levels on pituitary function were assessed. Timed pregnant rats were given 125 ppm lead (as lead nitrate) in their drinking water beginning on day 5 of gestation. After weaning, pups were continued on lead until sacrifice at 7 weeks of age. The average blood lead level at this time was 18.9 ug/dl (range 13.7-27.8). On the day of sacrifice the pituitary was removed, hemisected and incubated with vehicle or 40 nM hGRH (human growth hormone releasing hormone). Pituitaries from chronically lead-treated pups were 64% less responsive to GRH than controls. In contrast, no difference in responsiveness was observed in pituitaries from the dams. The specific binding of GRH was also examined. Control animals showed a dose-dependent displacement of 125I-GRH by unlabeled ligand (10-1000 nM). In the pituitaries of lead-treated pups binding of labeled ligand was markedly reduced by unlabeled GRH (less than 100 nM). Chronic exposure to lead had no effect on serum GH or prolactin levels or on pituitary content of GH. These data suggest that one mechanism by which lead can affect growth is by inhibition of GH release

  19. Growth inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by polyoxyethylene stearate present in the BACTEC pyrazinamide susceptibility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M A; Thibert, L; Desjardins, F; Siddiqi, S H; Dascal, A

    1996-01-01

    We have previously found that approximately 3.5% of 428 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis yield uninterpretable results in the BACTEC pyrazinamide (PZA) susceptibility test system, because of inadequate growth. We tested the hypothesis that polyoxyethylene stearate (POES), the ingredient of the reconstituting fluid for the test, was the cause of this growth inhibition. A total of 15 isolates known for their previously uninterpretable results and 100 randomly chosen clinical isolates were tested in parallel both with and without POES. Repeat testing of the isolates with previously uninterpretable results yielded results in the presence of POES in only seven (47%). In the absence of POES, all gave interpretable results but one such result showed false resistance. For the other 100 clinical isolates, interpretable results were obtained with and without POES, but growth was enhanced in the absence of POES, especially in the PZA-susceptible strains. This was evidenced by a decreased time to attain a growth index of 200 in the control vial (4.9 days without POES versus 5.8 days with POES; P interpretation of the test (7.4% without POES versus 2.2% with POES; P interpretable results indicating PZA resistance are obtained only in the absence of POES, the result should be confirmed by a pyrazinamidase assay or by the conventional proportion method. Routine omission of POES from the BACTEC test for all clinical strains is discouraged because of the unacceptably high false-resistance rates.

  20. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  2. A novel compound, NP-184, inhibits the vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Ting; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Ching-Hu; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2010-03-25

    Angiogenesis is observed in many diseases, such as tumor progression, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis; it is a process that involves proliferation, migration, differentiation and tube formation of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in angiogenesis by induction of these endothelial functions. Thus, inhibition of these critical angiogenic steps is a practical therapeutic strategy for those diseases. NP-184 is a substituted benzimidazole analogue which exhibits a potent anti-thrombotic activity. In this report, NP-184 inhibited the viability of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a concentration-dependent manner, and caused cell apoptosis as examined by cell-cycle analysis and Annexin V staining with flow cytometry. NP-184 also concentration-dependently inhibited the HUVEC migration, tube formation on Matrigel, and rat aortic ring sprouting stimulated by VEGF. Regarding the intracellular signal transduction, NP-184 concentration-dependently interfered with the activation of AKT, ERK and the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. In vivo study showed that NP-184 dose-dependently reduced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assay. These results indicate that NP-184 is a potential candidate for developing the treatment of angiogenesis related-diseases.

  3. Tolcapone induces oxidative stress leading to apoptosis and inhibition of tumor growth in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Tyler; Rich, Maria; Hayes, David; Zhao, Ping; Nagulapally, Abhinav B; Bond, Jeffrey; Saulnier Sholler, Giselle

    2017-06-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that inactivates dopamine and other catecholamines by O-methylation. Tolcapone, a drug commonly used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, is a potent inhibitor of COMT and previous studies indicate that Tolcapone increases the bioavailability of dopamine in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that Tolcapone kills neuroblastoma (NB) cells in preclinical models by inhibition of COMT. Treating four established NB cells lines (SMS-KCNR, SH-SY5Y, BE(2)-C, CHLA-90) and two primary NB cell lines with Tolcapone for 48 h decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, with IncuCyte imaging and Western blotting indicating that cell death was due to caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Tolcapone also increased ROS while simultaneously decreasing ATP-per-cell in NB cells. Additionally, COMT was inhibited by siRNA in NB cells and showed similar increases in apoptotic markers compared to Tolcapone. In vivo xenograft models displayed inhibition of tumor growth and a significant decrease in time-to-event in mice treated with Tolcapone compared to untreated mice. These results indicate that Tolcapone is cytotoxic to neuroblastoma cells and invite further studies into Tolcapone as a promising novel therapy for the treatment of neuroblastoma. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Kaempferol inhibits gastric cancer tumor growth: An in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haibin; Bao, Junjie; Wei, Yuzhe; Chen, Yang; Mao, Xiaoguang; Li, Jianguo; Yang, Zhiwei; Xue, Yingwei

    2015-02-01

    Kaempferol, which is one of the general flavonoids, has recently been reported to suppress proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest and promote apoptosis in various human cancer cell lines. In the present study, the effect and mechanism of kaempferol on gastric cancer (GC) was examined. The results showed that kaempferol significantly inhibited the proliferation of MKN28 and SGC7901 cell lines. However, no significant inhibition in the GSE-1 normal gastric epithelial cell line in our experimental dose was detected. Additionally, significant apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest were identified following the treatment of kaempferol. More importantly, we observed that kaempferol inhibited the growth of the tumor xenografts although no marked effects on liver, spleen or body weight were induced. The expression levels of G2/M cell cycle‑regulating factors, cyclin B1, Cdk1 and Cdc25C, were significantly reduced. In addition, kaempferol treatment markedly decreased the level of Bcl-2 concomitant with an increase in Bax expression, resulting in the upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and -9, which promoted PARP cleavage. Kaempferol-treated cells also led to a decrease in p-Akt, p-ERK and COX-2 expression levels. The present study therefore provided evidence that kaempferol may be a therapeutic agent for GC.

  5. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansur Medina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L., which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic, a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT, which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  6. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; Souza, Wanderley de; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-02-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  7. Nexrutine Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth as a Consequence of Mitochondrial Damage and Mitophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nexrutine is an herbal extract of Phellodendron amurense and has been used as nutrient supplement in China as well as America. Potential protection effect of Nexrutine has been reported. Methods: To investigate the mechanism of Nexrutine, we used the HeLa, U2OS and HCT116 as a model. Based on the acidification of cell culture media, we examined the lactate, mitochondria damage as well as mitophagy status by corresponding assay. Results: Our data suggest that Nexrutine alters the cellular glucose metabolism to promote lactate production. This effect is caused by mitochondrial damage, not an alteration to lactate dehydrogenase activity. As a result of the mitochondrial damage, cell proliferation was inhibited and was associated with an elevation in p21/p27 proteins, which are both important cell cycle inhibitors. As another consequence of the mitochondrial damage, mitophagy was highly activated in Nexrutine-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. When the autophagy pathway was blocked by siRNAs against BECN1 or ATG7, the growth inhibition caused by Nexrutine was reversed. Conclusion: Our study revealed that autophagy plays an important role in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation by Nexrutine.

  8. Silencing cathepsin S gene expression inhibits growth, invasion and angiogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Qi; Wang, Xuedi; Zhang, Hanguang; Li, Chuanwei; Fan, Junhua; Xu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cat S is highly expressed in HCC cells with high metastatic potential. ► Knockdown of Cat S inhibits growth and invasion of HCC cells. ► Knockdown of Cat S inhibits HCC-associated angiogenesis. ► Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy. -- Abstract: Cathepsin S (Cat S) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis by its ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). Our previous study suggested there could be a potential association between Cat S and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. The present study was designed to determine the role of Cat S in HCC cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis, using RNA interference technology. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences for the Cat S gene were synthesized and transfected into human HCC cell line MHCC97-H. The Cat S gene targeted siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cat S expression, leading to potent suppression of MHCC97-H cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. These data suggest that Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  9. HELICOBACTER PYLORI GROWTH INHIBITION BY SUBSTANCE PRODUCED PSEUDOMONAS BY AEROGINOSA: IN VTRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A FAZELI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of H.pylori against metronidazole is increasingly appeared in reports of investigators of gastric infections. So that, seeking to find more effective anti-helicobacter drugs is a necessity. In this study, inhibitory effect of the P. aeroginosa-produced substance on H. pylori growth was determined using two methods, Cross-streak and Well-diffusion Only two out of 37 P. aeroginosa isalates were able to inhibit H. pylori growth which one of them was chosen for further investigation. Its antibacterial activity was tested on 31 isolates of H. pylori consisting 27 metrondazole-sensitive and 4 metronidazole-resistant isolates. The inhibitory substance was enable to kill both metrondazole-sensitive and resistant isolates of H. pylori. The substance could also inhibit the of several other bacteria including E.coli, Salmonella sp., Klebsiella sp., S. aureus and a gram positive bacilli. While the inhibitory effect of the substance had no change at 40c for 30 days, its effect substantially reduced by treating at 600c for 15 minutes. Treatment of substance at 600c (30 min. 80?c and 100?c (15 & 30min, and freezing (-20?c and melting (37?c inactivated its inhibitory effect completely. Treatment with trips in also could inactivate it. Thus P. aeroginosa-produced substance, probably is a protein and may be classified in bacteriocin group.

  10. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Plant-made trastuzumab (herceptin inhibits HER2/Neu+ cell proliferation and retards tumor growth.

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    Tatiana V Komarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant biotechnology provides a valuable contribution to global health, in part because it can decrease the cost of pharmaceutical products. Breast cancer can now be successfully treated by a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb, trastuzumab (Herceptin. A course of treatment, however, is expensive and requires repeated administrations of the mAb. Here we used an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system to produce trastuzumab in plant cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the cloning and expression of gene constructs in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using intron-optimized Tobacco mosaic virus- and Potato virus X-based vectors encoding, respectively, the heavy and light chains of trastuzumab. Full-size antibodies extracted and purified from plant tissues were tested for functionality and specificity by (i binding to HER2/neu on the surface of a human mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell line, SK-BR-3, in fluorescence-activated cell sorting assay and (ii testing the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of HER-2-expressing cancer cell proliferation. We show that plant-made trastuzumab (PMT bound to the Her2/neu oncoprotein of SK-BR-3 cells and efficiently inhibited SK-BR-3 cell proliferation. Furthermore, mouse intraperitoneal PMT administration retarded the growth of xenografted tumors derived from human ovarian cancer SKOV3 Her2+ cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that PMT is active in suppression of cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  12. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

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    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  13. Comparison of UVA- and UVA/riboflavin-induced growth inhibition of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdoumi, Karim; Bäckman, Anders; Mortensen, Jes; Magnuson, Anders; Crafoord, Sven

    2013-02-01

    To investigate whether ultraviolet light (UVA) at 365 nm can inhibit/eliminate Acanthamoeba growth and if riboflavin would potentiate such an association. Acanthamoeba castellanii in a fluid medium with a concentration of approximately 1.7 × 10(4) protozoa/ml were prepared with (0.01 %) and without riboflavin. Exposure of UVA (dose 5.475 J/cm(2)) took place twice, with each illumination period followed by culturing of 10 μl in peptone yeast-extract glucose (PYG) medium for 7 days. Every suspension prepared had a non-exposed control solution. Determination of Acanthamoeba was conducted daily, by count in Burker chamber days 4 through 7 after exposure. Statistical analysis was done by repeated-measurement ANOVA and post-hoc analysis for unpaired samples. The exposure of ultraviolet light resulted in an inhibited growth of Acanthamoeba compared to the non-exposed solutions, with a statistically significant reduction over time (p = 0.0003). The addition of riboflavin did not amplify the effect, and there were no tendencies for an interaction effect between UVA and riboflavin. The antiprotozoal effect of the UVA wavelength, utilized in CXL, is solely mediated by ultraviolet light, and riboflavin does not seem to amplify the antimicrobial efficacy.

  14. Effect of crude saponins from Gaultheria trichophylla extract on growth inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

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    Fiaz Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Gaultheria also comprised of species with reported cytotoxic activities. Current research work was carried out to evaluate G. trichophylla crude extract and respective saponins fraction against human colorectal cancer cell line (Caco-2 based on cell viability assays. Caco-2 cells treated with the crude extract showed significant growth inhibition (p< 0.001 in a dose dependent manner with apparent IC50 value of 200 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL in MTT and NRU assays respectively. The fractioned crude saponins showed an enhanced response and inhibited the growth of Caco-2 by 93.6 and 97.4% in MTT and NRU assays respectively, with compared to actinomycin-D (65%. The DAPI staining of cell treated with crude saponins observed under confocal microscope showed shrunken nuclei with apparent nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation indicating apoptosis mode of cell death. The study exhibited that the G. Trichophylla saponins induced apoptosis of Caco-2 cell lines. This study provides new evidences to further explore this plant for the novel targets in anticancer drug development.

  15. Induction of oxidative metabolism by mitochondrial frataxin inhibits cancer growth: Otto Warburg revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Tim J; Thierbach, René; Voigt, Anja; Drewes, Gunnar; Mietzner, Brun; Steinberg, Pablo; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ristow, Michael

    2006-01-13

    More than 80 years ago Otto Warburg suggested that cancer might be caused by a decrease in mitochondrial energy metabolism paralleled by an increase in glycolytic flux. In later years, it was shown that cancer cells exhibit multiple alterations in mitochondrial content, structure, function, and activity. We have stably overexpressed the Friedreich ataxia-associated protein frataxin in several colon cancer cell lines. These cells have increased oxidative metabolism, as shown by concurrent increases in aconitase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, cellular respiration, and ATP content. Consistent with Warburg's hypothesis, we found that frataxin-overexpressing cells also have decreased growth rates and increased population doubling times, show inhibited colony formation capacity in soft agar assays, and exhibit a reduced capacity for tumor formation when injected into nude mice. Furthermore, overexpression of frataxin leads to an increased phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as decreased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Taken together, these results support the view that an increase in oxidative metabolism induced by mitochondrial frataxin may inhibit cancer growth in mammals.

  16. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Martinez-Sanmiguel, Juan Jose; Diaz, David; Zumeta-Dube, Inti; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85%) and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized aqueous colloidal Bi2O3 nanoparticles. PMID:23637533

  17. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B signaling reduces growth in medulloblastoma in vivo

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    Deckard Lindsey A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant pediatric brain tumor that requires surgery, whole brain and spine irradiation, and intense chemotherapy for treatment. A more sophisticated understanding of the pathophysiology of medulloblastoma is needed to successfully reduce the intensity of treatment and improve outcomes. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Methods To test the importance of NFκB to medulloblastoma cell growth, the effects of multiple drugs that inhibit NFκB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfasalazine, curcumin and bortezomib, were studied in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a malignant glioma cell line and normal neurons. Expression of endogenous NFκB was investigated in cultured cells, xenograft flank tumors, and primary human tumor samples. A dominant negative construct for the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, IκB, was prepared from medulloblastoma cell lines and flank tumors were established to allow specific pathway inhibition. Results We report high constitutive activity of the canonical NFκB pathway, as seen by Western analysis of the NFκB subunit p65, in medulloblastoma tumors compared to normal brain. The p65 subunit of NFκB is extremely highly expressed in xenograft tumors from human medulloblastoma cell lines; though, conversely, the same cells in culture have minimal expression without specific stimulation. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of NFκB in cell lines halts proliferation and leads to apoptosis. We show by immunohistochemical stain that phosphorylated p65 is found in the majority of primary tumor cells examined. Finally, expression of a dominant negative form of the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, dnIκB, resulted in poor xenograft tumor growth, with average tumor volumes

  18. Raman spectrum reveals Mesenchymal stem cells inhibiting HL60 cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Fang, Shaoyin; Zhang, Daosen; Zhang, Qinnan; Lu, Xiaoxu; Tian, Jindong; Fan, Jinping; Zhong, Liyun

    2017-04-01

    Though some research results reveals that Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability of inhibiting tumor cells proliferation, it remains controversial about the precise interaction mechanism during MSCs and tumor cells co-culture. In this study, combing Raman spectroscopic data and principle component analysis (PCA), the biochemical changes of MSCs or Human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cells during their co-culture were presented. The obtained results showed that some main Raman peaks of HL60 assigned to nucleic acids or proteins were greatly higher in intensity in the late stage of co-culture than those in the early stage of co-culture while they were still lower relative to the control group, implicating that the effect of MSCs inhibiting HL60 proliferation appeared in the early stage but gradually lost the inhibiting ability in the late stage of co-culture. Moreover, some other peaks of HL60 assigned to proteins were decreased in intensity in the early stage of co-culture relative to the control group but rebounded to the level similar to the control group in the late stage, showing that the content and structure changes of these proteins might be generated in the early stage but returned to the original state in the late stage of co-culture. As a result, in the early stage of MSCs-HL60 co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation of HL60 was lowered relative to its control group, the proliferation rate of HL60 cells was decreased. And in the late stage of co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation was rebounded, the reverse transfer of Raman peaks within 875-880 cm- 1 appeared, thus MSCs lost the ability to inhibit HL60 growth and HL60 proliferation was increased. In addition, it was observed that the peak at 811 cm- 1, which is a marker of RNA, was higher in intensity in the late stage than that in the control group, indicating that MSCs might be differentiated into myofibroblast-like MSCs. In addition, PCA results also exhibited

  19. Mycoepoxydiene suppresses HeLa cell growth by inhibiting glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kehua; Li, Li; Sun, Xihuan; Xu, Qingyan; Song, Siyang; Shen, Yuemao; Deng, Xianming

    2017-05-01

    Upregulation of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a major characteristic of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer and provides cancer cells with energy and vital metabolites to support their rapid proliferation. Targeting glycolysis and the PPP has emerged as a promising antitumor therapeutic strategy. Marine natural products are attractive sources for anticancer therapeutics, as evidenced by the antitumor drug Yondelis. Mycoepoxydiene (MED) is a natural product isolated from a marine fungus that has shown promising inhibitory efficacy against HeLa cells in vitro. We used a proteomic approach with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry to explore the cellular targets of MED and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of MED in HeLa cells. Our proteomic data showed that triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PGLS), which participate in glycolysis and the PPP, respectively, were significantly downregulated by MED treatment. Functional studies revealed that the expression levels of several other enzymes involved in glycolysis and the PPP, including hexokinase 2 (HK2), phosphofructokinase 1 (PFKM), aldolase A (ALDOA), enolase 1 (ENO1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), were also reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the LDHA and G6PD enzymatic activities in HeLa cells were inhibited by MED, and overexpression of these downregulated enzymes rescued HeLa cells from the growth inhibition induced by MED. Our data suggest that MED suppresses HeLa cell growth by inhibiting glycolysis and the PPP, which provides a mechanistic basis for the development of new therapeutics against cervical cancer.

  20. A bi-paratopic anti-EGFR nanobody efficiently inhibits solid tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roovers, Rob C.; Vosjan, Maria J.W.D.; Laeremans, Toon; el Khoulati, Rachid; de Bruin, Renée C.G.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Verkleij, Arie J.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be a valid cancer target for antibody-based therapy. At present, several anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been successfully used, among which cetuximab and matuzumab. X-ray crystallography data show that these antibodies bind to different epitopes on the ecto-domain of EGFR, providing a rationale for the combined use of these two antibody specificities. We have previously reported on the successful isolation of antagonistic anti-EGFR nanobodies. In the present study, we aimed to improve on these molecules by combining nanobodies with specificities similar to both cetuximab and matuzumab into a single bi-paratopic molecule. Carefully designed phage nanobody selections resulted in two sets of nanobodies that specifically blocked the binding of either matuzumab or of cetuximab to EGFR and that did not compete for each others binding. A combination of nanobodies from both epitope groups into the bi-paratopic nanobody CONAN-1 was shown to block EGFR activation more efficiently than monovalent or bivalent (monospecific) nanobodies. In addition, this bi-paratopic nanobody potently inhibited EGF-dependent cell proliferation. Importantly, in an in vivo model of athymic mice bearing A431 xenografts, CONAN-1 inhibited tumour outgrowth with an almost similar potency as the whole mAb cetuximab, despite the fact that CONAN-1 is devoid of an Fc portion that could mediate immune effector functions. Compared to therapy using bivalent, mono-specific nanobodies, CONAN-1 was clearly more potent in tumour growth inhibition. These results show that the rational design of bi-paratopic nanobody-based anti-cancer therapeutics may yield potent lead molecules for further development. PMID:21520037

  1. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. ► Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. ► Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. ► Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. ► Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  2. Epidermal growth factor binding, stimulation of phosphorylation, and inhibition of gluconeogenesis in rat proximal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R C; Daniel, T O

    1989-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor and insulin share many biological activities, including stimulation of cell proliferation, ion flux, glycolysis, fatty acid and glycogen synthesis, and activation of receptor-linked tyrosine kinase activity. In the kidney, insulin has been shown to regulate transport processes and inhibit gluconeogenesis in the proximal tubule. Since the kidney represents a major source of EGF, the present studies investigated whether proximal tubule contained EGF receptors, whether EGF receptors were localized to apical or basolateral membranes, and whether EGF receptor activation participated in the regulation of an important proximal tubule function, gluconeogenesis. Specific EGF receptors were demonstrated in the basolateral membrane of proximal tubule. Following incubation with 125I EGF, basolateral membranes demonstrated equilibrium binding at 4 degrees C and 23 degrees C. There was 78 +/- 2% specific binding (n = 13). The dissociation constant (Kd) was 1.5 x 10(-9) M and maximal binding was 44 fmol/mg protein. There was ninefold more specific binding to proximal tubule basolateral membrane than to brush border membrane. In basolateral, but not brush border membranes, EGF induced phosphorylation of the tyrosine residues of intrinsic membrane proteins, including a 170 kDa protein, corresponding to the EGF receptor. In the presence of the gluconeogenic substrates, alanine, lactate, and succinate, proximal tubule suspensions synthesized glucose. EGF inhibited glucose production in a concentration-dependent manner over a concentration range of 3 x 10(-11) to 3 x 10(-9) M. In addition, EGF inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated glucose production in the proximal tubule suspensions. EGF did not significantly increase net glucose metabolism nor decrease cellular ATP concentrations. Therefore, these studies demonstrated that rat proximal tubule contained specific receptors for EGF that were localized to the basolateral membrane and linked to tyrosine kinase

  3. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, Sylvie, E-mail: lamy.sylvie@uqam.ca; Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Gamma Inhibition Protects from Anthracycline Cardiotoxicity and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchuan; Sala, Valentina; De Santis, Maria Chiara; Cimino, James; Cappello, Paola; Pianca, Nicola; Di Bona, Anna; Margaria, Jean Piero; Martini, Miriam; Lazzarini, Edoardo; Pirozzi, Flora; Rossi, Luca; Franco, Irene; Bornbaum, Julia; Heger, Jacqueline; Rohrbach, Susanne; Perino, Alessia; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Lima, Braulio H F; Teixeira, Mauro M; Porporato, Paolo E; Schulz, Rainer; Angelini, Annalisa; Sandri, Marco; Ameri, Pietro; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Mongillo, Marco; Zaglia, Tania; Morello, Fulvio; Novelli, Francesco; Hirsch, Emilio; Ghigo, Alessandra

    2018-01-18

    Background -Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DOX), are potent anti-cancer agents for the treatment of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. However, their clinical use is hampered by cardiotoxicity. This study sought to investigate the role of PI3Kγ in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and the potential cardio-protective and anti-cancer effects of PI3Kγ inhibition. Methods -Mice expressing a kinase-inactive PI3Kγ or receiving PI3Kγ selective inhibitors were subjected to chronic DOX treatment. Cardiac function was analyzed by echocardiography and DOX-mediated signaling was assessed in whole hearts or in isolated cardiomyocytes. The dual cardio-protective and anti-tumor action of PI3Kγinhibition was assessed in mouse mammary tumor models. Results -PI3Kγ KD mice showed preserved cardiac function after chronic low-dose DOX treatment, and were protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. The beneficial effects of PI3Kγ inhibition were causally linked to enhanced autophagic disposal of DOX-damaged mitochondria. Consistently, either pharmacological or genetic blockade of autophagy in vivo abrogated the resistance of PI3Kγ KD mice to DOX cardiotoxicity. Mechanistically, PI3Kγ was triggered in DOX-treated hearts, downstream of TLR9, by the mitochondrial DNA released by injured organelles, and contained in autolysosomes. This autolysosomal PI3Kγ/Akt/mTOR/Ulk1 signaling provided maladaptive feedback inhibition of autophagy. Finally, PI3Kγ blockade in models of mammary gland tumors prevented DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, and concomitantly synergized with the anti-tumor action of DOX, by unleashing anticancer immunity. Conclusions -Blockade of PI3Kγ may provide a dual therapeutic advantage in cancer therapy, by simultaneously preventing anthracyclines cardiotoxicity and reducing tumor growth.

  5. The isoflavone metabolite 6-methoxyequol inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellou Sofia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased consumption of plant-based diets has been linked to the presence of certain phytochemicals, including polyphenols such as flavonoids. Several of these compounds exert their protective effect via inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Identification of additional phytochemicals with potential antiangiogenic activity is important not only for understanding the mechanism of the preventive effect, but also for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Results In an attempt to identify phytochemicals contributing to the well-documented preventive effect of plant-based diets on cancer incidence and mortality, we have screened a set of hitherto untested phytoestrogen metabolites concerning their anti-angiogenic effect, using endothelial cell proliferation as an end point. Here, we show that a novel phytoestrogen, 6-methoxyequol (6-ME, inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE cells, whereas VEGF-induced migration and survival of HUVE cells remained unaffected. In addition, 6-ME inhibited FGF-2-induced proliferation of bovine brain capillary endothelial (BBCE cells. In line with its role in cell proliferation, 6-ME inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK, the key cascade responsible for VEGF-induced proliferation of endothelial cells. In this context, 6-ME inhibited in a dose dependent manner the phosphorylation of MEK1/2, the only known upstream activator of ERK1/2. 6-ME did not alter VEGF-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK or AKT, compatible with the lack of effect on VEGF-induced migration and survival of endothelial cells. Peri-tumor injection of 6-ME in A-431 xenograft tumors resulted in reduced tumor growth with suppressed neovasularization compared to vehicle controls (P  Conclusions 6-ME inhibits VEGF- and FGF2-induced proliferation of ECs by targeting the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and it downstream substrate ERK1/2, both key components of the mitogenic MAPK

  6. Inhibition of growth and alteration of host cell interactions of Pasteurella multocida with natural byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaheen, S; Almario, J A; Biswas, D

    2014-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a leading cause of fowl cholera in both free-range pasture and conventional/commercially raised poultry. Its infection is a serious threat to poultry health and overall flock viability. Organic poultry is comparatively more vulnerable to this pathogen. It is a significant cause of production loss and price increase of poultry products, specifically organic poultry products. Some plant products are well documented as sources of natural antimicrobials such as polyphenols found in different berry pomaces and citrus oil. Pomace, a byproduct (primarily of seeds and skins) of fruits used for juice and wine production, and citrus oil, the byproduct of citrus juice production, show promising antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. Here, we showed for the first time that blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts and citrus oil inhibited P. multocida growth. Minimum bactericidal concentrations were determined as 0.3 and 0.4 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent for blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts, respectively. Similarly, only 0.05% citrus oil (vol/vol) completely inhibited P. multocida growth. Under shaking conditions, the antimicrobial activity of both pomace extracts and citrus oil was more intensive. Even citrus oil vapor also significantly reduced the growth of P. multocida. In addition, cell surface hydrophobicity of P. multocida was increased by 2- to 3-fold and its adherence to chicken fibroblast (DF1) and bovine mammary gland (MacT) cells was reduced significantly in the presence of pomace extracts only. This study indicates that these natural products might be good alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents, and hence, may be used as feed or water supplements to control fowl cholera and reduce production loss caused by P. multocida. Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Small interference RNA targeting tissue factor inhibits human lung adenocarcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jianing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human coagulation trigger tissue factor (TF is overexpressed in several types of cancer and involved in tumor growth, vascularization, and metastasis. To explore the role of TF in biological processes of lung adenocarcinoma, we used RNA interference (RNAi technology to silence TF in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 with high-level expression of TF and evaluate its antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Methods The specific small interfering RNA (siRNA designed for targeting human TF was transfected into A549 cells. The expression of TF was detected by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT and clonogenic assays. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The metastatic potential of A549 cells was determined by wound healing, the mobility and Matrigel invasion assays. Expressions of PI3K/Akt, Erk1/2, VEGF and MMP-2/-9 in transfected cells were detected by Western blot. In vivo, the effect of TF-siRNA on the growth of A549 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in nude mice was investigated. Results TF -siRNA significantly reduced the expression of TF in the mRNA and protein levels. The down-regulation of TF in A549 cells resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. Erk MAPK, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as VEGF and MMP-2/-9 expressions were inhibited in TF-siRNA transfected cells. Moreover, intratumoral injection of siRNA targeting TF suppressed the tumor growth of A549 cells in vivo model of lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Down-regulation of TF using siRNA could provide a potential approach for gene therapy against lung adenocarcinoma, and the antitumor effects may be associated with inhibition of Erk MAPK, PI3K/Akt pathways.

  8. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Wu, Xinchao [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Maimaiti, Yusufu [Department of Thyroid and Breast Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Gao, Zairong, E-mail: gaobonn@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Zhang, Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China)

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine {sup 131}I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from {sup 131}I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced {sup 131}I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. - Highlights: • BRD4 is upregulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of BRD4 induced cell cycle arrest and enhanced radioiodine uptake in vitro and impaired tumor growth in vivo. • JQ1 suppressed the expression of C-MYC and promoted the expression of NIS and P21. • JQ1 attenuated the recruitment of BRD4 to MYC promoter in thyroid cancer.

  9. Dependence of growth inhibiting action of increased planting density on capacity of lettuce plants to synthesize ABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotskaya, Lidiya B; Arkhipova, Tatyana N; Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2018-01-01

    Inhibition of lettuce plant growth under increased planting density was accompanied by accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) in the shoots of competing plants. To check causal relationship between these responses we studied the effect of decreased synthesis of ABA on growth indexes and hormonal balance of lettuce plants under elevated density of their planting (one (single) or three (competing) plants per pot). Herbicide fluridone was used to inhibit ABA synthesis. Preliminary experiments with single plants showed that presence of fluridone in the soil solution at rather low concentration (0.001mg/L) did not affect either chlorophyll content or growth rate of shoots and roots during at least one week. Treatment of competing (grouped) plants with this concentration of fluridone prevented both accumulation of ABA and competition induced growth inhibition. These results confirm important role of this hormone in the growth inhibiting effect of increased planting density. Furthermore, as in the case of ABA, fluridone prevented allocation of indoleacetic acid (IAA) to the shoots of competing plants likely contributing to leveling off the increase in the ratio of leaf area to their mass that is characteristic effect of shading in the dense plant populations. The results suggest involvement of ABA in allocation of IAA in competing plants. Application of fluridone did not influence the concentration of cytokinins in the shoots, whose level was decreased by competition either in fluridone treated or control (untreated with fluridone) plants. Accumulation of ABA in the shoots of competing plants accompanied by inhibition of their growth and the absence of either accumulation of ABA or inhibition of their growth in fluridone treated grouped plants confirms importance of ABA synthesis for growth response to competition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. [Inhibitive effects of mifepristone on growth of breast cancer: experiment with animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xing-Song; Zhou, Wen-Hong; Wu, Guo-Jun; Sun, Jing-Zhong; Cong, Ming-Hua

    2008-02-26

    To investigate the effects of mifepristone (MIF) on the growth of breast cancer. Forty female athymic BALB/c-nude mice underwent subcutaneous injection of breast cancer cells of the line MCF-7, ER +/PR +. Ten days later when tumor nodules were formed, the mice were randomly divided into 4 equal groups to be administered with MIF of the concentrations of 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg/kg x d respectively by gastric perfusion. The tumor size was observed every 3 day till 3 weeks later. Ten mice were used as normal control group, undergoing gastric perfusion of vegetable oil. Parts of the animals were killed 2 weeks later, and the remaining mice were all killed 3 weeks later. The tumors were taken out and underwent immunochemistry to measure the protein expression of CD34, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bcl-2, Ki67, p53, and CerbB-2. Microscopy was used to measure the microvessel density (MVD). The growth velocity of tumor of the mice of MIF groups were all slower than that of the control group (all P Ki67, p53, and CerbB-2 of the MIF groups were all significantly lower, time and dose-dependently, than those of the control group (all P breast cancer by the mechanisms related to apoptosis promotion and inhibition of angiogenesis, so it can be used in breast cancer endocrine therapy.

  11. CASK inhibits ECV304 cell growth and interacts with Id1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Jie; Su Yongyue; Sun Rongju; Zhang Fang; Luo Xiaofeng; Yang Zongcheng; Luo Xiangdong

    2005-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) is generally known as a scaffold protein. Here we show that overexpression of CASK resulted in a reduced rate of cell growth, while inhibition of expression of endogenous CASK via RNA-mediated interference resulted in an increased rate of cell growth in ECV304 cells. To explore the molecular mechanism, we identified a novel CASK-interacting protein, inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) with a yeast two-hybrid screening. Furthermore, endogenous CASK and Id1 proteins were co-precipitated from the lysates of ECV304 cells by immunoprecipitation. Mammalian two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assays indicated that CASK possessed a different binding activity for Id1 and its alternative splicing variant. It is known that Id proteins play important roles in regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Thus, we speculate that the regulation of cell growth mediated by CASK may be involved in Id1. Our findings indicate a novel function of CASK, the mechanism that remains to be further investigated

  12. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase (ASNS) suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. ASNS is deemed as a promising therapeutic target and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance in several human cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis has not been investigated. In this study, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transiently knockdown ASNS in two gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN-45, followed by growth rate assay and colony formation assay. Dose response curve analysis was performed in AGS and MKN-45 cells with stable ASNS knockdown to assess sensitivity to cisplatin. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo synergistic effects of ASNS depletion and cisplatin on tumor growth. Expression level of ASNS was evaluated in human patient samples using quantitative PCR. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was performed to evaluate association between ASNS expression and patient survival. Transient knockdown of ASNS inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in AGS and MKN-45 cells. Stable knockdown of ASNS conferred sensitivity to cisplatin in these cells. Depletion of ASNS and cisplatin treatment exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth in AGS xenografts. Moreover, ASNS was found to be up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Low expression of ASNS was significantly associated with better survival in gastric cancer patients. ASNS may contribute to gastric cancer tumorigenesis and may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of gastric cancer.

  13. Mechanisms of neuroblastoma cell growth inhibition by CARP-1 functional mimetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magesh Muthu

    Full Text Available Neuroblastomas (NBs are a clinically heterogeneous group of extra cranial pediatric tumors. Patients with high-risk, metastatic NBs have a long-term survival rate of below 40%, and are often resistant to current therapeutic modalities. Due to toxic side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapies, development of new agents is warranted to overcome resistance and effectively treat this disease in clinic. CARP-1 functional mimetics (CFMs are an emerging class of small molecule compounds that inhibit growth of diverse cancer cell types. Here we investigated NB inhibitory potential of CFMs and the molecular mechanisms involved. CFM-1, -4, and -5 inhibited NB cell growth, in vitro, independent of their p53 and MYCN status. CFM-4 and -5 induced apoptosis in NB cells in part by activating pro-apoptotic stress-activated kinases (SAPKs p38 and JNK, stimulating CARP-1 expression and cleavage of PARP1, while promoting loss of the oncogenes C and N-myc as well as mitotic cyclin B1. Treatments of NB cells with CFM-4 or -5 also resulted in loss of Inhibitory κB (IκB α and β proteins. Micro-RNA profiling revealed upregulation of XIAP-targeting miR513a-3p in CFM-4-treated NB, mesothelioma, and breast cancer cells. Moreover, exposure of NB and breast cancer cells to CFM-4 or -5 resulted in diminished expression of anti-apoptotic XIAP1, cIAP1, and Survivin proteins. Expression of anti-miR513a-5p or miR513a-5p mimic, however, interfered with or enhanced, respectively, the breast cancer cell growth inhibition by CFM-4. CFMs also impacted biological properties of the NB cells by blocking their abilities to migrate, form colonies in suspension, and invade through the matrix-coated membranes. Our studies indicate anti-NB properties of CFM-4 and 5, and suggest that these CFMs and/or their future analogs have potential as anti-NB agents.

  14. Dietary fiber enhances TGF-β signaling and growth inhibition in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanna; Gao, Xuxia; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Guohua; Nguyen, Anthony K; Liu, Xianghua; Jimenez, Fernando; Cox, Charles S; Townsend, Courtney M; Ko, Tien C

    2011-07-01

    Dietary fiber intake links to decreased risk of colorectal cancers. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, we found that butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber, enhances TGF-β signaling in rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE-1). Furthermore, TGF-β represses inhibitors of differentiation (Ids), leading to apoptosis. We hypothesized that dietary fiber enhances TGF-β's growth inhibitory effects on gut epithelium via inhibition of Id2. In this study, Balb/c and DBA/2N mice were fed with a regular rodent chow or supplemented with a dietary fiber (20% pectin) and Smad3 level in gut epithelium was measured. In vitro, RIE-1 cells were treated with butyrate and TGF-β(1), and cell functions were evaluated. Furthermore, the role of Ids in butyrate- and TGF-β-induced growth inhibition was investigated. We found that pectin feeding increased Smad3 protein levels in the jejunum (1.47 ± 0.26-fold, P = 0.045, in Balb/c mice; 1.49 ± 0.19-fold, P = 0.016, in DBA/2N mice), and phospho-Smad3 levels (1.92 ± 0.27-fold, P = 0.009, in Balb/c mice; 1.83 ± 0.28-fold, P = 0.022, in DBA/2N mice). Butyrate or TGF-β alone inhibited cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest. The combined treatment of butyrate and TGF-β synergistically induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in RIE-1 cells and repressed Id2 and Id3 levels. Furthermore, knockdown of Id2 gene expression by use of small interfering RNA caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that dietary fiber pectin enhanced Smad3 expression and activation in the gut. Butyrate and TGF-β induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which may be mediated by repression of Id2. Our results implicate a novel mechanism of dietary fiber in reducing the risk of colorectal cancer development.

  15. Improvement of insulin sensitivity in response to exercise training in type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with vascular endothelial growth factor A expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Henrik; Fischer, Helene; Degerblad, Marie; Alvarsson, Michael; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Insulin sensitivity changes in response to exercise training demonstrate a large variation. Vascular endothelial growth factor A could promote increased insulin sensitivity through angiogenesis. We investigated associations between changes in expression of key genes and insulin sensitivity, aerobic capacity and glycaemic control following exercise training in diabetes mellitus type 2. Subjects with diabetes mellitus type 2 underwent 12 weeks of structured exercise. Euglycaemic clamp, exercise test and HbA1c were performed. Muscle biopsies were obtained for mRNA expression. A total of 16 subjects completed the study. Change in vascular endothelial growth factor A expression was positively associated with an increase in insulin sensitivity (p = 0.004) and with a decrease in HbA1c (p = 0.034). Vascular endothelial growth factor A receptor-1 expression showed similar associations. The variation in physical adaptation to exercise training in diabetes mellitus type 2 was associated with changes in expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A in muscle. This difference in induced gene expression could contribute to the variation in exercise training effects on insulin sensitivity. Measures of capillary blood flow need to be assessed in future studies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Inhibition of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell growth following combination treatment with resveratrol and imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X J; Li, Y H

    2015-06-11

    To investigate the effect of treatment with resveratrol combined with imatinib mesylate on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, in vitro cultured human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells were incubated with different concentrations of resveratrol and imatinib mesylate when the cells were in the logarithmic phase. Next, the cell growth inhibition was evaluated using the MTT assay and cellular morphology observation. Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining. The results demonstrated that treatment with resveratrol (concentration-dependent) and imatinib mesylate showed significantly greater inhibition of K562 cell growth and a higher apoptosis rate of K562 cells than imatinib mesylate medication alone and the control group (P imatinib mesylate medication alone group showed significant inhibition of K562 cell growth and apoptosis rate of K562 cells compared to the control group (P imatinib mesylate and resveratrol are potent drug treatments for human chronic myelogenous leukemia, offering a promising means of inhibiting cell growth and apoptosis.

  17. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Qingyi [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Qing, Yong, E-mail: qingyongxy@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Xiaohua, E-mail: wuxh@scu.edu.cn [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  18. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    -DDN. Moreover, we confirmed by clonogenic-assay that DDNDBeQ treatment significantly (p<0.001 inhibits H1299 colony-formation as compared to control/DDN. Overall, encapsulation of potent VCP-inhibitor DBeQ into a dendrimer allows selective VCP-mediated proteostasis-inhibition for controlling NSCLC-tumor growth and progression to allow tumor-targeted sustained drug delivery.

  19. Inhibition of fibroblast growth by Notch1 signaling is mediated by induction of Wnt11-dependent WISP-1.

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    Zhao-Jun Liu

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are an integral component of stroma and important source of growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM. They play a prominent role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and in wound healing and tumor growth. Notch signaling regulates biological function in a variety of cells. To elucidate the physiological function of Notch signaling in fibroblasts, we ablated Notch1 in mouse (Notch1(Flox/Flox embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. Notch1-deficient (Notch1(-/- MEFs displayed faster growth and motility rate compared to Notch1(Flox/Flox MEFs. Such phenotypic changes, however, were reversible by reconstitution of Notch1 activation via overexpression of the intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD1 in Notch1-deficient MEFs. In contrast, constitutive activation of Notch1 signaling by introducing NICD1 into primary human dermal fibroblasts (FF2441, which caused pan-Notch activation, inhibited cell growth and motility, whereas cellular inhibition was relievable when the Notch activation was countered with dominant-negative mutant of Master-mind like 1 (DN-MAML-1. Functionally, "Notch-activated" stromal fibroblasts could inhibit tumor cell growth/invasion. Moreover, Notch activation induced expression of Wnt-induced secreted proteins-1 (WISP-1/CCN4 in FF2441 cells while deletion of Notch1 in MEFs resulted in an opposite effect. Notably, WISP-1 suppressed fibroblast proliferation, and was responsible for mediating Notch1's inhibitory effect since siRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1 expression could relieve cell growth inhibition. Notch1-induced WISP-1 expression appeared to be Wnt11-dependent, but Wnt1-independent. Blockade of Wnt11 expression resulted in decreased WISP-1 expression and liberated Notch-induced cell growth inhibition. These findings indicated that inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Notch pathway activation is mediated, at least in part, through regulating Wnt1-independent, but Wnt11-dependent WISP-1 expression.

  20. IN-VITRO GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF COMMERCIAL PROBIOTIC STRAINS AND THEIR POTENTIAL FOR INHIBITION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE AND CLOSTRDIDUM PERFRINGENS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, Anders

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...... aerobic conditions was assessed. To evaluate inhibition of C. difficile and C. perfringens sterile supernatant of the probiotic culture was added to BHI inoculated with a standard C. difficile or C. perfringens suspension. Growth was measured spectrophotometrically at 0 and 24h and compared to the control...... (C. difficile or C. perfringens suspension in BHI). At pH 4 12% of strains showed >50% growth and 24% were unable to grow, however did survive. At pH 2 none of the tested strains grew or survived. Eighty eight percent showed >75% growth in 0.15% bile, 60% showed >75% growth in 0.3% bile. Ninety...

  1. Inhibition of cell growth by EGR-1 in human primary cultures from malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Franco

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the putative role of EGR-1 in the growth of glioma cells. EGR-1 expression was examined during the early passages in vitro of 17 primary cell lines grown from 3 grade III and from 14 grade IV malignant astrocytoma explants. The explanted tumors were genetically characterized at the p53, MDM2 and INK4a/ARF loci, and fibronectin expression and growth characteristics were examined. A recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 was tested in the primary cell lines. Results Low levels of EGR-1 protein were found in all primary cultures examined, with lower values present in grade IV tumors and in cultures carrying wild-type copies of p53 gene. The levels of EGR-1 protein were significantly correlated to the amount of intracellular fibronectin, but only in tumors carrying wild-type copies of the p53 gene (R = 0,78, p = 0.0082. Duplication time, plating efficiency, colony formation in agarose, and contact inhibition were also altered in the p53 mutated tumor cultures compared to those carrying wild-type p53. Growth arrest was achieved in both types of tumor within 1–2 weeks following infection with a recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 but not with the control adenovirus. Conclusions Suppression of EGR-1 is a common event in gliomas and in most cases this is achieved through down-regulation of gene expression. Expression of EGR-1 by recombinant adenovirus infection almost completely abolishes the growth of tumor cells in vitro, regardless of the mutational status of the p53 gene.

  2. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-12-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462-484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake-metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities.

  3. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors.

  4. Two new growth inhibition tests with the filamentous algae Ceramium strictum and C. tenuicorne (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ellen; Eklund, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Two growth inhibition tests using the red marine macroalgae Ceramium strictum and the brackish water relative C. tenuicorne have been developed. Besides using phenol as a reference substance, the toxicity of a metal, a flame retardant and a complex effluent water were assayed. The two methods are reliable and repeatable bioassays for salinities between 4 and 30 per thousandth. The coefficients of variation (CV) for toxicity of the reference substance phenol were 15% for the Stereo Microscope Analysis test and between 24 and 51% for the Computer Image Analysis test (n=5). Ceramium spp. are common and important primary producers in temperate coastal waters and are thus relevant as test organisms. Both algae grow well in laboratorial conditions and tests can be performed all year around.

  5. Two new growth inhibition tests with the filamentous algae Ceramium strictum and C. tenuicorne (Rhodophyta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Ellen; Eklund, Britta

    2003-09-01

    Two species of Ceramium grow well in lab assays and tests can be performed all year around. - Two growth inhibition tests using the red marine macroalgae Ceramium strictum and the brackish water relative C. tenuicorne have been developed. Besides using phenol as a reference substance, the toxicity of a metal, a flame retardant and a complex effluent water were assayed. The two methods are reliable and repeatable bioassays for salinities between 4 and 30%o. The coefficients of variation (CV) for toxicity of the reference substance phenol were 15% for the Stereo Microscope Analysis test and between 24 and 51% for the Computer Image Analysis test (n=5). Ceramium spp. are common and important primary producers in temperate coastal waters and are thus relevant as test organisms. Both algae grow well in laboratorial conditions and tests can be performed all year around.

  6. Two new growth inhibition tests with the filamentous algae Ceramium strictum and C. tenuicorne (Rhodophyta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Ellen; Eklund, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Two species of Ceramium grow well in lab assays and tests can be performed all year around. - Two growth inhibition tests using the red marine macroalgae Ceramium strictum and the brackish water relative C. tenuicorne have been developed. Besides using phenol as a reference substance, the toxicity of a metal, a flame retardant and a complex effluent water were assayed. The two methods are reliable and repeatable bioassays for salinities between 4 and 30%o. The coefficients of variation (CV) for toxicity of the reference substance phenol were 15% for the Stereo Microscope Analysis test and between 24 and 51% for the Computer Image Analysis test (n=5). Ceramium spp. are common and important primary producers in temperate coastal waters and are thus relevant as test organisms. Both algae grow well in laboratorial conditions and tests can be performed all year around

  7. Resveratrol inhibits myeloma cell growth, prevents osteoclast formation, and promotes osteoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Andersen, Thomas L; Abdallah, Basem M

    2005-01-01

    , a challenge for treating multiple myeloma is discovering drugs targeting not only myeloma cells but also osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Because resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) is reported to display antitumor activities on a variety of human cancer cells, we investigated the effects...... of this natural compound on myeloma and bone cells. We found that resveratrol reduces dose-dependently the growth of myeloma cell lines (RPMI 8226 and OPM-2) by a mechanism involving cell apoptosis. In cultures of human primary monocytes, resveratrol inhibits dose-dependently receptor activator of nuclear factor......RNA and cell surface protein levels and a decrease of NFATc1 stimulation and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation, whereas the gene expression of c-fms, CD14, and CD11a is up-regulated. Finally, resveratrol promotes dose-dependently the expression of osteoblast markers like osteocalcin and osteopontin in human bone...

  8. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6 ' -O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ( 1 H and 13 C NMR, 1 H- 1 H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC 50 values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  9. Effect of chemically and biologically synthesized Ag nanoparticles on the algae growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Mražiková; Oksana, Velgosová; Jana, Kavuličová

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few years green methods for preparation of silver nanoparticles has become necessary due to its friendly influence on ecosystem. In the present work antimicrobial properties of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Bio-AgNPs) using green algae extract and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Chem-AgNPs) using sodium citrate against algae Parachlorella kessleri is investigated. Both used Bio-AgNPs and Chem-AgNPs exhibit long-term stability as demonstrated by UV-vis spectroscopy measurements. The results revealed stronger toxic effects of Bio-AgNPs on agar plates what was confirmed clear inhibition zone around wells impregnated with Bio-AgNPs. On the other hand Bio-AgNPs were confirmed to be less toxic in aquatic environments for the growths of green algae P. kessleri comparing to Chem-AgNPs.

  10. Pekinenin E Inhibits the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Promoting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a malignant primary liver cancer with poor prognosis. In the present study, we report that pekinenin E (PE, a casbane diterpenoid derived from the roots of Euphorbia pekinensis, has a strong antitumor activity against human HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. PE suppressed the growth of human HCC cells Hep G2 and SMMC-7721. In addition, PE-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress caused increasing expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, leading to apoptosis in HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of ER stress with CHOP small interfering RNA or 4-phenyl-butyric acid partially reversed PE-induced cell death. Furthermore, PE induced S cell cycle arrest, which could also be partially reversed by CHOP knockdown. In all, these findings suggest that PE causes ER stress-associated cell death and cell cycle arrest, and it may serve as a potent agent for curing human HCC.

  11. Components in aqueous Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flower extract inhibit in vitro melanoma cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina H. Goldberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is extremely common, and melanoma causes about 80% of skin cancer deaths. In fact, melanoma kills over 50 thousand people around the world each year, and these numbers are rising. Clearly, standard treatments are not effectively treating melanoma, and alternative therapies are needed to address this problem. Hibiscus tea has been noted to have medicinal properties, including anticancer effects. Extracts from Hibiscus have been shown to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells. In particular, recent studies found that polyphenols extracted from Hibiscus sabdariffa by organic solvents can inhibit melanoma cell growth. However, effects of aqueous extracts from Hibiscus rosa-sinesis flowers, which are commonly used to make traditional medicinal beverages, have not been examined on melanoma cells. Here, we report that aqueous H. rosa-sinesis flower extract contains compounds that inhibit melanoma cell growth in a dose dependent manner at concentrations that did not affect the growth of nontransformed cells. In addition, these extracts contain low molecular weight growth inhibitory compounds below 3 kD in size that combine with larger compounds to more effectively inhibit melanoma cell growth. Future work should identify these compounds, and evaluate their potential to prevent and treat melanoma and other cancers.

  12. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  13. Capric acid secreted by S. boulardii inhibits C. albicans filamentous growth, adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Murzyn

    Full Text Available Candidiasis are life-threatening systemic fungal diseases, especially of gastro intestinal track, skin and mucous membranes lining various body cavities like the nostrils, the mouth, the lips, the eyelids, the ears or the genital area. Due to increasing resistance of candidiasis to existing drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit. Such a probiotic microorganism is yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, a close relative of baker yeast. Saccharomyces boulardii cells and their extract affect the virulence factors of the important human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its hyphae formation, adhesion and biofilm development. Extract prepared from S. boulardii culture filtrate was fractionated and GC-MS analysis showed that the active fraction contained, apart from 2-phenylethanol, caproic, caprylic and capric acid whose presence was confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Biological activity was tested on C. albicans using extract and pure identified compounds. Our study demonstrated that this probiotic yeast secretes into the medium active compounds reducing candidal virulence factors. The chief compound inhibiting filamentous C. albicans growth comparably to S. boulardii extract was capric acid, which is thus responsible for inhibition of hyphae formation. It also reduced candidal adhesion and biofilm formation, though three times less than the extract, which thus contains other factors suppressing C. albicans adherence. The expression profile of selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by real-time PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, INO1 and CSH1 genes in C. albicans cells treated with capric acid and S. boulardii extract. Hence capric acid secreted by S. boulardii is responsible for inhibition of C. albicans filamentation and partially also adhesion and

  14. Exercise-induced muscle-derived cytokines inhibit mammary cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Pernille; Dethlefsen, Christine; Brandt, Claus; Hansen, Jakob; Pedersen, Line; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-09-01

    Regular physical activity protects against the development of breast and colon cancer, since it reduces the risk of developing these by 25-30%. During exercise, humoral factors are released from the working muscles for endocrinal signaling to other organs. We hypothesized that these myokines mediate some of the inhibitory effects of exercise on mammary cancer cell proliferation. Serum and muscles were collected from mice after an exercise bout. Incubation with exercise-conditioned serum inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation by 52% and increased caspase activity by 54%. A similar increase in caspase activity was found after incubation of MCF-7 cells with conditioned media from electrically stimulated myotubes. PCR array analysis (CAPM-0838E; SABiosciences) revealed that seven genes were upregulated in the muscles after exercise, and of these oncostatin M (OSM) proved to inhibit MCF-7 proliferation by 42%, increase caspase activity by 46%, and induce apoptosis. Blocking OSM signaling with anti-OSM antibodies reduced the induction of caspase activity by 51%. To verify that OSM was a myokine, we showed that it was significantly upregulated in serum and in three muscles, tibialis cranialis, gastronemius, and soleus, after an exercise bout. In contrast, OSM expression remained unchanged in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, liver, and spleen (mononuclear cells). We conclude that postexercise serum inhibits mammary cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis of these cells. We suggest that one or more myokines secreted from working muscles may be mediating this effect and that OSM is a possible candidate. These findings emphasize that role of physical activity in cancer treatment, showing a direct link between exercise-induced humoral factors and decreased tumor cell growth.

  15. Artesunate inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by downregulating COX-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, He-Sheng; Li, Ming; Tan, Shi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate, a derivative of artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua L., has been traditionally used to treat malaria, and artesunate has demonstrated cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancer cells. However, there is little available information about the antitumor effects of artesunate on human gastric cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of artesunate on human gastric cancer cells and whether its antitumor effect is associated with reduction in COX-2 expression. The effects of artesunate on the growth and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells were investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometric analysis of annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, rhodamine 123 staining, and Western blot analysis. Results indicate that artesunate exhibits antiproliferative effects and apoptosis-inducing activities. Artesunate markedly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with a reduction in COX-2 expression. Treatment with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib, or transient transfection of gastric cancer cells with COX-2 siRNA, also inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the treatment with artesunate promoted the expression of proapoptotic factor Bax and suppressed the expression of antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2. In addition, caspase-3 and caspase-9 were activated, and artesunate induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting that the apoptosis is mediated by mitochondrial pathways. These results demonstrate that artesunate has an effect on anti-gastric cancer cells. One of the antitumor mechanisms of artesunate may be that its inhibition of COX-2 led to reduced proliferation and induction of apoptosis, connected with mitochondrial dysfunction. Artesunate might be a potential therapeutic

  16. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

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    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported.To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures.Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  17. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  18. Targeting SPARC by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, a calcium-binding matricellular glycoprotein, is implicated in the progressions of some cancers. However, no information has been available to date regarding the function of SPARC in cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis. Methods In this study, we isolated and established high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones from human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa by the limited dilution method. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were performed to investigate SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones. Then lentivirus vector with SPARC shRNA was constructed and infected the highly invasive subclones. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were also performed to investigate the changes of SPARC expression after viral infection. In functional assays, effects of SPARC knockdown on the biological behaviors of cervical cancer cells were investigated. The mechanisms of SPARC in cervical cancer proliferation, apoptosis and invasion were also researched. Results SPARC was over-expressed in the highly invasive subclones compared with the low invasive subclones. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase through the p53/p21 pathway, also caused cell apoptosis accompanied by the decreased ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and inhibited cell invasion and metastasis accompanied by down-regulated MMP2 and MMP9 expressions and up-regulated E-cadherin expression. Conclusion SPARC is related to the invasive phenotype of cervical cancer cells. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis and inhibits cell invasion and metastasis. SPARC as a promoter improves cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis.

  19. Rottlerin-mediated inhibition of Toxoplasma gondii growth in BeWo trophoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ietta, Francesca; Maioli, Emanuela; Daveri, Elena; Gonzaga Oliveira, Juliana; da Silva, Rafaela José; Romagnoli, Roberta; Cresti, Laura; Maria Avanzati, Anna; Paulesu, Luana; Barbosa, Bellisa de Freitas; Gomes, Angelica de Oliveira; Roberto Mineo, José; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira

    2017-04-28

    Autophagy is a crucial and physiological process for cell survival from yeast to mammals, including protozoan parasites. Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, typically exploits autophagic machinery of host cell; however host cell upregulates autophagy to combat the infection. Herein we tested the efficacy of Rottlerin, a natural polyphenol with autophagic promoting properties, against Toxoplasma infection on the chorioncarcinoma-derived cell line BeWo. We found that Rottlerin, at sub-toxic doses, induced morphological and biochemical alterations associated with autophagy and decreased Toxoplasma growth in infected cells. Although autophagy was synergically promoted by Toxoplasma infection in combination with Rottlerin treatment, the use of the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine revealed that Rottlerin anti-parasitic effect was largely autophagy-independent and likely mediated by the converging inhibitory effect of Rottlerin and Toxoplasma in host protein translation, mediated by mTOR inhibition and eIF2α phosphorylation. Both events, which on one hand could explain the additive effect on autophagy induction, on the other hand led to inhibition of protein synthesis, thereby depriving Toxoplasma of metabolically essential components for multiplication. We suggest that modulation of the competition between pathogen requirement and host cell defense might be an attractive, novel therapeutic approach against Toxoplasma infection and encourage the development of Rottlerin-based new therapeutic formulations.

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for green algae growth inhibition by polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Tom M; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Hendriks, A Jan; van de Meent, Dik

    2017-07-01

    After use and disposal of chemical products, many types of polymer particles end up in the aquatic environment with potential toxic effects to primary producers like green algae. In this study, we have developed Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) for a set of highly structural diverse polymers which are capable to estimate green algae growth inhibition (EC50). The model (N = 43, R 2  = 0.73, RMSE = 0.28) is a regression-based decision tree using one structural descriptor for each of three polymer classes separated based on charge. The QSAR is applicable to linear homo polymers as well as copolymers and does not require information on the size of the polymer particle or underlying core material. Highly branched polymers, non-nitrogen cationic polymers and polymeric surfactants are not included in the model and thus cannot be evaluated. The model works best for cationic and non-ionic polymers for which cellular adsorption, disruption of the cell wall and photosynthesis inhibition were the mechanisms of action. For anionic polymers, specific properties of the polymer and test characteristics need to be known for detailed assessment. The data and QSAR results for anionic polymers, when combined with molecular dynamics simulations indicated that nutrient depletion is likely the dominant mode of toxicity. Nutrient depletion in turn, is determined by the non-linear interplay between polymer charge density and backbone flexibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Pharmacological Inhibitor of the Protease Taspase1 Effectively Inhibits Breast and Brain Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Y.; Lee, Yishan; Van Tine, Brian A.; Searleman, Adam C.; Westergard, Todd D.; Liu, Han; Tu, Ho-Chou; Takeda, Shugaku; Dong, Yiyu; Piwnica-Worms, David R.; Oh, Kyoung J.; Korsmeyer, Stanley J.; Hermone, Ann; Gussio, Richard; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Hsieh, James J.-D.

    2011-01-01

    The threonine endopeptidase Taspase1 has a critical role in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this study, we developed and evaluated small molecule inhibitors of Taspase1 as a new candidate class of therapeutic modalities. Genetic deletion of Taspase1 in the mouse produced no overt deficiencies, suggesting the possibility of a wide therapeutic index for use of Taspase1 inhibitors in cancers. We defined the peptidyl motifs recognized by Taspase1 and conducted a cell-based dual-fluorescent proteolytic screen of the NCI diversity library to identify Taspase1 inhibitors (TASPINs). Based on secondary and tertiary screens the 4-[(4-arsonophenyl)methyl]phenyl]arsonic acid NSC48300 was determined to be the most specific active compound. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated a crucial role for the arsenic acid moiety in mediating Taspase1 inhibition. Additional FRET-based kinetic analysis characterized NSC48300 as a reversible, non-competitive inhibitor of Taspase1 (KI = 4.22 μM). In the MMTV-neu mouse model of breast cancer and the U251 xenograft model of brain cancer NSC48300 produced effective tumor growth inhibition. Our results offer an initial preclinical proof of concept to develop TASPINs for cancer therapy. PMID:22166309

  2. A pharmacologic inhibitor of the protease Taspase1 effectively inhibits breast and brain tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Y; Lee, Yishan; Van Tine, Brian A; Searleman, Adam C; Westergard, Todd D; Liu, Han; Tu, Ho-Chou; Takeda, Shugaku; Dong, Yiyu; Piwnica-Worms, David R; Oh, Kyoung J; Korsmeyer, Stanley J; Hermone, Ann; Gussio, Richard; Shoemaker, Robert H; Cheng, Emily H-Y; Hsieh, James J-D

    2012-02-01

    The threonine endopeptidase Taspase1 has a critical role in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this study, we developed and evaluated small molecule inhibitors of Taspase1 as a new candidate class of therapeutic modalities. Genetic deletion of Taspase1 in the mouse produced no overt deficiencies, suggesting the possibility of a wide therapeutic index for use of Taspase1 inhibitors in cancers. We defined the peptidyl motifs recognized by Taspase1 and conducted a cell-based dual-fluorescent proteolytic screen of the National Cancer Institute diversity library to identify Taspase1 inhibitors (TASPIN). On the basis of secondary and tertiary screens the 4-[(4-arsonophenyl)methyl]phenyl] arsonic acid NSC48300 was determined to be the most specific active compound. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated a crucial role for the arsenic acid moiety in mediating Taspase1 inhibition. Additional fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based kinetic analysis characterized NSC48300 as a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of Taspase1 (K(i) = 4.22 μmol/L). In the MMTV-neu mouse model of breast cancer and the U251 xenograft model of brain cancer, NSC48300 produced effective tumor growth inhibition. Our results offer an initial preclinical proof-of-concept to develop TASPINs for cancer therapy. ©2011 AACR.

  3. MicroRNA-187 promotes growth and metastasis of gastric cancer by inhibiting FOXA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Lu, Sumei; Shi, Yubin

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an active role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The expression and biological function for miR-187 in gastric cancer remains unknow. In the present study, we demonstrated that miR-187 expression was increased in gastric cancer (GC) tissues and cells. Increased expression level of miR-187 was associated with adverse clinical features including tumor size, lymph metastasis and TNM stage, and decreased overall survival and disease-free survival of GC patients. Functionally, overexpression miR-187 could promote while inhibition of miR-187 could suppress, the proliferation, migration and invasion of GC cells in vitro. In vivo experiments showed that overexpression of miR-187 promoted the growth and lung metastasis of SGC-7901 cells in nude mice. Mechanically, we confirmed that FOXA2 was the downstream target of miR-187 in GC cells using luciferase assay, qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Moreover, overexpression of FOXA2 abrogated the promoting effects of miR-187 overexpression on SGC-7901 cell proliferation, migration and invasion, while inhibition of FOXA2 reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-187 downregulation on these biological functions of AGS cells, suggesting that FOXA2 was a functional mediator of miR-187 in GC. Therefore, this study indicates that miR-187 is potentially a biomarker and treatment target for GC patients.

  4. Andrographolide Suppress Tumor Growth by Inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Activation in Insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma. PMID:24719558

  5. Macelignan inhibits bee pathogenic fungi Ascophaera apis growth through HOG1 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.K. Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascosphaera apis is a bee pathogen that causes bee larvae infection disease, to which treatment is not yet well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal susceptibility in vitro against A. apis and to identify a new antifungal agent for this pathogen through minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC assay and western blot analysis. Macelignan had 1.56 and 3.125 μg/mL MIC against A. apis after 24 and 48 h, respectively, exhibiting the strongest growth inhibition against A. apis among the tested compounds (corosolic acid, dehydrocostus lactone, loganic acid, tracheloside, fangchinoline and emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. Furthermore, macelignan showed a narrow-ranged spectrum against various fungal strains without any mammalian cell cytotoxicity. In spite of miconazole having powerful broad-ranged anti-fungal activity including A. apis, it demonstrated strong cytotoxicity. Therefore, even if macelignan alone was effective as an antifungal agent to treat A. apis, combined treatment with miconazole was more useful to overcome toxicity, drug resistance occurrence and cost effectiveness. Finally, HOG1 was revealed as a target molecule of macelignan in the anti-A. apis activity by inhibiting phosphorylation using S. cerevisiae as a model system. Based on our results, macelignan, a food-grade antimicrobial compound, would be an effective antifungal agent against A. apis infection in bees.

  6. New symmetrically esterified m-bromobenzyl non-aminobisphosphonates inhibited breast cancer growth and metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelkarim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although there was growing evidence in the potential use of Bisphosphonates (BPs in cancer therapy, their strong osseous affinities that contrast their poor soft tissue uptake limited their use. Here, we developed a new strategy to overcome BPs hydrophilicity by masking the phosphonic acid through organic protecting groups and introducing hydrophobic functions in the side chain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We synthesized non-nitrogen BPs (non N-BPs containing bromobenzyl group (BP7033Br in their side chain that were symmetrically esterified with hydrophobic 4-methoxphenyl (BP7033BrALK and assessed their effects on breast cancer estrogen-responsive cells (T47D, MCF-7 as well as on non responsive ones (SKBR3, MDA-MB-231 and its highly metastatic derived D3H2LN subclone. BP7033Br ALK was more efficient in inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, migration and survival when compared to BP7033Br. Although both compounds inhibited tumor growth without side effects, only BP7033Br ALK abrogated tumor angiogenesis and D3H2LN cells-induced metastases formation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together these data suggest the potential therapeutic use of this new class of esterified Bisphosphonates (BPs in the treatment of tumor progression and metastasis without toxic adverse effects.

  7. Manic fringe inhibits tumor growth by suppressing Notch3 degradation in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fuming; Amarasinghe, Baru; Dang, Thao P

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling plays an essential role in development as well as cancer. We have previously shown that Notch3 is important for lung cancer growth and survival. Notch receptors are activated through the interaction with their ligands, resulting in proteolytic cleavage of the receptors. This interaction is modulated by Fringe, a family of fucose-specific β1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify the extracellular subunit of Notch receptors. Studies in developmental models showed that Fringe enhances Notch's response to Delta ligands at the expense of Jagged ligands. We observed that Manic Fringe expression is down-regulated in lung cancer. Since Jagged1, a known ligand for Notch3, is often over-expressed in lung cancer, we hypothesized that Fringe negatively regulates Notch3 activation. In this study, we show that re-expression of Manic Fringe down-regulates Notch3 target genes HES1 and HeyL and reduces tumor phenotype in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism for this phenomenon appears to be related to modulation of Notch3 protein stability. Proteasome inhibition reverses Manic Fringe-induced protein turnover. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that Manic Fringe functions as a tumor suppressor in the lung and that the mechanism of its anti-tumor activity is mediated by inhibition of Notch3 activation.

  8. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma.

  9. In vitro inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae growth by a urogenital strain of Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, D; Bisaillon, J G; Beaudet, R; Portelance, V

    1985-01-01

    A strain of Streptococcus faecalis isolated from the urogenital flora was selected for its ability to inhibit the in vitro growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Initially, the inhibitory activity was demonstrated on solid medium only when the inhibitor and the target strains were growing simultaneously, such as in the spot-lawn and flip-flop agar overlay methods. The antigonococcal effect was not due to a shift in the pH or depletion of nutrient in the medium. This activity was not produced in liquid medium nor could it be extracted in a soluble form from either the solid medium or the streptococcal cells. The production of the inhibitory activity could not be enhanced by ultraviolet irradiation or treatment with mitomycin C. The composition of the medium was found to affect the size of the inhibitory zone produced. The inhibitory activity showed a wide antigonococcal spectrum and was susceptible to trypsin and pronase but resistant to alpha- and beta-amylases and catalase. This activity passed through a filtering membrane and was also dialyzable and had an apparent molecular weight of less than 1,000. The addition of bovine serum albumin to solid medium enabled us to show an inhibition even when the producer and the target strains were grown sequentially, thus suggesting that part of the difficulty of studying such inhibitory activity could be due to its instability.

  10. 8-Carbon oxylipins inhibit germination and growth, and stimulate aerial conidiation in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Garcia, Erika; Garzia, Aitor; Cordobés, Shandra; Espeso, Eduardo A; Ugalde, Unai

    2011-01-01

    Germination of Aspergillus nidulans conidia in liquid cultures was progressively inhibited at inoculum loads above 1×10(5)conidiamL(-1). High conidial densities also inhibited growth of neighbouring mycelia. The eight-carbon oxylipin 1-octen-3-ol was identified as the main inhibitor in a fraction also containing 3-octanone and 3-octanol. These three oxylipins also increased the conidiation rate of dark-grown surface cultures, but had no effect on liquid cultures. 3-octanone was the most conidiogenic compound. The action of 3-octanone required functional forms of developmental activators fluG, flbB-D and brlA, and was not additive to the conidiogenic effect of stress stimuli such as osmotic stress or carbon starvation. Oxylipins were produced shortly after hyphae made contact with the atmosphere and were most effective on aerial mycelia, indicating that they perform their signalling function in the gas phase. Copyright © 2011 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis through anti-angiogenesis by blocking the Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Dong

    Full Text Available While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases.

  12. Chitosan inhibits enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A in growth medium and chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoman, Maryam; Udompijitkul, Pathima; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming bacterium and a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of chitosan against spore germination, spore outgrowth and vegetative growth of C. perfringens food poisoning (FP) isolates. Chitosan of differing molecular weights inhibited germination of spores of all tested FP isolates in a KCl germinant solution containing 0.1 mg/ml chitosan at pH 4.5. However, higher level (0.25 mg/ml) of chitosan was required to effectively arrest outgrowth of the germinated C. perfringens spores in Tripticase-yeast extract-glucose (TGY) medium. Furthermore, chitosan (1.0 mg/ml) was bacteriostatic against vegetative cells of C. perfringens in TGY medium. Although chitosan showed strong inhibitory activities against C. perfringens in laboratory medium, higher levels (2.0 mg/g) were required to achieve similar inhibition of spores inoculated into chicken meat. In summary, the inhibitory effects of chitosan against C. perfringens FP isolates was concentration dependent, and no major difference was observed when using different molecule weight chitosan as an inhibitor. Our results contribute to a better understanding on the potential application of chitosan in cooked meat products to control C. perfringens-associated disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Imatinib and Dasatinib Inhibit Hemangiosarcoma and Implicate PDGFR-β and Src in Tumor Growth12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Marley, Kevin; Edris, Wade; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Schalk, Vidya; MacDonald, Valerie; Loriaux, Marc; Druker, Brian J; Helfand, Stuart C

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma, a natural model of human angiosarcoma, is an aggressive vascular tumor diagnosed commonly in dogs. The documented expression of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by these tumors makes them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, we possess limited knowledge of the effects of TKIs on hemangiosarcoma as well as other soft tissue sarcomas. We report here on the use of the TKIs imatinib and dasatinib in canine hemangiosarcoma and their effects on platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) and Src inhibition. Both TKIs reduced cell viability, but dasatinib was markedly more potent in this regard, mediating cytotoxic effects orders of magnitude greater than imatinib. Dasatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of the shared PDGFR-β target at a concentration approximately 1000 times less than that needed by imatinib and effectively blocked Src phosphorylation. Both inhibitors augmented the response to doxorubicin, suggesting that clinical responses likely will be improved using both drugs in combination; however, dasatinib was significantly (P hemangiosarcoma established that clinically achievable doses of dasatinib may be realized in dogs and provides a means to investigate the effect of TKIs on soft tissue sarcomas in a large animal model. PMID:23544168

  14. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Bolaños-Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10–80 μM during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin–V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells.

  15. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kajikawa, Masunori; Sugiura, Masahito; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Urano, Sakiko; Karasawa, Chigusa; Usami, Ihomi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Masuda, Tohru

    2017-01-11

    To create a new anti-tumor antibody, we conducted signal sequence trap by retrovirus-meditated expression method and identified coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR) as an appropriate target. We developed monoclonal antibodies against human CXADR and found that one antibody (6G10A) significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous as well as orthotopic xenografts of human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, 6G10A also inhibited other cancer xenografts expressing CXADR, such as pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells. Knockdown and overexpression of CXADR confirmed the dependence of its anti-tumor activity on CXADR expression. Our studies of its action demonstrated that 6G10A exerted its anti-tumor activity primarily through both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Moreover, 6G10A reacted with human tumor tissues, such as prostate, lung, and brain, each of which express CXADR. Although we need further evaluation of its reactivity and safety in human tissues, our results show that a novel anti-CXADR antibody may be a feasible candidate for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Lactose inhibits the growth of Rhizobium meliloti cells that contain an actively expressed Escherichia coli lactose operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timblin, C R; Kahn, M L

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 made the cells sensitive to the addition of the beta-galactosides lactose, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and lactobionic acid. Growth stopped when the beta-galactoside was added and viability decreased modestly during the next few hours, but little cell lysis was observed and the cells appeared normal. Protein synthesis was not inhibited. Growth was inhibited only when beta-galactosidase expression was greater than 160 U. Lactose-resistant mutants had defects in the plasmid-carried E. coli beta-galactosidase or beta-galactoside permease and in the R. meliloti genome. We speculate that uncontrolled production of galactose by the action of the lactose operon proteins was responsible for growth inhibition. PMID:6427192

  17. Co-aggregation and growth inhibition of probiotic lactobacilli and clinical isolates of mutans streptococci: An in vitro study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette Kirstine; Hassl F, Pamela; Stecks N-Blicks, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Co-aggregation and growth inhibition abilities of probiotic bacteria may play a key role in their interference with the oral biofilm. The aim was to investigate the in vitro ability of selected commercial probiotic lactobacilli to co-aggregate and inhibit growth of oral mutans...... steptococci isolated from adults with contrasting levels of caries. Materials and methods. Mutans streptococci (MS) strains were isolated from caries-free (n = 3) and caries-susceptible (n = 5) young adults and processed with eight commercial probiotic lactobacilli strains. One laboratory reference strain (S....... mutans Ingbritt) was selected as control. Co-aggregation was determined spectrophotometrically and growth inhibition was assessed with the agar overlay technique. Results. All probiotic lactobacilli showed an ability to co-aggregate with the isolated MS strains. Statistically significant differences (p...

  18. Effusanin E suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth by inhibiting NF-κB and COX-2 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhu Zhuang

    Full Text Available Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-κB to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-κB-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-κB/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-κB and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  19. N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe (BOC2) inhibits the angiogenic activity of heparin-binding growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Imtiaz M; Chiodelli, Paola; Rezzola, Sara; Paganini, Giuseppe; Corsini, Michela; Lodola, Alessio; Di Ianni, Alessio; Mor, Marco; Presta, Marco

    2018-02-01

    The peptides N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe (BOC2) and BOC-Met-Leu-Phe (BOC1) are widely used antagonists of formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), BOC2 acting as an FPR1/FPR2 antagonist whereas BOC1 inhibits FPR1 only. Extensive investigations have been performed by using these FPR antagonists as a tool to assess the role of FPRs in physiological and pathological conditions. Based on previous observations from our laboratory, we assessed the possibility that BOC2 may exert also a direct inhibitory effect on the angiogenic activity of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Our data demonstrate that BOC2, but not BOC1, inhibits the angiogenic activity of heparin-binding VEGF-A 165 with no effect on the activity of the non-heparin-binding VEGF-A 121 isoform. Endothelial cell-based bioassays, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and computer modeling indicate that BOC2 may interact with the heparin-binding domain of VEGF-A 165 , thus competing for heparin interaction and preventing the binding of VEGF-A 165 to tyrosine kinase receptor VEGFR2, its phosphorylation and downstream signaling. In addition, BOC2 inhibits the interaction of a variety of heparin-binding angiogenic growth factors with heparin, including fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) whose angiogenic activity is blocked by the compound. Accordingly, BOC2 suppresses the angiogenic potential of human tumor cell lines that co-express VEGF-A and FGF2. Thus, BOC2 appears to act as a novel multi-heparin-binding growth factor antagonist. These findings caution about the interpretation of FPR-focusing experimental data obtained with this compound and set the basis for the design of novel BOC2-derived, FPR independent multi-target angiogenesis inhibitors.

  20. Does native Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin mediate growth inhibition of a mammary tumor during infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abello-Cáceres, Paula; Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Rosas, Carlos; Maldonado, Ismael; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; González, Carlos; Ramírez, Galia; Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-09-13

    For several decades now an antagonism between Trypanosoma cruzi infection and tumor development has been detected. The molecular basis of this phenomenon remained basically unknown until our proposal that T. cruzi Calreticulin (TcCRT), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone, translocated-externalized by the parasite, may mediate at least an important part of this effect. Thus, recombinant TcCRT (rTcCRT) has important in vivo antiangiogenic and antitumor activities. However, the relevant question whether the in vivo antitumor effect of T. cruzi infection is indeed mediated by the native chaperone (nTcCRT), remains open. Herein, by using specific modified anti-rTcCRT antibodies (Abs), we have neutralized the antitumor activity of T. cruzi infection and extracts thereof, thus identifying nTcCRT as a valid mediator of this effect. Polyclonal anti-rTcCRT F(ab')2 Ab fragments were used to reverse the capacity of rTcCRT to inhibit EAhy926 endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, as detected by BrdU uptake. Using these F(ab')2 fragments, we also challenged the capacity of nTcCRT, during T. cruzi infection, to inhibit the growth of an aggressive mammary adenocarcinoma cell line (TA3-MTXR) in mice. Moreover, we determined the capacity of anti-rTcCRT Abs to reverse the antitumor effect of an epimastigote extract (EE). Finally, the effects of these treatments on tumor histology were evaluated. The rTcCRT capacity to inhibit ECs proliferation was reversed by anti-rTcCRT F(ab')2 Ab fragments, thus defining them as valid probes to interfere in vivo with this important TcCRT function. Consequently, during infection, these Ab fragments also reversed the in vivo experimental mammary tumor growth. Moreover, anti-rTcCRT Abs also neutralized the antitumor effect of an EE, again identifying the chaperone protein as an important mediator of this anti mammary tumor effect. Finally, as determined by conventional histological parameters, in infected animals and in those treated with EE

  1. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piwen Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (<2 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells by 30–50% at 48 h compared to control, and inhibited WPE1-NA22 cells by 75%, while did not affect normal prostate epithelial cells. Male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were implanted subcutaneously with LAPC-4 cells for in vivo studies. In one experiment, the intervention started one week after tumor implantation. Mice received arctigenin at 50 mg/kg (LD or 100 mg/kg (HD b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD and 70% (HD compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its

  2. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangchao; Gao, Shan; Tian, Huiyu; Wu, Wenwen; Robert, Hélène S; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al) stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC), which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ) in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3) is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al-induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress.

  3. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangchao Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC, which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3 is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4 functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al-induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress.

  4. Combination of α-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Huang

    Full Text Available α-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or α-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of α-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the α-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-κB activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with α-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with α-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of α-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that α-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer.

  5. A RNA antagonist of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, EZN-2968, inhibits tumor cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberger, Lee M; Horak, Ivan D; Filpula, David

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in angiogenesis, survival, metastasis, drug resistance, and glucose metabolism. Elevated expression of the alpha-subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1alpha), which occurs in response to hypoxia or activation of growth factor...... the expression of HIF-1alpha mRNA. In vitro, in human prostate (15PC3, PC3, and DU145) and glioblastoma (U373) cells, EZN-2968 induced a potent, selective, and durable antagonism of HIF-1 mRNA and protein expression (IC(50), 1-5 nmol/L) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions associated with inhibition of tumor......-regulation of endogenous HIF-1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in the liver. The effect can last for days after administration of single dose of EZN-2968 and is associated with long residence time of locked nucleic acid in certain tissues. In efficacy studies, tumor reduction was found in nude mice implanted...

  6. Photodynamic therapy with ATX-S10.Na(II) inhibits synovial sarcoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Ken; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Nakae, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective cancer treatment modality that allows selective destruction of malignant tumor cells. We asked whether PDT could inhibit in vivo and in vitro growth of synovial sarcoma cells. We analyzed PDT using ATX-S10.Na(II) and a diode laser for a synovial sarcoma cell line (SYO-1). Photodynamic therapy with ATX-S10.Na(II) showed an in vitro cytotoxic effect on the cultured SYO-1 cells. The in vitro effect of PDT depended on the treatment concentration of ATX-S10.Na(II) and the laser dose of irradiation. ATX-S10.Na(II) was detected in the tumor tissue specimens that were excised from nude mice bearing SYO-1 within 6 hours after intravenous injection, but it was eliminated from the tumor 12 hours after injection. Photodynamic therapy suppressed the tumor growth of nude mice bearing SYO-1, and high-dose irradiation induced no viable tumor cells in histologic specimens. Photodynamic therapy performed after marginal resection of the tumor of nude mice bearing SYO-1 reduced the rate of local recurrence of the tumor. Our results suggest PDT using ATX-S10.Na(II) and laser irradiation may be a potentially useful treatment for synovial sarcoma, especially to reduce the surgical margin and preserve critical anatomic structures adjacent to the tumor.

  7. Inhibition of bacterial growth by different mixtures of propofol and thiopentone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is, as a result of its formulation, an ideal bacterial and yeast culture medium. An outbreak of sepsis in humans and an increase in wound infections in dogs has been ascribed to the use of propofol. It has been previously reported that a 1:1 mixture of propofol and thiopentone has bactericidal properties. This study was undertaken to determine if further serial mixtures of propofol and thiopentone maintained the bactericidal properties. Mixtures of 1:1 (solution A, 5:1 (solution B, 10:1 (solution C, 50:1 (solution D and 100:1 (solution E of 1 % propofol to 2.5 % thiopentone, 2.5 % thiopentone (solution T, 1 % propofol (solution P and saline (solution S were prepared and inoculated with between 105 and 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. A sample was withdrawn from each solution at 0, 1, 6, 12, 48 and 120 hours after inoculation and a bacterial count was performed. This study showed that thiopentone and solution A behaved in similar fashion by inhibiting bacterial growth and was bactericidal after 48 hours. Solution B was not bactericidal against S. aureus and C. albicans. Propofol and solutions D and E all supported growth of all the organisms tested. These data indicate that mixtures of propofol and thiopentone at a ratio less than 1:1 do not maintain the bactericidal properties.

  8. Downregulation of SREBP inhibits tumor growth and initiation by altering cellular metabolism in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yang-An; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Napier, Dana L; Vallee, Emma; Li, Austin T; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark; Gao, Tianyan

    2018-02-15

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) belong to a family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes required for the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Three SREBP isoforms, SREBP1a, SREBP1c, and SREBP2, have been identified in mammalian cells. SREBP1a and SREBP1c are derived from a single gene through the use of alternative transcription start sites. Here we investigated the role of SREBP-mediated lipogenesis in regulating tumor growth and initiation in colon cancer. Knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 decreased levels of fatty acids as a result of decreased expression of SREBP target genes required for lipid biosynthesis in colon cancer cells. Bioenergetic analysis revealed that silencing SREBP1 or SREBP2 expression reduced the mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, as well as fatty acid oxidation indicating an alteration in cellular metabolism. Consequently, the rate of cell proliferation and the ability of cancer cells to form tumor spheroids in suspension culture were significantly decreased. Similar results were obtained in colon cancer cells in which the proteolytic activation of SREBP was blocked. Importantly, knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo and decreased the expression of genes associated with cancer stem cells. Taken together, our findings establish the molecular basis of SREBP-dependent metabolic regulation and provide a rationale for targeting lipid biosynthesis as a promising approach in colon cancer treatment.

  9. Photobiological properties of the inhibition of etiolated Arabidopsis seedling growth by ultraviolet-B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Gary; Lin, Chentao; Tobin, Elaine M; Loehrer, Heather; Brinkman, Doug

    2009-11-01

    Alteration of 'normal' levels of ultraviolet-B light (UV-B, 280-320 nm) can affect plant chemical composition as well as growth; however, little is known about how plants perceive UV-B light. We have carried out fluence response curves, and demonstrated that the growth inhibition of etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings by low fluence UV light is specific to UV-B and not UV-A (320-390 nm). The response shows reciprocity between duration and intensity, at least over a limited range, and thus depends only on photon fluence and not on photon flux. The action spectrum for this response indicates a peak of maximum effectiveness at 290 nm, and response spectra at different fluences indicate that the most effective wavelength at 30,000 micromol m(-2) is 290 nm, whereas 300 nm light was the most effective at 100,000 micromol m(-2). This response occurs in mutant seedlings deficient in cryptochrome, phytochrome or phototropin, suggesting that none of the known photoreceptors is the major UV-B photoreceptor. Some null mutants in DNA repair enzymes show hypersensitivity to UV-B, suggesting that even at low fluence rates, direct damage to DNA may be one component of the response to UV-B.

  10. Curcumin-induced HDAC inhibition and attenuation of medulloblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Krauthauser, Candice; Maduskuie, Victoria; Fawcett, Paul T; Olson, James M; Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its prognosis is worse than for many other common pediatric cancers. Survivors undergoing treatment suffer from serious therapy-related side effects. Thus, it is imperative to identify safer, effective treatments for medulloblastoma. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer potential of curcumin in medulloblastoma by testing its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in vitro and in vivo using established medulloblastoma models. Using cultured medulloblastoma cells, tumor xenografts, and the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model, the antitumor effects of curcumin were tested in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in medulloblastoma cells. These effects were accompanied by reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 expression and activity and increased tubulin acetylation, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe. In in vivo medulloblastoma xenografts, curcumin reduced tumor growth and significantly increased survival in the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that curcumin has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for medulloblastoma

  11. Curcumin-induced HDAC inhibition and attenuation of medulloblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson James M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its prognosis is worse than for many other common pediatric cancers. Survivors undergoing treatment suffer from serious therapy-related side effects. Thus, it is imperative to identify safer, effective treatments for medulloblastoma. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer potential of curcumin in medulloblastoma by testing its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in vitro and in vivo using established medulloblastoma models. Methods Using cultured medulloblastoma cells, tumor xenografts, and the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model, the antitumor effects of curcumin were tested in vitro and in vivo. Results Curcumin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in medulloblastoma cells. These effects were accompanied by reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC 4 expression and activity and increased tubulin acetylation, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe. In in vivo medulloblastoma xenografts, curcumin reduced tumor growth and significantly increased survival in the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model. Conclusions The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that curcumin has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for medulloblastoma.

  12. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibition in combination with antibiotics abrogates growth of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; van de Kamer, Tim; Brouwer, Ellen C; Leavis, Helen L; Woodford, Neil; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    2017-03-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity in debilitated patients. New antimicrobials are needed to treat antibiotic-resistant E. faecium infections in hospitalised patients. E. faecium incorporates lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (1,3-polyglycerol-phosphate linked to glycolipid) in its cell wall. The small-molecule inhibitor 1771 [2-oxo-2-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylamino)ethyl 2-naphtho[2,1-b]furan-1-ylacetate] specifically blocks the activity of Staphylococcus aureus LtaS synthase, which polymerises 1,3-glycerolphosphate into LTA polymers. Here we characterised the effects of the small-molecule inhibitor 1771 on the growth of E. faecium isolates, alone (28 strains) or in combination with the antibiotics vancomycin, daptomycin, ampicillin, gentamicin or linezolid (15 strains), and on biofilm formation (16 strains). Inhibition of LTA synthesis at the surface of the cell by compound 1771 in combination with current antibiotic therapy abrogates enterococcal growth in vitro but does not affect mature E. faecium biofilms. Targeting LTA synthesis may provide new possibilities to treat MDR E. faecium infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Diaz, David; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Garza-Enriquez, Marianela; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam A; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities. Results Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM. Conclusion These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation. PMID:22619547

  14. Inhibition of oxidative stress-elicited AKT activation facilitates PPARγ agonist-mediated inhibition of stem cell character and tumor growth of liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanlan Liu

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor-initiating cells (TICs are the most malignant cell subpopulation in tumors because of their resistance to chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Targeting TICs may be a key innovation for cancer treatment. In this study, we found that PPARγ agonists inhibited the cancer stem cell-like phenotype and attenuated tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS initiated by NOX2 upregulation were partially responsible for the inhibitory effects mediated by PPARγ agonists. However, PPARγ agonist-mediated ROS production significantly activated AKT, which in turn promoted TIC survival by limiting ROS generation. Inhibition of AKT, by either pharmacological inhibitors or AKT siRNA, significantly enhanced PPARγ agonist-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and stem cell-like properties in HCC cells. Importantly, in nude mice inoculated with HCC Huh7 cells, we demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone and the AKT inhibitor triciribine on tumor growth. In conclusion, we observed a negative feedback loop between oxidative stress and AKT hyperactivation in PPARγ agonist-mediated suppressive effects on HCCs. Combinatory application of an AKT inhibitor and a PPARγ agonist may provide a new strategy for inhibition of stem cell-like properties in HCCs and treatment of liver cancer.

  15. Growth inhibition of thyroid follicular cell-derived cancers by the opioid growth factor (OGF - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donahue Renee N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the thyroid gland is an uncommon cancer, but the most frequent malignancy of the endocrine system. Most thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cell. Follicular carcinoma (FTC is considered more malignant than papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most lethal human cancers. Opioid Growth Factor (OGF; chemical term - [Met5]-enkephalin and its receptor, OGFr, form an inhibitory axis regulating cell proliferation. Both the peptide and receptor have been detected in a wide variety of cancers, and OGF is currently used clinically as a biotherapy for some non-thyroid neoplasias. This study addressed the question of whether the OGF-OGFr axis is present and functional in human thyroid follicular cell - derived cancer. Methods Utilizing human ATC (KAT-18, PTC (KTC-1, and FTC (WRO 82-1 cell lines, immunohistochemistry was employed to ascertain the presence and location of OGF and OGFr. The growth characteristics in the presence of OGF or the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX, and the specificity of opioid peptides for proliferation of ATC, were established in KAT-18 cells. Dependence on peptide and receptor were investigated using neutralization studies with antibodies and siRNA experiments, respectively. The mechanism of peptide action on DNA synthesis and cell survival was ascertained. The ubiquity of the OGF-OGFr axis in thyroid follicular cell-derived cancer was assessed in KTC-1 (PTC and WRO 82-1 (FTC tumor cells. Results OGF and OGFr were present in KAT-18 cells. Concentrations of 10-6 M OGF inhibited cell replication up to 30%, whereas NTX increased cell growth up to 35% relative to cultures treated with sterile water. OGF treatment reduced cell number by as much as 38% in KAT-18 ATC in a dose-dependent and receptor-mediated manner. OGF antibodies neutralized the inhibitory effects of OGF, and siRNA knockdown of OGFr negated growth inhibition by OGF. Cell survival

  16. Lactobacillus brevis-based bioingredient inhibits Aspergillus niger growth on pan bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaelena Di Biase

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bread shelf life is generally compromised by fungi mainly belonging to Aspergillus and Penicillium genera, which colonise the surface of the product within few days from the production. The aim of this study was to select a Lactobacillus brevis-based bioingredient (LbBio able to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus niger ITEM5132 on pan bread in order to prolong its shelf life. Four LbBio formulations, obtained by growing a selected L. brevis strain in a flour-based medium containing different carbon sources or acid precursors (fructose, LbBio1; fructose and maltose, LbBio2; α-chetoglutaric acid, LbBio3; short-chain fructooligosaccharides, LbBio4, were evaluated for their content of organic acids (lactic, acetic, propionic, phenyllactic, 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic, valeric, isovaleric acids. The LbBio formulations were applied in yeast-leavened bread during bread-making trials and the resulting products were inoculated after baking with A. niger spore’s suspension and the fungal growth was monitored during storage (25°C for 6 days. The formulation showing the highest inhibitory activity was separated by ultra-filtration method, and whole and fractions obtained were evaluated for their in vitro activity. The fraction showing the highest activity was further separated by gel-filtration and the resulting products were investigated for their protein content and in vitro inhibition. The results from the bread-making trials performed using different formulations of LbBio showed a delay in fungal growth (1 day respect to the bread not containing the bioingredient (control or including calcium propionate (0.3% w/w. The formulation LbBio2, prepared with fructose and maltose 1% (w/vol, contained the highest amount of total organic acids, including phenyllactic and hydroxyl-phenyllactic acids, and reduced the visual spoilage of bread. This formulation was separated by ultra-filtration and fractions containing metabolites with molecular weight higher than 30 k

  17. Emerging role of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in therapy for advanced malignancy: focus on NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.

    2004-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy regimens have emerged as the standard approach in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a 2-month increase in median survival after platinum-based therapy vs. best supportive care, and an absolute 10% improvement in the 1-year survival rate. Just as importantly, cytotoxic therapy has produced benefits in symptom control and quality of life. Newer agents, including the taxanes, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, and irinotecan, have expanded our therapeutic options in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Despite their contributions, we have reached a therapeutic plateau, with response rates seldom exceeding 30-40% in cooperative group studies and 1-year survival rates stable between 30% and 40%. It is doubtful that substituting one agent for another in various combinations will lead to any further improvement in these rates. The thrust of current research has focused on targeted therapy, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is one of the most promising clinical strategies. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors currently under investigation include the small molecules gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) and erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), as well as monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab (IMC-225, Erbitux). Agents that have only begun to undergo clinical evaluation include CI-1033, an irreversible pan-erbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and PKI166 and GW572016, both examples of dual kinase inhibitors (inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor and Her2). Preclinical models have demonstrated synergy for all these agents in combination with either chemotherapy or radiotherapy, leading to great enthusiasm regarding their ultimate contribution to lung cancer therapy. However, serious clinical challenges persist. These include the identification of the optimal dose(s); the proper integration of these agents into popular, established cytotoxic regimens; and the selection of the optimal setting(s) in which

  18. The involvement of nitric oxide in ultraviolet-B-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth of Paulownia tomentosa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun-Min He; Xiao-Ling Bai; Rui-Bin Wang; Bing Cao; Xiao-Ping She [School of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2007-10-15

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B)-induced reduction of in vitro pollen germination and tube growth of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied. Results showed that exposure of the pollen to 0.4 and 0.8 W m{sup -2} UV-B radiation for 2 h resulted in not only the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth but also the enhancement of NO synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) activity and NO production in pollen grain and tube. Also, exogenous NO donors sodium nitroprusside and S-nitrosoglutathione inhibited both pollen germination and tube growth in a dose-dependence manner. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-Arg-methyl eater (L-NAME) and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) not only largely prevented the NO generation but also partly reversed the UV-B-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. These results indicate that UV-B radiation inhibits pollen germination and tube growth partly via promoting NO production in pollen grain and tube by a NOS-like enzyme. Additionally, a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 6-anilino-5, 8-quinolinequinone (LY-83583) prevented both the UV-B- and NO donors-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth, suggesting that the NO function is mediated by cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. However, the effects of c-PTIO, L-NAME and LY-83583 on the UV-B-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth were only partial, suggesting that there are NO-independent pathways in UV-B signal networks. (au)

  19. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  20. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Griseofulvin impairs intraerythrocytic growth of Plasmodium falciparum through ferrochelatase inhibition but lacks activity in an experimental human infection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clare M; Jerkovic, Ante; Truong, Thy Thuc; Foote, Simon J; McCarthy, James S; McMorran, Brendan J

    2017-02-08

    Griseofulvin, an orally active antifungal drug used to treat dermatophyte infections, has a secondary effect of inducing cytochrome P450-mediated production of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX (N-MPP). N-MPP is a potent competitive inhibitor of the heme biosynthetic-enzyme ferrochelatase, and inhibits the growth of cultured erythrocyte stage Plasmodium falciparum. Novel drugs against Plasmodium are needed to achieve malaria elimination. Thus, we investigated whether griseofulvin shows anti-plasmodial activity. We observed that the intraerythrocytic growth of P. falciparum is inhibited in red blood cells pretreated with griseofulvin in vitro. Treatment with 100 μM griseofulvin was sufficient to prevent parasite growth and induce the production of N-MPP. Inclusion of the ferrochelatase substrate PPIX blocked the inhibitory activity of griseofulvin, suggesting that griseofulvin exerts its activity through the N-MPP-dependent inhibition of ferrochelatase. In an ex-vivo study, red blood cells from griseofulvin-treated subjects were refractory to the growth of cultured P. falciparum. However, in a clinical trial griseofulvin failed to show either therapeutic or prophylactic effect in subjects infected with blood stage P. falciparum. Although the development of griseofulvin as an antimalarial is not warranted, it represents a novel inhibitor of P. falciparum growth and acts via the N-MPP-dependent inhibition of ferrochelatase.

  2. 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth through regulating VEGF-Src-FAK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhengfu, He; Hu, Zhang; Huiwen, Miao; Zhijun, Li; Jiaojie, Zhou; Xiaoyi, Yan; Xiujun, Cai

    2015-08-21

    The search for safe, effective and affordable therapeutics against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other lung cancers is important. Here we explored the potential effect of 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a novel extract from Inula britannica-F, on angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth. We demonstrated that ABL dose-dependently inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, and capillary structure formation of cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). In vivo, ABL administration suppressed VEGF-induced new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs. For the mechanism investigations, we found that ABL largely inhibited VEGF-mediated activation of Src kinase and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of A549 NSCLC cells with ABL resulted in cell growth inhibition and Src-FAK in-activation. Significantly, administration of a single dose of ABL (12 mg/kg/day) remarkably suppressed growth of A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vivo microvessels formation and Src activation were also significantly inhibited in ABL-treated xenograft tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that ABL suppresses angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth possibly via regulating the VEGFR-Src-FAK signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-01-01

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10μg/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4μg/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated

  4. Apyrase inhibitors enhance the ability of diverse fungicides to inhibit the growth of different plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Tripathy, Manas; Weeraratne, Gayani; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2017-09-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that the treatment of Arabidopsis plants with chemical inhibitors of apyrase enzymes increases their sensitivity to herbicides. In this study, we found that the addition of the same or related apyrase inhibitors could potentiate the ability of different fungicides to inhibit the growth of five different pathogenic fungi in plate growth assays. The growth of all five fungi was partially inhibited by three commonly used fungicides: copper octanoate, myclobutanil and propiconazole. However, when these fungicides were individually tested in combination with any one of four different apyrase inhibitors (AI.1, AI.10, AI.13 or AI.15), their potency to inhibit the growth of five fungal pathogens was increased significantly relative to their application alone. The apyrase inhibitors were most effective in potentiating the ability of copper octanoate to inhibit fungal growth, and least effective in combination with propiconazole. Among the five pathogens assayed, that most sensitive to the fungicide-potentiating effects of the inhibitors was Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Overall, among the 60 treatment combinations tested (five pathogens, four apyrase inhibitors, three fungicides), the addition of apyrase inhibitors increased significantly the sensitivity of fungi to the fungicide treatments in 53 of the combinations. Consistent with their predicted mode of action, inhibitors AI.1, AI.10 and AI.13 each increased the level of propiconazole retained in one of the fungi, suggesting that they could partially block the ability of efflux transporters to remove propiconazole from these fungi. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis by Soluble EphB4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Martiny-Baron

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available EphB receptors and their ephrinB ligands play a key role in the formation of a regular vascular system. Recent studies have also shown the involvement of Eph/ephrin interactions in malignant tumor progression and angiogenesis. We have generated soluble monomeric EphB4 (sEphB4-expressing A375 melanoma cells to study the effect of dominant negatively acting sEphB4 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Soluble EphB4-expressing A375 tumors grown subcutaneously in nude mice show dramatically reduced tumor growth compared to control tumors. The proliferative capacity of sEphB4-expressing cells in monolayer culture is not altered. Yet, sEphB4-expressing A375 cells cannot establish proper cell-cell contacts in three-dimensional spheroids. However, sEphB4 transfectants have reduced proliferation and apoptosis rates when grown in three-dimensional culture in vitro or in subcutaneous tumors in vivo. Analysis of the vascular phenotype of the tumors revealed a reduction of intratumoral microvessel density in sEphB4-expressing tumors. Corresponding to these mouse experiments, a matched pair analysis of EphB4 and ephrinB2 expression in human colon carcinomas revealed significantly upregulated levels of EphB4 expression compared to adjacent normal tissue. Taken together, the data identify dual effects of sEphB4 on the tumor and the vascular compartment that collectively inhibit tumor growth.

  6. Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth by simultaneous uptake of glucose and maltose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Haruyo; Mitsunaga, Hitoshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2018-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses α-glucoside transporters, such as MalX1p (X=1(Agt1p), 2, 3, 4, and 6), which are proton symporters. These transporters are regulated at transcriptional and posttranslational levels in the presence of glucose. Malt wort contains glucose, maltose, and maltotriose, and the assimilation of maltose is delayed as a function of glucose concentration. With the objective of increasing beer fermentation rates, we characterized α-glucoside transporters and bred laboratory yeasts that expressed various α-glucoside transporters for the simultaneous uptake of different sugars. Mal21p was found to be the most resistant transporter to glucose-induced degradation, and strain (HD17) expressing MAL21 grew on a medium containing glucose or maltose, but not on a medium containing both sugars (YPDM). This unexpected growth defect was observed on a medium containing glucose and >0.1% maltose but was not exhibited by a strain that constitutively expressed maltase. The defect depended on intracellular maltose concentration. Although maltose accumulation caused a surge in turgor pressure, addition of sorbitol to YPDM did not increase growth. When strain HD17 was cultivated in a medium containing only maltose, protein synthesis was inhibited at early times but subsequently resumed with reduction in accumulated maltose, but not if the medium was exchanged for YPDM. We conclude that protein synthesis was terminated under the accumulation of maltose, regardless of extracellular osmolarity, and HD17 could not resume growth, because the intracellular concentration of maltose did not decrease due to insufficient synthesis of maltase. Yeast should incorporate maltose after expressing adequate maltase in beer brewing. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of Akt sensitises neuroblastoma cells to gold(III) porphyrin 1a, a novel antitumour drug induced apoptosis and growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Xie, Y; Sun, R W-Y; Liu, Q; Young, J; Yu, W-Y; Che, C-M; Tam, P K; Ren, Y

    2009-07-21

    Gold(III) porphyrin 1a is a new class of anticancer drug, which inhibits cell proliferation of wide range of human cancer cell lines and induces apoptosis in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. However, the underlying signalling mechanism by which gold(III) porphyrin 1a modifies the intracellular apoptosis pathways in tumour cells has not been explained in detail in neuroblastoma cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by measuring 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Annexin V binding, respectively. Western blot assay was used to detect proteins involved in apoptotic and Akt pathways. In vivo tumour growth was assessed by inoculating tumour cells to nude mice subcutaneously, and gold(III) porphyrin 1a was administrated intravenously. This study assessed the antitumour effect and mechanism of gold(III) porphyrin 1a on neuroblastoma in vitro and in vivo. Gold(III) porphyrin 1a displayed a growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells effectively in vitro, which was accompanied with release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO and caspases activation. Further studies indicated that gold(III) porphyrin 1a inhibited X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). However, we found that gold(III) porphyrin 1a can induce a survival signal, Akt activation within minutes and could last for at least 24 h. To further confirm association between activation of Akt and the effectiveness of gold(III) porphyrin 1a, neuroblastoma cells were treated with API-2, an Akt-specific inhibitor. API-2 sensitised cells to gold(III) porphyrin 1a-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition. These results suggested that Akt may be considered as a molecular 'brake' that neuroblastoma cells rely on to slow down gold(III) porphyrin 1a-induced apoptosis and antiproliferation. Gold(III) porphyrin 1a is a mitochondrial apoptotic stimulus but also activates Akt, suggesting an involvement of Akt in mediating the effectiveness to growth

  8. Effects of Prenatal Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation on Fetal Growth Factors: A Cluster-Randomized, Controlled Trial in Rural Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernand, Alison D.; Schulze, Kerry J.; Nanayakkara-Bind, Ashika; Arguello, Margia; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Ali, Hasmot; Wu, Lee; West, Keith P.; Christian, Parul

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal multiple micronutrient (MM) supplementation improves birth weight through increased fetal growth and gestational age, but whether maternal or fetal growth factors are involved is unclear. Our objective was to examine the effect of prenatal MM supplementation on intrauterine growth factors and the associations between growth factors and birth outcomes in a rural setting in Bangladesh. In a double-blind, cluster-randomized, controlled trial of MM vs. iron and folic acid (IFA) supplementation, we measured placental growth hormone (PGH) at 10 weeks and PGH and human placental lactogen (hPL) at 32 weeks gestation in maternal plasma (n = 396) and insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in cord plasma (n = 325). Birth size and gestational age were also assessed. Early pregnancy mean (SD) BMI was 19.5 (2.4) kg/m2 and birth weight was 2.68 (0.41) kg. There was no effect of MM on concentrations of maternal hPL or PGH, or cord insulin, IGF-1, or IGFBP-1. However, among pregnancies of female offspring, hPL concentration was higher by 1.1 mg/L in the third trimester (95% CI: 0.2, 2.0 mg/L; p = 0.09 for interaction); and among women with height supplementation had no overall impact on intrauterine growth factors. MM supplementation altered some growth factors differentially by maternal early pregnancy nutritional status and sex of the offspring, but this should be examined in other studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00860470 PMID:26431336

  9. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells.

  10. Inhibition of Fusarium graminearum growth in flour gel cultures by hexane-soluble compounds from oat (Avena sativa L.) flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehlert, Douglas C; Rayas-Duarte, Patricia; McMullen, Michael S

    2011-12-01

    Fusarium head blight, incited by the fungus Fusarium graminearum, primarily affects wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgarum), while oat (Avena sativa) appears to be more resistant. Although this has generally been attributed to the open panicle of oats, we hypothesized that a chemical component of oats might contribute to this resistance. To test this hypothesis, we created culture media made of wheat, barley, and oat flour gels (6 g of flour in 20 ml of water, gelled by autoclaving) and inoculated these with plugs of F. graminearum from actively growing cultures. Fusarium growth was measured from the diameter of the fungal plaque. Plaque diameter was significantly smaller on oat flour cultures than on wheat or barley cultures after 40 to 80 h of growth. Ergosterol concentration was also significantly lower in oat cultures than in wheat cultures after growth. A hexane extract from oats added to wheat flour also inhibited Fusarium growth, and Fusarium grew better on hexane-defatted oat flour. The growth of Fusarium on oat flour was significantly and negatively affected by the oil concentration in the oat, in a linear relationship. A hexane-soluble chemical in oat flour appears to inhibit Fusarium growth and might contribute to oat's resistance to Fusarium head blight. Oxygenated fatty acids, including hydroxy, dihydroxy, and epoxy fatty acids, were identified in the hexane extracts and are likely candidates for causing the inhibition.

  11. Oral picropodophyllin (PPP) is well tolerated in vivo and inhibits IGF-1R expression and growth of uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Mario A; Andersson, Sandra; Vasilcanu, Diana; All-Ericsson, Charlotta; Menu, Eline; Girnita, Ada; Girnita, Leonard; Axelson, Magnus; Seregard, Stefan; Larsson, Olle

    2008-11-01

    The cyclolignan picropodophyllin (PPP) efficiently blocks the activity of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and inhibits growth of uveal melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we aimed to investigate the efficiency of orally administered PPP on growth of uveal melanoma xenografts. Further, we focused on the effect of PPP on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in vivo and evaluated its effects in combination with other established anti-tumor agents in vitro. Four different uveal melanoma cell lines (OCM-1, OCM-3, OCM-8, 92-1) were treated with PPP alone and in combination with imatinib mesylate, cisplatin, 5-FU and doxorubicin. Cell viability was determined by XTT assay. SCID mice xenografted with uveal melanoma cells were used to determine anti-tumor efficacy of oral PPP in vivo. Tumor samples obtained from the in vivo experiments were analyzed for VEGF and IGF-1R expression by western blotting. PPP was found to be superior to the other anti-tumor agents in killing uveal melanoma cells. Oral PPP inhibited uveal melanoma growth in vivo and was well tolerated by the animals. PPP decreased VEGF expression in the tumors. Oral PPP is well tolerated in vivo and caused total growth inhibition of uveal melanoma xenografts as well as it decreased the levels of VEGF in the tumors.

  12. Inhibition of Klebsiella pneumoniae growth by selected Australian plants: natural approaches for the prevention and management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnett, V; Sirdaarta, J; White, A; Clarke, F M; Cock, I E

    2017-04-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional Australian medicine to treat inflammatory disorders, including autoimmune inflammatory diseases. One hundred and six extracts from 40 native Australian plant species traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation and/or to inhibit bacterial growth were investigated for their ability to inhibit the growth of a microbial trigger for ankylosing spondylitis (K. pneumoniae). Eighty-six of the extracts (81.1%) inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae. The D. leichardtii, Eucalyptus spp., K. flavescens, Leptospermum spp., M. quinquenervia, Petalostigma spp., P. angustifolium, S. spinescens, S. australe, S. forte and Tasmannia spp. extracts were effective K. pneumoniae growth inhibitors, with MIC values generally <1000 µg/mL. The T. lanceolata peppercorn extracts were the most potent growth inhibitors, with MIC values as low as 16 µg/mL. These extracts were examined by non-biased GC-MS headspace analysis and comparison with a compound database. A notable feature was the high relative abundance of the sesquiterpenoids polygodial, guaiol and caryophyllene oxide, and the monoterpenoids linalool, cineole and α-terpineol in the T. lanceolata peppercorn methanolic and aqueous extracts. The extracts with the most potent K. pneumoniae inhibitory activity (including the T. lanceolata peppercorn extracts) were nontoxic in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The lack of toxicity and the growth inhibitory activity of these extracts against K. pneumoniae indicate their potential for both preventing the onset of ankylosing spondylitis and minimising its symptoms once the disease is established.

  13. Effect of inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling on distribution of extravasated antibodies in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Tsutomu; Norberg, Scott M; Shalinsky, David R; Hu-Lowe, Dana D; McDonald, Donald M

    2006-02-01

    Antibodies and other macromolecular therapeutics can gain access to tumor cells via leaky tumor vessels. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling can reduce the vascularity of tumors and leakiness of surviving vessels, but little is known about how these changes affect the distribution of antibodies within tumors. We addressed this issue by examining the distribution of extravasated antibodies in islet cell tumors of RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice and implanted Lewis lung carcinomas using fluorescence and confocal microscopic imaging. Extravasated nonspecific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and antibodies to fibrin or E-cadherin accumulated in irregular patchy regions of stroma. Fibrin also accumulated in these regions. Anti-E-cadherin antibody, which targets epitopes on tumor cells of RIP-Tag2 adenomas, was the only antibody to achieve detectable levels within tumor cell clusters at 6 hours after i.v. injection. Treatment for 7 days with AG-013736, a potent inhibitor of VEGF signaling, reduced the tumor vascularity by 86%. The overall area density of extravasated IgG/antibodies decreased after treatment but the change was less than the reduction in vascularity and actually increased when expressed per surviving tumor vessel. Accumulation of anti-E-cadherin antibody in tumor cell clusters was similarly affected. The patchy pattern of antibodies in stroma after treatment qualitatively resembled untreated tumors and surprisingly coincided with sleeves of basement membrane left behind after pruning of tumor vessels. Together, the findings suggest that antibody transport increases from surviving tumor vessels after normalization by inhibition of VEGF signaling. Basement membrane sleeves may facilitate this transport. Antibodies preferentially distribute to tumor stroma but also accumulate on tumor cells if binding sites are accessible.

  14. Contact-inhibited chemotaxis in de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeland M H Merks

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels form either when dispersed endothelial cells (the cells lining the inner walls of fully formed blood vessels organize into a vessel network (vasculogenesis, or by sprouting or splitting of existing blood vessels (angiogenesis. Although they are closely related biologically, no current model explains both phenomena with a single biophysical mechanism. Most computational models describe sprouting at the level of the blood vessel, ignoring how cell behavior drives branch splitting during sprouting. We present a cell-based, Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg model (also called Cellular Potts Model simulation of the initial patterning before the vascular cords form lumens, based on plausible behaviors of endothelial cells. The endothelial cells secrete a chemoattractant, which attracts other endothelial cells. As in the classic Keller-Segel model, chemotaxis by itself causes cells to aggregate into isolated clusters. However, including experimentally observed VE-cadherin-mediated contact inhibition of chemotaxis in the simulation causes randomly distributed cells to organize into networks and cell aggregates to sprout, reproducing aspects of both de novo and sprouting blood-vessel growth. We discuss two branching instabilities responsible for our results. Cells at the surfaces of cell clusters attempting to migrate to the centers of the clusters produce a buckling instability. In a model variant that eliminates the surface-normal force, a dissipative mechanism drives sprouting, with the secreted chemical acting both as a chemoattractant and as an inhibitor of pseudopod extension. Both mechanisms would also apply if force transmission through the extracellular matrix rather than chemical signaling mediated cell-cell interactions. The branching instabilities responsible for our results, which result from contact inhibition of chemotaxis, are both generic developmental mechanisms and interesting examples of unusual patterning instabilities.

  15. Lessons from the Crystal Structure of the S. aureus Surface Protein Clumping Factor A in Complex With Tefibazumab, an Inhibiting Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannakambadi K. Ganesh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules, ClfA (clumping factor A is an important virulence factor in staphylococcal infections and a component of several vaccines currently under clinical evaluation. The mouse monoclonal antibody aurexis (also called 12-9, and the humanized version tefibazumab are therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting ClfA that in combination with conventional antibiotics were effective in animal models but showed less impressive efficacy in a limited Phase II clinical trial. We here report the crystal structure and a biochemical characterization of the ClfA/tefibazumab (Fab complex. The epitope for tefibazumab is located to the “top” of the N3 subdomain of ClfA and partially overlaps with a previously unidentified second binding site for fibrinogen. A high-affinity binding of ClfA to fibrinogen involves both an interaction at the N3 site and the previously identified docking of the C-terminal segment of the fibrinogen γ-chain in the N2N3 trench. Although tefibazumab binds ClfA with high affinity we observe a modest IC50 value for the inhibition of fibrinogen binding to the MSCRAMM. This observation, paired with a common natural occurring variant of ClfA that is not effectively recognized by the mAb, may partly explain the modest effect tefibazumab showed in the initial clinic trail. This information will provide guidance for the design of the next generation of therapeutic anti-staphylococcal mAbs targeting ClfA.

  16. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Zhen, Yong-su; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Sheng-hua; Zhou, Daifu; Li, Liang; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  17. Factors that inhibit growth of Listeria monocytogenes in nature-ripened Gouda cheese: A major role for undissociated lactic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, factors relevant to nature-ripened Gouda cheese were evaluated for their potential to inhibit growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Factors included water activity, pH, undissociated acetic and lactic acid, diacetyl, free fatty acids, lactoferrin, nitrate, nitrite and nisin. In addition,

  18. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth and cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo but its role in colon cancer prevention remains to be characterized. This study tested the hypothesis that methylselenol inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells and tumors. We found that submicr...

  19. Selective growth-inhibiting effects of compounds identified in Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark on human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Kim, Jun-Ran; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Kyoung Soon; Takeoka, Gary R; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2005-02-23

    The growth-inhibiting activity of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid and lapachol identified in the inner bark of taheebo, Tabebuia impetiginosa, toward 10 human intestinal bacteria was evaluated by using a paper disk diffusion bioassay and compared to those of seven lapachol congeners (1,4-naphthoquinone, naphthazarin, menadione, lawsone, plumbagin, juglone, and dichlone) as well as two commercially available antibiotics, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid exhibited very strong growth inhibition of Clostridium paraputrificum at 1 microg/disk while 100 microg/disk of lapachol was needed for moderate growth inhibition of the same organism. These two isolates exhibited weak inhibition of Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli at 100 microg/disk while no adverse effects were observed on the growth of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei at 1000 microg/disk. Structure-activity relationships indicate that a methyl group in the C-2 position of 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives might play an important role in antibacterial activity.

  20. Endophytic fungi from mangrove inhibit lung cancer cell growth and angiogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wu, Xin; Ma, Yuefan; Zhang, Wenzhang; Hu, Liang; Feng, Xiaowei; Li, Xiangyong; Tang, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    The secondary metabolites of mangrove-derived endophytic fungi contain multiple substances with novel structures and biological activities. In the present study, three types of mangrove plants, namely Kandelia candel, Rhizophora stylosa and Rhizophoraceae from Zhanjiang region including the leaves, roots and stems were collected, and endophytic fungi were isolated, purified and identified from these mangrove plants. MTT assay was used to observe the effects of the isolated endophytic fungi on the growth of A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. The effect of the endophytic fungi on lung cancer angiogenesis in vitro induced by the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein was observed. Our results showed that 28 strains of endophytic fungi were isolated, purified and identified from the three types of mangrove plants. Ten strains of endophytic fungi significantly suppressed the growth of A549 and NCI-H460 cells. The average inhibitory rates in the A549 cells were 64.4, 59.5, 81.9, 43.9, 58.3, 56.2, 48.3, 42.4, 93.0 and 49.7%, respectively. The average inhibitory rates in the NCI-H460 cells were 41.2, 49.3, 82.7, 40.7, 53.9, 52.6, 56.8, 64.3, 91.0 and 45.6%, respectively. Particularly, three strains of endophytic fungi markedly inhibited HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein‑induced lung cancer angiogenesis in vitro. These findings contribute to the further screening of potential chemotherapeutic agents from mangrove-derived endophytic fungi.

  1. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Solorzano, Walter; Diaz, Tanya; Magyar, Clara E; Henning, Susanne M; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-06-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa , has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (arctigenin at 50mg/kg (LD) or 100mg/kg (HD) b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD) and 70% (HD) compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo , which provides a high promise in its translation to human application.

  2. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rene Hernandez-Delgadillo1, Donaji Velasco-Arias2, David Diaz2, Katiushka Arevalo-Niño1, Marianela Garza-Enriquez1, Myriam A De la Garza-Ramos1, Claudio Cabral-Romero11Instituto de Biotecnologia, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias de la Salud, CIDICS, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 2Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Distrito Federal, MexicoBackground and methods: Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities.Results: Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM.Conclusion: These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation.Keywords: zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles, antimicrobial agent, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans

  3. Inhibition of tumor growth and leukocyte alterations in splenectomized mice treated with a PCj3 polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, L S; Chasseing, N A; Couto, A; de Lederkremer, R M

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a polysaccharide (PCj3), isolated from the ascomycete "Cyttaria johowii" was studied on the growth of the ascitic Sarcoma 180 (S180) inoculated subcutaneously in BALB/c mice which had been previously splenectomized. The leukocyte alterations in peripheral blood were analyzed simultaneously, and the percentage of cells with C3b receptors in the population of peritoneal cavity was evaluated through the E (IgM)C rosette technique. A significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in the splenectomized mice treated with PCj3 with respect to the untreated splenectomized and to the control group, which had not been splenectomized. It was also found that the first group acquired relative resistance to the later inocula of the ascitic S180 via i.p. On the day 8 after the tumor inoculation a marked lymphocytosis increased up to 224% in PCj3 treated mice and only to 59% in untreated splenectomized mice. The increase in the controls, that had not been splenectomized was 18%. With regard to the number of neutrophils a significant difference was found between both splenectomized groups on the 8 day, corresponding the highest values to the group treated with PCj3. No differences were observed on the 25 day even though the neutrophilia was maintained. The percentage of cells with C3b receptors in population of peritoneal cavity was significantly lower in mice treated with PCj3, although an increase in the number of E (IgM)C attached per cell and ingestion of system were observed.

  4. Zika virus infection dysregulates human neural stem cell growth and inhibits differentiation into neuroprogenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devhare, Pradip; Meyer, Keith; Steele, Robert; Ray, Ratna B; Ray, Ranjit

    2017-01-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus-associated diseases in South America and its threat to spread to other parts of the world has emerged as a global health emergency. A strong link between Zika virus and microcephaly exists, and the potential mechanisms associated with microcephaly are under intense investigation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Zika virus infection of Asian and African lineages (PRVABC59 and MR766) in human neural stem cells (hNSCs). These two Zika virus strains displayed distinct infection pattern and growth rates in hNSCs. Zika virus MR766 strain increased serine 139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a known early cellular response proteins to DNA damage. On the other hand, PRVABC59 strain upregulated serine 15 phosphorylation of p53, p21 and PUMA expression. MR766-infected cells displayed poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 cleavage. Interestingly, infection of hNSCs by both strains of Zika virus for 24 h, followed by incubation in astrocyte differentiation medium, induced rounding and cell death. However, astrocytes generated from hNSCs by incubation in differentiation medium when infected with Zika virus displayed minimal cytopathic effect at an early time point. Infected hNSCs incubated in astrocyte differentiating medium displayed PARP cleavage within 24–36 h. Together, these results showed that two distinct strains of Zika virus potentiate hNSC growth inhibition by different mechanisms, but both viruses strongly induce death in early differentiating neuroprogenitor cells even at a very low multiplicity of infection. Our observations demonstrate further mechanistic insights for impaired neuronal homeostasis during active Zika virus infection. PMID:29022904

  5. Growth Inhibition of Refractory Human Gallbladder Cancer Cells by Retinol, and Its Mechanism of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Imai, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Noriko

    2017-04-01

    Among the constituents of the essential nutrient vitamin A, retinol is a potent suppressor of refractory cancer cell growth linked to tumor progression, showing greater efficacy than retinoic acid (RA). However, the mechanisms of retinol action on human refractory cancer are not known well. In the current study, we examined the actions of retinol on proliferation of human gallbladder cancer NOZ C-1 cells. Retinol and RA inhibited the proliferation of human NOZ C-1 cells in dose-dependent manner, while RA was less potent than retinol. Cell incorporation of RA was approximately two-fold higher than retinol and was not correlated with anti-proliferative activity. Retinol did not affect caspase-3 activity or mRNA expression of Bax and Bcl-2, which are associated with apoptosis. In addition, protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK)/ERK and p-Akt/Akt were not significantly changed by retinol treatment. In contrast, retinol treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress factors (heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), and DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 9 (DNAJB9)). Furthermore, the number of cells in the G 0 /G 1 phase was increased, while the number of cells in the S phase were decreased by retinol treatment. Retinol increased expression of the autophagy-associated protein, LC3-II. These results indicate that retinol is a potent suppressor of gallbladder cancer cell growth by mechanisms that involve ER stress, which results in autophagy and cell cycle delay. This suggests that retinol might be useful for anticancer prevention and therapy in the clinic.

  6. Deferasirox (ICL670A) effectively inhibits oesophageal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S J; Obeidy, P; Lovejoy, D B; Bedford, M; Nichols, L; Chadwick, C; Tucker, O; Lui, G Y L; Kalinowski, D S; Jansson, P J; Iqbal, T H; Alderson, D; Richardson, D R; Tselepis, C

    2013-03-01

    Growing evidence implicates iron in the aetiology of gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, studies demonstrate that iron chelators possess potent anti-tumour activity, although whether iron chelators show activity against oesophageal cancer is not known. The effect of the iron chelators, deferoxamine (DFO) and deferasirox, on cellular iron metabolism, viability and proliferation was assessed in two oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines, OE33 and OE19, and the squamous oesophageal cell line, OE21. A murine xenograft model was employed to assess the effect of deferasirox on oesophageal tumour burden. The ability of chelators to overcome chemoresistance and to enhance the efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin, fluorouracil and epirubicin) was also assessed. Deferasirox and DFO effectively inhibited cellular iron acquisition and promoted intracellular iron mobilization. The resulting reduction in cellular iron levels was reflected by increased transferrin receptor 1 expression and reduced cellular viability and proliferation. Treating oesophageal tumour cell lines with an iron chelator in addition to a standard chemotherapeutic agent resulted in a reduction in cellular viability and proliferation compared with the chemotherapeutic agent alone. Both DFO and deferasirox were able to overcome cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, in human xenograft models, deferasirox was able to significantly suppress tumour growth, which was associated with decreased tumour iron levels. The clinically established iron chelators, DFO and deferasirox, effectively deplete iron from oesophageal tumour cells, resulting in growth suppression. These data provide a platform for assessing the utility of these chelators in the treatment of oesophageal cancer patients. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Inhibition of TMEM16A expression suppresses growth and invasion in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Sui

    Full Text Available Metastasis leads to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients, and there is a growing need for new therapeutic targets. TMEM16A (ANO1, DOG1 or TAOS2 has recently been identified as a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC and is reported to be overexpressed in several malignancies; however, its expression and function in colorectal cancer (CRC remains unclear. In this study, we found expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in high-metastatic-potential SW620, HCT116 and LS174T cells, but not in primary HCT8 and SW480 cells, using RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence labeling. Patch-clamp recordings detected CaCC currents regulated by intracellular Ca(2+ and voltage in SW620 cells. Knockdown of TMEM16A by short hairpin RNAs (shRNA resulted in the suppression of growth, migration and invasion of SW620 cells as detected by MTT, wound-healing and transwell assays. Mechanistically, TMEM16A depletion was accompanied by the dysregulation of phospho-MEK, phospho-ERK1/2 and cyclin D1 expression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that SW620 cells were inhibited from the G1 to S phase of the cell cycle in the TMEM16A shRNA group compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results indicate that TMEM16A CaCC is involved in growth, migration and invasion of metastatic CRC cells and provide evidence for TMEM16A as a potential drug target for treating metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  8. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  9. Iodine from bacterial iodide oxidization by Roseovarius spp. inhibits the growth of other bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Lim, Choon-Ping; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Microbial activities in brine, seawater, or estuarine mud are involved in iodine cycle. To investigate the effects of the microbiologically induced iodine on other bacteria in the environment, a total of 13 bacteria that potentially participated in the iodide-oxidizing process were isolated from water or biofilm at a location containing 131 μg ml(-1) iodide. Three distinct strains were further identified as Roseovarius spp. based on 16 S rRNA gene sequences after being distinguished by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Morphological characteristics of these three Roseovarius spp. varied considerably across and within strains. Iodine production increased with Roseovarius spp. growth when cultured in Marine Broth with 200 μg ml(-1) iodide (I(-)). When 10(6) CFU/ml Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus pumilus were exposed to various concentrations of molecular iodine (I(2)), the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 0.5, 1.0, and 1.0 μg ml(-1), respectively. However, fivefold increases in the MICs for Roseovarius spp. were obtained. In co-cultured Roseovarius sp. IOB-7 and E. coli in Marine Broth containing iodide (I(-)), the molecular iodine concentration was estimated to be 0.76 μg ml(-1) after 24 h and less than 50 % of E. coli was viable compared to that co-cultured without iodide. The growth inhibition of E. coli was also observed in co-cultures with the two other Roseovarius spp. strains when the molecular iodine concentration was assumed to be 0.52 μg ml(-1).

  10. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses melanoma growth by inhibiting inflammasome and IL-1{beta} secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lixia Z.; Liu, Weimin; Luo, Yuchun; Okamoto, Miyako; Qu, Dovina; Dunn, Jeffrey H. [Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Fujita, Mayumi, E-mail: mayumi.fujita@ucdenver.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth via inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} suppression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics. -- Abstract: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic component of green tea, has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties. The anti-melanoma effect of EGCG has been previously suggested, but no clear mechanism of action has been established. In this study, we demonstrated that EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). In the search for mechanisms of EGCG-mediated melanoma cell suppression, we found that NF-{kappa}B was inhibited, and that reduced NF-{kappa}B activity was associated with decreased IL-1{beta} secretion from melanoma cells. Since inflammasomes are involved in IL-1{beta} secretion, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} suppression was mediated by inflammasomes, and found that EGCG treatment led to downregulation of the inflammasome component, NLRP1, and reduced caspase-1 activation. Furthermore, silencing the expression of NLRP1 abolished EGCG-induced inhibition of tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a key role of inflammasomes in EGCG efficacy. This paper provides a novel mechanism for EGCG-induced melanoma inhibition: inflammasome downregulation {yields} decreased IL-1{beta} secretion {yields} decreased NF-{kappa}B activities {yields} decreased cell growth. In addition, it suggests inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics.

  11. Investigation of Opioid Growth Factor Pathway Inhibition on the Histologic Structure of Testicular Tissue and Microscopic Indices of Spermatogenesis in Adult Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Davoud Khar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Endogenous opioids function as negative factors affecting the growth has been established. The most influential factor in the growth and differentiation of the proliferating cells is the opioid growth factor (OGF. Recently, some studies have been completed about the effects of opioid growth factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes and the beneficial effects of inhibition of this growth pathway have been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inhibition of opioids growth pathway, in proliferation and growth of testicular germ cells and spermatogenesis following experimental diabetes in adult mice.

  12. Growth Inhibition of Cocoa Pod Rot Fungus Phytophthora palmivora byPseudomonas fluorescence and Bacillus subtilis bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakti Widyanta Pratama

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Black pod disease caused by Phytophthora palmivorafungus is one of the important diseases on cocoa crop. Pod rot is the most important disease because it may cause loss of cocoa pod. Until now, the fungal pathogen of cocoa black pod disease is still a crucial problem and there is no fungicide that is really effective against the disease. One alternative to control the cocoa black pod disease is by using biological agents as biofungicide, including utilizing Pseudomonas fluorescenceand Bacillus subtilis bacteria. The research was done by isolation of P. palmivora from infected pods of Kaliwining Experimental Station to obtain pure cultures of fungus and by multiplication of P. fluorescence and B. subtilis. Antagonist test was performed by inoculating P. palmivora into a petri dish in a distance of 3 cm from the edge. P. fluorescenceand B. Subtilis were inoculated into petridishes in three days after the fungal treatment. Control was inoculated with isolate of P. palmivora only. Fungal growth was measured everyday by measuring radius of fungal colonies first time 24 hours after inoculation. Growth of Phytophthora palmivora in the two treatmens were used to calculate the percentage of inhibition. The results of this study indicated that P. fluorescence and B. subtiliswere able to inhibit fungal growth of P. palmivora. Both bacterial antagonists had the same effectiveness in inhibiting the growth of P. palmivora fungus based on the percentage of inhibition and effectiveness criteria. Based on the results of translucent zones indicated that B. subtiliswas more powerfull in inhibiting growth of P. Palmivora compared to P. fluorescence. Key words: Black pod disease of cocoa, biological control, Phytophthora palmivora, Pseudomonas fluorescence, Bacillus subtilis

  13. Differential effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A isoforms in a mouse brain metastasis model of human melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, B.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Wesseling, P.; Verrijp, K.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Ruiter, D.J.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We reported previously that vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) expression by Mel57 human melanoma cells led to tumor progression in a murine brain metastasis model in an angiogenesis-independent fashion by dilation of co-opted, pre-existing vessels and concomitant enhanced blood

  14. Pump-free gradient-based micro-device enables quantitative and high-throughput bacterial growth inhibition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Min; Wang, Ying; Wang, Sida; Luo, Chunxiong

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility testing is very important in antibiotic therapy. Traditional methods to determine antibiotic susceptibility include disk diffusion and broth dilution. However, these tests are always labor intensive, time-consuming, and need large amounts of reagents. In this paper, we demonstrated a novel pump-free micro-device that enables quantitative and high-throughput bacterial growth inhibition analysis. This device consists of a series of wells and diffusion-based antibiotic gradient channels. The wells serve as antibiotic sources and buffer sinks, and we could easily observe the bacterial growth in the gradient channels .The design of the multi-wells is adapted to the commercialized multi-channel pipette, which makes it very convenient for loading reagents into the wells. For each assay, only about 20 μL antibiotic solution is needed. As a demonstration, we used both fluorescence images and dark-field images to quantify the bacterial growth inhibition effect under different antibiotics. The quantitative data of bacterial growth inhibition under different antibiotics can be obtained within 3 to 4 h. Considering the simple operation process and the high-throughput and quantitative result this device can offer, it has great potential to be widely used in clinics and may be useful for the study of the kinetics of bacterial growth.

  15. Real-Time Observation of Atomic Layer Deposition Inhibition: Metal Oxide Growth on Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Jason R.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Farha, Omar K.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Through in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring we resolve the growth of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and subsequent metal oxide deposition with high resolution. Here, we introduce the fitting of mass deposited during each atomic layer deposition (ALD) cycle to an analytical island-growth model that enables quantification of growth inhibition, nucleation density, and the uninhibited ALD growth rate. A long-chain alkanethiol was self-assembled as a monolayer on gold-coated quartz crystals in order to investigate its effectiveness as a barrier to ALD. Compared to solution-loading, vapor-loading is observed to produce a SAM with equal or greater inhibition-ability in minutes vs. days. The metal oxide growth temperature and the choice of precursor also significantly affect the nucleation density, which ranges from 0.001 to 1 sites/nm 2 . Finally, we observe a minimum 100 cycle inhibition of an oxide ALD process, ZnO, under moderately optimized conditions.

  16. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL. PMID:26137413

  17. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  18. Short communication: Lactic acid bacteria from the honeybee inhibit the in vitro growth of mastitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccart, K; Vásquez, A; Piepers, S; De Vliegher, S; Olofsson, T C

    2016-04-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge of prevention and control strategies, bovine mastitis remains one of the most challenging diseases in the dairy industry. This study investigated the antimicrobial activity of 13 species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), previously isolated from the honey crop of the honeybee, on several mastitis pathogens. The viable LAB were first reintroduced into a sterilized heather honey matrix. More than 20 different bovine mastitis isolates were tested against the mixture of the 13 LAB species in the honey medium using a dual-culture overlay assay. The mastitis isolates were identified through bacteriological culturing, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Additionally, the mastitis isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing through disk diffusion. Growth of all tested mastitis pathogens, including the ones displaying antimicrobial resistance to one or more antimicrobial compounds, were inhibited to some extent by the honey and LAB combination. The antibacterial effect of these LAB opens up new perspectives on alternative treatment and prevention of bovine mastitis. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Volatiles of two growth-inhibiting rhizobacteria commonly engage AtWRKY18 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Katrin; Wanke, Dierk; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth; Harter, Klaus; Piechulla, Birgit

    2012-05-01

    Interactions with the (a)biotic environment play key roles in a plant's fitness and vitality. In addition to direct surface-to-surface contact, volatile chemicals can also affect the physiology of organism. Volatiles of Serratia plymuthica and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia significantly inhibited growth and induced H(2) O(2) production in Arabidopsis in dual culture. Within 1 day, transcriptional changes were observed by promoter-GUS assays using a stress-inducible W-box-containing 4xGST1 construct. Expression studies performed at 6, 12 and 24 h revealed altered transcript levels for 889 genes and 655 genes in response to Se. plymuthica or St. maltophilia volatiles, respectively. Expression of 162 genes was altered in both treatments. Meta-analysis revealed that specifically volatile-responsive genes were significantly overlapping with those affected by abiotic stress. We use the term mVAMP (microbial volatile-associated molecular pattern) to describe these volatile-specific responses. Genes responsive to both treatments were enriched for W-box motifs in their promoters, and were significantly enriched for transcription factors (ERF2, ZAT10, MYB73 and WRKY18). The susceptibility of wrky18 mutant lines to volatiles was significantly delayed, suggesting an indispensable role for WRKY18 in bacterial volatile responses. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Chronic restraint stress inhibits hair growth via substance P mediated by reactive oxygen species in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Wang, Lin-Hui; Guo, Ling-Ling; Wang, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Xi-Ping; Jiang, Yan; Shang, Jing; Murao, Koji; Chen, Jing-Wei; Fu, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Solid evidence has demonstrated that psychoemotional stress induced alteration of hair cycle through neuropeptide substance P (SP) mediated immune response, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in brain-skin-axis regulation system remains unknown. The present study aims to investigate possible mechanisms of ROS in regulation of SP-mast cell signal pathway in chronic restraint stress (CRS, a model of chronic psychoemotional stress) which induced abnormal of hair cycle. Our results have demonstrated that CRS actually altered hair cycle by inhibiting hair follicle growth in vivo, prolonging the telogen stage and delaying subsequent anagen and catagen stage. Up-regulation of SP protein expression in cutaneous peripheral nerve fibers and activation of mast cell were observed accompanied with increase of lipid peroxidation levels and reduction of the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in CRS mice skin. In addition, SP receptor antagonist (RP67580) reduced mast cell activations and lipid peroxidation levels as well as increased GSH-Px activity and normalized hair cycle. Furthermore, antioxidant Tempol (a free radical scavenger) also restored hair cycle, reduced SP protein expression and mast cell activation. Our study provides the first solid evidence for how ROS play a role in regulation of psychoemotional stress induced SP-Mast cell pathway which may provide a convincing rationale for antioxidant application in clinical treatment with psychological stress induced hair loss.

  1. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMurillo-Cuesta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ß (TGF-ß is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-ß as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss, we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-ß1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-ß1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-ß1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage.

  2. Inhibition of Human Cervical Cancer Cell Growth by Ethanolic Extract of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Punarnava Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indian traditional medicine, Boerhaavia diffusa (punarnava roots have been widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, jaundice, enlargement of spleen, abdominal pain and as an anti-stress agent. Pharmacological evaluation of the crude ethanolic extract of B. diffusa roots has been shown to possess antiproliferative and immunomodulatory properties. The extract of B. diffusa was studied for anti-proliferative effects on the growth of HeLa cells and for its effect on cell cycle. Bio-assays of extracts from B. diffusa root showed that a methanol : chloroform fraction (BDF 5 had an antiproliferative effect on HeLa cells. After 48 h of exposure, this fraction at a concentration of 200 μg mL−1 significantly reduced cell proliferation with visible morphological changes in HeLa cells. Cell cycle analysis suggests that antiproliferative effect of BDF 5 could be due to inhibition of DNA synthesis in S-phase of cell cycle in HeLa cells, whereas no significant change in cell cycle was detected in control cells. The fraction BDF 5 caused cell death via apoptosis as evident from DNA fragmentation and caspase-9 activation. Thus the extract has potential to be evaluated in detail to assess the molecular mechanism-mediated anticancer activities of this plant.

  3. Immunoneutralization of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibits pregnancy establishment in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, J; Lalitkumar, P G L; Najwa, A R; Charnock-Jones, D S; Evans, A L; Sharkey, A M; Smith, S K; Ghosh, D

    2007-06-01

    Maternal endometrial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered important in blastocyst implantation. However, there is no direct evidence to support this conjecture in the primate. In the present study, we have examined this hypothesis by testing whether immunoneutralization of VEGF during the peri-implantation stage of gestation affects embryo implantation in the rhesus monkey. Adult female animals (n = 36) during mated ovulatory cycles were randomly assigned to one of the experimental groups treated subcutaneously with either isotype-matched mouse immunoglobulin (group 1: control, n = 8) or monoclonal mouse antibody against VEGF-A (anti-VEGF Mab; group 2: 10 mg on day 5 after ovulation, n = 8; group 3: 20 mg on day 5 after ovulation, n = 8; group 4: 10 mg on day 10 after ovulation, n = 4; group 5: 10 mg on days 5 and 10 after ovulation, n = 8). Anti-VEGF Mab-treated animals in groups 2-4 did not show any marked inhibition in pregnancy establishment. On pooled analysis, however, anti-VEGF Mab administration in groups 2-5 (n = 28) resulted in a significant (P establishment significantly (P gestation when compared with samples from control group animals (n = 8). Thus, VEGF action is required for successful blastocyst implantation in the rhesus monkey.

  4. Src SUMOylation Inhibits Tumor Growth Via Decreasing FAK Y925 Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Deng, Rong; Cui, Nan; Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Tianqi; Dou, Jinzhuo; Zhao, Xian; Chen, Ran; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu; Huang, Jian

    2017-12-01

    Src, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase protein, plays a critical role in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. SUMOylation, a reversible ubiquitination-like post-translational modification, is vital for tumor progression. Here, we report that the Src protein can be SUMOylated at lysine 318 both in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia can induce a decrease of Src SUMOylation along with an increase of Y419 phosphorylation, a phosphorylation event required for Src activation. On the other hand, treatment with hydrogen peroxide can enhance Src SUMOylation. Significantly, ectopic expression of SUMO-defective mutation, Src K318R, promotes tumor growth more potently than that of wild-type Src, as determined by migration assay, soft agar assay, and tumor xenograft experiments. Consistently, Src SUMOylation leads to a decrease of Y925 phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established regulatory event of cell migration. Our results suggest that SUMOylation of Src at lysine 318 negatively modulate its oncogenic function by, at least partially, inhibiting Src-FAK complex activity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. ► Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. ► Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  6. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro, E-mail: krlee@skku.edu [Natural Products Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Wook [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Yeou [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6{sup '}-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC{sub 50} values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  7. Alphavirus replicon particles containing the gene for HER2/neu inhibit breast cancer growth and tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Maughan, Maureen F; Lachman, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    Overexpression of the HER2/neu gene in breast cancer is associated with an increased incidence of metastatic disease and with a poor prognosis. Although passive immunotherapy with the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) has shown some effect, a vaccine capable of inducing T-cell and humoral immunity could be more effective. Virus-like replicon particles (VRP) of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus containing the gene for HER2/neu (VRP-neu) were tested by an active immunotherapeutic approach in tumor prevention models and in a metastasis prevention model. VRP-neu prevented or significantly inhibited the growth of HER2/neu-expressing murine breast cancer cells injected either into mammary tissue or intravenously. Vaccination with VRP-neu completely prevented tumor formation in and death of MMTV-c-neu transgenic mice, and resulted in high levels of neu-specific CD8 + T lymphocytes and serum IgG. On the basis of these findings, clinical testing of this vaccine in patients with HER2/neu + breast cancer is warranted

  8. Silencing ofECHDC1inhibits growth of gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Seiji; Miura, Noriyoshi; Sawada, Yuichiro; Noda, Terutaka; Kikugawa, Tadahiko; Tanji, Nozomu; Saika, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Combined gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) treatment is a first line chemotherapy for bladder cancer. However, acquired resistance to GC has been a major problem. To address the mechanism of gemcitabine resistance, and to identify potential biomarkers or target proteins for its therapy, we aimed to identify candidate proteins associated with gemcitabine resistance using proteomic analysis. We established gemcitabine-resistant human bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC3GR and HT1376GR) from gemcitabine-sensitive human bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC3 and HT1376). We compared the protein expression of parental and gemcitabine-resistant cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase (ECHDC1) expression was significantly increased in both of the gemcitabine-resistant cell lines compared to the respective parental cell lines. Silencing of ECHDC1 reduced ECHDC1 expression and significantly inhibited the proliferation of UMUC3GR cells. Furthermore, silencing of ECHDC1 induced upregulation of p27, which is critical for cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, and induced G1 arrest. In conclusion, ECHDC1 expression is increased in gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells, and is involved in their cell growth. ECHDC1, which is a metabolite proofreading enzyme, may be a novel potential target for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer therapy.

  9. MicroRNA-29a Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Tristetraprolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Jun Sun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The microRNA (miR 29 family has been studied extensively for its involvement in several diseases, and aberrant expression of its members is associated with tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Here, we examined the role of miR-29a in pancreatic cancer and the involvement of tristetraprolin (TTP. Methods: We monitored miR-29a and TTP expression in pancreatic cancer by qRT-PCR and western blotting. The effect of miR-29a on pancreatic cancer was determined through MTT assay and migration assay. The results were validated in the tumorigenesis model. Results: We found that miR-29a was up regulated in pancreatic tumor tissues and cell lines and positively correlated with metastasis. Ectopic expression of miR-29a increased the expression of pro-inflammatory factors and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers, through down regulating TTP. TTP was down regulated in tumor tissues, and its ectopic expression decreased cell viability and migration in vitro, inhibited tumor growth and the EMT phenotype in vivo, and reversed the effect of miR-29a on tumor cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Our results suggest that miR-29a acts as an oncogene by down regulating TTP and provide the basis for further studies exploring the potential of miR-29a and TTP as biomarkers and targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Felix J., E-mail: fkim@drexelmed.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19102-1192 (United States); Schrock, Joel M. [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Spino, Christina M. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19102-1192 (United States); Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W. [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  11. Rhodiola crenulata induces death and inhibits growth of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yifan; Roberts, Louis; Shetty, Kalidas; Schneider, Sallie Smith

    2008-09-01

    Diverse compounds from many different chemical classes are currently targeted in preclinical analyses for their ability to act as both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. Phenolic phytochemicals from Rhodiola crenulata has such potential. This Rhodiola species is a perennial plant that grows in the Tundra, Siberia, and high-elevation regions of Tibet. The phenolic secondary metabolites isolated from R. crenulata were recently analyzed in a preclinical setting for their ability to treat lymphosarcomas and superficial bladder cancers. However, the effects of R. crenulata have yet to be examined for its implications in breast cancer prevention or for its chemotherapeutic abilities. Therefore this study investigated the effects of R. crenulata on breast cancer both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using aggressive human-derived MDA-MB-231 and mouse-derived V14 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that phenolic-enriched R. crenulata extract was capable of inhibiting the proliferation, motility, and invasion of these cells. In addition, the extracts induced autophagic-like vesicles in all cell lines, eventually leading to death of the tumor cell lines but not the immortal or normal human mammary epithelial cells. Finally, an in vivo experiment showed that phenolic-enriched dietary R. crenulata is effective in preventing the initiation of tumors and slowing down the tumor growth in mice bearing tumor grafts, thereby further demonstrating its possible potential for treatment of breast cancer progression and metastasis.

  12. Azaspirene analogs inhibit the growth of human uterine carcinosarcoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Makoto; Yano, Kyoko; Choijamts, Batsuren; Sakai, Shinnosuke; Hirasawa, Shun; Wakamori, Shinnosuke; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Tachibana, Katsuro; Kanomata, Nobuhiro

    2015-05-01

    Uterine carcinosarcoma is a highly aggressive gynecological neoplasm that responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies have shown high angiogenic activities of this tumor, hence anti-angiogenic approaches are expected to provide new treatment strategies for this tumor. In previous work, azaspirene was isolated from Neosartorya sp. fungi, and in vitro anti-angiogenic activities were shown. In the present study, the anti-angiogenic effects of azaspirene analogs, synthetic molecules with a shorter ethyl group replacing a hexadienyl side-chain of the natural compound, were assessed in vitro using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) co-cultured with FU-MMT-3 human uterine carcinosarcoma cells. The anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects of these analogs were also evaluated in vivo using FU-MMT-3 xenografted tumors in nude mice. The azaspirene analogs inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs induced by FU-MMT-3 cells in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo compared to the untreated group (control). A significant reduction of the microvessel density in tumors was observed, in comparison to the control. No apparent toxicity, including body loss, was observed in any mice treated in this study. These azaspirene analogs may be effective against uterine carcinosarcoma, possibly acting via potent anti-angiogenic effects. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. 1082-39, an analogue of sorafenib, inhibited human cancer cell growth more potently than sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Cui-Rong; Song, Zhi-Yu; Wang, Rui-Qi; Qin, Yi-Zhuo; Li, Wen-Bao; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2014-04-01

    1082-39, an analogue of sorafenib, is a derivative of indazole diarylurea. We evaluated the activity of 1082-39 against human cancer cell growth. Its effects and mechanisms of action were then compared with those of sorafenib. The experiments were performed in human melanoma M21 cells. Cell viability was estimated by using the colorimetric assay. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay was used to recognize the apoptotic cells. Further analysis of the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) was performed by the JC-1 fluorescence probe staining. The levels of apoptotic proteins and kinases related to cancer proliferation were determined by western blotting assay. 1082-39 possessed the activity against cancer cell proliferation with time- and dose-dependent manner. 1082-39 induced M21 cell to apoptosis, showing the increase of annexin V-FITC/PI staining cells, the MMP collapse and releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria. Western blotting analysis showed the activation of the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway, showing the increase of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP. Statistical analysis suggested that 1082-39 possessed greater activities than sorafenib in the inhibition of M21 proliferation and induction of apoptosis. These effects of 1082-39 might arise from its activity of regulation the PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. 1082-39 is a promising candidate compound which could develop as a potent anticancer agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Solar energy system reduces time taken to inhibit microbial growth in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phitthayarachasak, Thanathep; Thepa, Sirichai; Kongkiattikajorn, Jirasak [Energy Technology Division, School of Energy Environment and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Prachauthid Road, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2009-11-15

    This research studied how to reduce the time consumption and to increase and improve the efficiency of the solarization process. The asymmetry compound parabolic concentrator (ACPC) was developed to produce boiling water to be utilized while the solarization process was in operation. This could decrease the time consumed in the solarization process from 4 to 6 weeks to 4 h, with a temperature of approximately 41.25 C at the various depth levels, not exceeding 50 cm. The test to inhibit the growth of Ralstonia solanacearum, the causative agent of wilt in crops leaves, indicated that R. solanacearum was reduced from the total bacterial population of 10.9 x 10{sup 8} colony forming unit/g soil (cfu g{sup -1}) at soil surface to 9.0 x 10{sup 7}, 7.5 x 10{sup 4} and 4.1 x 10{sup 3} cfu g{sup -1} within 1, 2 and 4 h, respectively. (author)

  15. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  16. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA interference targeting SLUG inhibits lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Peng; Wang, Ming-Zhao; Luo, Yi-Ren; Shen, Yi; Wei, Zhao-Xia

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a deadly cancer, whose kills more people worldwide than any other malignancy. SLUG (SNAI2, Snail2) is involved in the epithelial mesenchymal transition in physiological and in pathological contexts and is implicated in the development and progression of lung cancer. We constructed a lentivirus vector with SLUG shRNA (LV-shSLUG). LV-shSLUG and a control lentivirus were infected into the non-small cell lung cancer cell A549 and real-time PCR, Western blot and IHC were applied to assess expression of the SLUG gene. Cell proliferation and migration were detected using MTT and clony formation methods. Real-time PCR, Western Blot and IHC results confirmed down-regulation of SLUG expression by its shRNA by about 80%~90% at both the mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of SLUG significantly suppressed lung cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of SLUG significantly inhibited lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Finally, knockdown of SLUG induced the down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of E-cadherin. These results indicate that SLUG is a newly identified gene associated with lung cancer growth and metastasis. SLUG may serve as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer in the future.

  17. Chronic restraint stress inhibits hair growth via substance P mediated by reactive oxygen species in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: Solid evidence has demonstrated that psychoemotional stress induced alteration of hair cycle through neuropeptide substance P (SP mediated immune response, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in brain-skin-axis regulation system remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: The present study aims to investigate possible mechanisms of ROS in regulation of SP-mast cell signal pathway in chronic restraint stress (CRS, a model of chronic psychoemotional stress which induced abnormal of hair cycle. METHODS AND RESULTS: Our results have demonstrated that CRS actually altered hair cycle by inhibiting hair follicle growth in vivo, prolonging the telogen stage and delaying subsequent anagen and catagen stage. Up-regulation of SP protein expression in cutaneous peripheral nerve fibers and activation of mast cell were observed accompanied with increase of lipid peroxidation levels and reduction of the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in CRS mice skin. In addition, SP receptor antagonist (RP67580 reduced mast cell activations and lipid peroxidation levels as well as increased GSH-Px activity and normalized hair cycle. Furthermore, antioxidant Tempol (a free radical scavenger also restored hair cycle, reduced SP protein expression and mast cell activation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides the first solid evidence for how ROS play a role in regulation of psychoemotional stress induced SP-Mast cell pathway which may provide a convincing rationale for antioxidant application in clinical treatment with psychological stress induced hair loss.

  18. mTORC1 inhibition delays growth of neurofibromatosis type 2 schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Marco; Bonne, Nicolas-Xavier; Vitte, Jeremie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Tanaka, Karo; Adams, Rocky; Fisher, Laurel M.; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Goutagny, Stephane; Kalamarides, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, resulting in a variety of neural tumors, with bilateral vestibular schwannomas as the most frequent manifestation. Recently, merlin, the NF2 tumor suppressor, has been identified as a novel negative regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1); functional loss of merlin was shown to result in elevated mTORC1 signaling in NF2-related tumors. Thus, mTORC1 pathway inhibition may be a useful targeted therapeutic approach. Methods We studied in vitro cell models, cohorts of mice allografted with Nf2−/− Schwann cells, and a genetically modified mouse model of NF2 schwannoma in order to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed targeted therapy for NF2. Results We found that treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduced the severity of NF2-related Schwann cell tumorigenesis without significant toxicity. Consistent with these results, in an NF2 patient with growing vestibular schwannomas, the rapalog sirolimus induced tumor growth arrest. Conclusions Taken together, these results constitute definitive evidence that justifies proceeding with clinical trials using mTORC1-targeted agents in selected patients with NF2 and in patients with NF2-related sporadic tumors. PMID:24414536

  19. PREPARATION, DRUG RELEASE, AND CELL GROWTH INHIBITION OF A GELATIN – DOXORUBICIN CONJUGATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darren C.; Cammarata, Christopher R.; Park, Hyun Joo; Rhodes, Brian T.; Ofner, Clyde M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel macromolecular delivery system for doxorubicin (DOX) which combines pH dependent DOX release with a high molecular weight and biodegradable gelatin carrier. Methods DOX was conjugated to gelatin using an acid labile hydrazone bond and a glycylglycine linker. The gelatin-doxorubicin conjugate (G-DOX) was evaluated for hydrazide and DOX content by spectrophotometry, molecular weight by HPLC-SEC, in vitro DOX release at various pH, and cell growth inhibition using EL4 mouse lymphoma and PC3 human prostate cells. Results G-DOX hydrazide and DOX content was 47% and 5-7%, respectively of theoretical gelatin carboxylic acid sites. During preparation of G-DOX, the molecular weight decreased to 22 kDa. DOX release was 48% in pH 4.8 phosphate buffer, 22% at pH 6.5, but 10% at pH 7.4. The G-DOX IC50 values in EL4 and PC3 cells were 0.26 μM and 0.77 μM, respectively; the latter value 3 times greater than that of free DOX. Conclusions A 22 kDa macromolecular DOX conjugate containing 3.4-5.0% w/w DOX has been prepared. The pH dependent drug release in combination with a biodegradable gelatin carrier offer potential therapeutic advantages of enhanced tumor cell localization and reduced systemic toxicities of the drug. PMID:23686374

  20. Targeting long non-coding RNA-TUG1 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, R; Liu, G-B; Liu, B-H; Chen, G; Li, K; Zheng, S; Dong, K-R

    2016-06-30

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common liver tumor of early childhood, which is usually characterized by unusual hypervascularity. Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have emerged as gene regulators and prognostic markers in several cancers, including hepatoblastoma. We previously reveal that lnRNA-TUG1 is upregulated in hepatoblastoma specimens by microarray analysis. In this study, we aim to elucidate the biological and clinical significance of TUG1 upregulation in hepatoblastoma. We show that TUG1 is significantly upregulated in human hepatoblastoma specimens and metastatic hepatoblastoma cell lines. TUG1 knockdown inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo, and decreases hepatoblastoma cell viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. TUG1, miR-34a-5p, and VEGFA constitutes to a regulatory network, and participates in regulating hepatoblastoma cell function, tumor progression, and tumor angiogenesis. Overall, our findings indicate that TUG1 upregulation contributes to unusual hypervascularity of hepatoblastoma. TUG1 is a promising therapeutic target for aggressive, recurrent, or metastatic hepatoblastoma.

  1. Inhibition of bacterial growth by tetracycline-impregnated enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorvatn, K; Skaug, N; Selvig, K A

    1984-12-01

    Tetracyclines can react with enamel and dentin to form relatively insoluble fluorescent compounds. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible antimicrobial effect of these reaction products on various microorganisms associated with human dental plaque and periodontal disease. Slabs of native dentin and enamel as well as demineralized dentin were immersed in aqueous solutions of tetracycline HCl, oxytetracycline HCl and doxycycline HCl for periods of 1 h or 24 h. Unimpregnated enamel and dentin slabs sterilized by gamma irradiation and specimens impregnated with phenoxymethylpenicillin calcium were used as controls. Test and control specimens were placed on agar plates seeded with B. cereus, C. ochraceus, S. sanguis, F. nucleatum, B. melaninogenicus or A. viscosus and were subsequently incubated aerobically or anaerobically at 37 degrees C. With the exception of enamel impregnated for 1 h in a 0.01 mg/ml tetracycline solution, all test specimens caused growth inhibition zones, varying in size according to concentration of the drug, immersion period and bacterial species. The results indicate that tetracyclines react with enamel and dentin to form slightly soluble compounds with a pronounced antibacterial effect. In comparison, the antimicrobial effect of dentin treated with penicillin was small.

  2. A mycobacterial growth inhibition assay (MGIA) for bovine TB vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepponi, Ilaria; Khatri, Bhagwati; Tanner, Rachel; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Vordermeier, Martin; McShane, Helen

    2017-09-01

    Human tuberculosis remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. The global economic impact of bovine TB is considerable. An effective vaccine would be the most cost-effective way to control both epidemics, particularly in emerging economies. TB vaccine research would benefit from the identification of an immune correlate of protection with which vaccines could be gated at both preclinical and clinical levels. In-vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIA) are functional assays that include most aspects of the complex host immune response to mycobacteria, and they may serve as functional immune correlates for vaccine development. We applied to cattle an MGIA that was developed for use with human and murine samples. Several technical difficulties were encountered while transferring it to the cattle model. However, our data demonstrate that the assay was not discriminatory in cattle and further work is needed before using it for bovine TB vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Zinc-Triggered Hydrogelation of Self-assembled Small Molecules to Inhibit Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Cai, Yanbin; Ren, Chunhua; Gao, Jie; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant need to develop antibacterial materials that could be applied locally and directly to the places surrounded by large amount of bacteria, in order to address the problems of bacterial antibiotic-resistance or irreversible biofilm formation. Hydrogels are thought to be suitable candidates due to their versatile applications in biomedical field. Among them, small molecular hydrogels have been paid lots of attention because they are easy to design and fabricate and often sensitive to external stimuli. Meanwhile, the antibacterial activity of metal ions are attracting more and more attention because resistance to them are not yet found within bacteria. We therefore designed the zinc ion binding peptide of Nap-GFFYGGGHGRGD, who can self-assemble into hydrogels after binds Zn2+ and inhibit the growth of bacteria due to the excellent antibacterial activity of Zn2+. Upon the addition of zinc ions, solutions containing Nap-GFFYGGGHGRGD transformed into supramolecular hydrogels composed of network of long nano-fibers. Bacterial tests revealed an antibacterial effect of the zinc triggered hydrogels on E. coli. The studied small molecular hydrogel shows great potential in locally addressing bacterial infections.

  4. Irradiation effects for the growth inhibition of weed seeds invaded from foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatani, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Weeds of foreign origin have been invaded through imported maize or dried grass which using for animal feeds, and causing serious damages to agricultural crops and farm animals in Japan. These weeds are spreading mainly through animal feeds to feces. For the purpose to decrease the damage from these weeds, we investigated the gamma-irradiation effect on 7 species of the weed seed to suppress the germination or elongation of stem and root. After the irradiation of the weed seeds, all species kept the ability of germination even at 4 kGy in petri dish cultivation, whereas decreased the germination ratio in some species. However, many species of weed decreased the ability on elongation of stem or root below l kGy irradiation. Furthermore, all of species lost the ability on the development of root hair and appearance of first leaf after germination of seeds below 1 kGy irradiation. From this study, necessary dose for growth inhibition was estimated to be 1 kGy which should be able to apply with combination treatment of the animal feeds for elimination of pathogenic bacteria such as salmonellae at 3 to 5 kGy irradiation. (author)

  5. Antimicrobial activity, cytotoxicity and intracellular growth inhibition of Portuguese Thymus essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A. Dandlen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thyme essential oils are well recognized by their excellent biological activities and the antimicrobial activity of Portuguese thyme essential oils has been investigated with promising results, particularly against food borne pathogens. In this study the potential antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of five species of Thymus (Lamiaceae, namely Th. caespititius Brot., Th. camphoratus Hoffmanns. & Link, Th. capitellatus Hoffmanns. & Link., Th. carnosus Boiss. and Th. zygis L. was evaluated against Candida albicans, Haemophilus influenza, Helicobacter pylori, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica and Streptococcus pneumoniae. H. pylori strains were the most susceptible bacteria, particularly to the essential oils of Th. caespititius (Planalto Central, Th. zygis (Rebordãos and Th. caespititius (Pico which minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranged from 0.05 to 0.08 mg.mL-1. Th. caespititius essential oil from Planalto Central or its main component, carvacrol significantly (p<0.05 inhibited the intracellular growth of H. pylori, and showed no citotoxicity to the gastric cell line. Our results suggest the potential of this essential oil and its main component as a promising tool as anti-Helicobacter agent potentiating the eradication of this important gastroduodenal pathogen.

  6. By reducing hexokinase 2, resveratrol induces apoptosis in HCC cells addicted to aerobic glycolysis and inhibits tumor growth in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yujing; He, Lei; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Abudumijiti, Huerxidan; Chen, Rongxia; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Zheng; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Wang, Chengfen; Zhang, Huawei; Zhou, Yingqun; Xu, Ling; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit an altered metabolic phenotype known as the aerobic glycolysis. The expression of HK2 changes the metabolic phenotype of cells to support cancerous growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on HK2 expression and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell glycolysis. Aerobic glycolysis was observed in four HCC cell lines compared to the normal hepatic cells. Resveratrol sensitized aerobic glycolytic HCC cells to apoptosis, and this effect was attenuated by glycolytic inhibitors. The induction of mitochondrial apoptosis was associated with the decrease of HK2 expression by resveratrol in HCC cells. In addition, resveratrol enhanced sorafenib induced cell growth inhibition in aerobic glycolytic HCC cells. Combination treatment with both reagents inhibited the growth and promoted apoptosis of HCC-bearing mice. The reduction of HK2 by resveratrol provides a new dimension to clinical HCC therapies aimed at preventing disease progression. PMID:25938543

  7. Naringenin inhibits the growth and stimulates the lignification of soybean root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciene de Souza Bido

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The flavanone naringenin, an intermediate in flavonoid biosynthesis, was tested for its effect on root growth, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and peroxidase (POD activities, as well as phenolic compounds and lignin contents in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill seedlings. Three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 6.0, with or without 0.1 to 0.4 mM naringenin in a growth chamber (25°C, 12-h photoperiod, irradiance of 280 µmol m-2 s-1 for 24 h. Inhibitory effects on root growth (length, weight, cell viability, PAL and soluble POD activities were detected after naringenin treatments. These effects were associated with stimulatory activity of the cell wall-bound POD followed by an increase in the lignin contents, suggesting that naringenin-induced inhibition in soybean roots could be due to the lignification process.Os efeitos de naringenina, um intermediário da biossíntese de flavonóides, foram avaliados sobre o crescimento das raízes, as atividades da fenilalanina amônia liase (PAL e peroxidases, bem como sobre os teores de compostos fenólicos e de lignina em plântulas de soja (Glycine max L. Merrill. Plântulas de três dias foram cultivadas em solução nutritiva de Hoagland, meia-força (pH 6,0, contendo ou não, naringenina 0,1 a 0,4 mM, em uma câmara de germinação (25°C, fotoperíodo de 12 h, 280 µmol m-2 s-1 durante 24 h. Efeitos inibitórios no crescimento das raízes (comprimento, massa e viabilidade celular e nas atividades da PAL e POD solúvel foram constatados após os tratamentos com naringenina. Estes efeitos foram associados com atividade estimulatória da POD ligada à parede celular, seguido por aumento nos teores de lignina, sugerindo que a inibição do crescimento das raízes pode ser devido ao processo de lignificação.

  8. Inhibition of Cyanobacterial Growth on a Municipal Wastewater Sidestream Is Impacted by Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosh, Travis C; Dutcher, Andrew; Pfleger, Brian F; McMahon, Katherine D

    2018-01-01

    Sidestreams in wastewater treatment plants can serve as concentrated sources of nutrients (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) to support the growth of photosynthetic organisms that ultimately serve as feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals. However, other chemical characteristics of these streams may inhibit growth in unanticipated ways. Here, we evaluated the use of liquid recovered from municipal anaerobic digesters via gravity belt filtration as a nutrient source for growing the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The gravity belt filtrate (GBF) contained high levels of complex dissolved organic matter (DOM), which seemed to negatively influence cells. We investigated the impact of GBF on physiological parameters such as growth rate, membrane integrity, membrane composition, photosystem composition, and oxygen evolution from photosystem II. At 37°C, we observed an inverse correlation between GBF concentration and membrane integrity. Radical production was also detected upon exposure to GBF at 37°C. However, the dose-dependent relationship between the GBF concentration and the lack of membrane integrity was abolished at 27°C. Immediate resuspension of strains in high levels of GBF showed markedly reduced oxygen evolution rates relative to those seen with the control. Taken together, the data indicate that one mechanism responsible for GBF toxicity to Synechococcus is the interruption of photosynthetic electron flow and subsequent phenomena. We hypothesize that this is likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds within the DOM. IMPORTANCE Cyanobacteria are viewed as promising platforms to produce fuels and/or high-value chemicals as part of so-called "biorefineries." Their integration into wastewater treatment systems is particularly interesting because removal of the nitrogen and phosphorus in many wastewater streams is an expensive but necessary part of wastewater treatment. In this study, we evaluated strategies for cultivating

  9. The growth hormone dependent serine protease inhibitor, Spi 2.1 inhibits the des (1-3) insulin-like growth factor-I generating protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maake, C; Yamamoto, H; Murphy, L J

    1997-12-01

    The conversion of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) to the biologically more active des (1-3) IGF-I variant is catalyzed by a ubiquitous protease. This proteolytic activity is inhibited by human alpha1-antitrypsin and soy-bean trypsin inhibitor and is up-regulated in serum and tissue extracts of hypophysectomized rats. These observations lead us to investigate whether the growth hormone regulated, serine protease inhibitor, Spi 2.1 was able to inhibit the des (1-3) IGF-I generating protease. Dihydrofolate reductase deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO(dhfr-ve)) cells were transfected with a rat Spi 2.1 expression vector containing the dhfr and neomycin resistance gene. Stable transfectants were selected using G418 and amplified using methotrexate. Conditioned medium from Spi 2.1 transfected CHO cells potently inhibited proteolytic activity directed against a synthetic hexa-peptide with a sequence identical to the N-terminal of IGF-I. In contrast conditioned medium from wild-type CHO cells had little effect. Based upon these observations we suggest that our previous finding of enhanced des (1-3) IGF-I generating protease activity in growth hormone deficient rats may be, at least partly explained by reduced levels of Spi 2.1. Furthermore, we propose that the regulation of the generation of des (1-3) IGF-I may be an additional potential site of growth hormone regulation of IGF-I action.

  10. KAEMPFEROL, A FLAVONOID COMPOUND FROM GYNURA MEDICA INDUCED APOPTOSIS AND GROWTH INHIBITION IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaofang; Zuo, Jiangcheng; Tan, Chao; Xian, Sheng; Luo, Chunhua; Chen, Sai; Yu, Liangfang; Luo, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has been shown to induce cancer cell apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in several tumors. Previously we have conducted a full investigation on the chemical constituents of Gynura medica , kaempferol and its glycosides are the major constituents of G. medica . Here we investigated the growth inhibition and apoptosis induction effect of kaempferol extracted from G. medica . The inhibition effects of kaempferol were evaluated by MTS assay and soft agar colony formation assay. Fluorescence staining and western blotting were be used to study the apoptosis. The structure was identified by 1 H- NMR), 13 C-NMR and ESI-MS analyses. Our results showed that kaempferol's inhibition of MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth may through inducing apoptosis and downregulation of Bcl2 expression. Kaempferol is a promising cancer preventive and therapeutic agent for breast cancer. List of non-standard abbreviations: MTS: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, NMR: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, ESI-MS Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectral, PARP: Poly ADP-ribose polymerase.

  11. Regulation of correlative inhibition of axillary bud outgrowth by basal branches varies with growth stage in Trifolium repens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roderick G; Hay, Michael J M

    2015-07-01

    In Trifolium repens the decline in bud outgrowth that occurs with distance from basal root systems is due to correlative inhibition by the first-formed basal branches. The apical and axillary buds on these basal branches are the source of the inhibitory effect, but their mode of action is unclear. Inhibition might occur via basal branches being a sink for xylem-transported branching stimulants or alternatively by providing a source of inhibitory signals, or by both mechanisms. To distinguish between these mechanisms, four experiments were conducted on plants varying in initial growth stage from 10 to 19 nodes along their main stems to determine any variation in the relative importance of the operative mechanisms of correlative inhibition. Inhibitory signal exported into the main stem, detected as a branching response to girdling of basal branches, was relatively more significant in smaller (initially with 10-15 nodes on the main stem) than in larger (>19 nodes on main stem) plants. This signal was shown not to involve auxin fluxes, and is unidentified. However, across all stages of growth, the predominant mechanism driving correlative inhibition was the action of axillary and apical buds of basal branches as sinks for the stimulatory signal. This study indicates that the relative importance of the mechanisms regulating bud outgrowth in T. repens varies with growth stage and that, during intermediate stages, regulation has some similarity to that in Pisum. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lingling; Liu, Jinjin; Zhu, Linyun; Chen, Qingge; Meng, Ziyu; Sun, Li; Hu, Junsheng; Ni, Zhenhua; Wang, Xiongbiao

    2018-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6) significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  13. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  14. Ganoderma lucidum suppresses growth of breast cancer cells through the inhibition of Akt/NF-kappaB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Slivova, Veronika; Harvey, Kevin; Valachovicova, Tatiana; Sliva, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi, Lingzhi) is a popular Asian mushroom that has been used for more than 2 millennia for the general promotion of health and was therefore called the "Mushroom of Immortality." Ganoderma lucidum was also used in traditional Chinese medicine to prevent or treat a variety of diseases, including cancer. We previously demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum suppresses the invasive behavior of breast cancer cells by inhibiting the transcription factor NF-kappaB. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of Ganoderma lucidum on the growth of highly invasive and metastatic breast cancer cells has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that Ganoderma lucidum inhibits proliferation of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells by downregulating Akt/NF-kappaB signaling. Ganoderma lucidum suppresses phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473 and downregulates the expression of Akt, which results in the inhibition of NF-kappaB activity in MDA-MB-231 cells. The biological effect of Ganoderma lucidum was demonstrated by cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, which was the result of the downregulation of expression of NF-kappaB-regulated cyclin D1, followed by the inhibition of cdk4. Our results suggest that Ganoderma lucidum inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by modulating Akt/NF-kappaB signaling and could have potential therapeutic use for the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Potential targets of transforming growth factor-beta1 during inhibition of oocyte maturation in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelland Eric

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is a multifunctional growth factor involved in regulating a variety of cellular activities. Unlike mammals, the function of TGF-beta in the reproduction of lower vertebrates, such as fish, is not clear. Recently, we showed that TGF-beta1 inhibits gonadotropin- and 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxyprogesterone (DHP-induced maturation in zebrafish. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying this action. Method To determine if the effect of TGF-beta1 on oocyte maturation involves transcription and/or translation, ovarian follicles were pre-treated with actinomycin D, a blocker of transcription, and cyclohexamide, an inhibitor of translation, and incubated with hCG or DHP, either alone or in combination with TGF-beta1 and oocyte maturation scored. To determine the effect of TGF-beta1 on mRNA levels of several key effectors of oocyte maturation, three sets of experiments were performed. First, follicles were treated with control medium or TGF-beta1 for 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. Second, follicles were treated with different concentrations of TGF-beta1 (0 to 10 ng/ml for 18 h. Third, follicles were incubated with hCG in the absence or presence of TGF-beta1 for 18 h. At the end of each experiment, total RNA was extracted and reverse transcribed. PCR using primers specific for 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20beta-HSD which is involved in DHP production, follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR, luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR, the two forms of membrane progestin receptor: mPR-alpha and mPR-beta, as well as GAPDH (control, were performed. Results Treatment with actinomycin D, a blocker of transcription, reduced the inhibitory effect of TGF-beta1 on DHP-induced oocyte maturation, indicating that the inhibitory action of TGF-beta1 is in part due to regulation of gene transcription. Treatment with TGF-beta1 caused a dose and time-dependent decrease in mRNA levels of 20beta-HSD, LHR and mPR-beta in

  16. FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells through inhibiting mTOR-s6K pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiongfei, E-mail: xiongfeihuang@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Gastrointestinal Cancer, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Zeng, Yeting [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Wang, Xinrui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Ma, Xiaoxiao [Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, CA 91010 (United States); Li, Qianqian; Li, Ningbo; Su, Hongying [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Huang, Wendong [Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, CA 91010 (United States)

    2016-05-27

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is likely a tumor suppressor in liver tissue but its molecular mechanism of suppression is not well understood. In this study, the gene expression profile of human liver cancer cells was investigated by microarray. Bioinformatics analysis of these data revealed that FXR might regulate the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. This was confirmed by altering the expression level of FXR in liver cancer cells. Overexpression of FXR prevented the growth of cells and induced cell cycle arrest, which was enhanced by the mTOR/S6K inhibitor rapamycin. FXR upregulation also intensified the inhibition of cell growth by rapamycin. Downregulation of FXR produced the opposite effect. Finally, we found that ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep-1 xenografts inhibits tumor growth and reduces expression of the phosphorylated protein S6K. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that FXR suppresses proliferation of human liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. FXR expression can be used as a biomarker of personalized mTOR inhibitor treatment assessment for liver cancer patients. -- Highlights: •FXR inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells by prolonging G0/G1 phase. •Microarray results indicate that mTOR-S6k signaling is involved in cellular processes in which FXR plays an important role. •FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

  17. miR-449 overexpression inhibits papillary thyroid carcinoma cell growth by targeting RET kinase-β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyu; Huang, Xin; Xu, Jinkai; Su, Qinghua; Zhao, Jun; Ma, Jiancang

    2016-10-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common thyroid cancer and represent approximately 80% of all thyroid cancers. The present study is aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-449 in the progression of PTC. Our results revealed that miR-449 was underexpressed in the collected PTC specimens compared with non-cancerous PTC tissues. Overexpression of miR-449 induced a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and inhibited PTC cell growth in vitro. Further studies revealed that RET proto-oncogene (RET) is a novel miR-449 target, due to miR-449 bound directly to its 3'-untranslated region and miR-449 mimic reduced the protein expression of RET. Similar to the effects of miR-449 overexpression, RET downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas RET overexpression reversed the inhibitive effect of miR-449 mimic. Furthermore, miR-449 overexpression inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and reduced the expression of several downstream genes, including c-Myc, cyclin D1, T cell-specific transcription factor (TCF) and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1), and inactivated the β-catenin pathway in TPC-1 cells. Moreover, overexpression of β-catenin prevented miR-449-reduced cell cycle arrest and cell viability. In xenograft animal experiments, miR-449 overexpression effectively suppressed the tumor growth of PTC. Taken together, our research indicated that miR-449 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting RET, and that miR-449 overexpression inhibited the growth of PTC by inactivating the β-catenin pathway. Thus, miR-449 may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PTC.

  18. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zindel, Stephan; Kaman, Wendy E; Fröls, Sabrina; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Peters, Anna; Hays, John P; Fuchsbauer, Hans-Lothar

    2013-07-01

    A novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae was completely inhibited by 10 μM SPI. At this concentration of SPI, no cytotoxicity was observed. We conclude that SPI inhibits bacterial virulence factors and has the potential to become a novel therapeutic treatment against a range of unrelated pathogenic bacteria.

  19. 6-Gingerol Inhibits Hair Shaft Growth in Cultured Human Hair Follicles and Modulates Hair Growth in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Yabin; Wang, Wenjun; Du, Benjun; Xiao, Shun-e; Hu, Yijue; Hu, Zhiqi

    2013-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on hu...

  20. The growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells by a novel synthetic progestin involves the induction of transforming growth factor beta.

    OpenAIRE

    Colletta, A A; Wakefield, L M; Howell, F V; Danielpour, D; Baum, M; Sporn, M B

    1991-01-01

    Recent experimental work has identified a novel intracellular binding site for the synthetic progestin, Gestodene, that appears to be uniquely expressed in human breast cancer cells. Gestodene is shown here to inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent fashion, but has no effect on endocrine-responsive human endometrial cancer cells. Gestodene induced a 90-fold increase in the secretion of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) by T47D human breast cancer cells. O...

  1. Fumigation of Brazil nuts with allyl isothiocyanate to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and aflatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lucas F; Bordin, Keliani; de Lara, Gabriel Hc; Saladino, Federica; Quiles, Juan M; Meca, Giuseppe; Luciano, Fernando B

    2018-01-01

    Brazil produces approximately 40 000 tons of Brazil nuts annually, which is commonly contaminated with fungi and mycotoxins. Gaseous allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) was used to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and its production of aflatoxins (AFs) in Brazil nuts. Nuts were inoculated with 10 4 spores g -1 of A. parasiticus and placed in airtight glass jars with controlled relative humidity (RH = 95 or 85%). Samples were treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 µL L -1 of gaseous AITC and analyzed after 30 days to determine the fungal population and AFs content. Samples were also submitted to sensory evaluation. AITC at 2.5 µL L -1 could completely inhibit the fungal growth and AFs production in both the RH tested. AITC at 0.5 and 1 µL L -1 did not affect the microbial growth at RH = 95%, but 1 µL L -1 reduced the production of AFs by ∼50%. All AITC treatments reduced the fungal population and AFs to undetectable levels at RH = 85%. None of the concentrations altered sensory characteristics of Brazil nuts. Gaseous AITC could be used as an alternative to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus during storage and transport of Brazil nuts. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Growth inhibition and apoptosis in cancer cells induced by polyphenolic compounds of Acacia hydaspica: Involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Tayyaba; Trembley, Janeen H.; Salomon, Christine E.; Razak, Suhail; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Acacia hydaspica R. Parker is known for its medicinal uses in multiple ailments. In this study, we performed bioassay-guided fractionation of cytotoxic compounds from A. hydaspica and investigated their effects on growth and signaling activity in prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Four active polyphenolic compounds were identified as 7-O-galloyl catechin (GC), catechin (C), methyl gallate (MG), and catechin-3-O-gallate (CG). The four compounds inhibited prostate cancer PC-3 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CG and MG inhibited breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell growth. All tested compounds inhibited cell survival and colony growth in both cell lines, and there was evidence of chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and apoptotic bodies. Further, acridine orange, ethidium bromide, propidium iodide and DAPI staining demonstrated that cell death occurred partly via apoptosis in both PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In PC-3 cells treatment repressed the expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin, coupled with down-regulation of signaling pathways AKT, NFκB, ERK1/2 and JAK/STAT. In MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment induced reduction of CK2α, Bcl-xL, survivin and xIAP protein expression along with suppression of NFκB, JAK/STAT and PI3K pathways. Our findings suggest that certain polyphenolic compounds derived from A. hydaspica may be promising chemopreventive/therapeutic candidates against cancer. PMID:26975752

  3. Growth in working memory and inhibition predicts literacy in English language learners: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, H Lee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cross-sectional and growth effects in second language (L2) literacy are related to the executive component of working memory (WM) and whether inhibition may underlie the links between WM and reading in children whose first language (L1) is Spanish. Elementary school children (grades 1, 2 and 3) were administered a battery of cognitive [WM, short-term memory (STM), random generation, rapid naming, phonological processing], vocabulary and reading measures in both Spanish (L1) and English (L2) in Year 1 and again one year later. The regression analyses showed that L2 growth in WM significantly predicted growth in L2 reading skills even when inhibition was controlled. Further, the contributions of WM to reading growth in both L1 and L2 reading were independent of cross-language skills in phonological processing, STM, oral language and naming speed. Overall, the results suggest the mental activities that underlie WM and inhibition in predictions of L2 literacy reflect independent executive processes.

  4. Plant lectin can target receptors containing sialic acid, exemplified by podoplanin, to inhibit transformed cell growth and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Alberto Ochoa-Alvarez

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death of men and women worldwide. Tumor cell motility contributes to metastatic invasion that causes the vast majority of cancer deaths. Extracellular receptors modified by α2,3-sialic acids that promote this motility can serve as ideal chemotherapeutic targets. For example, the extracellular domain of the mucin receptor podoplanin (PDPN is highly O-glycosylated with α2,3-sialic acid linked to galactose. PDPN is activated by endogenous ligands to induce tumor cell motility and metastasis. Dietary lectins that target proteins containing α2,3-sialic acid inhibit tumor cell growth. However, anti-cancer lectins that have been examined thus far target receptors that have not been identified. We report here that a lectin from the seeds of Maackia amurensis (MASL with affinity for O-linked carbohydrate chains containing sialic acid targets PDPN to inhibit transformed cell growth and motility at nanomolar concentrations. Interestingly, the biological activity of this lectin survives gastrointestinal proteolysis and enters the cardiovascular system to inhibit melanoma cell growth, migration, and tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate how lectins may be used to help develop dietary agents that target specific receptors to combat malignant cell growth.

  5. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibit growth and reduce estradiol levels of antral follicles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Rupesh K.; Singh, Jeffery M.; Leslie, Tracie C.; Meachum, Sharon; Flaws, Jodi A.; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2010-01-01

    Any insult that affects survival of ovarian antral follicles can cause abnormal estradiol production and fertility problems. Phthalate esters (PEs) are plasticizers used in a wide range of consumer and industrial products. Exposure to these chemicals has been linked to reduced fertility in humans and animal models. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) decrease serum estradiol levels and aromatase (Arom) expression, prolong estrous cycles, and cause anovulation in animal and culture models. These observations suggest PEs directly target antral follicles. We therefore tested the hypothesis that DEHP (1-100 μg/ml) and MEHP (0.1-10 μg/ml) directly inhibit antral follicular growth and estradiol production. Antral follicles from adult mice were cultured with DEHP or MEHP, and/or estradiol for 96 h. During culture, follicle size was measured every 24 h as a measurement of follicle growth. After culture, media were collected for measurement of estradiol levels and follicles were subjected to measurement of cylin-D-2 (Ccnd2), cyclin-dependant-kinase-4 (Cdk4), and Arom. We found that DEHP and MEHP inhibited growth of follicles and decreased estradiol production compared to controls at the highest doses. DEHP and MEHP also decreased mRNA expression of Ccnd2, Cdk4, and Arom at the highest dose. Addition of estradiol to the culture medium prevented the follicles from DEHP- and MEHP-induced inhibition of growth, reduction in estradiol levels, and decreased Ccnd2 and Cdk4 expression. Collectively, our results indicate that DEHP and MEHP may directly inhibit antral follicle growth via a mechanism that partially includes reduction in levels of estradiol production and decreased expression of cell cycle regulators.

  6. Leishmania eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF inhibits parasite growth in murine macrophages.

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    Olga Koutsoni

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases constitute neglected global public health problems that require adequate control measures, prophylactic clinical vaccines and effective and non-toxic drug treatments. In this study, we explored the potential of Leishmania infantum eukaryotic initiation factor (LieIF, an exosomal protein, as a novel anti-infective therapeutic molecule. More specifically, we assessed the efficacy of recombinant LieIF, in combination with recombinant IFN-γ, in eliminating intracellular L. donovani parasites in an in vitro macrophage model. J774A.1 macrophages were initially treated with LieIF/IFN-γ prior to in vitro infection with L. donovani stationary phase promastigotes (pre-infection treatment, and resistance to infection was observed 72 h after infection. J774A.1 macrophages were also treated with LieIF/IFN-γ after L. donovani infection (post-infection treatment, and resistance to infection was also observed at both time points tested (19 h and 72 h after infection. To elucidate the LieIF/IFN-γ-induced mechanism(s that mediate the reduction of intracellular parasite growth, we examined the generation of potent microbicidal molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS, within infected macrophages. Furthermore, macrophages pre-treated with LieIF/IFN-γ showed a clear up-regulation in macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α expression. However, significant different protein levels were not detected. In addition, macrophages pre-treated with LieIF/IFN-γ combined with anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody produced significantly lower amounts of ROS. These data suggest that during the pre-treatment state, LieIF induces intramacrophage parasite growth inhibition through the production of TNF-α, which induces microbicidal activity by stimulating NO and ROS production. The mechanisms of NO and ROS production when macrophages are treated with LieIF after infection are probably

  7. Optimal design for informative protocols in xenograft tumor growth inhibition experiments in mice

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    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth; ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e. control vs treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e. “short” and “long” studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 grams of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped three days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected. PMID:27306546

  8. BRL3 and AtRGS1 cooperate to fine tune growth inhibition and ROS activation.

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    Meral Tunc-Ozdemir

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane-localized leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases directly activates G protein complex via interaction with seven transmembrane domain Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1 protein. Brassinosteroid insensitive 1 (BRI1 LIKE3 (BRL3 phosphorylates AtRGS1 in vitro. FRET analysis showed that BRL3 and AtRGS1 interaction dynamics change in response to glucose and flg22. Both BRL3 and AtRGS1 function in glucose sensing and brl3 and rgs1-2 single mutants are hyposensitive to high glucose as well as the brl3/rgs1 double mutant. BRL3 and AtRGS1 function in the same pathway linked to high glucose sensing. Hypocotyl elongation, another sugar-mediated pathway, is also implicated to be partially mediated by BRL3 and AtRGS1 because rgs1-2, brl3-2 and brl3-2/ rgs1-2 mutants share the long hypocotyl phenotype. BRL3 and AtRGS1 modulate the flg22-induced ROS burst and block one or more components positively regulating ROS production because the brl3/rgs1 double mutant has ~60% more ROS production than wild type while rgs1-2 has a partial ROS burst impairment and brl3 has slightly more ROS production. Here, we proposed a simple model where both BRL3 and AtRGS1 are part of a fine-tuning mechanism sensing glucose and flg22 to prevent excess ROS burst and control growth inhibition.

  9. N-P Fertilization Inhibits Growth of Root Hemiparasite Pedicularis kansuensis in Natural Grassland

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    Yanyan Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization has been shown to affect interactions between root hemiparasitic plants and their host plants, alleviating damage to the hosts by parasitism. However, as a majority of studies were conducted in pot cultivation, the influence of fertilizer application on root hemiparasites and the surrounding plant community in field conditions as well as relevant mechanisms remain unclear. We manipulated soil nutrient resources in a semi-arid subalpine grassland in the Tianshan Mountains, northwestern China, to explore the links between fertilization and plant community composition, productivity, survival, and growth of a weedy root hemiparasite (Pedicularis kansuensis. Nitrogen (at a low rate, LN, 30 kg N ha-1 year-1 as urea; or at a high rate, HN, 90 kg N ha-1 year-1 as urea and phosphorus [100 kg ha-1 year-1 as Ca(H2PO42⋅H2O] were added during two growing seasons. Patterns of foliar nutrient balances were described with isometric log ratios for the different plant functional groups receiving these fertilization regimes. Fertilization with LN, HN, and P reduced above-ground biomass of P. kansuensis, with above-ground biomass in the fertilization treatments, respectively, 12, 1, and 39% of the value found in the unfertilized control. Up to three times more above-ground biomass was produced in graminoids receiving fertilizers, whereas forb above-ground biomass was virtually unchanged by the fertilization regimes and forb species richness was reduced by 52% in the HN treatment. Fertilization altered foliar nutrient balances, and distinct patterns emerged for each plant functional group. Foliar [C | P,N] balance in the plant community was negatively correlated with above-ground biomass (P = 0.03. The inhibited competitiveness of P. kansuensis, which showed a much higher [C | P,N] balance, could be attributed to reduced C assimilation rather than mineral nutrient acquisition, as shown by significant increase in foliar N and P concentrations but

  10. Action spectrum for cryptochrome-dependent hypocotyl growth inhibition in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Margaret; Grancher, Nicholas; Heil, Mary; Black, Robert C; Giovani, Baldissera; Galland, Paul; Lardemer, Danielle

    2002-06-01

    Cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors are found in both plants and animals and have been implicated in numerous developmental and circadian signaling pathways. Nevertheless, no action spectrum for a physiological response shown to be entirely under the control of cryptochrome has been reported. In this work, an action spectrum was determined in vivo for a cryptochrome-mediated high-irradiance response, the blue-light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis. Comparison of growth of wild-type, cry1cry2 cryptochrome-deficient double mutants, and cryptochrome-overexpressing seedlings demonstrated that responsivity to monochromatic light sources within the range of 390 to 530 nm results from the activity of cryptochrome with no other photoreceptor having a significant primary role at the fluence range tested. In both green- and norflurazon-treated (chlorophyll-deficient) seedlings, cryptochrome activity is fairly uniform throughout its range of maximal response (390-480 nm), with no sharply defined peak at 450 nm; however, activity at longer wavelengths was disproportionately enhanced in CRY1-overexpressing seedlings as compared with wild type. The action spectrum does not correlate well with the absorption spectra either of purified recombinant cryptochrome photoreceptor or to that of a second class of blue-light photoreceptor, phototropin (PHOT1 and PHOT2). Photoreceptor concentration as determined by western-blot analysis showed a greater stability of CRY2 protein under the monochromatic light conditions used in this study as compared with broad band blue light, suggesting a complex mechanism of photoreceptor activation. The possible role of additional photoreceptors (in particular phytochrome A) in cryptochrome responses is discussed.

  11. a-Tocopherol enhances tumour growth inhibition by cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II

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    Sarna S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Present studies indicate that alpha-tocopherol enhances the efficacy of cisplatin as demonstrated by inoculation of Dalton's lymphoma cells incubated with either cisplatin (5 or 10 µg/ml alone or cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol (25 or 50 µg/ml into C3H/He mice. Tumour cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse incubated with cisplatin grow slowly in syngeneic mice as indicated by the late appearance of tumour. However, mice failed to develop tumour when inoculated with tumour cells incubated with cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol. When the animals were challenged with tumour cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse on the 15th day after the initial inoculation, 30-50% survived more than 60 days, with 10% tumour-free survivors being observed in some groups. Antitumour activity was higher in mice receiving lymphoma cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse preincubated with cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol compared to cisplatin alone. Tumour-bearing mice receiving cisplatin in combination with different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol exhibited significantly higher (P<0.001 intratumour platinum content (123-306% but without any change in the kidney platinum content as compared to those receiving cisplatin (5 or 10 µg/ml alone. Enhancement of cisplatin-induced tumour growth inhibition is probably due to the modulation of tumour cell membrane permeability by alpha-tocopherol. alpha-Tocopherol might increase the influx of cisplatin into tumour cells, causing the DNA repair machinery to be less efficient due to increased efficiency of adduct formation in the DNA molecule. This effect of alpha-tocopherol can render cisplatin more effective as an antitumour agent.

  12. Dietary administration of scallion extract effectively inhibits colorectal tumor growth: cellular and molecular mechanisms in mice.

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    Palanisamy Arulselvan

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Diet is known to play an important role in the etiology of colon cancer and dietary chemoprevention is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or alternative treatment of colon cancers. Allium fistulosum L., commonly known as scallion, is popularly used as a spice or vegetable worldwide, and as a traditional medicine in Asian cultures for treating a variety of diseases. In this study we evaluated the possible beneficial effects of dietary scallion on chemoprevention of colon cancer using a mouse model of colon carcinoma (CT-26 cells subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c mice. Tumor lysates were subjected to western blotting for analysis of key inflammatory markers, ELISA for analysis of cytokines, and immunohistochemistry for analysis of inflammatory markers. Metabolite profiles of scallion extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Scallion extracts, particularly hot-water extract, orally fed to mice at 50 mg (dry weight/kg body weight resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth and enhanced the survival rate of test mice. At the molecular level, scallion extracts inhibited the key inflammatory markers COX-2 and iNOS, and suppressed the expression of various cellular markers known to be involved in tumor apoptosis (apoptosis index, proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-Myc, angiogenesis (VEGF and HIF-1α, and tumor invasion (MMP-9 and ICAM-1 when compared with vehicle control-treated mice. Our findings may warrant further investigation of the use of common scallion as a chemopreventive dietary agent to lower the risk of colon cancer.

  13. Delivery of CdiA nuclease toxins into target cells during contact-dependent growth inhibition.

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    Webb, Julia S; Nikolakakis, Kiel C; Willett, Julia L E; Aoki, Stephanie K; Hayes, Christopher S; Low, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion proteins. CDI systems deploy a variety of distinct toxins, which are contained within the polymorphic C-terminal region (CdiA-CT) of CdiA proteins. Several CdiA-CTs are nucleases, suggesting that the toxins are transported into the target cell cytoplasm to interact with their substrates. To analyze CdiA transfer to target bacteria, we used the CDI system of uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536 (UPEC536) as a model. Antibodies recognizing the amino- and carboxyl-termini of CdiA(UPEC536) were used to visualize transfer of CdiA from CDI(UPEC536+) inhibitor cells to target cells using fluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the entire CdiA(UPEC536) protein is deposited onto the surface of target bacteria. CdiA(UPEC536) transfer to bamA101 mutants is reduced, consistent with low expression of the CDI receptor BamA on these cells. Notably, our results indicate that the C-terminal CdiA-CT toxin region of CdiA(UPEC536) is translocated into target cells, but the N-terminal region remains at the cell surface based on protease sensitivity. These results suggest that the CdiA-CT toxin domain is cleaved from CdiA(UPEC536) prior to translocation. Delivery of a heterologous Dickeya dadantii CdiA-CT toxin, which has DNase activity, was also visualized. Following incubation with CDI(+) inhibitor cells targets became anucleate, showing that the D.dadantii CdiA-CT was delivered intracellularly. Together, these results demonstrate that diverse CDI toxins are efficiently translocated across target cell envelopes.

  14. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats